NEWSLETTER - The Mediterranean Society of America

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NEWSLETTER - The Mediterranean Society of America
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Julia Scott, President
The area around the Bay of Naples is one
of the most beautiful and historic regions
of Italy. The region, known as Campania, comprises five provinces: Caserta,
Benevento, Napoli, Avellino, and Salerno.
The islands of Capri, Ischia, and Procida
are also part of Campania. Since its founding in 1968, the Mediterranean Society has
visited this area many times and will visit
again in May 2017. This article describes
some of the sites we will visit.
Naples: The city of Naples is the capitol of Campania. The historic center of
Naples is a UNESCO World Heritage Site,
and the Naples National Archaeological
Museum contains one of the world’s finest
collections of Graeco-Roman artefacts.
Cumae: The acropolis of Cumae is
one of the most beautiful and evocative
archaeological sites in the world. The cave
of the Cumaean Sibyl is located here; she
prophesied by “singing the fates” and was
a guide to the Underworld. The ancients
believed the entry to the Underworld was
located at nearby Lake Avernus.
Pompeii, Herculaneum, and Mt.
­Vesuvius: Pompeii and its smaller neighbor, Herculaneum, were Roman towns near
Mt. Vesuvius. They were buried in ash and
pumice after the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius
in 79 C. E. The ash and pumice preserved
the sites until their re-discovery in the late
16th century. Pompeii and Herculaneum
compose a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Amalfi Coast: The Amalfi Coast is a
UNESCO Natural World Heritage Site
and considered an exemplar of a Mediterranean landscape. The coastal road winds
past grand villas, beautiful towns, and ter-
Top, Naples and its Bay; above, Amalfi Coast
raced vineyards. A leisurely drive along the
Amalfi Coast will include stops in some of
the towns for sightseeing and lunch.
Capri and Ischia: Capri has been a
summer residence of choice for the wealthy
since Roman times. We will visit two villas, one ancient and one modern. Villa
Jovis is the ancient residence of the Em-
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July 2016
Spring 2017 Seminar on
“Greeks and Romans in the Bay of Naples”
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The Mediterranean
Society of America
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Volume 45, Number 1
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peror Tiberius and boasts a stunning view
across the Bay of Naples. Villa San Michele
was built in 1900 and was the home of the
Swedish physician Axel Munthe. The villa
and gardens also have stunning views of
the Bay of Naples. Ischia is a volcanic island located at the northern end of the Bay
Continued on page 3
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Mediterr anean
Society of
America
Board of Directors 2015–16
Term ending October 31, 2016:
Victoria A. Ashby
Shirley V. Blackwell
Linwood W. Davis
Elisabeth Flynn-Chapman
Elaine M. Themo
Term ending October 31, 2017:
Eugenia H. Borum
Julia Proctor
Nancy S. Saylor
Julia S. Scott
Carolyn H. Spencer
Term ending October 31, 2018:
Patricia E. Archer
Meade Boswell
Julian Ward Jones, Jr.
William G. Stoops, Jr.
C. Wayne Tucker
Director Emeritus
W. Douglas Gottwald, Jr.
Officers
President: Julia S. Scott
Vice President: Julia Proctor
Secretary: C. Wayne Tucker
Treasurer: Nancy S. Saylor
Mark Your
Calendars!
The 2016-17
Opening Reception
will be on
Sunday, September 11,
at the Westhampton Center
(formerly the Deanery)
PAGE 2
National Gallery of Art
On February 27, Society
members visited the
National Gallery of Art
for the “Power and Pathos:
Bronze Sculpture of the
Hellenistic World.”
Left. Julia and Barry Scott
leaving the West Building
with the exhibition poster
behind them.
Below, Travelers gather
for their group photo at
the entrance to the East
Building.
“Greeks and Romans in the Bay of Naples” CONTINUED
Continued from page 1
of Naples. It is known for its beaches and
thermal spas, which take advantage of the
island’s natural volcanic activity with hot
springs and volcanic mud.
Pozzuoli, Baia, and Bacoli: This area
is approximately 15 km northwest of Naples. Pozzuoli, known in the ancient world
as Puteoli, was the main harbor for the
city of Rome until the construction of the
harbor at Ostia by the Emperor Claudius.
The ruins in this area include baths, villas,
an amphitheater, and the Piscina Mirabilis, the largest Roman cistern still in existence. The Piscina Mirabilis provides a
detailed glimpse into Roman engineering
expertise and may have supplied water to
the Roman Navy stationed at Miseno. The
Archaeological Park at Baia has underwater ruins that can be viewed from a
glass-bottomed boat.
Caserta and Capua: The Royal
Palace and Park at Caserta is a
UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Commissioned by Charles III in
the 1700s, the palace is a triumph
of Italian Baroque architecture and
has been compared to the Royal Palace at Versailles. The ancient city
of Capua boasted the best gladiator
schools for training prisoners of war
and slaves to fight for public entertainment. Spartacus was trained at
a gladiator school in Capua, and the
insurrection he led started there. An
amphitheater and gladiator museum
are located at Capua.
Benevento: The Santa Sofia Church in
Benevento is one of the principal surviving examples of Lombard architecture
and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
The church was built around 760 as a
personal chapel for Arechis II, the Duke
of Benevento. In addition to Santa Sofia,
Benevento is also home to the exceptionally well-preserved Arch of Trajan built
between 114 and 117 to commemorate the
completion of the Via Traiana.
Villas: The Bay of Naples is home to
many villas, both ancient and modern. Like
the island of Capri, the entire area around
the bay has been a summer residence of
choice for the wealthy since Roman times.
We will visit the remains of ancient villas
in Stabia, Boscoreale, and Oplontis.
Paestum: The archaeological remains
at Paestum compose a UNESCO World
Heritage Site. The city of Paestum was
founded by Greeks from Sybaris in the
6th century B.C.E. The Greeks built three
magnificent Doric temples forming the
centerpiece of the site. There is also an
archaeological museum.
Modern Thermal Spa: The idea of
salus per aquam, or “health through
water,” is a pervasive theme in ancient
Roman culture. It is especially evident in
the area around the Bay of Naples, where
many baths were built to take advantage
of the thermal springs and warm volcanic
mud resulting from the volcanic activity
in the area. In the modern era, spas have
been built to take advantage of the thermal springs. Participants in the seminar
will have an opportunity to visit one of the
spas as an optional excursion.
For this trip to the Bay of Naples, arrangements have been made to stay in
one hotel in Pozzuoli for the entire trip.
The hotel is in a location with spectacular
views over the Bay, and all travelers will
stay in sea-view rooms with balconies
to take advantage of the location. The
Society is engaging a certified guide for
the Campania region to accompany us for
the entire trip. Transportation will be by
a private chartered bus at the disposal of
the Society for the trip. The cost of the trip
will include lodging, the services of the
guide, transportation, all entrance fees,
breakfast, and dinner with wine every day.
The brochure containing detailed information, including the itinerary and
costs, will be mailed to all members of the
Society. If you know of others who may be
interested in learning about the trip, please
let President Scott have their names so that
a brochure can be sent to them ([email protected]
commund.com).
Left, Capri; below, Santa Sofia Benevento
PAGE 3
Final Lecture
The year’s final lecture featured Charles Brownell on Richmond’s Monumental Church.
President Scott with Brownell at the
reception following his March talk.
At the reception Pat Archer and
Brownell.
Also at the reception, Jan Van Horn,
Carolyn Spencer, and John Canada.
July 22 Deadline
for August 6 Excursion to D.C.
Friday, July 22, is the deadline to register for the August 6 excursion to the National Gallery
of Art for the special exhibition, “In Celebration of Paul Mellon,” and the National Geographic Museum for “The Greeks: Agamemnon to Alexander the Great.” If you know of
non-members who may be interested in the trip, get in touch with Nancy Saylor ([email protected]
verizon.net), who will send out additional brochures.
PAGE 4
Newport News Excursion
A Special Excursion in May took
in Lee Hall Mansion and Endview
Plantation in Newport News.
Top left, our guide at Lee Hall
Mansion, Juanita (left front), with
participants in the excursion.
Top right, lunch was at Second
Street.
Left, Lee Hall Mansion provides the
backdrop for the group photo.
Below, participants with the two
guides at Endview Plantation.
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The Mediterranean Society of America
P.O. Box 14793
Richmond, Virginia 23221
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Be sure to visit the Society’s Web Site:
www.mediterranean-society.org
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“Friends Traveling Together”
Contributing Members
2015–2016
Susan Ancarrow
Victoria A. Ashby
Janis C. & Frederick J. Augustine
Betsy Ault
Eugenia H. Borum
Meade H. Boswell
Mary Agnes Chun
Edward J. Cook
Linwood W. Davis
Elisabeth Flynn-Chapman
Richard M. Frazer, Jr.
Elizabeth & W. Douglas Gottwald, Jr.
Margaret D. Hicks
Ellen Houck
in memory of Joan Cornwall
Julian Ward Jones, Jr.
Marietta B. Jones
Ann and Alan Loxterman
PAGE 6
Susan K. Murphey
Mary Bryan Perkins
Patsy Pettus
Robin Price
Julia and Jack Proctor
Jane and Tony Ruffa
Nancy S. Saylor
Julia & Barry Scott
Carol V. Sharp
Anna Mae Shishido
Carolyn H. Spencer
Virginia H. Spratley
Harold & Delia Stark
Dr. Keir B. and Anne D. Sterling
William G. Stoops
Elaine M. Themo
C. Wayne Tucker

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