Monthly Newsletter of the Ottawa Lapsmith and Mineral

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Monthly Newsletter of the Ottawa Lapsmith and Mineral
The Cutting Edge
Monthly Newsletter of the Ottawa Lapsmith and Mineral Club
In this month’s
newsletter:
Happy New Year!!
President’s message &
Lapidary tips & tricks p.1
Our next meeting & Tips on
drilling p.2
Copper patinas p.3
Workshop calendar and info
p.5
Membership form p.6
Workshop Address:
1000 Brookfield Road,
Ottawa, ON K1V 6J1
Mailing Address:
P.O Box 39054 R.P.O
Billings,
Ottawa ON K1H 1A1
Phone:
613-700-GEMS (4367)
Website:
http://www.olmc.ca
Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/
OttawaLapsmithMineralClub
The club received a rock donation on December 27 from the estate of a
rockhound who was active in the 1970s and 1980s. There is lots of cutting
rough, fossils, grit and a few mineral specimens.
The January meeting will be our winter auction. Some of the donated
material has already been put aside for the auction.
Kerry Day
Lapidary Tips & Tricks
Do not use the microwave oven for
dopping, curing cemented stones, or heat
treating stone. All stones contain moisture
and heating them in a microwave can
explode both the stone and the
microwave. (Northwest Newsletter, July
1992 via Rockhound Rumblings)
Have a small spice
rack behind your
faceting machine to
keep small vials of
polishing compound
and other faceting
supplies, it makes a
convenient storage
and keeps everything
handy. (Via Chips &
Tips)
OLMC’s monthly newsletter – Jan 2015
Trouble polishing peridot? A
drop or two of lemon juice or
vinegar will speed up things
considerably. Remember to
rinse laps and splash pans
with water when done. (Via
Laphound News)
Page 1
OLMC’s
Rock Auction
Another 6 months have gone by and it’s time for rock
auction again.
As Kerry mentioned in his message on page 1, the club
received a generous donation from a former rockhound,
and some of the goods will be up for bid. Come and find
out what kind of treasure you may get.
Date:
Thurs, Jan 8, 2015
Time:
7:30pm-9:30pm
Location:
OLMC Workshop
1000 Brookfield
Road, Ottawa ON
The door will open at 7pm if you want to see the items and who you are up against.
The auction will start at 7:30pm. The usual rules: must be a member to bid, all
bidders must register before bidding, all items are due for payment immediately after
the auction ends, winners must pay before picking up the winning items.
Next month’s
meeting:
Speaker and
presentation
In Feb, our Program
Chair, Russ, may have
a goldsmith lined up to
give us a presentation
on his design process;
Details will be provided
in our newsletter.
See you there.
Tips on drilling a hole in stone with a
copper tube drill bit
By Judy Courteau
The biggest problem seems to be the shaft of the bit being flattened in the chuck of the
drill press. Firstly the chuck need only be tight enough to prevent spinning of the bit, so
try it snug but not tight, and if the bit spins, tighten it slightly. It is helpful as well as a
preventative measure to insert into the drill bit before using it, a wire the inside diameter of the copper
tube. There should be friction in installing the wire. It should not go as deep as the diamond tip and
should not block the holes in the tip itself. These holes, and indeed the tube itself help relieve pressure on
the stone.
The second problem I've encountered in drilling with any type of bit, is that pressure can be applied
unintentionally in a direction away from the person drilling if they are holding the stone, in a slightly
pushing action, rather than applying pressure directly downwards. A change in seating of the lapidary
may correct this. Sometimes a taller chair helps.
A third major problem is blowing out on the bottom of your stone. Use the slowest speed possible and
light pressure. Try to minimize any vibration. Drill only half way through, flip the stone then drill from the
other side. A great idea for finding the location for starting the hole on the other side was something I read
from the article online "To do this, take two pieces of cotton. Wrap the cotton around the stone so that
they cross. Where the crosses meet on the top and underside of your stone, mark with your pen."
(http://www.eternaltools.com/blog/how-to-drill-pebbles)
I've made my own bits from stainless steel needles from a coop or the vet by grinding off the tip and
cutting off the plastic end. Then loose carbide grit (200 or 400) in a well of water with a plasticine wall
does the cutting, while I lift and drop the bit mounted in a drill press lightly onto the rock.
Happy drilling,
Judy
OLMC’s monthly newsletter – Jan 2015
Page 2
Liver of Sulphur
By Vicki Jasperse
I have experimented with Liver of Sulphur gel added to water and
patina effects range from light to dark, depending on the temperature
of the water, amount of gel used (I usually use three drops) and
duration the metal sits in the liquid. The hotter the water, the more quickly the piece darkens. I generally dunk for
about ten seconds, pull out, inspect and decide if it needs more time. Once I’m happy with the colour, the piece
goes immediately into cold water with a teaspoon or so of baking soda to neutralize. I use steel wool to lighten the
patina on the raised design while leaving the background dark. I usually tumble my pieces before adding the patina
but you can also put them in the tumbler after you’ve applied it.
• Coffee method: I have been really pleased with the effects I’ve been getting by mixing a few drops of Liver
of Sulphur in a cup of good strong brewed coffee (I use Starbucks Pike’s Place beans because we drink it at
home – pretty sure you can use anything you like!). Hot coffee produces an interesting pearlescent effect –
cold coffee brings out some beautiful reds and oranges.
Ammonia
I’ve gotten some really interesting blue/green patinas using the following techniques with ammonia:
• Simple fuming: place about a quarter of a cup of ammonia in the bottom of a plastic bucket. Take an old
saucer or plate (it will discolour, so chose something you can live without) and place it upside down in the
bottom of the bucket. Dip your piece in white vinegar and place on the plate. Cover the bucket with a plastic
bag and leave overnight or until you are happy with the colour. The blue patina tends to a very dark
turquoise. You can also sprinkle sea salt on the metal after it’s been dipped in the vinegar – the blue patina
that results is much brighter, but a little crusty. Rinse well and let dry - I generally sand with fine sandpaper
and then coat both sides with a very light spray of polyurethane to seal. This also brings up the colour nicely.
.
• Hanging Method: place about a quarter of a cup of ammonia in the
•
bottom of a deep container (I use a plastic bucket but you can use a
coffee can or anything else with a cover). Dip your piece in white vinegar
and then, if desired, sprinkle a healthy amount of sea salt on both sides of
it. Suspend your piece on some wire stretched across the top of your
container and cover. You can leave it for a few hours or a few days – it all
depends on what pleases you. The patina may be a little delicate – some
will wash or flake off when you clean it, but enough remains to give a
pleasing effect. When it’s completely dry, sand and finish as desired –
wax or spray.
Bury Method: (my favourite): crumple a few paper towels and lay in the bottom of a plastic container and
wet them with a few splashes of ammonia. Sprinkle sea salt on the towels. Dip the copper piece in vinegar
and then lay it on top of the towels – cover with more ammonia dampened and salted towels. Seal the
container and leave for at least a day, although you’ll see that the colour will begin to develop quickly. The
longer you leave it the brighter the blue – you will also see green tones developing the longer the piece
stays in the container
Alcohol Ink Method
Adirondack Alcohol Inks produce some really nice, subtle effects on copper. I found them at Omer Deserres – they
come in a range of colours that can be blended with very nice results.
Nail Polish Remover
I use nail polish remover to wipe off the red Sharpie residue on my etched pieces before I hammer the bracelet and
have been getting some really interesting colour effects on the copper – completely erratic but ranging from a soft
raspberry to very interesting oranges and rusts. If you don’t like what you get, a bath in pickle restores the piece to
its original shiny copper finish.
*Items in photos made by OLMC’s members.
OLMC’s monthly newsletter – Jan 2015
Page 3
SAVINGS ON WIRE PURCHASES
Sterling Silver, Gold Filled Wire, Sterling Filled
• Sterling Silver is $70 /oz and
22g and Copper 22 SQ 18 HR
• Gold Filled is $90. /oz. (for old stock)
Jenny McBride, has most wire shapes and sizes,
• Gold Filled is $110. /oz (for new stock) 22 g SQ HH
please call to verify availability
and HR HH
Visa, Master Card, cash and check (with proper
• Sterling Silver Filled is $ 30/oz
ID) are accepted.
• Copper is $3.20 / oz 22 SQ g DS AND 18 g HR DS
You can reach Jenny or Ken at 613-794-5709
or by email at [email protected]
• We also sell tools and some findings
NOTE: All prices are subject to change due to Market fluctuations.
OLMC’s monthly newsletter – Jan 2015
Page 4
January 2015
Contact:
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
4
5
Stone
Carving
6:30-9pm
Secretary
John Skelton
[email protected]
11
12
Faceting
6:30-9pm
Treasurer
Rita Hudec
[email protected]
18
19
Stone
Carving
6:30-9pm
Workshop Chair
Jean-Guy Bradette
[email protected]
25
26
Faceting
6:30-9pm
Membership Chair
Nathalie Bourget
[email protected]
Program Chair
Russell Black
[email protected]
Newsletter Editor
Vema Ho
[email protected]
6
General
Lapidary
10:30am-4pm
Silversmithing
6:30-9pm
13
General
Lapidary
10:30am-4pm
Silversmithing
6:30-9pm
20
General
Lapidary
10:30am-4pm
Silversmithing
6:30-9pm
27
General
Lapidary
10:30am-4pm
Silversmithing
6:30-9pm
Friday
Saturday
2
General
Lapidary
6pm-9pm
3
General
Lapidary
10am-4pm
7
General
Lapidary
6:30pm -9pm
8
Rock
Auction
7:30p-9:30p
9
General
Lapidary
6pm-9pm
10
General
Lapidary
10am-4pm
14
General
Lapidary
2pm -9pm
15
16
General
Lapidary
6pm-9pm
17
General
Lapidary
10am-4pm
21
General
Lapidary
6:30pm -9pm
22
23
General
Lapidary
6pm-9pm
24
General
Lapidary
10am-4pm
28
General
Lapidary
2pm -9pm
29
30
General
Lapidary
6pm-9pm
31
General
Lapidary
10am-4pm
President
Kerry Day
[email protected]
Vice-President
Arnold Roos
[email protected]
Thursday
1
Want to join our workshops but
not yet a member?
It’s perfect time to get your membership.
We accept new members all year round!
Please see the last page for membership
application form.
Would you like to be a
supervisor?
supervisor?
We are on facebook, join us!
https://www.facebook.com/OttawaLapsmithMineralClub
OLMC’s monthly newsletter – Jan 2015
We are looking for volunteers to
supervise our workshop.
If you would like to become one of our
workshop supervisors, you can contact
Jean-Guy Bradette for details at
[email protected]
Page 5
Membership Application for the Year: 2015
New Membership
Membership renewal
Family (2 or more persons under the same residence) $30
Single (for individual) $20
Annual workshop access fee $60 (optional)
Name(s):
Address:
City:
Province:
Postal code:
Telephone:
Please specify how you would like to receive OLMC’s newsletter:
By email:
By mail
Do you require a receipt?
Yes
No
Payments are payable to Ottawa Lapsmith and Mineral Club. Please mail your membership form and fees to:
Ottawa Lapsmith and Mineral Club
P. O. Box 39054, RPO Billings, Ottawa, ON, K1H 1A1
Please note that all membership information is used only for administrative purpose.
Administration use only:
Card provided:
Yes
No
Supervisor signed:
Yes
No
Other services:
• Newsletter advertisement: $25 per year for members – ten quarter pages per year over ten newsletters,
which can be combined for fewer, larger ads. (Businesses wishing to advertise in the newsletter pay $45,
which is the advertising fee plus a family membership.)
• Locker Fee: $25 per year – depends on locker availability
• Cabochon Course: $55 - required for all new members (more information can be found at
http://www.olmc.ca/cabbing-course.html)
Questions? Please contact us by phone or email [email protected] for details.
OLMC’s monthly newsletter – Jan 2015
Page 6