Conference Program and Exhibition Guide

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Conference Program and Exhibition Guide
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Published in
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Gallery
in the Exhibit Hall
at Booths 306-8
Broski
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Coleman
Cushing
Dorf
Fagin
Fritts
Hassell
Hatch
King
Meisinger
Mueninck
Meyer
Nichols
Reitz
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Debra Fritts, Roswell, GA
Wandless
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
1
NCECA is a national organization with
centralized administrative offices, geographically widespread governance and membership, programming offered through the Annual Conference and a variety of supporting
materials and events that reinforce education,
celebration and dissemination of knowledge
in the ceramic arts. NCECA is committed to
the fair and equal employment of people with
disabilities. Reasonable accommodation is
the key to this non-discrimination policy. In
accordance with Americans with Disabilities
Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation
Act, accommodations will be provided to
qualified individuals with disabilities when
such accommodations are directly related to
performing essential functions of a job, competing for a job, or to enjoy equal benefits
and privileges of employment. As well, every
reasonable attempt will be made by NCECA
to accommodate persons with disabilities in
attendance at all NCECA events; information
and assistance will be available at registration
and information kiosks, as well as through
NCECA Event staff members.
The National Council on Education for
the Ceramic Arts assumes no responsibility
for the statements and opinions advanced
by the contributors to its publications or by
the speakers at its programs. In addition, an
organization’s freedom to exhibit in the manufacturers/suppliers and non-profit exhibitor
area does not constitute an endorsement of
the products and services of the companies
and institutions.
NCECA 2010, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,
Conference Program Guide
©2010 National Council on Education for
the Ceramic Arts
The NCECA 2010 Conference is supported by a grant from National Endowment
for the Arts, a Federal agency.
This conference guide was published
in partnership with Ceramics Monthly.
monthly
Publisher Charles Spahr
Editorial
[email protected]
telephone: (614) 794-5895
fax: (614) 891-8960
editor Sherman Hall
assistant editor Holly Goring
assistant editor Jessica Knapp
editorial assistant Erin Pfeifer
production editor Cynthia Griffith
online editor Jennifer Poellot Harnetty
Advertising/Classifieds
[email protected]
telephone: (614) 794-5834
fax: (614) 891-8960
classifi[email protected]
telephone: (614) 794-5843
advertising manager Mona Thiel
advertising services Jan Moloney
Marketing
telephone: (614) 794-5809
marketing manager Steve Hecker
Editorial and advertising offices
600 Cleveland Ave., Suite 210
Westerville, Ohio 43082
www.ceramicsmonthly.org
2
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
4 President’s Letter
4 On-Site Welcome
6 The Lay of the Land: Philadelphia
Navigating the city, public transportation, getting around while
you’re in town
8 Registration
Location, hours, and hotel information
8 About NCECA
Programs, Awards and Fellowships, Support
9 NCECA Board and Staff
9 Acknowledgements
10 NCECA Awards
NCECA Regional Award for Excellence, NCECA Fellows, Excellence in
Teaching Award, NCECA Honors Award
12 NCECA 2010 at a Glance
Plan your conference days with this quick and easy reference guide.
16 Hotel and Convention Center Floor Maps
Find your way to the conference lectures and panel discussions.
16 NCECA Gallery Expo and NEXPO
Six great clay galleries, as well as emerging and demonstrating
artists, fellows, honorary members, and the NCECA membership
18 Program Notes
Details on all conference events
50 NCECA Sponsored Exhibitions
NCECA 2010 Invitational Exhibition “Earth Matters,” Eighteenth
Annual Cup Sale, NCECA 2010 “National Juried Student Exhibition,
Thirteenth Annual “National K12 Ceramic Exhibition”
52 Exhibition and Shuttle Information
Get to your favorite exhibitions with ease
Listings and Maps
52
54
55
58
60
62
63
64
Greater Area Exhibitions
Walking Route
Center City/University City/South Philly Route
Old City Route
Northern Liberties/Fishtown Tour
Outer Rim South Tour
Outer Rim North Tour
Museum Area Route
66 Nonprofit Exhibitors
Tumblers with Shelf, 8 in. (20 cm) in height, porcelain,
high fired in oxidation, by Douglas Peltzman, graduate
student at Penn State University; in the National
Student Juried Exhibition. See page 50 for full details.
68 Manufacturers/Suppliers
69 Exposition Floor Map
70 NCECA 2011 Call for Program Proposals
and Exhibition Calls for Entry
2011 Program proposal requirements and deadlines and calls
for entry for the NCECA 2011 Biennial exhibition, and the 2011
“National Student Juried Exhibition”
72 Index to Advertisers
cover artists, left to right: Spencer Ebinga, Perry Haas,
Sam Scott, Russell Wrankle
V-7, 23 in. (58 cm) in length, stoneware and porcelain,
fired in oxidation, by Ryan Labar, graduate student at
the University of Nebraska, Lincoln; in the National
Student Juried Exhibition. See page 50 for full details.
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
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Onsite Welcome
Dear NCECA Members and Friends,
On behalf of the NCECA Board
of Directors, Advisory Board and
staff, I welcome you to Independence, the 44th Annual Conference
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The
upcoming conference program and
exhibitions celebrate the independent spirit in all of us as NCECA
returns to Philadelphia to explore
new ideas and investigate conventional understanding of the ceramic
medium and the traditions with which it is associated.
NCECA is approaching its 50th year as a unique community
of educators, artists, students, collectors, critics, writers, publishers, suppliers and manufacturers. The NCECA membership and
community is international in scope and continues to be a model
of cultural leadership, sustainable practices as an organization and
information for artists ranging from the practical to the theoretical. Collectively we can promote and foster the appreciation and
education of the ceramic arts to build on the strong foundation
and history of the council that makes NCECA one of the premier
international arts organizations in the 21st century.
On-Site Conference Liaisons Amy Sarner Williams and Jeff
Guido, along with the entire staff and board of The Clay Studio
need to be recognized and thanked for hosting the NCECA
membership. From programming that highlights a stellar array
of exhibitions and four days of presentations and events the
NCECA members have much to be proud of as we come together
to learn and gain insight from each other. The strength of this
organization is based in the knowledge, talent and creativity of
you, the NCECA members, and it is important to note that the
organization has never been stronger. When you attend NCECA
2010 Independence you will be treated to first rate exhibits spread
across the region, a program of variety and insight into the many
facets of ceramic art, that will enrich your life and studio practice
for a long time to come.
I wish to thank and acknowledge our dedicated staff Dori
Nielsen, Conference Manager; Kate Vorhaus, Projects Manager;
Helen Anderson, Bookkeeper; Barbara Webb, Membership Services; Jonathon Hopper, Webmaster; Allen Browning, Membership Coordinator and Marko Fields, Publications Director. As
the opportunity arises, please introduce yourself to these hard
working professionals and thank them for all they do to add value
to your NCECA membership.
I urge each and every one of you to get involved in NCECA
through conference proposals, exhibitions, or governance. You,
the NCECA members, are what make this organization so special,
so bring forward your suggestions and proposals as we grow
towards celebrating our 50th anniversary.
Best Regards,
Skeffington Thomas
NCECA President
The Clay
Studio Community and the city
of Philadelphia
welcome you all
to Independence:
The 44th Annual
National Council
on Education for
the Ceramic Arts
Conference. We, the staff and the board of NCECA and of The
Clay Studio, have worked very hard to program a conference of
relevance and interest that reflects the incredible changes that are
taking place within our field while at the same time honoring our
rich traditions.
The Conference is headquartered at the Philadelphia Convention Center with exhibitions scattered throughout the Metropolitan region. University of the Arts, The Tyler School of Art,
Temple University, Moore College of Art and The University of
Pennsylvania all are playing host to exhibitions, as are the The
Clay Studio, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Eastern State Penitentiary and the Philadelphia Art Alliance. Performance works,
installations, video, abstract and representational sculpture, hand
and industrially made vessels and functional ware are all included
in this year’s exhibitions program. We want to thank all of our
friends and colleagues – non-profit art centers, community
centers, commercial galleries and alternative spaces - throughout
the region who have graciously opened up their spaces to host
exhibitions or who developed projects of their own in support of
The Clay Studio and this conference.
This is the third time that the city of Philadelphia has played
host to the NCECA conference and it is a city truly worthy of
that honor. Rich in history and filled with many of our nations
firsts, it is a city of character, with diverse and eclectic neighborhoods and an incredibly rich and vibrant arts community.
Philadelphia is consistently voted to be one of the best walking
cities in America and we would certainly encourage you to put on
your walking shoes, explore our parks and the streets of our city
and discover all that makes it special. From Boathouse Row to
the Italian Market, from Eastern State Penitentiary to the Mütter
Museum, from Old City to the U Penn Campus, this city is full
of life with something to discover around every corner.
The Clay Studio is incredibly proud to be the onsite liaison
for Independence: The 44th Annual National Council on Education for the Ceramics Arts Conference and feels fortunate to have
the opportunity for you all to experience what we do at The Clay
Studio first hand. We are confident that your experience here in
Philadelphia and at the 44th Conference will be truly memorable.
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President’s Letter
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
Jeff Guido
Amy Sarner Williams
On-site co-liaisons
NCECA 2010, Philadelphia
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
5
The Lay of the Land: Philadelphia
The grid of streets in central Philadelphia, the first US city to
be so arranged, follows the original plans of William Penn and
was laid out by Thomas Holme appointed by Penn in 1682 as
Surveyor General of Philadelphia. Midway between the two
rivers, Penn Square, occupied by City Hall, is the centre of the
plan. Four shady, fountained squares—Logan, Franklin, Washington, and Rittenhouse—dot the quadrants. Westward from Penn
Square along John F. Kennedy Boulevard is Penn Center, and the
long stretch of Broad Street, north and south of Penn Square,
has been called the Avenue of the Arts because of its numerous
cultural attractions.
For additional information about navigating the city, visit
www.theclaystudio.org and click on the “Independence: 44th
Conference” logo link.
Navigating the City
Philadelphia is consistently rated one of the best walking cities in
America. Its grid of streets and overall layout allows one to easily
navigate the city. Simple tips to remember while walking around
the city are:
Market Street forms the North/South Divide within city
center. Streets that are named with numbers run North and South
only, with addresses beginning at Market Street, again running in
both directions. Addresses between 1–100 are located between the
first block both North and South of Market, 100—200, would be
on the second block and so on. Numbered streets (second, third,
fourth) south of Market are South Second, South Third and
South Fourth, etc., and north of Market, North Second, North
Third and North Fourth, etc.
For streets that run east and west (those with names other than
numbers) if the numbers in the addresses are getting larger, then
one is traveling west and if the numbers are getting smaller, then
one is traveling east. All addresses located between Second and
Third streets are two hundred, between Third and Fourth Streets,
three hundred, etc. So if an address is 233 Pine Street you know
that it is on a street that runs east and west and that it would be
located between Second and Third Streets. Broad Street (Avenue
of the Arts) is actually 14th Street.
Public Transportation
Cabs are ever present in Center City and all one need do is raise
their arm to hail one down. All taxi rates are based per trip not
per person. Most taxis can accommodate up to 3 passengers. In
some cases certain vehicle types can accommodate 4 passengers.
Cabs now accept credit or debit cards, however if that is your
method of payment you should make your cabbie aware upon
entry. Should you need to contact a cab company, a list follows:
Capital Dispatch 215-235-2200
City Cab Co. 215-238-5000
Liberty Cab Co. 215-389-8000
Old City Taxi, 215-247-7678
Quaker City Cab, 215-728-8000
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NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
Airport Transportation
One may also take Regional Rail both to and from the airport.
Operated by SEPTA (Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation
Authority) the R-1 High Speed Rail Line costs $7 one-way and
can take you into the heart of the city. Coming from the airport
you must purchase the ticket on the train and you must pay cash.
The R-1 line is accessible from every terminal, via the pedestrian
bridges that cross over a commercial roadway (again follow the
signs). The SEPTA R-1 Airport rail line runs every 30 minutes
between the Airport and Center City. Trains operate from Center
City to the Airport between 4:25 AM and 11:25 PM, and from
the airport to Center City from 5:09 AM to 12:09 AM. The R-1
stops at Terminals A-East, B, C, D, E. Other stops on the route
are Eastwick, University City, 30th Street (Amtrak), Suburban and
Market East. Connections can be made to other regional rail lines
for an additional fee at 30th Street, Suburban and Market East.
One should take the R-1 to the Market East Station, which
is located at 11th and Market. The conference hotels are located
just a short walk away, the Marriott one block west (12th and
Market), and the Hampton Inn, two blocks north and two blocks
west of the station (13th and Race). To return to the airport,
depart from the same Market East Station on the R-1 rail line.
Regional Rail fares are based on zones. Knowing the zone of the
station you are boarding and traveling to will help you determine
the correct fare. You may purchase a ticket at the ticket counter
within the train station. If you purchase a ticket on the train you
will pay a $2.00 surcharge.
For maps of the Philadelphia rail system, visit
www.septa.org/maps.
City Rails: Market-Frankford Line, Broad Street Line, Trolleys
The Market-Frankford Subway-Surface line runs east and
west, while the Broad Street Subway Line runs North and South.
For complete information on schedules and routes plus a very
handy application called trip planner (where you can plot your
start point and destination and get exact route plans), visit
www.septa.org. When riding on a City or Suburban Transit
service, exact fare must be used. Please be aware that the bus and
subway do not run all night, generally the last buses and trains
leave between 11pm and 11.30pm
Cash: The base cash fare for bus, trackless trolley, subway, and
trolley service is $2.00. Cash is accepted for travel on all services.
Exact fare must be used.
Tokens: Tokens provide a discount off the base cash fare and
cost $1.45 each.
Tokens may only be purchased in packs of two or more. Two
cost $2.90; five are $7.25, and a ten pack costs $14.50. They are
also available for bulk purchase. Some Subway stations have token
machines if there is not an attendant to buy them from. Tokens
may not be returned at any time for a refund.
Visit www.theclaystudio.org for particular bus/transit routes to
exhibition venues.
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
7
Registration
NCECA 2010 NAME BADGE IS REQUIRED FOR ADMITTANCE TO ALL CONFERENCE ACTIVITIES
Reserved seating for those with special needs is provided in the first row of each meeting room. Badge checkers will assist you.
Tickets are required for bus routes.
PLEASE BE COURTEOUS AND TURN OFF YOUR CELL PHONE/PAGER IN ALL MEETING ROOMS!
Lost or stolen name badges and program guides will be charged the day admission rate. A conference receipt and photo ID is required for
replacements.
Registration Location
Philadelphia Convention Center, Bridge
Registration Hours
Tuesday, March 30
Wednesday, March 31
Thursday, April 1
Friday, April 2
Saturday, April 3
12:00 pm-5:00 pm
8:30 am-5:00 pm
7:30 am-4:30 pm
7:30 am-4:30 pm
8:30 am-10:00 am
HOTELS
Philadelphia Marriott Downtown
1201 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107
215-625-2900
Hampton Inn Philadelphia Center City-Convention Center
1301 Race St, Philadelphia, PA 19107
215-665-9100
ABOUT NCECA
Founded in 1966, the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts is a not-for-profit educational organization that provides
valuable resources and support for individuals, schools, and organizations with a passion for the ceramic arts.
The purpose of NCECA is to promote and improve the ceramic arts through education, research, and creative practice. NCECA offers programs, exhibitions, and publications that are uniquely beneficial and rewarding to its membership, which includes ceramic artists,
educators, students and patrons. As a dynamic, member-driven organization, NCECA strives to be both flexible in its programming and
responsive to the changing needs of its constituency.
PROGRAMS
•“NCECA Regional Student Juried Exhibition”: Held annually, this exhibition showcases undergraduate and graduate work
from a multi-state region surrounding the conference host city.
Publications
NCECA keeps its members informed of important developments
in the field through the following publications:
•NCECA Journal: Published annually, the Journal documents
the presentations and events of each conference with reports,
articles and photographic essays.
•NCECA News: A forum that provides information and a
calendar of upcoming NCECA events important to all NCECA
members, plus a new focus on ceramic criticism.
•NCECA Directory: An annual listing of the current membership with contact information to promote communication
among members.
•Special Publications: NCECA produces special publications
focusing on specific topics, such as the NCECA Ceramic Assignment Handbook.
AWARDS and FELLOWSHIPS
SUPPORT
NCECA formally recognizes the outstanding achievement of artists,
educators and students with the following awards: Honorary Members,
Fellows of the Council, Excellence in Teaching, Regina Brown Undergraduate Student Fellowships, NCECA Graduate Student Fellowships,
Outstanding Achievement, and Regional Award of Excellence.
Membership and registration fees, grants from the NEA, as well
as individual, foundation and organizational donations and grants
support NCECA activities. NCECA is a qualified 501(c)(3) notfor-profit educational organization.
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Membership brings access to the following NCECA programs
and resources.
Annual Conference
The annual NCECA Conference gives its members an opportunity to unite and discuss topics relating to the field of ceramics. The
conference features an awards ceremony, demonstrations, lectures,
panel discussions, graduate student, international and K12 image
forums, manufacturers/suppliers and non-profit exhibits, ceramic
art exhibitions, and technical clinics.
Exhibitions
NCECA sponsors three exhibitions to increase public recognition and appreciation, as well as further critical investigation and
dialogue, of ceramic art.
•“NCECA Clay National Biennial Exhibition”: Held in odd
numbered years, the “Clay National Biennial” is a juried exhibition open to United States and international members.
•“NCECA Invitational”: Held in even-numbered years, the
“Invitational” is a curated exhibition that explores the theme of
the NCECA Annual Conference.
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
NCECA STAFF
NCECA BOARD
President 2012: Skeffington Thomas, Rowan
University/Art Department, 201 Mullica Hill
Road, Glassboro, New Jersey 08027-1701;
856-256-4522; [email protected]
Past President 2010: Robert Harrison, P.O.
Box 5085, Helena, Montana 59604; 406-4578281; [email protected]
President-Elect 2014: Keith Williams,
Concordia University Art Department, 275
Syndicate Street North, St. Paul, MN 55104;
651-641-8743; [email protected]
Director at Large 2011: Lydia Thompson,
Mississippi State University College of
Architecture Art and Design, Barr Avenue
102 Freeman Hall, P.O. Box 5182, Mississippi State, MS 39762; 662-325-8590;
[email protected]
Director at Large 2012: Rhonda Willers, E8610 N. County Road E., Elk
Mound, WI 54739; 715-425-3267;
[email protected]
Secretary-Treasurer 2011: Eduardo Lazo,
227 Lyndhurst Avenue, Belmont, CA 94002;
650-802-8429; [email protected]
Student Director at Large 2010: Jessica Orlowski, Georgia State University/
School of Art and Design, P.O. Box 4107,
Atlanta, GA 30302; 518-429-6244;
[email protected]
Programs Director 2011: Steve Hilton,
MWSU/Art Department, 3410 Taft Blvd.,
Wichita Falls, TX 76308; 940-397-4270;
[email protected]
NCECA 2010 On-Site Co-Liaison: Jeff
Guido, The Clay Studio, 139 N. Second
Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106; 215-925-3453
ext. 18; [email protected]
Exhibitions Director 2011: Linda Ganstrom,
206 West 26th Street, Hays, KS 67601; 785628-4273; [email protected]
NCECA 2010 On-Site Co-Liaison: Amy
Sarner Williams, The Clay Studio, 139 N.
Second Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106; 215925-3453 ext. 12; [email protected]
Communications Director 2010: Brian Kohl,
414 East Wilshire Avenue, Fullerton, CA
92832; 714-227-8189; [email protected]
Director at Large 2010: Jim Romberg,
Eagleheart Center for Arts, P.O. Box 737, CR
142, Abiquiu, NM 87510; 505-685-0011;
[email protected]
Conference Manager
Dori Nielsen
[email protected]
Project Manager
Kate Vorhaus
[email protected]
Publications Director
Marko Fields
[email protected]
Webmaster/Marketing Coordinator
Jonathan Hopper
[email protected]
Accountant
Helen Anderson
[email protected]
NCECA, 77 Erie Village Square, Suite 280
Erie, Colorado 80516
866-CO-NCECA (866-266-2322)
Phone 303-828-2811
Fax 303-828-0911
NCECA 2011 On-Site Liaison: Brian Ransom, Eckerd College, 1320 Serpentine Drive
South, St. Petersburg, FL 33705; 727-8648473; [email protected]
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The NCECA Board of Directors wishes to express its deep appreciation and thanks to those who have contributed to the success of this conference:
The On-site Co-Liaisons, Jeff Guido and Amy Sarner Williams, The Clay Studio, for all of their time and hard work in organizing the
exhibitions for the enjoyment of the membership and Philadelphia communities.
Special recognition is given to Naomi Cleary, The Clay Studio, for her assistance in helping the On-site Co-Liaisons.
The Galleries at Moore College of Art & Design for hosting the Earth Matters, NCECA 2010 Invitational Exhibition.
Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery for hosting the 2010 NCECA National Student Juried Exhibition.
All of the museums, colleges and universities, and galleries that are hosting the many excellent ceramic exhibitions for NCECA 2010.
Those institutions and organizations that organized pre/post conference activities for the enjoyment of our members.
Gabrielle Schulman for arriving early in Philadelphia and managing the insertion pieces of 5,000 conference packets.
Chris Stanley, Rob McMillen, Robert Moore, and Les Laidlaw for managing the audiovisual aspects of the programming.
Richard Wehrs for coordinating and managing the Eighteenth Annual Cup Sale.
NCECA’s Image Forum Coordinators: Sally Brogden, Graduate Students’ Image Forum; Steve Driver, International Image Forum; Barbara Beasley-Eggbrouwer, K12 Image Forum.
Shawn Spangler, Demonstrator Volunteer Coordinator; Jacque Liu, Bus/Shuttle Volunteer Coordinator; Kay Gering and Lauren Comito
Program Volunteer Coordinators, for placing attendees into 74 volunteer positions.
The many volunteers, who have worked diligently behind the scenes, for their assistance with many aspects of the conference.
Presidential Appointee: Joe Molinaro – Video Screening and 2011 China Reciprocal
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
9
NCECA Regional Award
for Excellence
NCECA Fellows
Susan Filley
Susan Filley has contributed to NCECA in many ways, as Director at Large, Advisor, project volunteer, Board Liaison, cup sale
coordinator, and she became the first working studio artist to serve as President of the
Council.
Susan first studied pottery with Japanese
artist Mitsuo Kakutani, before pursuing her
passion for functional pottery with a Master’s of Fine Arts in ceramics from LSU.
Susan’s work has been exhibited nationally and internationally, including the Fletcher Challenge Awards
in New Zealand , 21st Century American Ceramics, Contemporary Clay National Exhibition, and the Strictly Functional Pottery
National. Recognized for her gestural grace in form and rich glaze
surfaces, her work has been widely published - Ceramic Design
Book, 500 Teapots, High Fire Glazes and more. Her works are in
the Shiwan Museum in China, the La Grange Museum, Georgia,
and many private collections.
Throughout her career, Susan has worked to enhance public
awareness and appreciation for ceramic art, and has taught in
many venues including Penland Craft School and Arrowmont
Craft School. Awarded a grant by the SC Arts Commission in
1999, Susan established an innovative studio gallery in Charleston, SC. In 2005, Susan moved and built a private studio in
Chapel Hill, NC.
Ruth Snyderman
Ruth Snyderman has owned The Works Gallery since 1965—45
years. There always has been a presence of ceramics in the gallery,
starting with the Wallingford Potters Guild.
Paulus Berensohn brought the
work of ten potters to the gallery for
an opening exhibition and their work
was shown for several years afterwards.
The original gallery was located in
Center City and showed fiber, jewelry,
glass, and clay. Paula and Bob Winokur were two of the first potters shown at this location.
In l970 The Works opened a second location in a low-rent
district. Ruth and her husband spent much of their time developing that neighborhood into a viable arts district. That took many
years, which involved stopping a highway and running festivals to
bring people to that area. It eventually became the most popular street in Philadelphia for theater, fine meals, and shopping.
The businesses were all open until midnight on the weekends. It
became a very close community.
Ruth has served as a juror, panelist, curator, and speaker many
times in her long career. The most recent trips as a lecturer have
been in Ireland and Australia.
Board commitments have been to the Clay Studio, The Painted Bride Art Center, Philadelphia Collectors Group (for glass) as
President, and Trustee for Watershed Center of the Ceramic Arts.
Ruth is also Treasurer of the Old City Arts Association.
Jeremy Jernegan
Jeremy Jernegan, MA and MFA - San Jose State University, is an
Associate Professor in the Newcomb Art Department of Tulane
University, where he has been ceramics area head since 1990,
and is currently Associate Dean of Finance and Planning of the
School of Liberal Arts.
Jeremy first joined the NCECA Board of
Directors in 1992 as Conference Chair for
New Orleans, hosting the Gumbo Ceramique
conference in 1994. He then served as Program Director from 1998-2005, including
Columbus, Denver, Charlotte, Kansas City,
San Diego, Indianapolis, and Baltimore.
Jeremy’s current large-scale sculptural work consists of graphic
wall pieces constructed from ceramic panels and stainless steel that
investigate the relationship between 2- and 3-D imagery. Recent
solo exhibitions include “Prescience” (2008) and “Surge” (2006) at
Gallery Bienvenu in New Orleans, and “Ceramic Sculpture” (2007)
at the Anna Lamar Switzer Center for Visual Arts in Pensacola.
Jeremy’s book Dry Glazes was published in 2009 by A&C
Black/University of Pennsylvania Press. Recent publications featuring his work include “Jeremy Jernegan: Prescience” by Thomasine Bartlett, Ceramics Art and Perception 77 (2009), China
Paint and Overglaze by Paul Lewing (2007), “Jeremy Jernegan:
Surface and Form” by Glen R. Brown, Ceramic Monthly 53
(2005), and Ceramics in the Environment: An International
Review by Janet Mansfield (2005).
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Kathryn Narrow
Kathryn Narrow is a potter and educator who has lived and
worked in Philadelphia for most of her professional career. She
has taught both children and adults
in the Philadelphia Public School
System, The University of the Arts,
and at The Clay Studio where she
was the Managing Director and
Education Director until her retirement in 2008. It was here that she
created The Clay Studio’s hugely successful Community Outreach
Program, The Claymobile, which has since served as a model
nationally for other community outreach programs. The program
uses creative experiences in clay as a tool to reinforce learning
of current classroom curricula, to create a dialogue in discussing social ills and concerns, and to encourage personal growth
and development. The program serves children and adults, both
mainstream and challenged populations, through partnerships
with public and private schools, community organizations and
social service agencies. Narrow was also a founding member of the
Philadelphia Arts in Education Partnership (PAEP), whose mission is to promote learning in and through the arts for students
in K-12 schools. Through these efforts, and her steadfast belief
in “learning as fun”, Narrow has exposed countless people to the
power of clay and individual creative expression.
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
NCECA Honors Award
Yoshiro Ikeda
Yoshiro Ikeda (Yoshi) is Distinguished Professor at Kansas State
University, Manhattan, Kansas. “When discussing his philosophy
of pot making, Yoshi offers a few hardwon phrases. For a fleeting moment, he
might speak of gesture, line or rhythm.
He may even talk about the meaning
of content. Then, the inevitable smile
spreads beneath his mustache, his eyes
widen, and any tools in his hands are laid
aside. “You know what you should do, if you want to be an artist,”
he says with an impish grin. “You should marry a rich girl.”
Ikeda emigrated from Japan in his teens. He met the challenges of his new home with a strong will and a sense of humor
that later became his trademark in his teaching career. He earned
a BS in painting/drawing and minored in ceramics at Portland
State University, Oregon. His passion for clay led him to Japan to
study at Kyoto University of Fine Art. He earned his MFA from
the University of California Santa Barbara. For the last 32 years
he’s been honored to teach such hard-working students at Kansas
State University in Manhattan, a place he fondly describes as “an
island surrounded by farms in the middle of nowhere.”
Richard Shaw
Richard Shaw has been teaching since 1966, first at the San
Francisco Art Institute, and from 1987 in the department of art
practice at the University of California
at Berkeley where he teaches ceramic
sculpture and life drawing. Born in 1941
to artist parents, his focus was always
drawing and painting. However, while an
art major in a community college, he discovered clay and became a ceramics major
while studying with Ron Nagle and Jim
Melchert at the San Francisco Art Institute in the early 60’s. He
began exhibiting and teaching in the late 60’s while first attending
Alfred University where he studied with Val Cushing and John
Wood and later graduating from the University of California at
Davis where he received an MFA, studying with Robert Arneson,
Manuel Neri, William T. Wiley, and Roy De Forest.
Shaw’s work changed when he collaborated with his neighbor
and former teacher, the sculptor Robert Hudson. Working in both
artists’ studios for two years, this work culminated in an exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Art in 1973. These slip-cast
assemblages created at that time began his exploration of the still
life and its tradition in ceramics, sculpture and painting over the
centuries in all cultures. Many of his sculptures are containers in
disguise such as jars, pitchers and plates as a format from which
to begin. Others are figures created from common objects. Much
of this work is a personal contest to see how one can push the
medium of clay and the viewer’s eye.
Bunny A. McBride
Bunny A. McBride was born 1938 in Butte, Montana. His undergraduate education was completed at Montana State University, Bozeman.
Mentoring by David Shaner while spending
summers at the Bray Foundation led Bunny
to Alfred, NY and the influences of Val Cushing, Bob Turner, and Dan Rhodes.
Following completion of an MFA in 1970,
Bunny began teaching Ceramics for the School
of Art and Art History at the University of
Iowa, becoming the first person to be awarded
tenure in Ceramics (1980) and the rank of Professor of Ceramics.
National and international recognition developed through
classroom teaching, workshops, foreign symposiums, and gallery
exhibitions. Beginning in 1983 and continuing through 2005 Bunny
traveled with students to China and Korea, documenting disappearing ancient kiln sites; research culminated in the production of an
interactive study CD including diagrams and photographs of the
ancient kilns, and development of Shino glazes. In 2002 and 2005
Bunny was invited to chair sessions at the International Symposium
on Ancient Ceramics and toured new archeological discoveries at the
Longquan kiln sites of Zhejiang and the area of Jinhua of Jun ware.
The “Iowa Connection” is nationwide. Bunny has been a
steady and constant force in the development of ceramics students,
working to provide good technical training, consistent and caring
support, and an opportunity to develop and create their own style
of work. The most important principle to Bunny was his students’
work reflected respect for the material and oneself. More than
just his own ceramic work, Bunny’s forty-year career has fostered
students who have become successful studio potters—even chairs of
prestigious universities—and, countless friends.
Photo: Alice Shaw
Excellence in Teaching Award
Matthias Ostermann (1950-2009)
Matthias Ostermann was born in Germany and immigrated to
Toronto, Canada in 1953. There, his mentor Isolde Rest introduced him to pottery in his late teens,
sparking a life-long passion and career
in the ceramic arts. For the past 20
years he lived and worked in Montreal.
Although initially trained as a production potter in high-fired stoneware,
Matthias’ desire to combine drawing
with clay surface led him to explore
low-fire maiolica and copper sgraffito techniques.
Drawing inspiration from mythology, dreams and human
relationships, he had many colorful stories to tell. He told them
all with great eloquence and vitality – both in person and in pots.
At the peak of his career, Matthias lectured, taught and exhibited around the world. His works are held in the collections of the
Victoria and Albert Museum, the Musée national des beauxarts du Québec, the Royal Ontario Museum, and the Gardiner
Museum of Ceramic Arts, as well as in private homes and in the
kitchens of many friends.
Widely recognized for his knowledge of the field, Matthias is
the author of three well-received books and countless magazine
articles about ceramics. His final exhibition, ‘Boats of Passage’,
was held in Toronto in December 2008.
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
11
8 am
9 am
10 am
11 am
Tuesday
12 noon
1 pm
2 pm
12–5Registration
March 30
Wednesday
8:30–5Registration, Bus Ticket Sales, NCECA Sales, Manufacturers/Suppliers, and Nonprofit Exhibits
March 31
9–1:30 Outer Rim North Concurrent Independent Exhibition Tour
9–2:15 Outer Rim South Concurrent Independent Exhibition Tour
9–5NCECA Gallery Exposition/NEXPO
9–5
Eighteenth Annual Cup Sale Submission and Exhibition
9–6
2010 Educational Showcase
9:30–5Continuous Exhibition Shuttle Loops (5 pm departures for pick-up only)
1–5 Grad Students’ and Int’l I
1–5Student Critique Sign-up Thursday
April 1
7:30–4:30Registration, NCECA Sales
8–8:45 Yoga for Potters
8–8:30 Lecture:
Mosaic
8–8:30 Lecture:
China Painting
Panel:
Philadelphia
8–9
8:30–11:30Simultaneous Demonstrations
Lecture: Nature 9–10
of Color
Panel: Key Texts in 20th 9–10:30
Cent.
Ceramic Criticism
For detailed session descriptions,
see Program Details on pages 18–48.
nceca2010 at a glance
10–6Thirteenth Annual National K–12 Ceramic Exhibition
9–5Manufacturers/Suppliers and Nonprofit Exhibits
9–5
Graduate Programs and Employment Opportunities
9–5Thirteenth Annual National K–12 Ceramic Exhibition
9–7NCECA Gallery Exposition/NEXPO
9–6
2010 Educational Showcase
9:30–10:30 Lecture: Green Ceramics
9:30–3:30 Graduate Students’ Image Forum / International Image Forum
10–12Student Critique Room
10–4
Video Screening
10–5
Eighteenth Annual Cup Sale Submission and Exhibition
11–11:30
Global/local
11–12 Panel: Ai Weiwei:
Dropping the Urn
11–12 Co-Lecture:
Sexy Bodies (clay)
12–1 First NCECA Members’ Business Meeting
1–2 Lecture: Health and
Safety in the Arts
1–2:30 Panel: Academia to Community–and
Back: The Baltimore Clayworks Circle
1–4Simultaneous 1–5S
1:30–2:30 Panel: Exquisite Pots: 6
Degrees of Collaboration
1:30–3NCECA’s Green
2:30–3:30D
12
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
3 pm
4 pm
5 pm
6 pm
7 pm
8 pm
9 pm
5:30–7NCECA Gallery Expo/
NEXPO Reception
Image Forum Sign-up & Scheduling
& Scheduling
7–9
Opening Ceremonies
Demonstrations
Student Critique Room
Task Force
Residual Landscape with Cloud, 23 in. (58 cm) in height,
stoneware, fired in oxidation, by Jasmine Wallace, graduate
student at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities; in the National
Student Juried Exhibition. See page 50 for full details.
Distinguished Lecture: Into the Fire
3:30–4 Anat
3:30–5:00 New Works
4:00–4:30
Get Butch
4–6 NCECA Connections
8:30–9:30 Randall Session
9:30–12:30 Jam
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
13
8 am
Friday
April 2
9 am
10 am
11 am
12 noon
1 pm
2 pm
7:30–4:30 Registration
8–8:30 Veg.
Oil Firing
8–8:30
Eulogies
8–8:45
Yoga for Potters
8–9 Panel: Landscape
of Craft
8–2
Eighteenth Annual Cup Sale
8:30–11 Simultaneous Demonstrations
9–9:30 Lecture:
Xavier Toubes
9–9:30 Lecture:
Wisdom/Clay
9–5NCECA Gallery Exposition/ NEXPO
9–5Manufacturers / Suppliers and Nonprofit Exhibits
9–5
9–6
Graduate Programs and Employment Opportunities
Educational Showcase
9:30–10 British
Ceramic Ed.
9:30–3:30 Graduate Students’ Image Forum / International Image Forum
Panel:
10–11
Curating Clay
Panel: Ceramic Tech.- 10–11:30
Material Issues
10–12Student Critique Room
10–3
K–12 Image Forum
10–4
Video Screenings
For detailed session descriptions,
see Program Details on pages 18–48.
nceca2010 at a glance
9–4 Thirteenth Annual National K–12 Ceramic Exhibition
Saturday
April 3
Panel: Bridging
10:30–12
the Gap
11:30–12:30 Lecture: Marvels
12–1:30 Panel:
Fabricating
Ideas
12:30–1Lecture:
Dust to Dust
1–2 Awardees/Honorees
1–4Simultaneous 1–5Student CritiqueR
1:30–3Panel: EmergingF
2–2:30Deco Porcelain
8:30–10Registration
9–10:30 Emerging Artists
10:30–10:45
Closing
10:45–11:45 Closing Lecture:
How Did I End Up Here?
11:45–1Second NCECA
Members’ Meeting
Open Board
Meeting
1–2
14
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
3 pm
4 pm
5 pm
6 pm
7 pm
8 pm
9 pm
Demonstrations
Room
Faculty
2:30–3:30
Anti-Biotic, 18 in. (46 cm) in height, stoneware, fired in oxidation, with
mixed media, by Christopher Adelhardt, undergraduate student at the
University of Edinboro; in the National Student Juried Exhibition. See
page 50 for full details.
Lecture: Selling Out
3–4:30 Panel: To Die For
3:30–4 Post WWII Ceramics
4–4:30 Lecture:
Glassagama
4:30–6NCECA Topical Discussions
9:30–1:30 Dance
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
15
Hotel and Convention Center Floor Maps
Marriott Third Floor
(connects to convention
center second floor and
Marriott Tower)
Convention Center Second Floor
(south of Grand Hall)
Marriott Fourth Floor
NCECA Gallery Expo and NEXPO
The NCECA Gallery Expo located in booths A–E and G.
The Expo features gallery style works executed by well-known
professional artists. An intersection between the worlds of
studio practice and gallery business, this area offers viewers not
only an opportunity to experience and buy high quality ceramic
art, but also the chance to interact with gallery owners and some
of the artists they represent. This area offers a great place to begin or build your collection of ceramic art and teaching examples
while learning more about professional gallery practice.
A)
Red Lodge Clay Center
D)
Mindy Solomon Gallery
P.O. Box 1527
124 2nd Ave NE
Red Lodge, MT 59068
St. Petersburg, FL 33701
David Hiltner
Mindy Solomon
406-446-3993
727-502-0852
www.redlodgeclaycenter.com
www.mindysolomon.com
B)
The Dolphin Song
E)
18 Hands Gallery, LLC
20425 Apple Ridge Lane
249 W. 19th St, Ste B
Spring Hill, KS 66083
Houston, TX 77008
Danny Meisinger
Karen Cruce
913-592-3915
713-869-3099
www.thedolphinsong.com
www.18handsgallery.com
Ferrin Gallery
C)
Sherrie Gallerie
G)
694 N. High St
437 North St
Columbus, OH 43215
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Sherrie Hawk
Leslie Ferrin
614-221-8580
413-442-1622
www.sherriegallerie.com
www.ferringallery.com
16
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
Marriott, Liberty Ballroom, A & B
(see map above)
NCECA NEXPO Gallery located in booths F and H.
Join us to celebrate and support NCECA at this year’s first NCECA
Featuring artists from our membership and more: Emerging
and demonstrating artists, Fellows, Honorary Members and the
membership! Sales from the NEXPO booth will contribute to
NCECA’s Fund for Artistic Development, which helps sustain various future artist opportunities
Philadelphia Convention Center Second Floor
Ballroom A/B
(convention
center third
floor)
Marriott third floor
connected via bridge
(see maps on opposite page)
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
17
Program Details
All programming will take place at the
Pennsylvania Convention Center, 1010
Arch St., and the Philadelphia Marriott
Downtown, 1201 Market St.
Events are listed by day, then time
and location. For locations, see maps
on pages 16 and 17.
Panel moderators are indicated with
“(m)”, sessions geared specifically
toward issues of sustainability are
marked with a and sessions of
particular interest to students are
marked with a .
9–2:15, 12th St. Bus Loading
States. Designed to showcase the best K12 ceramic work made in the country.
Outer Rim South Concurrent
Independent Exhibition Tour
See full description on page 51.
Tickets required for boarding
1–5, Bridge
9–5, Liberty A/B (Marriott)
Graduate Students’ Image Forum,
International Image Forum, and
Student Critique Sign-up & Scheduling
NCECA Gallery Expo
Bus Ticket Sales for Wednesday shuttles
Features gallery style works executed by wellknown professional artists. An intersection
between the worlds of studio practice and gallery business, this area offers viewers not only an
opportunity to experience and buy high quality
ceramic art, but also the chance to interact with
gallery owners and some of the artists they represent. This area offers a great place to begin or
build your collection of ceramic art and teaching
examples while learning more about professional
gallery practice. See complete listing of participating galleries and map on page 16.
NCECA Sales: T-shirts, NCECA 2010 Invitational
Exhibition Catalog, Demonstrator DVDs
9–5, Liberty A/B (Marriott)
Tuesday, March 30
12–5pm, Bridge
Registration
12–6, Hall B
Exhibitor Move In (Exhibitor personnel only)
5:30–7, Liberty A/B (Marriott)
NCECA Gallery Expo/NEXPO
Opening Reception
Visit the 2010 NCECA Gallery Expo to experience
aesthetically beautiful, hand-made objects that
capture a fleeting cultural moment within a
timeless medium. Gallery representatives will be
available to visit with visitors about the content
and techniques involved in creating the work.
Join us to celebrate and support NCECA at this
year’s first NCECA NEXPO Gallery. Featuring artists from our membership and more: Emerging
and Demonstrating Artists, Fellows, Honorees
and the membership!
Wednesday, March 31
NEXPO
Featuring artists from our membership and more:
Emerging and Demonstrating Artists, Fellows,
Honorees and the membership! Sales from
the NEXPO booth will contribute to NCECA’s
endowment, which helps sustain various future
(“NEXt”) artist opportunities and supports conference programming.
9–5, Independence (Marriott)
Eighteenth Annual Cup Sale
Submission and Exhibition
Coordinated by Richard Wehrs
Drop off cup donations and receive a bonus
NCECA 2011 Conference/Membership drawing
ticket. All donated cups will be considered for
the NCECA “Cups of Merit” Commission Award.
In its ninth year, the award is designed to add
further recognition of the extraordinary quality
of these donations. The selections will be made
by a jury’s review of all donated cups.
NCECA Sales T-shirts, NCECA 2010 Invitational
Exhibition Catalog, Demonstrator DVDs
The NCECA Cup Sale is a powerful demonstration of the generosity of our clay community,
as members from all over, and of all skill levels,
bring their contributions for display and sale
-- all for the benefit of others through NCECA’s
scholarship programs. Come by and join in this
excellent program!
8:30–5, Hall B
9–6, 406, 407,408 (Marriott)
8:30–5, Bridge
Registration
Bus Ticket Sales for Wednesday shuttles
(limited availability)
Manufacturers/Suppliers and
Nonprofit Exhibitors
Visit with manufacturers and suppliers of ceramic
products, schools offering ceramic programs and
companies providing publications in the ceramic
arts. See complete listing of exhibitors starting
on page 66.
NCECA Booth
Visit with Board members. View a sampling of
“Cups of Merit” Commission Awards. Samples of
NCECA publications will be on display. Deposit
$100 exhibitor drawing ticket.
9–1:30, 12th St. Bus Loading
Outer Rim North Concurrent
Independent Exhibition Tour
Tickets required for boarding.
18
7–9, Ballroom
Opening Ceremonies
Welcome by Skeff Thomas, NCECA President;
Welcome by Jeff Guido and Amy Sarner
Williams, NCECA 2010 On-site Co-Liaisons,
Welcome by Mayor Nutter; Introduction of
Terry Gross by Steve Hilton, NCECA Programs
Director; Closing remarks, Skeff Thomas,
NCECA President.
Keynote: Terry Gross, Award-winning Host of
National Public Radio’s Fresh Air
In her lecture presentation, Terry Gross offers a
behind-the-mic glimpse of her innovative and
hugely popular public radio show “Fresh Air.”
Recounting stories (and playing brief clips) of
extremely successful interviews, as well as relating entertaining tales of particularly disastrous
interviews, Terry shares a side of herself that her
listeners rarely get to see. During the Q&A that
follows, the audience gets the chance to turn the
tables on NPR’s foremost interviewer by asking
their own questions.
Thursday, April 1
7:30–4:30, Bridge
Registration
NCECA Sales
T-shirts, NCECA 2010 Invitational Exhibition Catalog, and Demonstrator DVDs
8–8:30, Ballroom A
Lecture: From Mercer to Mosaic:
Building Immersive Art Environments
by Isaiah Zagar
Continuous Exhibition Shuttle Loops
In 1968, I visited the residence of archeologist
and tilemaker Henry Chapman Mercer and
became enamored with Mercer’s castle-like home
and impressive ceramics collection. This lifechanging experience, paired with my journeys
through Clarence Schmidt’s immersive folk art
environments, inspired me to collect thousands
of tiles, including those by Mexican ceramicist
Juan Jorge Wilmot Mason. For the past 42 years,
I have embellished buildings with mosaics composed of tiles, ceramics, and recycled materials.
My largest project spans three city lots on Philadelphia’s famous South Street. My lecture will
focus on the contributions of Mercer, Schmidt,
and other folk artists, as they have influenced
my work.
Tickets required for boarding (5 pm departures
for pick-up only)
8–8:30, 204 B/C
10–6, Liberty C (Marriott)
Lecture: China Painting on
Woodfired Surfaces
2010 Educational Showcase
Showcases for educational programs provide
the opportunity for students from participating
schools to show and sell their ceramic artwork.
9:30–5, 12th St. Bus Loading
Thirteenth Annual National K12
Ceramic Exhibition
(Reception 4:30-5:30pm)
Juried ceramic competition for Kindergarten
through Grade 12 (K-12) students in the United
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
by Julia Whitney
Developed around 1278 AD traditional china
painting has spent the majority of its history
avoiding the effects of wood and charcoal kilns.
This presentation will cover the application,
materials, and methods used for china painting
on wood fired surfaces. A brief history of china
painting as compared to wood firing will be
discussed, as well as how to find and utilize china
painting resources in your area.
8–8:45, Room 410 (Marriott)
Yoga for Potters
by Debra Chronister
Experience a series of gentle yoga postures
designed specifically for ceramic artists. The
class will be directed towards beginners, with
adaptations for those with yoga experience.
Yoga mats are available on a first-come basis.
To get the most from this session: Come with
a fairly empty stomach; non-binding, stretchy
clothing is recommended.
light, and our perception of that light. Perhaps
because it is perceptual and not physical, color’s
meanings can exist apart from and across objects.
Each color has a long and associative history;
meanings are as slippery and changeable as
language. The pursuit and perception of pigments forms a very human story full of intrigues,
blunders and perseverance.
9–10:30, Ballroom A
Panel: Key Texts in Twentieth-Century
Ceramic Criticism
Ezra Shales (m), Jenni Sorkin, Glen Brown,
Garth Clark
Panel: Philadelphia: A Magnet for
Clay or How NCECA Learned to Love
Philadelphia
Is the state of ceramic criticism dire? Is the issue
the death of the reader or the death of the
author? Paying homage to writing worth recuperating, this panel maps an ABC of potential
ceramic criticism. Presentations will illuminate
terms of engagement that are worthy of reconsideration, both as tactics to conduct resistance
and mirrors to negotiate self-evaluation. Jenni
Sorkin, PhD candidate, Yale University, will
speak on Marguerite Wildenhain’s Pottery:
Form and Expression (1958), Glen Brown will
address Rose Slivka’s “poetic perspective,”
Garth Clark will recall Philip Rawson, and Ezra
Shales will moderate.
Robert Winokur (m), Liz Stewart, Helen Drutt,
James Makins
9–5, Hall B
Yoga relaxes and strengthens the body and
mind, increasing our physical ability to work
with clay as well as our intellectual and spiritual
capacity for creativity. Ours is a physically intensive craft, from our back to our fingers, and the
better our body feels, the better we work.
8–9, Ballroom B
The panel will talk about and describe aspects
of the Philadelphia Community; Its history and
institutions and how they worked to bring
NCECA to Philadelphia so often in the past 42
years. A very brief acknowledgement of the numerous players that contribute to and make up
the Philadelphia Ceramic community will be presented. R. Winokur: The Tyler School of Art of
Temple University and its contribution. Elizabeth
Stewart and James Makins: The contribution of
The University of The Arts. Helen Drutt: Will talk
about The Philadelphia Council of Professional
Craftsmen and the Helen Drutt: Philadelphia
Gallery. The panel will take questions from the
audience should time permit.
Manufacturers/Suppliers and
Nonprofit Exhibitors
8:30–11:30, Hall C
9–5, 203 A
Simultaneous Demonstrations
Kari Radasch and Richard Shaw
Graduate Programs and
Employment Opportunities Room
Kari Radasch - I hope to not only hand make
objects used for celebration, but to also celebrate the handmade. It is from this perspective
that I am most inspired to make decorative,
functional pottery. I will be working with terracotta clay and will use bisque and plaster hump
molds along with slip molds to generate the
main body of my forms.
Representatives from university ceramics departments, art schools, etc., may sign up to discuss
their programs and/or employment offerings
today (first-come, first-served). Candidates may
check the bulletin board in the room for the
schedule. This schedule will be updated periodically, so check back often. Employment opportunities will be posted.
Richard Shaw - What I’m going to demonstrate
at NCECA will be in two parts. The first day
I’m going to jigger up some plates, silkscreen
newsprint underglaze transfers, and apply them
to the plates. On the second day, I’m going to
slip cast from many molds and join the various
objects and had built items together and create
a couple of finished pieces.
9–10, 204 B/C
Lecture: Nature of Color
Visit with manufacturers and suppliers of ceramic
products, schools offering ceramic programs and
companies providing publications in the ceramic
arts. See complete listing of exhibitors starting
on page 66.
9–7, Liberty A/B (Marriott)
NEXPO
Purchase work from artists from our membership and more - Emerging and Demonstrating
Artists, Fellows, Honorees and the membership!
Sales from the NEXPO booth will contribute to
NCECA’s endowment, which helps sustain various
future (“NEXt”) artist opportunities and supports
conference programming.
9–6, 406,407,408 (Marriott)
2010 Educational Showcase
Showcases for educational programs provide
the opportunity for students from participating
schools to show and sell their ceramic artwork.
9:30–10:30, Ballroom B
Lecture: Green Ceramics: The
Seduction of Sustainability
by Nancy Utterback
This lecture is information from the three year
Boulder Wood Kiln Research Project. Working
with the University of Colorado, The U. S. Forestry Service, the EPA and a group of dedicated
potters and graduate students I was able to
take a look at air quality, water conservation,
zero waste and “best practices” for potters. I
started the research project in 2006 and was seduced into the world of environmental awareness, encouraging me to make better choices
for the environment and the way I work, teach
and live.
9:30–3:30, 201 A
Graduate Students’ Image Forum
NCECA Booth
Visit with Board members. View a sampling of
“Cups of Merit” Commission Awards. Samples of
NCECA publications will be on display. Deposit
2011 Conference/Membership drawing ticket.
Coordinated by: Sally Brogden
The Graduate Students’ Image Forum gives
graduate students an opportunity to present images of their work.
9:30–3:30, 201 B
9–5, Liberty C (Marriott)
Thirteenth Annual National K12
Ceramic Exhibition
Juried ceramic competition for Kindergarten
through Grade 12 (K-12) students in the United
States. Designed to showcase the best K12 ceramic work made in the country.
See full description on page 51.
by Rebecca Harvey
9–7, Liberty A/B (Marriott)
We see only what we know – Johann Wolfgang
von Goethe.
NCECA Gallery Expo
Color, as we know it is dependent on two things:
ciation of the ceramic arts. See complete listing
of participating galleries and map on page 16.
The Expo provides an opportunity for collectors
and art lovers of all types to deepen their appre-
International Image Forum
Coordinated by: Steven Driver
NCECA annually offers this forum to provide our
international members an opportunity to show
images and speak briefly about their work, the
workplace/studio, and their home country.
10–12, Room 405 (Marriott) Continues
today 1–5pm and Friday 10–12 and 1–5
Student Critique Room
The Student Critique Room gives collegiate
students an opportunity to discuss images of
their work one on one with professional artists
from around the country. Laptops provided. All
critiques will be of digital images. Additional
slots will be posted outside Room 405 and will be
available on a first come/first serve basis.
10–4, 201 C
Video Screenings
The Video Screening room provides an opportunity for our members to share recent
video production work. The films have not been
prescreened or juried by NCECA. Filmmakers
are welcome to give a brief introduction before
their film.
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
19
Program Details Thursday, April 1
10–10:08, Fantasia in ClayA Nebraska Story
by NET Foundation for Television / 7:16 min.
Ceramics artist Gerit Grimm works on one of her
creations during taping for the pilot episode of
Nebraska Stories in May 2009.
10:20–10:30, Untitled
Eighteenth Annual Cup Sale
Submission and Exhibition
Donate your cups and preview hundreds of cups
generously donated for this event. Cups go on
sale tomorrow beginning at 8:00 a.m.
by Lee Johnson / 10 min.
11–11:30, 204 B/C
The video shows a 9-frame manipulated sequence of the fabrication of my current work, a
9-frame sequence of video reactions to the work
itself, and a live camera set up in the screening
room to record any reactionary information to
be utilized within the piece in the future.
Co-Lecture: Thinking Globally While
Acting Locally: How The Clay Studio
Impacts its Community and the World
10:40–10:43, Heart of the Craft
by John Jensen / 3 min.
Intended as a short abstract piece to communicate the essence of pottery, it is composed of
tightly composed vignettes taken from the various stages of pottery making.
10:55–11:01, Untitled (C1-5)
by Brian Benfer / 5:51 min.
My clay installations have existed primarily as
the residual of an event, and the video documentation of it was initially done as a tool for
me to better understand the work. The work
itself is an effort to redefine the function of
the most recognizable tool of the discipline.
Harkening back to expressionist painting, the
fluxes movement and performance art, the installations find themselves somewhere between
“throwing gone bad” and spin art. In addition,
the video speaks to aspects of the working class,
monotony, and failure.
11:15–11:50, A Community of Fire
by Liz Johnson / 35 min.
In May 2008, Kevin Crowe invited Jack Troy,
Judith Duff, Stephen Driver, Mark Hewitt, Robert
Compton and Vicky Hansen to join him and his
team of potters in firing his Hikarigama wood
kiln. The film shares the firing insights and
Kevin’s hope to “get it right and pass it on.”
by Lisa Brown and Annette Monnier
The Clay Studio is a locally dedicated arts center
whose reputation for excellence in the ceramic
arts is known around the globe. the Studio
annually serves over 32,000 individuals on a
local, national and international basis, and its
collaborations with diverse inner city institutions through the Claymobile Outreach Program
provide innovative solutions to a variety of
societal and economic concerns. In this presentation, Brown and Monnier will discuss how The
Clay Studio has adapted its programming to
Philadelphia’s changing social and economic
environments by exploring the links between
art, education, human development, economic
revitalization and community engagement.
11–12, Ballroom A
Panel: Ai Weiwei: Dropping the Urn
Gregg Moore (m), Richard Torchia, Maris
Gillette
Featuring a selection of ceramic works from 1995
to the present, Ai Weiwei: Dropping the Urn will
offer viewers a focused look at Ai’s iconoclastic
appropriations of historic clay vessels. Begun just
after Ai’s return to Beijing in 1993, these ceramic
works have become critical to understanding a
radical practice that has evolved to incorporate
sculpture, installation, photography, video,
performance, and architecture as well as curating
and activism.
11–12, Ballroom B
Co-Lecture: Sexy Bodies—Making
Excellent Clay
1–1:25, Marl Hole
by Matthew Katz and David Finkelnburg
by Johnny Magee / 25 min.
The subject of clay is huge. We’re going to talk
about the very basics of what makes up clay bodies and why. We’re going to cover a little science,
to help you see what happens inside a clay body.
We’ll use this to show how to solve some firing
problems and how to adjust the firing temperature of different bodies. Finally, we’re going to
talk about the science behind mixing bodies and
how to apply that in your studios.
MARL HOLE draws upon notions of the ‘EPIC’ to
convey the scale and ambition unfolded by four
artists, Neil Brownsword (UK) Alexandre Englefriet (Holland), Pekka Paikkari (Finland), and
Torbjørn Kvasbø (Norway) inside a clay quarry in
North Staffordshire. Over a period of five days,
Johnny Magee captures each artistic response,
which fuse the interactions of making and performance with site and locale specificity through
a range of ephemeral interventions.
1:40–4:05, Hand Thrown: East Asian
Wedged Coil Technique
by Joyce Michaud and the Holden Brothers /
145 min.
East Asian Wedged Coil Technique, a traditional
technique, which provides the maximum versatility and structural strength for the greatest
diversity of forms both functional and sculptural,
has endured through a rich and varied history of
coiled pottery as contemporary artists continue
the dialogue.
20
10–5, Independence (Marriott)
12–1, 204 B/C
First NCECA Members’
Business Meeting
The NCECA Board of Directors encourages all
members to participate in the governance of
your organization.
—Announcements
—Board Reports
—Old Business
—Nomination to Board Positions
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
• SECRETARY/TREASURER The Secretary/Treasurer shall serve for three years and may be
re-elected. Duties of the post include: being
responsible for the minutes, documents, and
financial records; overseeing the transcription of
all formal action of the Board of Directors, and
seeing that the minutes of the annual Members’ Business Meetings are presented to the
membership in a timely manner. Minutes of the
Board of Directors’ meetings shall be circulated
to Board members within a like period or as requested by the President. Copies of all minutes
shall also be sent to the NCECA Archives. The
Secretary/Treasurer shall be bonded by a reputable bonding firm and shall oversee the collection of dues and fees. The Secretary/Treasurer
shall keep and disperse all monies as directed by
the President, shall keep and dispense all monies as monitored by a professional service, shall
oversee an annual audit, shall submit financial
reports as requested by the President, and shall
present all records and documents of the office
to the successor of the office.
•DIRECTOR AT LARGE shall be nominated and
elected to serve one three-year, non-renewable
term. Directors-at-Large shall serve as representatives of the membership at large and as advocates for the Board. DALs shall serve on or chair
ad hoc committees, administer special projects
and special assignments for the Council as designated by the President. DALs may initiate special
projects subject to the talents of the individual
with the approval of the Board. DALs shall
actively help to generate conference program
proposals; shall be responsible for input into the
Annual Conference program proposals; shall be
responsible for input into the Annual Conference by coordinating special programming.
DALs are responsible for soliciting information
for NCECA publications.
•STUDENT DIRECTOR AT LARGE must be
enrolled as a full-time student (graduate or
undergraduate) for at least one complete year
of the elected term. Serves as an advocate
for student concerns. Organizes the NCECA
Regional Student Juried Exhibition under the
guidance of the Exhibitions Director. Reviews
the regional selection process, coordinating it so
that it represents all states fairly as conference
sites are selected. Is responsible for programming related to the Student Exhibition. Assumes
committee responsibilities at the request of the
President. Serves on Regina Brown Undergraduate Student Fellowship Committee and helps in
the organization and selection of awardees.
—New Business
—Members’ Comments
—Drawing for $100 Exhibitor Purchase
Certificate (must be present to win)
1–2, Ballroom B
Lecture: Health and Safety in the Arts
by Jim Gubernick
The talk is meant for individuals with little or
no experience in health and safety issues who
want or need to create a health and safety
training for their home department. Topics to
be covered are content information needed
for an effective training as well as presentation
methods and resource information for those
creating the program.
peter pugger
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
21
Program Details Thursday, April 1
Student Critique Room
1–2:30, Ballroom A
Panel: Academia to Community–and
Back: The Baltimore Clayworks Circle
Deborah Bedwell (m), Linda Arbuckle, Kyle
and Kelly Phelps, Matthew Hyleck
Education at Baltimore Clayworks broadens the
view of what the field of ceramics is and can
be. In this presentation, panelists will illustrate,
using narrative examples and images, why and
how academic art programs and community art
centers can and do work together to advance
ceramics and strengthen communities.
1–4, Hall C
Simultaneous Demonstrations
Matthew Metz and Judy Fox
Matthew Metz - full time studio potter for 20
years, will demonstrate processes used in his
own particular studio practice. These include
forming strategies on and off the wheel (stacking parts and building with thrown elements)
Points of discussion may include the relationship of: time intensive work and studio output;
decoration and utility; historical sources and
contemporary context.
Judy Fox - will demonstrate how she achieves
articulated form through carving at leather hard.
Projected images will show references and longterm process, including painting with casein.
1–5, Room 405 (Marriott)
(Continues Friday 10–12 and 1–5)
The Student Critique Room gives collegiate
students an opportunity to discuss images of
their work one on one with professional artists
from around the country. Laptops provided. All
critiques will be of digital images. Additional
slots will be posted outside Room 405 and will be
available on a first come/first serve basis.
1:30–2:30, 204 B/C
Panel: Exquisite Pots: 6 Degrees
of Collaboration
Kelly Connole (m), Andrew Martin, Margaret
Bohls, Sam Chung
Three artists who participated in “Exquisite Pots:
6 Degrees of Collaboration” reflect on the collaborative process used to create works currently on
exhibit at the Perkins Center for the Arts. Rooted
in the Surrealists game, the exquisite corpse, the
artists exchanged porcelain bisque ware and
finished the work using their own distinct surface
treatments. The resulting pots prompt us to
think about the relationship between form and
finish and about the aesthetic “ownership” of a
piece. In addition to the panelists listed above,
participating artists include Andy Brayman, Maren
Kloppmann, and Deborah Schwartzkopf.
1:30–3, JWs (Marriott, second floor)
NCECA’s Green Task Force Annual
Meeting
The discussion will be lead by Brian Kohl,
Communications Director for NCECA and GTF
committee member.
Join the GTF in a round table discussion about upcoming projects and to voice your concerns about
the direction we should be taking to steer NCECA
and the ceramics arts in reducing our impact on
the environment. This will be an opportunity for
you to meet other members of the GTF and to
make contacts with other NCECA members interested in the environmental concerns of our field.
The Green Task Force mission:
NCECA’s Green Task Force (GTF) is committed to
environmental stewardship in all venues, from
administrative work to conference gatherings
to educating NCECA members about important
environmental issues affecting the ceramic arts.
The GTF will share creative solutions and provide
a forum for progressive discussion on sustainable
studio practices. During the conference, student
volunteers will be conducting surveys on sustainable practice to help gather creative solutions to
share with the NCECA Membership.
2:30–3:30, Ballroom B
Distinguished Lecture: And Into the
Fire: Post Studio Ceramics
by Glenn Adamson
Recent developments in ceramics—ranging from
cuts to university departments to shifts in art
practice—suggest that the studio tradition may
be reaching its end. In its place, we now see
the rise of ‘post studio’ practice, which often
depends on industrial production capacities.
In this new situation, creativity is not located
in the work, but rather in the way of working.
Continued on page 24.
Raku: Alternative Decoration and Firing
Steven Branfman & Eduardo Lazo
One-Day Workshop | Sunday, March 28, 2010 | 11am - 5pm
Both artists will demonstrate their individual vessel forming methods
styles. Learn about Eduardo’s specialized “upside down” throwing
technique where forms are created in an inverted fashion. Watch
Steven demonstrate forms and throwing techniques such as altering
shapes, surface design and manipulation.
Above: Eduardo Lazo, Closed form,
16x16x14, Multi-fired with fuming
Cost: $45 per person/$25 for students
To register, please call the GoggleWorks at 610.374.4600 or visit www.goggleworks.org.
Please mention course VA1001 when registering. A current student ID number is required to receive the
student rate. Workshop is limited to 40.
Jason Messinger:
Above: Steven Branfman,
Vessel, 2007, 13.5” x 10”
Symbols & Sympathies | March 4 - April 18
Opening Reception: Thursday, March 4th | 5.30pm - 7:30pm | Cohen Gallery
Solo show of ceramic artwork by Jason Messinger featuring the artist’s unique sculpture and more
than 200 of his ceramic tiles displayed in his signature mural grids.
201 Washington Street, Reading, PA 19601
www.goggleworks.org | 610.374.4600
mission: to nurture the arts, foster creativity, promote
education and enrich the community.
Just an hour drive from Philadelphia, or check out daily bus schedules to Reading, PA.
22
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
23
Program Details Thursday, April 1
Authorship is more widely distributed, in less
predictable patterns, than ever before. In this
talk, Glenn Adamson will take account of this
new development. He will also offer a defense of
the studio tradition, arguing that even if it has
entered a period of decline, it still offers lessons
for the present and future of ceramics.
als and ideas, of mixing cultural influences, of
appropriation and quotation, was an artistic
practice and a form of authentic expression in
the field of ceramics and visual arts prevalent
throughout history, and is not unique to today’s
world of post industrial, postproduction and the
information age.
3:30–4, 204 B/C
3:30–5, Ballroom A
Lecture: Ceramics in a World of
no Boundaries
New Work
by Anat Shiftan
Artists on the subject of a body of their own
work completed within the last three years.
An anecdotal historical survey that demonstrates
that today’s environment of recycling materi-
Brian Benfer - The Industrial Ceramics series
has enabled me a continued participation in
what I view as being the most significant traditional aspect of the discipline: the fire.
Linda Huey - This discussion will illustrate
how several ideas and approaches can follow a
meaningful pathway toward form and content.
My work uses natural imagery as a source of
inspiration, but with an increasing concern for
environmental issues.
Justin Novak - Contested Territories. After
years of exploring the lyrical conventions of Rococo figurines, I have recently turned my attention to contemporary figurines. An uncanny shift
occurs in the translation to porcelain of a formal
vocabulary particular to plastics and animation.
Leigh Taylor Mickelson - Nature repeats
itself in minute and magnificent ways and the
forms that I find in nature have never lacked in
providing me a platform for which to express
myself and tell my “stories.”
4–4:30, Ballroom B
Lecture: Get Butch: Ceramics
and Gender
by Erik Scollon
Advertisements for ceramics supplies sometimes
feel like a Viagra ad, with companies touting
whose equipment is biggest, strongest, and
longest lasting. However, the practice of ceramics has not always been oriented toward these
macho kinds of character traits. There is also a
rich tradition of china painting and other forms
of ceramic making that have been relegated
to the margins. In the middle of the twentieth
century the ways that we taught ceramics underwent a big transition. This is when ceramics
tried to get butch.
4–6, (various locations noted below)
NCECA Connections
Small breakouts formed around particular organizational affiliations or concerns. A group leader
facilitates discussion and sharing of information
on various topics.
201 A
Firing with Hydrogen: David Zdrazil (m)
Hydrogen, the most abundant element in the
universe, has great potential as a fuel and
renewable energy storage medium. David Zdrazil
has been researching and experimenting with
hydrogen as a fuel and has successfully fired his
ceramic-wares using this material. Come learn
about the process, material, advantages and
disadvantages of Firing with Hydrogen. David
Zdrazil is an Associate Faculty Member at the College of the Redwoods in Eureka, California.
201 B
Time-Based: Activating the
Performative Poetics of Ceramics:
Abigail Donovan (m)
Time-Based: Activating the Performative Poetics of Ceramics will offer insight into how this
ancient and complex material continues to
anticipate and catalyze an array of future artistic
possibilities. Investigating ceramic and clay artwork that takes on the dimension and impact of
atmosphere/action/performance, group and audience members will be invited to present their
own individual artistic practices and experiences.
We will also consider nontraditional art, situaContinued on page 26.
24
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
We provide the space. You create.
Contemporary ceramic studios set in the Historic Clay District.
Ceramic residencies between one month and one year.
Medalta International Artists in Residence
Medicine Hat, Canada
medalta.org/miair
403.529.1070
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
25
Program Details Thursday, April 1
tions, and environments as the group outlines
both collective and individual senses of these poetic possibilities. Abigail Donovan is an Assistant
Professor at the University of Delaware.
201 C
Practical Pursuit: Amber Ginsburg and
Tara Rochford (M)
Do you have a particular way of starting or ending your studio day? Teapot or Wall Tile? (pick
one) Practical Pursuit: A game that poses questions about how we create, sustain and explore
artistic practice. This NCECA Connection takes the
form of an open-ended, non-competitive game
in which participants answer randomly selected
questions about various aspects of artistic
practice. Amber Ginsburg, Artist and Professor,
University of Chicago.
Tara Rochford, graduate student, The School for
American Craft, Rochester, New York.
202 A
Community College Ceramics
Programs: Coming from the
Cultural Core of the Community:
Rick Malmgren (m)
Join us for a discussion of community college
ceramics programs the hidden educational
powerhouse that grows directly from the cultural
core of each community. Ideas to be shared and
discussed will include: building a strong program,
student support through portfolio development
and ceramics clubs, developing relationships
between life-long learning community students
and the community college, advice for those in-
26
terested in part-time or full-time faculty positions
in the community college.
Rick Malmgren is an Associate Professor and
Department Chair for Visual Arts and Humanities
at Anne Arundel Community College, Maryland.
202 B
Innovative Classroom Project Ideas:
Heather Nameth Bren (m)
Calling educators of all levels! Self-Portrait Busts
with a Chia sprout twist? Come and share your
Innovative Classroom Project Ideas! Share ideas
that meet technical objectives while inviting a
spirit of playfulness, creativeness and freshness to
our medium that allow students to depart from
preconceived notions of clay processes.
Heather Nameth Bren is a third year Assistant
Professor at Northwestern College as well as a
practicing ceramicist.
204 B/C
Artist at heart…with a full time-job:
Greta Zakrzewska (m)
Are you an artist with a full-time job in a non-art
field? Are you experiencing a change in location? Join us for a conversation to encourage
and inspire new and existing ceramic and clay
lovers to–regardless of what is happening–continue creating!
Greta Zakrzewska is an artist and health care
professional in Chicago, Illinois.
204 B/C
Sprigging Reinvented: Halldor Hjalmarson (m)
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
After decades of dormancy, sprigging is emerging again within the field of ceramics and
being reinvented. Come share and exchange
ideas with others who have been experimenting and using sprigging in their ceramic works.
Curious? Come and learn from the experimentation of others!
Halldor Hjalmarson is a studio potter from
Phoenix, Arizona, where Hjalmarson Pottery
is located.
204 B/C
China Paint: New Directions: Paul
Lewing and Marci Blattenberger (m)
China paint is on the brink of a revival, due
to new materials, techniques, technology
(especially in decals) and imagery. It offers brilliant, consistent color, fast, cheap firings, and
subtle painterly effects. For those clay artists
who are also painters, it is the perfect medium.
Renewed interest in color and imagery allows
china paint to take its rightful place in the arsenal of ceramic decorating tools. Paul Lewing,
author of China Paint & Overglaze, and Marci
Blattenberger, moderator of Porcelain Painters
International Online, are your guides to this
new/old medium.
Paul Lewing (Seattle, Washington) and Marci
Blattenberger (Hendersonville, Tennessee) are
both full-time artists.
Ballroom B
International Study Tours in the
Ceramic Arts: Christopher Kelly & Preston
Saunders (m)
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
27
Program Details Thursday, April 1
Join us for a discussion centering on students and
professionals who have attended, led or are interested in participating in an International Study
Tour and the experiences encountered. What
were the initial perceived outcomes? How did the
study tour affect your artwork and/or your view
of other cultures? Share your international study
trip experience or ask questions about leading or
attending an International Study Tour.
Christopher Kelly is Chair, Department of art at
Piedmont College in Demorest, Georgia.
Preston Saunders is Associate Professor of Art at
Bridgewater State College in Massachusetts.
Ballroom
pmg ad B2/18/10
9:57 AM Page 3
The Inside SCOOP on Grad School:
Chanda Glendinning, Cristin Zimmer, Derek
Hambly (m)
Graduate students will lead a discussion on all aspects of the grad school process. They will discuss
not only what they did to prepare for graduate
school, but also the factors they considered when
choosing which schools to apply to, and the
choices they made after the applications were in.
Insights on being a graduate student, discussing critiques, classes, teaching, studio space,
assistantships, scholarships, program size, and
other aspect of graduate school will be shared
and discussed.
Chanda Glendinning is in her second year of
studies at Kansas State University, Cristin Zimmer
of
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attends Utah State University in Salt Lake City
and Derek Hambly is a second year grad student
at Kent State University in Ohio.
Ballroom B
Flash & Ash: Justin Lambert
Firing with wood is often misinterpreted as
loading the kiln and hoping for the best. In my
experience the best results come about with
hard work, commitment, and superb documentation. Photographs, firing logs, weather
documentation, stoking patterns, clay bodies,
wood type, and kiln design are all intertwined
and must work harmoniously to achieve consistent, desirable results. Flash and Ash is meant
to provide technical information to experienced
artists using a wood-burning kiln in a personal
studio environment. Attendees are encouraged to bring information to share, and those
interested in the process are welcome to attend
and ask questions.
Justin Lambert, Studio Artist and Professor, runs
Live Oak Pottery in Jupiter Farms, Florida.
Ballroom B
The Challenges with Changing
Curriculums: Lucy Breslin
Many colleges and universities are currently in
the process of reviewing curriculums. Faculty
is initiating some of these changes; some are
being driven by administration decisions, some
are in response to changing technology or
pedagogy. NCECA offers the ideal opportunity
for faculty from schools around the country to
share stories and compare ideas and opinions
centering on the changes taking place within
curriculums in ceramics departments. Find out
how other faculty and schools are making decisions and how these decisions are playing out.
Current
Exhibition
Tell-Tale
Tiles &
Fractured
Fantasies
Lucy Breslin is an Associate Professor at the
Maine College of Art, Portland, Maine.
8:30–9:30 Ballroom A
"A top Philly
attraction."
– The New Yo
rk Times
Randall Session
Two resident artists from the Academy of Vocal
Arts in Philadelphia, under the music direction of
José Meléndez, will sing a duet concert of opera,
light opera, and classic Broadway favorites.
9:30–12:30, JWs (Marriott, second floor)
Potter’s Jam
Come one come all! After you have attended all
of the great openings in Philadelphia on Thursday evening . . . If you play a musical instrument,
or would like to listen to some great music,
please come to NCECA’s first annual Potter’s Jam.
See you there.
Come see Isaiah
Zagar's masterpiece,
just 8 blocks from
Convention Center!
Open Daily
1020 South Street, Phila. PA 19147
215.733.0390
Friday, April 2
7:30–4:30, Bridge
Registration
NCECA Sales
T-shirts, NCECA 2010 Invitational Exhibition Catalog, and Demonstrator DVDs.
Make your purchase today. Sales closes at 10:00
am tomorrow!
28
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
29
Program Details Friday, April 2
8–8:30, Ballroom A
Lecture: Vegetable Oil Based
Alternative Fuel Burner Systems
by Ben Culbertson
This lecture will present recent findings from a
grant project at Shippensburg University to produce a kiln and firing system that will fire from
start to finish on vegetable-based fuel sources
including waste vegetable oil, biodiesel and
glycerin (a by-product of the biodiesel process
with high BTU content). Discussion will include
atomization systems using a modified common
furnace burner or compressed air siphon feed,
and drip systems using a drip-plate system or
Babington-type burner. Further suggestions for
research to use solar or human-powered generators to produce electricity to run blower systems
will be discussed with the intent of envisioning a
freestanding kiln that approaches “green”.
8–8:30, Ballroom B
Eulogies
Sadly some of our NCECA members have passed
away since our conference in Phoenix. During this
time we will eulogize those who have passed on.
8–8:45, Room 410 (Marriott)
Yoga for Potters
by Debra Chronister
Experience a series of gentle yoga postures designed specifically for ceramic artists. The class will
be directed towards beginners, with adaptations
30
for those with yoga experience. Yoga mats are
available on a first-come basis. To get the most from
this session: Come with a fairly empty stomach; nonbinding, stretchy clothing is recommended.
Yoga relaxes and strengthens the body and mind,
increasing our physical ability to work with clay
as well as our intellectual and spiritual capacity
for creativity.
8–9, 204 B/C
Panel: Site of Supplementarity: The
Landscape of Craft
David East (m) Benjamin Schulman,
Garth Johnson
In a time when craft is being broadened,
stretched, rethought and rediscovered; there
are opportunities for new dialogue that better
chart this new landscape. Instead of pursuing a
kind of retrenchment, this panel seeks to open
the elastic space where craft exists as a response
to modernism, to capitalism, to alienation, thus
positioning itself at several interstices of the
avant-garde. The panel will look at the emergence of new theory about and around craft,
the rise of a new capital “C” Craft perspective,
collectives, DIY movements, craft as a community builder, as a political tool and provocateur.
8–2, Independence (Marriott)
Eighteenth Annual Cup Sale
Coordinated by Richard Wehrs
Continue to build the NCECA Fund for Artistic
Development, designed to provide opportunities
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
for artistic growth through scholarships, residencies and programs including the Regina Brown
Undergraduate Fellowship, and at the same time
build your collection. Purchases are limited to
three cups.
8:30–11:30, Hall C
Simultaneous Demonstrations
Kari Radasch and Richard Shaw
A continuation of Thursday’s session
9–9:30, Ballroom A
Lecture: Xavier Toubes: Thoughts
About Intuition and Practice
by Xavier Toubes-Vilarino
I will refer to my most recent exhibitions: Behind
the Fields2007 and Lustre2009 to talk about a
working practice as a process to discover and to
abandon. Made with the palm, as the poet said,
with the palm at the back of the mind. For the
senses, iridescent, in pieces and fragments, theatrical without a theme, with chance as partner to
designate fact and some ideas.
9–9:30, Ballroom B
Lecture: The Wisdom from
Touching Clay
by Chris Staley
Learning is particularly profound when it changes the way we live. This talk will provide insights
into why clay is a unique material for learning. Why do some objects elicit an emotional
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
31
Program Details Friday, April 2
response and others don’t? When creating with
clay how does mortality become life affirming?
What is the difference between information and
wisdom? What are the implications of touch and
it’s unique ability to alter? These questions and
more will be addressed during the talk.
9–4, Liberty C (Marriott)
Thirteenth Annual National K12
Ceramic Exhibition
Juried ceramic competition for Kindergarten
through Grade 12 (K-12) students in the United
States. Designed to showcase the best K12 ceramic work made in the country.
See full description on page 51.
9–5, Liberty A/B (Marriott)
NCECA Gallery Expo
The Expo provides an opportunity for collectors
and art lovers of all types to deepen their appreciation of the ceramic arts. See complete listing
of participating galleries and map on page 16.
9–5, Liberty A/B (Marriott)
NEXPO
Purchase work from artists from our membership and more - Emerging and Demonstrating
Artists, Fellows, Honorees and the membership!
Sales from the NEXPO booth will contribute to
NCECA’s endowment, which helps sustain various
future (“NEXt”) artist opportunities and supports
conference programming.
9–5, Hall B
Manufacturers/Suppliers and
Nonprofit Exhibitors
Visit with manufacturers and suppliers of ceramic
products, schools offering ceramic programs and
companies providing publications in the ceramic
arts. See complete listing of exhibitors starting
on page 66.
NCECA Booth
Visit with Board members. View a sampling of
“Cups of Merit” Commission Awards. Samples
of NCECA publications will be on display. 2011
Conference/Membership drawing ticket must be
deposited by 5 pm.
9–5, 203 A
Graduate Programs and
Employment Opportunities Room
Representatives from university ceramics departments, art schools, etc., may sign up to discuss
their programs and/or employment offerings
today (first-come, first-served). Candidates may
check the bulletin board in the room for the
schedule. This schedule will be updated periodically, so check back often. Employment opportunities will be posted.
9–6, 406, 407, 408 (Marriott)
2010 Educational Showcase
Showcases for educational programs provide
the opportunity for students from participating
schools to show and sell their ceramic artwork.
32
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
6” x 6”
12.5”
12.5”
$25
9.5”
EUCLID KILNS
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
33
Program Details Friday, April 2
9:30–10, 204 B/C
Lecture: Can British Ceramics
Education Survive?
by Matthew Partington
This paper asks why there has been a precipitous
decline in the number of ceramics courses in the
higher education sector in the UK in the past
ten years. Using responses to a series of research
questions from leading figures in the British ceramics world and a brief case study of the closure
of a ceramics degree course, the paper posits a
number of factors, which have contributed to the
decline, and offers a cautionary tale for ceramics
teaching in other parts of the world.
9:30–3:30, 201 A
Graduate Students’ Image Forum
Coordinated by Sally Brogden
A continuation of Thursday’s program. Schedule
of presentations will be posted at the door.
9:30–3:30, 201 B
International Image Forum
Coordinated by Steve Driver
A continuation of Thursday’s program. Schedule
of presentations will be posted at the door.
10–11, Ballroom A
Panel: Curating Clay
Jody Clowes (m), Jo Lauria, John Perreault,
Judith Tannenbaum
An exploration of curatorial practice with Jo
Lauria, John Perreault, Judith Tannenbaum,
34
and Jody Clowes. Their diverse backgrounds
and experience provide a window on the many
different perspectives from which curators approach contemporary work in clay. Each curator
will offer an overview of the exhibitions they’ve
curated for this conference, followed by a facilitated discussion
10–3, 202 B
K12 Image Forum
Coordinated by Barbara Beasley
10–11:30, Ballroom B
To provide an opportunity to showcase and
share outstanding K12 ceramic programs; innovative ceramic curriculum; teaching and learning; research; authentic assessment and quality
student artwork.
Panel: Ceramic TechnologyMaterial Issues
10–4, 201 C
Jonathan Kaplan (m), John Britt, Angela Fina,
Jeff Zamek
Our field is heavily laden with raw materials
used in both clays and glazes. The consequences of their use can pose some risk. Usage
without knowledge increases that risk. Understandings of the changing nature of ceramic
materials, variables in firing, the necessity of
testing are imperative to making consistent
work. Correct and proper information about
the materials we use will promote life long
safety in the studio.
10–12, Room 405 (Marriott) (Continues
today 1–5)
Student Critique Room
The Student Critique Room gives collegiate
students an opportunity to discuss images of
their work one on one with professional artists
from around the country. Laptops provided. All
critiques will be of digital images. Additional
slots will be posted outside Room 405 and will be
available on a first come/first serve basis.
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
Video Screenings
The Video Screening room provides an opportunity for our members to share recent video production work. The films have not been prescreened
or juried by NCECA. Filmmakers are welcome to
give a brief introduction before their film.
10–10:35, The Leach Pottery
by Marty Gross / 35 min.
This DVD is a restoration of a silent film from
1952 taken at The Leach Pottery and presents an
inside view of the activities of the potters and
work of Bernard Leach himself. New narration
by American potter Warren MacKenzie has been
added. This edition also includes rarely seen
scenes from the early 1950s taken at the Leach
Pottery, by Warren MacKenzie himself.
10:45–10:49, Half-Life: The Video
by Jinsoo Song / 3:35 min.
Continued on page 36.
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
35
Program Details Friday, April 2
An abstract portraiture of an artist struggling
through the journey of self-discovery. Loaded
with personal symbolism and metaphors, the
work resembles the style of the early Surrealist videos.
10:55–11, Gray Noise
by Jinsoo Song / 3:43 min.
Examines the image of an artist straddling the
optimism borderlining delusion of grandeur and
the sobering pessimism. Schizophrenic mixture
of believable fictions and unbelievable truths attempts to enliven otherwise monotonous nature
of urban isolation.
11:10–11:25, AMACO/Brent Ceramics
Laboratory Claymation Videos
by Stretching Sky Arts Laboratory, Charitable
Film Network, and Scrub Brush Productions /
15 min.
These short videos culminate student work over
a six-week course in summer 2009. From storyboards to polymer sculpture to video production,
students put their fantasies, nightmares, and
dull moments in life onto the screen.
1–1:21, Handmade in America
by Paul Lyzun / 20:39 min.
This film explores the connection between the
creators and consumers of handmade objects
through the experiences of three potters. The
obstacles and rewards they’ve encountered
will reveal the unique value of handmade in
America.
1:35–1:57, Confluence of Community:
The Cochise College 3rd Annual
Ceramic Pit-Fire Festival
by Stephen Crout & Tate Rich / 22 min.
A convergent evening of clay, fire, music, food
and dance. The Art Department at Cochise College in Southeastern Arizona brought together
500 ceramic vessels, 600 pallets of wood, and
5 different modes of artistic expression to
celebrate the power of community in Cochise
County, Arizona.
2:10–4:04, Tom Turner: Two-Day
Workshop
by Tom Turner / 114 min.
Filmed during a workshop, Tom works on pots at
different stages to take advantage of ‘point in
time’, which includes a discussion of glazes, various surface treatments, trimming, stamping and
paddling, along with different reduction firing
approaches using Oxy-probes are all covered in
this video.
10:30–12, 204 B/C
Panel: Bridging the Gap from
High School to College: What are
the Standards of Knowledge and
Experience?
Val Cushing (m), Errol Willett, Steven Branfman, Maureen Mills, Lisa Floryshak-Windman
How can high school art teachers best prepare
their students for college art programs when fac-
Continued on page 38.
36
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
Visit us at
ceramic arts dail y.org
Showcasing the work of leading ceramic artists
Michael Lancaster
Your resource for ceramic techniques
Antoinette Badenhorst
Gerald and Kelly Hong
A membership community of potters and artists
ceramic arts dail y.org
A website bringing it all together
for the ceramics community
Patrick Coughlin
Join today to receive your FREE newsletter featuring weekly videos,
post your work, submit listings and much more.
Ceramic Publications Company, 600 N. Cleveland Avenue, Suite 210, Westerville,
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Phone:
866-721-3322
Fax: 614-794-5842
37
NCECA 2010 OH
• 44th
Annual
Conference
Program • Philadelphia,
PA
Program Details Friday, April 2
ing problems with facilities, class size, shortened
contact hours, required curricula, syllabus expectations, et al? Can college art teachers make
their standards of knowledge in the teaching
of art more widely known and taught in high
school? Do we know what kind of high school.
art experience helps students the most? In high
school art programs, should more emphasis be
put on learning-skills and techniques or on developing concepts, ideas and aesthetic insights?
11:30–12:30, Ballroom A
Lecture: Marvels of Things Created
and Miraculous Aspects of Things
Existing
by Brian Meunier
My work has long been inspired by my earlier
academic majors in Biology and Anthropology,
specifically- my love of forms from nature and
the human-made, art and artifact. I will present
the trajectory of my work in sculpture, from
my earlier wood work to my recent series of
ceramic sculptures
12–1:30, Ballroom B
Panel: Fabricating Ideas
Forrest Snyder (m), Jeanne Quinn, Chad Curtis, Steven Thurston
A group of five artists and two facilitators was
founded several years ago to investigate the
meaning of using new or high technology tools
into the creative process. Topics to be considered include: How are the tools integrated into
the creative process? What is the conceptual
consequence on the work? Does the meaning
of “maker” change? Does this technology affect
tactility, for both the maker and the viewer?
Can the artist create objects not previously
practical or possible? And, most importantly, can
artists make meaningful work employing these
new implements?
12:30–1, 204 B/C
Lecture: Dust to Dust
by Sharbani Das Gupta
The alchemy of clay, its dance with fire and the
immutable finality of the outcome is a familiar
experience. So what could the implication
of the process be when it stops just short of
transformation? With this thought in mind I
went to watch the image makers of Kumartuli,
a cramped square in old Kolkata where clay
artisans make magnificent impermanent unfired
figures of Hindu gods; terracruda not terracotta.
Recording the journey of these images from
creation to inevitable dissolution, this presentation is a photo-documentary essay of the context
and work of the versatile, relatively unknown
clay artists of Bengal.
1–2, Ballroom A
Awardees/Honorees
Fellow of the Council presentation to Susan Filley and Jeremy Jernegan
Honorary member presentation to Mathias Ostermann (posthumously) and Richard Shaw.
NCECA Excellence in Teaching Award presentation to Bunny McBride and Yoshiro Ikeda
NCECA Regional Award of Excellence presentation to Kathryn Narrow and Ruth Snyderman
38
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
39
Program Details Friday, April 2
1–4, Hall C
2–2:30, Ballroom B
3–4:30, Ballroom B
Simultaneous Demonstrations
Panel: To Die For
Matthew Metz and Judy Fox
Lecture: Art Deco Porcelains: The
Noritake Years 1925-1931
A continuation of Thursday’s session
by Judith Schwartz
1–5, Room 405 (Marriott)
Student Critique Room
Last chance for collegiate students to discuss images of their work one on one with professional
artists from around the country.
1:30–3, 204 B/C
Panel: Emerging Faculty: Approaches to
Teaching Clay aka: Creating an exciting
undergraduate program in ceramics
Alisa (AL) Holen (m), Brian Harper, Jake Allee,
Shannon Sullivan
Discussion by ceramic artists who received their
MFA’s around the same time and have had
tremendous success in their new found full-time
positions teaching ceramics. This panel will discuss fresh approaches to teaching clay, including:
Skill development within interesting conceptual
projects, integrating new technologies into
ceramics curricula, integrating design fundamentals into compelling assignments and critiques,
and effectively including histories and contemporary ceramic movements into the curriculum.
Examples of assignments and project results will
be shown.
The earliest and, by far, broadest expression of
art deco available at moderate cost for purchase
in the United States were the art deco porcelains
manufactured by the Noritake company during
the years 1925 - 1931. Designed on West 23rd
Street in Manhattan, fabricated in a factory in a
suburb of Nagoya called Noritake, and exported
to the US, these high-quality porcelains were sold
throughout the United States. Drawing from the
Kottler and Schwartz collections of over 1200
pieces, I provide, in this overview, a brief history
of the company and a sampling of the more than
900 deco motifs applied to the functional objects
they sold.
Monica Van den Dool (m), Jack Thompson,
Gillett Griffin, Becky Young
This panel was formed in conjunction with the
NCECA concurrent “To Die For” exhibition at
Philadelphia’s Projects Gallery. Our purpose is to
provide context for the exhibition’s themes of
death, mortality and the afterlife, and to explore
the unique role of ceramics in the development
of related images. Jack Thompson and Gillett
Griffin will provide valuable historical perspective, Monica Van den Dool will introduce various
approaches by contemporary artists, and Becky
Young will speak more generally about the mysteries of death as reflected in her own work.
3:30–4, 204 B/C
2:30–3:30, Ballroom A
Lecture: Post-WWII Ceramics, the
“Boom” Era
Lecture: Selling Out
by Christy Johnson
by Leslie Ferrin
Exhibition preview: Foundation, Fabrication &
Fulfillment, American Museum of Ceramic Art
(AMOCA), November, 2011.Thematically similar
to national ceramic trends, AMOCA’s 1945-1975
survey exhibition with accompanying text will
illustrate studio pottery, industrial crossover,
university pedagogy, and philosophical attitudes
concerning craft. This nostalgic sampling will
underscore how the study of ceramic art history
is the backbone of contemporary clay exploration and discovery.
Red Dots. How does an artist “sell out” without
selling out? How does one Red Dot make more
Red Dots? Leslie Ferrin provides a visual tour of
contemporary ceramic artwork on view in commercial venues with an amusing roundup of “sell
out” success stories along the way. Discussion will
include gallery / artist expectations, standards,
goals, methods and professional working relationships between the artist, dealer and clients in
“for profit” business environments.
AndersonRanch arts center
Workshops . Artists’ Residencies . Community Outreach . Public Events
Summer workShopS 2010
Ted Adler, Margaret Bohls, Kathy Butterly,
Doug Casebeer, Tom Coleman,
Debra Fritts, Andrea Gill, John Gill,
Chris Gustin, Sam Harvey, Jason Hess,
Rebecca Hutchinson, Frank Martin,
Lorna Meaden, Alleghany Meadows,
Lisa Orr, Pete Pinnell, Jeanne Quinn,
Kari Radasch, Pelusa Rosenthal,
Ralph Scala and John Toki
Field workShop Jamaica
april 23 - may 1, 2010
Alleghany Meadows
guest artists: David Pinto & Doug Casebeer
Post Office Box 5598 Snowmass Village, CO 81615
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NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
AndersonRanch.org
Table T - 52
WHAT’S NEW AT KCAI?
“Visit the Kansas City Art Institute at Table T-52
to learn more about the renowned KCAI
ceramics program.”
– Cary Esser, chair, ceramics dept.
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
41
Program Details Friday, April 2
4–4:30, Ballroom A
Lecture: Woodfired Ceramics and Glass
Kiln Glassagama
by Fred Herbst
This lecture will discuss the research collaboration
and unique kiln design developed by Fred Herbst
and glass artists from the Corning Museum of
Glass. After successful woodfired glassblowing
trials in an anagama style kiln, a new type of kiln
was constructed that allows for glassblowing and
firing ceramics simultaneously.
4:30–6 (various locations noted below)
NCECA Topical Discussions
Designed for individual members with common
interests and ideas to participate in informal
group discussions. Topics are up to the leader.
Ideas and information are for discussion in a
roundtable format.
201 A
Touch and Tactility: Declaring
Independence from the Visual
Hegemony: Bonnie Kemske
We handle and touch ceramic ware daily,
whether it is when we sleepily lean against the
bathroom sink to carry out our morning rituals, or take our first sip of hot coffee from our
favorite mug. As potters, we take it for granted
that ceramics are tactile, but what do we mean
by that?
Join us for a discussion amongst makers, academics, and others about touch within the ceramic
aesthetic.
Bonnie Kemske is an independent ceramic artist,
researcher, writer, and critic from Cambridge,
England.
201 B
Creative Independence in Social
Networking: Following the Money!:
Carola Jones
Come and learn: Everything You Ever Wanted to
Know About Social Networks But Were Afraid to
Ask, The Nuts & Bolts of Available Resources to
Help You Use Social Networking Sites, and Following the Money: Examples of Clay Artists Who
Are Doing It.
The goal of this discussion is to create a shared
conversation within NCECA around innovative
uses of technology that connects students, studio
artists, educators, gallerists, collectors and curators. In doing so, Creative Independence in Social
Networking, seeks to fuel increased collaboration
and integration among clay artists.
Carola Jones is a Mixed Media Studio Artist &
Internet Technologies Teacher. Presently, Jones
is a Volunteer, Creative Capital Alumni and past
Scholarship Student at Penland School of Crafts,
Penland, North Carolina, and a clay artist at Dan
Finch’s Pottery Studio, Bailey, North Carolina.
201 C
Clay in Combination With Other
Materials: David T. Collins
Discussion of the current trends of the ceramic/
mixed media, some of the aesthetic, semiotic, sociological, and alchemical implications of clay being combined with other materials., time will be
allotted to talk about the methodological issues
involved in actually attaching materials with other
than clay properties to clay itself. Among these
topics are shrinkage, choosing adhesives, and the
devising of effective physical attachments.
David T. Collins is an Assistant Professor at the
University of West Georgia, Carrollton, Georgia.
202 A
Woodfiring: What We’ve Learned the
Past Year: Jack Troy and Kevin Crowe
The proliferation of wood-burning kilns has
meant that defining and solving problems
connected with the process (clays, kilns, fuels,&
firing) are usually accomplished by individuals or
small groups, often working in isolation. We will
provide a forum for sharing information that
will be mutually beneficial to the participants.
In addition to technical, process-oriented information, we will share experiences relating to
aesthetics, and value-centered issues, such as the
challenges and achievement relating to personal
expression and individual goals in woodfiring.
Jack Troy is a potter, teacher and writer from
Huntingdon, Pennsylvania.
Kevin Crowe is a studio potter from Amherst,
Virginia.
Continued on page 44.
42
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
43
Program Details Friday, April 2
202 B
ceramic art as a vehicle for political debate, the
relationship of ceramics to other areas of visual
culture in a post-modern context, and the use of
clay in body and performance art.
Independence Through Research:
Christie Brown and Clare Twomey
In the current climate of decline of both ceramic
education and industry it is imperative that the
importance of this discipline and its role in visual
culture be understood through the development
of research and critical theory in order to build
for an independent long-term future.
204 B/C
At the University of Westminster in London the
Ceramics Research Group have successfully seen
two practice-based PhD candidates to completion
and currently have two others underway. The research spans the range of ceramic practice including highly technological and scientific research,
Learn how to: Plan/fund independent working facilities for clay artists with basic physical
challenges, and Improve accessibility to ceramic
Professor of Ceramics, Christie Brown, and
Research Fellow, Clare Twomey, University of
Westminster, London,
Designing Independence: Disabled
Accessible Clay Studio: Robin Gary with
Kristen Rovezzi
ODYSSEY CENTER FOR CERAMIC ARTS
2010 SUMMER WORKSHOPS
Innovative Handbuilding Techniques
LANA WILSON • May 31-June 4
Satake
Forbes-deSoule
The Art of Raku
STEPHEN FORBES-deSOULE • June 7-11
204 B/C
Keeping Your Hands in Clay:
Charting a Career Path in the Arts for
Students of All Ages – Job Strategies:
Susan Silverman
Beginning artists face frustrations and challenges
when preparing for the Arts Professional career.
Practical aspects of negotiating a path to success
will be shared and discussed. Learn and share
ideas for entering the ceramics community and
surviving and thriving within it!
Susan Silverman, a Studio Potter for 25 years and
Assistant Professor of 20 years (Franklin Pierce
University), along with students, Jason Lamkin
and Brigida Mosley, will lead this practical and
useful discussion.
Time, Energy and the Digital Firing:
Cordova
China Painting: New Directions
PAUL LEWING • June 21-25
The Misunderstood Extruder
HAYNE BAYLESS • June 28-July 2
Japanese Aesthetics
JOHN DIX • July 9-10
FIGURE: form + content
CRISTINA CORDOVA • July 12-16
Narrative Ceramics
JAMES TISDALE • July 26-30
Robin Gary is a Clay Artist and Teacher. She runs
Robin Gary’s Creative Clay Studio in Plano, Texas.
Kristen Rovezzie is a Clay Artist and student who
participates in studios and classes provided by
Plano Parks and Recreation in Plano, Texas.
204 B/C
Porcelian Pots for Service
SILVIE GRANATELLI • June 14-18
Gamble’s Low-Fire Clay Adventure
DAVID & TRACY GAMBLE • July 19-23
studios in support of the increasing demand for
such accessibility. Independence is a goal for
these participants for multiple reasons: Join us to
explore the ways in which a Clay Studio can be
modified to support accessibility needs!
Rory MacDonald
How does ceramics, which relies so heavily on
the transformation of materials through energy,
address the concerns of present day environmentalism? How are questions raised by energy use
addressed within contemporary ceramics? How
does a continual move towards integrated technologies in culture and efficiency of time and
energy in the studio production impact studio
artists? Bring your ideas for future directions in
studio ceramics.
Rory MacDonald is presently an Assistant Professor at Nova Scotia College of Art and Design.
Ballroom A
Combating Nature-Deficit with Clay:
Granatelli
Anna Wiehe
Finding the Beauty in Imperfection
AKIRA SATAKE • August 2-6
Lewing
Bayless
Gamble
Tisdale
Today’s youth spends over 40 hours a week inside
with electronic devices. How can clay supplement
the lack of natural experiences of today’s youth?
This discussion will explore the ways in which
educators can use clay to encourage independent
and creative thought in K-12 students through
emphasizing its natural properties. Through the
sharing of ceramic lesson ideas and teaching
methods, we will discuss natural experience
approaches in the art classroom setting as well
as outside the classroom that will allow our
students to develop vital critical-thinking skills
and creativity.
Anna Wiehe is currently an Art Teacher at Northview Elementary in Manhattan, Kansas.
Dix
Ballroom A
Wilson
www.highwaterclays.com
ODYSSEY CENTER FOR CERAMIC ARTS, 236 Clingman Ave, Asheville NC 28801
[email protected] • 828-285-0210
44
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
Criticism: Smoke or Fire?: Ted Adler
NCECA’s upcoming symposium on criticism seems
to indicate an overwhelming interest in the topic,
Continued on page 46.
LE
BRA
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E
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A R S
★
The largest ceramics education center in the Midwest
state-of-the-art facility · gas & soda kilns
studio spaces · exhibitions · classes
Artist Residency opportunities in Chicago and our
satellite location in beautiful Lakeside, Michigan
CALL FOR ENTRIES
B OWL M E OVE R : TH E 3 R D
L I L L S T R E E T I N T E R N AT I O N A L
August 2010 | Juried by Steve Lee
Entries Due: July 1, 2010
773 ·769 · 42 2 6
|
L I L L S T R E E T.CO M
www.ofa.fas.harvard.edu
Ceramics Program
Office for the Arts at Harvard
Enroll now for Summer ‘10 program offerings
www.ofa.fas.harvard.edu
Harvard Ceramics Program
219 Western Avenue, Allston, MA 02134
T 617.495.8680
[email protected]
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
45
Program Details Friday, April 2
but why do we need a symposium for it? How
can the individual maker benefit from engaging
critical perspectives? What is the role of criticism
in education? This Topical Discussion group will
consider the underlying purpose of the CRITICAL:
Santa Fe Symposium, as well as broader issues in
the fields of ceramics and criticism and their relationships to critical interpretation and judgment.
Ted Adler is currently an Assistant Professor of
Art at Wichita State University, Wichita, Kansas.
Ballroom A
Strategic Update: Strategic Planning
Committee Member
Are you interested in the future of NCECA?
Join us for an Update on the Strategic Planning
process of NCECA! Bring your comments and
questions to share.
This session will be led by one of the members of
the Strategic Planning Committee for NCECA.
Ballroom B
Ceramics as Bridge: Collaborations &
Connections: Valerie Zimany & Daniel Bare
This Topical Discussion will assemble a repertoire
of concepts and approaches for teaching Ceramics in collaboration with other disciplines at the
undergraduate level. Our interests focus on
innovative practices, challenges and successes in
bringing together Ceramics with East Asian Studies. Additional cooperative methods (such as with
Economics, Political Science, and Anthropology)
are sought and encouraged for discussion.
NCECA members Valerie Zimany (Lawrence
University, Appleton, Wisconsin), Daniel Bare
(Grand Valley State University), & Lynn Chytilo
(Albion College) were recent presenters at the
Freeman Foundation sponsored colloquium,
Bringing Asian Arts and Material Culture into
the Undergraduate Curriculum, held at Beloit
College, Beloit, Wisconsin.
Ballroom B
Why Don’t We Just Use Your Space for
Computers? Kate Missett
Surviving as an independent arts program
within a larger institution poses unique problems particularly in this financially challenged
time. Whether one is working with a settlement
house, a YMCA, or a private organization, many
of the same problems exist. Dedicated space,
program costs, escalating tuitions, an often aging population and non supportive administrations can present constant challenges to those
of us who would rather just focus on making
art. We will discuss the challenges and share
ideas that have worked in keeping our programs growing and vital through difficult times.
. Let’s discuss what has worked in preserving the
independence and integrity of our programs
while maintaining the support of our parent
organizations.
Kate Missett is a Ceramics professor and Visual
Arts Director for West Side YMCA, NYC.
Ballroom B
Table-Where: Alternative Exhibitions
for Emerging Potters: Jana Evans,
Christian Tonsgard and Candace Ring
As a student, or someone new to exhibiting, it
can be difficult to break into traditional exhibition spaces. Economy and current art trends
call for creativity and a need to find alternative
venues and a re-thinking of the traditional gallery space. As a result, young artists are creating
methods to reach and educate new audiences.
This discussion introduces artists with imaginative ideas of reaching new audiences and reviving the perception of contemporary pottery.
Jana Evans is currently a graduate student
at Arizona State University (Tempe, Arizona)
and a collaborative creator of the Exhibition
Series: a la cARTe and Potluck. Candace Ring is a
Canadian functional ceramist currently pursuing
her MFA at Arizona State University. Christian
Tonsgard lives in Rhode Island as a studio potter
and is a collaborative creator of the Exhibition
Series: a la cARTe.
Ballroom B
Anagama: Cutting the Umbilical
Cord, Breaking from Tradition: Eileen
Sackman and Lynn Anne Verbeck
Considering how wide spread the process of
Anagama firing has become in America, do we
start to form our own traditions within the firing
method or do we hold on to the Japanese style
and aesthetic?
Eileen Sackman and Lynn Anne Verbeck are
graduate students at SUNY-New Paltz.
Potters Council 2010 exhibition: FIll-adelphia
First juried exhibition of Potters Council members’ work
MArk your CAlendAr
exhibition dates: March 19–April 30, 2010
Public reception: April 2, 2010 | 6–9 pm
Featured Artists:
Jake Allee | Posey Bacopoulos | diana Bjel | Barabara Brown | Gratia Brown | darlene davis
dawn Ferguson | Marko Fields | doris Fischer-Colbrie | linda Fitz Gibbon | Patz Fowle
ovidio Giberga | Samuel Hoffman | linda Hughes | Mark Issenberg | Jake Johnson
Brenda lichman | robbie lobell | lee Middleman | debra oliva | Jeff Pender
Vince Pitelka | nan rothwell | Meryl ruth | Sam Scott | eric Serritella
Claire Shenk rodgers | Marty Shuter | Alexander Solla
Simon van der Ven
Public reception on April 2, 2010 at Show of Hands Gallery
1006 Pine Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107
46
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
47
Program Details Friday, April 2
9:30–1:30, Grand Hall
Annual Dance
Saturday, April 3
10:30–10:45, Ballroom
Closing Remarks
Urban Guerrilla Orchestra
The UGO is comprised of instrumentalists and
vocalists who have performed, toured and
recorded (and still do) with: Quincy Jones, Aretha
Franklin, James Brown, Patti LaBelle, Boyz II Men,
The Temptations, The O’Jays, The Stylistics, Teddy
Pendergrass, Harold Melvin and The Blue Notes,
McFadden & Whitehead, Michael Bolton, Kool
and The Gang, Billy Paul, The Roots, and countless more...
The band’s quality of vocal performance and
musical execution is second to none.
8:30–10, Bridge
Registration
NCECA Sales
T-shirts, NCECA 2010 Invitational Exhibition
Catalog, and Demonstrator DVDs. Sales closes at
10 am.
9–10:30, Ballroom
Emerging Artists
10:45–11:45, Ballroom
Closing Lecture: How Did I End Up Here?
by Malcolm Davis
As I travel about the land, giving workshops, I am
continually touched and amazed by the journeys
that have brought people to clay and how this
humble material from the earth has transformed
their lives into the unexpected. I will focus on
clay, not as an art form, nor as a vehicle for selfexpression, but as a material that has the power
to transform the human spirit. Clay is the reason
that we are all here today; Clay has given each of
us a Journey of Transformation.
11:45–1, Ballroom
Second NCECA Members’ Business
Meeting
The NCECA Board of Directors encourages all
members to participate in the governance of
your organization.
Welcome, Skeff Thomas
Thanks - Jeff Guido and Amy Sarner Williams
Introduction of Board nominees - Robert Harrison
Nomination speeches
Election of Board of Directors
Announcement of the artists chosen for the
International Residency Programs - Lydia
Thompson
• Jingdezhen Sanbao Ceramic Art Institute,
Jingdezhen, China
• Guldagergaard International Ceramic Research
Center, Skaelskor, Denmark
• Zentrum Fur Keramik, Berlin, Germany
Presentation of NCECA National Student Juried
Exhibition Award - Jessica Orlowski
Announcement of the 2010 Regina Brown
Undergraduate Student Fellowship Award
recipients - Robert Harrison
Presentation of 2010 Cups of Merit Awards Rhonda Willers
Announcement of the 2010 NCECA Graduate Student Fellowship Award recipients - Jim Romberg
Induction of New Directors - Skeff Thomas
Farewell to Outgoing Directors - Keith Williams
NCECA’s 45th Annual Conference presentation Brian Ransom and Anna Calluori Holcombe
NCECA’s 46th Annual Conference location announcement - Keith Williams
Drawing for the NCECA 2011 Conference/Membership (must be present to win)
1–2, Rooms 402-403 (Marriott)
Open Board Meeting
All members are invited to participate. Ask questions. Voice your opinion and concerns to your
governing Board.
48
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
49
NCECA Sponsored Exhibitions
You are invited to the NCECA Sponsored Gala Reception for the
2010 NCECA Invitational “Earth Matters” and the NCECA 2010
National Juried Student Exhibition.
Thursday, April 1, 2010, 7:00–9:00 p.m.
The Galleries at Moore, Moore College of Art and Design
20th St. and the Parkway, Philadelphia, PA
NCECA 2010 Invitational Exhibition “Earth Matters”
The Galleries at Moore, Moore College of Art and Design (p. 64)
March 13 – April 10, 2010
Featuring 50 ceramic works by 27 artists from the US and abroad,
“Earth Matters” is intended to offer a challenging and thoughtprovoking artistic experience revealing our many connections to each
other and nature. Viewers are encouraged to confront environmental
issues related to nature, agricultural practice, energy consumption,
resource management, the role of technology, and human health.
Ranging in format from functional pottery to large scale installation,
this exhibition celebrates the beauty and fragility of nature and the
ceramic medium.
Selected by NCECA Exhibitions Director, Linda Ganstrom, the
process used to curate this NCECA Invitational was to select a core of
established voices speaking to this environmental theme and to add
passionate new voices through a jury process. In selecting the writers
for “Earth Matters,” a similar format was followed by inviting Dr. Glen
R. Brown, one of the ceramics field most widely published authors and
Canadian writer, Nicole Burisch, whose writing in Utopian Impulses
was activism oriented and full of challenge. Their words should further
enrich and challenge readers to change action and attitude in ways that
lead to a healthier personal lifestyle and planet.
A full color print catalog will document and extend the impact
of “Earth Matters.” In addition, the included digital catalog provides
high resolution images that can be viewed on a computer screen or
projected to share with a large group. This digital catalog will also
include images from our premier 2010 NCECA National Juried
Student Exhibition. The catalog may be purchased at the conference,
at the exhibitions or through NCECA’s web site.
Artists include: Susan Beiner, Aislinn Caron, Bryan Czibesz,
Spencer Ebbinga, Shanna Fliegel, Roxanne Jackson, Gudrun Klix,
Jae Won Lee, Emily Loehle, Kate MacDowell, Warren Mather,
Anna Metcalfe, Dennis Lee Mitchell, Ted Neal, Grace Nickel, Justin
Novak, Kip O’Krongly, George Penaloza, Sam Scott, Bonnie Seeman,
Amy Smith, Keith Smith, Nan Smith, Ryan Takaba, Christopher
Torrez, John Williams, Paula Winokur
EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL CUP SALE
You are invited to participate in this popular fundraiser by donating and buying cups. The cup sale supports the NCECA Fund for
Artistic Development designed to provide opportunities for artistic
growth through scholarships, residencies, and programs including the
Regina Brown Undergraduate Fellowship. The pieces may not exceed
9x9x9 inches. Please deliver your cup(s) on Wednesday, March 31,
9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. and Thursday, April 1, 10:00 a.m. - 5:00p.m.
to Independence Ballroom located in the Marriott. Each cup will be
considered for a “Cups of Merit” Commission Award. Each on-site
donor will receive a bonus NCECA 2011 Conference/Membership
drawing ticket in addition to the ticket in the conference packet.
The cups will go on sale on Friday, April 2, 8:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Purchases will be limited to three cups at a time.
50
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
NCECA 2010 NATIONAL STUDENT JURIED EXHIBITION
University of the Arts’ Rosenwald Wolf Gallery (pp. 55, 56)
320 South Broad St., Philadelphia, PA 19105
March 25–April 14
Showcasing the finest undergraduate and graduate ceramic art in the
United States of America.
“Independence” is a fitting theme for the conference which hosts the
inaugural National Student Juried Exhibition. This year’s NSJE embodies the spirit of independence. While mindful of tradition these students
have presented us with fresh perspectives and inventive uses of their
medium.—Jessica Orlowski NCECA SDAL
Jurors
Erin Furimsky—Currently a practicing studio ceramic artist and
in Normal, Illinois. She also teaches at Illinois State University and
Heartland Community College. Erin received an MFA from The Ohio
State University and has had the honor of being an Artist In Residence
at the Oregon College of Art and Craft and The Archie Bray Foundation. Her work has been published in numerous books focusing on
glaze and surfaces. She has participated in many noted national and
international shows. The NCECA organization recognized her as being
a 2006 Emerging Artist.
Matt Long—Received his MFA from Ohio University in 1997
and his BFA from The Kansas City Art Institute in 1995. Matt is
currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Mississippi where
he is the head of ceramics and the graduate coordinator.
Matt has been a potter for 27 years and currently resides in Oxford Mississippi. His work can been seen in many national juried and
invitational shows throughout the country. Matt teaches between 6-8
workshops a year and is involved in 8-10 national shows a year.
Awards
NCECA Undergraduate Student Awards 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Place
NCECA Graduate Student Award 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Place
Rodger Lang Award for Student Excellence
The Retired Professors RSJE Award
KBH Merit Award
Aardvark Clay Purchase Award
Soldner Clay Mixers by Muddy Elbow Manufacturing Award
of Excellence
Studio Potter Undergraduate Merit Award
Studio Potter Graduate Merit Award
Paperclay Award
Undergraduate
Christopher Adelhardt*, Michael Arnold, Angela Biederman, Ariel
Bowman, James Coquia, Evan D'Orazio, Ryan Fletcher, Jared Gabriel, Jonathan Grengs, Sean Larson, Seungwon Lee, Justin Manfredi,
Bonilyn Parker, Greg Pugh, Kate Roberts, Duncan Tweed, Eric
Wolever, Crisha Yantis
Graduate
Landon Anderson, Ben Carter, Lauren Clay, Shenny Cruces,
Chandra Debuse, Zachary Dunn, Robin Dupont, Devin Farrand,
Benjamin Fiess, Melissa Griffin, Aisha Harrison, Ryan Labar, Ginger
Lukas, Janet MacPherson, Keira Norton, Douglas Peltzman, Kelly
Ann Schnorr, Laina Seay, Mark Stafford, Jasmine Wallace, Mallory
Wetherell, Paige Wright
* Two pieces selected
THIRTEENTH ANNUAL NATIONAL K12 CERAMIC EXHIBITION
March 31–April 3, 2010
Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Liberty C (p. 16)
Reception, March 31, 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.
Exhibit hours: Wednesday March 31, 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Thursday April 1, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Friday April 2, 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
On behalf of the National K12 Ceramic Exhibition Foundation I
extend a warm welcome to the 13th Annual National K12 Ceramic
Education Exhibition. Again this year we experienced an increase in
submissions to our exhibition. This is a sweet success for us with a
touch of lime. Exhibiting 150 works out of 1,150 entries submitted
was a challenging task for our juror. Yet, it is a profound statement
to all of us in the K12 community the strength K - 12 ceramic teachers have in promoting ceramic education in their schools and how
they inspire their student to achieve marvelous work in clay. Our
commitment to bring the best of the ceramic arts in K-12 schools
across these United States to the venue of the NCECA conference is
a shared pleasure. Please join us in celebrating the creativity of these
talented students from all levels and congratulate the teachers who
inspire them. Scholarships, awards and recognitions will be giving
during the reception.—Leah Schlief-Freese, Curator of the National
K-12 Ceramic Exhibition
Juror
The Thirteenth Annual K12 Ceramic Exhibition is honored to have
Dick Hay as our 2010 juror.
For over forty-five years he has been very active as a professional
artist and as a teacher.
As an artist, he has exhibited his work in over two-hundred-andforty exhibitions in the United States, Japan, Canada, Russia, Latvia,
and Korea. His work is in major collections throughout the world,
including the Pushkin Museum, in Russia; the Riga Museum of Art,
in Latvia; the Byung-Tak Woo Public Collection, in Korea; the Sea of
Japan Collection, in Japan; and The Butler Institute of American Art,
in the United States. In the past three years, he has had exhibitions
of his work in Denver, Colorado; Hot Springs, Arkansas; Lincoln,
Nebraska; Pittsburg, Pennsylvania; Columbus, Ohio; Kansas City,
Missouri; and Kearney, Nebraska. This past year (2009), he has had
exhibitions of his work at the Halcyon Contemporary Art Gallery/
Sheldon Swope Art Museum, Terre Haute, Indiana; the Haggerty
Gallery, Dallas, Texas; the Christel DeHaan Fine Art Gallery, Indianapolis, Indiana; and the Sisson Gallery, Dearborn, Michigan. (The
Sisson Gallery was an exhibition titled ‘Three Living Legends’ with
artists Val Cushing and Victor Spinski.) Over the past twenty years,
he received five University Arts Endowment Grants from Indiana
State University to help support his work.
He is a much sought after lecturer and has been invited to lecture
about his work at over a hundred-and-fifty universities in the United
States, Canada, Latvia, Russia, and Korea. In the United States, he
has been a guest lecturer at Princeton University, the University of
Delaware, the University of Florida, the University of North Dakota,
the University of Kansas, the University of Illinois, the University of
Eastern New Mexico, Indiana University, Arizona State University,
Louisiana State University, Auburn University, and Southern Georgia
University, among others.
In 1991, he was one of fifteen American artists invited to lecture
at the Dzintari Art Institute, Jurmala, Latvia; and in 1995, he was one
of three American artists invited to lecture at the Muju International
Art Symposium, in Muju, Korea. He has been listed in Who’s Who
In American Art since 1972. In the tenth anniversary edition of ‘Arts
Indiana,’ he was included as a ‘State Art Treasure.’ (This is a listing
of Indiana writers, performing and visual artists.) In 2008, he was
awarded their ‘Lifetime Achievement Award’ by Arts Illiana, of the
State of Indiana.
After forty years of teaching at Indiana State University, he retired
in 2006 and now holds the academic rank of Professor Emeritus
of Art. As a teacher, he received the ‘Caleb Mills Award for Distinguished Teaching by Indiana State University,’ and he was made a
‘Teaching Fellow’ by the Center for Teaching and Learning, Indiana
State University. He received the National Council on Education
for the Ceramic Arts’ ‘Excellence in Teaching Award’ at their annual
conference in San Diego, California, in March, 2003.
He has been a member of the National Council on Education for
the Ceramic Arts since 1967, and he was president of this organization for two years. He was awarded the ‘Fellowship of the Council’ by
this organization in 1977.
He received the BFA degree from Ohio University and the MFA
from New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University.
Dick Hay has been a strong advocate for the advancement of quality ceramics education. We appreciate his support of The National
K12 Ceramic Exhibition Foundation
Twisted Structure, 22 in. (56 cm) in length, fired in oxidation, by Lauren Clay,
graduate student at Wichita State University; in the National Student Juried
Exhibition. See page 50 for full details.
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
51
Exhibition Shuttles and Tours
The listings on the following pages have been organized according to shuttle routes (tickets sold with registration). Any seats not sold through
preregistration may be available onsite. Shuttle service will be available on Wednesday, March 31; buses will depart from the Philadelphia Convention Center on 12th St. First departure is at 9 am, with the last run at 4 pm for pickup only.
Walking Route
(see map on page 54)
Stop 1: Pennsylvania Convention Center
Stop 2: Philadelphia Marriott Downtown
Stop 3: Center for Architecture of
AIA—Philadelphia
Stop 4: Hampton Inn Philadelphia Center City
Stop 5: City Hall
Stop 6: Copy Gallery
Stop 7: James Oliver Gallery
Center City/ University City Route/
South Philly Route
(see map on page 55)
Stop 1: Philadelphia Art Alliance, The Center
for Emerging Visual Artists, Fleisher Ollman,
Sande Webster Gallery, The Lutheran Church
of the Holy Communion, Mütter Museum at
the College of Physicians of Philadelphia
Stop 2: University of Pennsylvania Museum of
Archaeology and Anthropology, Fox Art Gallery/
Claudia Cohen Hall, University of Pennsylvania
Stop 3: Sub Octo Gallery
Exhibition Listing Key
• NCECA Exhibition
• NCECA Partner Exhibition
• The Clay Studio Exhibition
• Concurrent Independent Exhibition
• From the Community Exhibition
Stop 4: JAG Fine Art, University of the Arts,
Hamilton Hall, Gallery One, Gallery 316,
and Solmson Court, University of the Arts,
Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery, University of the
Arts, Anderson Hall
Stop 5: Show of Hands Gallery, Philadelphia’s
Magic Gardens, B Square Gallery, Da Vinci Art
Alliance, Pageant: Soloveev, Creperie Beau
Monde, Eyes Gallery,
Stop 6: Locks Gallery, Bridgette Mayer Gallery,
James Oliver Gallery
Old City Route
(see map on page 58)
Stop 1: Rosenfeld Gallery, The Clay Studio,
Dalet Gallery, Pentimenti Gallery, Race
Street Café, Salt, Flotsam + Jetsam, Wexler
Gallery, OLC, Café Ole, the candycoated
center, Moderne Gallery, The Works Gallery,
The Snyderman Gallery, Painted Bride
Art Center, Wood Turning Center, Hudson
Beach Glass
Stop 6: Bambi Gallery
Stop 7: Art Star, Projects Gallery
Outer Rim South Tour
(see map on page 62)
Stop 1: The Duke Gallery at Community
Art Center
Stop 2: Davenport Gallery, Wayne Art Center
Stop 3: Main Line Arts Center, The Haverford
school’s Centennial Hall Gallery, The Quad,
and the Wilson Hall Community Gallery
Stop 4: Saint Joseph’s University Gallery
Stop 5: Philadelphia Horticultural Center
Outer Rim North Tour
(see map on page 63)
Stop 1: Chestnut Hill Academy
Stop 2: Arcadia University Art Gallery
Stop 3: Cheltenham Art Center, Gladys Wagner Gallery and Millie Dunn Weiss Gallery
Stop 4: Stella Elkins Tyler Gallery, The Piazza
at Tyler School of Art
Northern Liberties/Fishtown Tour
Museum Area
(see map on page 60)
Stop 1: Flex Space @ The Ceramic Shop, Amber Street Studios
Stop 2: FLUXspace
Stop 3: Stella Elkins Tyler Gallery, The Piazza
at Tyler School of Art
Stop 4: Little Berlin, Highwire Gallery, Rocket
Cat Café
Stop 5: Crane Arts Building, Bahdeebahdu
(see map on page 64)
Stop 1: Community College of Philadelphia,
Mint Building Rotunda Gallery
Stop 2: Eastern State Penitentiary
Stop 3: The Philadelphia Museum of Art and
The Philadelphia Museum of Art, Perelman
Building Galleria
Stop 4: The Galleries at Moore College of Art
& Design
3 The Fine Arts Gallery (at the Art Barn), Mont-
out New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware and
New York. Michael Connelly, Matthew Courtney, Chad
D. Curtis, Abby Donovan, David East, Heather Mae
Erickson, Joseph Gower, Ryan Greenheck, Del Harrow,
Douglas Herren, Ryan Kelly, Sumi Maeshima, Andrea
Marquis, Eric Miller, Peter Morgan, Adelaide Paul, Neil
Patterson, Hope Rovelto, Theresa Saulin, Kala Stein,
John Williams, Jennifer Woodin. Curated by Heather
Mae Erickson.
Greater Area Exhibitions
1 Bucks County Community College Library, New-
town Campus, 275 Swamp Rd., Newtown, PA; 215968-8432. Mar 1–Apr 2. Mon–Thu 8:00am–9:00pm;
Fri–Sat 8:00am–3:30pm. Reception Apr 1, 5:00–
7:00pm. . Area Restaurants: Dolce Carini, Dominick’s
Pizza, Dragon’s Chinese, Duck Sauce, Friends Bar and
Grille, Florentino’s, Grotto.
• “Philadelphia Regional Ceramics Invitational.”
A selection of works by six Philadelphia area ceramic
artists. Helen Weisz, Lisa Naples, Jim Chaney, Victor
Spinski, Paula Winokur, Paul Wandless. Curated by
Michael Stek IV.
2
James A. Michener Art Museum, 128 Pine St.,
Doylestown, PA; 215-340-9800. Feb 27–Jun 13.
Tue–Fri 10:00am–4:30pm; Sat 10:00am–5:00pm; Sun
12:00–5:00pm. . Area Restaurants: Max Hansen Café.
• “Contemporary Folklore.” This exhibition
highlights sculptural work that touches upon dominant
themes studied within the discipline of folklore. The
four exhibiting artists translate stories from mythology,
legends and personal experience into three-diemensional
form and in doing so, raise questions about how we
come to understand our shared history. Ann Chahbandour, Ryan Kelly, Lisa Naples, Kukuli Velarde. Curated
by Kristy Krivitsky.
52
gomery County Community College, 340 DeKalb
Pike, Blue Bell, PA; 215-641-6300. Mar 24–Apr 9.
Mon–Thu 8:00am–9:30pm; Fri 8:00am–4:30pm.
Reception Mar 31, 5:00–7:00pm. . Area Restaurants:
KC Alley, Dettern Wine Bar and Restaurant.
•
“Surfaces.” An invitational exhibition. Artists exhibiting work in clay as well as mixed media that includes
innovative materials and processes (clay being no less
than 50% of the work). In this exhibition, the artists are
challenged to execute original concepts that will broaden
the definition of contemporary art, particularly functional
personal objects. Dale Neese, Jim Chaney, Helen Weisz,
Paul Wandless, Victor Spinski, Gary Greenberg, Jeff Life,
Joyce Jablonski, Tom Beldon, Patsy Cox, Steven Wolochowicz, John Eden, Constant Albertson, Kirk Mangus,
Eva Kwong, Kathy Rhoades, Tom Pergola. Curated by
Michael Stek IV.
4 Rowan University Art Gallery, 201 Mullica Hill
Rd., Glassboro, NJ; 856-256-4521. Mar 29–Apr 17.
Mon–Fri 10:00am–5:00pm; Sat 12:00–5:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 5:00–7:00pm. .
•
“Artist / Educator.” This exhibition highlights
ground breaking work created by some of the most
influential young artists in ceramics today who also happen to be educators at universities and colleges through-
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
5 Perkins Center for the Arts/Collingswood, 30 Irvin
Ave., Collingswood, NJ; 856-235-6488 ext. 202. Mar
13–Apr 10. Wed–Sat 10:00am–6:00pm. Reception Apr
1, 6:00–9:00pm. Gallery-yes; restroom-Not handicap
accessible. Area Restaurants: Tortilla Press, Casona,
IndeBlue, Sagami, Thai Basil, Saporo, Villa Barone,
Nunzio’s, Blackbird.
•
“Exquisite Pots: Six Degrees of Collaboration.”
Features work by six potters who exchanged bisqued
pieces with each other for glazing and finishing. Similar
to the “exquisite corpse” game invented by the Surrealists, this exchange expands the idea of collaboration
from its usual consciously cooperative mode to include
the possibility for the unconscious and accidental.
Margaret Bohls, Andy Brayman, Sam Chung, Maren
Kloppmann, Andrew Martin, Deborah Schwartzkopf.
Curated by Jamie Lang.
Greater Area Exhibitions
6
The Baldwin School, 701 W. Montgomery Ave.,
Bryn Mawr, PA; 215-592-1999. Mar 14–Apr 9. Mon–
Fri 12:00–3:00pm. . Area Restaurants: Tango Bistro,
Bertucci’s, Lordas Greek Tavern, Café Fresko, Fuigi
Mountain Japanese Restaurant.
•
“The Clay Studio 3rd Floor Students and Artists.”
Group exhibition of students and artists from the 3rd
floor. Various artists.
Greater Area Restaurants
R1: KC’s Alley, 10 West Butler Ave.; 215-628-3300. R2:
Tortilla Press, 703 Haddon Ave.; (856) 869-3345. R3:
Casona, 563 Haddon Ave.; (856) 854-5555. R4: Thai
Basil, 655 Haddon Ave.; (856) 833-0098. R5: Rocket
Cat Café, 2001 Frankford Ave.; 215-739-4526. R6:
Johnny Brendas, 1201 Frankford Ave.; 215-739-9684.
R7: Memphis Tap Room, 2331 East Cumberland St.;
215-425-4460.
in Philadelphia to create a ceramic-based work of art with
each class. Participating schools are Independence Charter
School, St. Mary’s Interparochial School, The Youth Study
Center and Spruce Hill Christian School. Curated by Annette Monnier and Jeff Guido.
•
T-A
“Myung Jin Choi: Generation.” A site-specific
installation that includes five views of Philadelphia
with more than 7,000 ceramic elements—each element
is representative of a building within the city. The
sculptural forms range from interpretive topographies
to suspended helixes. Myung Jin Choi. Curated by
Leah Douglas.
•
Philadelphia International Airport, Terminal D.
Nov 15–May. .
Philadelphia International Airport, Terminal
A-West. Jan 15–Jul. .
“Douglas Herren: Industria/Ware.” Douglas Herren
is known for his brightly painted large-scale vessels that
reference oversized pitchers and teapots. Yet, there is an
industrial aesthetic that prevails as some sections appear to
be cast from old machine parts and bolted back together.
Douglas Herren. Curated by Leah Douglas.
T-C Philadelphia International Airport, Terminal C.
Mar 15– Sep.
.
T-D
•
“Hiroe Hanazono: Ceramic Dinnerware.” Hiroe
Hanazono’s ceramic dinnerware considers the overall aesthetics of the meal, particularly as her work relates to and
enhances food. Her minimalist approach—the simple lines,
forms, and muted palette set the tone for an experiential
meal where design and functionality are equally important.
Hiroe Hanazono. Curated by Leah Douglas.
Airport Exhibitions
T-CD
Philadelphia International Airport between
Terminals C and D. Dec 15–Jun. .
•
“Nicholas Kripal: Swarm.” A site specific installation
that features a series of terra cotta sculptural forms created
using casts from common molds—primarily ornate baking
pans. The cast forms are re-invented through their variations
and combinations into unique objects that appear partly
architectural and partly functional yet remain unexplainable
in origin. Nicholas Kripal. Curated by Leah Douglas.
T-AB Philadelphia International Airport, between
Terminals A-East and B. Mar 15– Sep.
.
• “Claymobile Wonderkammer: Cabinets of Wonder
–Four Projects by The Claymobile, The Clay Studio,
Philadelphia.” The Claymobile, the outreach component of
The Clay Studio, Philadelphia, worked with four schools
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
53
Walking Route
1 Pennsylvania Convention Center, 1101Arch St.
2 Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, 1201 Market St.
•
.
“NCECA Gallery Expo/NEXPO.” Liberty Ballroom, A and B. Mar 30–Apr 2. Wed and Fri 9:00am–
5:00pm, Thur 9:00am–7:00pm. Reception Mar 30,
5:30–7:00pm. The NCECA Gallery Expo features
gallery style works executed by well-known professional
artists. An intersection between the worlds of studio
practice and gallery business, this area offers viewers
not only an opportunity to experience and buy high
quality ceramic art, but also the chance to interact with
gallery owners and some of the artists they represent.
Participating galleries: Red Lodge Clay Center, The Dolphin Song, Sherrie Gallerie, Mindy Solomon Gallery,
18 Hands Gallery, LLC, Ferrin Gallery. The NCECA
NEXPO features artists from our membership and more:
Emerging and demonstrating artists, Fellows, Honorary
Members, and the membership.
• “Thirteenth Annual National K12 Ceramic
Exhibition.” Liberty Ballroom, C. Mar 31–Apr 3. Wed
10:00am–6:00pm, Thur 9:00am–5:00pm, Fri 9:00am–
4:00pm. Reception Mar 31, 4:30–5:30pm. Annual
juried ceramic competition for K-12 students in the US.
Designed to showcase the best K12 ceramic work made in
the country. Juried by: Dick Hay
“Santa Fe Clay Presents La Mesa.” Rooms
302–306; 505-984-1122. Mar 31–Apr 3. Wed
•
10:00am–7:00pm, Thurs 10:00am–8:00pm, Fri 10–7,
Sat 10:00am–1:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 6:00–8:00pm.
170 place settings in a spectacular banquet table display by some of the country’s foremost ceramic artists
and potters. Posey Bacopoulos, Hayne Bayless, Susan
Beiner, Nicholas Bivins, Sandy Blain, Jenni Brant,
Mark Burleson, Conner Burns, Linda Christianson,
Autumn Cipala, Bede Clarke, Bruce Cochrane, David
Crane, Paul Donnelly, Debra Fritts, Hiroe Hanazono,
Ayumi Horie, Matthew Hyleck, Mike Jabbur, Sarah
Jaeger, Nicholas Joerling, Matt Kelleher, Kristen
Kieffer, Kathy King, Leah Leitson, Simon Levin, Suze
Lindsay, Ruchika Madan, Janet Mansfield, Allison
McGowan, Ryan McKerley, Kent McLaughlin, Jenny
Mendes, Lisa Orr, Judith Salomon, Emily Schroeder,
Deborah Schwartzkopf, Laurie Shaman, Stacy Snyder,
Curtis Stewardson, Shoko Teruyama, Sandra Trujillo,
Holly Walker, Jason Walker, gwendolyn yoppolo, and
many more. Curated by Avra Leodas and Santa Fe
Clay staff.
•
“Artstream Nomadic Gallery: Studio Pottery
2010.” Suite 309-310; 970-618-7479. Wed 10:00am–
7:00pm, Thurs 10:00am–8:00pm, Fri 10:00am–
7:00pm, Sat 10:00am–2:00pm. Reception Apr 1,
6:00–8:00pm. Exhibition and sale of work by 25
nationally recognized potters. Jen Allen, Christa Assad,
Mary Barringer, Andy Brayman, Steven Colby, Michael
Connelly, Michael Corney, Josh DeWeese, Julia Gal-
loway, Sam Harvey, Ayumi Horie, Simon Levin, Ben
Maier, Lorna Meaden, Alleghany Meadows, Matthew
Metz, Ron Meyers, Lisa Orr, Mark Pharis, Kari Radasch,
Elizabeth Robinson, Ellen Shankin, Andy Shaw, Mikey
Walsh, Tara Wilson.
3 Center for Architecture of AIA—Philadelphia,
1218 Arch St.; 215-569-3186 ext. 107. Mar 29–Apr 9.
Mon–Sat 10:00am–6:00pm. . Area Restaurants: Reading Terminal Market.
•
“William Daley & Thomas Daley: Collaborations.”
Building pots and making buildings/a visual conversation
is a collaboration for building between a father and son.
William Daley (artist) and Thomas Daley (architect).
Organized by Thomas Daley.
4
Hampton Inn Philadelphia Center City, 1301
Race St.
5
City Hall, Broad and Market St., 2nd and 4th floors,
NE corner; 215-686-9912. Feb 1–Apr 16. Mon–Fri
8:00am–5:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 5:00–7:00pm. , NE
corner. Area Restaurants: Center City, South Broad Street.
•
“Abstract Clay: Form and Surface.” Art In City
Hall presents a juried exhibition of artists from the
Philadelphia region. Ken Vavrek, founder of The Clay
Studio and former professor at Moore College of Art
and Design: “Through abstract art often comes the
simplification of forms and shapes in nature, sometimes
the subject source is seemingly absent in the resulting
work, or at least not immediately recognizable. Other
times a non-objective approach eliminates the subject
matter concern altogether. ” Various artists from the
Philadelphia region. Curated by Ken Vavrek.
6 Copy Gallery, 319 N. 11th St., 3rd floor; 267-
679-4587. Mar 30–Apr 3. Tue–Sat 10:00am–8:00pm.
Reception Apr 2, 6:00–10:00pm. , but call ahead
267-679-4587. Area Restaurants: Vietnam Restaurant,
Lee How Fook Tea House, Indonesia Restaurant, Four
Points by Sheraton, New Harmony Vegetarian Restaurant, Maggiano’s Little Italy, Banana Leaf.
•
“Sugar Coated: The Candy Shop.” Welcome to
the candy shop—a sugar coated feast for the eyes incorporating clay and mixed media sculpture with a taste
of performance art. Artists Gerit Grimm and Stephanie
Leach create a new world turned on its head through the
use of Grimm’s figurative sculptures and Leach’s candies
and consumer goods. The artists will be on site through
the run of the show inviting viewers to enter into the
world they have created and in the spirit of the City
of Brotherly love, take a piece of this world home with
them. Organized by Stephanie Leach.
7
James Oliver Gallery, 723 Chestnut St., 4th floor;
215-923-1242. Mar 27–Apr 25. Mon 12:00–5:00pm;
Tue–Fri 5:00–8:00pm; Sat 12:00–7:00pm. Reception
Apr 1, 6:00–9:00pm. Not handicap accessible. Area Restaurants: Morimoto, Union Trust, Chifa, Jones, LaScala’s,
Aqua Malaysian & Thai Restaurant.
•
“Atmosphere.” Features seven ceramic artists
investigating and responding to their natural, artificial,
and mediated environments. These artists consider a
range of surroundings from the mundane everyday
spaces of parking lots to the uncommon and spectacular landscapes of the earth’s poles to the immaterial,
virtual worlds of data and the media. Cyndy Giachetti,
Debbie Kupinsky, Laura Primozic, Brian Bolden, Alex
Hibbitt, Merrie Wright, Kimberly Greene. Curated by
Kimberly Greene.
Walking Restaurants
R1: Vietnam Restaurant, 221 N. 11th St.;
215.592.1163. R2: Lee How Fook Tea House, 219
North 11th St.; 215-925-7266. R3: New Harmony Vegetarian Restaurant, 135 North 9th St.; 215-627-4520.
R4*: Cherry Street Chinese Restaurant, 1010 Cherry
St.; 215-923-3663. R5*: Rangoon Burmese Restaurant,
112 North 9th St.; 215-829-8939.
54
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
Center City / University City / South Philly Route (maps on pages 56,57)
Stop 1 (1906 Rittenhouse Square, south side of square)
1a Philadelphia Art Alliance, 251 South 18th St.;
215-545-4302. Feb 11–May 3. All days 11:00am–
5:00pm; extended hours Fri Apr 2, 11:00am–8:00pm.
Reception Apr 2, during extended hours. , please call
ahead for assistance. Area Restaurants: Gardenia located
in the Art Alliance building.
• “Brooke Hine: In Motion.” Resembling many different forms found in nature, Brook Hine’s installations
and sculptures are inspired by found objects in a state of
decay. Delving into an imagined history, Hine finds the
tactile nature of clay to be ideal for her subject matter and
the spontaneous working method, allowing the material
to guide the organic nature of each form. Brooke Hine.
Curated by Melissa Caldwell.
•
“Darla Jackson: While you were out….” As a
figurative sculptor working in clay, Darla Jackson’s
working procedure begins with the creation of clay
molds to cast the final pieces in various materials such
as plaster or resin. Built on a formal knowledge of human anatomy, her level of expertise and understanding
of this type of sculptural realism informs her current
interest in the anatomy of animals. Darla Jackson.
Curated by Melissa Caldwell.
•
“Convergence: Pottery from Studio and Factory.”
Until recently, studio pottery and industrial ceramic
production have existed in entirely separate spheres.
But the line between them is becoming increasingly
blurred. The current generation of studio potters is
far more open to inspiration from industrial design,
popular culture, and fashion than their predecessors,
and industrial design today is also less regimented
than even a few decades ago. Recent developments in
prototyping technology, small-batch production and
web-based marketing, along with a tremendous expansion of public design awareness, have created surprising
new opportunities for making and selling objects of
all kinds. The 36 artist designers in the exhibition
include: Heather Mae Erickson, Paul Eshelman, Karen
Swyler, Andy Brayman, Kristine Morich, Paul Kotula,
Alain Goyer & Denise Bonneau, Janet DeBoos, Marek
Cecula. Curated by Jody Clowes, commissioned by The
Clay Studio, Philadelphia.
1b
The Center for Emerging Visual Artists, 1521
Locust St., lower level; 215-546-7775. Mar 29–Apr 16.
Mon–Fri 10:00am–5:00pm; sat 12:00–4:00pm or by
appt. Reception Apr 1, 5:00–7:00pm. . Area Restaurants: A variety of Center City restaurants.
•
“Merging Paths in Clay.” A group exhibition with
Associate Artists of The Clay Studio. Lynne Berman,
Shannon Donovan, Lynne Dorman, Kay Gering, Cheryl
Hendershott, Carol Klein, Pam Lethbridge, Diane
Marimow, Kathryn Narrow, Christina Osheim, Karen
Pugliese, Marjorie Robbins, Carole Sivin, Larry Spitz.
Curated by Brooke Hine.
1c Fleisher Ollman, 1616 Walnut St., Suite 100 (1st
floor above St.); 215-545-7562. Mar 31–May 1. Mon–Fri
10:30am–5:30pm; Sat 12:00–5:00pm. Reception Apr 1,
6:00–8:00pm. .
• “Annabeth Rosen: Contingency; Mei-Ling Hom:
Yun Nan = Southern Clouds; Paul Swenbeck: Shaker
Legend-trip.” Work by three artists for whom clay
plays a central role in their artistic practices. Rosen
builds complex organic works out of thousands of
individual hand-crafted ceramic pieces of varying
size, shape, color, and pattern. Hom’s new ceramic
work, made in North Carolina with self-taught potter
Dan Johnston, continues her ongoing contemplation
of cloud imagery and metaphor. Swenbeck’s work
reinterprets traditional ceramics–in this case Neolithic
Jomon pottery–through a 21st-century lens, using
contemporary materials and vibrant colors. Annabeth
Rosen, Mei-ling Hom, Paul Swenbeck.
1d
Sande Webster Gallery, 2006 Walnut St.; 215636-9003. Mar 8–Apr 3. Mon–Fri 10:00am–6:00pm; Sat
11:00am–4:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 6:00–8:00pm.
• “Syd Carpenter: Places of Our Own.” Ceramic
landscapes inspired by the resourcefully ordered
African-American farms of the rural South, combining
images of the clothes line, recycled architecture, and
well tended fertile ground. Syd Carpenter. Curated by
Sande Webster.
1e The Lutheran Church of the Holy Communion,
2111 Sansom St.; 215-567-3668. Mar 31–Apr 2. Wed
9:00am–9:00pm; Thu 10:00am–5:00pm; Fri 10:00am–
5:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 7:00–9:00pm. . Area
Restaurants: El Fuego, Mirah Korean, Fuji Mountain
Japanese, Thai Chef & Noodle Fusion, Primo Hoagies,
TA Flannery’s.
•
“TEMPLES.” This exhibition is comprised of
sculptural ceramics created by graduates (BFA/MFA)
and faculty of the Temple University, Tyler School of
Art ceramic program. Participating artists will depict or
redefine a personal non-secular spirituality of what is
sacred to them. The pieces may also represent/define/
suggest a temple of objects related to the function of a
temple such as relic or reliquary. Heidi Andersen, Peggy
Bradley, Syd Carpenter, John Costanza, Chad Curtis,
Candy Depew, Kate Dowell, Melody Ellis, Lindsay
Feuer, Laura Gascogne, Brian Grow, Laura Haight,
Martha Jackson-Jarvis, Jacqueline J Rolf, Nicholas
Kripal, Eva Kwong, Carla Lombardi, Mitch Messina,
Barbara Messina, Judy Moonelis, Lisa Muller, Laney
Oxman, lo Palmer, Neil Patterson, Debbie Quick, Keith
Renner, Dorothy Roschen, Mel Rubin, Bethany Rusen,
Paul Santoleri, Emily Snedden, Carol Stirton-Broad,
Jack Thompson, Sue VanDuyne, Paula Winokur, Robert
Winokur. Organized by Jacqueline J Rolf and Carol
Stirton-Broad.
1f
Mütter Museum, The College of Physicians
of Philadelphia, 19 S. 22nd St.; 215-563-3737. Feb
2–Aug 2. Daily 10:00am–5:00pm. Reception Apr 2,
5:30–7:30pm. Panel gallery talk with artists, Apr 3,
3:00–4:00pm. . Area Restaurants: Fuji Mountain,
Coventry Deli, Shanghai Wok, T.A. Flannery’s, Smile
Café, El Fuego, Pearl.
•
“Corporeal Manifestations.” A unique collaboration between the Mütter Museum and curator Sasha K.
Reibstein, highlighting artists who are reinterpreting
traditional figurative work by exploring the psychological impact of our biological existence. The exhibition
is inspired by the large overlap between the disciplines
of creating three-dimensional objects from clay, which
is one of the most natural materials available to artists,
and the medical field of documenting, displaying, and
researching medical specimens and their conditions.
Sergei Isupov, Tip Toland, Jason Briggs, Tom Bartel,
Roxanne Jackson, Melissa Mencini, Christina West, Kate
MacDowell, Anne Drew Potter, Jessica Kreutter, Colleen
Toledano. Curated by Sasha K. Reibstein.
Stop 2 (34th St. in front of the University of the
Pennsylvania Hospital)
2a University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, 3260 South St.; 215-898-4001.
Mar 29–Jun 27. Tue–Sat 10:00am–4:30pm.
•
“Interactions in Clay.” Sited at three venerable
Philadelphia institutions, this exhibition involves the
commissioning of new works in response to a piece,
collection or space housed within each venue. Through
these proposed encounters, artists will interact with
historical work or spaces to discover new meanings and
formal strategies. The artists’ work offers each institution—and its public—an expanded or new context for
seeing, interpreting or experiencing their collections or
the way they perceive their space. (The two other sites
being Eastern State Penitentiary and The Philadelphia
Museum of Art.). Steve Keister. Curated by Jody
Clowes, Jo Lauria, John Perreault, Judith Tannenbaum,
commissioned through The Clay Studio, Philadelphia.
2b
Fox Art Gallery / Claudia Cohen Hall, University of Pennsylvania, 249 S. 36th St.; 215-898-5552.
Mar 15–Apr 4. Mon–Fri 10:00am–6:00pm; Sat–Sun
12:00–4:00pm. Reception Mar 30, 6:30–8:00pm. .
Area Restaurants: Bubble House, Cosi, Distrito, New
Deck Tavern, Pallet Restaurant, Penne Restaurant &
Wine Bar, Pod, White Dog Café.
•
“[email protected] 2010: Declarations.” Group exhibition
of clay works by past and present clay faculty and staff.
Matthew Courtney, Ryan Greenheck, Sumi Maeshima,
Michelle Miller, Linda Cordell, Jacklyn DeMeo, Paul
Donnelly, Brad Johnson, Mark Lueders, Ichiro Matsuo,
Jeff Warnock, Matt Wilt, Rebekah Wostrel. Curated by
University of Pennsylvania Clay Program.
Stop 3 (on Washington Ave., SE corner at 22nd)
3a Sub Octo Gallery, 2202 Alter St.; 215-893-8812.
Mar 30–Apr 25. Daily 10:00am–9:00pm. Reception Apr
1, 5:00–9:00pm. . Area Restaurants: Sidecar Bar &
Restaurant, Divan Turkish Kitchen, Dmitri’s.
•
“Val Cushing.” Largest east coast showing of
contemporary ceramics by renowned artist Val Cushing.
Val Cushing.
Stop 4 (on Broad, SE corner at South St.)
4a JAG Fine Art, 1538 Pine St.; 215-840-8591. Mar
27–Jun 1. Wed–Sat 11:00am–6:00pm; Sun 11:00am–
3:00pm. Reception Apr 3, 6:00–9:00pm. . Area Restaurants: Buddakan, Noble American Cookery, El Azteca.
•
“Heart Head or ‘Where’s the Love’.” Solo exhibition
featuring a new series of sculpture and pottery. Matt
Burton. Curated by John Andrulis.
4b
University of the Arts, Hamilton Hall, Gallery
One (Basement), Gallery 316 (3rd Floor), and
Solmson Court (The Great Hall), 320 S. Broad. St.;
215-717-6201. Mar 24–Apr 4. Daily 9:00am–6:00pm.
. Reception Mar 25, 6:00–8:00pm. . Area Restaurants:
The University Café.
•
“A Place Called Paradise.” Site specific sculptures
made with adobe that represent undergraduate students’
response to a visit to Longwood Gardens. All undergraduate ceramics majors at The University of the Arts. Curated
by Lizbeth Stewart and Jim Makins.
•
“Current Investigations.” Current work by the
undergraduate students in the ceramics program at The
University of the Arts. All undergraduate ceramics students. Curated by Lizbeth Stewart and Jim Makins.
•
“Mentors Past and Present.” Former and current
ceramics faculty at The University of the Arts. Bill
Daley, Petras Vaskys, Marcus Aurealius Renzetti, Bill
Parry, Roland Jahn, Rob Forbes, Rudy Staffel, Paula
Winokur, Jeanne Jaffe, Larry Donahue, Alec Karros,
Mark Burns, Ed Eberle, Wayne Bates, Steve Goldner,
Julia Jackson, Byron Temple, Zach Duncan-Tessmer,
Jeff Warnock, Sumi Maeshima, Jack Troy, Jin-hwan Bae,
Kathy Narrow, Hope Rovelto, Heather Mae Erickson,
Nancy Carmen, Karen Aumen, Mark Lueders, Lizbeth
Stewart, Jim Makins. Organized by Lizbeth Stewart and
Jim Makins.
4c University of the Arts, Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery,
333 S. Broad St.; 215-717-6480. Mar 25–Apr 14. Mon,
Tue, Wed, Fri 10:00am–5:00pm; Thu 10:00am–9:00pm;
Sat 12:00–5:00pm. Gala Reception for the 2010 NCECA
Invitational “Earth Matters” and the NCECA 2010 National Juried Student Exhibition at the Galleries at Moore,
Apr 1, 7:00–9:00pm. .
•
“NCECA 2010 National Juried Student Exhibition.” This exhibition marks the premier of the expansion of the NCECA Student Exhibition to a national
scope. Showcasing excellence in undergraduate and
graduate ceramic art from across the United States;
jurors Erin Furimsky and Matt Long selected 41 works
by 40 artists. Christopher Adelhardt, Landon Anderson,
Michael Arnold, Angela Biederman, Ariel Bowman,
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
55
Center City / University City / South Philly Route
Ben Carter, Lauren Clay, James Coquia, Shenny Cruces,
Chandra Debuse, Evan D’Orazio, Zachary Dunn,
Robin Dupont, Devin Farrand, Benjamin Fiess, Ryan
Fletcher, Jared Gabriel, Jonathan Grengs, Melissa
Griffin, Aisha Harrison, Ryan Labar, Sean Larson,
Seungwon Lee, Ginger Lukas, Janet MacPherson, Justin
Manfredi, Keira Norton, Bonilyn Parker, Douglas
Peltzman, Greg Pugh, Kate Roberts, Kelly Ann Schnorr,
Laina Seay, Mark Stafford, Duncan Tweed, Jasmine
Wallace, Mallory Wetherell, Eric Wolever, Paige Wright,
Crisha Yantis.
4d
University of the Arts, 333 S. Broad St., 2nd Floor,
Anderson Hall; 215-717-6106. Mar 31–Apr 3. Wed, Fri,
Sat 10:00am–5:00pm; Thu 10:00am–7:00pm. Reception
Apr 1, 5:00–7:00pm. .
•
exploring the idea of holding, enclosure or containment. Interpretations can be as functional as a beer
mug, as symbolic as a mother’s arms, or as metaphorical as a box of rain. You will see the diversity, skill, and
commitment of our members expressed through this
broad and inclusive theme. Jake Allee, Posey Bacopoulos, Diana Bjel, Barbara Brown, Gratia Brown, Darlene
Davis, Dawn Ferguson, Marko Fields, Doris FischerColbrie, Linda Fitz Gibbon, Patz Fowle, Ovidio Giberga, Samuel Hoffman, Linda Hughes, Mark Issenberg,
Jake Johnson, Brenda Lichman, Robbie Lobell, Lee
Middleman, Debra Oliva, Jeff Pender, Vince Pitelka,
Nan Rothwell, Meryl Ruth, Sam Scott, Eric Serritella,
Claire Shenk Rodgers, Marty Shuter, Alexander Solla,
Simon van der Ven. Curated by Potters Council.
5b
“Who Needs a Pedestal? University of the Arts MFA
Program in Ceramics.” Exhibition of alumni and current
graduate students of the MFA Program in Ceramics at
The University of the Arts.
Philadelphia’s Magic Gardens, 1020 South St.;
215-733-0390. Mar 19–Apr 19. Daily 11:00am–8:00pm.
Reception Apr 1, 5:00–8:00pm. . Area Restaurants:
Supper, Kanella, La Fourno, Varga Bar, Beaumonde,
Brauhaus Schmitz, BBQ.
Stop 5 (7th St., NE corner at South St.)
“Tell-Tale Tiles & Fractured Fantasies.” In partnership with the Tile Heritage Foundation, PMG will
host a juried art exhibition of tile and mosaic artworks.
Tell-Tale Tiles & Fractured Fantasies is inspired by the
rich history of tile and mosaic art in the Philadelphia
area over the past 100 years, Juried by artist and historian Susan Tunick, the scope of the exhibition includes
social, political, personal, and family stories.
5a Show of Hands Gallery, 1006 Pine St.; 215-592-
4010. Mar 19–Apr 30. Mon–Sat 10:00am–6:00pm; Sun
11:30am–5:00pm. Reception Apr 2, 6:00–9:00pm. Area
Restaurants: Mixto, Pine Street Pizza, Café Central.
•
“2010 Potters Council Juried Show “FILL-adelphia”.” Potters Council members were challenged to
create work exploring all of the definitions of the word
“FILL.” “FILL-adelphia” will be an exhibition of works
56
•
5c B Square Gallery, 614 S. 9th St.; 215-625-0692.
Mar 25–May 1. Wed, 9:00am–7:00pm; Thu, 12:00–
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
9:00pm; Fri, 9:00am–7:00pm; Sat, 12:00–6:00pm.
Reception Apr 1, 6:00–8:00pm. . Area Restaurants:
Beau Monde, Bebe’s Barbecue, Sabrina’s Café, Little Fish,
Gnocchi (cash only).
•
“1,895 Years of Pottery.” Showcasing the work of
60 of the nations leading and most experienced potters
highlighting one of the most dynamic facets within the
field of ceramics, utilitarian pottery; a facet of the ceramic arts that has a deep, rich history and is especially
thriving and vibrant today. All 60 potters represented
in this show have at least 25 years of experience working with clay, adding up to over 1,895 years of experience; thus the title is a celebration of that wealth of
experience. Stan Andersen, Linda Arbuckle, Mary Baringer, Joe Bennion, Posey Bacopoulos, Cynthia Bringle,
Bob Briscoe, Bill Brouillard, Doug Casebeer, Linda
Christianson, Malcolm Davis, Jon and Becky Ellenbogen, Susan Filley, Angela Fina, Julia Galloway, Scott
Goldberg, John Glick, Sylvie Granatelli, Louise Harter,
Mark Hewitt, Steven Hill, Clary Ilian, Nick Joerling,
Randy Johnston, Karen Karnes, Gail Kendall, Michael
Kline, Maren Kloppmann, Mary Law, Dick Lehman,
Leah Leitson, Suze Lindsey, Peg Malloy, Warren MacKenzie, Linda McFarling, Jan McKeachie-Johnston, Kent
McLaughlin, Matt Metz, Ron Meyers, Lisa Naples,
Kathryn Narrow, Jeff Oestreich, Neil Patterson, Sandi
Pierantozzi, Pete Pinnell, Douglass Rankin and Will
Ruggles, Harriett Ross, Ellen Shankin, Mark Shapiro,
Linda Sikora, Willi Singleton, Michael Simon, Gay
Smith, McKenzie Smith, Janice Strawder, Will Swanson, Jack Troy, Bill Van Gilder, Holly Walker, Royce
Yoder. Organized by Neil Patterson.
5d
Da Vinci Art Alliance, 704 Catharine St.; 215829-0466. Mar 30–Apr 25. Tue–Sun 10:00am–5:00pm.
Reception Apr 1, 6:30–9:30pm. Area Restaurants: Little
Fish, Cucina Forte, The Saloon, Sabrina’s Cage, James,
Vesusvio, Salt & Pepper, Morning Glory Café, Dmitri’s,
Cantina el Caballito, Dante & Luigi’s, Ralph’s Italian.
• “Out of Place: Clay and Context.” Nine clay
artists working in Chester County, Pennsylvania, an
area rich in pot-making tradition. From the 18th
and 19th Century, our county was home to over 100
potteries producing Quaker stoneware, majolica, and
slipware from the German tradition. Our exhibition
will underscore that contemporary forces in the larger
world alter the shape of regionalism. Susan Bankert,
Paul Bernhardt, Nell Hazinski, Lyla Kaplan, Carla
Lombardi, Lisa Muller, Joyce Nagata, Dale Shuffler,
Jeanie Silver. Organized by Carla Lombardi.
5e Pageant : Soloveev, 607 Bainbridge St.; 215-
925-1535. Mar 27–May 2. Wed–Sun 12:00–8:00pm.
Reception Apr 1, 7:00–10:00pm. . Area Restaurants:
Beau Monde, Bistrot La Minette, Southwark, Little Fish,
Cochon, The Saloon, James, Supper.
•
“Nick Lenker: The Destruction and Creation of
Man.” A film depicting a rite of passage, drawing from mythology, psychology, the occult, and the dualities of nature.
Ceramic objects, film props, as well as digital prints will be
exhibited. Nick Lenker. Curated by Daniel Dalseth.
5f Creperie Beau Monde, 624 S. 6th St.; 215-592-0656,
March 31–April 3. Wed-Fri noon–11:00pm. Sat 10am-11pm.
•
“a la cARTe.” Drawing together the work of clay
artists and cuisine from Philadelphia restaurants, “a
la cARTe” explores the intersection of economic and
aesthetic practices and discourse. Specialty dishes
and drinks will be served on artist-made tableware
for a limited time at participating locations. All of
the artist-made tableware will also be available for
purchase. Artists include Jenni Brant, Doug Casebeer,
Sam Chung, Erica Cioe, Steven Colby, Mark Cole,
Chandra DeBuse, Heather Mae Erickson, Jana Evans,
Diana Fayt, Marty Fielding, Julia Galloway, Angus
Graham, Ryan Greenheck, Nell Hazinski, Hiroe
Hanazono, Niel Hora, Ayumi Horie, Brian R. Jones,
Alex Karros, Melissa McGurgan, Joyce Nagata, Kathryn Narrow, Brooke Noble, Neil Patterson, Candice
Ring, Hide Sadohara, Stacy Snyder, Janice Strawder,
Munemitsu Taguchi, Skeff Thomas, Christian
Tonsgard, Elizabeth Robinson Wiley. Organized by:
Jana Evans, Melissa McGurgan, Kathryn Narrow, and
Christian Tonsgard.
5g Eyes Gallery, 402 South St.; 215-925-0193.
Mar 1–May 31. Mon–Thu 11:00am–7:00pm; Fri–Sat
11:00am–8:00pm; Sun 12:00–7:00pm. -1st floor
only. Area Restaurants: Xochitle, Buganvilla, Copa
Banana, and Famous Fourth Street Delicatessen.
•
“Talavera from the Uriarte Workshop, Puebla,
Mexico.” Hand painted “Talavera” majolica from the 100
year old Uriarte Workshop of Puebla, Mexico. Special
work of Marcela Lobos with Uriarte Workshop artisans.
Curated by Julia Zagar.
Stop 6 (on 7th St., west side of Washington Square)
6a Locks Gallery, 600 Washington Square South; 215629-1000. Mar 23–Apr 24. Tue–Sat 10:00am–6:00pm.
Reception Apr 3, 5:30–7:30pm.
•
“Jill Bonovitz, Kathy Butterly, Betty Woodman.”
The porcelain vessels by Jill Bonovitz are a variation
on a theme that the artist has been working with since
the 1990s. Kathy Butterly’s porcelain and earthenware
vessels are elaborate objects suggestive of costumed flesh
or collapsing, ornate chalices. Betty Woodman’s work
takes form in both canvas-and-clay wall pieces and
free-standing ceramic sculptures. Jill Bonovitz, Kathy
Butterly, Betty Woodman.
6b
Bridgette Mayer Gallery, 709 Walnut St.; 215413-8893. Mar 30–May 1. Tue–Sat 10:00am–6:00pm.
Reception Apr 2, 6–8:30pm. Area Restaurants: Union
Trust, Morimoto, Aqua, Jones.
•
“Exploding Relationships.” Large and small
examples of Steve Tobin’s legendary ceramic and glass
“bang pots”. Tobin has conducted tens of thousands
of explosions to develop this new visual language. By
translating an explosion into form, Tobin documents
the movement of order into chaos. Steve Tobin. Curated by Bridgette Mayer.
6c James Oliver Gallery, 723 Chestnut St., 4th floor;
215-923-1242. Mar 27–Apr 25. Mon 12:00–5:00pm;
Tue–Fri 5:00–8:00pm; Sat 12:00–7:00pm. Reception
Apr 1, 6:00–9:00pm. Area Restaurants: Morimoto,
Union Trust, Chifa, Jones, LaScala’s, Aqua Malaysian &
Thai Restaurant.
•
“Atmosphere.” Features seven ceramic artists
investigating and responding to their natural, artificial,
and mediated environments. These artists consider a
range of surroundings from the mundane everyday
spaces of parking lots to the uncommon and spectacular
landscapes of the earth’s poles to the immaterial, virtual
worlds of data and the media. In each environment,
humanities place within and effect upon our world is
examined. Cyndy Giachetti, Debbie Kupinsky, Laura
Primozic, Brian Bolden, Alex Hibbitt, Merrie Wright,
Kimberly Greene. Curated by Kimberly Greene.
Center City/University City/
South Philly Restaurants
R1: El Fuego, 2104 Chestnut St.; 215-751-1435. R10:
The Side Car Bar and Grille, 2201 Christian St.;
215-732-3429. R2: Miran Korean Restaurant, 2034
Chestnut St.; 215-569-1200. R3: Fuji Mountain, 2030
Chestnut St.; 215-751-0939. R4: Coventry Deli, 2000
Market St.; 215-972-8310. R5: Pearl, 1904 Chestnut St.
R6: Marathon Grille, 1818 Market St.,; 215-564-4745.
R7: New Deck Tavern, 3408 Sansom St.; 215-3864600. R8: Pallet Restaurant, 3549 Chestnut St,; 215387-8000. R9: White Dog Café, 3420 Sansom St.; 215386-9224. R11: Divan Turkish Kitchen, 918 South
22nd St.; 215-545-5790. R12: Dimitris, 795 South 3rd
St.; 215-625-0556. R13: Buddakan, 325 Chestnut St.;
215-574-9440. R14: Noble American Cookery, 2025
Sansom St.; 215-568-7000. R15: El Azteca Mexican
Restaurant., 714 Chestnut St. R16: Cucina Forte, 768
South 8th St.; 215-238-0778. R17: Salt and Pepper,
746 South 6th St.; 215-238-1920. R18: aladeen, 619
South St. R19: Bridget Foys, 200 South St. R20:
Famous Fourth Street Delicatessen, 700 S 4th St. R21:
James, 824 South 8th St.; 215-629-4980. R22: Creperie
Beau Monde, 624 South 6th St.; 215-592-0656. R23:
Café Central, 1218 Pine St.; 215-735-1880. R24:
Mixto, 1141 Pine St.,; 215-592-0363. R25: More Than
Just Ice Cream, 1119 Locust St.; 215-574-0586. R26:
Brauhaus Schmitz, 718 South St.; (267) 909-8814.
R27: Kanella, 1001 Spruce St.; 215-922-1773. R28:
Varga Bar, 941 Spruce St.; 215-627-5200. R29: New
Samosa, 1214 Walnut St.; 215-546-2009.
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
57
Old City Route
Stop 1 (on Arch St., near the NE corner of 2nd and
Arch Sts. This is the only stop on this route.)
1a
Rosenfeld Gallery, 113 Arch St.; 215-9221376. Mar 31–May 2. Wed–Thu 10:00am–5:00pm;
Fri 10:00am–9:00pm; Sat 10:00am–5:00pm; Sun
12:00–5:00pm. Reception Apr 2, 6:00–9:00pm. .
•
“Ken Vavrek, Paula Winokur, Robert Winokur.”
The three artists will each have one-person exhibitions of
their recent ceramic works.
1b
The Clay Studio, 137 N. 2nd St.; 215-9253453 ext. 10. Mar 19–May 2. Mon–Sat 10:00am–
9:00pm; Sun 10:00am–3:00pm. Reception Apr 2,
5:00–9:00pm. .
Conven
tion Ce
58
nter ½
•
“Of This Century: Residents, Fellows and Select
Guest Artists of The Clay Studio.” A group exhibition of work from current and former resident artists,
Shapiro fellows and select guest artists (2000–2010).
Artists include: Myung Jin Choi, Bryan Czibesz, Hiroe
Hanazono, Ryan Kelly, Melissa Mytty, Nathan Prouty,
Amy Santoferraro, Shawn Spangler, Munemitsu Taguchi,
Joanie Turbek, John Williams, David Ray, David
Cushway, Anne Gibbs, Catrin Howell, Jae Won Lee,
llona Romule, Jin Won Chung, Brad Johnson, Allison
McGowan, Susan Beiner, Christyl Boger, Jeremy Brooks,
Linda Cordell, Kate Doody, Colleen Toledano, Heather
Mae Erickson, Rain Harris, Paul Donnelly, Byung Joo
Suh, Hide Sadohara, Candy Depew, Benji Schulman,
Kari Radasch, Rob Raphael, Andy Shaw, Rebekah
mile
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
Wostrel, Rob Kirsch, Adelaide Paul, Julie York, Michael
Fujita, Zach Duncan-Tessmer. Curated by Jeff Guido.
1c Dalet Gallery, 141 N. 2nd St.; 215-923-2424.
•
.
“The Travel Show.” Mar 29–Apr 27. Sun-Sat
11:00am-8:30pm; Wed 10:00am-8:30pm. Reception
Apr 2, 5:00–8:30pm. Twelve artists will be presenting a
work that is about “place.” Their pieces will be designed
such that they are portable, and easily shipped. The
works will range from installation, to wall and pedestal
pieces. This premise of portability references the idea
of packing for travel, and is a response to the irksome
task of packing and shipping work for exhibitions.
Bruk Dunbar, Pattie Chalmers, Shay Church, Craig
Clifford, Gerit Grimm, Del Harrow, Debbie Kupinsky,
Peter Morgan, Kristen Morgin, Amy Santoferraro, Kim
Tucker, Derek Weisberg. Organized by Peter Morgan.
Kanovitz, Chris Antemann, Crystal Boger, Kurt Weiser,
Dirk Staschke, and more. Curated by Leslie Ferrin.
“Birth of Shape.” Mar 29–Apr 26. Sun-Sat
11:00am-8:30pm; Wed 10:00am-8:30pm. Reception
Apr 2, 5:00–8:30pm. Four artists will present a variety
of ceramic sculptures, using different styles, scale, and
technologies. Peter Callas, Chrissy Callas, Susan Puleo,
Wendy Holcomb.
“Adelaide Paul: The Peaceable Queendom.” An installation of new work by the Philadelphia-based ceramic
artist and sculptor in the main gallery space. Exploring
the idea that American culture posits an alternately cloyingly sentimental and brutally callous relationship between humans and both domesticated and wild animals,
the exhibition will include life-sized interpretations of
animate beings such as mountain lions, dogs, and horses,
made from both found and fabricated materials.
•
1d
Pentimenti Gallery, 145 N. 2nd St.; 215-6259990. Mar 16–Apr 30. Mon & Tue 12:00–5:00pm; Wed
10:00am–5:30pm; Thu 10:00am–7:00pm; Fri 10:00am–
9:00pm; Sat 10:00am–6:00pm. Reception Artist Talk &
Reception Apr 2, 5:00pm. .
• “Julie York: Reflectionnoitcelfer.” The work explores
the artist’s interest in visual relations and ways of seeing.
The work presents objects and images as both static and
in flux, referencing the present and the past. Julie York.
Curated by Christine Pfister.
1e (R1) Race Street Café, 208 Race St.; 215-6276181. Mar 31–Apr 3. Wed–Fri 11:30am–2:00am; Sat
10:30am–2:00am.
•
“a la cARTe.” Drawing together the work of clay
artists and Philadelphia restaurants, “a la cARTe” explores
the intersection of economic and aesthetic practices and
discourse. Specialty dishes and drinks will be served on
artist made tableware for a limited time at participating locations. All artist made tableware will be available
for purchase. Jenni Brant, Doug Casebeer, Sam Chung,
Erica Cioe, Steven Colby, Mark Cole, Chandra DeBuse,
Heather Mae Erickson, Jana Evans, Diana Fayt, Marty
Fielding, Julia Galloway, Angus Graham, Ryan Greenheck, Nell Hazinski, Hiroe Hanazono, Niel Hora, Ayumi
Horie, Brian R. Jones, Alex Karros, Melissa McGurgan,
Joyce Nagata, Kathryn Narrow, Brooke Noble, Neil
Patterson, Candice Ring, Hide Sadohara, Stacy Snyder,
Janice Strawder, Munemitsu Taguchi, Skeff Thomas,
Christian Tonsgard, Elizabeth Robinson Wiley. Organized
by Jana Evans, Melissa McGurgan, Kathryn Narrow,
Christian Tonsgard.
1f
Salt, 212 Race St.; 215-939-7426. Mar 26–Apr 18.
Wed 10:00am–6:00pm; Thu and Fri 11:00am–6:00pm;
Sat 11:00am–8:00pm. Reception Apr 2, 6:30–10:00pm.
•
“Visual Translations.” This exhibition will look at
the work of artists who, while producing three dimensional pieces, use two dimensional elements as a reference
point in their work. This occurs in a variety of ways: as
drawing on objects, as form used to create a drawing in
space, and in the relationship between two-dimensional
works and three-dimensional objects. David Alban, Linda
Casbon, Neil Forrest, Jae Won Lee, Lisa Nappa, Christopher Russell, Anat Shiftan, Julie Tesser, Holly Walker.
Organized by Linda Casbon.
1g
Flotsam + Jetsam, 224 Race St.; 215-351-9914.
Mar 30–May 31. Tues–Sat 10–6, Fri 10–8:30. Reception
Apr 2, 5:00–8:30pm.
•
“Simulacrum.” Patterned ceramic sculptures that
utilize repeating abstract motifs informed by the biological world. Rain Harris.
•
“Inferred landscape.” Slipcast, thrown, and handbuilt functional pottery exploring the themes of landscape
and architecture. Paul Donnelly.
• “Dot Dot Dash.” Functional porcelain objects for
the dinner table patterned with decorative and unsavory
motifs. Meredith Host.
1h
Wexler Gallery, 201 N. 3rd St.; 215-923-7030.
Mar 5–May 1. Tue–Sat 10:00am–6:00pm. Reception Apr
2, 5:00–8:00pm. first floor only.
•
“The Hermaphrodites: Living in Two Worlds.”
Focusing on figural sculpture that both embodies the
literal definition of hermaphrodites (encompassing
both genders) and the conceptual nature of the term
as it applies to figural sculpture that can be categorized
equally as contemporary fine art sculpture, as applied or
decorative art. Tip Toland, Sergei Isupov, Dana Major
•
1i OLC, 152 N. 3rd St.; 215-923-6085. Apr 1–30.
Tue–Sat 10:00am–5:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 6:00–
8:00pm plus book signing. Area Restaurants: Race St.
Café, Fork, Farmacia, Society Hotel, Old City Cheese
Shop, Café Ole.
1j Café Ole, 147 N. 3rd St.; 215-627-2140. Mar
31–Apr 3. Wed–Sat 7:30am–7:00pm.
•
“a la cARTe.” Drawing together the work of
clay artists and Philadelphia restaurants, “a la cARTe”
explores the intersection of economic and aesthetic
practices and discourse. Specialty dishes and drinks will
be served on artist made tableware for a limited time at
participating locations. All artist made tableware will be
available for purchase. Jenni Brant, Doug Casebeer, Sam
Chung, Erica Cioe, Steven Colby, Mark Cole, Chandra
DeBuse, Heather Mae Erickson, Jana Evans, Diana Fayt,
Marty Fielding, Julia Galloway, Angus Graham, Ryan
Greenheck, Nell Hazinski, Hiroe Hanazono, Niel Hora,
Ayumi Horie, Brian R. Jones, Alex Karros, Melissa
McGurgan, Joyce Nagata, Kathryn Narrow, Brooke
Noble, Neil Patterson, Candice Ring, Hide Sadohara,
Stacy Snyder, Janice Strawder, Munemitsu Taguchi, Skeff
Thomas, Christian Tonsgard, Elizabeth Robinson Wiley.
Curated by Organized by: Jana Evans, Melissa McGurgan, Kathryn Narrow, Christian Tonsgard.
1k the candycoated center, 118 N. 3rd St., 4th Floor
(walk-up); 215-498-2153. Mar 26–May 22. Tue–Sat
11:00am–5:00pm. Reception Apr 2, 6:00–9:00pm.
•
“Erotomania: An International Display of Erotica.”
There are many different kinds of maniacs. Egomaniacs
love themselves, pyromaniacs love fire, but perhaps the
most interesting are those obsessed with love itself. Erotomania is the extraordinary condition where the fantasy of
being in love can drive people to extremes. Leroy Johnson,
Kukuli Verlade, David Cushway, David East, Nidhi Jalan,
Julia Stratton, Wally Gilbert, Su Tomesen, Marc Th. Van
der Voorn, Nick Kripal, Justin Credible, Cammi Climaco,
Nikolai Renke, Julie York, Sinisa Kukec, Jesse Potts, Kevin
Mullavey, William Eadon, Chris Staley, Mortiz Ebinger,
Daan Ooms, Maryanne Friel, Gilbert Van Drunen, Timea
Tihanyi, Boris Van Berkum, Sharon Sullivan, Daniel Petraitis, Sophie Heawood, Pawel Kruk, David Posey, Stefan
Vis, Marc Leuders, Heeseung Lee, Marjet Wessels Boer,
Nami Yamamoto, Matt Suib, Nadia Hironaka, Garrick
Gott, Adi Aronau. Candy Depew, facilitator.
•
“Margaret O’Rourke: Translucent Porcelain and
Light.” Fine translucent porcelain lights for domestic,
corporate and large scale interiors. Margaret O’Rourke.
Curated by Mark Sconyers.
1l Moderne Gallery, 111 N. 3rd St.; 215-923-8536.
Mar 26–Apr 30. Tue–Sat 11:00am–6:00pm. Yes, with
some difficulty. Area Restaurants: Old City.
•
“Vintage American Studio Ceramics: 1925-1985.”
Vintage ceramics by Masters of the American Craft Movement. Currier, Daley, DeVore, Ferguson, Frey, Grotell,
Rhodes, Soldner, Staffel, Takaezu, Turner, Voulkos.
Curated by Robert Aibel.
1m
The Works Gallery, 303 Cherry St.; 215-9227775. Mar 31–Apr 30. Tue–Sat 10:00am–6:00pm.
Reception Apr 2, 5:30–8:30pm. . Area Restaurants:
Fork, Bistro 7, Continental.
•
“A Watershed Connection.” Sculptural vessels and
forms and collaborative works on paper. Chris Gustin, Nancy Selvin, Ruth Borgenicht. Curated by Ruth Snyderman.
1n
The Snyderman Gallery, 303 Cherry St.; 215238-9576. Mar 31–May 20. Tue–Sat 10:00am–6:00pm.
Reception Apr 2, 5:30–8:30pm. Area Restaurants: Café
Ole, Fork, Race Street Café.
•
“Conversations, Coincidences and Motivations.”
There is no singular “Alfred Experience.” The following
represents the range of Alfred MFA alumni whose work,
ideas, and service to the community have stimulated and
challenged a recent group of MFA alums (the curators)
to pursue their individual experience in art and ceramics
at Alfred. Anne Currier, Andrea Marquis, Josh DeWeese,
Bruce Dehnert, Kala Stein, Jason Green, Rebecca Catterall, Liz Sparks, Sanam Emami, Tom Spleth, Shawn
Murrey, Juan Santiago, Lee Somers, Rebecca Chappell,
Judith Salomon, Bill Brouillard, Michael Fujita, Chris
Baskin, Sam Morgan. Organized by Marquis, Stein,
Sparks, Murrey, Chapell, Fujita.
1o
Painted Bride Art Center, 230 Vine St.; 215-9259914. Mar 30–May 15. Tue–Sat 12:00–6:00pm. Reception Apr 2, 5:00–9:00pm. . Area Restaurants: Ristorante
Panorama & il bar, Gigi Restaurant and Lounge, Amada,
Konak, Dolce.
•
“J.J. McCracken: Hunger, Philadelphia.” Visual
artist J.J. McCracken spent the summer of 2009 as
Guest Artist-In-Residence at The Clay Studio in the
Old City neighborhood of Philadelphia laying the
foundation for this upcoming active installation. “Calling attention to need as an under-discussed issue in society, the Hunger project juxtaposes plenty with value,
immediate gratification with sustainability.” During
a closing celebration all project proceeds, including a
fully functioning community garden, will be gifted to
the Stenton Family Manor Homeless Shelter in Mount
Airy. The exhibition will include both an installation
and performance piece. J.J. McCracken. Curated by
John Perreault.
1p
Wood Turning Center, 501 Vine St.; 215-6238000. Mar 31–Jul 17. Tue–Fri 10:00am–5:00pm; Sat
12:00–5:00pm. Reception Apr 2, 5:30–7:30pm. . Area
Restaurants: Radicchio Café.
•
“Magic Realism: Exploring Material Illusions.”
This exhibition brings together 19 artists who use
materials including wood, clay, leather, and glass to
create provocative illusions of other materials. Ruth
Borgenicht, Jim Butler, John Cederquist, Tom Eckert,
Susan Glasgow, Michelle Holzapfel, Ron Isaacs, Janel
Jacobson, Ani Kasten, Greg Nangle, Randall Rosenthal,
Dan Saal, Lincoln Seitzman, Eric Serritella, Richard
Shaw, Brent Skidmore, Paul Stankard, David Wiseman
and Xuti. Curated by Robin Rice.
1q
Hudson Beach Glass, 26 S. Strawberry St.; 267319-1887. Mar 31–Apr 30. Tue–Fri 12:00–7:00pm; Sat
11:00am–7:00pm; Sun 12:00–5:00pm. Reception Apr 2,
5:30–9:30pm. Area Restaurants: Amada, Fork, Eulogy,
Bennelux Tasting Room, Haru.
•
“Clay, A Way of Life.” Figures and wall relief murals,
wood fired (anagama), stoneware. Joy Brown.
Area Restaurants
R1: Race Street Café, 208 Race St.; 215-627-6181.
R2: café ole, 147 North 3rd St.; 215-627-2140. R3:
Charlies Pub, 114 N 3rd St. R4: Fork, 306 Market St.;
215-625-9425. R5: Amada, 217 Chestnut St.; 215-6252450. R6: Eulogy, 136 Chestnut St.; 215-413-1918.
R7: Continental, 138 Market St. R8: Old City Cheese
Shop,160 North 3rd St.; 215-238-1716. R9: Farmicia,
15 S 3rd St. R10: Society Hill Hotel, 301 Chestnut
St.; 215-925-9570. R11: Cube Libre, 10 S 2nd St;
215-627-0666. R12: Sassafras Bar, 48 South 2nd St.;
215-925-2317. R13: Chloe, 232 Arch St.; 215-6292337. R14: La Locanda del Ghiottone, 130 N 3rd St.
R15: Bistro 7, 7 North 3rd St. 931–1560. Reception.
R16: Continental, 138 Market St. R17: Radicchio,
402 Wood St.; 215-627-6850.
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
59
Northern Liberties / Fishtown Tour (not a shuttle. Stay with your bus for the whole tour)
Stop 1
1a Flex Space @ The Ceramic Shop, 3245 Amber St.;
215-427-9665. Mar 1–Apr 30. Mon–Fri 9:00am–5:00pm;
Sat 10:00am–2:00pm. Reception Mar 30, 7:30–9:30pm.
Area Restaurants: The Hinge, Mercer Café.
• “Pioneers.” Over the last 50 years, two high school
ceramics instructors, Paul Bernhardt and John Matthews,
have inspired numerous artists. This exhibition will
highlight some of the many alumni who have graduated
from the renowned, Conestoga High School in Berwyn,
Pennsylvania. Paul Bernhardt, John Matthews, Malcolm
Mobutu Smith, Paul Donnelly, Michael Connelly, Mark
Lueders, Jeff Warnock, Eric Eley, Steve Scheaffer. Organized by Mark Lueders.
1b
Amber Street Studios, 3239 North Amber St.;.
Mar 29–Apr 3. Wed–Fri 9:00am–5:00pm; Sat 10:00am–
5:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 6:00–9:00pm.
•
“Clayworks: The Collective @30.” Baltimore
Clayworks flourishes and finds its collective institutional
voice through the interaction and the ceramic artwork
of its artists. The artists exhibiting are currently active,
producing, teaching, exhibiting,
ceramic artists.
Donough, Robin Strangfeld, Blake Jamison Williams.
Organized by Casey McDonough.
Stop 2
FLUXspace, 3000 N. Hope St.; 914-806-4889. Mar
29–Apr 5. Wed–Sun 12:00–4:00pm. Reception Apr 1,
6:00–10:00pm. . Area Restaurants: Freddy and Tony’s.
•
“Constructs.” The artists represent an important
niche in ceramics today. They are alumni of Tyler School
of Art’s ceramics program. Dylan Beck, Kate Dowell,
Daniel Forrest Hoffman. Organized by Daniel Hoffman.
•
“A Post Production Moment.” The selected artists
bring to their work an aesthetic that reflects their specific
background and heritage while talking in clay to a globally informed audience. These artists address issues of
production in its physical, cultural, and ideological forms
by either appropriating, reconfiguring, or reconstructing the recognizable in our everyday lives, subversively
demanding that we reconsider our understanding of reality. Jelena Gazivoda, Kate Doody, Benjamin Schulman,
Danielle Richter, Sin - Ying Ho, Mat Karas. Organized by
Anat Shiftan and Kate Doody.
Stop 3
3a Stella Elkins Tyler Gallery, 2001 N. 13th St.; 267536-9696. Mar 30–Apr 3. Tue–Sat 10:00am–6:00pm.
Reception Apr 1, 4:00–8:00pm. .
•
“Divergence.” Features the evolving work of current
Tyler graduate students in the ceramics area. David Bruce,
Matthew Ziemke, Lauren Dombrowiak, Theo Ulia.
Curated by Chad Curtis and Nicholas Kripal.
3b
The Piazza at Tyler School of Art, 2001 N. 13th
St.; 267-536-9696. Mar 30–Apr 3. Tue–Sat 10:00am–
6:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 4:00–8:00pm. .
•
“Intersections.” Features the work of a selection of
Tyler students that have graduated from the ceramics area
within the past five years. Dylan Beck, Benjamin DeMott,
Cavan Drake, Daniel Hoffman, Sarah House, Jerry Kaba,
Andrea Marquis, Eric Miller, Louise Radochonski, Jury
Smith. Curated by Chad Curtis and Nicholas Kripal
Stop 4
4a Little Berlin, 119 W. Montgomery St.; 610-308-
0579. Mar 31–Apr 30. Wed 10:00am–5:00pm. Area
Restaurants: Modo Mio, Johnny Brendas, Taco Riendo,
Memphis Taproom, Rocket Cat, The Piazza.
•
“Multiples of Five.” Mar
31–Apr 3. An energetic exhibition
where figure, object, and installation intersect with repetition…
from translucent porcelain to
earthenware, each artist’s approach to process and conceptual
exploration is expressed within the
realm of the multiple. Frederick
Bartolovic, Jim Hake, Casey Mc-
•
“Scene.” Exhibition of artists working with
the performative aspects of the ceramic object. This
experimental work uses distinct qualities of performance
to bring the ceramic objects to a wider audience. Using
video, Internet, and stage design, the typically static ceramic art object is activated. Ane Fabricius Christiansen,
Henny Linn Kjellberg, Jennifer Woodin. Organized by
Jennifer Woodin.
approx.
1 mile
4b Highwire Gallery, 2040 Frankford Ave.; 215-426-
2685. Mar 31–May 2. Wed–Thu 12:00–4:00pm; Fri
3:00–9:00pm; Sat–Sun 12:00–5:00pm. Reception Apr
2, 3:00–9:00pm. . Area Restaurants: Rocket Cat Café,
Memphis Tap Room, Johnny Brenda’s.
•
“Puneeta Mittal: Of the Earth.” Ceramic vessels,
sculpture and installations. Puneeta Mittal.
4c Rocket Cat Café, 2001 Frankford Ave.; 215-730-
4526. Mar 1–Apr 5. Mon–Fri 7:00am–9:00pm; Sat–Sun
8:00am–8:00pm. Reception Apr 2, 6:00–9:00pm. , one
stair at entrance. Area Restaurants: Ida Mae’s Bruncherie,
Johnny Brenda’s Tavern.
•
“Get Mugged.” An exhibition introducing the
increasingly popular Fishtown area to the conversation of
the handmade mug. Cups from over 15 local and national
ceramic artists will be on view. Free organic fair trade coffee
is included with the purchase of a piece. Various artists.
Stop 5
5a Crane Arts Building, 1400 N. American St.; 215232-8183.
[email protected], 1400 N. American St.; 215-232-8183.
Mar 25–May 2. Wed–Sat 12:00–6:00pm. Reception Apr
1, 6:00–9:00pm. . Area Restaurants: Bar Ferdinand,
Johnny Brenda’s, Standard Tap, Swift Half Pub, El
Camino Real, Vino.
•
“Catalyze This: Contemporary Ceramic Practices.”
NCECA is being hosted in Philadelphia at the same
time as the Southern Graphics Conference (SGC). To
support both conferences, [email protected] is presenting two
exhibitions at once, consisting of vastly different materials
and intention to simultaneously explore the individual as
independent and as brand. The goal of this simultaneous
exploration is to showcase the tensions, similarities, illusions, and impacts of the self. Syd Carpenter, Art Johnson,
Jim Makins, Brian Meunier, Melissa Mytty, Julie Schustack.
It is accompanied by a showcase of work from University
of Delaware second year MFA students Kenny Delio and
Claudia Torres-Guillemard. Curated by Abby Donovan.
60
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
Indigo Arts Gallery at Crane Arts, 1400 N. American
St., Suite 104; 215-765-1041. Mar 11–Apr 3. Wed–Sat
12:00–6:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 6:00–9:00pm. . Area
Restaurants: Bar Ferdinand, Johnny Brenda’s, Standard Tap,
Swift Half Pub, El Camino Real, Vino.
•
“African Vessels.” Traditional ceramic vessels from
Africa. Works from Mali, Nigeria, Burkina Faso, South
Africa. Various artists. Curated by Anthony H. Fisher.
Icebox at Crane Arts, 1400 N. American St.; 215232-3203. Mar 3–Apr 4. Wed–Sat 10:00am–8:00pm.
Reception Apr 1, 6:00–9:00pm. . Area Restaurants: Bar
Ferdinand, Johnny Brenda’s, Standard Tap, Swift Half
Pub, El Camino Real, Vino.
•
“Medium Resistance.” Recent discourse tends to
force print and craft objects into not-so-recent, even
outright conservative categories: as fine art, they must be
autonomous, original, and auratic; as artisanship, they
must rely on tactility, skill, and apprenticeship. In both
instances, printmaking and crafts are defined in defensive
opposition to the forces and effects of mass culture,
reproducing an old-fashioned binary in which art and
artisanship provide a substitute sphere or “authentic”
creative experience rather than a critical engagement with
cultural production at large. This exhibition features
contemporary works of print and craft that resist such
an either-or classification. Various artists including Piper
Shepard, Robert Dawson, Francesc Ruiz. Curated by
Nicholas Kripal, Phillip Glahn, Richard Hricko.
Crane Arts Project Room, 1400 N. American St., Suite
104; 215-232-3203. Mar 3–Apr 3. Wed–Sat 10:00am–
8:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 6:00–10:00pm. . Area
Restaurants: Bar Ferdinand, Johnny Brenda’s, Standard
Tap, Swift Half Pub, El Camino Real, Vino.
•
“Practice of the Druggist.” Ben DeMott and Eric
Miller will develop an installation of abstract work that
purveys their common and individual interests, as well as
their relationship as friends and collaborators. It navigates
through ancillary interests, commonality, brotherhood, and
culture; then it will develop into broader formats of accessibility and technology. This installation is manifested via
a blog at http://practiceofthedruggist.blogspot.com over a
six month period from August 2009 to February 2010. Ben
DeMott and Eric Miller.
The Grey Area, 1400 N. American St.; 215-232-3203.
Mar 3–Apr 4. Wed–Sat 10:00am–8:00pm. Reception Apr
1, 6:00–9:00pm. . Area Restaurants: Bar Ferdinand,
Johnny Brenda’s, Standard Tap, Swift Half Pub, El
Camino Real, Vino.
•
“Fabricating Ideas.” An on-going project dedicated
to exhibiting work that uses the latest advanced manufacturing technologies and three-dimensional fabrication
tools in the artistic process. While each of the participating artists has a very strong foundation in ceramics, they
are all innovators with regard to material, process, and
conceptualization. David East, Neil Forrest, Del Harrow,
Jeanne Quinn, Steven Thurston. Curated by Chad Curtis
and Forrest Snyder.
Crane Arts Green Space, 1400 N. American St.; 215232-3203. Mar 3–Apr 4. Wed–Sat 10:00am–8:00pm.
Reception Apr 1, 6:00–9:00pm. . Area Restaurants: Bar
Ferdinand, Johnny Brenda’s, Standard Tap, Swift Half
Pub, El Camino Real, Vino.
•
“Paisley for the Patio.” Large scale ceramic
sculpture presented as monuments to ornamental motifs
amidst a blooming garden. Tamara Laird. Curated by
Nicholas Kripal.
5b
Bahdeebahdu, 1522 N. American St.; 215627-5002. Mar 11–Apr 3. Tue–Fri 11:00am–6:00pm;
Sat 11:00am–4:00pm or by appt. Reception Apr 2,
6:00–9:00pm. .
•
“Emergence.” A group exhibition in association with The National Council on Education for
the Ceramic Arts (NCECA), Philagrafika 2010, and
FiberPhiladelphia. The work represents the complexity of ordinary life—shifting the perceptual patterns
of the world. Participating artists working with clay,
printmaking and fabric explore this concept in a
world of stability and change. The process from which
emergent properties in either the observed or observing
system can commonly be identified by their patterns of
accumulating change, most generally called ‘growth’.
Featuring over 15 local and national artists working
with ceramics, printmaking, and fabric. Curated by
Brooke Hine.
Stop 6
Bambi Gallery, The Schmidts Piazza, 1001-13 N. 2nd
St.; 267-319-1374. Mar 31–Apr 17. Wed, 1:00–7:00pm;
Thu, 1:00–8:00pm; Fri, 1:00–7:00pm; Sat, 12:00–
7:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 6:00–8:00pm. . Area Restaurants: The Swift Half, P.Y.T., Bar Ferdinand, Standard
Tap, Vino, Dos Segundos, Koi.
•
“Man, Myth, and Magic.” A collaboration of work
by Philadelphia artists Paul Swenbeck and Nick Lenker.
Their work blends clay and new media inspired by
mythological narratives and traditional ceramics. Nick
Lenker, Paul Swenbeck. Curated by Megan Webb.
Stop 7
7a Art Star, 623 N. Second St.; 215-238-1557.
Mar 27–Apr 25. Tue–Sat 11:00am–7:00pm; Sun
12:00–6:00pm. Reception Apr 2, 6:00–9:00pm. Area
Restaurants: Soy Café, The Abby, Standard Tap, The
Cantina, Rustica Pizza.
•
“The Souvenir Shop.” Souvenirs act as memory
markers. They can be both a poetic attempt to summarize an experience and a crass commodification of our
personal memories. The Souvenir Shop celebrates this
strange co-mingling of nostalgia and consumption with
a diverse collection of handmade souvenirs specifically
designed for the NCECA Conference and Philadelphia.
Featuring over 25 artists from across the country. Curated by Kyan Bishop, Kate Hardy, and Joanie Turbek.
7b
Projects Gallery, 629 N. 2nd St.; 267-303-9652.
Mar 31–May 1. Wed–Sat 12:00–7:00pm. Reception Apr
2, 6:00–9:00pm. . Area Restaurants: Abbaye, Bar Ferdinand, II Cantuccio, Koi, Kong, Liberties, North Third,
Silk City, Standard Tap.
•
“To Die For.” Whether in effigy pots, vase paintings, or offerings to the dead, ceramics has always been
a significant material in the world of the rituals of death,
spirituality, and transformation. Invited and juried artists have responded to the timeless topics of death and
dying, the nature of mortality, the afterlife, and the surrounding fears of loss—hosts, ghosts and the meaning of
life. Mark Burns, Richard Cleaver, John De Fazio, David
Furman, Peter Gourfain, Kathy King, Charles Kraft,
Matt Nolen, Mel Rubin, Richard Shaw, Ehren Tool,
Monica Van den Dool. Curated by Judith Schwartz and
Jack Thompson.
Northern Liberties Restaurants
R1: Freddy and Tony’s, 201 West Allegheny Ave.;
215-634-3889. R2: Johnny Brendas, 1201 Frankford
Ave.; 215-739-9684. R3: El Camino Real, 1040 North
2nd St.; 215-925-1110. R4: Sketch , 413 E Girard Ave;.
R5: Ekta Indian, 1040 North 2nd St.; 215-925-1110.
R6: Modo Mio, 161 West Girard Ave.; 215-203-8707.
R7: Taco Riendo, 1301 North 5th St.; 215-235-2294.
R8: The Standard Tap, 901 North 2nd St.;215-2380630. R9: Cantina dos Segundos, 931 North 2nd St.;
215-629-0500. R10: Memphis Tap Room, 2331 East
Cumberland St.; 215-425-4460. R11: Rustica Pizza, 903
N 2nd St.; 215-627-1393. R12: Bar Ferdinand,1030
North 2nd St. R13: Il Cantuccio, 701 North 3rd St.;
215-627-6573. R14: Rocket Cat Café, 2001 Frankford
Ave.; 215-739-4526. R15: Abbaye, 637 North 3rd St.;
215-627-6711. R16: Silk City, 435 Spring Garden St.;
215-592-8838.
www.nceca.net
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
61
Outer Rim South Tour
(half-day tour with box lunch—not a shuttle, stay with your bus for the whole tour)
Stop 1
The Duke Gallery at Community Art Center, 414
Plush Mill Rd.; 610-566-1713 x12. Mar 7–Apr 23. Mon
& Tue 10:00am–5:00pm; Wed–Fri 10:00am–8:00pm; Sat
12:00–5:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 5:00–8:00pm. .
•
“Dis/Arming Domesticity.” The works take forms and
formats referencing the domestic environment or marking
significant issues pursuant to our domestic lives. The implications are complex and often visually entangled with the
unease of our times. Ian Anderson, Russell Biles, Richard
Cleaver, Nathan Craven, Jennifer Ling Datchuk, Michelle
Erickson, Chelsea Greninger, Stephanie Lanter, Sarah
Lindley, Melissa Mytty, Joseph Pintz, Anne Drew Potter,
Stephanie Rozene, Benjamin Schulman, Jin Soo Song, Tip
Toland, Ehren Tool, Sandra Trujillo, Wendy Walgate, Blake
Jamison Williams. Curated by Gail M. Brown.
Stop 2
Davenport Gallery, Wayne Art Center, 413 Maplewood
Ave.; 610-688-3553. Mar 15–Apr 10. Mon–Sat 9:00am–
7:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 5:00–8:00pm. . Area Restaurants: Bertucci’s Brick Oven, Christopher’s A Neighborhood Place, Georges’ Restaurant, Great American Pub of
Wayne, Nectar, Teresa’s Café & Next Door Bar, White
Dog Café, Margaret Kuo’s Wayne.
•
“Portraiture Beyond Likeness.” Challenging conventional notions of portraiture, the exhibition presents a select
group of artists who use this genre to reveal the human
condition and explore the multiple personality traits that
comprise identity. The exhibition will be populated with
portrait heads and full-scale figures that animate attributes,
emotions, attitudes, and alter egos through methods of
representation as diverse as hyperrealism and symbolic
62
abstraction. Tanya Batura, Rebekah Bogard, Andrea Keys
Connell, Phyllis Green, Curt Lacross, Esther Shimazu,
Kim Simonsson, Dirk Staschke, Beth Cavener Stichter, Liz
Zacher, Magda Gluszek. Curated by Jo Lauria, commissioned by The Clay Studio, Philadelphia.
• “From a Throat Smaller than a Finger.” How, from
a throat, smaller than a finger, can the waters, of this song
fall? –excerpt from “Ode to Bird-Watching” by Pablo
Neruda. We are five women potters who share a passion
for the complex and delicate vulnerability of nature.
We chose the bird as a primary subject, as it embodies
this dichotomy of fragility and power; the tiny songbird
lives on seeds, but flies across continents. Julia Galloway,
Bernadette Curran, Ayumi Horie, Julie Johnson, Hannah Niswonger. Organized by Hannah Niswonger and
Bernadette Curran.
Stop 3
Main Line Arts Center, 746 Panmure Rd.; 610-5250272. Mar 13–Apr 4. Mon–Fri 9:00am–9:00pm; Sat–Sun
9:00am–5:00pm. Reception Apr 2, 6:00–9:00pm
proceeded by a gallery talk by juror, Glen Brown. . Area
Restaurants: Ardmore: Fellinis Café, Siamese Princess,
Kotatsu Restaurant, Positano. Bryn Mawr: Fuji mountain,
Lordas Greek Taverna, Gullifty’s Restaurant.
•
“Main-Lining-Ceramics.” This is a juried exhibition of artists from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware,
District of Columbia, Maryland and New York. Ceramic
work can include sculpture, installations, mixed media
and new technologies. This exhibition promotes the idea
of pushing boundaries and expectations for working with
clay. Curated by Glen R. Brown.
Centennial Hall Gallery, The Haverford School,
450 Lancaster Ave.; 610-642-3020 ext. 1249. Mar
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
28–Apr 30. Sun–Sat 11:00am–7:00pm. Reception Apr
2, 6:00–9:00pm. . Area Restaurants: Samurai, The
Grog, Sushi Land, Café Fresko, Bella Italia, Roach and
O’Brians, Du Jour.
•
“Antonio Fink 2010 Tiles.” Antonio Fink’s first tile
exhibition took place in May of 1997 at the Clay Studio
in Philadelphia. Since then, Fink has developed his tile
technique, as well as his depictions of the human face, and
figure. The visual impact of these tiles are a conglomerate
of influences from Jose Clemente Orozco, Frank Stella,
Bellows, Viola Frey, Picasso, and Matisse, to name a few.
This exhibition features contructivist, high relief tiles that
are full of color and reflections on contemporary life.
Antonio Fink.
The Quad at the Haverford School, The Haverford
School, 450 Lancaster Ave.; 610-642-3020 ext. 1249.
Mar 20–Apr 30. Sun–Sat 11:00am–7:00pm. Reception
Apr 2, 6:00–9:00pm. . Area Restaurants: Samurai, The
Grog, Sushi Land, Café Fresko, Bella Italia, Roach and
O’Brians, Du Jour.
•
“6-III*.” Site specific, outdoor ceramic installation
exhibition. This is Antonio Fink’s third edition of “6” exhibitions since 2001 in Philadelphia. Motivation for these
exhibitions comes from the Guerilla Girl movement of the
80’s to exhibit more artwork made by women. The exhibition presents seven different approaches to material and
environment. Theresa M. Saulin, Monica Carrier, Nancy
Agati, Christa Naomi Merrick, Mary Beth Hughes, Tania
O’Donnell, Jenny Q. Waring. Curated by Antonio Fink.
Wilson Hall Community Gallery, The Haverford
School, 450 Lancaster Ave.; 610-642-4583. Mar 22–Apr
9. Tue–Wed 9:00am–4:00pm. . Area Restaurants:
Samurai, The Grog, Sushi Land, Café Fresko, Bella Italia,
Roach and O’Brians, Du Jour.
Outer Rim North Tour
(half-day tour with box lunch—not a shuttle, stay with your bus for the whole tour)
• “The Haverford School Student Ceramic Art Exhi- Stop 1
bition.” Selected works from current and former students
of The Haverford School. Current students and selected
Alumni. Curated by Kris G. Nelson.
Stop 4
Saint Joseph’s University Gallery, 5600 City Ave.; 610660-1840. Feb 22–Apr 3. Mon–Thu 10:00am–8:00pm;
Sat 9:00am–4:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 6:00–8:00pm.
Yes/1st floor. Area Restaurants: Bravo Pizza, The Tavern
Restaurant, Pei Wei Asian Diner, Houlihans, Chili’s,
Mama’s Pizzeria.
•
“Soft.” The pots in this exhibition are more than
utilitarian vessels. The work is comprised of soft, sensuous forms and surfaces. The artists hope to exemplify
the importance of domestic intimacy by heightening
the user’s sensual experience as he or she engages in
rituals of daily nourishment. Artists include: Birdie
Boone, Hiroe Hanazono, Ingrid Bathe, gwendolyn
yoppolo. Organized by Birdie Boone.
Stop 5
Philadelphia Horticultural Center, 100 N. Horticultural Dr. and Montgomery Ave.; 215-685-0096. Mar
15–Apr 3. Daily 10:00am–3:00pm. .
•
“Fertile Ground.” Features ceramic works using natural
history, architecture, and horticultural references. Dramatic
space combined with exotic plantings provide the backdrop
for works ranging from Meunier’s surreal animal monuments
to Leigh’s massive suspended mixed media clusters. Brian
Meunier, Sana Musasama, Doug Herren, Leroy Johnson,
Malcolm Mobutu Smith, Lydia Thompson, Simone Leigh,
Angelica Pozo. Curated by Syd Carpenter.
•
Chestnut Hill Academy, 500 West Willow Grove Ave.;
215-247-4700. Mar 31–Apr 30. Wed–Sat 9:00am–
5:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 6:00–9:00pm. .
•
“Off the Wheel: A Showcase of Slab-built Pots
for the Table and Home.” Slab-built pots can say many
things. This exhibition is intended to showcase the
variety of approaches to slab building. The artists chosen
represent a wide range of work and work types, from
tight and rendered to loose and fluid. Benjamin Carter,
Sam Chung, Marc Digeros, Allison McGowan, Sandi
Pierantozzi, Cheyenne Chapman Rudolph, Amy Scher,
Liz Zlot Summerfield. Organized by Cheyenne Chapman Rudolph.
Stop 2
Arcadia University Art Gallery, 450 South Easton Rd.;
215-572-2133. Feb 17–Apr 18. Tue, 10:00am–8:00pm;
Wed, 10:00am–6:00pm; Thu, 10:00am–8:00pm;
Fri, 10:00am–7:00pm; Sat, 10:00am–6:00pm; Sun,
12:00–5:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 6:00–8:00pm.
•
“Ai Weiwei: Dropping the Urn.” Ceramic works by
this Beijing-based Chinese artist, architect, and activist
featuring a focused selection of his iconoclastic appropriations of historic vessels. Ai Weiwei. Curated by Gregg
Moore and Richard Torchia.
“Artaxis.org: An Evolving Independent Network
of Artists.” Democracy is the theory that government by
the whole people is in the protection of group interest.
Artaxis.org utilizes this principle to interpret the field using
criteria formed from its own internal logic. Membership is
determined by group consensus. This exhibition has been
curated by the members and therefore embodies the principles and potential of the site. Tim Berg and Rebekah Myers, Tiffany Carbonneau, Chad Curtis, David East, Brian
Harper, Del Harrow, Ayumi Horie, Kristen Kieffer, Tsehai
Johnson, Tyler Lotz, Richard Notkin, Adelaide Paul, Jeanne
Quinn, Scott Rench, Erin Furimsky, Benjamin Schulman,
Brooke Hine, Mikey Walsh, Adam Welch, Christina West.
Cheltenham Art Center, Millie Dunn Weiss Gallery,
439 Ashbourne Rd.; 215-379-4660. Mar 27–May
14. Mon–Sat 10:00am–9:00pm. Reception Apr 1,
4:00–9:00pm. .
•
“Inland Seas and Mythical Travelers.” These two
artists are a study in contrast. Although each do highly
detailed work, their processes of construction, Joanne
a hand builder and Peter a wheel thrower, demonstrate
the versatility of ceramic construction. Their inspirations are also a study in contrast, Joanne informed
by nature and Peter informed by civilization. Joanne
Taylor Brown and Peter Quinn.
Stop 4
Stop 3
Stella Elkins Tyler Gallery, 2001 N. 13th St.; 267-5369696. Mar 30–Apr 3. Tue–Sat 10:00am–6:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 4:00–8:00pm. .
Cheltenham Art Center, Gladys Wagner Gallery, 439
Ashbourne Rd.; 215-379-4660. Mar 28–May 14. Mon–Sat
10:00am–9:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 4:00–9:00pm. .
“Divergence.” Features the evolving work of current
Tyler graduate students in the ceramics area. David Bruce,
Matthew Ziemke, Lauren Dombrowiak, Theo Uliano.
Curated by Chad Curtis and Nicholas Kripal.
•
The Piazza at Tyler School of Art,
2001 N. 13th St.; 267-536-9696. Mar
30–Apr 3. Tue–Sat 10:00am–6:00pm.
Reception Apr 1, 4:00–8:00pm. .
•
“Intersections.” Features the work
of a selection of Tyler students that
have graduated from the ceramics area
within the past five years. Dylan Beck,
Benjamin DeMott, Cavan Drake,
Daniel Hoffman, Sarah House, Jerry
Kaba, Andrea Marquis, Eric Miller,
Louise Radochonski, Jury Smith.
Curated by Chad Curtis and Nicholas
Kripal.
Outer Rim
Restaurants
R1: Bertuccis Brick Oven Pizza, 523
W Lancaster Ave; (610) 293-1700.
R2: Teresas Café, 124 N Wayne Ave;
(610) 293-9909. R3: Great American
Pub of Wayne, 4 West Ave.; (610)
964-9535. R4: Nectar, 1091 East
Lancaster Ave.; (610) 725-9000.
R5: Georges Restaurant, 503 West
Lancaster Ave.; (610) 964-0882.
R6: Christopher’s A Neighborhood Place, 108 N Wayne Ave. R7:
Felinis Café, 31 East Lancaster Ave.;
(610) 642-9009. R8: Kotatsu, 36
Greenfield Ave; (610) 642-7155. R9:
Grog Restaurant and Bar, 836 West
Lancaster Ave.; (610) 527-5870. R10:
Bella Italia Pizza, 12 East Lancaster
Ave.; (610) 649-1700. R11: The New
City Tavern, 261 Montgomery Ave.
(610) 667-9100. R12: Bravo Pizza,
273 Montgomery Ave. R13: Pei Wei
Asian Diner, 4040 City Ave,; 215594-8230.
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
63
Museum Area Route
Stop 1 (corner of 16th St. and Spring Garden St.)
Community College of Philadelphia, Mint Building
Rotunda Gallery, 1700 Spring Garden St.; 215-751-8297.
Mar 31–Apr 3. Wed–Fri 9:00am–9:00pm; Sat 9:00am–
5:00pm. Reception Mar 31, 4:30–6:30pm. . Area Restaurants: Rose Tattoo, Long’s Gourmet Chinese Cooking,
Sabrina’s Café, St. Stephen’s Green, Whole Foods Market,
Jack’s Firehouse, Rembrandt’s Restaurant and Bar.
• “Past, Present and Future / 35 Years of Clay at
Community College of Philadelphia.” This exhibition
celebrates the College’s ceramics faculty throughout the
years. Karen Aumann, Bruce Campbell, Syd Carpenter,
Jimmy Clark, Melissa Crotty, William Daley, Nancy
Durant, Frank Gaydos, Rain Harris, Mei-Ling Hom,
Joel Kaylor, Jo Kamm, Kyung Lee, Don Nakamura, Neil
Patterson, Sandi Pierantozzi, Marian Pritchard, Rebecca
Pulver, Mel Rubin, Elyse Saperstein, Andy Shaw, Linda
Shustermen, Lizbeth Stewart, Jack Thompson, Brett
Thomas, Alan Willoughby, Royce Yoder. Organized by
Karen Aumann.
Stop 2 (on Fairmount Ave., in front of Eastern
State Penitentiary)
these proposed encounters, artists will interact with
historical work or spaces to discover new meanings and
formal strategies. (The two other sites are The Philadelphia Museum of Art and The University of Pennsylvania
Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.) Ryan Kelly,
Rocky Lewycky, Jeffrey Mongrain, Judy Moonelis, Judyth Van Amringe. Curated by Jody Clowes, Jo Lauria,
John Perreault, and Judith Tannenbaum, commissioned
through The Clay Studio, Philadelphia.
Stop 3 (on Fairmount Ave. in front of the
Perelman Building)
3a The Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2600 Benjamin
Franklin Parkway; 215-763-8100. Mar 31–Jul 11. Tue–
Sat 10:00am–5:00pm. .
•
“Interactions in Clay.” Artists include: Anne Agee,
Walter McConnell, Paul Sacaridiz, Betty Woodman.
Curated by Jody Clowes, Jo Lauria, John Perreault, and
Judith Tannenbaum, commissioned through The Clay
Studio, Philadelphia.
3b
The Philadelphia Museum of Art, Perelman
Building Galleria, 2525 Pennsylvania Ave.; 215-7638100. Current–Apr 18. Tue–Sun 10:00am–5:00pm. .
Eastern State Penitentiary, 2124 Fairmount Ave.; 215236-5111. Mar 24–May 14. Mon–Sat 10:00am–5:00pm.
• “Jun Kaneko: Dangos.” This sculptural installation is
in conjunction with a city-wide celebration of the artwork
“Interactions in Clay.” Sited at three venerable
Philadelphia institutions, this exhibition involves the
commissioning of new works in response to a piece,
collection or space housed within each venue. Through
of Jun Kaneko, coinciding with the East Coast debut of his
production of the opera Madama Butterfly with the Opera
Company of Philadelphia in October 2009. Jun Kaneko.
Curated by Elizabeth Agro.
•
64
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
Stop 4 (on 20th St., just north of Race St.,
in front of the Franklin Institute )
The Galleries at Moore College of Art & Design,
Between 19th and 20th St.s on Race; 215-965-4044.
Mar 13–Apr 10. Mon, Tue, Fri 11:00am–7:00pm; Wed
9:00am–7:00pm; Thu 11:00am–9:00pm; Sat 11:00am–
5:00pm. Reception Apr 1, 7:00–9:00pm. .
•
“Earth Matters NCECA 2010 Invitational.”
Featuring 50 ceramic works by 27 artists from the US and
abroad. The works confront environmental issues related to
agricultural practice, energy consumption, resource management, the role of technology, and human health. Susan
Beiner, Aislinn Caron, Bryan Czibesz, Spencer Ebbinga,
Shanna Fliegel, Roxanne Jackson, Gudrun Klix, Jae Won
Lee, Emily Loehle, Kate MacDowell, Warren Mather, Anna
Metcalfe, Dennis Lee Mitchell, Ted Neal, Grace Nickel,
Justin Novak, Kip O’Krongly, George Penaloza, Sam Scott,
Bonnie Seeman, Amy Smith, Keith Smith, Nan Smith,
Ryan Takaba, Christopher Torrez, John Williams, Paula
Winokur. Curated by Linda Ganstrom.
Museum Area Restaurants
R1: Rose Tattoo Café, 1847 Callowhill St.; 215-569-8939.
R2: Sabrinas Café, 1804 Callowhill St.; 215-636-9061. R3:
Whole Foods Market ,2001 Pennsylvania Ave; 215-5570015. R4: Belgian Café, 2047 Green St.; 215-235-3500.
R5: Bishop’s Collar, 2349 Fairmount Ave.; 215-765-1616.
R6: Bridgid’s, 726 N. 24th St.; 215-232-3232. R7: Figs,
2501 Meredith St. R8 Illuminare, 2321 Fairmount Ave.
Arrowmont 2010 Workshops
catalog & online listing now available
work-study | studio assistantships | scholarships
SAVE THE DATE
Figurative Association:
The Human Form in Clay
October 27-30, 2010
school of arts and crafts
Gatlinburg, Tennessee
[email protected] arrowmont.org
(865) 436-5860
www.a rrowmont.org
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
65
NON-PROFIT EXHIBITORS
accessCeramics (Lewis & Clark College) . . . T78
Northern Clay Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T32
Anderson Ranch Arts Center . . . . . . . . . . . . T49
Ohio University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T63
Archie Bray Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T58
Oregon College of Art and Craft . . . . . . . . T86
Arizona State University Ceramics . . . . . . . T56
Penland School of Crafts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T26
Arrowmont School of Arts/Crafts . . . . . . . . T01
Pennsylvania Clay Arts and Sciences
Foundation /Black Sheep Pottery . . . . . . . . T84
www.accessceramics.org
www.andersonranch.org
www.archiebray.org
www.asu.edu
www.arrowmont.org
Australian National University . . . . . . . . . . T64
www.anu.edu.au
Baltimore Clayworks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T33
www.baltimoreclayworks.org
Blair Museum Of Lithophanes . . . . . . . . . . T62
www.lithophanemuseum.org
Bowling Green State University . . . . . . . . . T03
www.bgsu.edu/art
Carbondale Clay Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T74
www.carbondaleclay.org
Clay Art Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T40
www.clayartcenter.org
Clay Studio, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T54
www.theclaystudio.org
www.northernclaycenter.org
www.ohio.edu
www.ocac.edu
www.penland.org
www.blacksheeppottery.org
Pennsylvania Guild of Craftsmen . . . . . . . . T14
www.pacrafts.org
Peters Valley Craft Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T19
www.petersvalley.org
Potters For Peace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T47, T48
www.pottersforpeace.org
Pottery Northwest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T43
www.potterynorthwest.org
Red Lodge Clay Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T31
www.redlodgeclaycenter.com
Rhode Island School of Design . . . . . . . . . . T44
www.risd.edu
Craft Emergency Relief Fund (CERF) . . . . . . T87
Schein-Joseph International Museum of
Ceramic Art at Alfred . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T60
East Tennessee State University . . . . . . . . . T36
School For American Crafts/RIT . . . . . . . . . T12
Edinboro University of Pennsylvania . . . . . T41
Sierra Nevada College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T53
Empty Bowls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T29
Snow Farm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T89
Florida State University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T65
Studio Potter Magazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T73
Greenwich House Pottery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T80
SUNY, New Paltz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T07
Guldagergaard -International Ceramics
Research Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T83
Syracuse University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T66
www.craftemergency.org
www.etsu.edu
www.edinboro.edu
www.emptybowls.net
www.fsu.edu/~art
www.greenwichhouse.org
www.ceramic.dk
Haystack Mountain School of Crafts . . . . . T50
www.haystack-mtn.org
Hood College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T42
www.hood.edu
Indiana State University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T11
www.indstate.edu
Jacksonville University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T81
www.ju.edu
Kansas City Art Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T52
www.kcai.edu
Kansas State University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T34
www.k-state.edu/art/index.html
Kent State University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T57
www.kent.edu
Kutztown University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T09
www.kutztown.edu
www.ceramicsmuseum.alfred.edu
www.cias.rit.edu/crafts
www.sierranevada.edu
www.snowfarm.org
www.studiopotter.org
www.newpaltz.edu/ceramics/
www.syr.edu
Tainan National University of the Arts . . . . T37
www.tnnua.edu.tw
Tennessee Tech University, Appalachian
Center for Craft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T51
www.tntech.edu/craftcenter
Texas Tech University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T06
www.depts.ttu.edu/art/
The Ohio State University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T39
www.arts.osu.edu
The University of Mississippi . . . . . . . . . . . T30
www.olemiss.edu
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville . . . T59
http://art.utk.edu
Tyler School of Art of Temple University . . T10
www.temple.edu/tyler/ceramics
UMass, Dartmouth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T55
www.umassd.edu/cupa
La Meridiana- International School of Ceramic
Art in Tuscany . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T71
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville . . . . . . T38
Log Book, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T75
University of Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T04
Lorton Arts Foundation
Workhouse Arts Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T05
University of Hawaii, Manoa . . . . . . . . . . . T88
www.lameridiana.fi.it
www.thelogbook.net
www.workhousearts.org
LSU Ceramics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T15
www.design.lsu.edu/artschool/ceramics
Maine College of Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T16
www.meca.edu
Maryland Institute College of Art . . . . . . . . T79
www.mica.edu
Medalta International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T67
www.medalta.org
Mendocino Art Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T25
www.mendocinoartcenter.org
Michigan State University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T77
www.art.msu.edu
Montana State University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T28
www.montana.edu/art
New Hampshire Institute of Art . . . . . . . . . T08
www.nhia.edu
New York State College of Ceramics
at Alfred University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T61
www.alfred.edu
66
(see floor map on page 69)
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
http://art.uark.edu/ceramics/
www.arts.ufl.edu/ART/ceramics
www.hawaii.edu/art/
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities . . . . . T13
www.art.umn.edu
University of Montana, Missoula . . . . . . . . T82
www.umt.edu/art/
University of Nebraska, Lincoln . . . . . . . . . T02
www.unl.edu/art/
University of North Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . T76
www.und.edu
University of South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . T35
www.sc.edu
Utah State University, Logan . . . . . . . . . . . T17
www.art.usu.edu
Virginia Commonwealth University . . . . . . T18
www.vcu.edu/arts/craft/dept
Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts . . . T68
www.watershedceramics.org
West Virginia University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T85
www.arts.ccarts.wvu.edu
Wichita State University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T27
www.wichita.edu
“The Paragon Dragon has
changed my life. I have
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feet of tiles without trouble.”
—Cha-Rie Tang
“The Paragon Dragon has
changed my life,” said custom tile
maker and architect Cha-Rie
Tang. “A front-loading kiln is essential for tiles. I can load five layers easily. I can finally claim that I
can offer Craftsman tiles for installation.
“I use the kiln to do custom
murals. Since I can fire up to 22" x
22", I carve relief panels in the
style of Craftsman tiles. I have
worked on an entrance wall for
Santa Barbara’s Tile Collection, a
fountain for All Nations Church,
numerous private commissions,
and the new Los Angeles Public
Library Exposition Park Branch.
“In addition to firing ceramics,
I have used the Dragon to fire architectural-sized glass. The computer controls are easy to use,”
Cha-Rie added.
Create breathtaking pottery in
this exciting kiln. The Dragon exudes power. Its 16,500 watts heat
the 24” wide, 24” deep, 27” high
interior to cone 10 with ample
power to spare. This results in
long element life, because the elements do not “struggle” to reach
high temperatures.
The Sentry digital controller can calculate electrical
usage. Learn to conserve energy by experimenting with
firing speed, load density, etc.
Long-lasting mercury relays
power the elements.
We offer a wide selection
of top- and front-loading
kilns. Call us or visit our
website for a free catalog and
the name of the Paragon
dealer near you.
Architect Cha-Rie Tang of Pasadena, California
with her Paragon Dragon front-loading kiln.
This kiln is becoming a favorite with potters. It
is easy to load, heavily insulated, and designed
to reach cone 10 with power to spare.
Better
Designed
Kilns
2011 South Town East Blvd.,
Mesquite, Texas 75149-1122
800-876-4328 / 972-288-7557
Toll Free Fax 888-222-6450
www.paragonweb.com
[email protected]
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
67
MANUFACTURERS/SUPPLIERS
Aardvark Clay & Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 431
www.aardvarkclay.com
AccuAngle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
www.accuangle.com
Aftosa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224, 226, 236, 238
www.aftosa.com
Amaco/Brent . . . . 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 311
www.amaco.com
Bailey Pottery Equip. Corp. . . 501, 600, 602, 604, 606
www.baileypottery.com
Bison Studios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 608
www.bisonstudios.com
Blackjack Clay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 525
www.activaproducts.com
CeramicArtsDaily.org . . . . . . . 401, 403, 405,
500, 502, 504
www.ceramicartsdaily.org
Ceramic Arts Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408
www.ceramicartslibrary.com
Ceramic Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 518
www.ceramicindustry.com
Ceramics Monthly . . . . . . . . . . 401, 403, 405,
500, 502, 504
www.ceramicsmonthly.org
Ceramic Shop, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511, 610
www.theceramicshop.com
Ceramics: Art & Perception . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402
www.ceramicart.com.au
Chinese Clay Art Corp . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121, 123
www.chineseclayart.com
Clay Art Center/Scott Creek Pottery . . . . . . 424
www.clayartcenter.net
www.scottcreekpottery.com
Clay Times Magazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
www.claytimes.com
Clayworks Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407
www.clayworkssupplies.com
Continental Clay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220, 222
www.continentalclay.com
Coyote Clay & Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 404, 406
www.coyoteclay.com
Cress Manufacturing Co, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 624
www.cressmfg.com
DelVal Potter’s Supply, Co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
www.delvalpotters.com
Dolan Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503
www.ceramictools.com
Echo Ceramics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
www.echoceramics.com
Enduring Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
www.enduring-images.com
Euclid Kilns & Euclid’s Elements . . . . . 233, 332
www.euclids.com
Evenheat Kiln, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 429
www.evenheat-kiln.com
Geil Kilns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323, 422
www.kilns.com
Georgies Ceramic & Clay Co . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
www.georgies.com
Giffin Tec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 426
www.giffingrip.com
Highwater Clays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 411
www.highwaterclays.com
Icheon City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 505, 507
www.icheon.go.kr
iLoveToCreate, a Duncan Enterprise Co. . 417,
419
www.ilovetocreate.com
Kemper Tools USA MFG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
www.kempertools.com
L&L Kiln Manufacturing, Inc. . . 200, 201, 202, 203
www.hotkilns.com
Laguna Clay Company/Axner . . . . . . . 515, 517
www.lagunaclay.com
www.axner.com
Larkin Refractory Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
www.larkinrefractory.com
Master Kiln Builders, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
www.kilnbuilders.com
Mayco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329, 331
www.maycocolors.com
Mecca Pottery Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Mid-South Ceramic Supply, Opulence Glaze . . . 532
www.midsouthceramics.com
Minnesota Clay Co., USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
www.minnesotaclayusa.com
MKM Pottery Tools, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . 620, 622
www.mkmpotterytools.com
Mudtools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
www.mudtools.com
NCECA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301, 400
www.nceca.net
NCECA Green Task Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
www.ncecagtf.com
Neue Keramik/New Ceramics . . . . . . . . . . . 205
www.neue-keramik.de
North Star Equipment, Inc . . . . . . . . . . 325, 327
www.northstarequipment.com
Olympic Kilns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
www.greatkilns.com
Paragon Industries LP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530
www.paragonweb.com
Peter Pugger Mfg., Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 433, 435
www.peterpugger.com
Potters Council . . . . . . . . . . . . 401, 403, 405,
500, 502, 504
www.potterscouncil.org
Pottery Making Illustrated . . . 401, 403, 405,
500, 502, 504
www.potterymaking.org
Pottery Texture Queen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420
www.potterytexturequeen.com
Resco/Cedar Heights Clay . . . . . . . . . . 101, 103
www.rescoproducts.com
Royal Brush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410
www.royalbrush.com
Saint-Gobain Ceramics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
www.refractories.saint-gobain.com
www.lo-mass.com
Sanbao Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
www.chinaclay.com
Sheffield Pottery, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
www.sheffield-pottery.com
Shimpo Ceramics . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614, 616, 618
www.shimpoceramics.com
Shoe Guys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321
www.theshoeguys.com
Skutt Kilns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415, 514, 516
www.skutt.com
Smith-Sharpe Fire Brick Supply . . . . . . . . . . 117
www.kilnshelf.com
Soldner Clay Mixers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314
www.soldnerequipment.com
Spectrum Glazes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 510
www.spectrumglazes.com
Speedball Art Products . . . . . . . . . . . . 521, 523
www.speedballart.com
Standard Ceramic Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
www.standardceramic.com
Tucker’s Pottery Supplies, Inc. . . . . . . . 303, 305
www.tuckerspottery.com
www.coneartkilns.com
Xiem Clay Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508
www.xiemclaycenter.com
68
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
EXPO FLOOR MAP
The exhibit hall is located on Level
2, Exhibit Hall B, of the Pennsylvania
Convention Center at 1101 Arch St,
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. See page 17
for floor Convention Center map.
Manufacturers/Suppliers
Exhibit hall hours are 8:30–5 on
Wednesday, March 31; 9–5 on Thursday,
April 1; and 9–5 on Friday, April 2.
Exhibitor Lounge
Nonprofit Exhibitors
ORDER YOUR COPY
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NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
69
NCECA 2011 CALL FOR PROGRAM PROPOSALS
NCECA 2011 – 45th Annual Conference
March 30-April 2, 2011, Tampa/St. Petersburg, Florida
Application deadline is May 3, 2010, 11:59pm MST.
THEME
Tidal Forces: The Next Wave will examine and expose the unbroken arc
spanning our deepest traditions and the most contemporary emerging
work. A tidal wave can work to tear down walls between old and new,
while unearthing what is hidden beneath the surface. We intend to help
artists look beyond what is conventional while remembering the roots
of this powerful and multi-faceted art form. The 2011 conference will
both celebrate the new works being created while also examining the
power of traditional art.
TOPICS FOR PROPOSALS
For the 45th annual meeting of NCECA in Tampa/St. Petersburg,
we call for proposals of lectures and panel discussions relating to issues of exploration, discovery, and the relevance of site, location, and
environment. As always, we also welcome proposals on all subjects
relevant to our field. Submissions will be evaluated in regard to merit,
the presenter’s expertise in the area, and a general interest in providing
a balanced and inclusive program for the members. The general categories for proposals are as follows:
• Aesthetics and Critical Theory, including presentations about concepts of beauty, value, art attitudes, theory, content, goals, and standards.
• Art History, including presentations about traditional and nontraditional artists and movements, styles, surveys of regional, national
and international art in clay.
• Education, including presentations about traditional and nontraditional curricula, goals, standards, methods, and ideologies.
• Professionalism, including presentations about working standards,
goals, methods, and attitudes or, the professional working relationships
of guilds, co-ops and other ceramic centers.
• Technology, including presentations about traditional and non-traditional materials, processes, kilns, equipment, innovations, and theory.
• New Work, is a category of proposals for up to four artists to
present a 15-minute visual presentation on the subject of a body of
their own work completed within the last three years. Artists 30 years
and older who have been working professionally for at least five years
since completing their training are eligible to submit. Proposals should
include 5-7 images of new work and 5 of the older work, along with
context of the artist’s overall career.
ELIGIBILITY
Everyone is eligible EXCEPT for those who participated in the previous year (NCECA 2010 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania). Participation is
generally limited to only one presentation.
LECTURE AND PANEL FORMATS
Lectures of 15 minutes (suitable for New Work), 30 minutes and 60
minutes (ideal for presenting specific information and ideas), and
panels of 90 minutes (suitable for investigating topics that are best
informed by varied perspectives), are scheduled and may include questions and answers from the audience. Panels are limited to no more
than three panelists plus a moderator. Co-lectures of 60 minutes may
also be proposed, with two individuals presenting different aspects of
the same topic.
70
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
HONORARIUM
Panelists, moderators, and lecturers whose careers or expertise are in
the ceramic arts receive a conference registration (2011) and a one-year
membership to NCECA (March 30, 2011 – April 1, 2012).
APPLICATION PROCESS
Applications must be submitted completely electronically (see link
below). Your ONLINE submittal should include the following:
Presentation content description – 400 word maximum
New Work only – 200 word artist statement and a 200 word
description of the New Work
Two-page resume
Panel proposals: names, addresses, email addresses, and brief
resumes of the participants
Images of each presenter’s work not to exceed 12 images total (only
images that will strengthen the proposal)
Proposal abstracts, images, and support materials will be available
electronically to all NCECA Board Members for review prior to the
Board meeting in May 2010. Proposal selections will be made by the
full board at that meeting. Make sure your submittal is complete. Incomplete proposals will not be considered. NCECA’s Program Director
will notify you of the Board’s decision after the May meeting.
2011 CALL FOR CONFERENCE DEMONSTRATORS
For the first time, NCECA will have a call for demonstrators for
the 2011 conference in Tampa/St. Pete, Florida. A committee,
selected from and by the NCECA Board will act as a jury in selecting demonstrators that will enhance the conference experience
and bring high quality ceramic demonstrations to the conference
and hosting community.
ONLINE SUBMITTAL FORM
Please read the information below to prepare for your Online Submittal. All proposals must be submitted using NCECA’s Online Submittal
process (link to the form is provided below). A CD of the proposal also
needs to be sent to the NCECA office:
NCECA 2011 Demonstrator proposal
77 Erie Village Square, Suite 280
Erie, CO 80516-6996
The deadline for the Online Proposal Submittal is May 3, 2010,
11:59pm MST. The deadline for CDs to arrive in the NCECA office is
May 7, 2010.
IMPORTANT application information:
The following will be entered or attached to the Online Proposal
Submittal form AND will also need to be included on your CD that
is sent to the NCECA office (ONLY .doc or .pdf files can be accepted
and must be less than 1MB):
• Name of demonstrator (permanent marker on CD)
• Demonstrator’s plan and concept (400 words or less)
• Demonstrator resume
• Artists’ statement for the demonstrator (250 words or less)
• List of special equipment, or assistance. (NOTE: NCECA cannot
help with all special equipment or assistance needs)
• Minimum of 10, maximum of 20 images that will be uploaded
with your Online Proposal Submittal
Link to ONLINE Submittal Form is now available. Visit
www.nceca.net for more information.
The NCECA 2011 Biennial
Call for Submissions
NCECA is proud to announce a call for entry for the 2011
NCECA Biennial, which will be held at the beautiful new
Tampa Museum of Art in Tampa, Florida, from January 29
to April 24, 2011. The exhibition will be held in conjunction
with the NCECA Conference, “Tidal Forces: The Next Wave”
in Tampa and St. Petersburg, Florida, which is scheduled for
March 30–April 2, 2011.
The 2011 NCECA Biennial Jurors:
Julia Galloway
Glen R. Brown
Arthur Gonzalez
Past Awards have been sponsored by:
National Council of Education for the Ceramic Arts
Ceramics Monthly
Clay Times
L & L Kiln Mfg Inc
AMACO/Brent
Skutt Kilns
Trax Gallery
Studiopottery.co.uk
And an Anonymous Paper Clay Award
If you would like your work to be considered, please review the
prospectus on the NCECA web site (www.nceca.net) under Exhibitions and you will be directed to the entry form.
Submission must be received by August 30, 2010 to be considered for this exhibition.
Images of work accepted for the exhibition will be retained by
NCECA for publicity and documentation purposes. Photography
will be allowed in the exhibition.
A catalog will be produced to document the exhibition.
NCECA 2011 National Student
Juried Exhibition
Call for Submissions
NCECA is proud to announce a call for entry for the NCECA
2011 National Student Juried Exhibition competition with categories for graduate and undergraduate work.
The 2011 NSJE Jurors:
Ayumi Horie
Neil Forrest
If you would like your work to be considered for the 2011
NSJE, please review the prospectus on the NCECA web site
(www.nceca.net) under Exhibitions and you will be directed to
the entry form.
Submissions must be received by September 30, 2010 to be
considered for this exhibition.
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
71
Now is the time to join an organization that works for you. our member
benefits touch every aspect of your life — from money saving discounts,
and eligibility for group health insurance, to learning new techniques at
conferences. Visit us in booth 401 to join.
Show Special
Receive a FREE instructional DVD
if you join or renew your membership*
Featuring Mitch Lyons, Tony Clennell,
Philippe Faraut, Jeffrey Nichols,
*Applies to onsite new/renewal memberships only
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potters council
Potters Council — Making a Difference!
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tters ouncil
c
index to advertisers
Aardvark Clay & Supplies.................. 41
Coyote Clay & Color........................... 42
Laguna................................................. 71
Portion Master.................................... 32
ACerS Books...................................... 69
Craft-N-Spin.......................................... 2
Larkin.................................................. 67
Potters Council............................. 46, 72
Lillstreet Art Center............................. 45
Potters Shop....................................... 61
Discovery Art Travel........................... 45
Massachusetts College of Art........... 29
Runyan................................................. 68
Dolan Tools.......................................... 67
Master Kiln Builders........................... 61
Alligator Clay...................................... 66
Amaco and Brent....................... Cover 2
American Museum of Ceramic
Art (AMOCA)................................... 7
Anderson Ranch Arts......................... 40
Appalachian Center for Crafts........... 65
Davens Ceramic Center.................... 43
Medalta Artists in Residence............. 25
Euclid’s/PSH....................................... 33
Arrowmont School of Arts & Crafts.... 65
Georgies Ceramic & Clay.................. 45
Artstream Nomadic Gallery............... 49
Giffin..................................................... 71
Bamboo Tools..................................... 66
Bracker’s Good Earth Clays.............. 32
Bridgette Mayer Gallery..................... 27
Goggle Works.................................... 22
Great Lakes Clay................................ 65
CeramicArtsDaily.org......................... 37
Ceramic Arts Library.......................... 36
Chinese Clay Art................................ 49
Mindy Solomon Gallery....................... 39
Minnesota Clay................................... 65
MKM Pottery Tools............................. 38
Northern Clay Center......................... 47
John C. Campbell Folk School.......... 43
Odyssey.............................................. 44
Olympic Kilns..................................... 38
KC Art Institute................................... 41
Kentucky Mudworks.......................... 47
Kiln Doctor, The.................................. 32
Sheffield Pottery................................. 34
Shimpo.................................................. 5
Sierrascoringtools.com...................... 69
Skutt Ceramic Products............. Cover 4
Spectrum Glazes....................... Cover 3
Trinity Ceramic Supply....................... 48
Truro Center for Arts........................... 61
Tucker’s Pottery.................................. 24
Paragon.............................................. 67
Penland School of Crafts................... 49
UMass, Dartmouth............................. 47
Peter Pugger...................................... 21
University of PA Press........................ 35
Clay Studio (The)................................ 23
L&L Kiln Mfg......................................... 1
Philadelphia Magic Gardens............. 28
Continental Clay................................. 26
L&R Specialties.................................. 38
Philadelphia Museum of Art................ 2
NCECA 2010 • 44th Annual Conference Program • Philadelphia, PA
Shakerag Workshops......................... 66
Smith-Sharpe Fire Brick Supply........ 30
Harvard Ceramics Program.............. 45
Clay Art Ctr/Scott Creek..................... 43
72
Mid-South Ceramic Supply............... 66
New Mexico Clay............................... 41
Buyers Market of American Crafts.... 31
Carolina Clay...................................... 69
Mendocino Art Center........................ 36
Santa Fe Clay..................................... 49
Ward Burner Systems........................ 36