Air Force Junior ROTC Cadet Guide

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Air Force Junior ROTC Cadet Guide
Buchholz High School
Florida - 821
Air Force Junior
ROTC
Cadet Guide
2015-2016 School Year
Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
i
Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
Dear Cadet,
17 August 2015
Welcome to the AFJROTC Cadet Corps.
We hope that your goal this year is to gain an understanding of aerospace power and simultaneously
become knowledgeable, effective, productive, and proud members of the Buchholz High School Cadet
Corps. Each of you will learn about aerospace science, develop your leadership skills, and become
more acquainted with the civil, industrial, and military components of aerospace, thus becoming a more
responsible citizen. Our goal for you is to accomplish all the above while also having a lot of fun!
This cadet guide is designed to aid every cadet to obtain and maintain the high standards that will prepare
each of you for a position of leadership by stressing habits of order, self-reliance, self-discipline, and
pride in self, the unit, the school, and our country. This guide pertains to all cadets in the FL-821st
Cadet Corps, whether a cadet officer, a cadet non-commissioned officer, or a cadet airman.
Through this organization, you have an opportunity to directly affect other lives in a positive way and
bring honor and distinction to this unit, this school, and yourself. You will set the standards for other
AFJROTC Cadet Corps to emulate.
Working together, we will share a prosperous and exciting year full of opportunities for individual and
group growth.
James E. Roberts Jr.
Colonel, USAF (Ret)
Senior Aerospace Science Instructor
Ricky G. Price
CMSgt, USAF (Ret)
Aerospace Science Instructor
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Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
Introduction
The purpose of this Cadet Guide is to provide you with a source of information that will help you become a successful and
contributing member of the Buchholz High School Air Force Junior ROTC Cadet Corps. This guide contains basic
information concerning the academic, behavior, and grooming standards that each cadet must know. It provides information
on the course and how the cadet group is organized and provides policy guidelines on how the Group, the three Squadrons,
and each of the five Flights are expected to operate.
You will be expected to know the information in this guide and therefore must make every effort to learn what is in it, how to
use it, and generally become familiar with as much information as possible. The Table of Contents below is the key to
finding the information that you want. In addition to the chapter and paragraph titles, each attachment and figure is indexed
as well. Note that the paragraph, page, and figure number correspond to the chapter number. This guide will be used in the
development of a Cadet Airman Promotion Exam which you will be required to pass with a [email protected] (70%) or better before you
will be eligible to receive your first stripe.
CONTENTS
Chapter 1 - Mission of the AFJROTC Program ............................................................Number............................Page
Background ........................................................................................................
Mission Statement ..............................................................................................
Motto..................................................................................................................
AFJROTC Objectives .........................................................................................
Expectations ........................................................................................................
1.1 ....................................
1.2 ....................................
1.3.....................................
1.4 ....................................
1.5 ....................................
1
1
1
1
2
2.1 ....................................
2.2 ....................................
2.3 ....................................
2.4 ....................................
2.5 ....................................
2.6 ....................................
2.7 ....................................
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
Chapter 2 - Program Benefits
General ..............................................................................................................
Recognition ........................................................................................................
Certificate of Training ........................................................................................
Certificate of Completion ...................................................................................
College Credit ....................................................................................................
Service Academy Appointments .........................................................................
Scholarships .......................................................................................................
Chapter 3 - Cadet Conduct and Classroom Procedures
Classroom/Program Code of Conduct .................................................................
Classroom Procedures ........................................................................................
Behavior ............................................................................................................
Military Etiquette ...............................................................................................
3.1 ....................................
3.2 ....................................
3.3 ....................................
3.4 ....................................
5
6
7
8
4.1 ....................................
4.2 ....................................
4.3 ....................................
4.4 ....................................
4.5 ....................................
4.6 ....................................
4.7 ....................................
4.8 ....................................
9
9
9
9
10
11
11
12
Chapter 4 - Uniform Procedures and Supply Accounts
General ..............................................................................................................
Supply Procedures ..............................................................................................
Which Uniform to Wear .....................................................................................
When to Wear the Uniform .................................................................................
Responsibilities ...................................................................................................
How to Wear the Uniform ...................................................................................
Unauthorized Wear of the Uniform .....................................................................
Distinctive Uniform Items ...................................................................................
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Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
Wear of Insignia and Badges ...............................................................................
4.9 .................................... 12
Chapter 5 - AFJROTC Grooming Standards
General ...............................................................................................................
Common Standards .............................................................................................
Female Standards.................................................................................................
Male Standards....................................................................................................
Failure to Meet Standards ...................................................................................
Personal Hygiene ................................................................................................
Physical Conditioning .........................................................................................
5.1 .................................... 13
5.2 .................................... 13
5.3 .................................... 13
5.4 .................................... 13
5.5 .................................... 14
5.6 .................................... 14
5.7 .................................... 14
Chapter 6 - AFJROTC Grading System
General ...............................................................................................................
AFJROTC Standards ..........................................................................................
Grades ................................................................................................................
Academic Tests ..................................................................................................
Weekly Inspections .............................................................................................
Academic Ace Program ......................................................................................
6.1 .................................... 15
6.2 .................................... 15
6.3 .................................... 15
6.4 .................................... 15
6.5 .................................... 15
6.6 .................................... 15
Chapter 7 - Cadet Rank and Grade
General ...............................................................................................................
Use of Titles ........................................................................................................
Permanent Grade and Merit Grade ......................................................................
Cadet Rank .........................................................................................................
Permanent Cadet Grade ......................................................................................
Unit Manning Document ....................................................................................
7.1 .................................... 16
7.2 .................................... 16
7.3 .................................... 16
Fig 7.1............................... 17
Fig 7.2............................... 17
Fig 7.3............................... 18
Chapter 8 - Promotion of Cadets
Purpose ..............................................................................................................
Permanent Promotions .......................................................................................
Cadet Positions and Rotation ..............................................................................
Merit Promotions ................................................................................................
Enlisted Merit Promotion ....................................................................................
Officer Merit Promotion ......................................................................................
Enlisted Promotion Criteria .................................................................................
Officer Promotion Criteria …...............................................................................
PEP Promotions ....................................................................................................
Posting of Promotions .........................................................................................
8.1 .................................... 19
8.2 .................................... 19
8.3 .................................... 19
8.4 .................................... 20
8.5 .................................... 20
8.6 .................................... 20
8.7 .................................... 20
8.8 .................................... 20
8.9 .................................... 20
8.10 .................................. 20
Chapter 9 - Military Training
Drill and Ceremonies ..........................................................................................
Weekly Personal Inspections ...............................................................................
Military Courtesy ................................................................................................
Summer Leadership/Orientation Camp ...............................................................
Basic Training Test .............................................................................................
9.1 .................................... 21
9.2 .................................... 21
9.3 .................................... 22
9.4 .................................... 23
9.5 .................................... 23
Chapter 10 - Cadet Flag Detail
General ..............................................................................................................
General Guidelines for Reveille & Retreat ..........................................................
ii
10.1..................................... 24
10.2..................................... 24
Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
Chapter 11 - President=s Physical Fitness (PPF) Program
General ..............................................................................................................
Purpose ..............................................................................................................
Program Structure ..............................................................................................
PPF Evaluation...................................................................................................
Behavior ............................................................................................................
PPF Award ........................................................................................................
PPF Exercises ...................................................................................................
Personal Fitness Conversion Chart ....................................................................
11.1..................................... 25
11.2..................................... 25
11.3..................................... 25
11.4..................................... 25
11.5..................................... 25
11.6..................................... 25
Fig 11.1-11.6....................... 26-27
Fig 11.7-11.8....................... 28-32
Chapter 12 - Special Activities
General ..............................................................................................................
Activities ...........................................................................................................
12.1..................................... 33
12.2..................................... 33
Chapter 13 - AFJROTC Awards and Decoration Program
General ..............................................................................................................
National Organization Awards ...........................................................................
AFJROTC Sponsored Awards ............................................................................
Locally Sponsored Awards .................................................................................
13.1..................................... 35
13.2..................................... 35
13.3..................................... 36
13.4..................................... 36
Chapter 14 - Kitty Hawk Air Society
General ..............................................................................................................
Membership .......................................................................................................
Membership Procedures .....................................................................................
KHAS Organization ...........................................................................................
14.1..................................... 38
14.2..................................... 38
14.3..................................... 38
14.4..................................... 39
Appendices
AFJROTC Staff Work ........................................................................................
Cadet Contract....................................................................................................
Air Force JROTC Cadet Hand Receipt....................................................................
Job Description for Leadership Positions..............................................................
Cadet/Active Duty Grade Insignia, Badges, and Uniform.......................................
iii
App. A................................ 40
App. B................................ 42
App. C................................ 44
App. D................................ 45
App. E................................ 56
Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
Chapter 1
MISSION OF THE AFJROTC PROGRAM
Junior ROTC program at Buchholz High School is to
ADevelop citizens of character, dedicated to serving their
nation and [email protected]
1.1.
Background
1.1.1._ Congress passed and the president signed
Public Law 88-647,AReserve Officers Training Corps
Vitalization [email protected] of October 13, 1964. This law provides the
authority to operate Air Force Junior Reserve Officers
Training Corps (AFJROTC) programs in secondary schools.
It states that cadets must be physically fit, a United States
citizen and at least fourteen years of age. Through this act of
the 88th Congress, twenty high schools in our nation were
selected to begin the new AFJROTC Program. Buchholz
High School=s program began in 1982. Presently, there are
over eight hundred high schools world-wide with an
AFJROTC program. You can be proud of being an
AFJROTC cadet at Buchholz High School.
1.1.2. Air Force Instruction (AFI 36-2010),
AJunior Reserve Officer Training Corps,@ prescribes the
operation of AFJROTC units. Schools hosting AFJROTC
units enter into a contract with the Air Force to offer the
course of instruction provided by the Air Force. In that
contract, the school agrees to limit membership in the unit to
students who maintain acceptable standards of academic
achievement and conduct. This is the authority under which
a cadet will be removed from the course for improper
conduct.
1.1.3. AFJROTCI 36-2001, AAir Force Junior
ROTC Operations,@ prescribes the policies and procedures for
AFJROTC units. It gives guidance for organizing the cadet
corps and provides other direction in the operation of the
FL-821 AFJROTC cadet squadron. AFJROTCI 36-2001 is
also the primary reference for this guide.
1.1.4.
AFJROTCI 36-2001 also establishes
policies, procedures, and standards governing the wear of
cadet uniforms in our program. This Instruction is also the
basis for requiring AFJROTC cadets to maintain the same
active duty Air Force personal grooming standards
established in AFI 36-2903.
1.1.5.
Buchholz High School offers Aerospace
Science (AFJROTC) as a three or four year elective course
granting one academic credit for each year of successful
completion. Students are enrolled into the course by
completing a ACadet [email protected] which is an educational type
contract. Cadets who pass AFJROTC and who desire to
enroll for a second or subsequent year must complete a new
ACadet [email protected] Third year cadets=s desiring to re-enroll
must meet a strict selection criteria that is based upon attitude,
interest, behavior, attendance, instructor recommendation,
test scores, working to one=s ability and predicted success as a
fourth year cadet. A sample of the ACadet [email protected] can be
found in Appendix B.
1.2.
1.3. Motto. The motto of Air Force Junior ROTC is
ABuilding Better Citizens for [email protected] The motto of
FL-821 is ARespect the Past, Represent the [email protected]
1.4.
AFJROTC Objectives. The objectives of the Air
Force Junior ROTC cadet program are to educate and train
high school cadets in citizenship; promote community service;
instill responsibility, character, and self-discipline; and
provide instruction in air and space fundamentals. In trying to
do this, the program places special emphasis on those qualities
associated with good citizenship such as responsibility,
integrity, honesty and leadership. As such, AFJROTC
students should work to develop the qualities listed below:
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)
f)
g)
h)
i)
j)
Mission Statement. The mission of the Air Force
1
An appreciation of the basic elements and
requirements for national security.
Respect for, and an understanding of, the need
for constituted authority in a democratic society.
Patriotism and an understanding of their
personal obligation to contribute toward national
security.
Habits of orderliness and precision.
A high degree of personal honor, self-reliance,
and leadership.
A broad based knowledge of the aerospace age
and fundamental aerospace doctrine.
Basic military skills.
A knowledge of and appreciation for the
traditions of the Air Force.
An interest in completing high school and
pursuing higher educational goals or skills, and;
An acquaintance with Air Force careers.
Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
1.5.
Expectation
1.5.1.
AFJROTC is a course which
emphasizes self-discipline and self-reliance.
Some
consider the program to be overly strict, while others do
not. However, it must be clear to all that cadets are
expected to meet certain minimum standards in order to be
successful in AFJROTC. This Guide will provide cadets
with the details of those standards.
1.5.2. The instructors believe strongly in group
and individual promptness, preparedness, participation,
courtesy, discipline, self control and respect to others and
therefore give these high priority. In addition, cadet
behavior and grooming standards must be maintained at
the same high level expected of an individual the military.
1.5.3. Cadets are expected to establish
individual and group goals. Once established, all must
cooperate and work together to reach those goals. Strict
timetables and deadlines are generally established.
Failure to meet deadlines will effect eligibility for
promotion and awards consideration.
1.5.4. The academic phase of the program
incorporates aspects of history, social studies and science.
The leadership education phase of the AFJROTC program
has less academic intensity but requires a high degree of
self-discipline and teamwork.
The course includes
home-work, reading, writing and class presentations with a
strong emphasis upon completing work on time.
Academic grades are earned in both Aerospace Science
and Leadership Education. A combined grade is given for
the marking period. There are quizzes, tests and final
examinations in the AFJROTC program.
1.5.5. The cadet leaders in each flight (class) are
responsible for the beginning and the end of each class
period. They may also be responsible for some activities
during class. The integrity of this leadership process must
be preserved and respected by each cadet cooperating with
the program.
1.5.6. As a young person you will be challenged
by the rather high standards expected of you. However,
when you consider these standards, they do not differ from
those of any successful team or group. A Bobcat football
player does not tell his coach that he forgot there was a
practice, or that he forgot his assignment during a game.
A marching band member does not tell the conductor that
he or she forgot their music or uniform. A drama club
member does not forget their costume for a play
performance. The philosophy under which we would like
cadets to operate is to ask themselves, AIf this were a job,
would I still be working here [email protected] Your answer to
this question will determine how well you do in this
program.
Air Force Song
Off we go into the wild blue yonder,
Climbing high into the sun;
Here they come zooming to meet our thunder,
At=em boys, giv=er the gun!
Down we dive spouting our flame from under,
Off with one heck-uv-a roar!
We live in fame or go down in flame,
Nothing can stop the US Air Force.
Minds of men fashioned a crate of thunder,
Sent it high into the blue;
Hands of men blasted the world asunder,
How they lived God only knew!
Souls of men dreaming of skies to conquer
Gave us wing, ever to soar.
With scouts before and bombers galore,
Nothing can stop the US Air Force!
Here is a toast to the host of those who love the
vastness of the sky.
To a friend we send the message of his
brother men who fly.
We drink to those who gave their all of old.
Then down we roar to score the rainbow=s pot of gold.
A toast to the host of men we boast,
The US Air Force.
Off we go into the wild sky yonder,
Keep the wings level and true!
If you=d live to be a gray-haired wonder
Keep the nose out of the blue!
Flying men guarding our nation=s borders,
We=ll be there followed by more.
In echelon we carry on!
Nothing >ll stop the US Air Force
2
Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
Chapter 2
PROGRAM BENEFITS
2.1. General. Cadets who are active in the learning
process and who develop self-discipline and self-reliance
will stand to gain significant benefits from the AFJROTC
program. In addition to gaining a clearer understanding
of the world around them, cadets can also benefit from the
following.
service means increased pay, added responsibilities, and
opportunities, so in essence, JROTC is paying you to
perform.
2.5. College Credit. If you successfully complete three
or four years of Air Force Junior ROTC and enroll in an
Air Force ROTC program in college, you may receive
credit for the first year of the four-year college ROTC
program as well as improve your opportunity to gain an
Air Force ROTC one-, two-, or three-year scholarship
while in college. This scholarship can provide all tuition,
fees, and book costs while in scholarship status. In
addition, a tax free allowance is also provided to the
scholarship student. Additionally, qualified cadets are
eligible for consideration for the guaranteed scholarship
program established for AFJROTC cadets while in high
school. (see paragraph 2.7 )
2.2. Recognition. In addition to national awards from
civic and patriotic organizations, active cadets are eligible
for academic, leadership, and service awards from within
the program. These awards are ribbons and medals that
are worn on the cadet uniform and are readily seen by
others as evidence of their achievement. Cadets who
work up to their ability and work hard can earn promotion
in the form of cadet rank. This will provide valuable
leadership experience which will be extremely useful in
later life. In addition, one elective course credit toward
high school graduation is given for each year of
AFJROTC successfully completed. Finally, satisfactory
completion of two years of Aerospace Science Academic
Course may be used to offset one of the HOPE and
performing arts core credits.
2.6. Service Academy Appointments. Schools
holding AFJROTC honor unit status may nominate up to
five cadets to the United States Air Force Academy
(Colorado Springs, CO). To be eligible for a nomination,
cadets must successfully complete at least two years of
AFJROTC upon graduation from high school.
Additionally, JROTC have an advantage over
non-JROTC students as academy selection committees
normally give extra-weight to students who have excelled
in high school JROTC as cadets have shown a
willingness/ability to accept the demands of the military
lifestyle. Additionally, the other service academies (i.e.
West Point and Annapolis) also tend to view a person=s
time in JROTC as a plus when considering people for
appointments to their schools.
2.3. Certificate of Training. An Air Force ACertificate
of [email protected] is given for successful completion of two
years of the AFJROTC program. In addition, if a cadet
should choose to enlist into a branch of the armed
services, the leadership education and overall experiences
from the program will make basic training, and the
transition into the military lifestyle much easier.
“The proper blend of aspiration (setting high goals for
yourself) and inspiration (using your brain matter),
mixed with a whole lot of perspiration (good old
fashioned hard work) will produce excellence in
everything you do.”
“Ninety-nine percent of the failures come
from people who have the habit of making
excuses.”
BGeorge Washington Carver
BAnonymous
2.4. Certificate of Completion. A ACertificate of
[email protected] is given for successful completion of three
or more years of AFJROTC. A note of caution: the
definition of Asuccessful [email protected] is at the discretion
of the Commandant of Cadets. In general, an average
grade of [email protected] and course credit are considered Asuccessful
[email protected] This certificate should enable a cadet who
chooses to enlist in a branch of the armed services to
receive advanced rank. For example, if you enlist in the
Air Force and have received a ACertificate of [email protected]
(satisfactorily completed three or more years of JROTC),
you may enter two grades higher (E-3) than other
enlistees (E-1). This higher grade when entering the
3
Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
scores, and progression in the JROTC program, the more
money you will receive.
Competition for these
scholarships begins in the fall of a cadet=s senior year, but
don=t wait until then to start preparing to win a
scholarship. Instead, hit the books now; get active in
JROTC and other school activities now so you will be a
qualified candidate when it comes time to compete. If
you win one of these scholarships the Air Force not only
pays up to full tuition, fees/books and spending money,
but it also guarantees you a commission as a second
lieutenant in the United States Air Force working in a
challenging and rewarding job.
2.7. Air Force JROTC College ROTC Scholarships.
Students enrolled in High School AFJROTC units may
also compete for college ROTC scholarships directly
through HQ ROTC. These scholarships are limited
primarily to technical areas of study, such as engineering,
math, computer science, etc., but will normally qualify
students for scholarships with lower GPAs/SAT scores
than non-AFJROTC competitors. To be eligible, you
must have completed two years of AFJROTC by the time
you graduate from high school and have earned the
required GPAs/SAT levels. There are several types of
these scholarships and varying amounts of money available
through each. Obviously, the better your grades, SAT
ANever pass up an opportunity to keep your
mouth [email protected]
- General Charles Horner
4
Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
Chapter 3
CADET CONDUCT AND CLASSROOM PROCEDURES
3.1. Classroom Code of Conduct.
In order for an
organization to operate efficiently and effectively, there
must be rules and regulations to go by. This is certainly
true of Buchholz High School Air Force Junior ROTC
where we are attempting to develop your leadership and
followership skills in a simulated military environment.
You will find that most of our rules are in fact school rules,
but we will strictly enforce them to ensure that the
necessary military atmosphere is maintained. Violations
of these rules can affect your opportunity for success,
advancement, and in some cases even participation in
JROTC sponsored activities. Below we have listed some
of the more important rules that we think, after you read
them, you will agree that the secret to success in JROTC
and in life is to treat all people and things with RESPECT.
Classroom Conduct
DO:
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Show respect for the American Flag and the Air Force uniform at all times.
Follow the instructions of those in a position of authority over you.
Take pride in yourself and in this cadet corps.
Be polite, courteous, and respectful at all times.
Strive for excellence in everything you do.
Be the Aexample for others to [email protected]
Be punctual to class.
Bring required materials (paper, pencils, etc.) to class every day.
Be by your seat or in your assigned position when the class bell rings.
Be alert and attentive in class.
Raise your hand and wait until called on prior to contributing to the class.
Leave the classroom clean with tables properly aligned.
Follow all school policies on student discipline while in the JROTC area.
DON=T
$
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$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Wear sunglasses or hats in the classroom.
Bring food or drinks in the class.
DON’T CHEW GUM IN ANY JROTC PORTABLE!
Sit on top of desks or other furniture.
Place feet on chairs, desks, tables or walls.
Write on or deface desks, tables, chairs or walls.
Make noise, talk, pass notes, create disturbances, or throw things in class.
Disturb pictures, models, or bulletin boards.
Read or work on anything other than AFJROTC material without permission.
Leave the classroom without the instructor=s permission.
Write on the whiteboard without the instructor=s permission.
Talk when the instructor is teaching or when someone else has the floor.
Enter any office area without the permission of the person in charge of that area.
Post announcements or alter them without expressed approval.
USE YOUR CELL PHONE IN ANY WAY!!!
Haze cadets -- Both supervisors and individual cadets will be expected to maintain proper military poise and bearing at
all times. Cadets in the JROTC program must be well behaved and in control of their actions. There will be no
hazing or harassing of any cadet by other cadets or the staff B EVER!!
Figure 3.1.
5
Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
3.2.
Classroom Procedures. All will be conducted
using proper military procedures and discipline.
3.2.1. Classroom Seating. Your seating position
in the class is determined by what leadership position you
have within the class (we call it a flight) as seen in Figure
3.2. The three top positions in the flight are the flight
commander, flight sergeant and the flight guide. The
flight commander and flight sergeants will sit in the rear
left of the room, with the flight guide sitting at a table in
the front right corner. The element leaders and their
assistants will sit at the beginning of their respective row.
Members of each element will sit within the row of their
respective element leader. These tables face to the front
of the classroom and are in position to easily observe the
instructor or speaker at the front of the room. The flight
commander is in charge of the flight; the flight sergeant is
in charge during the absence of the flight commander; the
guide carries the guidon (a flight pennant) and regulates
the rate/direction that the flight marches; the element
leaders are in charge of the members of their element and
are responsible to the flight commander, and the assistant
element leaders are responsible to the element leader and
are in charge of the
element in the absence of the element leader.
3.2.2. Beginning Class Procedures:
3.2.2.1. Forming the Flight.
After the
tardy bell rings, the flight commander (or flight sergeant,
flight guide, then 1st element leader, etc. in the absence
of those ahead in the chain of command) will call the
flight to attention. (If not at your seat when this
command is given you will be marked tardy.) After
the flight is at attention next to their assigned seats, the
flight commander directs the flight guide AGuide [email protected]
At this command, the flight guide, in a military manner,
will move the flight guidon from the case and post it in the
stand in the front right corner of the classroom. After
posting the guidon, the guide will do a salute the flight
commander and report, Aguidon posted, sir/[email protected]
While the guide is posting the guidon, all members of the
flight should stay at attention, as this flag represents the
strength, teamwork, camaraderie, and esprit de corps of
you and the other members of the flight.
Air Force Junior ROTC
CLASSROOM SEATING CHART
(Front of Classroom)
1st El
Ldr
Asst El
Ldr
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Flt
Guide
2nd El
Ldr
Asst El
Ldr
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
3rd El
Ldr
Asst El
Ldr
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Flt
CC
Flt
Sgt
4th El
Ldr
Asst El
Ldr
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Cadet
Figure 3.2
Figure 3.2
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Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
3.2.2.2.
Pledge of Allegiance. When
the Pledge of Allegiance is given during the first period, all
cadets (whether or not in uniform) will stand at attention
and properly state the pledge.
3.2.2.3 Reporting In. After the flight=s
guidon has been posted, the flight commander directs,
AElements, [email protected] (Prior to this command, all element
leaders should have noted any absent cadets from their
element.) At this command, each element leader, in turn,
salutes the flight commander and reports any absences, by
name, from their element. The salute is maintained and
proper replies by the element leader would include: ASir
(Ma=am), first element, all cadets present and/or accounted
for, Sir (Ma=am)@or ASir (Ma=am), second element, cadets
Jones and Smith missing, Sir (Ma=am)[email protected] The flight
commander would then return the salute at which point the
element leader would drop the salute. If for some reason
the element leader is absent, the assistant element leader
will report the absences; if both are absent, the cadet closest
to the element leader=s seat will report absences. After all
of the elements have reported, the flight commander will
give the command, [email protected] At this command, all
members of the flight will take their seats and remain silent.
3.2.2.4.
Taking Attendance. This is normally the responsibility of the flight sergeant. After the
cadets are seated, the flight sergeant will call the cadets= last
name in order. When your name is called, the proper reply
is AHere, [email protected] If for some reason the flight
commander or any other officer is calling the roll, your
proper reply would be, AHere, [email protected] or AHere, [email protected]
3.2.2.5.
Announcements.
After
attendance is taken, the flight commander will read any
pertinent announcements. Announcements can cover
many different topics from staff meeting notes, to passing
around sign-up sheets for an upcoming field trip. This is
the time set aside each day for the cadet staff to relay
information to the cadet corps, so please pay attention.
After the announcements, the flight commander turns the
class over to the instructor.
3.2.2.6.
Tardies. Cadets are expected to
be by their assigned seats, with all personal items placed on
the floor under your seat, when the class bell rings so that
the flight commander can begin opening procedures. If
you are not by your seat when the bell rings, you are
considered tardy. The first unexcused tardy, each nine
weeks, you will receive a warning; the second, you will be
restricted from JROTC facilities; the third, you will be
referred to the Dean=s Office for Saturday school. In
addition, you will lose participation points for each tardy as
follows:
1 = 5 pts
5 = 45 pts
2 = 10 pts
6 = 70 pts
3 = 15 pts
7 = 100 pts
4 = 25 pts
If you should arrive late to class, you should take just one
step into the room, stop, and assume the position of
attention.
Remain at attention until class opening
procedures are complete and then ask the flight
commander, ASir (Ma=am), permission to join the [email protected]
When directed to do so, you will take your seat or proceed
to stand at the back of the class, depending on the
circumstances. These same procedures apply if the SASI
or ASI are in charge of the class at the time of your arrival,
except you will stand at attention until the instructor
recognizes you.
3.2.3. Ending Class Procedures. Normally, the
class instructor will try to end the class instruction 2 to 3
minutes prior to the bell. This time should be used by the
flight commander for any last minute reminders of future
activities. When the class bell does ring, the flight
commander will call the flight to attention. After all
movement has stopped and cadets are standing behind their
seats, the flight commander will formally dismiss the class.
Cadets must not leave the class until dismissed by the flight
commander or his/her stand-in.
3.3 Behavior. Cadets must be well behaved and in
control of their actions at all times. Misbehaving will not
be tolerated and will result in immediate corrective action
by the instructors or group staff. If you find that you
cannot live by these rules, we suggest you find a class other
than Air Force Junior ROTC to act up in.
3.3.1.
If you are the type of person who
consistently gets into trouble, you can almost be assured
that you will not progress in the JROTC program. We
cannot appoint people as cadet leaders if they do things that
get them suspended or in trouble. Nor can we make
leaders of cadets that constantly earn detention, give other
teachers a hard time, spend most of their waking hours in
the dean=s office for misbehaving, skipping school, or
otherwise breaking school and JROTC rules. Just follow
the rules and everyone will be the better for it.
3.3.2. Each cadet in the corps is expected to
demonstrate the utmost of integrity. The honor code,
which is stated at the end of this paragraph, is very specific
and clear as to what it means to each and every cadet. It
means we all must be honorable in everything that we do
but also, and in many cases the more difficult task, we must
demand that all those around us must live up to those same
high standards. It means that we all must live a life free of
lying, cheating or stealing; be individuals of the utmost
integrity who follow the rules because it is the right thing to
do. It means that if you see a friend cheating on a test, you
need to get him/her to stop or you have an obligation to turn
the cheater in. This is not easy to do for many of us, but
most of the really good things in life are difficult in one way
or another. There is nothing more important than an
individual=s honor and integrity because without those, no
one will trust you. Work hard to live by this code and
promote it to all those around you and you will live a happy
and prosperous life.
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Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
FL-821st Honor Code
“I will not lie, cheat, or steal nor tolerate those among us that do!”
3.3.3. Cadets may be disenrolled from JROTC
for any of the following infractions:
$
Violation of the trust, integrity, and behavior
standards of the Honor Code.
$
Demonstrated lack of willingness/desire to
perform in accordance with the high standard
expected of Buchholz High School Air Force
Junior ROTC cadets.
$
Demonstrated indifference toward the
program, misconduct or unacceptable character
traits that conflict with the standards expected
of a cadet.
3.3.4. Cadets should be willing to assist other
cadets at all times in a sense of cooperation and the desire to
reach group goals.
respect from others. When this practice is used outside of
JROTC, it will produce equally satisfying results,
especially from parents and teachers.
3.4.3. Conversation Etiquette. Words like
APlease,@ AThank you,@ and AMay I= are important for all of
us to use. Do not interrupt others and do respect other
people=s opinions as you would want them to respect yours.
While in formation, it is proper to request permission to
speak by raising your right hand and when recognized by
the person in charge say, ASir (Ma=am), request permission
to [email protected]
3.3.4. Respect for Authority. Responsible and
successful citizens develop respect for authority.
Authorities are those who have been appointed over you:
the school principal, your teachers, and cadet leaders, etc.
Cadets are expected to respect the authority given to other
cadets. Because of cadet rotations through the flight and
staff positions, sometimes cadets with lesser experience and
younger in age may be placed in a position of authority over
you. It is part of the learning experience for you to extend
the proper courtesy to all cadets, regardless of age or
experience. A courteous cadet always reflects positively
upon himself, the cadet corps, this school and the
community.
3.4.5. Common Courtesy. During class, whenever the command AAt [email protected] is given, all talking will stop.
If you leave the classroom during the period to go outside
for military training, proceed quickly and quietly. When
you return, go directly to you seat and stand at attention
until ordered to take your seat by the flight commander.
3.4. Military Etiquette.
This subject will be covered
in detail during military training classes. However, in
order to emphasize some of the important areas, we will
cover some of the military customs and courtesies.
3.4.1. Use of Titles. Civilians are addressed as
Mr., Mrs., Miss and Ms. Military people are addressed by
their military rank. Cadets may be addressed as Mr. or
Miss, or by their cadet rank, such as ACadet Sergeant [email protected]
or ACadet Captain [email protected] Address your Commandant of
Cadets as AColonel [email protected] and your Aerospace Science
Instructor as AChief [email protected]
3.4.2. Use of Sir and Ma=am. It is a sign of
respect to elders or superiors to address them as [email protected] or
AMa=am,@ so try not to resist it. The more you use it, the
easier it becomes to use and soon you will attract equal
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Air Force Junior ROTC
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FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
Chapter 4
UNIFORM PROCEDURES AND SUPPLY ACCOUNTS
4.1. General.
The United States Air Force uniform is
the symbol of a proud and honorable service. Air Force
men and women wear it proudly in the best tradition of the
service. AFJROTC cadets are issued the same uniform
worn by the United States Air Force with the exception of a
distinctive shoulder patch and the different uniform/grade
insignia. The instructors and upper class cadets will do all
that is possible to ensure that cadets at all levels wear the
uniform correctly and neatly in order to uphold the dignity
of the Air Force, AFJROTC, their fellow cadets and
themselves. Remember, while in uniform you represent
both the United States Air Force and Buchholz High School,
in addition to yourself. The manner in which you wear the
uniform will reflect upon every cadet in our group.
4.2.1.3. Uniform Turn-In. At the end of the
school year, or if you leave Buchholz High School prior to
the end of the school year, your uniform account must be
properly closed. Everything that was issued must be
returned before you leave school with the exception of
ribbons, T-shirt and socks (retain if these items have been
worn). To properly close your account, everything must be
returned to the supply room, where you received it.
4.2.2. Equipment Accounts. Cadets are encouraged to participate in AFJROTC extra-curricular activities.
Special equipment such as replica rifles, helmets, berets,
belts, gloves, etc. are available in the supply room for these
activities
4.2.2.1. Issue. This special equipment will
be Asigned [email protected] on a Ahand [email protected] to the individual for their
use. While this equipment is in your possession, it is your
responsibility and it must be returned to the supply room
when the activities are finished.
4.2.
Supply Procedures:
4.2.1. Uniform Account. You will be issued, on a
loan basis, a properly fitted uniform that must be signed for,
kept clean and in good repair, and turned in upon request.
All items remain the property of the Air Force. Your
parents or guardians must give their consent prior to being
issued a uniform. The Cadet Hand Receipt (Appendix C) is
used to indicate which items you have in your possession
and are responsible for. Your parent=s and your signature
indicates an agreement to care for the Air Force property and
that you will pay for any replacement costs due to your lack
of proper care.
4.2.1.1.
Opening. When you receive your
cadet uniform, you will have an open uniform and
equipment account in the AFJROTC supply room.
Everything that is checked out to you is listed on this
account. All items are loaned to you by the Air Force and
they must be accounted for at all times. Remember: as an
extra bonus, turning your Uniform Account Form in early or
on time earns points toward Honor Flight!
4.2.1.2.
Exchanges. Any uniform item that
becomes unserviceable through normal wear and tear can be
replaced at no cost to you. Any uniform item that does not
fit properly can be replaced or exchanged at no charge.
Bring the article in question to the AFJROTC supply room
for adjustment. When you must exchange or turn in a
uniform item, make sure it is [email protected] dry cleaned or
laundered. When articles are lost, stolen or ruined because
of your personal irresponsibility, you must pay for them.
You are required to replace any uniform items that you
cannot account for as soon as possible. Do not wear the
uniform with items missing. You cannot bring a uniform in
on Wednesday (normal uniform day) for exchange or
adjustment and expect to be excused from the inspection.
Make all adjustments on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, or
Friday. Remember, there is only one way to wear the
AFJROTC uniform, and that is properly and proudly.
4.3.
Which Uniform to Wear. The instructors, in
conjunction with the Group Staff, will prescribe the
appropriate uniform to wear based upon the season and
circumstances.
The guidelines used to select the
appropriate uniform are:
1. The formal or ceremonial participation of cadets
in uniform;
2. The attire of other participants or guests;
3. The weather.
A AUniform of the [email protected] notice will be posted by the Cadet
Vice Commander on the Group Bulletin Board and will state
exactly which uniform to be worn. This notice should be
posted at least one full day prior to the event. It is the
cadet=s responsibility to wear the proper uniform.
4.4.When to Wear the Uniform. The uniform is to be worn
by all cadets one day each week, on the day prescribed as
Auniform [email protected] That day will normally be on Wednesday,
which is Leadership Lab Day. Uniforms may be required
on other days due to special occasions, visitors, or activities.
The uniform may be worn only when authorized by the
instructors. When a cadet is earning extra credit for
activities, uniform wear is an addition to uniform day.
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Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
4.5.2.
Flight caps have been a big
problem. Cadets lay them down and forget them or leave
them where they can be stolen. If you will remember to
tuck it under the belt (left side with opening to the rear),
you may not have the problem of paying for another cap.
As a backup measure, place your name on masking tape
inside your cap. This way, if the cap is found, it is much
easier to return. And, it may save you from paying for a
new one.
4.5.3. Shoes must be shined and the badges, insignia, belt buckle and other metallic devices must be
maintained in the proper luster and condition.
4.5.4. Coats, trousers/slacks/skirts must be
dry cleaned only. Shirts and blouses should be
laundered at home or the cleaners after each wear.
Ironing will make washed items look better. Exercise
care in cleaning to remove Aring around the [email protected]
4.5.5. Be alert for any uniform items left lying
around or misplaced by other cadets, ESPECIALLY
CAPS. Please turn them in to the ASI. Let=s work
together and help each other out.
4.5.6. Prepare your uniform completely the day
before you are to wear it and hang it in a place where you
will see it in the morning. That way you will not be
rushed at the last minute to find an item.
4.5.7. Do not alter the style or fit of the uniform
such as tapering the shirt or trousers/slacks, unless you
have the approval of the ASI.
4.4.1. The uniform must be worn on the prescribed
uniform day. Absence from class on uniform day does
not excuse you from Amaking up uniform [email protected] If you
are absent on uniform day and the absence is excused,
wear the uniform your first day back at school. Failure
to make up a missed uniform day will result in a grade of
zero for that week. If you anticipate being absent for
some reason and cannot wear the uniform on uniform day,
you may wear it on the day prior to uniform day, with
advanced and special permission of the ASI. (This will
have the same effect as turning in an assignment early) If
you are not in uniform on uniform day, a written excuse or
explanation from your parent or guardian must be
presented to the ASI. Some common excuses, that are
not acceptable and the replies you can expect from the
staff are:
4.4.1.1.
AI [email protected] (Poorest of excuses)
Reply: You must learn responsibility for your actions and
must plan ahead in order to meet your obligations.
4.4.1.2. AMy mother [email protected] (Next to the
poorest excuse.) Reply: Do not depend upon your
mother for things which by now should be your personal
responsibility. Besides, we don=t give grades to your
mother, we give them to you.
4.4.1.3. AIt=s in the [email protected] (Poor excuse.)
Reply: Inspect your uniform when you take it off on
Wednesday afternoon. If it needs cleaning, take it in
Wednesday (after school) or Thursday and request it by
Friday.
4.4.1.4. AThe trousers are [email protected] or AThe
zipper [email protected] Reply: Advise the ASI when it happens.
If it just happened, perhaps it was caused by last minute
rushing or by not taking proper care. (Costly in time and
money)
4.4.1.5. ANo excuse, [email protected] (Honest.) Reply:
CARE MORE!!
4.4.2. How you react and learn from your mistakes, problems, or failures is much more important than
the excuse or reason for your failure.
AIf you can=t get soldiers to wear their
uniforms properly and follow all the rules of
the organization, how can you expect them to
be willing to die for their [email protected]
BGeneral George S. Patton
4.5.8. Be extra careful to watch where you sit, lean
or walk so that the uniform (including shoes) does not
become excessively untidy or worn.
4.5.9. Keep your hands out of pockets, keep all
buttons buttoned and keep the jacket zipped at least half
way. Do not carry bulky articles in uniform pockets.
Items should not protrude from pockets such as combs,
pencils, etc. Do not carry pencils on your ear or pencils
and combs in your hair.
4.5.10.
Trim loose threads and frayed
seams before wearing the uniform. If these are not
corrected by the weekly inspection it will result in the loss
of points.
4.5.11.
Do not smoke, in or out of uniform,
and stay away from others that do. A cigarette burn in
the uniform renders it unserviceable and you will be billed
for the cost of replacement.
4.5. Responsibilities. You must take care of your
uniform and equipment items at all times. Do not lend
uniform items to other people. If they lose items issued to
you, you will still be held accountable. Do not leave them
in unlocked lockers or other places where they are not
secure. Do not try to turn them in to the school office or
any other place except the AFJROTC supply room. Lost
uniform items must be paid for to close your account.
4.5.1. In order for our cadet corps to present an
outstanding appearance, it is the responsibility of each
cadet to take pride in the proper maintenance of the
uniform. As a rule of thumb, all dark blue uniform
items must be dry cleaned and the light blue shirts
and blouses can be washed and pressed.
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Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
and slightly breaks the crease in front. In the back, they
4.6. How to Wear the Uniform.
First determine
which uniform is prescribed. That information is
generally posted in the classroom at least one full day
prior to uniform day. If it is not posted, ask. Wear only
the uniform specified by the instructors. Do not mix
civilian and military uniform clothing.
4.6.1. Credit. To receive credit for uniform
day, you must wear the uniform to JROTC class. For
convenience, cadets are allowed to wear the uniform the
entire day including travel to and from school. There is
also the option to change into civilian clothes for other
classes; however, cadets must do it on their own time.
Cadets are not allowed to ask teachers if they can get a
pass to change—cadets will not miss class to change.
Most cadets find it easier to remain in uniform for the
entire day.
4.6.2. Caps.
The headgear will be worn outdoors at all times and will be removed upon entering a
building. This applies to both male and female cadets
and includes wearing the cap while operating bicycles,
unless safety headgear is worn. When the flight cap is
not being worn, it may be carried under the belt to the left
of the buckle between the first and second loop with
opening of the cap facing to the rear, unfolded. All
cadets will place their name in their cap on a piece of
masking tape to avoid a hassle when the cap is misplaced.
The cap is never carried under the shoulder epaulet.
Caps are removed when bowed in prayer. Buchholz
High School has been designated a Ano hat [email protected] This
means that cadets are relieved of the responsibility to
wear caps while on the campus. There will be
exceptions to this, such as Change of Command Parade,
cadet photos, field trips, etc. Cadets will be informed of
these exceptions in the AUniform of the [email protected] notice or by
special orders.
4.6.3. Service Coats.
Service coats will be
buttoned completely at all times. Coats may be removed
inside the classroom if it is necessary to be comfortable.
Remember, coats are to be dry cleaned only.
4.6.4. Neckties and Tie Tabs. Neckties (male)
and tie tabs (female) must be worn with the service coat.
Ties will not be loosened, removed, nor tucked into the
trousers. The official Air Force tie tack or clasp may be
worn and when worn should be positioned halfway
between the tip of the tie and the knot. Remember,
neckties and tie tabs are to be dry cleaned only.
4.6.5. Short sleeve shirt/blouse. When worn as
the outer garment, name tags, badges, ribbons and the
rank lapel insignia are worn on the short sleeve shirt.
When directed by the SASI/ASI, citation cords and/or
neckties and tie tabs may be worn.
Remember,
shirts/blouses should be laundered after each wear,
paying particular attention to the Aring around the [email protected]
4.6.6. Trousers/Slacks. Trousers/slacks are
worn with the belt and buckle. Trousers/slacks should be
hemmed in such a way that the front touches the shoe top
should be hemmed where the shoe back meets the heel.
Neither trousers nor slacks should be altered unless
authorized by the ASI. Remember, trousers and slacks
must be dry cleaned only.
4.6.7. Shoes. Only one pair of shoes will be
issued each year. Shoes, as with all uniform parts, should
only be worn for AFJROTC approved activities. Shoes
should fit comfortably and allow for future growth.
Remember, a little shoe polish and edge dressing will
extend the wear and also improve the inspection grade.
4.6.8. Socks/hose. Male cadets will wear only
black socks with the uniform. Female cadets, when
wearing the skirt, must wear hose of a neutral shade which
complements the uniform. Hose must be sheer with no
design. Females may wear the slacks with or without
socks but if they wear socks they must be black in color.
ADo something every day that you don=t want
to do, this is the golden rule for acquiring the
habit of doing your duty without [email protected]
BMark Twain
4.6.9. Undershirts. Solid white [email protected] neck Tshirts must be worn with the men=s short sleeve shirt to
protect it and the coat from accumulating body odor.
Regular T-shirts with round necks, turtle necks, colors
other than white, or T-shirts with designs or logos are not
authorized.
4.6.10. Semi-formal Uniform. Male cadets will
be authorized to wear the blue uniform with white shirt
and issued tie on occasions such as the Military Ball.
Specific approval of the Commandant of Cadets must be
obtained before this uniform option can be worn. Female
cadets may wear a formal gown in prescribed events.
4.7.
Unauthorized Wear of the Uniform:
4.7.1. No item of the United States Air Force
uniform may be worn by anyone except members of the
AFJROTC unit. Federal law prohibits, AWear Without
Authority,@ and states that, AAny person within the
jurisdiction of the United States who wears a uniform or
distinctive part of the uniform of the Armed Services
without authority is subject to the penalties prescribed in
Title 18, U.S.C. [email protected] Cadets violating this policy will be
advised of the impropriety of wearing the uniform under
these conditions and reported to the Commandant of
Cadets for disciplinary or disenrollment action. Cadets are
not permitted to wear the uniform, or any part of the
uniform or accessories, except to and from official
AFJROTC activities, unless approved by the SASI or
ASI.
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Air Force Junior ROTC
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17 August 2015
4.7.2. Uniforms will be worn only between home
and school or the site of the special event. You may not
wear the uniform while hitchhiking, or while participating
in sporting events, such as gym class. No part of the
uniform will be worn in PE classes or when participating
in physical games or activities. Disciplinary action will
be taken against violators.
4.7.3. Cadets will not wear the Air Force uniform
while participating in student demonstrations either as
participants or in the capacity of police or guards.
4.9.3.
Other ribbons. Ribbons earned
while enrolled in the Army, Navy, or Marine Corps
JROTC and specific Civil Air Patrol (CAP) awards may
be worn. Consult the Commandant of Cadets or the ASI
for the order of precedence. Be prepared to prove that
you earned them if challenged.
ABuild for your team a feeling of oneness, of
dependence upon one another and of strength
derived from [email protected]
BVince Lombardi
4.7.4. When in uniform, proper military bearing
must be maintained at all times. Do not show affection
while wearing the uniform, this includes holding hands
and kissing. Public displays of affection (PDA) or hand
holding while in uniform is not considered proper.
Additionally, cadets must refrain from using
unprofessional language.
4.7.5. Wearing headsets or ear speakers, such as
the kind used with portable listening devices, is not
permitted in uniform or on the Buchholz campus.
4.8.
Distinctive Uniform Items. Members of the
Color Guard, Drill Team and certain other cadets may be
authorized to wear distinctive uniform items such as
ascots, berets, cords, gloves and belts. These items are
accountable and use of these items will be prescribed at
time of issue.
4.9.
Wear of Insignia and Badges. Cadets are
authorized to wear cap, lapel and rank insignia, patches,
name tags, ribbons, model rocket and flight badges.
Special orders authorize the wear of these items and
particular attention must be paid to placement of these
devices on the uniform.
4.9.1.
Ribbons. Chapter 13, AAwards and
Decorations,@ describes the awards and decorations
available to cadets. Ribbons that are earned are worn in
the order of their importance (precedence), left to right,
top to bottom, as you look at them.
4.9.2.
Medals.
Medals are generally
worn onlyfor special occasions on the semiformal dress
uniform. Medals are centered on the left breast pocket
flap with the top edge of the medal on the pocket seam.
Medals and ribbons may be worn together on such
occasions.
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Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
Chapter 5
AFJROTC GROOMING STANDARDS
5.1. General. Helping to make the Air Force JROTC
program a unique course of instruction is its association
with the Air Force. AFJROTC cadets wear the same
United States Air Force uniform and have certain grooming
standards which must be met, just like the regular Air
Force. The pride that you have in your daily personal
appearance will greatly enhance the esprit de corps (spirit of
the corps) essential to a successful AFJROTC unit.
Therefore, it is most important for you to maintain a high
standard of personal appearance. The standard that applies
equally to all has four basic elements: neatness,
cleanliness, safety, and military image. This standard is
based on Air Force Instruction 36-2903 and applies to
cadets while in uniform. However, since cadets become
associated with the AFJROTC program, even when not in
uniform, they are encouraged to maintain the same high
personal grooming standards even when not in uniform.
5.1.1. Although cadets wear the uniform only one
day each week, you should know that even in civilian
clothes, your neatness and cleanliness reflects not only
upon you, but your family, your circle of friends, and upon
any organization to which you belong, AFJROTC included.
5.1.2. These same high standards of personal
appearance apply not only while in uniform, but also when
you are in the cadet area or while attending cadet functions.
Standards of excellence apply especially while you are in
uniform. Failure to meet these standards will influence
grades and could result in removal from the program.
Only one earring or healing post may be worn on or in each
earlobe. Male cadets may NOT wear earrings or healing
posts while in uniform or while at any AFJROTC activity.
5.2.3. Eyeglasses and Other Ornaments. Ornaments on the head, visible ornaments around the neck, and
ornamentation on eyeglass lenses are prohibited in uniform.
When not in formation, conservative sunglasses and
photosensitive-type eyeglasses may be worn outdoors.
[email protected] style sunglass lenses are not appropriate in
uniform.
5.2.4. Other Items. Wallets, checkbooks, pens,
pencils, watch chains or fobs, pins, jewelry, handkerchiefs,
combs, sunglasses, gloves, and so forth, are not to be
exposed while in uniform. Items which are carried in
uniform pockets should not detract from a proper military
image.
5.3.
Female Standards:
5.3.1. Cosmetics. Must be conservative and in
good taste.
5.3.2.
Hair Styles (Female).
The hair must
be styled to present a professional appearance. The hair
must not extend in length on sides below an invisible line
drawn parallel to the ground at the bottom edge of the shirt
collar at the back of the neck. It must not exceed three
inches in bulk or prevent the proper wear of headgear. It
must not include hair ornamentation such as ribbons or
jeweled pins. Plain and conservative pins, combs, and
barrettes similar to the individual=s hair color may be worn
to keep hair in place.
5.3.3. Nail Polish. If worn while in uniform, nail
polish must be conservative in color and in good taste. It
must not contain any ornamentation. French tip nails are
allowed.
5.2.
Common Standards:
5.2.1. Hair Styles.
Hair must be clean, well
groomed and neat. It must not contain excessive amounts
of grooming aids. Hair must be styled so it does not touch
the eyebrows when groomed or protrude below the front
band of properly worn headgear. (Exception: Hair may be
visible under the front of a female cadet=s flight cap.) The
hair must not be worn in an extreme or fad style such as
lines cut into the hair, a mohawk, ducktail, or braids (men)
or cornrows, pigtails, dog ears (women) or in such a way
that exceeds the length or bulk standards.
5.2.2. Jewelry. Members may wear conservative
wristwatches and rings. No more than a total of three (3)
rings may be worn on both hands at any one time. ID
bracelets are also permitted if they are neat, conservative
and not wider than one inch. Female cadets may wear
small, conservative white pearl, gold or silver spherical
earrings that fit tight against the ear and do not extend
below the earlobe.
5.4.
Male Standards:
5.4.1. Beards.
Cannot be worn except for
health reasons when authorized by the Commandant of
Cadets upon the written recommendation of a physician.
5.4.2. Mustache. Must not extend downward
below the lip line of the upper lip or extend sideways
beyond a vertical line drawn upward from the corner of the
mouth. Handlebar mustaches are prohibited.
5.4.3 Sideburns. If worn, must be neatly trimmed
and tapered in the same manner as the haircut.
Additionally, sideburns must not extend below the lowest
part of the exterior middle ear opening.
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5.4.4. Hair Styles (Male). Hair must have a
tapered appearance on the sides and back, both with and
without headgear. A tapered appearance is one that when
viewed from any angle outlines the individual=s hair so that
it conforms to the shape of the head, curving inward to the
termination point. The bulk (thickness) or depth of the
mass of hair must not exceed 1/4 inch at the termination
point. A block cut is permitted as long as a tapered
appearance is kept. The hair must not touch the ears and
only the closely cut or shaved hair on the back of the neck
may touch the collar. Hair must not exceed one and
one-quarter inches in bulk, regardless of length and it must
not contain or have any visible foreign items attached to it.
5.6. Personal Hygiene. Cadets are expected to observe
high standards of personal health, cleanliness and sanitary
practice. Cadets may be counseled and referred to the
school nurse if they fail to meet acceptable standards.
5.7. Physical Conditioning.
Your physical condition
is important in AFJROTC. Cadets must be physically fit to
withstand the long periods of standing or marching in
formation. Because of the marching, cadets should eat a
nourishing meal to start the day. Additional information
on the AFJROTC Physical Fitness Program is contained in
Chapter 11.
5.5. Failure to Meet Standards.
Cadets must work
hard to continually meet the grooming standards. It is the
responsibility of upper class cadets to tactfully inform a
cadet when that standard has not been met. Cadets
informed of standard violations should take immediate
corrective action.
“He that has learned how to obey will know how to command.”
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Chapter 6
AFJROTC GRADING SYSTEM
6.1. General.
The AFJROTC grading system at
Buchholz High School is divided into three separate areas:
academic
instruction,
leadership
training
and
wellness/participation. Workbook assignments will
normally be completed during the class period to allow
more time for cadets to complete other subject work at
home.
instructor the first day back for any assignment missed. It
is also your responsibility to make up any work or
examination as soon as possible after your return. All
missed exams (except for missed uniform wears) will be
made up not later than the first Tuesday you are back in
school, after the test. Missed uniform days must be made
up on the first day you return back to school after an
absence. (See chapter 4, item 4.4.1. for instructions on
missed uniform days.)
6.2. AFJROTC Standards.
Failure to maintain an
overall high school GPA of 2.0 will adversely affect
promotion opportunities in the cadet corps and limit
participation in AFJROTC extra-curricular activities.
6.2.1. Cadets will be tested on academic and
military training subjects throughout the school year. A
significant portion of the semester final exams are made up
directly from the individual chapter tests.
6.2.2. All academic and leadership grades are kept
numerically during the year. Just prior to the grades being
reported to the school, the numerical grades are averaged
and converted to a respective letter grade. A numerical
average between 90% and 100% is an [email protected]; 80% to 89% is a
[email protected]; 70% to 79% is a [email protected]; and 60% to 69% is a [email protected] A
score of 59% or less results in an [email protected] All cadets are
expected to maintain a passing grade at all times.
6.5.
Weekly Inspections:
6.5.1.
In computing the cadet=s leadership
grade, the personal inspection grade received on each
military training day is considered with all test grades.
Each cadet begins each uniform inspection day with a
perfect score of 100%. If infractions of the rules are noted,
a [email protected] or [email protected] is given and the perfect score is reduced
by five points. This grade is extremely important! Any
cadet who is present but fails to wear the uniform on
inspection day and does not have a valid excuse will receive
a grade of A0" for that inspection. If you are absent on
uniform day, remember to wear it on your first day back.
If you don=t wear it on your first day back because you
forgot, you will receive a A0" for that week=s inspection.
Wear of the uniform is extremely important to your grade,
so let=s wear it every week properly and proudly.
6.5.2.
In addition to the uniform inspection
itself, other factors including citizenship are also evaluated
on uniform inspection day. These citizenship ratings are
determined by the cadet=s attitude, conduct, and compliance
with AFJROTC rules. Unacceptable behavior on leadership
days will result in a reduction of the inspection grade.
6.3.
Grades:
6.3.1. Nine Weeks Grades. At the end of each
nine weeks, all of your academic, leadership and
participation grades will be averaged. The result is your
nine weeks Aerospace Science grade which will be reported
to the school.
6.3.2. Semester Grades.
Semester grades
consist of an average of both nine weeks grades.
6.3.3. Extra Credit.
Periodically during the
school year, opportunities will be given to earn extra credit
towards semester or nine-week grades. Extra credit for the
leadership (uniform) grade may be earned by wearing the
uniform while participating in service projects, parades, etc.
You should know what your grade is and approach the
SASI or ASI for an extra credit assignment if you need the
help.
6.6.
Academic Ace Program:
6.6.1. In recognition of superior academic achieve
ment, the AFJROTC at Buchholz High School has an
AAcademic [email protected] program which recognizes the 26 cadets
with the highest grade point average (GPA) in each nine
week period, with an honorable mention for those above a
3.0 GPA.
6.6.2. For a cadet at Buchholz High School to be
recognized on this board, he/she must earn a 3.0 GPA or
higher for the semester. GPA=s will be provided by the
SASI or ASI to Group Vice Commander who will update
the board for the current nine week period and prepare a
letter of congratulations to the recognized cadets.
Additional incentives for people earning this award will be
looked into by the Group Staff.
6.4.
Academic Tests.
6.4.1. You may be tested on either academics or
military training subjects, sometimes both. A grade of
59% or less is an [email protected] You are expected to maintain a
passing grade at all times. Once again, you are in
competition with each person in your flight and if you wish
to win leadership positions or be recognized with awards,
you must always strive to be the best that you can be.
6.4.2. An unexcused or unauthorized absence
during a scheduled test period may result in test failure. If
you are absent, it is your responsibility to check with your
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Chapter 7
CADET RANK AND GRADE
7.1. General.
The military is built on grade
seniority. The term [email protected] actually indicates the rank order
of grades. Anyone that has more rank than you is your
senior in grade. It also means the date that you were
promoted to your grade as compared to others of the same
grade. For instance, cadet officers are senior to all enlisted
grade cadets. Detailed explanations of this system will be
conducted in your military training classes. It is absolutely
necessary that you learn all cadet grades. You will see by
the grade chart that our cadets are divided into three
categories, which are as follows:
7.1.1.
Cadet Airmen. At the lowest level are
the airmen cadets. Airman grades start with the grade of
AAirman [email protected] and go through ASenior [email protected] There is
no grade insignia for an airman basic, an airman has one
stripe, an airman first class has two stripes, and a senior
airman has three stripes.
7.1.2.
Cadet NCOs. The non-commissioned
officer grades are next. They begin with the grade of
ACadet Staff [email protected] (four stripes) and go through the
grade of ACadet Chief Master [email protected] (five stripes under
and three over). The term [email protected] is an abbreviation for
non-commissioned officer. Cadets holding an NCO
position will be expected to lead other cadets with less
grade than themselves.
7.1.3.
Cadet Officers.
Cadet officers wear
their grade insignias on the shoulder epaulets of their shirts.
The starting cadet officer grade is that of Acadet second
[email protected] A cadet officer may advance to the grade of
Acadet [email protected] Cadet second lieutenants, cadet first
lieutenants and cadet captains are known as ACompany
Grade [email protected] Cadet majors, cadet lieutenant colonels
and cadet colonels are known as AField Grade [email protected]
7.2.2.
Do not permit cadet grades to become
confused with actual United States Air Force grades. The
word [email protected] must be a part of any written or oral reference
to a specific cadet grade. When talking official business
by telephone, always refer to yourself as ACadet Sergeant
[email protected] or ACadet Lieutenant Smith from the Junior ROTC
program at Buchholz High [email protected] All written reference
to grade will include the letter [email protected] prior to the grade as in
AC/[email protected] or AC/[email protected]
7.3.
Permanent Grade and Merit Grade.
7.3.1.
Permanent Grade. Permanent grade is
determined by the number of years that a student has been
in Air Force Junior ROTC. This is the minimum grade
that a student will be authorized to wear regardless of the
position he/she holds within the Cadet Group. (See Figure
7.2 for the breakout of Permanent Grades.) First year
cadets will normally be awarded the first stripe after
satisfactory completion (70% or better) of the AAirman
Promotion [email protected] (end of the first nine weeks of school).
7.3.2.
Merit Promotions. A merit promotion
is grade that a cadet is awarded for successfully passing a
sequential promotion exam for the cadet=s next available
grade. In addition to passing the appropriate promotion
exam, the cadet will be required to meet additional
promotion criteria in order to test for the promotion. This
criteria and promotion procedures are defined in Chapter 8.
A cadet can progress from cadet/airman basic to cadet/chief
master sergeant through a series of enlisted promotion
exams provided each semester. In addition, a cadet that
has been assigned to a staff officer position will
automatically be awarded the rank of cadet/2nd lieutenant
and be able to progress through the officer grades through a
series of officer promotion exams provided at the 1st and 3rd
nine week period for qualified cadet officers. The only
exception to these procedures are cadets selected for the
executive staff. The executive staff is comprised of the
Group Commander, Vice Commander, Ops Support
Squadron Commander and 1st and 2nd Squadron
Commanders.
The Group Commander will be
automatically promoted to cadet/lt col and the remainder of
the executive staff to cadet/major upon their selection.
(refer to Figure 7.3)
7.2.
Use of Titles:
7.2.1. It is appropriate to address cadets by the term
AMister,@ AMiss,@ or their cadet rank. Cadets are expected
to address all superior officers as [email protected] or [email protected] (Figure
7.1 shows the cadet rank title, appropriate abbreviation, and
title to be used when addressing a cadet of that rank.)
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CADET RANK
Rank Title
Abbreviation
Addressed As
Cadet Airman Basic
C/AB
ACadet [email protected]
Cadet Airman
C/Amn
ACadet [email protected]
Cadet Airman First Class
C/A1C
ACadet [email protected]
Cadet Senior Airman
C/SrA
ACadet [email protected]
Cadet Staff Sergeant
C/SSgt
ACadet [email protected]
Cadet Technical Sergeant
C/TSgt
ACadet [email protected]
Cadet Master Sergeant
C/MSgt
ACadet [email protected]
Cadet Senior Master Sergeant
C/SMSgt
ACadet [email protected]
Cadet Chief Master Sergeant
C/CMSgt
ACadet [email protected]
Cadet Second Lieutenant
C/2Lt
ACadet [email protected]
Cadet First Lieutenant
C/1Lt
ACadet [email protected]
Cadet Captain
C/Capt
ACadet [email protected]
Cadet Major
C/Maj
ACadet [email protected]
Cadet Lieutenant Colonel
C/LtCol
ACadet [email protected]
Cadet Colonel
C/Col
ACadet [email protected]
Figure 7.1
PERMANENT
CADET
GRADE
Class
Grade
Abbreviation
Description
AS1
AS2
AS3
AS4
Cadet Airman
Cadet Airman First Class
Cadet Senior Airman
Cadet Staff Sergeant
C/Amn
C/A1C
C/SrA
C/SSgt
One Stripe
Two Stripes
Three Stripes
Four Stripes
Figure 7.2
UNIT MANNING DOCUMENT (UMD)/AUTHORIZED MERIT GRADE STRUCTURE
B The below listed leadership positions are the maximum authorized. Whether or not all positions are filled, will be up to the
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determination of the SASI, ASI, and FL-821 Group Commander.
B In order to hold any of these leadership positions (except the Element Leader, and Assistant Element Leader positions) a cadet
must meet the criteria established in Chapter 8.
B The following Unit Manning Document shows the authorized positions and their associated grade structure for the Florida 821st
Group at Buchholz High School, Gainesville, Florida. Cadets will normally enter a position at least one grade level below the minimum
authorized to provide them an opportunity for growth through promotion.
Staff Position
# Authorized
Entry Level Grade
Maximum Grade
Group Commander
1
C/LtCol
C/Col
Special Asst. to the SASI
1
C/Col
C/Col
Group Vice Commander
1
C/Maj
C/Lt Col
Kitty Hawk President
1
C/2nd Lt
C/Maj
Operations Support Squadron Commander
1
C/Maj
C/Lt Col
Squadron Commanders
2
C/Maj
C/Lt Col
Audio-Visual Officer
2
C/2nd Lt
C/Maj
Chaplain
1
C/2nd Lt
C/Maj
Information Technology Officer
1
C/2nd Lt
C/Maj
Logistics Officer
1
C/2nd Lt
C/Maj
Maintenance Officer
1
C/2nd Lt
C/Maj
Personnel Files Officer
Personnel CIMS Officer
1
1
C/2nd Lt
C/2nd Lt
C/Maj
C/Maj
Public Affairs Flyer Officer
Public Affairs Web Officer
1
1
C/2nd Lt
C/2nd Lt
C/Maj
C/Maj
Range Control Officer
1
C/2nd Lt
C/Maj
Recruiting Officer
1
C/2nd Lt
C/Maj
Training Officer
1
C/2nd Lt
C/Maj
Drill Team Commander
1
C/2nd Lt
C/Maj
Color Guard Commander
1
C/2nd Lt
C/Maj
Rifle Team Commander
1
C/2nd Lt
C/Maj
Rocket Club President
1
C/2nd Lt
C/Maj
Staff NCOICs
8
As Req
C/CMSgt
Flight Commanders
5
As Req
C/Maj
Flight Sergeants
5
As Req
C/CMSgt
Flight Guides
5
As Req
C/CMSgt
Element Leaders
25
As Req
C/CMSgt
Assistant Element Leaders
25
As Req
C/CMSgt
Chapter 8
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PROMOTION OF CADETS
8.1. Purpose: The subject of promotions holds a great
deal of interest for members of the cadet corps. This
interest is proper and important since the insignia of rank
worn by a cadet is a visible indication of his or her
standing among fellow cadets.
Of even more
importance, the insignia is evidence of growing maturity,
willingness to accept additional responsibilities, and it
demonstrates growth in leadership capability learned by
working with and directing others toward desirable goals.
8.1.1. The purpose of group promotions is to
have a visible system of reward or recognition for cadets
who consistently meet and often exceed group standards
of behavior, appearance, leadership and academic
performance. You must realize that starting on the first
day you are in competition with each person in your
flight and squadron for promotion. Grade has no
significance unless cadets at all levels understand its
importance and respect cadet authority and the concept
of chain of command. Cadets who do not make the
effort to understand and respect the system of grade in
the squadron will not be successful in AFJROTC, let
alone receive a promotion consideration themselves.
8.1.2. There are three types of cadet promotion,
Apermanent,@ [email protected] and APromotion for Exceptional
[email protected] (PEP). These types of promotions will
be described in following paragraphs.
8.3.
Cadet Position and Rotation:
8.3.1. The Senior Aerospace Science Instructor
“We judge ourselves by what we feel we are capable of
doing; others judge us by what we have done.”
BHenry Wadsworth Longfellow
selects the Cadet Group Commander, Cadet Vice Group
Commander, and Squadron Commanders. The Group
Commander will select the Group Staff Members.
Recommendations from the outgoing staff are encouraged
and will be given consideration. Cadets selected for staff
officer positions will automatically be promoted to C/2nd
Lt and will be able to progress through the officer grades
as prescribed below. Any changes resulting from people
failing to make a 2.0 GPA will be resolved as soon as
possible after the start of classes.
8.3.2. Positions are rotated at the end of the first
and third nine weeks to allow several cadets the
opportunity to experience the various leadership
positions available within the cadet group. Changes in
group leadership will normally occur at the second and
fourth nine week periods of each semester. More
frequent changes may be made if necessary.
8.3.3. The Cadet Group Commander is generally
selected from among the third and fourth year cadets and
holds the officer grade of Cadet Lieutenant Colonel with
possible promotion to Cadet Colonel. A Cadet Vice
Group Commander is usually selected from among the
third and fourth year cadets and holds the officer grade of
Cadet Major with possible promotion to Cadet Lieutenant
Colonel. In addition to the Vice, the Operations Support
Squadron Commander, the 1st Squadron Commander and
the 2nd Squadron Commanders will also hold the officer
rank of Cadet Major with a possible promotion to Cadet
Lt Col.
8.3.4. The Cadet Group staff positions work
for the Operations Support Squadron Commander and
include the following: Personnel, Rocket Club President,
Information Technology, Maintenance, Logistics, Public
Affairs, Training, Information Technology, Recruiting,
Range Control, Audio-Visual, Drill Team, Rifle Team
and Color Guard Commanders. Cadets selected to fill
these positions may be either second, third, or fourth year
cadets. One or more officers and one or more NCOICs
are selected to fill each of the staff positions.
8.3.5. Flight Commanders will normally be a
fourth year cadet assigned to that flight. Squadron
Commanders select Flight Sergeants and Flight Guides
from outstanding second and third year cadets and
occasionally a first year cadet. Normally all Flight
Commanders and Flight Sergeants are changed between
semesters to increase the leadership opportunities.
8.2.
Permanent Promotions: Permanent grade is
considered an instructor awarded promotion and each
cadet is expected to earn it by making satisfactory
progress in the AFJROTC program. Retention of
permanent grade is contingent upon continued
satisfactory performance as determined by the Group
Commander in concurrence with the AFJROTC
instructors. Permanent grade may be taken away for
disciplinary reasons with the recommendation of the
Group Commander in concurrence with the AFJROTC
instructors. Cadets have a permanent grade based on
their Aerospace Science class as shown in Chapter 7
(Figure 7.2).
8.2.1. With the exception of first year cadets,
permanent rank is awarded at the beginning of the school
year when the uniforms are issued. The first year cadets
begin the program with the grade of cadet airman basic,
or no stripes. After successful completion of the
Airman Promotion Exam with 70% or higher or
satisfactory completion of the Summer Orientation
Program, first year cadets are given their new permanent
grade of cadet airman.
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8.4.
Merit Promotions: Cadets who consistently
meet and/or exceed AFJROTC standards will be
considered for promotion within the merit promotion
category. Normally, merit promotions will occur twice a
year for all cadet airman, NCOs and officers. The merit
promotion system consists of cadets meeting certain
performance criteria during the promotion cycle to make
them eligible to test for promotion and satisfactory
completion of the promotion exam for the respective
rank.





8.5.
Enlisted Merit Promotions: The following
procedures apply for cadet enlisted promotions.
8.5.1. Cadets will enter the FL-821 Air Force
Junior ROTC program at the rank of Cadet/Airman Basic.
Incoming first year (AS I) cadets that attend Leadership
Laboratory Activities (LLA) prior to the start of the
school year may receive their first promotion to
Cadet/Airman with successful completion of LLA and the
Cadet/Airman Promotion Exam. NOTE: Promotion
for attending LLA may only be granted to incoming
first year cadets.
8.5.2. Cadets that meet the enlisted rank
criteria listed below (para. 8.7) may test for subsequent
promotion to their next eligible rank prior to the end of the
first and third nine week periods of the school year.
Promotion exams will be administered to eligible cadets
on the Wednesday prior to the end of the nine week
period, unless circumstances dictate otherwise.
8.5.3. Promotion exams for each enlisted cadet
rank will be available for qualified cadets. Cadets must
pass their respective exam with a minimum score of 70%.


or you are absent that day and uniform is made
up, or you participated in an outside event.
Must have a uniform average of 90% or better.
Must not have more than one unexcused tardy.
Must make a [email protected] or better in JROTC.
Must be attentive in class and respectful of
authority figures, particularly Colonel Roberts
and Chief Price, followed by the Flight
Commander and Flight Sergeant.
Must not exhibit a negative or rebellious attitude,
either in class, during marching, or toward other
cadets.
Must be an active and positive contributor to the
class environment, either through leadership,
good conduct, or constructive participation in
class discussions.
Must have NO disciplinary action against the
cadet as determined by FL-821 SASI.
8.8.
Officer Promotion Criteria. In addition to the
enlisted criteria above, cadets must meet the following in
order to be eligible to test for officer merit promotions:
 Must not have missed any uniform wear on
established uniform day, except if they are
absent that day and made up, or participating
in an outside event.
 Must make an [email protected] in JROTC.
 Must perform their required staff officer
duties as evaluated by the Ops Support Sq
Commander and Group Commander.
 Must maintain an overall 2.0 GPA or better.
8.9.
PEP Promotions.
An additional avenue of
promotion is called the APEP [email protected] This is defined
as Apromotion for exceptional [email protected] This allows
FL-821 SASI/ASI to recognize a cadet that has either
achieved an extraordinary action or continued
extraordinary performance in JROTC by an immediate
promotion to the cadet=s next rank, either enlisted or
officer.
8.6.
Officer Merit Promotions
8.6.1. Cadets that are selected for staff officer
positions will be automatically promoted to the rank of
Cadet/2nd Lt. In order to be considered for a staff officer
position, a cadet must have completed at least one nine
week period as an NCOIC for any staff position. These
cadets will then be allowed to continue through the cadet
officer rank structure by meeting the cadet officer
promotion criteria (para. 8.8) and successfully passing the
respective officer promotion exam. A cadet must have
retained their current rank for at least one semester in
order to advance to the next officer grade.
8.6.2. Promotions will be offered to eligible
cadets prior to the end of the first and third nine week
period. Cadets must pass their promotion exam with a
minimum score of 70%
8.10. Posting of Promotions. At the end of the first
and third nine weeks, the promotion lists should be posted
in a special order. Separate orders should be posted for
the Airman, NCOICs and Officers.
8.10.1.
On the next uniform day after the
promotions have been posted, the cadets will receive their
new rank in a formal ceremony held during class. The
Awards Officer is responsible for posting the list of all
promotees. This list will be used by the Awards Officer
to prepare the necessary rank for the promotion ceremony.
The Logistics Officer will ensure old rank is collected and
put back into the inventory.
8.7.
Enlisted Promotion Criteria.
The following
criteria must be met in order to test for enlisted merit
promotions:
 May have one uniform miss during the
promotion cycle as long as the miss has been
allowed to be made up and done so successfully,
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Chapter 9
MILITARY TRAINING
9.1.
Drill and Ceremonies. Among other studies in
the AFJROTC program, the ASI is tasked with instruction
in Drill and Ceremonies. On leadership days, which are
normally Mondays and Wednesdays, flights will form up
outside after roll call in the classroom. All cadets will
begin together with the very basics of close order drill,
learning each position or movement, one at a time. The
ASI will provide instruction to all cadets, then everyone
will practice. Corrections are necessary when mistakes
are made, so do not take it personally. After each cadet
becomes proficient, your flight leaders take over from the
ASI and will then drill you as a flight; or may possibly
break the flight down into smaller training units called
[email protected] The ASI supervises and makes corrections
as necessary, but the cadet leaders in the flight conduct the
actual training. On Abad weather [email protected] there will be
other military training subjects which will be taught in the
classroom. During the academic year, you will be tested
on these subjects as well as drill and ceremonies.
9.1.1.
How to Lead. The best way to Alearn
to [email protected] is to Alearn to [email protected] All cadets should pay
close attention to the instructions, then try their best to
follow the instructions exactly. If you can follow
instructions, you will find that you will soon be able to
help others and that you may be able to lead an element or
even take over the entire flight. Your instructors are
constantly looking for this leadership ability.
Promotions are based heavily on conduct and the ability
to lead others, as well as your attitude and grades.
Regardless of what you may have heard, there is no such
thing as a born leader and all leaders were followers at one
time. With proper training, practice and experience, you
too can become an effective leader.
9.1.2. Do Your Best. Your ASI is looking for
each cadet to do their best. Forget about playing when it
is time for outside training. Your instructors know there
is a vast difference in the level of skill and experience
within the cadet corps. Therefore, do not feel any
pressure if you have difficulty trying to learn the basic
drill movements. If you need extra help, you will be
given additional time and more instruction by senior
cadets. To become proficient at drill, you will need to
practice at home on your own. If you=re having a great
deal of difficulty with any portion of drill, feel free to
discuss it with your instructors.
9.1.3. Team Effort. Close order drill is a Ateam
[email protected] Everyone must do the movements together. All
of the movements performed by the marching formation
should be done as one unit. Keep in mind that you do not
want to be the individual that makes your entire flight
look bad. Think fluid teamwork and success. Make
your flight the best and tell everyone you believe it to be
so. Good Luck!!
assess your willingness to follow simple instructions; and
to observe your level of progress in military training. We
are also exposing you to the military=s way of doing
things. After each flight is completely uniformed, we
will begin open ranks inspection on uniform days.
Unless you are told differently, uniform day will normally
be on Wednesday.
When bad weather prevents
inspections outdoors, they will be held in the classroom or
under cover. Remember, you normally have seven to
nine uniform grades during a nine week grading period.
These grades are considered equally with your academic
grade to determine your overall grade for the nine weeks.
Few people can afford A0'[email protected] on tests, so wear that uniform
on every uniform day.
9.2.1. Normally, the ASI will be conducting
the inspection. Occasionally, the Flight Commander will
do the inspecting.
When your flight commander
inspects, he/she will be assisted by your flight sergeant.
You will be inspected for items listed on the inspection
sheet. If you violate the inspection rules, you will
receive a five point deduction or [email protected] for each item
identified. Please note, in addition to errors on your
uniform, you can be [email protected] for moving while in ranks,
talking, by showing a poor attitude, or by displaying bad
conduct during the inspection.
9.2.2. There is usually no excuse for not wearing
the uniform on the designated uniform day. However, if
you see in advance that you will not be able to wear the
uniform, you should see your flight commander and get
your uniform inspection excused, postponed or completed
early. If you are absent on uniform day, and the absence
is excused, you will be allowed to wear your uniform on
the next day back to school and make up the uniform
inspection grade. Poor excuses will not be accepted.
If you are not in uniform on uniform day, you must fall-in
with the formation and explain to the person conducting
the inspection why you are not wearing the uniform. Not
wearing a uniform and not having a valid excuse is an
automatic A0" or [email protected] for the inspection.
9.2.3. Uniform Preparation. We recommend
that you prepare your uniform on the Monday before the
inspection. Check it out to see if a shirt needs washing or
if the trousers need to be pressed. If your uniform needs
to be sent to the cleaners, do it immediately after the
inspection so that it will be ready on the next inspection
day. Shirts can be washed, but the dark blue trousers/
slacks, skirt, tie, windbreaker and the dark blue coat
must be dry-cleaned. An important guide is anything
dark blue must be dry cleaned. NOTE: A AUniform of
the [email protected] will be posted each week by the Group Vice
Commander. You must wear the assigned uniform for
that uniform day or you will receive a 20 point deduction
for that inspection. Example: If the service dress
uniform is assigned and you wear a short sleeve shirt with
an open collar, you will receive a maximum grade of A80"
assuming you have no other uniform errors.
9.2.
Weekly Personal Inspection.
The purpose of
inspections are: to check the fit of your uniform; to test
your understanding of the proper wear of the uniform; to
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Air Force Junior ROTC
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FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
9.2.4. Image. Attitude is an important item in
your military training. We encourage each cadet to take
this training and program seriously. We expect all of you
to want to wear the Air Force uniform; and, to want to
wear it properly. We expect to see learning and
improvement as a result of having received a few [email protected]
We do not expect to see a cadet receive [email protected] for the
same violation over and over.
9.2.4.1.
Military training time is not playtime. Talking while at attention; looking around when in
formation; and disturbing other cadets with your actions
will not be tolerated.
9.2.4.2. Discipline is what military training
is all about. In addition to what your flight commander
or instructor teaches you, you must learn to discipline
yourself. Responding to commands and taking orders
(especially orders from someone who you consider your
peer) are two things that new people in military service
quite often have trouble accepting.
returned by the person of the higher grade. The practice
of saluting is not meant to degrade anyone, and as you see
by the above explanation, it is a two way street. It may
help you to remember that you are not saluting the
individual, but the uniform and the insignia that this
person is wearing. Saluting is a part of your military
training and must be done properly. There is only one
way to deliver a proper military salute, and we will show
you how to do it and then expect you to do it with respect
every time.
9.3.2.3. Always give a hand salute from the
position of attention, whether standing still or moving.
The salute is never given while you are running. If you
find that you must salute a senior officer and you are
running, just slow to a walk, come to attention and salute.
Then continue running if necessary.
9.3.2.4. Salutes are usually accompanied
by an exchange of greetings, determined by the time of
day, such as: AGood morning, Sir/[email protected] or AGood
evening, Cadet [email protected]
9.3.3. When to Salute. All our military
customs and courtesies should be observed at all times.
Saluting rules and saluting areas are for training purposes
and failure to comply with these rules may make you
eligible for disciplinary action.
9.3.3.1. You salute whenever outdoors and
in uniform. Buchholz High School is a Ano hatBno
saluting [email protected] therefore saluting is not required. One rule
that may help you to remember to salute is that whenever
you are outdoors and you also have your head gear on,
you must salute cadet officers and officer instructors,
except when you are within a ACovered [email protected]
9.3.3.2
When in uniform and the National
Anthem is played outdoors, always come to attention,
face the flag (music) and salute. Hold your salute from
the first note of the music until the music is finished.
9.3.3.3.
Anytime a cadet in uniform
observes the American flag moving up or down the
flagstaff, the cadet will come to attention and salute. The
salute will be held until the flag has reached termination.
If not in uniform, military instructions say the cadet will
come to attention and place their right hand over their
heart. If wearing civilian headgear, the cadet will stand
at attention holding the headgear at the left shoulder, so
their right hand is over their heart.
9.3.3.4.
While in a formation and ordered
to APresent [email protected]
9.3.3.5.
If you are in a group of cadets
standing in a saluting area, and a cadet or instructor
officer comes by, the first person to see the officer calls
the group to attention, and all cadets salute. If you are in
charge of a group of cadets and a senior grade officer
passes your formation, you call the group (formation) to
attention and render the salute for the group.
9.3.
Military Courtesy:
9.3.1. Saluting. Probably the most important
of our military customs and courtesies is the hand salute.
Many people develop the wrong idea about why the
military uses the salute. The salute is one of the oldest
of our military customs and courtesies and, in its simplest
form, is merely a greeting between soldiers. However,
we must also remember that saluting is a mandatory
courtesy that must be used by junior ranking people to
show their respect for higher ranking individuals within
their organization.
9.3.2. Some General Rules About Saluting.
Cadet officers and NCOs (sergeants) are expected to
correct all saluting violations on the spot. This is to be
done in a civil and tactful manner. They will correct only
cadets junior in grade. First year cadets will not be
corrected by other cadets until they have completed cadet
basic training (first four weeks of school). All cadets are
expected to accept corrections properly. Cases of
disrespect, insolence or insubordination should be
reported to the cadet=s flight commander, the ASI or the
Commandant of Cadets immediately so that corrective
training can be accomplished. If disciplinary action is
necessary, a Cadet Evaluation Board will be convened to
review the case and provide a recommendation for
corrective action to the Group Commander and the
Commandant of Cadets.
9.3.2.1. The salute must be given only to
officers or warrant officers. All cadets must salute the
Commandant of Cadets and all officers of all services of
the armed forces when in uniform. All cadet airmen and
cadet sergeants must salute all cadet officers. Junior
grade cadet officers must salute cadet officers of a senior
grade. Cadet officers of the Army, Navy and Air Force
senior ROTC units are to be saluted when recognized.
And finally, the President of the United States, acting as
the Commander-in-Chief of all the armed forces, as well
as the Secretaries of Defense and the Air Force must be
saluted by all military personnel including cadets.
9.3.2.2.
The person who is junior in
grade initiates the salute, and holds the salute until it is
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Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
9.3.3.6. When reporting to an officer. The
only time Air Force members and AFJROTC cadets
(other than a Color Guard) salute while indoors is when
they are reporting to a senior grade officer. When
business is completed, the salute is rendered again when
reporting out prior to leaving. The following outlines
AReporting-In/ Reporting-Out [email protected] for all cadets
in the FL-821st Group:
9.3.3.6.1. All cadets will execute these
reporting procedures when reporting into the Cadet Group
Commander, SASI (Col Roberts), or the ASI (CMSgt
Price).
9.3.3.6.2. Stand behind the line in office,
ring the bell once, and do not cross the line until directed
to do so.
9.3.3.6.3. When told to enter, go to the
front of the desk, in a military manner, via the most direct
route. Stand at attention near their desk, initiate a salute,
and while holding the salute say, ACadet _____ reports as
[email protected] or ACadet _____ requests to talk to [email protected] At this
time, the person you are reporting into will return the
salute at which time you drop the salute, be at ease, and
state your business.
9.3.3.6.4.
When your business is
complete, stand at attention near the desk of the person
you visited and initiate/hold a salute. The person you are
visiting will return the salute and say, ADismissed,@ at
which time you will drop your salute and exit the room in
a military manner via the most direct route.
9.4.
Summer Orientation/Leadership Laboratory
Activities (LLA)
Each summer, normally the week prior to the start of the
school year, AFJROTC will hold a summer camp to
provide initial training to first year students and provide
leadership development for returning students in the
JROTC program. The curriculum will ready returning
students for leadership positions within the corps and
allow participants to earn the LLA Ribbon. For new
students, the curriculum will focus on the basics of drill,
uniform wear, JROTC rules/procedures, military customs
and courtesies, time management, study skills, and goal
setting and give them the opportunity to leave the camp
with a couple of ribbons and their first promotion in rank.
All students are encouraged to attend this camp as it will
allow them to hone their JROTC and leadership skills
while also giving them the opportunity to bond with other
cadets in the JROTC program.
9.5.
Basic Training. The first four weeks of the
school year will focus on basic skills all cadets need to
know to be successful in JROTC. In this regard, the
curriculum will focus on basic drill skills, military
customs and courtesies, uniform wear, honors to the flag,
corps organization, military chains of command, etc.
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Air Force Junior ROTC
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FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
Chapter 10
CADET FLAG DETAIL
10.1. General: The AFJROTC cadet corps is charged
by the principal of Buchholz High School with
conducting proper flag ceremonies every school day.
The AFJROTC FL-821 Color Guard Commander, in
coordination with all the class Flight Commanders, has
overall responsibility for the conduct of these ceremonies.
Color Guard members or experienced cadets in the first
and sixth period classes will be tasked to raise and lower
the flag.
10.1.1. The morning ceremony is called
[email protected] The American flag is raised to the top of the
school flag pole at this time. The afternoon ceremony is
called [email protected] At this time the flag is lowered, taken
off the halyards and stored in the JROTC office for the
night. Reveille will take place during first period each
morning and Retreat will be conducted during sixth
period.
10.1.2. As stated above, the Color Guard Commander is designated as the cadet responsible for the flag
detail. He/She will establish formal procedures for the
conduct of both of these ceremonies, ensure these
procedures are made available in writing to all flights, and
train all the flight commanders on these procedures so
that they in turn can train all the members of their flights.
Periodically, the Color Guard Commander should
observe these procedures to ensure they are being
conducted in the proper fashion.
Disrespect for the
flag is something we cannot tolerate and violations should
be reported to the affected flight commander, group
commander, and ASI as soon as possible.
10.1.3. For obvious safety concerns, if it is
lightning at Reveille time, the flag will not be raised.
Once the flag is up, it is not lowered until Retreat at the
end of school. Likewise, if it is lightning at Retreat, do
not lower the flag. If it has rained during the day and the
flag is wet after Retreat, bring the flag to the Hangar
classroom and spread it over the desks to dry overnight.
10.2.
General Guidelines for Reveille and Retreat:
10.2.1.
The American and Florida State flags
are always treated and handled with great respect and
care. All movements are to be made in a crisp, military
manner and all turns will be made sharply. There will be
no movement when at attention. A serious attitude will
be shown throughout each ceremony and there will be no
talking except by the cadet in charge (the senior ranking
cadet).
10.2.2.
The American flag is normally stored
in the JROTC office. The cadet in charge should pick it
up before going to the flag pole and should also ensure it
is returned to the office at the end of the day. The only
exception to this would be on days when it has rained. If
the flag is wet when you take it down, don=t fold it, just
bring it back to the JROTC classroom and hang it up to
dry. If the flag is not in the office when you go there in
the morning, check with the JROTC class because it is
probably in there drying out.
(Specific procedures, including half-staff procedures,
will be developed/published by the Color Guard
Commander, filed in an appropriate place for future
reference, and made available to all flight
commanders for use in training their people.)
“Ask not what your country can do for you;
ask what you can do for your country.”
BJohn Fitzgerald Kennedy
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Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
Chapter 11
PRESIDENT=S PHYSICAL FITNESS (PPF) PROGRAM
11.1. General. AFJROTC at Buchholz High School
is a program in which students show a desire to better
themselves morally, mentally, and physically. In joining
this program, students try to follow guidelines set by the
Air Force. One set of guidelines established by the Air
Force relates to the physical appearance and fitness
standards of its members. These same guidelines should
be followed when participating in the AFJROTC PPF
program.
consist of the five required PPF exercises. These exercises
include the Curl Ups, V-Sit Reach, Right Angle Push
Ups, Shuttle Run and the One Mile Run. Descriptions
for each of these five exercises are contained on pages
26-27. Stretching exercises must be conducted prior to
the PPF evaluation. The training officer will have helpers
to monitor each exercise to ensure the exercises are done
properly. Exercises done incorrectly will not count.
Scores will be computed using the PPF evaluation chart on
pages 28-32.
11.2. Purpose.
The purpose of the AFJROTC PPF
program at Buchholz High school is:
 To provide cadets with basic understanding of the
need for, and the benefits of, a personal fitness
program.
 To make cadets strive towards a fitness standard
according to the Air Force fitness test.
 To provide cadets an opportunity to earn the PPF
Ribbon by successfully completing the PPF
Program.
 To promote esprit de corps in AFJROTC.
11.5.
Behavior.
Both supervisors and individual
cadets will be expected to maintain proper military poise
and bearing at all times. Cadets in the PPF program must
be well behaved and in control of their actions. There will
be no hazing or harassing of any cadet by other cadets or
the trainer and helpers B EVER!! The appointed
supervisor is in complete control of the program and must
be obeyed at all times. Misbehavior will not be tolerated
since this could jeopardize the trainee, the supervisors, the
instructors, the PPF Program, and the AFJROTC program.
Discipline for all misbehaving cadets will be severe and
may include removal from the AFJROTC program.
11.3.
Program Structure. Participation in the
JROTC PPF program is mandatory. Physical fitness
must be a continuing program. You can=t expect to work
out for a week or two or one day a week and expect to stay
in shape. Ideally every cadet would work out at least
five days a week, working both on aerobic exercises and
weight training. Unfortunately, our class schedule won=t
allow us time to exercise every day so, therefore, much of
the responsibility for getting and then staying in shape
must fall on your shoulders. Every cadet in the corps is
eligible to earn the PPF Ribbon. In order to receive it
you must complete the five required PPF program
exercises for an initial evaluation to set a baseline and
individual goals during the first quarter of the school year.
A final evaluation during the last quarter of the school
year will be conducted to determine individual
improvement. You will be familiarized with each of the
five required exercises prior to the initial evaluation.
However, you will be required to establish and maintain
your own personal training program to insure you are
prepared for the final PPF evaluation.
11.3.1. Program Responsibility. The Group
Training Officer is responsible for developing and
maintaining the physical fitness program and
administering the PPF evaluations throughout the year.
This officer must come prepared to administer the test
with a stopwatch and have the appropriate materials to
record each cadet=s time and points received for each
event. This officer must ensure that records are kept of
every cadet who completes the PPF program and receives
the PPF Ribbon.
11.4.
PPF Evaluation.
11.6. PPF Award.
Those who complete both the
initial and final PPF evaluation will receive the PPF
Ribbon. In addition, you will receive a percentile score
based on your performance in the evaluation. The
following will also be awarded based on your score:
 If you receive a percentile score of 75%-84%,
you will receive a Bronze Star to be worn on
your PPF ribbon.
 If you receive a percentile score of 85%-94%,
you will receive a Silver Star to be worn on
your PPF ribbon.
 If you receive a score between 95%-100%,
you will receive a Gold Star to be worn on
your PPF ribbon.
There is also a AMost Improved [email protected] presented to the
cadet who has best improved his fitness over the course of
the school year as determined by the SASI.
11.7 Air Force Physical Fitness Test (PFT). JROTC
cadets do not take the Air Force PFT. However, the Air
Force PFT is an important part of the application process
for earning either an ROTC college scholarship or an
appointment to the Air Force Academy. Col Roberts or
Chief Price will happily administer the PFT to any cadet
pursuing either endeavor. Since the PFT is such an
important part of the application process, Col Roberts or
Chief Price will not write a letter of recommendation for a
cadet applying for ROTC or the Academy unless the cadet
passes the Air Force PFT. Bottom line: to be in the
military you must be physically fit.
The PPF evaluation will
25
Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
Curl-Up
This event measures abdominal strength and endurance.
Curl-Ups Test
Have students lie on cushioned, clean surface with knees flexed and feet about 12 inches from buttocks.
Partner holds feet. Arms are crossed with hands placed on opposite shoulders and elbows held close to
the chest. Keeping this arm position, student raises the trunk curling up to touch elbows to thighs and
then lowers the back to the floor so that the scapulas (shoulder blades) touch the floor, for one curl-up.
To start, a timer calls out the signal AReady? [email protected] and begins timing student for one minute. The
student stops on the word [email protected]
Shuttle Run
This event measures speed, quickness, and agility.
Shuttle Run Test
Mark two parallel lines 30 feet apart and place two blocks of wood or similar object behind one of the
lines. Students start behind opposite line. On the signal, AReady? [email protected] the student runs to the blocks,
picks one up, runs back to the starting line, places block behind the line, runs back and picks up the
second block and runs back across starting line. Blocks should not be thrown across the lines.
Scores are recorded to the nearest tenth of a second.
V-Sit Reach
This event measures flexibility of the lower back and hamstrings.
V-Sit Test
Mark a straight line two feet long on the floor as a baseline. Draw a measuring line perpendicular to the
midpoint of the baseline extending two feet on each side and marked off in half-inches. The point
where the baseline and measuring line intersect is the A0" point. Student removes shoes and sits on the
floor with measuring line between legs and soles of feet placed immediately behind baseline, heels 8-12"
apart. Student clasps thumbs so that hands are together, palms down and places them on measuring
line. With the legs held flat by two partners, student slowly reaches forward as far as possible, keeping
fingers on baseline and feet flexed. After three practice tries, the student holds the fourth reach for three
seconds while that distance is recorded. Legs must remain straight with soles of feet held perpendicular
to the floor (feet flexed). Students should be encouraged to reach slowly rather than [email protected] while
stretching. Scores, recorded to the nearest half inch, are read as plus scores for reaches beyond
baseline, minus scores for reaches behind baseline.
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Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
Right Angle Push-Ups
Right Angle Push-Up Test
The student lies face down on the mat in push-up position with hands under shoulders, fingers straight,
and legs straight, parallel and slightly apart, with the toes supporting the feet. The student straightens
the arms, keeping the back and knees straight, then lowers the body until there is a 90-degree angle at the
elbows, with the upper arms parallel to the floor. A partner holds her/his hand at the point of the
90-degree angle so that the student being tested goes down only until her/his shoulder touches the
partner=s hand, then back up. The push-ups are done to a metronome (or audio tape, clapping, drums)
with one complete push-up every three seconds, and are continued until the student can do no more in
rhythm (has not done the last three in rhythm) or has reached the target number for the PPFA. Record
only those push-ups done with proper form and in rhythm.
One-Mile Run/Walk
This event measures speed and endurance.
One-Mile Run/Walk Test
The student will complete one mile on an accurately measured track as quickly as possible. They may
run, jog or walk during this exercise.
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Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
CURL-UP STANDARDS
Percentile Scores are based on Age/Test in Number of Curl-Ups in 60 Seconds
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Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
SHUTTLE RUN STANDARDS
Percentile Scores are based on Age/Test in Seconds and Tenths
Shuttle Run for Boys
Shuttle Run for Girls
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Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
V-SIT REACH STANDARDS
Percentile Scores are based on Age/Test Scores in Inches
V-Sit for Boys
V-Sit for Girls
30
Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
RIGHT ANGLE PUSH-UP STANDARDS
Percentile Scores are based on Age/Test Score in Number of Push-Ups every 3 Seconds
Push-Up for Boys
Push-Up for Girls
31
Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
ONE MILE RUN/WALK STANDARDS
Percentile Scores are based on Age/Test Scores in Minutes and Seconds
One Mile for Boys
One Mile for Girls
32
Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
Chapter 12
SPECIAL ACTIVITIES
12.1. General. In addition to the regular curriculum,
there are several co-curricular activities which will assist
cadets in learning good citizenship along with
experiencing the Aesprit de [email protected] within the AFJROTC
program. Many of these activities enable cadets to earn
extra credit for school grades or towards the AFJROTC
Service Award, while other activities simply give cadets
an opportunity for fellowship with others. Some of the
activities below have eligibility requirements. For those
activities, cadets must maintain a passing grade in
Aerospace Science, have an overall 2.0 GPA in other
classes, and not be in danger of losing credit through poor
attendance. Academic eligibility is evaluated each nine
week grading period.
12.2.4.
Group Newsletter. The Public Affairs
Staff is responsible for the compilation and publication of
the group newsletter, the AFlyer,@ which is published at
the beginning of each month, and is designed to inform all
cadets about what is going on in the group and to give
notice of upcoming events. Cadets with an interest or
talent in journalism, writing or photography may be asked
to submit articles. In addition, extra credit may be
earned for all those who submit articles to the [email protected]
12.2.5.
Parades.
All cadets in the
group are encouraged to participate in the local parades.
Generally, the Buchholz High School AFJROTC marches
in the Tacachale Christmas Parade every December
. The Buchholz High School AFJROTC banner
is usually followed by the Color Guard and one or more
Drill Teams. The whole corps is encouraged to attend this
fun and exciting event. Additionally, formal military
parades are periodically held during the school year on the
practice football field to show off the corps= drill skills.
12.2.
Activities:
12.2.1.
Kitty Hawk Air Society (KHAS).
This is the official honor society within the AFJROTC
program. Its purpose is to promote high academic
standards and be of service to the school and community.
KHAS is primarily a service organization who=s main
goal is to raise the overall academic standing of the cadet
corps. Members of the Society act as mentors to the
other cadets in the corps providing academic assistance
and help in any way possible. This is an after school
activity with membership limited to cadets in good
standing with both the school and AFJROTC, who have a
minimum overall school GPA of 3.0, and have a [email protected] in
Aerospace Science.
12.2.2.
Color Guard.
Color Guard
members will have the opportunity to carry the Colors
(flag) at home football games, basketball games, in
parades and for special ceremonies. Color Guard
members normally practice before school on alternating
days from the Drill Team. They learn the proper care
and use of the flag and rifles. Color Guard members
wear special gear and are expected to excel in
self-discipline and personal appearance. Members are
eligible for the Color Guard Ribbon by participating in
75% of the scheduled events each semester.
12.2.3.
Drill Team practices before school
at least two days a week (sometimes three when a drill
meet is approaching). The team specializes in precision
drill and participates in local parades (such as the
University of Florida Homecoming Parade), special
ceremonies and drill competitions. Members are eligible
for the Drill Team Ribbon by participating in 75% of the
scheduled activities each semester.
12.2.6. Award Ceremony.
The Awards
Ceremony is held in early May for cadets of the
AFJROTC program who have demonstrated outstanding
leadership capabilities and have participated in various
corps activities. The Awards Ceremony consists of the
presentation of local cadet awards and awards sponsored
by national organizations and the AFJROTC
headquarters. The Awards Ceremony is sponsored by
the AFJROTC Booster Club. All families are invited
and encouraged to attend.
12.2.7. Field Trips. Cadets in good standing
are taken annually on a field trip to at least one active duty
military installation. The type of installation visited is
rotated among the various services. Additional field
trips during the year are possible depending on funding
limitations. These may include: 1) a repelling and/or
obstacle course trip to Camp Blanding; or 2) trips to air
shows in the local area.
12.2.8. Booster Club. The Buchholz High
School AFJROTC program has an active Booster Club.
Their purpose is to raise additional funds to reduce the
cost of our many outside activities. In addition to
providing scholarships to graduating seniors, they provide
many of the items that are not funded either by Buchholz
High School or the Air Force, such as replica rifles,
chrome helmets, food and refreshments at parties, etc.
All parents are welcome to join the Booster Club.
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12.2.9.
Service Projects.
Cadets can
perform a service to the school and community by
ushering, escorting, performing work details, etc. In
doing so, cadets can earn credit toward the AFJROTC
Service Ribbon and experience an important part of
growing up known as Ahelping [email protected] Cadets who take
the leadership role of these activities are also considered
for special leadership awards and increase their
opportunities for promotion. Service projects include
such things as helping out at the Buchholz Open House,
posting the Colors at football games, and participating in
the March of Dimes annual Walk America.
12.2.10. Activities Leadership. Most of the
above mentioned activities are planned, managed and
organized by and for the cadets. These cadets are known
as Project Officers. Project Officers are usually the
upper class cadets in the AFJROTC program. This cadet
leadership is essential to the success of these activities. It
is through this process that cadets have the opportunity to
practice what they have learned about the principles of
leadership and management as taught in the
leadership/management section of the Aerospace Science
course. The SASI or the ASI will provide sponsorship
and guidance, but cadets must plan, execute and manage
the activity.
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Chapter 13
AFJROTC AWARDS AND DECORATIONS PROGRAM
13.1. General. Cadets new to the AFJROTC
Program will notice that many cadets wear ribbons or
other distinctive items on their uniforms. These awards
are presented as a result of exceptional achievement by
those cadets in this program. There are two categories
under which these awards fall: National Awards and
AFJROTC sponsored awards. The following is a listing
and description of each award and a general summary
concerning the necessary requirements for earning each.
13.2.6.
American Veterans (AMVETS)
Award. Presented annually to one qualified cadet. This
cadet must possess individual characteristics contributing
to leadership such as: a positive attitude toward the
AFJROTC program and service to the Air Force; an
immaculate personal appearance (to include wearing of
the uniform, posture and grooming), personal attributes
including initiative, self-confidence, officer potential
(high personal standards, responsibility, leadership), earn
an [email protected] in the AS class and be in good scholastic standing
at the time of the selection.
13.2.7. Reserve Officer Association (ROA)
Award. Presented annually for military and academic
achievement to an outstanding ASIII or ASIV cadet.
The recipient must possess individual characteristics
contributing to leadership such as: a positive attitude
toward the AS curriculum, exceptional personal
appearance, exemplary personal attributes (judgment,
self-confidence and initiative) and courtesy (promptness,
obedience, respect), and strong growth potential. The
cadet must also rank in the top 10% of his/her AS class.
13.2.8 Military Order of the World Wars.
Presented annually to a deserving ASI cadet who must
excel in all military and scholastic areas. The cadet must
indicate by military and scholastic grades, extracurricular
activities and individual endeavors a desire to serve the
Nation, and must also have committed to continue the
Aerospace Science Program for the next school year.
13.2.9. Military Officers Association of
America. This award recognizes an outstanding ASII or
ASIII cadet who shows potential for military leadership.
Each cadet must be: a member of the junior class, be in
good academic standing, be of high moral character, show
a high order of loyalty to the unit, school and country, and
show great potential for military leadership.
13.2.10. Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW)
Award. This award recognizes an outstanding ASII,
ASIII or ASIV cadet who is actively engaged in the
AFJROTC program and who possesses individual
characteristics contributing to leadership.
The
nominated cadet must have a positive attitude,
outstanding military bearing/conduct, and demonstrate
strong attributes such as dependability, responsibility,
respect and cooperation. The recipient must also
demonstrate patriotism and promote Americanism
through activities such as the Color Guard, Drill Team,
demonstrate leadership potential, attain a [email protected] average in
AFJROTC, be active in student activities and not have
previously won the award.
13.2.
National Awards.
13.2.1.
Air Force Association Award.
Presented annually to an outstanding ASIII cadet. The
nominated cadet must rank in the upper 5% of the
Aerospace Science (AS) class, rank in the upper 10% of
his/her academic class and be recommended by the SASI.
The cadet must demonstrate a positive attitude, good
personal appearance, growth potential and display
exceptional courtesy and military bearing.
13.2.2. Daedalian Award. Presented annually to
an outstanding cadet in the junior class. The cadet must:
demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of
patriotism, love of country, and service to the Nation;
indicate the potential and desire to pursue a military
career; rank in the upper 10% of the AFJROTC junior
class; and rank in the upper 20% of the school junior
class.
13.2.3. American Legion Scholastic Award.
Presented annually to an ASII, ASIII or ASIV cadet based
on the cadet=s scholastic achievements. The honored
cadet must rank in the top 10% of his/her high school
class, rank in the top 25% of the AS class, demonstrate
leadership qualities and actively participate in
constructive student activities.
13.2.4. American Legion General Military
Excellence Award. Presented annually to one
outstanding ASII, ASIII or ASIV cadet. This cadet must
be in the upper 25% in the AS class and demonstrate
outstanding leadership, discipline, character, and
citizenship.
13.2.5. Daughters of the American Revolution.
Presented annually to a ASIII or ASIV cadet
who must rank in the top 25% or his/ her AS class and
high school class, as well as demonstrate qualities of
dependability, good character, adherence to military
discipline, leadership ability and a fundamental and
patriotic understanding of the importance of JROTC
training.
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13.2.11. National Sojourners Award. The
National Sojourners Award recognizes an outstanding
ASII or ASIII cadet who made a significant effort to
encourage and demonstrate Americanism both within the
corps and on campus. The cadet must be in the top 25%
of his/her AS class, show potential for outstanding
leadership encourage the ideals of Americanism, and not
previously have won the award.
13.2.12. Sons of the American Revolution.
Award. Recognizes all around excellence in Aerospace
studies. Presented at the end of a cadet=s first year of AS,
the nominated cadet must exhibit a high degree of
leadership, military bearing, and all around excellence in
the JROTC program and school.
13.2.13. Military Order of the Purple Heart
Award.
Recognizes an outstanding ASII, ASIII or
ASIV cadet who is enrolled in the AFJROTC program
and demonstrates leadership ability. The cadet must:
have a positive attitude toward AFJROTC and the United
States; hold a leadership position in the cadet corps; be
active in school and community affairs; attain a grade of
[email protected] or better in all subjects the previous semester; and not
have previously received the award.
13.2.14. Air Force Sergeants Association
(AFSA) Achievement Award. Recognizes an
outstanding ASII, ASIII or ASIV cadet. The recipient
must demonstrate outstanding qualities in military
leadership, discipline, character and citizenship, and
must not have previously won the award.
13.2.15.
Scottish Rite of Free Masonry
Award. Recognizes an outstanding ASII or ASIII cadet.
It is awarded to the cadet who has: contributed the most
among contemporaries to encourage and demonstrate
Americanism through deeds; demonstrated academic
excellence by being in the top 25% of their class;
demonstrated exceptional leadership qualities/potential;
and is not a previous recipient of this award.
13.2.16. Tuskegee Airman Award. Recognizes
an outstanding ASI, ASII or ASIII cadet. The recipient
must demonstrate outstanding qualities in military
leadership, discipline, character and citizenship, and
must not have previously won the award.
13.3.3. Distinguished AFJROTC Cadet
Badge. Recognizes one outstanding junior at each unit
annually. Selection is made at the end of each school
year to allow the cadet to wear the badge throughout the
senior
year. The recipient must hold the following awards prior
to selection: Achievement Ribbon, Leadership Ribbon,
Superior Performance Ribbon, Academic Ribbon,
Co-curricular Activities Leadership and the Service
Ribbon. The cadet must be of high moral character,
demonstrate positive personal attributes, display
outstanding military potential and maintain constant
academic and military excellence.
13.3.4. Outstanding Cadet Ribbon. Awarded
annually to the outstanding ASI, ASII, ASIII and ASIV
cadet. The recipient from each class must be of high
moral character, demonstrate positive personal attributes,
display outstanding military potential, and attain
academic and military excellence.
13.3.5. Leadership Ribbon. Awarded for outstanding performance in a position of leadership as an
AFJROTC cadet in corps training activities. Limited to
5% of the corps.
13.3.6. Achievement Ribbon. Awarded for
a significant achievement as deemed appropriate by the
ASI. Individuals may not receive the ribbon more than
once in a one year period. Limited to 10% of the corps.
13.3.7. Superior Performance Ribbon.
Awarded annually for outstanding achievement or
meritorious service rendered specifically on behalf of the
AFJROTC. Limited to 5% of the corps.
13.4.
Local Recognition Programs.
13.4.1. Cadet and Officer of the Quarter.
At the end of each nine week marking period, one enlisted
cadet and one officer from each flight will be nominated
by their flight commander to compete for the Cadet of the
Quarter. They will be selected by their respective flight
commanders for exceptional performance in academics,
leadership, followership, and overall participation in
JROTC activities. The nominations should be relayed in
writing to the Recognition Officer for review/approval at
least five days prior to the COQ selection board. All
nominees will meet the selection board for evaluation.
The board will forward the selectee to the SASI for final
approval/release. The selectee will receive certificates,
and have their picture hung on the Cadet of the Quarter
Board for the next nine week period. They will also
receive a special USAF Insignia Rock. Public Affairs is
responsible for ensuring the individual pictures are taken,
developed, and posted on the board not later than five
school days after the start of the next quarter, and for
completing the necessary certificates and ensuring that
they are given to the selectees at an appropriate time by
the Group Commander, ASI or SASI.
13.3.
AFJROTC Awards.
13.3.1. Valor Awards:
Gold AFJROTC Valor Award is awarded for
voluntary acts of self-sacrifice and personal bravery by
the cadet involving conspicuous risk above and beyond
the call of duty.
Silver AFJROTC Valor Award is awarded to a
cadet for a voluntary act of heroism which does not meet
the risk-of-life requirements for the Gold Valor Award.
13.3.2. Cadet Humanitarian Award. Recognizes exceptional humanitarian effort, above and
beyond the call of duty, on the part of a cadet.
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Completed packages, which are due sometime in early
April, are submitted before a non-JROTC faculty
committee for review/selection. Candidates must have
at least two years in JROTC at the time of graduation and
the winner is selected based on overall JROTC
performance and financial need.
“True heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.
It is not the urge to surpass others at whatever cost, but
to serve others at whatever the cost.”
BArthur Ashe
13.4.3. Academic Ace Board. Each semester
all students who earn a 3.0 GPA or higher will have their
name posted on the Academic Ace Board in the front of
the classroom. The SASI will get the GPAs from the
appropriate school authorities and provide the names/
GPAs of the Ace winners to the Information Management
Officer who will make/post the name plates on the
Academic Ace Board. This information will be posted
on the board no later than five school days after receipt of
the Ace list by the Information Management Officer.
13.4.2. Booster Club Scholarship. Each year
the FL-821st Booster Club provides up to two $500
scholarships to graduating seniors to assist them in
furthering their education beyond high school.
Application packages are normally provided to all
interested seniors, by the SASI, sometime during the
month of March.
ADefeat is not the worst of failures.
Not to have tried is the true [email protected]
BGeorge E. Woodberry
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17 August 2015
Chapter 14
KITTY HAWK AIR SOCIETY
14.1.
General.
The Kitty Hawk Air
Society (KHAS) is an honor society within the AFJROTC
program. Its objectives are to promote high academic
standards both within the society and cadet corps, be of
service to the school and community, promote
self-confidence and initiative among its members,
develop leadership abilities, and encourage academic
excellence and continued educational development in the
post high school years.
membership list must be approved by the KHAS
President and faculty advisor.
The Membership
Committee may also nominate individuals who have
made outstanding contributions to KHAS for honorary
membership, but final approval rests with the KHAS
President and the Advisor.
14.3.1.
Induction. Cadets nominated to
become members of the KHAS chapter must complete a
pledge program of no less than 30 days in which a
community service project is accomplished. During this
pledge period, prospective members will be evaluated as
they accomplish a pledge program of reasonable, nondegrading tasks established by the Membership
Committee and approved by the KHAS advisor—at no
time will pledges be hazed or demined in anyway. Once
the prospective member has met all the requirements for
membership and is approved by the Membership
Committee, the Group Commander, and the KHAS
Advisor, then the member is authorized to wear the
KHAS badge on the uniform.
14.3.2. Due Process. Members who have been
expelled from the Society for other than academic
reasons, may file a protest by notifying the President in
writing within five school days of the change of status.
The President, along with the Membership Committee,
will discuss the protest and make recommendations to the
KHAS Advisor with seven school days. The KHAS
Advisor will determine the final action.
14.2.
Membership. There are three levels
of membership within the KHAS: Active, Honorary, and
Probationary.
14.2.1. Active. An active member must be
enrolled in the AFJROTC program as a full time high
school student. An invitation to join KHAS will be
extended only to those cadets who have a minimum
Aerospace Science grade of [email protected] and an overall 3.0 GPA in
all other subjects without any failing grades during the
preceding semester. Members who fail to maintain these
standards for any semester will be moved from active to
probationary status until the discrepancy is corrected.
14.2.2. Honorary.
14.2.2.1. Chapter Level.
The School
District Superintendent, high school principal, and
AFJROTC instructors are honorary members. Other
individuals may be recommended to the Membership
Committee for honorary membership.
14.2.2.2. State Level. The President of the
Air Force Association (AFA) and the AFJROTC Area
Commandant will be honorary members.
14.2.2.3. National Level. The President of
the AFA, additional advisory board members appointed
from the AFA, the Commandant AFROTC, and the
Director of the AFJROTC Program (AFROTC/DOJ) will
be extended honorary membership in the KHAS.
14.2.3.
Probationary. Any member who fails
to maintain required standards for a semester will be
placed on probationary status for the next semester.
During this period, the member cannot hold office or vote.
At the end of the grading period, if the member has
regained minimum academic standards, they may return
to active membership status. If the member fails to
regain minimum academic standards, they will be
expelled from the chapter pending a majority vote of the
Membership Committee. Additionally, if a member is
suspended or expelled from school, the member will be
removed from the chapter.
“People do less than ought, unless they do all
that they can.”
BThomas Carlyle
14.3.3.
Discipline. Any KHAS officer who
misses two consecutive meetings without the approval of
the KHAS President or Advisor, will be required to resign
from office. Any member who misses two or more
consecutive meetings without an excuse will be referred
to the Membership Committee for disciplinary action.
Final action will be determined by the KHAS President
with the concurrence of the KHAS Advisor.
14.3. Membership Procedures. Invitations to join
this Society will be extended by the Membership
Committee.
The Membership Committee will be
responsible for determining the eligibility of prospective
members and establishing notification and induction
procedures for the candidates.
The prospective
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17 August 2015
14.4.
KHAS Organization. Duties of the
KHAS officers include:
14.4.1. President. The President will preside
over all meetings of the Society and shall do his/her
utmost
to
further
organizational
objectives.
Additionally, the President will establish a set schedule of
meetings so that members will have adequate time to
arrange their calendars and attend all meetings. The
President will be an ex officio member of all committees.
The President will be a special assistant to the corps
commander. The President will hold the rank of Cadet
Captain (eligible for promotion to Cadet Major) and will
ensure that the activities of the KHAS do not conflict with
those of the AFJROTC cadet corps. The principle focus
of the KHAS organization will be to raise the level of
academics in the AFJROTC Cadet corps and to conduct
school and community service. With this in mind, the
KHAS should undertake at least one school or community
service project each nine week period during the school
year.
14.4.2. Vice President. The Vice President
shall assume the duties of the President when the
President is absent, and hold the rank of C/1Lt. The Vice
President may be assigned additional responsibilities as
determined by the President. The Vice President shall be
the chairperson of the Membership Committee.
14.4.3. Secretary. The Secretary will record
all meetings, maintain necessary files, and handle routine
correspondence. The Secretary will also ensure that the
Advisor is given a copy of the minutes of all meetings.
14.4.4. KHAS Advisor. The
Aerospace
Science Instructor will be the faculty advisor to the
Society. In special situations, the principal may also
select additional non-AFJROTC faculty advisors who
have a high interest in aerospace activities and the
improvement of citizenship. The local AFA chapter will
be invited to name an advisor.
14.4.5. Committees. There will be at leastone
permanent standing committee, i.e. the Membership
Committee. Other permanent standing committees may
be formed by a majority vote of the general membership.
Members will be selected for permanent committees by
the President with the approval of the KHAS Advisor.
The President may also appoint other temporary
committees as the need arises.
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17 August 2015
Appendix A
AFJROTC STAFF WORK
A1.1 General. Successful leaders are able to influence
others to willingly and eagerly accomplish a mission or
task. A leader, whether in a civilian or military
organization, cannot do the entire task without the help
of people on committees. They do work in special areas
like membership, social activities, treasury, news
releases, etc. Committees, in military organizations
like AFJROTC are known as the [email protected] and are labeled:
OPERATIONS,
PERSONNEL,
INFORMATION
MANAGEMENT, LOGISTICS, PUBLIC AFFAIRS,
etc. The chairman of the staff positions are known as
[email protected] and their assistants are known as [email protected]
(Noncommisioned Officers in charge).
A2.1 Purpose. The purpose of each staff agency is to
gather information and ideas, study them, and make
specific recommendations to the commander who must
make a proper decision. Frequently the staff is called
upon to identify a problem and recommend a solution.
At other times, they are asked to discover new ways and
ideas to accomplish things. The staff may also have to
research school policies, cadet regulations or unit
precedent in order to come up with a recommendation
that is sound. The staff is responsible for doing the staff
work. When it is complete, it recommends specific
action to the group commander, who, through the use of
the completed staff work, can make a more informed
decision. Using this procedure, the result should be a
wise decision based upon thorough and accurate
information which has resulted from an overall team
effort. Once the decision is made, staff members may
be asked to follow through with actions based upon the
commander=s decision.
A3.1. Assigning Staff Work. Here are some hints
which should help commanders when assigning staff
work and the staff in accomplishing the work they are
assigned. The result of good assignments and proper
work is Acompleted staff [email protected]
A3.1.1. Commanders need complete and
accurate information from the staff so that the best
possible decision can be made. They must know how to
assign staff work if they expect it to get done. Keep
these rules in mind when asking a staff member to study
a problem and recommend a solution.
A3.1.2. Select an individual who is familiar with
the problem. This will eliminate unnecessary research
and speed the discovery of a solution. This usually is
the staff officer with normal responsibility in that
particular area. An alternative to this would be
assigning a Aproject [email protected] to the task.
A3.1.3. Give this individual sole responsibility
for the project.
A3.1.4. Know the problem yourself, so that
you can give adequate guidance.
A3.1.5. Explain the problem and give specific
directions to your subordinate. Mention referrals or leads
the person might pursue in researching the problem.
A3.1.6. Record the date the assignment is given
and give a firm completion date so that your staff
member will know when it is due.
A3.1.7. Specify the format for the completed
staff work. Should it be written or given to you orally.
A3.1.8. Be available. Let the individual know
you are ready to give advice or suggestions, but do not
become overbearing and do not end up doing it yourself.
An effective leader learns to recognize capable people
and then depends upon them.
A3.1.9. Basically, give your staff member
adequate guidance, sufficient authority and enough
confidence so that they can gather the facts or figures
you need on which to base a decision.
A4.1. Completed Staff Work As a staff member, you
are an administrator, spending your time gathering
information from many sources. You then analyze that
information, test it and draw conclusions based upon that
information. You must have a clear understanding of
what constitutes Acompleted staff [email protected] It is the study
of a problem and the presentation of a solution with
enough detail so that all a project supervisor or
commander need do is approve or disapprove the
completed action. You may if necessary, submit a
Arough [email protected] for review to see if you are on the right
track. You are responsible for forming the details of a
proposed action. Keep these principles in mind when
doing staff work.
A4.1.1. Work out all the details completely.
A4.1.2. Consult with other staff members if the
action will involve their area of responsibility.
A4.1.3. Be sure to ask: who, what, where, why,
and when. Then ask yourself, AWhat [email protected] and AWhat
could possibly go [email protected]
A4.1.4. Study, write, study again and rewrite
your work until you are confident that you have all the
facts.
A4.1.5. Do not commit this organization to any
action without specific authority to do so. Understand
the difference between, Awe are thinking about
[email protected] and Awe want to [email protected] Understand the
difference between a tentative date and a firm request for
the date.
A4.1.6. Present a single proposed action.
Coordinate it and if necessary get the initials of the other
staff member(s) concerned about the issue on your
report.
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17 August 2015
A4.1.7 Advise the commander on what action to
take. Do not ask or tell him/her.
A4.1.8. Accept the final decision of the
commander on the matter. If you have done a thorough
and accurate job, your recommendation will likely be the
final decision, but not necessarily.
A4.1.9. Achieving Acompleted staff [email protected] will
require extra effort on your part. Extra effort is the price
to pay for the recognition you get with the additional rank
or position title. Your completed work will protect the
commander from poor advice and immature oral Aquick
[email protected] It separates staff officers who merely pose
additional questions from those who have thought out and
completed an idea.
A4.1.10. The final test for completed staff work is
to ask yourself: AIf I were the commander would I be
willing to sign my recommendation into [email protected] If not,
take it back, it is not yet completed staff work.
A4.1.11. Staff members must work in harmony
with each other. If the matter you have been asked to
study involves other staff members, coordinate (or check)
with them for their input. This will save you possible
embarrassment for not doing all your homework!
A4.1.12. Remember completed staff work
involves more than just developing the plan and getting
approval from the commander. Your action is not
complete until you have implemented the commander=s
approved plan of action, completed an After Action
Report, and taken any corrective actions to
overcome/compensate for unanticipated problems. The
action is yours from beginning to end; you are ultimately
responsible for its success and failure so give your best
shot.
A4.1.13. If you take a serious approach to this
experience, you should have a lot of success in future
dealing with people and in organizing your work as a
member of this or any other organization.
TEAMWORK REQUIRES A MAXIMUM EFFORT
FROM EACH TEAM MEMBER! GOOD LUCK
AND HAPPY PLANNING!!!
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17 August 2015
APPENDIX B
CADET CONTRACT
Application and Agreement for the
Air Force Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (AFJROTC)
Forward
AFJROTC is a full credit elective course offered by the School Board of Alachua County at Buchholz High
School (BHS). It is a unique course of instruction because the US Air Force has established certain
requirements which must be met before academic credit can be given. This agreement, like an education
contract, serves to provide general guidelines concerning these requirements to each cadet and encourage a
commitment on their part to develop self-discipline and responsibility for personal actions.
NOTE: Participation in AFJROTC does not commit or obligate any student to military service nor does it
guarantee any special consideration should a student elect to enter any of the military services. However, a
cadet who successfully completes three years of AFJROTC may: (1) Qualify for advanced rank upon
enlistment; (2) Compete more favorably for college ROTC scholarships and service academy
appointments.
Application
I,
, do herby apply for enrollment in the Air Force Junior
Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFJROTC), at Buchholz High School.
Agreement
1. Upon acceptance of this application and the fulfillment of its conditions by the cadet the Aerospace
Science Instructors agree to:
a. Provide textbook materials
b. Issue a regulation Air Force uniform on a loan basis from the authorized tariff sizes
available from the Air Force.
c. Provide instruction in support of the purpose and program objectives of AFJROTC.
Specifically, a cadet should develop:
1) An appreciation of the basic elements and requirements for national security.
2) Respect for/an understanding of the need for constituted authority in a democratic
society.
3) Patriotism and an understanding of their obligation to contribute to national security.
4) Habits of orderliness and precision.
5) A high degree of personal honor, self-reliance, and leadership.
6) A broad based knowledge of the aerospace age and fundamental aerospace doctrine.
7) Basic military skills.
8) A knowledge of/appreciation for the traditions of the US Air Force.
9) An understanding of the opportunities in the Air Force as a career.
d. Encourage academic achievement/career planning. Provide guidance regarding the
continuing educational opportunities available through service academies and college
ROTC scholarship programs.
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2. In order to maintain the highest standards of courtesy, personal conduct and appearance required by the
USAF and the Alachua County School District as a cadet. I understand and agree to:
a. Take proper care of all AFJROTC textbook materials and return same when requested.
b. Wear the regulation Air Force uniform only on those occasions prescribed by the
AFJROTC staff. Refusal to wear or improper use of the uniform can result in removal
from JROTC and an “F” for the course.
c. Maintain the uniform in a clean, properly fitted, and required manner and to turn in the
complete uniform upon demand. Cadets are responsible for the cost of routine cleaning,
loss, theft, or damage to all uniform items.
d. Meet the personal grooming standards (especially haircuts) established by the USAF.
e. Meet the standards of attitude, behavior, and respect established and taught by the
instructors. (Cadets who are suspended from school, for whatever reason, risk loss of
rank/position within the corps and possible removal from the program.)
f. Maintain an acceptable standard of academic achievement (Cadets must have at least a
2.0 GPA to participate in any AFJROTC extra-curricular activities such as Drill
Team/Color Guard. Cadets must also have at least a 2.0 GPA to be eligible for advanced
rank or positions within the corps.)
g. To the best of my ability, participate in weekly physical training and the semiannual
Presidential Physical Fitness Assessments. Refusal to participate can result in removal
from the AFJROTC program.
h. Strive to meet the objectives listed in paragraph 1c above:
i. Respond positively to other cadets who have been appointed to leadership positions in
the cadet squadron and likewise show the proper respect to subordinates when placed in a
position of leader ship.
_____________________________________
(Student Signature)
___________________
(Date)
Parental Approval
I hereby give my permission for my son/daughter to enroll in the Air Force Junior ROTC
program and will encourage his/her participation. I understand that there is no commitment for
the military service because of participation in AFJROTC. I understand and will help support
your efforts to maintain the high standards expected of a cadet in the Buchholz High School
AFJROTC program.
______________________________________
(Parent Signature)
43
______________________
(Date)
Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
APPENDIX C
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Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
APPENDIX D
JOB DESCRIPTIONS FOR LEADERSHIP POSITIONS
Upon being appointed to leadership position in the FL-821st AFJROTC Cadet Corps, each cadet will assume duties and
responsibilities as outlined in the following job descriptions
(4). Serves as President of the Group Promotion
Selection Board. Provides recommendations to the
group commander and SASI for NCO and officer
promotions. Ensures appropriate records are maintained
on these board meetings.
(5). Oversees the development publishing and
implementation of the weekly operations order which
outlines uniform requirements and the schedule of events.
(6). As a member of the group staff, attends all
group staff meetings.
(7). Is responsible to perform the duties of Group
Inspector General to ensure that each level of command is
complying with group policies and procedures.
(8). Works closely with the Group Commander
in the management and supervision of the group.
(9). Acts as counselor to younger cadets
c. Special Assistant to the SASI: This position is
normally filled by an AS IV cadet who has successfully
served as Group and has rotated (without cause) from the
position. The purpose is to provide experienced cadet
leaders an opportunity to serve the organization in a
productive and unique way appropriate to their abilities.
(1). Provides an orientation for the new group
commander so that an orderly transition of command
duties can take place
(2). Is available to the cadet Group Commander
as a resource person and advisor; however, the assistant
must take great effort to avoid the appearance of trying to
run the group.
(3). Ex officio member of the squadron staff
(4). Observes and evaluates the progress of the
cadet group in accomplishing its mission. Serves as the
focal point to coordinate the group inspection from higher
headquarters.
(5). Makes recommendations to the SASI/ASI
concerning the policies, programs and administration of
the cadet group.
(6). Maintains the group organizational chart.
(7). Acts as a counselor to younger cadets.
d. Kitty Hawk President
(1). Responsible to the cadet Group Commander.
(2). Oversees and ensures that this organization
lives up to its charter by being active in school and
community service (scheduling one event every 9 weeks
throughout the school year) and promoting academic
excellence throughout its members and the corps.
D-1. Command Level
a. Group Commander
(1). Responsible to the Commandant of Cadets
for the appearance, discipline, efficiency, training, and
conduct of the cadet squadron. Understands the mission
and the objectives of the AFJROTC program and
promotes them throughout the group.
(2).Supervisor of the Vice Group Commander,
Squadron Commanders, Group Adjutant, Kitty Hawk
President, and Senior Enlisted Advisor and maintains
frequent/direct contact with the same.
(3). Works closely with the SASI/ASI and is
responsible for the overall planning and coordinating of
all group activities, facilities, and resources.
(4).
Receives
investigations
and
recommendations from the cadet evaluation board.
Consults with the commandant of cadets and
recommends action as necessary to maintain moral,
discipline and orderliness in the squadron.
(5). Acts as advisor to the commandant of cadets
concerning matters of promotion and demotion of cadets
(6). Establishes and maintains written policies
that provide standard guidance in the overall group
operation.
(7). Works with squadron commanders in
solving group problems at all levels.
(8). Responsible for the conduct of group staff
meetings to plan and organize squadron activities. Staff
meetings will be held at times other than regular class
periods. Regular meetings will be posted and additional
meetings, as required, will be announced far enough in
advance to ensure maximum attendance.
(9). Acts as counselor to younger cadets
b. Vice Group Commander
(1). Responsible to the cadet Group
Commander. Acts as group commander in his/her
absence. Performs other duties as may be assigned by the
cadet Group Commander.
(2). Serves as President of the Cadet Evaluation
Board, investigation cases sent before the Board.
Recommends action to the cadet group commander.
(3). As the cadet Group Safety Officer, conducts
weekly safely inspections of all cadet facilities. Reports
all safety violations or findings to the cadet Group
Commander or the Commandant of Cadets. Provides
recommendations for correcting safety related problems.
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(3). Establishes necessary committees to manage
organizational requirements.
The only mandatory
committee is a membership committee that will enforce
academic standards for entry and establish a pledge
program for prospective candidates.
(4). Conducts meetings on a scheduled basis (at
least once a month) to plan events.
(5). Keeps the cadet Group Commander and
Kitty Hawk advisor updated of ongoing actions/activities.
(6). Ensure national, regional, state, and local
policies and procedures are adhered to in all actions.
(7). Perform other tasks as directed by the Group
Commander or Kitty Hawk advisor.
D-2. STAFF LEVEL:
a. Operations Support Squadron Commander
(1). On behalf of the Group Commander direct
all activities of the various Group Staff agencies ensuring
all required staff actions are completed in a timely
manner.
(2).
Completes
performance
reports/
recommendations for promotions on all senior staff
officers in his/her chain of command. Also ensures
performance reports/promotion recommendations are
completed in a timely manner for all NCOs by their
supervisors within the Operations Support Squadron.
(3). Attends all Group Staff Meetings and fills in
for the Vice Commander when absent and the Group
Commander whenever both the Commander and Vice are
not available.
(4). Member of the Group Evaluation Board and
Group Promotion Board.
(5). Maintains the Group Calender of Activities
ensuring that there are no conflicts between scheduled
events. Ensures project officers for group activities
receive the appropriate information/forms to do their jobs
and ensure that AAfter Action [email protected] are turned in by
Project Officers at the completion of projects.
(6). Oversees through the scheduling of fund
raising activities and that proper bookkeeping records are
maintained.
(7). Oversees the activities of the Drill Team/
Color Guard.
(8). Through the Recruiting Officer plans and
implements an effective recruiting program for feeder
schools and here at BHS.
(9). Performs other tasks as directed by the
Group Commander
(10). Acts as a counselor to younger cadets.
b. Logistics Officer
(1). Responsible to the cadet Operations Support
Squadron Commander. Supervisor of the Squadron
Logistics NCOIC and as such is responsible for
counseling, performance reports, and promotion
recommendations for this individual.
(2). Manages and supervises the logisitcs
function of the group and, through the Operations Support
Squadron Commander, keeps the cadet Group
Commander informed on logistics matters.
(3). Assists the ASI in the receipt, issue and
accounting for all the items of uniform, equipment,
supplies, text, and library materials related to the
operation of the group.
(4). Insures compliance with AFJROTC
Instruction 36-2001 and other pertinent logistical
directives as they apply to equipment, uniform, and
supply actions. Assists the ASI in maintaining supply
records and assists in inventories as directed.
(5). Organizes and supervises the maintenance,
repair, and cleaning of the AFJROTC facilities, uniforms,
supplies, and equipment.
(6). Provides guidance to the cadet corps on
proper supply discipline.
(7). Performs other duties as directed by the
Operations Support Squadron Commander.
(8). Member of the Operations Support
Squadron Staff and Group Staff and as such attends
meetings of these two organizations.
(9). Acts as a counselor to younger cadets.
c. Logistics NCOIC
(1). Responsible to the Logistics Officer.
Attends staff meetings in the absence of the Logistics
Officer.
(2). Assists the Logistics Officer by providing
administrative support in the logistics functional area.
(3). Maintains squadron logistics files, cadet
reference library of books, and the accountability records
for the Aerospace Science textbook material.
d. Recruiting Officer
(1). Responsible to the cadet Operations Support
Squadron Commander. Supervises the Recruiting NCOIC
and as such is responsible for counseling, and completing
performance reports/promotion recommendations on this
individual.
(2). Responsible for maintenance of Unit
Recruiting Board in hallway.
(3).Organizes and coordinates for recruiting trips
and open house activities during the school year.
(4). Acts as a counselor to younger cadets.
e. Recruiting NCOIC
(1). Responsible to the Recruiting Officer.
Attends squadron and staff meetings in the absence of
Recruiting Officer.
(2). Assists the Recruiting Officer by providing
administrative support across the entire spectrum of this
area's responsibilities.
(3). Performs other duties as required by the
Administration Officer.
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17 August 2015
f. Personnel Files Officer
(1). Responsible to the cadet Operations Support
Squadron Commander. Supervises the Personnel NCOIC
and as such is responsible for the counseling, and
completing
performance
reports/promotion
recommendations on this individual.
(2). Manages and supervises the personnel
function of the group and keeps the cadet Operations
Support Squadron Commander informed on personnel
matters.
(3). Coordinates with the SASI and ASI on
group personnel problems.
(4). Responsible for maintaining history forms
and service records for each cadet. Responsible for
posting each special order content to the service record
(Personal history) form of each cadet.
(5). Member of the Operations Support
Squadron and Group Staffs and as such attends all
scheduled meetings of these organizations as directed.
(6). Serves as a member of the Cadet Evaluation
Board and as the Recorder for the Group Promotion
Boards.
(7). Keeps/posts records of leadership position
changes to cadet Personnel records
(8) Acts as a counselor to younger cadets.
f. Personnel WINGS Officer
(1). Responsible to the cadet Operations Support
Squadron Commander. Supervises the Personnel NCOIC
and as such is responsible for the counseling, and
completing
performance
reports/promotion
recommendations on this individual.
(2). Manages and supervises the personnel
function of the group and keeps the cadet Operations
Support Squadron Commander informed on personnel
matters.
(3). Coordinates with the SASI and ASI on
group personnel problems.
(4). Responsible for maintaining an up-to-date
cadet group squadron computer data base to include cadet
locator information, cadet phone listings, computations
for honor flight, etc.
(5). Keeps a current list of cadets on probation
for failure to meet eligibility requirements for field trips,
participation in extra-curricular activities, etc.
(6). Member of the Operations Support
Squadron and Group Staffs and as such attends all
scheduled meetings of these organizations as directed.
(7) Acts as a counselor to younger cadets.
g. Personnel NCOIC
(1). Responsible to the Personnel Officer.
Attends meetings in the absence of the Personnel Officer.
(2). Assists the Personnel Officer by providing
administrative and technical support in the personnel
functional area.
(3). Maintains the group file on personnel
matters.
(4). Performs the other duties as directed by the
Personnel Officer.
h. Maintenance Officer
(1) Responsible to the cadet Operations Support
Squadron Commander. Supervisor of the Maintenance
NCOIC and as such is responsible for counseling and
completing
performance
reports/promotion
recommendations on this individual.
(2) Manages and supervises maintenance
function of the group and keeps the cadet Operations
Support Squadron Commander informed on these
matters.
(3) Maintains cleanliness, repair, and upkeep of
all group facilities and equipment.
(4) Responsible to make routine inspection of
equipment to determine proper operation and report any
discrepancies to the cadet Operations Support Squadron
Commander or SASI/ASI.
(5) Responsible for cleanliness of vehicles used
for group functions at the completion of activity.
(6) Member of the Operations Support Squadron
and Group Staffs and as such attends all meetings of these
organizations as required.
(7) Acts as counselor to younger cadets.
i. Maintenance NCOIC
(1)Responsible to the Maintenance Officer.
Attends the squadron and group staff meetings in the
absence of the Maintenance Officer.
(2) Assists the Maintenance Officer by providing
administrative and technical support in the maintenance
functional area.
(3) Assists in maintenance and inspection of
group facilities as assigned by Maintenance Officer.
(4) Performs other duties as required by the
Maintenance Officer.
j. Public Affairs Web Officer
(1) Responsible to the cadet Operations Support
Squadron Commander. Supervises the Squadron Public
Affairs NCOIC and is a Co-Officer to the Public Affairs
Flyer Officer.
(2) Manages and supervises the public affairs
function of the group and keeps the cadet Operations
Support Squadron Commander informed on public affairs
matters. Monitors and is responsible for reporting on the
activities of the Awareness Presentation Team (APT)
when and if such a team is formed.
(4) Provides newsworthy information, including
pictures, concerning the group activities and
accomplishments to the high school yearbook,
newspaper, TV, local media and to the AFJROTC
Headquarters and other AFJROTC units. Additionally,
works with the ASI to get an AFJROTC input into the
BHS yearbook.
(5) As the cadet group historian, maintains the
cadet corps history reflecting the tradition,
accomplishments, and activities of the cadet corps.
Responsible for the documentation of historical
information and data pertaining to corps activities on
computer or electronic medium. The history should
contain four chapters, one for each nine weeks period and
it should be completed by the last day of school.
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(6) Responsible for the currency and orderliness
of the squadron magazine rack and bulletin board in the
rear of the classroom.
(7) Member of the Operations Support Squadron
and Group Staff and as such attends all meetings of these
organizations as required.
(8) Acts as counselor to younger cadets.
k. Public Affairs Flyer Officer
(1) Serves as Editor of the AFJROTC monthly
newspaper. Responsible for gathering stories from all
affected agencies, assembling this information into a
monthly publication, and obtaining staff/faculty approval
prior to reproduction and release. The monthly newspaper
will come out on or about the 15th of each month, except
August, January, and the summer months.
(2) In coordination with the Squadron
Commanders and Flight Commanders establish points of
contact within each flight who will be tasked to provide
inputs to the newspaper.
(3) Responsible for the overall cadet corps
publicity and community relations program. Prepares
public news releases to school, community, and Air Force
publications and clears them with the SASI/ASI prior to
release.
(4) Provides newsworthy information, including
pictures, concerning the group activities and
accomplishments to the high school yearbook,
newspaper, TV, local media and to the AFJROTC
Headquarters and other AFJROTC units. Additionally,
works with the ASI to get an AFJROTC input into the
BHS yearbook.
(5) Member of the Operations Support Squadron
and Group Staff and as such attends all meetings of these
organizations as required.
(6) Perform all other duties as directed by the
Public Affairs Officer
(7) Acts as counselor to younger cadets.
l. Public Affairs NCOIC
(1) Responsible to the Public Affairs Officer.
Attends squadron staff meetings in the absence of the
Public Affairs Officer and Assistant.
(2) Assists the Public Affairs Officer by
providing administrative and technical support in the
public affairs functional area.
(3). Maintains group public affairs files, the
trophy display area, magazine rack, and bulletin board in
the rear of the classroom.
(4). Performs other duties as required by the
Public Affairs Officer.
m. Training Officer
(1). Responsible to the cadet Operations Support
Squadron Commander. Supervises the Training NCOIC
and as such performs counseling, and completes
performance reports/promotion recommendation forms
on this individual.
(2). Manages and supervises the group Wellness
program and coordinates with other affected staff
agencies on the award of the Wellness ribbon.
(3). In coordination with the squadron
commanders and flight commanders, establishes points of
contact within the flights to coordinate athletic
competitions between the flights. This point of contact
should also direct the E2C program within the flight to
include administering the Physical Fitness Test as
required.
(4). Plan, organize, and direct a tutoring program
geared to help AFJROTC cadets who are in need of
academic assistance.
(5). Plan, and implement in the Fall Field Day
Competition between the flights.
(6). Member of the Group and Operations
Support Squadron Staffs and as such attends all meetings
of these organizations as directed.
(7). Acts as a counselor to younger cadets.
n. Training NCOIC
(1). Responsible to the Training Officer. Attends
Group and Operations Support Squadron staff meetings in
the absence of the Training Officer.
(2). Provides administrative and technical
support to the Training Officer.
(3). Assists the Training Officer in managing the
Group physical fitness and tutor programs.
(4). Performs other duties as directed.
o. Chaplain
(1). Responsible to the cadet Operations Support
Squadron Commander. Supervises the Chaplain NCOIC
and as such performs counseling, and completes
performance reports/promotion recommendation forms
on this individual.
(2). Responsible for monitoring attendance
status of group cadets and noting extended periods of
absence of any. If so noted, responsible for investigating
and reporting status of cadet to Operation Support
Commander or SASI/ASI.
(3). Responsible to track birthdays of all group
members and inform flight commanders of the dates of
their flight members on the appropriate day.
(4). Responsible to implement an effective
birthday gift system for members celebrating their
birthday.
(5). Responsible for providing invocation and
benediction for appropriate group functions.
(6). Member of the Group and Operations
Support Squadron Staffs and as such attends all meetings
of these organizations as directed.
(7). Acts as a counselor to younger cadets.
p. Chaplain NCOIC
(1). Responsible to the Chaplain. Attends
squadron and group staff meetings in the absence of the
Chaplain.
(2). Assists the Chaplain by providing
administrative and technical support in the maintenance
functional area.
(3). Performs other duties as required by the
Chaplain.
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17 August 2015
(4). Responsible for scheduling drill team
practices after school and for coordinating maintenance
and competitions with the Color Guard Commander and
Drill team Advisor.
(5).
Member of the Operations Support
Squadron Staff. Attends all Operations Support
Squadron Staff and Group Staff Meetings.
(6). Acts as a counselor to younger cadets.
v. Color Guard Commander
(1). Responsible to the cadet Operations Support
Squadron Commander.
(2). Responsible for ensuring that the National
and State Flags are raised and lowered each
school day. Assists in training A & E flights on proper
procedures for Reveille/Retreat and then delegates
responsibility for conducting these activities to the A & E
flight commanders.
(3). Assists the Color Guard Advisor in training and organizing the color guard.
(4). Schedules color guard practices after
school and coordinates performances/competitions.
(5). Leads the color guard at public appearances
and competitions.
(6).
Member of the Operations Support
(7). Acts as counselor to the younger cadets.
w. Rifle Team Commander
(1). Responsible to the cadet Operations Support
Squadron Commander.
(2). Assists the Rifle Team Advisor in training
and organizing the rifle teams.
((3). Trains new rifle team members until they
are ready to formally join the rifle team.
(4). Responsible for scheduling rifle team
practices and for coordinating maintenance and
competitions with the Color Guard Commander, Drill
Team Commander and the Rifle Team Advisor.
(5).
Member of the Operations Support
Squadron Staff. Attends all Operations Support
Squadron Staff and Group Staff Meetings.
(6). Acts as a counselor to younger cadets.
x. Rocket Club President
(1). Responsible to the cadet Operations Support
Squadron Commander. Supervises the Rocket Club
NCOIC.
(2). Responsible for the training and education
of all Rocket Club members.
(3). Ensure proper knowledge of rocketry
through testing prior to any and all launches.
(4). Responsible for organizing and
scheduling a minimum of two launches during the school
year.
(5). Responsible for all areas of safety and
protocol during scheduled rocket launches.
(6). Acts as a counselor to younger cadets.
q. Audio-Visual Officer
(1). Responsible to the cadet Operations Support
Squadron Commander. Supervises the Audio-Visual
NCOIC and as such performs counseling, and completes
performance reports/promotion recommendation forms
on this individual.
(2). Responsible for maintaining the groups
audio-visual library.
(3). Ensures proper audio-visual coverage of all
group activities throughout the year.
(4). In coordination with the Public Affairs
Officer, will assist and provide appropriate audio-visual
material to acquire adequate publicity of the Buchholz
High School JROTC program and our activities.
(5). Member of the Group and Operations
Support Squadron Staffs and as such attends all meetings
of these organizations as directed.
(6). Acts as a counselor to younger cadets.
r. Audio-Visual NCOIC
(1). Responsible to the Audio-Visual Officer.
Attends the squadron and group staff meetings in the
absence of the Audio-Visual Officer.
(2) Assists the Audio-Visual Officer by
providing
administrative and technical support in the audio-visual
functional area.
(3) Performs other duties as required by the
Audio-Visual Officer.
s. Information Technology Officer
(1). Responsible to the cadet Operations Support Squadron Commander.
(2). Responsible for ensuring proper operation of all group computer equipment to include
installation of appropriate software.
(3).
Coordinates with all other functional
areas to ensure they have effective programs and training to maintain operation within their functional area.
(5).
Member of the Operations Support
Squadron Staff. Attends all Operations Support
Squadron Staff and Group Staff Meetings.
(6). Acts as a counselor to younger cadets.
t. Information Technology NCO
(1). Responsible to the IT Officer. Attends
squadron and groups staff meetings in the absence of the
IT Officer.
(2). Assists the IT Officer by providing technical
help maintaining the computer hardware in the IT area.
(3). Performs other duties as required by the IT
Officer.
u. Drill Team Commander
(1). Responsible to the cadet Operations Support
Squadron Commander.
(2). Assists the Drill Team Advisor in training
and organizing the drill teams.
(3). Trains new drill team members until they
are ready to formally join the drill team.
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17 August 2015
(6). Prepares the class for instruction by the
SASI or ASI. Is able to drill the flight and to instruct the
flight on individual drill.
(7). Promotes and encourages a positive flight
spirit, enthusiasm and support of flight and squadron
activities.
Serves as the focal point for inter-flight
competitions such as the Honor Flight competition.
(8). Completes Quarterly Awards packages on
deserving individuals within his flight.
(9). Makes every effort to improve the operation
and quality of their flight, squadron, and the group by
using all the available resources within the flight.
(10).
Member of the Operations Support
Squadron Staff and must attend or send a representative to
all scheduled staff meetings.
c. Flight Sergeant
(1). Responsible to the Flight Commander.
Supervises the Flight Guide and Element Leaders.
(2).
Attends Operations Support Squadron
Staff meetings in the absence of the Flight Commander.
(3). Reports absentees to the SASI or the ASI at
the beginning of each class.
(4). Able to drill the flight and instruct in
individual drill.
Trains the flight guide on
duties/responsibilities.
(5).
Insures flight compliance with
AFJROTC policies on uniform wear and care. Inspects
the flight, maintains inspection records and personally
meets the highest standard of uniform and personal
appearance. Instructs others in the proper wear and care
of the uniform and accessories.
(6).
Insures flight compliance with
AFJROTC standards of conduct, customs and courtesies.
Able to instruct others in proper conduct.
(7),
Promotes and encourages flight spirit,
cooperation and teamwork.
(8). Informs the Flight Commander on matters
concerning the morale, attitude and behavior of the flight.
Assists in preparing the class for instruction. Secures the
class for departure by inspecting to ensure everything is
neat and orderly at the end of each class period.
(9). Assists the flight commander as necessary
and assumes his/her duties when the flight commander is
absent.
d. Flight Guide
(1). Posts the flight guidon in the classroom at
the beginning of each class.
(2). Responsible for proper use of guidon at
public performances.
(3). Assists flight commander and flight sergeant
in training flight members during flight drill instruction.
e. Element Leader
(1).Serves as the training NCO for their element.
(2). Reports status of element at the beginning of
each class and ensures all is in order in the element prior
to dismissal at the end of the class.
(3). Supervises the Asst. Element Leader.
(4). First Element Leader assumes responsibility
for the duties of the Flight Sergeant when the flight
sergeant is absent. (Then 2nd, 3rd, etc.)
y. Rocket Club NCOIC
(1). Responsible to the Rocket Club
President. Attends the squadron and group staff meetings
in the absence of the Rocket Club President.
(2) Assists the Rocket Club President by
providing administrative and technical support in the
rocketry functional area.
(3) Performs other duties as required by the
Rocket Club President
D-3 OPERATIONAL LEVEL
a. 1st and 2nd Squadron Commanders
(1). Supervise the Flight Commanders under
their command and as such counsel and complete
performance reports/promotion recommendations on
same.
(2). Train Flight Commanders on how to be
effective leaders.
(3).
Establish squadron policies, consistent
with Group policies, that promote cadet development,
esprit de corps, and maximum participation in group
activities.
(4). Conduct Flight staff training sessions as
required to ensure that flight commanders, flight
sergeants, and flight guides understand their role in
making their flight effective.
(5), Member of the Cadet Evaluation/Promotion
Boards.
(6). Member of the Group Staff and as such must
attend or send a designated representative to all scheduled
staff meetings.
(7). Perform other tasks as directed by the
cadet Group Commander.
b. Flight Commander
(1). Responsible to the 1st or 2nd cadet
Squadron Commander.
Supervisor of the Flight
Sergeant and responsible for counseling, and completing
performance reports/promotion recommendations on this
individual. Manages and supervises the mission of the
flight and keeps the cadet Squadron Commander
informed on the flight status.
(2). Responsible for maintaining the appearance,
discipline, efficiency, and training of their respective
flight, working in close coordination with the SASI and
ASI. Provides recommendations for the Cadet of the
Quarter to the Squadron Commander. Provides name of
Flight's Cadet of the Quarter to the cadet Squadron
Commander.
(3). Responsible for the discipline and conduct
of the flight members on the drill field and in the
classroom. Reports violations to the SASI or ASI.
(4). Conducts weekly personal injections of each
flight member. Insures that flight members are complying
with the AFJROTC and group policies concerning
uniform wear,
customs and courtesies, personal
appearance and classroom conduct.
(5). Understands the squadron mission and
promotes it within the flight. Identifies flight objectives
and leads the flight members in the accomplishment of
those objectives.
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e. Assistant Element Leader
(1). Responsible to the Element Leader.
(2). Assumes the duties and responsibilities of
the Element Leader in their absence.
(3). First Assistant Element Leader assumes
responsibility for the duties of the Flight Guide in their
absence. (Then 2nd, 3rd, etc.)
“The key to success in any job is to leave it in
better shape than you found it!!”
C Anonymous Air Force Colonel
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Buchholz High School
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17 August 2015
APPENDIX E
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Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
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Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
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Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
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Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
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Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
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Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
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Air Force Junior ROTC
Buchholz High School
FL-821 Cadet Guide
17 August 2015
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