reggaexclusive`s - caribbeanmusic.ca

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reggaexclusive`s - caribbeanmusic.ca
CULTURAL NEWS, VIEWS, REVIEWS, INTERVIEWS VOL. 5 ISS. 3 SEPTEMBER 2007
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LYRIC MUSIC GROUP PRESENTS
THANKSGIVING
LONG WEEKEND
OCTOBER 5, 07
KOOLHAUS (TORONTO)
OCTOBER 6, 07
CLUB NEMESIS (BRANTFORD)
MARLON ASHER
“Ganja Farmer”
REGGAE ICON
SIZZLA KALONJI
MUNGA HONORABLE
“Bad From Mi Born”
For An Onlne Version Of Our Magazine Check: WWW.REGGAEXCLUSIVE.COM
Email: [email protected] Web: www.caribbeanmusic.ca/reggaex
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 2
ACTION PROMOTION
12 YEAR ANNIVERSARY &
CAVEMAN 32 YEAR ANNIVERSARY
Featuring
TAURUS RILEY
NATURAL BLACK
SAT. DECEMBER 1ST, 2007
and more
Inside: JAMAICA CANADIAN CENTRE
(995 Arrow Rd, Etobicoke)
Music By: CAVEMAN SOUND and more
To become a Sponsor or
Vendor for this event
Contact Action @ (416) 841-8326
or email: [email protected]
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 3
What’s Inside
ReggaeXclusive’s 19th Issue
pg 4
pg 5
pg 6
pg 7
pg 8
pg 9
pg 10
pg 11
pg 12
pg 13
pg 14
pg 15
pg 16
pg 17
pg 18
pg 19
pg 20
pg 22
pg 23
pg 24
pg 25
pg 26
Artist Spotlight - Ra-Sa-Nai (Formerly known as Denny Denton
JuLion’s Views - A Wake Up Call
Attention One And All; Reggae Musician Critically Injured in
Crash; Female Fronted Reggae-A Rare Prairie Sight;
Korexion’s New Video Premier; Pop-Up: Ra-Sa-Nai.
Multi-Award Winning Gospel Artiste Update; Upcoming
Event - 12 Tribes of Israe; Don Carlos - The Godfather
Sizzla - Up Close & Personal; Morgan Heritage Interview
Slingy; Iyah Roots; Real Roots Reggae - A Canadian Story
Prince Everald & Friends in Paradise; Gyptian Meets I-Wayne;
Jamaica Day “The Rock Rocks”
Prophecy - Capleton’s Official Band Reasons With ReggaeX
Eric Morgan of Action Promotion; Artist Spotlight: Janaya Ellis
Souljah Fyah; Calgary Reggaefest 007; TOK In Concert
The Dynamic Duo “Sly & Robbie”; Pop-Up: Exco Levi;
Michael Thompson
Canada Day Reggae Style; Rastafest 2007 in Review; Give
Thanks & Praise Concert Series; Lluidas Vale Fundraiser
Fyah Mumma Queen Ifrica Reasons with ReggaeXclusive
“Breakthrough” Shines for Nana at the 2007 Maja Gospel
Awards; Tarus Riley
Marlon Asher; Morgan Heritage Interview Continued
Reggaeplanet.net; Ibo & Janaya Ellis; Morgan Heritage
Interview Continued
Galaxie Top 10; Subscription Form; Resi Top 10 & Int’l. Top
10; Reggae Radio Program Listings
Ladies Night at Kabana; The Oprah of Dancehall - Natash Von
Castle of L3 Magazine
Munga Honorable; Natural Black; Natasha Von Castle Cont’d.
Dada Kalonji Interview Continued; Roger Steffens (Final)
Treson Chats with ReggaeXclusive; Prophecy Interview
Continued; Jamaica Day Review Continued; Don Carlos
Continued
Publisher:
reggaeXclusive
Publications
416-287-1335
Contributing Writers:
Sweet Marie
Layout & Design:
Paul Murton from
dbsduplication.com
All rights reserved.
No part of this publication
may be reproduced or transmitted
in any form without prior permission
from the Publisher.
(c) 2007 reggaeXclusive
Photographers:
Halina T. Di-Lallo
Lisa Connors
Sandi Destonis
Publisher:
ReggaeXclusive Publishing
Cover Design: dbs
Duplication
Send Photo and ads to:
[email protected]
( 300 lines Tiff, EPS or Quark
4, no “gif” from the web )
Editor:
Loraine Gomes
Marketing & Sales:
Fitz Knight
Loraine Gomes
On The Web:
Email: reggaexclusive
@rogers.com
www.caribbeanmusic.ca
/reggaex or:
reggaexclusive.com
Writers:
Lisa Connors
Halina T. Di-Lallo
JuLion
Sophia “Iyamtheiah” Daniel
Michelle Ottley
ReggaeXclusive is published every
quarter. 2007 Issues: March, June,
September & December
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S ARTIST WATCH
early singing experience in
the church. Growing up in
his community, he joined the
Boy Scout Cadets band
where he got the opportunity
to perform on many local
charity events island wide.
His musical influences and
favorite artists are Dennis
Brown, Bob Marley, Linval
Thompson, Toots and the
Maytals and many more.
RA-SA-NAI
(THE ARTIST FORMERLY
KNOWN AS DENNY DENTON)
Born Denton Cousins (aka
Ra-Sa-Nai) in the parish of
Portland in the beautiful
island of Jamaica, W.I. Like
many other artists he got his
In the early ‘80’s, he came
across a program called
“record jury”. This gave him
an in-depth overstanding of
how songs should be written.
This
program
explored
musical arrangement, lyrics
and melody techniques. After
appearing on several local
shows,
he
gained
the
confidence necessary to
pursue a musical career. In
1979, he wrote his first song
entitled “Nuclear Weapon”
that was later released in
1984 on the June Rose
Label. This song had a fair
amount of air play in the
Caribbean and elsewhere.
1986 marked his second
release entitled “Freedom”
on the Music Mountain Label.
That same year, he also
released “Girl now-a-days”,
“Wicked Apartheid” and “Don
Bonds”
produced
and
released on the Dennis Star
Label.
Upon migration to Canada
in 1993, he recorded “Lost
my Love” on the Bull’s Eye
Label produced by Mr. Bevin
Jackson, who also coproduced songs for Kings of
Kings CEO, Colin Levy’s (aka
Iley Dread) first album. Not
one to sit and wait, Ra-Sa-Nai
continued laying tracks. In
1995, he recorded “Dollars
Nah Value” on the Little
Melody Label out of Miami.
He continued on his musical
journey with the 1997
recording of the thought
provoking “Tell Me Why”
produced by Colin Levy and
published by the Kings of
Kings Label. This song was
one of his most popular
songs to date.
Armed with his arsenal of
profound musical lyrics, he
now performs on many stage
shows all over North America
and Jamaica with artists
such as Luciano, Dennis
Brown, Buju Banton, Beres
Hammond, Capleton, Beenie
Man, Sizzla, Anthony B, Errol
Dunkley and many more.
Words of Wisdom from
RA-SA-NAI: Ra is Love, so let
us continue to live in love
and respect each other.
Build the unity so that we can
Highly
gain the strength.
Bless!
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 4
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S VIEWS
our industry has to offer.
JULION’S VIEWS
“A WAKE-UP CALL”
hen I was a child
growing
up
in
Jamaica, whenever one of my
elders wished to ask a
question that needed some
level of intellectual response
from my little head, they would
start the questioning with that
dreaded “Stick a pin….”. Once
you heard that, you had better
get on the thinking cap and
stay focused. So I took a page
from the elders and stuck a
pin with the letter I wrote,
basically to the ‘industry’. I
put industry in quotation as, in
my humble estimation, there
really isn’t one.
Mind you,
reggae is getting spun on
turntables, CDs and singles
and albums getting made in
studios, live performances
happening, burnt CDs getting
sold and burnt some more, but
we don’t generate enough for
the music buyer to take us
seriously. When we can sell
music inside and outside of
Canada
I
will
certainly
concede that there is such a
thing as a reggae industry
here.
W
***************
“Hail community radio DJs
and artists...
As you are all aware, I write
for
the
ReggaeXclusive
magazine, published every
quarter. Each quarter, like
clock work, ReggaeXclusive
sends me my reminders to
write something about the
Canadian reggae scene. My
focus in the past little while,
has been the “Real Roots
Reggae - A Canadian Story”, a
project that I have GREAT
pride in and do believe
represents some of the best
What I am about to write
about is the fact that Leo
Cripps, a radio show host in
Calgary and Janaya Ellis of
Souljah Fyah is about to
outsell every radio personality
in Toronto as well as artist in
Toronto 100 to 1.
They are
enthusiastic about what they
consider to be a great project
and are selling them to their
audiences.
A part of my
strategy was to involve as
many people as possible so if
10 of the 20 took on these
roles, we might sell a few units
and make a mark and open
doors for other artists and
other projects.
A part of my article will
touch on the ineffectiveness
of
the
Toronto
radio
personality as it pertains to
selling an artists product. If
the role of the DJ is to just
play good reggae music, all of
you have that covered, as I,
like many other fans do enjoy
much of the music that you
spin. So keep playing what
you like and enjoy hearing for
yourself, but you are not
aiding effectively in my
project. I am letting you know
in advance so that you can
either:
1.
‘bun me out’ and say
that I am crying sour grapes
and the real problem is CRW’s
inability to be creative or point
to
my
poor
marketing
strategies. Or,
2. Cut up the compilation
saying that you don’t like the
attempt at a ‘lame’ radio show
in-between songs. Or,
3. The music is soft and
lame and if you had a choice,
you wouldn’t pick any of those
tunes or artists. Or,
4. Point out the vibe of it
and say it is stuck in a time
warp and no one listens to that
style of reggae anymore. Or
any other negative point that I
have missed.
I am giving you all
something to say, so that you
can send me your responses
prior to me putting my ‘views’
in print. I believe that you are
all ineffective as ‘music
sellers’ for the Canadian artist
and have been so for a LONG
time and that this trend must
change in order to grow this
industry.
Many
artists
question why we either listen
to you all in the first place.
Many veterans have told me
personally that they would
never give any of you their
music as it is a waste of space
and time. I will be saying
much of this, so I give you a
chance to rebut in print or on
your shows in advance.
Many of the current artists
today feel the same way about
all of you!
There is no
effective way to sell Canadian
reggae if you folks are
involved!
Maybe, we are
putting undue pressure on
you, as the ‘system’ is set up
against you.
Mainstream
radio with it’s ‘rotation’ system
are able to grow and sell
artists from even foreign
lands. With only 2-3 hours
per week, you are not able to
use such a system. But do
you play the artist music in the
first
place?
Do
you
communicate
amongst
yourselves to bus’ artists or
projects??? Well, I give you a
chance to respond folks!
What’s wrong with selfishly
playing Canadian? This is
where we live, pay taxes and
grow our children!
I will touch also on may of
the artists on the project who
have not lifted a finger to sell
this current project. I won’t
name names, but may have
the means to come and grab a
couple of copies from me and
sell to their family, fan base or
parties
and
have
done
nothing!!! They are waiting
for me, or the radio DJ or
some divine intervention to
sell music. Well the Canadian
‘reggae industry’ will always
flounder with my abrasive
style or your ineffective ways,
so lets continue to sink
together.”
What has come back to
date is that it is not the job of
a community radio personality
to sell Canadian produced
reggae music. Of that I and
many were already aware! But
I have been around and a part
of the scene for a time now
and am really tired of “second
place”. That isn’t exactly the
place we are really in; I’m
alluding to a mind set when I
say “second place”.
This is a competitive world
and a competitive business
and having performed, played,
spun, sung, created, pressed
and burnt reggae music for
close to 40 years now, it is
unacceptable to me that we
don’t
have
a
stronger
presence in our own country.
There is an old saying that
goes something like, “You
can’t be a king abroad until
you are a king at home.” And
that adage is true! Many in the
community
spend
time
bitching at mainstream radio,
especially Flow 93.5FM as if
ONE station is supposed to
save our plight. The problem
isn’t Flow! It is my askewed
perception that ‘someone’
else will come along and save
us and sell the reggae music!
There is no one!
I realize now, that the
problem isn’t the community
radio DJ, but more accurately
my misguided dependence on
what seemed to be our only
outlet for exposure and viable
sales opportunities. The real
problem is me and the many,
many, many artists in this
broad country not stepping up
and creating a stronger force.
Well the time for revolution
is now and I am seeking
forward thinking, business
minded, level headed, creative
thinkers to move this great
reggae music to its rightful
place.
Selling our reggae
music in OUR own country as
well as exporting and selling
on foreign lands… Come show
me how, because I don’t know,
but am willing to learn and to
work to achieve it! I dun bun
out some of the artist dem too
and blaze a little fire on myself
along the way, but don’t take it
personally, mek we tek de bull
by the horns. It’s only been 40
years…JuLion
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 5
REGGAEXCLUSIVE NEWS
ATTENTION
AND ALL!
ONE
n support of Ibo &
KinDread, The Calgary
Reggae Festival Society is
selling the First Canadian
Reggae Compilation CD - Real
Roots Reggae, A Canadian
Story which features Ibo &
KinDread’s track “Sweet like a
Sugah”
I
The CRFS is selling this
double disk set for $25.00
Fifteen dollars from each sale
will go directly to Ibo and the
band. Please show your
support and call 403-399-3705
to purchase a copy. For more
information on the CD visit
www.calgaryreggaefestival.co
m. Our thoughts and prayers
are with Ibo & KinDread at this
time.
REGGAE MUSICIAN
IBO INJURED IN
CRASH HEADING TO
CALGARY FESTIVAL
Published: Monday, August 20,
2007 by Jason van Rassel - Calgary
Herald
ne of the city’s bestknown
reggae
musicians was critically hurt
and members of his backing
band seriously injured in a
highway crash near Brooks.
Ibo and his band Kindread,
were on their way from a show
in Regina to Calgary, where
they were scheduled to play at
the
Calgary
International
Reggae Festival on Saturday
night. Their van, carrying six
people, left the Trans-Canada
Highway a few kilometers west
of Brooks about 9:15 a.m.
Culture Brown, a vocalist
touring with Ibo and his band,
said he was asleep in the
second row of seats when the
vehicle left the road. “I woke
up to a rolling van and I told
myself, ‘I don’t want to die,’ “
Brown recalled Sunday. The
van landed on its wheels.
Brown — who was wearing his
seatbelt — was able to quickly
jump out because the side
door had come off.
O
Ibo, who was driving was
also wearing a seatbelt, but
was trapped inside the wreck
and
critically
hurt.
Ambulances took Ibo and
three band mates to hospital
in Brooks, while Brown and
another musician escaped
with minor cuts and bruises.
STARS air ambulance later
flew Ibo and his keyboard
player, known by the stage
name Lee, to Foothills Hospital
in Calgary. The other two
injured
men
are
also
recovering at Foothills after
ambulances drove them into
the city.
Lee’s and Ibo’s condition
has since been upgraded to
stable, Ibo is now speaking a
few words which is something
he could not do before. Prior
to becoming a solo artist, Ibo
was a longtime member of the
veteran Calgary reggae band
Strugglah. He has toured
North America and opened for
reggae legends like the
Wailers and Jimmy Cliff.
News of the crash spread
quickly Saturday and cast a
pall over the normally joyful
reggae festival atmosphere.
“When we pulled up to the
hospital, there was a large
group of people who wanted to
know the latest about (Ibo’s)
condition,” Andrews said.
Ibo’s ties to the reggae festival
are long and strong. He is one
of the event’s founding
members.
“We were setting up for the
reggae festival and all you had
was a bunch of crying people,”
festival president Leo Cripps
said. “It’s family, its friends.”
Brown took the stage at the
festival Saturday night to
deliver the news to the
audience, and the remaining
musicians performed a tribute
to Ibo. “We had a tribute for
him and for all he’s done for
reggae music in Calgary,”
Cripps said. Ibo was born on
the Caribbean island of Nevis,
and his mother was trying to
make arrangements to be at
his bedside, officials said. Ibo
and his tour companions were
supposed to head to B.C. after
their show on Saturday, but
Brown said his only concern
now is for the musicians he
spent the summer touring the
country with. “Every one of us
are family. My family means
more to me,” he said. The
RCMP are probing the cause
of the crash.
FEMALE-FRONTED
REGGAE A RARE
PRAIRIE SIGHT:
Edmonton’s Souljah Fyah
Vows to Fill the Void with Tour
ne
of
Edmonton’s
most-loved
urban
music acts is set to embark on
an
extensive
western
Canadian tour.
With their
sophomore recording Truth
Will Reveal setting fire to
airwaves across the country,
Souljah Fyah will soon be
showcasing their scorching
live act in a string of cities,
with stops along the way to
headline the 2nd annual
Winnipeg Soca and Reggae
Festival, and the Forward
Festival in Sooke, B.C.
O
“We’ve built a strong
following in Edmonton and in
Calgary,” says lead singer
Janaya Ellis, “and Edmonton is
a great city for festivals in the
summer, but it is definitely
time to branch out.” Indeed,
this past winter Souljah Fyah
managed to draw crowds of
200+ to local establishment
Blues on Whyte on a weekly
basis and now they have the
confidence to go after the
national
stage.
While
Edmonton may not a be a
traditional bastion of reggae
music, Janaya Ellis and her
troupe of Souljahs have
managed to impress a number
of the genre’s top names.
They opened for reggae
legends Morgan Heritage and
Mikey Dread twice, and have
paved the way for Buju Banton
in Calgary last July. “It’s great
to rub shoulders with the
‘forefathers’” says Janaya,
“and while we respect and
learn much from them, we feel
we bring a unique aspect,
given the strong female
presence
in
the
band.”
Souljah Fyah’s first single
Abundance of Good will be one
of two tracks featuring female
vocalists that will appear on
the first ever Canadian reggae
compilation, produced by
Canadian Reggae World.
Souljah
Fyah’s
music
ranges from songs of love and
lament
to
passionately
political diatribes but it’s their
ability to fill the dance floor
that is fast making them one of
the most sought-after and
talked-about Canadian acts of
the year.
For a complete
listing of Souljah Fyah’s tour
dates,
visit
www.souljahfyah.com.
If
you’d like more information
about this topic, or to
schedule an interview with
Janaya Ellis, please contact
Love Empire Entertainment at
780/479-5265
or
email:
[email protected]
Contact: Janaya Ellis: Tel.
780/479-5265
Email:
[email protected]
KOREXION’S NEW
VIDEO PREMIER
It is here finally when GP
Promotions and Island View
presents
Anonymous
Saturdays starting September
15, 2006 inside Island View
Niteclub at Markham and
Lawrence in Scarborough.
This is a Scarborough Club
District event hosted by
Korexion (2007 Juno Award
Winner). Also, come and see
Korexion's video premiering
for the first time anywhere
before. Music by King Turbo,
Black Reaction, D'Enforcers,
Infinity Sound Crew. Nuff
prizes and surprises.
POP UP
“RA-SA-NAI”
The singer formally known as
Denny Denton is now known
as “RA-SA-NAI”.
Look
forward for new releases
soon.
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 6
REGGAEXCLUSIVE CULTURAL NEWS
MULTI-AWARD
WINNING INT’L.
GOSPEL ARTISTE
UPDATE
ay Morris is currently
working on a new single
featuring Luciano, with her full
CD to-follow. While in Jamaica
in May 2007 Kay (Nana Sika)
met several representatives of
the United Nations (UN AIDS
& UNDP) who applauded her for
her work in Africa. The
meeting aimed at discussing
KMF role in assisting people
living
with
HIV/AIDS in
Jamaica her native country.
K
During the meeting with the
UN, Kay stated that she would
like to see fellow successful
Jamaican artists join in the
fight against HIV/AIDS and give
back
to
Jamaica. She
suggested that she could
collaborate with a major
Jamaican music entertainer to
bring
forth a
powerful
message that would unite
Jamaicans and people around
the world in the fight against
HIV/AIDS.
She
contacted
Luciano about collaborating on
the project and he embraced
the idea. Kay is the writer of
the song “When You Cry”,
which addresses the various
issues
associated
with
sickness, disease, poverty
especially HIV/AIDS.
The UN invited Kay to come
back to Jamaica on UN Day
October 24th, 2007 and
participate in various projects
that will benefit orphanages
and HIV/AIDS agencies in the
Island.
On October 13th, 2007 Kay
Morris (Queen Nana Sika) will
be honored
at the
2007
Planet Africa Awards Gala
when she will receive the
prestigious Nelson Mandela
Humanitarian
Award. The
awards gala will be held at the
Renaissance Hotel on Dixon
Road. The public is invited. For
more information please log on
t
o
:
www.PlanetAfrica.net;www.silv
ertrust.net
UPCOMING EVENT
12 TRIBES OF ISRAEL (CANADA)
presents
The 77th
CORONATION CELEBRATION
OF HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY
EMPEROR HAILE SELASSIE
& STAGE-SHOW
ON NOVEMBER 2ND, 2007
JAMAICAN CANADIAN CENTRE
(995 Arrow Road, T.O.)
Infoline: 416-725-9891
STAY TUNED FOR MORE!
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S FOUNDATION ARTIST
DON CARLOS - THE
GODFATHER
“Laser Beam”
on Carlos (born Euvin
Spencer)
Legendary
Reggae Artist was born and
raised in one of the most
deprived regions of Western
Kingston, Jamaica, in a
district notoriously known as
D
Waterhouse,
which
incidentally is also a musical
spawning ground for many of
ever
Reggae's
greatest
talents, such as King Tubby,
Black Uhuru, The Jays, Junior
Reid, and King Jammy to name
a few. Don Carlos started his
singing career in 1965 in
conjunction with other artists
and quickly moved on to
creating solo singles. In 1972,
Don moved into a trio as one
of the original contributors of
Black Uhuru, alongside other
founding
members
Garth
Dennis (who later went on to
joining the Wailing Souls) and
Derrick Ducky Simpson. Two
years after the trio's groundbreaking debut, the group split
in different directions and Don
continued to pursue a solo
career. Within three years of
developing his songwriting
skills and grooming his
distinctive
vocal
style,
“Suffering” was released in
May 1981. This strong release
took the industry by storm,
courtesy of a heavy roots and
culture flavored showcase for
the Negus Roots Label. This
album was a massive hit in
Africa,
selling
in
unprecedented numbers.
At this time, he worked
alongside Gold, his co-writer
and
back
up
vocalist.
Together,
they
brought
such
timeless
through
creations as “Harvest Time”,
“Day to Day Living” and “Them
Never Know A Natty Dred Have
Credentials” between 1980 to
1984. Don continued on with
including
releases
more
“Laser
Beam”,
“Raving
Tonight”, “Never Run Away”,
“Just A passing Glance”,
“Ghetto Living” and “Deeply
Concerned”.
During the eighties, Don
was a popular artist in the
Dancehall
scene
with
numerous
Top
Ten
hits
between 1982-1985. Don is
still churning out solid,
melodic roots reggae. There's
an old saying in the music
industry that claims: What
goes around, comes back
around. In Don's case, a
request from Duckie for Don to
continue his former role as
lead vocalist in a rejuvenated
Black Uhuru reunion resulted
in another strong Black Uhuru
album - “Now”. 1989 marked
(Continued on page 25)
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 7
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S INTERVIEWS
SIZZLA – UP CLOSE
& PERSONAL
By: Stephanie Aleung
(Final from March 2007 issue)
.A: Does the I them live
as a commune?
Sizzla:
Yes.
We
are
Rastafarians.
We keep the
Sabbath. We’re like special
Imples that see to it that all
the
Rastafarians
stick
together. Whenever you have
a banquet, celebration or
coronation and Black History
month
is
coming
up.
Judgment Yard has been
known to go around and help
and assist all the mansions.
Whether financially or through
S
transportation or through
food, based on the fact that
the artists’ from Judgment
Yard reaches out to the world
so his duty is to make sure the
culture is being maintained.
Whereas with the nation is not
seeing. Through the world we
see what is going on, so it’s
our duty to take care of the
elders, the elder Rastafarians
and things like that, know
what I mean? So when we
come in the world and we do
tours and we get money, you
don’t know what’s happening
back there but we know. We
know. So then we just go and
make drums and we’ve got to
keep the drums clean, know
what I mean? You’ve got to
always have drums and to
make sure the priests’ have
their royal garments. Their
turbans and robes. You’ve got
to make sure those things are
there.
S.A:
Knowing and
overstanding the way in which
modern day slavery exists, InI
have personally faced people
who fight I positive works and
Rasta livity.
In your
experiences and coming up as
an African Rastaman in the
music industry today, have you
had to face any discrimination
night, hooked up performed
and left the same night. So we
didn’t really get to experience
Calgary.
MORGAN HERITAGE
Interview by Lisa Connors
C: Greetings to you and
welcome to Calgary on
behalf of all your fans. Is this
your first visit to Alberta?
Peter Morgan: Actually
we’ve been here before but
not on our own tour. It was on
a punk rock tour, the vans
warped tour. We came through
Calgary; I don’t even know
where we were, just on a big
field. We drove in during the
L
LC: Could you talk a little
about your beginnings in
music and when you first
started
to
play
music
together?
PM: At home still, you
know music was a part of our
upbringing. Our father Denroy
Morgan, reggae singer from
the mid 70’s, late 70’s
throughout the 80’s and after
his album with RCA Records
“I’ll do anything for you” which
was around 80, 81 he decided
to put it to us because he saw
the talent in us, we used to
just learn a lot of top 40 songs,
what was on the radio and
develop ourselves. We did get
some formal training me,
Lukes, Gramps not much
though just enough to know
what was what in music. Other
than that the development
was done on our own just
and how have you dealt with
it?
Sizzla: To be truthful, I
haven’t
faced
any
discrimination. Coming in as
Rastafari, it’s like we get the
icing on the cake you know?
You know what I mean?
I
haven’t
faced
any
discrimination. Ras Tafari is
the king of Africa, what you
should know. When I’m coming
to this country I’ve got to
abide by the principles so if
Ras Tafari is our King, why
shouldn’t we abide by his
principles? If he’s Ras Tafari,
we are Ras Tafari. So we’ve
got to maintain the principles
of The Most High. So that the
world is used to hearing about
Ras Tafari but the world needs
to research to know who Ras
Tafari is and why we are
Rastafarians. I didn’t face any
discrimination; I was more
accepted and respected to be
truthful.
S.A: Very happy for the I.
All of InI give thanks and look
at the I with such gratitude
and respect for paving the way
for other Rastafari artists’ and
for helping to diminish the
stigma that is sometimes
associated to Rastafarians by
those who do not overstand InI
teaching each other along the
way.
LC: What was it like for
you as a Jamaican family living
in a place like Springfield
Massachusetts?
PM: It really didn’t make
much difference to us because
as far as were concerned we
didn’t know the difference
between an American thing
and the Jamaican thing
because in our house the
lifestyle in our family was as if
we were living in Jamaica
being born in America but our
upbringing
was
straight
Jamaican because our parents
weren’t American. We used to
get in trouble because we
refused to speak American in
the house. My dad used to tell
us we were born in America so
we should speak it!
LC: How does it feel for
you to work as a family unit?
PM: Great man! As far as
that is concerned we don’t
livity.
InI look to you like
another Bob Marley. I also
love the way you will ride a hip
hop rhythm or any type of
rhythm like you’re riding a
proper reggae rhythm.
Sizzla: Yes. Because this is
it.
Sometime you need to
bring something new to them
and show them they are
Rastafarians. Not because of
the music, it’s not just about
singing.
It’s to unite the
youths
and
we
got
a
responsibility.
Don’t forget
about slavery! Children over
here in the real hip hop
culture, they are my brothers
and sisters but they have been
brought here because of
slavery. Their parents were
taken from the Caribbean and
scattered all over the world.
They’ve become accustomed
to the principles there.
They’re growing that way and
it’s the same thing in Jamaica.
Real Rastafarians know where
they’re coming from, before
they had even start living in
America, know hat I mean? So
Sizzla going through the world
now can’t stray from that
point. It doesn’t matter what
you do, no matter what those
rappers say. They are your
brothers and they are your
sisters. (Cont’d on page 26)
know nutten else. I wouldn’t
rather it any other way. It
works for me. I’m always with
my family and I’m greatful for
that.
LC: When you got signed
to MCA in 92, after Reggae
Sunsplash was that when you
realized your career was really
going to take off?
PM: Well it was like a
dream for us because growing
up we used to love listening to
New Addition, Bobbie Brown
and all those acts were signed
to MCA Records, coming out
of high school and going to
Jamaica on a vacation and
doing the Reggae Sunsplash
concert, we didn’t go to
Reggae Sunsplash looking for
a recording deal. We didn’t
even know there were scouts
there, and then all of that
came out of it!
LC: I heard you didn’t have
so much creative freedom with
(Continued on page 19)
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 8
BLACK ARROW
RECORDING ARTIST
“SLINGY”
“Untouchable”
lingy
aka
Kemar
Donaldson was born in
the parish of Clarendon,
Jamaica.
Slingy started
singing and Deejaying at the
age of ten. His big break came
at the age of fifteen when he
performed at Teen Splash in
2002 and Island Explosion in
2003 in Jamaica. Slingy has
opened up for such artists as
Hi Octane and Emanuel Steele
S
just to name a few. Slingy's
musical talent is a blend of
singing, singjay and deejaying,
which makes him very versatile
and a hit with the ladies. He is
now working on his debut
album called "Untouchable"
being produced by Courtney
Buckley and Shawn James at
Black Arrow Studio here in
Toronto. This will be a blend of
dancehall reggae, R&B, and
Hip-Hop.
Get news, entertainment
and everything you care about
at Live.com.
Check it out!
www.live.com/getstarted.aspx
REAL ROOTS REGGAE - A CANADIAN STORY
History!!! The First Ever Canadian Reggae Compilation!!!
Available For Sale - Online @ www.canadianreggaeworld.com
Also Available at: Trejah Isle - 1514 Eglinton Avenue West - 416-787-7615;
Roach-A-Rama - 191A Baldwin Avenue (Kensington Market) - 416-203-6990
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 9
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S “LIVE SHOW” REVIEWS
Williams made a choir from the
audience with “A Lot Of
People Nah Get Nuh Suppa
Tonight”. By that point we
should have realized how
blessed we are to live among
several Reggae veterans in
Canada.
Photo By: Sandi Destonis
PRINCE EVERALD &
FRIENDS IN
PARADISE
By: Sophia “Iyamtheiah” Daniel
n Friday June 22, 2007
Prince
Everald
celebrated his birthday and
the launch of his latest CD
entitled “Prince Everald &
Friends Vol 2”. The venue was
Club
Paradise
and
appropriately
so.
The
audience
witnessed
an
unforgettable show, one that
included some of Toronto’s
most
talented
upcoming
artists and legends.
In
addition to that, they were
backed by Reggae Music
Achievement Awards “Top
Band Of The Year” Mountain
Edge Band.
O
The night opened with a
tribute to Bob Marley by
female vocalist Megan. Param
forwarded chanting his new
release “Jah Ever Living”.
Recently
awarded
“Most
Promising Artist of The Year”
Exco Levi did no harm singing
“What One Dance Can Do”and
of course his “Oh Canada”.
belted
Clement
Gordon
“Darling Whoo”, “I Want a Love
That Is Real” and “Better Days
Are Coming”.
Later we heard the voice of
the Rasta woman. To be more
precise
“The
Dancehall
Empress” Donna Makeda
entered chanting “Babylon Yu
Throne Gone Down”.
Her
performance included “Hold
On” and “Jah Ah De Rulah”. It
is truly refreshing to hear
uplifting tunes in Dancehall
style. Soon “The Visionary”
Michael Thompson graced us
with “Amazing Grace”. “The
Armageddon
Man”
Willi
After much anticipation,
Prince Everald entered singing
the Lord’s prayer. His soothing
voice caressed the rhythms
singing
songs
including
“There’s A Land Far Far
Away”, “Wake Up Man Kind”
and “Glorify The King”. This
Some of the
man SINGS!
duets on the new CD were
performed
live
including
“Come Into My Life” with
Donna Makeda. The vibes of
love,
peace,
unity,
and
consciousness were sure
evidence of what great music
does.
Although the upcoming
artists and legends sang their
heart felt songs, a lot of
people got no knowledge that
night. The show was poorly
attended resulting once again
in
a
cultural/conscious
starvation in the reggae music
fraternity. In any regards, the
ones who attended either left
with CDs or the intention to
purchase at a later date.
Gyptian
GYPTIAN
IWAYNE
MEETS
By Sophia “Iyamtheiah” Daniel
unday July 15, 2007
perhaps marked one of
the hottest nights inside the
Jamaican Canadian Centre.
Action Promotion did it again
filling the venue almost to its
capacity. Although I Wayne
and Gyptian had already
performed in Toronto it would
be different.
Almost every
song performed by both artists
were known and sung by the
audience. Ja Pong opened the
S
show and perhaps nervously
so.
Those who had the
pleasure to see him previously
may agree that he’s been more
effective.
However, reggae
concert attendees understand
the pressure of being the first
performer
of
a
highly
anticipated show. His lyrics
were clear as he sung about
love and his relationship with
“weed”.
Shadae appeared in a pair
of daisy-dukes. Unexpectedly
she alarmed the audience with
an RnB vibe complimented by
soft vocals. She had difficulty
hearing herself at times due to
reasons beyond her control.
Feedback
from
the
microphone could not be
adjusted without adequate
equipment but the sound
issues appeared to cease the
moment Fire Chess stepped
on stage. “No Guns” created
waves. He also spoke to the
audience saying “It‚s not a
hype thing”. His fans must be
pleased with his decision to
make Toronto his home. Fire
Star perhaps made his first
appearance in Toronto that
night and judging from the fire
in the upcoming star ∑he will
return. Otis I was also present
and his fans enjoyed the
popular “Youths Dem Nah
Hear”.
Gyptian emerged singing
“Serious
Times”.
The
audience sang louder than he
could. His fired-up audience
later
received
some
counseling when he spoke and
sang of his disapproval of men
“Troubling little school girls”.
The shy artist Toronto saw a
year ago no longer existed.
The ladies loved him and he
teased them with roaring
sounds
between
songs.
Gyptian’s
multi-hit
performance included “My
Father
Say”,
“Beautiful
Woman” and “Oh Mama”.
I Wayne took the show to
another level. He immediately
began schooling ladies with
“Dash Weh Nuh Belly Young
Girls”. The “Fire Soldier” had
the crowd at full attention
during his acappella sessions.
“Can’t Satisfy Her”, “Living In
Love” and many others had
the
crowd
singing
and
dancing. It is not surprising
that I Wayne introduced New
York’s popular Hip-Hop radio
station (Hot 97) to roots
reggae.
Everyone wants to
hear I Wayne and seeing him
live is a plus.
Besides the
lack of a band and Fire Lion’s
hostile performance (swearing
on stage), the show was
enjoyable. Action Promotion
must be commended for a fun,
peaceful, and entertaining
night.
JAMAICA DAY 2007
“THE
ROCK”
ROCKS
By Sweet Marie
Tanya Mullings
ndependent Promotions
Entertainment
Inc.,
promoters of The Annual
Jamaica Day Celebrations in
Toronto, Canada has done it
again
with
yet
another
successful staging of the 17th
Jamaica Day Celebration. As
Loague, Karen and Funky put
it, ‘The Rock’, one love for
‘The Rock’, standing together
as a community”.
I
The Jamaica Day vibes
were peace, love and a lot of
fun. Everyone were relaxing
and enjoying the activities and
diverse
performances
by
world acclaimed artists from
both Canada, Jamaica and
abroad. When special guest
Sanchez from Jamaica graced
the stage belting out hit after
hit the crowd went wild. All
through his performance the
audience cheered and raised
flags for more and more of
Sanchez, they couldn’t get
enough of him. The goodlooking
romanticist
passionately
pleased
his
audience, who did not want to
see him leave the stage. Ernie
Smith, a veteran to the reggae
(Continued on page 25)
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexlusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 10
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S INTERVIEW
right?
Prophecy’s Buba: Yes, we
play for many other artists
when Capleton isn’t touring.
PROPHECY CAPLETON’S
OFFICIAL BAND
REASONS WITH
REGGAEXCLUSIVE
Story/Photo by Iyamtheiah
apleton’s
Prophecy
Band blessed us with a
solid reasoning about the
music industry. Two of the
four members were available.
It was like being in Jamaica
under a coconut tree by the
river with ancient Rastaman.
C
R.X: Blessed love. Thanks
for taking the time out for
ReggaeXclusive. Welcome to
Toronto
again.
Please
introduce yourselves.
Prophecy’s
Iyakimo:
Blessed.
Give
thanks.
Prophecy is Capleton’s official
band. My name is Iyakimo
A.K.A Israel.
Prophecy’s Buba:
I am
Buba the bass player.
R.X: Give us the history of
the band. How long has it
been since the four-piece
started playing out?
Buba:
Prophecy’s
Prophecy started specifically
for Capleton as a backing
band and we’ve been coming
to Toronto with him for more
than 9 years now. Prior to that
we had different members and
were
called
The
Roots
Explosion.
R.X:
So
you
play
exclusively for Capleton?
Prophecy’s Buba: We play
for other artists too like Cocoa
T and Gregory Isaacs, most
Jamaican artists really.
R.X: Capleton doesn’t use
another band though so when
he’s touring Prophecy is
committed to him.
Is that
R.X: Let’s talk about the
music industry. How do you
view the international reggae
scene?
Prophecy’s Buba: Ah just
global
love
from
the
international scene.
We’ve
toured around the world and
it’s just love everywhere.
How do you feel
R.X:
about the influence of modern
technology in the music
industry?
For example,
nowadays artists sometimes
work without live bands.
There
is
a
lot
more
computerized sound. How do
you think that affects reggae
music?
Prophecy’s Iyakimo: The
way I feel about the live thing,
man use tracks and all those
things but I think the people
full-joy the live band more
than the tracks because of the
natural energy.
You know
together we stand and united
we get a stronger force. The
people love the live band. The
people full-joy the live music
more. Everywhere we go they
welcome us.
So it doesn’t
really affect us.
R.X: What about pirating
the music? Many people own
CD/DVD burners.
Statistics
show that reggae sales are
impacted more than other
genres. What are your views
on this matter?
Prophecy’s Iyakimo: Don’t
feel dismayed about that. Life
still remains life and the
computer remains computer.
This is life and whatever
manifests in this life is life,
you understand, whether it’s
evil
or
righteousness.
Computer can’t get out life.
The devil comes trying to take
out life. It’s not just about the
music because the message
have to come through the
vessel that the Almighty bless
him with. Things have to get
back to the roots so the
message comes into the music
but it comes from an ancient
time. Everything has to take
back its course. So when you
make a CD and a man burn it
and sell it then get all the
money and you don’t even
make any, remember the
message have to get through.
Prophecy’s Buba: Yeah the
message has to go cross. We
can’t stop it.
Prophecy’s Iyakimo: So I
don’t feel any way about that.
The message is life and when
you understand life you don’t
really worry about that still.
R.X: In terms of content
(lyrics) where do you see the
music industry heading?
Prophecy’s Iyakimo: You
see this year 2007 is
perfection. Whosoever is not
dealing with righteousness
this year whether artist or
musician will get weed out.
Like I come and talk to the
brethren who put on this show
and he showed me that the
hip-hop artists are getting a
beating now. That is because
of how they are trying to
broadcast an evil mentality,
gun lyrics and degrading the
female gender. That has to get
weed out because whosoever
not dealing with righteousness
in these times I am sorry for
them. Everything has to get
back to reality; and when we
speak we speak biblically also
because the bible says that
you must sing a new song and
that
mean
songs
of
deliverance. What are songs
of deliverance? Something to
save
the
nations
you
understand me? Only a few
people understand what it
means and it’s a few who even
read. Some don’t know; so
whosoever don’t know will
face their judgment too ‘cause
I and I know that we have to
sing songs of deliverance.
Whosoever jumping up out
there thinking this is a money
thing should know it’s not
about money. It’s a work and
you are a messenger as
Luciano would say. You are a
messenger for The Most High
Jah Rastafari. So your duty on
this domain here is to make
sure that Rasta children eat
right and live right – loving
their brothers and sisters. So
when some men come and
jump into the music business
and talk lots of things, make
lots of money and bank it all
for himself - Judgment!
But then, we can teach
them too because we know
they don’t know. Music is the
biggest influence in the world
now spoiling people on a wide
scale especially we Israelites
or we can say Jamaicans or
Ethiopians in Jamaica. Plenty
judgment is on our heads. The
few warriors that know see it
like I. I sing you know, and I
write I tunes too. I’m stepping
out this year with my lyrics so
when you hear of Iyakimo you
will remember it was I talking
to you. If we sing to please
ourselves Rasta say woe to the
leaders who lead the children
astray. Jah will judge you with
fire. So many are just trying to
get rich and mighty but within
this domain that’s all they can
do. We don’t work for the
fame of men because men
can’t please us.
We do the
works of the Almighty. As a
Rasta sister you know the
heavens so it’s just clean livity.
RX: Thank you. Would you
like to add anything to that
Buba?
Prophecy’s Iyakimo: Yes.
The gangster thing isn’t
working out. We have to keep
the music positive. Many
artists are singing about who
should die, guns and teaching
the youth gangster messages.
That is all violence. Reggae
music is about teaching and
uplifting the people. Even in
Jamaica the gangster life is
coming across but I trod many
places in the earth and know
that the people really want to
hear positive messages. Even
you as a writer for the
magazine should write reality
in reference to The Most High.
You have to let them know to
put out clean lyrics.
The
entire music fraternity should
have the right message
carrying a right vibration and
right spiritual energy to the
nation in order for things to be
in harmony with creation.
(We’ll touch the clothing
industry another time). Live to
please Rastafari.
It’s not
about us ‘cause we didn’t
make ourselves. The Almighty
made us and placed us here
for a reason: to do his works.
(Continued on page 25)
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 11
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S PROMOTER SPOTLIGHT
He promoted his first dance at
Duhaney Park in Jamaica
where sounds like Love
Vibration played. With Mr.
Action’s background, and
friends like Tumpa Lion,
Simpleton, Pan Head, Ronnie
Twate, Admiral Bailey, Singing
Sweet, Roundhead, Power
Man, Johnny P, Capleton, Baby
Wayne and Penny Irie, no
wonder being able to promote
remains one of his greatest
pleasure. His other interest
used to include making tunes
in Penthouse studio with
Cleavy and Steely.
ERIC MORGAN OF
ACTION
PROMOTION
Promoter
ction Promotion has
being hailed as one of
the most popular promoters in
the dancehall industry with
over 11 years of experience in
the business. Mr. Action
learned the music business at
a very early age, when it all
started back in 1986 while he
was still living in Jamaica,
under the promotional name
and record label “Bammer”.
A
During the summer of “95,
Action Promotion did a BBQ
featuring sounds like Military
& Glamatone at Fresh Way
Drive. This was the first of
many. In ‘98, a stage show
called “Heads High” featuring
Vegas and Sean Paul at
Connections Nightclub, the
first ever promoter to bring
Sean Paul to Canada. In 2000
he brought Super Cat to the
Base Nightclub. In 2001, a
dance called “Link up in the
West” featuring David Rodigan
at the Base Nightclub. The
same year he did a dance
called “Stop the Violence”
featuring Tony Matterhorn to
open the dancing industry so
that people could feel safe
again in dancehall.
In
2002,
Mr.
Action
promoted his first “Lock De
City” dance and Black-O-BBQ
& Picnic which became a year
to year event, with a past
history of a variety of sounds
taking part including: Stone
Love, Tony Matterhorn, Bass
Odyssey, Black Chiney and
Cash Money. The same year
that he started Lock De City,
Mr.
Action
was
also
responsible for “Road to World
Clash that occurred at the
Base Nightclub where Rebel
Tone was crowned the winner,
the first sound from Canada to
enter the world clash in New
York City and bring home the
championship. In 2003, Mr.
Action
promoted
Bass
Odyssey and Mighty Crown in
a dance called “Two World
Champion”. In 2004 Mr. Action
brought Capleton, Mad Cobra,
and Assassin together in a
concert called “Heat” at the
Five Star Banquet Hall.
with Vibrant Promotion. Not to
mention in 2005, his “Reign of
Fire” tour with Capleton, along
with Jah Thunda and Military
Man, which occurred at the
Kool Haus and Mr. Action’s
10th
year
anniversary
featuring Beenie Man which
occurred at the Kool Haus. In
2006 he had Baby Cham live in
concert at Zone 1 Nightclub,
also in the same year he had
Morgan Heritage live in
concert at the Kool Haus and
the
Toronto
International
Cultural Reggae Festival with
George Nooks and Ja Melody.
Finally in 2006, Mr. Action’s
11th and Caveman’s 31st
Anniversary with Turbulence,
Natural Blacks, Fantan Mojah
and Ninja Ford at Zone 1
Nightclub. Then in July 2007
he had Gyptian meet I-Wayne
inside the Jamaican Canadian
Association. Mr. Action wants
to thank all of his supporters
who have supported his
events for over the past 11
years. Stay tuned for Mr.
Action’s 12th and Caveman’s
32nd
Anniversary
event
coming in December 2007.
Mr. Action has other
interests like “Pink N Jeans”,
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S ARTIST SPOTLIGHT
JANAYA ELLIS
“Feel Like Smiling”
anaya “Sista J” Ellis has
long been involved in
music. Trained classically on
piano for 17 years, Janaya had
a
good
foundation
for
branching out. Raised in a
musical family, she also played
flute, drums, and steel pan. At
8, she was an original member
of Edmonton’s first steel
orchestra, TRIN CAN. Janaya
began studying keyboards in
jazz-drenched Grant MacEwan
J
College. From there, her love
of Jamaican and African
beats, along with her West
Indian roots, influenced her
artistic direction. She has
played with Caribbean bands
like RISASA, TROPICANO’s,
EXODUS, and HARMONICS
band in Florida.
She has
toured the State of Florida
with St Kitts’ LORD SAINT.
She performed in 1999 at
Moonsplash in Anguilla, BWI.
Sista
J
composes,
produces, plays bass guitar,
keys, and is the lead singer in
SOULJAH FYAH, an Edmontonbased reggae band. She is the
leader, manager, and promoter
for SOULJAH FYAH, and the
band has had excellent
success
in
becoming
Edmonton’s leading reggae
action.
Playing everywhere
from the Sidetrack Café to the
amazing Winspear, the band
has rootical energy with wide
spread appeal.
Sista J is also working on a
solo project, produced by Ibo
from Nevis (of Kindread band).
In 2003 she returned from
Nevis, St.Kitts, and St Martin
promoting this project. The
response to the first single
“Feel Like Smiling” has been
overwhelming. SOULJAH FYAH
released the debut LP in 2004,
and it is available at all local
record stores in Edmonton, on
line at Souljahfyah.com, and is
available on order at HMV,
Chapters, and Indigo.
Purchase 1,000 Pressed Retail Ready
CDs from DBSduplication.com and get
a free “u-tube” video of your band
Details at
www.freevideo.dbsduplication.com
416-693-9413
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 12
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S BAND/GROUP SPOTLIGHT
SOULJAH FYAH
he top drawer of
Alberta talent! . . .
Lionel Rault, CKUA host of the
Nine to Noon show “Souljah Fyah showed up
in top form, inspirational
leader Janaya Ellis setting the
room on fire with her heartfelt
T
presence and constant call
for positive action. Ellis’ tiny
frame practically raised from
the ground, glowing as her
wild,
dreadlocked
mane
spiraled around her head,
following the beat. As the
night went on and sweat
poured from every pore,
Souljah Fyah solidified their
reputation as one of the most
dedicated and beloved local
acts around . . . the supreme
leaders of Edmonton’s reggae
scene.”
See
Magazine.
January 12, 2006
Edmonton group Souljah
Fyah is part of the changing of
the reggae guard in a number
of ways . . . Shereen Tuomi,
2005 Calgary Reggae Festival
preview
“If Janaya Ellis ever
decided to enter Canadian
Idol, she’d annihilate the
competition . . . “ Sandra
Sperounes – The Edmonton
Journal – July 24, 2003
Souljah Fyah is a reggae
band from Edmonton, Alberta,
with members hailing from all
around the globe.
A
bombastic live vibe and
meaningful lyrical content
make for a mystical musical
trans-sperience.
Front woman Sista J’s
single entitled “Feel like
Smiling” is featured on the
soon
to
be
released
compilation CD by Smokey
Room Productions. This CD
will feature many other great
Canadian Reggae artistes,
both male and female.
Souljah
Fyah’s
“Abundance
of
Good”
appears on history’s first
Canadian
Reggae
compilation, released in July
2007 by Canadian Reggae
World. Souljah Fyah will be
releasing “Truth Will Reveal”
summer 2007produced by
IBO.
Contact:
www.souljahfyah.com or call:
780-479-5265.
REGGAEXCLUSIVE “LIVE SHOW” REVIEWS
Causion
CALGARY
REGGAEFEST 007
Photo & Article by Lisa Connors
hat should have been
a joyous day for
Reggae fans in Calgary,
instead turned out to be a
very sad one. The fourth
annual Calgary International
Reggae Festival was just
about to get underway when
received
its
organizers
devastating news. Calgary’s
own Ibo and KinDread were in
a serious car crash while en
route to Calgary to perform at
Reggaefest 007. Long time
brethrens and band mates Ibo
and Yardie sustained critical
injuries. Chris and Robbie,
two of four musicians on tour
with
Ibo
and
KinDread
W
sustained serious injuries.
The other two musicians,
Culture Brown and Juan
fortunately escaped the crash
with only minor injuries. The
cause of the accident is yet
unknown.
The news of the accident
was
announced
at
the
Festival. Although the park
was filled with families,
friends, and great Reggae
music,
the
mood
was
definitely a somber one.
There was a deep sense of
sadness as well as a deep
sense of hope that our
brothers would pull through.
The Reggae community in
Calgary came together much
like a family, and held each
other up with love and
support to get through this
very difficult day.
Errol Blackwood
Reggae music, being as
spiritually uplifting as it is
helped to elevate the minds
and hearts of those at
Reggaefest. All acts were in
top form and did their best to
keep spirits high. Abijah, Dub
Station, Tanya Mullings and
Richie Stephens gave some
outstanding performances.
The
most
memorable
performances were those
from Causion and Kirk Davis
who both dedicated songs to
our brothers. Causion sang a
heartfelt song entitled “One
Life to Live” which the
audience loved. Kirk Davis
sang “One more chance”
beautifully, while Culture
Brown jumped and waved his
flag in celebration of life and
of love for his brothers.
At this time, two weeks
after the accident, Chris,
Robbie
and
Yardie’s
conditions are all improving.
Ibo is recovering slowly due to
the severity of his injuries.
Our thoughts and prayers are
with them and their families.
May Jah Bless them all.
TOK IN CONCERT
Photo and article by: Halina T. DiLallo - Photo Journalist, Calgary,
Alberta, Canada
fter a full day of
Carifest events held at
A
Princes Island Park, the party
goers continued well into the
wee hours of the morning.
Tunda
Clap
Promotions
presented a full night of non
stop entertainment at Lady
Fatima Hall on Saturday June
16th. Calgary rappers, “Vex
Cobo” and “King Khan”
opened the show, followed by
“Shayne Bailey” direct from
Trinidad who was promoting
her new single “Leggo Meh
Man”; keep an eye out for this
“hot” performer!
During
breaks, DJ’s “Black Emperor”,
“Nu-Tek” and “Jamsta J” kept
pumping out the vibes.
When “Rupee” (direct from
St. Thomas, Barbados) hit the
stage the crowd went wild!
What a stellar performance,
singing hit after hit including
“Tempted to Touch” and
“Jump”. After a short break
“TOK” stepped on stage when
the mass just rushed to the
front. This Dancehall Quartet
of four young men exceeded
my expectations.
What an
exceptional group.
They
performed one song after the
other, including my favourites
“Chi
Chi
Man”
and
“Footprints”.
This was
certainly an evening to
remember.
For more information on
upcoming events, check out:
www:tundaclap.com
and
Calgary Dancehall.com.
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www./reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 13
416-656-7926 or 416-656-7756
& PA SYSTEM
www.studioquality.net
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S “LIVE-SHOW” REVIEW
THE DYNAMIC DUO
"SLY & ROBBIE"
Editorial and photo by
Halina T. Di-Lallo
Cherine
Anderson
n Sunday August 19th,
Deep Entertainment
Social Club showcased the
legendary "Sly & Robbie"
better known in the industry
as the "Riddim Twins" at
Quincy's on 7th in Calgary.
O
Back in the mid 70's, these
two youths had already
become established figures
on the Jamaican scene, Sly as
a drummer and Robbie on
bass. They merged together
and formed a rhythmic drum
and bass partnership, and "Sly
& Robbie" was born! Back in
the day, the duo literally lived
off only bread and water while
on a world tour with Peter
Tosh in order to save up
enough money to start their
label.
After the tour, Taxi
Productions was launched
featuring the breakthrough of
Black Uhuru.
Nobody could accuse them
of taking things easy as
Drummer Lowell "Sly" Dunbar
and
bassist
Robbie
have
been
Shakespeare
pioneers in reggae music for
decades with legions of loyal
fans worldwide and they are
still going strong.
Their
riddims have been the driving
force behind countless songs
and it is estimated that
together they've played on
approximately 200,000 tracks,
and that does not include
remixes, versions, or dubs.
Sunday's showcase in
Calgary was one of their stops
on their North American Tour
featured the Taxi Gang,
highlighting Jamaica's Rising
Star "Cherine Anderson".
The
legendary
riddim
section took to the stage
around 10:00 p.m. With every
instrument playing their part,
keyboards, saxophone, and
trombone comprising the rest
of the backing band, Sly and
Robbie took the crowd from
one mood to another with
ease, with playful keyboards,
or with killer bass riddims that
echoed into your bones. They
hit the crowd with classic
riddim after riddim from their
extensive repertoire.
While Sly and Robbie took
care of the drum and bass,
guest
singer
Cherine
Anderson stepped on stage to
accompany
the
reggae
legends.
Cherine calls her
music "Dancehall Soul: a
mixture of reggae dancehall,
soul, R&B and a little Lover‚s
Rock". She says that "behind
the beat is a message, it
incorporates the grittiness of
my past with the sweetness of
things I've been exposed to".
This
highly
educated,
intelligent
young
lady
possesses so many qualities;
she has a superb voice, is an
actress and a songwriter. Her
stage
performance
was
outstanding. Keep an eye out
for this multi-talented lady.
The show finished at 11:30
p.m. with patrons calling out
for more for several minutes.
Even though an encore was
not to be, all the artists
mingled with the audience
signing autographs. Although
the venue was not filled to
capacity, the enthusiasm of
the crowd was certainly high.
Link with Sly & Robbie and
Cherine Anderson on their
sites on My Space Music for
their upcoming events and
news.
POP UP
EXCO LEVI will be going to
Jamaica for CureFest 2007.
He recently won an Award at
the 2007 Reggae Achievement
Awards
and
has
been
performing
at
numerous
shows during the Summer.
Look out for Exco Levi.
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg-14
be a part of the destiny...
Excellent Album, Nice Mix of Roots, Rockers, Rub-a-Dub & Lover’s Rock
Now Available on Itunes, Napster, Rhapsody, MSN, Music Match, Puretrackers
and many other outlets near you.
For more info/contact/inquiries: www.myspace.com/michaelthompsonvisionary
or [email protected] 416-315-2952
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg-15
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S “LIVE SHOW” REVIEWS
the lead vocal and plays
rhythm guitar entertained the
crowd when she played the
Didgeridoo. The venue was
held at the Tropicana Bar &
Grill, Marda Loop, Calgary.
Check out all artists on My
Space
Music
for
more
information.
Culture
Brown
CANADA DAY
“REGGAE STYLE”
Donna
Makeda
Photos and article by: Halina T.
Di-Lallo - Photo Journalist
(Calgary, AB, Canada)
he “Sweet Like a Sugar
Tour 07” which covers
one end of Canada to the
other, gave Calgary fans a
Canada Day to remember reggae style. Smokey Room
Productions presented IBO &
KinDread
featuring
from
Jamaica,
cultural
Deejay
“Culture Brown” who is
promoting his new single
“Strong & Bless”. The multi
talented “Five Star Affair”
band who play a mixture of
funk, ska and rock opened the
show. Tristin Chanel who is
T
RASTAFEST 2007
IN REVIEW
By Lisa Connors
t was time to wave the
ites, green and gold
banner once again when
Masani Productions presented
Rastafest 2007.
This longstanding festival started out
as Cuture Jam back in 1985
and has since evolved into a
I
four-day celebration of Rasta
culture.
Events including
workshops, seminars, plays,
arts and crafts exhibits, family
fun day, and the main event
"Back By Popular Demand"
gave the city of Toronto the
very best of Rasta vibes!
"Back
By
Popular
Demand" held at the Jamaican
Canadian Centre on July 19th,
was an evening of positivity,
true Rasta livity, including no
sale
of
alcohol,
and
edutainment, music with a
message! It all got underway
with a Rasta fashion show
featuring D. Grant Customized
Knitwear, African Bloodline
and Zin Zen Collection. All
lines were impressive, and
could hold their own on any
International runway!
The
evening continued with a host
of talented artistes including
Steele who sang a soulstirring rendition of "Slave
Driver" that would have made
Bob himself proud! Culture
Queen, Donna Makeda was
first to get the crowd to its
feet performing tunes like
"Hold On" and "Come Into My
GIVE THANKS AND
PRAISE CONCERT
SERIES
yric
Music
Group
presents Sizzla Kalonji,
Munga Honorable and Marlon
Asher on Friday October 5th,
2007 inside the Koolhaus,
Toronto and on Saturday
October 6th, 2007 inside Club
Nemesis
in
Brantford,
Ontario.
L
Canadian reggae fans are
in for a special treat on
Thanksgiving
Weekend.
Sizzla Kalonji (Reggae Icon),
Munga Honorable (Bad Form
Mi Born) and Marlon Asher
(Ganja Farmer) in one concert.
This could be the biggest
reggae concert Canada has
ever seen in recent history. It
is rare for Canadian reggae
fans to watch three reggae
artists of this magnitude in
one concert, on one stage.
Munga Honorable blazed
his way into super-stardom
Life"
(alongside
Prince
Everald) in high spirits.
Iwayne caused a frenzy when
he burst on stage for a
surprise appearance! Queen
Ifrica wowed the crowd as she
commanded the stage with
power and grace. Headliner
Tony Rebel put on a scorcher
of a performance, firing off
hits like "Fresh Vegetable",
"Know Jah" and many more.
Rebel closed the show with
Rasta anthem "Jah Is Standing
By My Side". What an upfull
night!
"Family Fun Day" took
place at York University on
Saturday, July 21st.
The
afternoon featured several
great performances by artistes
such as Prince Everald, Cherry
Natural, Trinity Drummers,
Mutabaruka and many more.
The event was well attended
and much enjoyed. Rastafest
2007 wrapped up on Sunday,
July 22nd with plays "Youth
Revolution" and "Curse Of
Ham". Big Thanks and raspect
to Masani Montague and all
who helped to make these
blessed events possible.
faster than any other reggae
artist in the last ten years.
With his crossover Reggae
and Rap style, some are
already calling him the next
reggae superstar.
Over the last ten years
Sizzla Kalonji has given us hit
after hit.
A show of this
magnitude can only bring out
another
legendary
performance! With over 40
albums to his credit it’s no
surprise why some call Sizzla
Kalonji “DADA the King”.
Not to be outdone is
Trinidadian Superstar Marlon
Asher with hits like Ganja
Famer and his latest hit
Shorty. He is a living legend in
his own right. Perhaps this
tour’s
name
should
be
changed from “The Give
Thanks and Praise Tour” to
“Tour of Legends”.
I Have only one thing to say
about this show and that is
that YOU BETTER BUY YOUR
TICKETS EARLY!!!
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 16
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S INTERVIEW
five hundred thousand people
I personally think that you
have a responsibility to at
least bring a message.
“FYAH MUMMA”
QUEEN IFRICA AT
RASTAFEST 2007
Article & Photo by Lisa Connors
eggaeX:
Greetings
Queen Ifrica. Thank you
for the beautiful show you just
gave us at Rastafest 2007. The
way you command the stage is
just unbelievable, seeing you
in person is like larger than
life!
Queen Ifrica: Give Thanks!
R
ReggaeX: How do you like
Canada?
Queen Ifrica: So far it’s like
as Rasta I n’ I have to come
together now wherever we are
in the world. When we are
doing Rasta functions like this
we put all the efforts around
making sure that people come
here and the message goes
out.
I n’ I are already
convinced. We done love it
already so we just bring in the
outsiders to come see the
glory of Rastafari. Who love it
ah go deh yah, which is I n’ I.
ReggaeX: I understand you
are more than a recording
artiste; you are also very
involved in community issues
in Jamaica, speaking out
against gun violence.
Queen Ifrica: That is why I
am so passionate about it
because it is not just about
going up on stage and making
people ‘wine’ up themselves.
But it’s about having the
responsibly of making sure
you leave a message. Singers
and players of instruments
have a serious role to play.
When you go on a stage and
you stand in front of one or
ReggaeX: That is definitely
what you are getting across.
You are using your music for
humanitarian works.
Queen Ifrica: That is the
word! That is exactly it. The
community work that we do in
Jamaica, the organization is
called
Committee
for
Community and it consists of
myself, Tony Rebel, Luciano,
an entertainment lawyer, a
social worker, and a few
others. We have a vital role
together to go into the
communities to take out the
rivalling gang members from
each side and sit them at a
conference table. We sit in
the middle as mediators and
have them discuss what they
are fighting about, and how we
can come about getting some
solutions.
ReggaeX: The situation
seems to be a volatile one. It’s
a brave act for you to get in
the middle of it.
Queen Ifrica: It’s not as
volatile as you may think. The
problems that we have in
Jamaica are concentrated in
specific areas but for some
reason you have people in the
media who put it on the
Internet as if the entire Island
is at war. Trust me if you have
never
been
there,
it’s
wonderful,
Kingston
is
wonderful
you
can
go
anywhere, safely.
ReggaeX: Yes I did go to
Kingston, safely.
Queen Ifrica: Safely, you
know!
There is a stigma.
There will always be enemies
that don’t want to see the
country rise for some reason
or another but we are there as
a reminder that good is there.
Good and evil is everywhere.
ReggaeX: Are you seeing
the results for your efforts that
you are looking for?
Queen Ifrica: Yes. What we
find is that it’s a lack of love,
that’s
a
reminder
that
something’s wrong.
These
youths are very young and
when we embrace them and
go to their hearts, we go to
their conscience. We don’t
make promises to them, we
don’t promise to buy them
anything
or
take
them
anywhere. We just let them
know that police will not ask
you any questions. They will
just kill you. We as a
committee, if the police
should
arrest
somebody
wrongfully what we do is
provide a lawyer to defend
them, to get bail. We make
them promise that if we are to
defend them they must stay in
accordance with the law. We
don’t defend the wrong in
what they do.
just entertainment. It’s far
from just entertainment. It
makes you stop and listen and
say yes I’m going to go out
there and do something.
Queen Ifrica: Yeah man,
that’s the mission.
ReggaeX: If people want to
help
out
with
your
organization, what can they
do? Check your website?
Queen
Ifrica:
Yes,
sometimes people do free
shows and then we split the
money
amongst
the
communities for things like
going back to school, for
people who want to do
something positive.
ReggaeX:
You
are
a
revolutionary and so is your
music.
Queen Ifrica: Yeah man,
give thanks. I intend to stick
to it.
ReggaeX: Your message is
making its way around the
world now that you are
touring, and travelling. You
came on to the scene around
‘95 and you have just
blossomed from there.
Queen Ifrica: Yes, because
we believe in growing. We
don’t
believe
in
mass
production. We believe in
organic growth, timely. Cause
you can’t build a house by
foundation alone.
ReggaeX: I’m sure you are
getting a good reception
everywhere you go. Do you
have
any
favourite
destinations?
Queen Ifrica:
No.
My
favourite would be Africa and I
haven’t reached there as yet.
I’m on my way there. I look
forward to experiencing that.
ReggaeX: Fyah Muma is
doing well there too, and also
globally.
Queen Ifrica: Yes and I
really give thanks for that. The
real message of that album
was to put myself in it. To say
yes we have problems but let
us find solutions.
ReggaeX: Your music is not
ReggaeX: The mission is
accomplished!
Queen Ifrica: Yeah man,
definitely.
It’s a serious
energy. We are very true to it.
I don’t preach sexist war or
division.
I preach balance.
Come together and meditate
to find solutions to the
problems.
ReggaeX: How are you able
to find a balance between
being a mother, a musician
and an activist?
Queen Ifrica: A good family
unit comes in right there. I
have a very great family unit
that creates that comfort,
always checking in with me.
As soon as I get to Jamaica
everybody is with me.
ReggaeX: Then you have
your extended family, your
musical family with people like
Tony Rebel.
Queen Ifrica: I give thanks.
I can’t say enough about Tony
Rebel. He is such a selfless
individual. He has come into
the business and he has been
Rasta before he came in like
myself, and he has done 100%
cultural music. I give thanks
to the Most High for his
support
and
Flames
Productions camp. It is not
necessarily about making the
money but spreading the
message.
We give thanks
every time. Edutainment is
what we say. We give thanks
for people like John Legend
who says “Imagine the world
with love”.
We strongly
believe that good over evil will
be the ultimate force, so we
stay close to that.
ReggaeX: Thank you Queen
Ifrica. God Bless.
Queen Ifrica: Give thanks,
same to you.
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 17
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S GOSPEL SPOTLIGHT
“BREAKTHROUGH”
SHINES FOR NANA
AT THE 2007 MAJA
GOSPEL AWARDS
Photo by Eddie Grant
amaican-born, Toronto
based songbird Nana
McLean has been on the
Reggae Music scene for more
than two decades and has
captured the hearts of many.
This year, at the Annual Maja
Gospel Awards, Nana walked
away with three awards, she
was nominated for six. The
awards she won are “Female
Artist
of
the
Year”,
“Reggae/Soca Performer of
the Year” and “Album of the
Year”.
J
Nana's career has been
littered
with
numerous
awards,
nominations,
presentations and recognition
from such organizations as the
Canadian
Black
Music
Association and the Canadian
JUNO Awards.
Her album
“Nana McLean - Collector’s
Series, produced by Jamaican
‘ace’ Donovan Jermaine, won
the 1997 JUNO for Best
Reggae Recording. Nana's 90minute world premiere concert
on Bravo television is a regular
repeat programme.
Since her entry to the
reggae music industry many
years ago, Nana has not
slowed down. With numerous
singles and albums, Nana
continues to shine and inspire
many with her music. Nana is
a first class performer, a
powerful, emotional balladeer,
and a classic reggae singer
with a bluesy R&B style. She
is now a born-again Christian
singing for the Lord and
writing and recording Gospel
songs. More blessings to you
Queen Nana, much respect.
airwaves both locally and
internationally.
Boasting 14
original tracks out of 15
"Parables" is a respectable
achievement for this young
artiste. The album is currently
being distributed by VP
records.
TAURUS RILEY
“Beware”
ot even ten chariots
with horses can stop
this new Reggae voice on the
scene. No, it's not a novelty
act, but one that is destined
for legendary status. A natural
man of superb talent has risen
like a Phoenix, some would say
"its Jah will". The singer who
gave us "Larger than Life" and
"Barber Chair" on his first
album "Challenges" on the
Yaman Label is back at it, and
even better than before. The
introduction of his 15-track
album 'Parables' produced
under Dean Frazer's Canon
Production was launched in
the heat of his career. Fans
were
introduced
to
the
musical shooter as they saw
how well he used words
emphatically. "Beware" is one
track that is conscious and
well received across the
N
The name Taurus Riley
originated from him being
ruled under the sign Taurus
and the style he first came on
the scene with, his friends
said he fired musical shots
with the fast pace that he
would deejay, both were
combined hence the name
Taurus Riley. The new musical
sensation got hands on
experience from his dad
Jimmy Riley who is a veteran
in the music fraternity, he said
that life was always in the
studio and traveling with his
dad and so he was exposed to
the music and to other
veterans which he looks up to
such as Beres Hammond and
instrumentalist Dean Frazer.
Taurus expresses the love and
respect he has been receiving
from his fans, throughout all
his
recognition
and
achievements he maintains his
goal in music, which is not to
preach to people but to uplift
youths and to increase peace
and love in societies.
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 18
REGGAEXCLUSIVE SINGERS SPOTLIGHT
some of his musical mentors.
Marlon feels that reggae
touches his soul and he wants
to communicate that extension
of spiritual soulfulness with
the world. A gifted musician,
Marlon
teaches
musical
arrangement of the steel pan,
the national instrument of
Trinidad and Tobago, to young
enthusiasts with an average
age range of 7-17 years old.
MARLON ASHER
“Ganja Farmer”
arlon Asher, a native
Trinidadian
started
singing at the age of seven in
the choir of his grandparent’s
church. The name “Asher” was
derived from the 12 tribes of
Israel and “Asher” is the tribe
which represents December
and the Spirit of Christ. His
musical style is that of a
conscious reggae artist and he
cites Bob Marley, Dennis
Brown and Barrington Levy as
M
Marlon Asher’s talent and
ingenuity was revealed with
the release of the song “Ganja
Farmer” which became a huge
hit via aggressive underground
marketing. The song “Ganja
Farmer” was derived from an
older selection named “Ganja
Man”, which was also written
by Asher. Asher maintains that
he is not a ganja farmer and
that the song does not
promote the cultivation or use
of the illegal substance.
However, he hopes to create
awareness for the work that
farmers do, and to be mindful
that regardless of their crop,
destroying any farm takes
away someone’s livelihood.
has
been
Marlon
performing
throughout
Trinidad and Tobago, the
Caribbean as well as the
United States. He has taken
the stage amongst renowned
performers such as Damien
“Jr. Gong” Marley, Beenie
Man, Shaggy, Maxi Priest,
Sizzla and even R&B sensation
Boys II Men. Since his debut
in the United States at Reggae
Carifest in July 2005, Marlon
has
been
performing
extensively in the Tri-State
area as well as in Miami,
Toronto, Baltimore, Boston,
Virginia and in 2006 he
performed his music in Europe
as well as Japan and Africa.
Asher feels that he has
been blessed and his future is
one that will involve him
singing. He said “God has his
plans for me. I believe I am a
messenger here to deliver a
serious message. I am just
waiting for Him [God] to reveal
his message”. Asher has a
message for the youth: “your
talent should never go to
waste, with God all things are
possible. Pray hard and you
will succeed”.
Marlon’s
preview album was produced
by Carl “Beaver” Henderson in
Trinidad. He is co-managed by
brother and sister duo Geron
“Big G” Woodruffe and Anje
Woodruffe
of
Caribbean
Underground Productions.
With the success of the
“Ganja Farmer”, Marlon has
now released the love song “I
Love You” on the same riddim
and has been performing his
new tracks “Love of Jah”,
“Standing” and the title track
of the album “Locked out”.
The 45 is available at Music
Ambassador & Beat Street
records in Brooklyn, New York.
For
bookings/information:
[email protected]
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S INTERVIEW
stage. We’re always writing
new material. When we get
older we can sit back and say
which one is our favourite!
Photo by Lisa Connors
MORGAN HERITAGE
(Cont’d form page 8)
MCA and the first album.
Of all the albums you’ve done
for VP is there a particular
favourite?
PM:
Not
necessarily
because we were always
working on new albums when
three in one came out we were
already working on full circle
so we never really get a
chance to sit and listen to our
album and really burn it out in
our heads because once it’s
finished recording we start
rehearsing it for the stage and
that’s where we know our
music, on stage. The audience
and the fans know our records
better than we do! A lot of
times the songs we remember
are the ones we pick for the
LC: What was it like to do
the Vans Warped Tour in such
a non-Reggae environment
and would you do it again?
PM: Yeah man! It was a
different vibe. It was an eye
opener. You see reggae music,
rap music, you see punk music
and you say what kinda ting
dat! You don’t get a true
understanding of what it’s
about, but being out there for
eight weeks with 52 punk
bands and you’re the lone
standing Reggae band you
learn a lot. To see that 80% of
them on that tour are
vegetarians, they are very
conscious and socially aware.
Punk music is still like an
underground music almost
just like Reggae.
LC:
So there are some
parallels there.
PM: Yes a lot of parallels, a
lot of things that you can
compare the in two musics. It
was almost like we met
another side of our family.
Especially because of how
radical they are and the things
that they rebel against. Maybe
the music is a bit too hard and
aggressive
for
you
to
understand what they are
saying. All the bands couldn’t
wait for us to come on stage to
play some Reggae. We stood
out so much the first year they
called us back to do a second
year!
It
was
a
great
experience!
LC:
Your music is so
heavily inspired by Ras Tafari
and your lyrics are clearly
teachings. Do you hope to
inspire your listeners to learn
more about the faith through
your music?
PM: Yes definitely! The
faith is more than saying you
are
a
Rasta.
It
is
enlightenment in life. It is
being aware of yourself, of
what we were created for,
being a lover of all people. It is
a universal love in a divine
manner. It’s not to just say you
is just Rasta and all about
Haile Selassie and smoke
ganja, it’s more than that. It’s
about how you live with
people, how you entertain your
friends; how you entertain
people you don’t know. It goes
much further than words from
your mouth. What we hope our
fans get out of our music and
our lyrics is an inspiration on
how to live a better life more
than just an inspiration to say
yes I am a Rasta. The music is
not just to convert people to
Rastafarianism but to show
people that there is hope in
the world. There is love in the
world! Rasta is not to say it is
the lone Religion, because
who can tell the Father
Creator how to reveal himself
to different people? So we as
Rasta respect all people of all
faiths, all religions. We don’t
condemn other faiths and say
that one is right and that one
is wrong. The goal is to try
and live an upfull life.
LC: Why did you write the
song “Don’t Haffi Dread” and
was it controversial?
PM: Yes major controversy!
The true thing about that is I
didn’t have locks growing up
(Cont’d on page 20)
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www./reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 19
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT
REGGAEPLANET
.NET
he Reggae Version of
myspace and youtube
is finally here - reggaeplanet.net - October 4, 2007. Be
a part of history as we unveil
the new look.
T
ReggaePlanet.net is where
you can rep your music, your
colors and your culture. Set
up a page and claim your
space while meeting others
who share the same passions
as you.
a fan, make reggaeplanet.net
your home. Take advantage
of you free web page with
you own url before all the
names are taken up - reggaeplanet.net/bobmarley
Watch the latest music
videos or watch other members videos. Share your
favorite music with others or
listen our 24 hour radio and
much much more! If you love
reggae music then reggaeplanet.net is for you.
On October 4, 2007 a new
era in reggae music will
begin! Reggaeplanet.net
If you are an artist or just
MORGAN HERITAGE
(Cont’d. from page 19
and from the day I born all
I know is Rasta, me grow up
inna
Twelve
Tribe,
and
amongst Binghi and the
teachings in my household
was Ras Tafari and I didn’t
have locks until 1997-98 so all
my years going through school
I wore my hair braided, I didn’t
cut my hair, my other brothers
cut their hair but how you
adorn yourself doesn’t tell us
who you are. Some people
want to be part of a fashion
and adorn themselves that
way. Haile Selassie the First
was the first Rataman and he
did’t tell anyone to be a part of
the movement you have to
wear locks. The whole lock
wearing is from an ancient
time. Locks in this day and
mean
time
don’t
really
anything to anyone except the
person who is wearing it.
Rasta is more than just that.
LC:
How much of your
lyrics are drawn from personal
experience?
For example
what about that song “Gnats
Groupie” talking about a
groupie robbing you?
PM: Well that in particular
didn’t happen to us but it
happened to another artist
that was staying in the same
hotel as us. It was a very
popular RnB artiste. All of our
lyrics are personal in the
sense that it might not have
happened to us, just personal
in that it could happen to any
man or any woman. We don’t
like to write fantasy songs.
LC: There seems to me to
be a bit of a Peter Tosh vibe to
some of your music. Some of
the heavy guitar riffs and some
of the vocals. Is this just a
coincidence?
PM: Well voices do sound
similar. Gramps has a very
close tone to Peter Tosh
himself. The music itself is
more than reggae because we
incorporate our music with
Rock and RnB music because
of our style of singing. We
never learned to sing by
singing reggae music. Our
whole development in singing
was based on RnB and
American Gospel music so all
of that creates a different
sound and a different style. We
can relate our music to Bob
Marley, Peter Tosh, Jacob
Miller and all the veterans.
And at the same time to the
RnB acts like Stevie Wonder,
and Michael Jackson because
these are the artistes we
listened to growing up.
LC: Do any of you have any
solo projects in the works?
PM: Yes, Mr. Mojo is
working on a solo project.
We're very excited about that.
It’s very different. Everyone
knows that Mr. Mojo Raps and
he sings and there is more to
him than what comes across
in Morgan Heritage and in
doing his solo project its not to
sound like Morgan Heritage its
for the fans and the lovers of
MH and new fans who will be
attracted to his music to
realize that there will be a
Ras Ibo & Janaya Ellis hanging out. Ras Ibo was recently involved in a
very serious accident in Calgary, AB. The staff of ReggaeXclusive
wishes you Jah-speed, get well soon my brother.
deeper dimension to everyone
in this group. When we’re
working as a collective body
everyone has to be on the
same page and share the
same view to deliver a
oneness in the message. So
this project is very interesting.
LC:
Where do you all
currently reside?
P.M: Between Jamaica and
the U.S. We were in Brooklyn
but we moved to South
Georgia and Florida so are
always in between there and
Jamaica.
LC: What are some of your
most memorable or favourite
destinations on tour?
PM: One of the first most
memorable places was when
we did our first tour in 1994, a
U.S tour in Red Rock Colorado
which is an amphitheatre, and
the altitude is so high we
could barely breathe! The
amphitheatre holds 20,000
people and it is carved out of
the rock! The seats go up so
when you’re performing the
audience goes straight up
which is very memorable.
Then our first trip to Africa,
the
Ivory
Coast,
very
memorable situation.
Then
our first trip to Japan when we
went with the Reggae Japan
Splash tour in 2000 with
Thriller U and Maxi Priest. The
first time we crossed the
border into Canada was very
memorable to us. We thought
we were flying, but we ended
up driving and it was a very
long drive.
LC: Who are some of your
favourite artistes right now?
P.M: Luciano, Sizzla, Buju
Banton, Capleton.
LC: What do you do in your
spare time when you’re not on
tour?
PM: We just chill at home.
We get in trouble by the family
because when we get home
they want to go out but we just
want to chill at home because
we’re tired!
LC: Do you want to break
into the mainstream with your
music?
P.M: Not for the reasons
that we thought we wanted to,
but for different reasons. To
bring this music across to the
people and to realize that
Reggae is still alive and that
dancehall and Reggae are two
different things.
LC: What can we expect
on the new album?
P.M: A little harder than the
last
one,
very
different
because we’ve decided to go
after a different audience, a
little younger.
We will still
have the traditional side of
Morgan Heritage on it but full
circle on a different level.
LC: What does the future
hold for Morgan Heritage?
P.M: Just more music,
more touring and a lot of new
material!
LC: Thank you for your
time. I appreciate it!
P.M: You’re welcome!
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 20
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 21
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S TOP TENS
GALAXIE REGGAE TOP 10 CANADIAN SPINS
TRACK #1: JAH JAH LOVE
ARTIST: Jahranimo
ALBUM: Real Life
LABEL: Utopia Records
TRACK #2: STRUMMING MY GUITAR
ARTIST: Silvanus
ALBUM: Talk To Jah
LABEL: Silverglobe Records
TRACK #6: ABUNDANCE OF GOOD
ARTIST: Souljah Fyah
ALBUM: Real Roots Reggae - A C’dian.
Story
LABEL: canadianreggaeworld.com
TRACK #7: X-RATED
ARTIST: Korexion
ALBUM: X-Rated EP
LABEL: Kornerstone
TRACK #3: RIGHT TRACK
ARTIST: Jah Cutta & Determination
ALBUM: Wha’ Gwan
LABEL: Stomp Records/Warner Music
Canada
TRACK #8: BURNING THE COALS
ARTIST: Ron Wiseman
ALBUM: Mystical Moods
LABEL: Marshmellow Records
TRACK #4: NO GUNS
ARTIST: Fire Chess
ALBUM: Single
LABEL: Independent
TRACK #9: WITH ME
ARTIST: Tonya P
ALBUM: Single
LABEL: Independent
TRACK #5: NO MORE WAR
ARTIST: Tasha T
ALBUM: Single
LABEL: Ras Vibes Records
TRACK #10: OH CANADA
ARTIST: Exco Levi
ALBUM: Single
LABEL: Rulaz Production
Channel 915 on Bell ExpressVu - www.galaxie.ca
Channel 540 on Videotron; Channel 632 on MTS; Channel 431 on SaskTel
Top 10 Canadian Spins for July - September 2007
Compiled by Stephen Neale/Galaxie Reggae
/
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REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S “RESI” TOP 10 / REGGAE RADIO PROGRAMS LISTINGS
Urban Space - Tony Barnes & Sweet T
CKLN 88.1 FM
Movements - Mercedes
CKLN 88.1 FM
ReggaeMania - Ron Nelson
CKLN 88.1 FM
1. OH CANADA
EXCO LEVI
Rebel Music - DJ Chocolate
CKLN 88.1 FM
2. NO GUNS
FIRE CHESS
Musical Triangle - Milton Blake
CKLN 88.1 FM
3. LION HAS PREVAILED (REMIX)
HUMBLE
4. NEW WORLD ORDER
STEEL & QUEEN IFRICA
Delroy G Showcase -Delroy G
CHRY 105.5 FM
5. GOD BLESS THE CHILDREN
KENNY B
Mix Supreme - Delroy Sterling
CHRY 105.5 FM
6. I WANT YOU
TONYA P
Zion Train - Natty B & Bigga
CHRY 105.5 FM
7. I DON’T MIND
TANYA MULLINGS
8. ONE GOD
MUZIK SOULJAH
Radio Dubplate - Richard Banton, Janet
CHRY105.5 FM
9. TIME & TIME AGAIN
LINDO P
CHRY 105.5 FM
Positive Vibrations - King David
TASHA T
10. LION OF JUDAH
CHRY 105.5 FM
Cool Runnings - Sir B
CHRY 105.5 FM
(AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2007 - COMPLIED BY NATTY B AND BIGGA - Caribbean Crucible - Luther Brown
ZION TRAIN - CHRY 105.5 FM - EVERY WEDNESDAY 1 - 4 PM )
Rebel Vibes - Carrie Mullings
CHRY 105.5 FM
CIUT 89.5 FM
Reggae Rhythms - Patrick Roots
Morning Ride - King Turbo
CIUT 89.5 FM
Norman Otis Richmond
CIUT 89.5 FM
SONG
ARTIST
High Praise
CHRY 105.5 FM
Caribbean Radio Show - Durmot Williams
CIRV 88.9 FM
1. SHE IS ROYAL
TARRUS RILEY
Reggae Plus Radio - Lee Marshall
www.reggaeplus.net
2. AFRICAN QUEEN
2 FACE IDIBIA
TARRUS RILEY
3. BEWARE
Galaxy Reggae - Stephen Neale
Ch 932/ Bell Express Vu
4. BEAUTIFUL
SEAN KINGSTON
Caribbean Express - Wayne Vernon
CFRO 102.7 FM
5. MOVING ON
COLLIE BUDZ
Crooked
Beat
Nicky
Dread
(Guelph)
CFRU 93.3 FM
TARRUS RILEY
6. STAY WITH YOU
C 101.5 FM
Hyah Fyah Show - DJ Justice (Hamilton)
7. CONSCIENCE
BABY CHAM
8. WRONG ADDRESS
ETANA
Reggae Pulse - Delroy Sterling
CHIN FM107/AM1540
BEENIE MAN
9. BACK IT UP
Internet Radio
Candi
McNeil
www.indietalent.ca
10. WINE PON IT
MUNGA
Ramjam Radio - MsFlexin
www.ramjamradio.com
AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2007 - COMPLILED BY EMPRESS KIM & THE Wikked Ackk Movements
www.fusionradio.ca
TREAJAH ISLE RECORD CREW - EGLINTON AVE. WEST )
Vintage Love - Leslie Andrews
CKCU 93.1 FM
SONG
ARTIST
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S “INT’L.” TOP 10
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 22
REGGAEXCLUSIVE DANCEHALL VIBES
of music. She has on many
occasions made it known to
the male selectas that she is
one to be reckoned with!
LADIES NIGHT AT
THE KABANA”
Article and photos Halina T. Di-Lallo
n Saturday, April 14th,
Kabana Bar & Grill
celebrated
its
1st
Year
Anniversary with a live stage
show introducing an all
“Ladies” cast. D.J. for the
evening was “Lady Redz” (half
of RnR Sound). From the top
to the very last drop Canada’s
top Selectress mesmerized
the
audience
with
her
expertise in dropping the
needle. She always grants the
Reggae massive what they
really wish for, as her motto
goes – “I always play for the
people and not for myself”.
From Foundation, Dancehall,
Soca to Pop, “Lady Redz”
shows her diverse knowledge
O
The show commenced
around 11 p.m. with the Backup Band for the evening
“Infiniti”. “Trevor Rankin” (the
other half of RnR Sound)
introduced the first act,
Calgary’s
own
Canadian
Reggae Music Award winner
“Bianca”. Entering the venue
she began singing a version of
“Heaven” a capella which she
released last Spring. Once on
stage, the familiar reggae beat
commenced and “Bianca”
accompanied by her back up
singer Angie McGillivray, took
command with her powerful
voice. Next, she broke out
with her newest single; a
rendition of Bob Marley’s “Who
The Cap Fit”. Bianca lacks no
confidence when performing
to a live audience and her
passion was electrifying as
she sang her slow version of
“Waiting In Vain”.
To
everyone’s
surprise,
she
finished her set by bursting
into an old ska riddim by
Phyllis Dillon, “Don’t Stay
Away”. Interacting with her
fans she had everyone up on
the dance floor as she sang an
extended mix of the tune.
Fans kept crying out for her to
“Pull Up! Pull Up!” which in
Jamaica this means that the
music sounds so nice, that you
must play it twice. Bianca
obliged gracefully.
She
continued singing as she left
the stage and thanked her
faithful
fans
for
their
continued support.
After a
short intermission with a
complimentary buffet for all
patrons in the Dining Area, the
next act appeared on stage.
Originally
from
Kingston,
Jamaica and now residing in
Florida, “Judy Bell” performed
a set of three songs. Although
she was having mic problems,
she scuffled through and
thanked her audience for their
support. The final act was
also an artist originally from
Jamaica and now living in
Florida, “Paulette Pearce”.
She gave a long performance
of approximately 11 songs,
including some from her
upcoming
album.
Unfortunately, the vibes were
lacking and the majority of the
audience unappreciative of
this talented artist.
The
backing
band
“Infiniti”
finished off the evening by
playing
a
couple
of
instrumentals.
Bianca was
elected to take on the lead
role in singing the final song of
the evening.
Gathering on
stage, all of the lady artists,
including
Lady
Redz,
accompanied her as they sang
one final song “One Love”, a
tribute to Bob Marley.
Final Thought: In a male
dominated
field,
“female
artists” are always struggling
to continue the legacy of
reggae music and keep it
alive.
Although the feature
artist
Paulette
Pearce
delivered a good performance,
the most impact efforts of the
night came from Calgary’s own
“Bianca” and DJ “Lady Redz”
who both capitaved their
audience with their magnetic
stage presence.
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S INTERVIEW/BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT
THE OPRAH OF
DANCEHALL:
NATASHA VON
CASTLE
By Sophia “Iyamtheiah” Daniel.
L3magazine.com is a place for
and about sound systems, disk
jockeys, producers, and all
others contributing to reggae
music.
Editor-in-Chief
Natasha Van Castle spoke with
ReggaeXclusive about L3
magazine’s success.
R.X: Greetings. Thank you
for taking the time to speak
with ReggaeXclusive.
We
appreciate that.
Natasha: Thank you. It’s a
pleasure.
n just over one year a
Toronto
born
reggae
magazine
has
gained
international
recognition
online.
The
website
I
R.X:
Tell us about L3
Magazine.
Natasha:
L3 Magazine
started online in January
2006. The L stands for Life,
Love, and Lyrics.
Special
prints are also available. We
interview sound systems,
artists, really everyone who is
associated with reggae music
in some shape or form. We
even
interview
other
magazines.
Without each
other we can’t be successful.
R.X: Can you share with us
the traffic to your site and
location of your readers?
Natasha: Yes. We get over
2,000
hits
per
week,
approximately 8,000 each
month. People all over the
world read our magazine. Our
readers are in Germany
(thanks to Sentinel Sound
System), England, Jamaica.
R.X: Why do you think that
your site has become so
popular in such a short time
span?
Natasha: It is because of
our relationships with the
sound systems.
We don’t
believe that only the artists
are stars. People behind the
scenes are just as important.
R.X: Tell us about your
interaction
with
sound
systems.
Natasha: I come from a
sound background so I’ve met
a lot of people over the years.
In fact I managed some sound
systems and artists. These
include Desert Storms, King
Turbo, and King Aggression.
The sound circle is small and
my passion and love for sound
systems was always there. I
would go to Muscle’s so I
could relate to their work.
That would always get them
excited as well as me.
R.X: Which artists have
you managed?
Natasha: I’ve managed a
few people such as radio
personality Carrie Mullings
and poet J. Nicole Noel for
example.
R.X: How does a young
person become a manager in
the entertainment industry?
Natasha:
Paralegal in
entertainment law was a result
of my education. I attended
Ryerson
University
for
Paralegal.
My first project
came to me from a company
called Narcotic Entertainment.
I was approached by them
regarding signing some artists
to publishing deals. They had
confidence in my abilities and
offered me a position in the
publishing division. That was
in 1998. (See L3 Magazine pg 24)
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 23
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S DEEJAYS/SINGJAYS SPOTLIGHT
the business with his hit song
“No Bad Like I”. Lyrically “Nuh
Bad Like I” launched an attack
on other upcoming deejays
who proved unable to match
Munga’s style. Following on
the success of the monster hit,
Munga performed on stages all
over the island, US East Coast
and the Caribbean.
MUNGA
HONORABLE
“Bad From Mi Born”’
loquent, street smart
and infectious dancehall
deejay
Munga
Honorable
introduced himself to the
dancehall with an explosion of
hardcore rhymes. Born Damian
Rhoden from Islington St Mary,
Munga joined the music scene
at the tender age of 18 when
he entered the Red Label Wine
Superstar Competition with the
original song “Who Drink Out
the Red Label Wine”?
E
Munga
developed
his
versatile style as a prodigy of
the fireman‚ Capleton before
grabbing the attention of the
nation as a solo act. With an
edgy rap style combined with a
conscious mind and a “gangsta
Ras” image, Munga broke into
L3 MAGAZINE
(Continued from page 23)
R.X: Can you explain how
your
management
career
paved
the
way
to
L3
Magazine?
Natasha: I can’t pinpoint
exactly how. It is like a car
driving from Toronto to
Pickering but there are stops
in between. I was raised in
reggae music. My parents are
from Trinidad but reggae
music just comes to me. From
the time I first heard Bob
Marley I remember thinking at
age six “That is the greatest
music on earth”. In 2003 Ses
from King Turbo offered me
employment as manager and
when you work for a great
sound system like King Turbo
you are exposed to many.
Because of the excitement in
Coming under the tutelage
of David House and Don
Corleon proved a turning point
for Munga. Under the guidance
of these co-managers, Munga
has unleashed an extensive
collection
of
singles
on
reggae’s hottest riddim tracks.
Since releasing his hit single
“Bad From Wi Born” in 2006,
Munga has become one of the
hottest commodities on stage
shows. His Flippin Rhymes‚ I
Came To Take My Place‚ Not At
All‚ and Earthquake‚ are all on
heavy rotations at parties and
all the radio stations. His highpitched Sizzla like singing style
has producers clamoring to
voice the artiste who hopes to
one day be as prolific as a
Capleton, Sizzla or Bob Marley.
In the midst of making his
first album, Munga knows that
he too will soon take his place
as a dancehall great. “I want to
be somewhere at the top of the
market, where mi can buss
some yute too, he says.
the reggae industry, everyone
wants to carry the news. I’m a
journalist and I like to call
myself the Oprah of Dancehall.
Chris
will
video
tape
interviews and that is my way
to be journalist and interview
the people.
R.X: Was it that easy?
Natasha:
No.
It hasn’t
been easy. It is a lot of hard
work. There were a lot of
disappointments along the
way but there were also
bonuses that made me hold on
and kept going forward.
R.X: Who inspired you?
Natasha: My mom. She
could be the worst person at
doing a particular task but you
can’t tell her no. What I take
from that is her determination.
I am also inspired by a few
women in the public eye. They
NATURAL BLACK
“Far From Reality”
atural Black represents
an exciting approach to
Reggae music. This resilient
brother has over the years
demonstrated his ability to get
the attention of a wide crosssection of music lovers to
listen to his music. He has
instilled a new awareness
among his peers, with songs
such as 'Bad Mind', 'Songs of
Feeling', 'Never Leave You
Lonely' and more recently,
'Nice It Nice', 'Far From
Reality', and 'Never Hurt You'
from his album, 'Far From
Reality'.
N
Mortimer 'Natural Black'
Softley
was
born
in
Georgetown, Guyana.
He
came to Jamaica in 1995.
Coming to Jamaica was
natural, as he epitomizes the
inherent culture of Reggae.
Asked what attracted him to
are: Donna Makeda:
Multiaward winning reggae singer
and
founder
of
ReggaeXclusive
magazine,
Tasha Roses: Owner of Guns
and Roses Sound System,
Carrie Mullings:
Radio
personality, Sharon Burke:
Organizer for Sting in Jamaica
and
Solid
Gold,
Traci
McGregor: Vice-president of
(Buju
Records
Gargamel
Banton’s Record Label) and
Oprah Winfrey: Renowned talk
show host, actress, etc. Each
of theses women represent a
aspect
of
my
different
personality.
R.X: Where is L3 Magazine
going? What are your goals?
Natasha:
More
international. Being able to
work with the clash masters
Irish and Chin now creates the
opportunity to travel. It is truly
Reggae music, Natural Black
pointed out that Reggae music
has a vibe that is different
from any other music.
He
says, “like life, Reggae music
inspires, and gives the artiste
an opportunity to express
one's self fully, regardless of
the issues highlighted”. His
message is crystal clear, and
his impassioned pleas for
wrongs to be made right and
justice applied in the case of
the poor and oppressed, are
indeed relevant in these
crucial times.
His style and personality
has made him a favorite
among some of the top record
producers
and
show
promoters in Jamaica and
throughout the Caribbean. As
a result, he has toured
extensively and has performed
to sold-out audiences in
Switzerland, Austria, France,
Italy and Slovenia. He has also
performed on festivals such as
Sting, Reggae-Sumfest, Rebel
Salute, East Fest and others.
P.G. Music's Marlon McCubbin
produced his current album
'Far
From
Reality',
and
believes that the singer is
capable of taking his audience
to subliminal levels, where
only in the depth of one's
consciousness can one's mind
create and conceive a true
spiritual balance.
amazing. We plan for monthly
printed issues distributing in
Toronto, New York, Australia,
Germany, Italy, etc.
R.X: After launching the
website, did you expect this?
Natasha: No. I just knew I
had a dream to follow through
with. However, as long as you
do whatever you do with
passion you will succeed. I
think passion is what made us.
R.X:
Your journey is
inspiring.
Thank you for
sharing. All the best with L3
Magazine.
Do you have
anything to add before we
conclude?
Natasha: Live life to the
fullest with joy in your heart.
Be mindful of the lyrics you
share – people are listening.
Inspire each other with Love
and the purest intent. Bless!
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg-24
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S INTERVIEW
TRÉSON CHATS
WITH REGGAE
XCLUSIVE
By Iyametheiah
TRÉSON: I was born in
Montreal, Canada but ended
up in a foster home in
Jamaica. By 9 years old I was
transferred to a Mandeville
Vison Home. My new foster
parents were U.S missionaries
and they got me a guitar.
R.X: They taught you how
to play the guitar?
TRÉSON: No, I just picked
it up and played. It was just
natural to sing and play.
Tréson took some time out
to speak with ReggaeXclusive
backstage.
The singer,
songwriter,
musician
is
climbing
the
ladder
of
success, yet he remains a
container for a humble and
peaceful charisma. We are
thankful that he shared
intimate details of his musical
journey
with
absolute
sincerity.
R.X: Tell us about Tréson
and how you started to sing?
“PROPHECY”
CAPLETON’S
OFFICIAL BAND...
(Continued from page 11)
Riches aren’t all. We have
to be humble, for the meek
shall inherit the earth. Word is
power so we must watch what
we say. When we send out a
word it is created and becomes
a living soul. So we have to say
the right words. As far as I am
concerned gangster is not a
good word. When you are a
gangster you have war in your
head,
violent
thoughts.
Reggae music is not about
that.
R.X: We give thanks for the
time.
More love, life, and
prosperity. Blessed Love.
Prophecy’s Iyakimo: Yes I.
Buba:
Prophecy’s
Rastafari.
Note:
Some translations
were necessary as the entire
interview was conducted in
Patios (Jamaican dialog)*
R.X: When did you start
performing?
TRÉSON:
My parents
formed a band including my
brothers, and I, we had gigs
twice per week. It was at that
time we started to play for our
community. There was always
somewhere for us to play as a
band.
R.X: What was next? How
did you become a solo artist?
TRÉSON:
I moved to
Toronto at age 16 and didn't
know what I wanted to do with
my life as yet. Soon, I joined
the Canadian Armed Force and
did five years. It was good and
it woke me up to myself. I
would tell anyone who is
unsure what to do to join the
army. You learn discipline but
I had one problem there. I
couldn't take the yes sir, no
sir, so I left.
R.X & TRÉSON burst into
laughter.
R.X: So when did you start
to sing again?
TRÉSON: I became selfemployed as a construction
worker and also some farming.
I did those for years but had a
strong feeling about music.
But it was more than just the
music. I was about 21 years
old. I got a guitar again and
made myself play. The words
came with the cords.
R.X:
What happened at
age 21 for you to pick up the
guitar again?
TRÉSON: The birth of my
daughter. That changed me.
My foster mom encouraged
me also. All this time I felt like
I had living to do. Singing is
easy but I started to ask
myself questions like "What
you gonna say with conviction
from the heart?" I started to
JAMAICA DAY
DON CARLOS
(Continued from page 10)
(Cont’d. from page 7)
music business and truly an
inspiration to all, captivated
the
crowd
with
his
performance.
He
was
definitely in great form and did
not fail to deliver.
the reunion of the original
vocal trio with Don, Garth and
Duckie. After six years, 19891994 and four albums, singing
lead for Black Uhuru in the
studio and on the road, Don
again went back to his solo
career. His other titles with
Black Uhuru include Mystical
Truths, Iron Storm and Strong.
All of these four albums are
classics with Don up front on
lead vocals. As well, each of
these
four
titles
were
nominated
for
Grammy
Other artists who gave
outstanding
performances
were Professor Nuts, Symfoni,
Tanya Mullings, Michael
Thompson, Demolition Man,
Treson, Kay Morris, Tonya P.,
Eyesus, Macomere Fifi, Jimmy
Reid, Blakka Ellis and Jakki
James.
Other artists
appearing on the bill were
Tinga Stewart, VC, Church
Boyz, Douglas Booth, Letna
Allen, Patrick Blair, O’neil
Davis, Ibo, Projek RAW Dance
Group, Mountain Edge Band
and Black-X-Kimo Band. Hosts
for the event were Carrie
Mullings, Super V and Garvia
Bailey. Much respect goes out
to the promoters for a very
peaceful event.
write solid lyrics, playing a lot,
hibernating in every park or
isolated spot in Toronto.
I
would even get in my car and
drive up to Wasaga beach. I
wrote songs like "KeepThe
Change" which starts: "I am
drifting from this ocean into a
commercial world".
R.X: Tell us how your music
became known with a number
one single and global airplay?
How did all that happen?
TRÉSON: CKLN Saturdays,
singles with Version Xcursion,
then that lead to Montreal
Reggae Festival, eventually
Urban Space Award and
positive feedback from people
in the Canadian Reggae scene
like DB Hawkes, Luther Brown,
Carrie Mullings, Friendly Man,
and so much more respectful
people.
R.X:
How did you feel
about the fact that they like
your music?
TRÉSON: Their listening to
my music is an award for me.
R.X:
Your music has a
unique sound.
(Cont’d. in Dec. 2007 Issue)
Awards.
After the Black Uhuru
reunion, Don continued to
show his inspiration through
his albums Ease Up, Seven
Days a Week and Groove with
Me.
During this time don
kept on touring and in the new
millennium he joined forces
with the California based
Reggae Angels for four years
with a solid backing band.
New cds Live at Belly Up and
Elevate the Roots, due out in
2007 available along with his
classics
at
www.DonCarlosRecords.com.
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.caribbeanmusic.ca/reggaex --- Phone: 647-435-0637 -- Email: [email protected] Pg - 25
REGGAEXCLUSIVE’S INTERVIEW
DADA KALONJI...
(Continued from page 8)
heir ancestors were
here, it’s just because
of Columbus or some slave
master that take them from
there and their children are
born there that they become
citizens. If the goat born in
the cow pen that doesn’t make
the goat a cow.
You
understand it? It’s still a goat.
It was just born there.
Naturally, know what I mean?
So the musician, every chord,
every pattern, every beat, the
player can play that so what’s
different? It’s just one music
and the same songs and tunes
and players of instruments.
The Most High dwells and
abides in each and every one
of them. If we know these
children here are not fully
wrapped in the culture, we’re
supposed to be the ones to
T
ROGER STEFFENS
Interview by: Michelle Ottley
Photo by: Sandi Destonis
andi: Whom from the
Marley family can you
say is sending a future
message of consciousness
with the year 3000 coming up
and who would you say is
reaching the people.
Roger: I think the future
message is coming from
Damian, he has terrific lyrics
but
unless
you
get
a
magnifying glass and read the
minor notes in the book and
the lyrics printed in it you are
not going to catch a whole
heap of this speed rap which
is the young generation’s way
of approaching music, it is not
S
step out and help. I’m not
going to be like some artists’
and just sing and go home. You
need to be someone who when
you’re not onstage and you’re
not hype to talk to you about
what you’re doing wrong and
what you’re going to do. You
might have the ‘bling bling’
fans but I have a cultural fan
that’s really serious about
slavery,
raping,
thieving,
kidnapping, racism, prejudice.
I got fans that, that BURN!
Those things! So you’ve got to
open your eyes now my rapper
brethrens and my rapper
sistrens. Wake up to the world
right now; it’s what’s going on?
So we have to unite someway,
somehow. But, reggae can’t
die and hip hop comes from
reggae and reggae comes
from Nyahbinghi, which is the
churchical music, know what I
mean? So, it’s one.
S.A: Yes I that’s very true,
and how lovely it would be if
everyone could wake up and
see that we all need to unite
and work together. What is
your favorite color?
Sizzla: (smiles) my favorite
color? I like all colors but
umm... I would say red, gold,
green, black, white and baby
blue.
These are the colors
musical. The song of rap to
me is the beat of a cell door
being slammed over and over
and over! I do not like being
shouted at, a kind word turns
away wrath and I think people
have to reconsider the roots
for the 21st century and find a
way for the roots to live again.
Artists like Turbulence and
Chrisinti, Jimmy Riley’s son
Taurus Riley and his debut
album 2 years ago were a
knock out, I played it on the
radio everywhere I went. I am
64 years old and I am still
being astonished, I want to be
astonished, I am always out
there rooting for young
people. Turn me on man, let
me hear something that I have
never heard before and I will
scream it to the roof top for
you. Give me something to be
excited about; don’t give me
something that I have heard
I think
16 times before.
Damian is reaching his
generation more so than any
other artist and because he
that represent the flag, the
banner because it’s red, gold
and green. Black because of
Black
Supremacy
throne
bearing and His Majesty as the
Black King.
We represent
ourselves with the color black.
Before the Sabbath you wear
black. The days are with the
colors. Sunday is more of red.
Monday is yellow. Tuesday is
green.
Thursday might be
blue, Friday black and the
Sabbath is white again, know
what I mean?
S.A: What is your favorite
food?
Sizzla: My favorite food?
Hmm...I like rice and peas,
yeah. Of lately I’m like more
into the soya products.
Sometimes words affect me (in
the bible), know what I mean?
Like knowing that I’m going on
stage and you know that
you’re supposed to have a
turban on and you don’t have
your turban on. Right now I
might be free.
I might be
having a bath so I might not
wear one. Once I’m going to
deal with people, spiritually
you’ve got to be like royally
adorned
to
fulfill
livity!
Chapter 21 verse 10 says that
he that is a high priest must
not uncover his head amongst
has the Marley name he will
continue to be awarded
Grammies, anything that has
the title Marley or the Wailers
is an automatic winner by
name recognition solely and it
that
you
is
interesting
mentioned 3000, because at
the millennium, the new York
times built a time capsule to
be opened by the year 3000
and they wanted to put a piece
of musical art that could stand
the test of time for the people
1000 years from now. And
they chose Bob Marley live at
the rainbow in 1977.
Michelle: So do you have
any final words?
Roger: For the Canadians,
I have been coming to Canada
for the last 40 years. Since I
came back from 26 months in
the war in Vietnam and had
the climate been better I
would have chosen here and
forsaken America in 1970. I
love Canada! The people are
great!
And there is a
his brethren or go naked or be
affiliated to anything dead
because
you’ve
been
consecrated and set aside to
deal with the work of The Most
High. So when I read those
things, I say dead? But fish is
dead. So let go the fish and
the chicken! They say, “King
you cyah stop eat fish!” Mi say
why? Look how far I have to
go to catch the fish. The fish
is way out in the sea. Why am
I going to his domain to catch
him? I start burn Fiyah! Fiyah!
No meat, and all of a sudden I
start notice the soya products
start take the supermarket.
Know what I mean? At one
time there weren’t much soya
products. So after the culture
consciousness come about I
notice soya products, right as I
start burning the fire! So yeah
soya products, tofu but not
only soya but a lot of different,
savory vegetarian dishes made
from spices of the earth.
S.A: If you had to choose
one word to describe yourself
what would it be?
Sizzla: (smiling) I could say
benevolent. Sizzla is just
tremendous. I want to thank
you ladies and ReggaeXclusive
Magazine. Blessed Love, Ras
Tafari!
sophistication that is the best
parts of England mixed with
the best parts of America and
if the blandness is the price
you pay, well so be it!
Because it’s a much better life
than what I see in America,
where our constitution is
being shredded to pieces.
And do not be ashamed of
being a Canadian artist,
realize that you can contribute
just as much to the world as
some poor kid born in the
bush in Jamaica without a
hope in the world or any kind
of future. And that was Bob
Marley and you are coming
from a much more civilized
time and place.
Michelle: Is there any
Canadian artist that you see
and like?
Roger:
I like Odel and
Michael St. George is a
brilliant Dub Poet and guy. I
also used to love Messenjah.
(This was the final portion
of the Interview with Roger)
reggaeXclusive -- Web Site: www.reggaexclusive.com --- Phone: 416-287-1335 -- Email: [email protected] Pg-26
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