V Regional Geology - Geoscience Resources of Newfoundland and

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V Regional Geology - Geoscience Resources of Newfoundland and
First Year Assessment Report of
Prospecting Activity On
Licence no. 14406m
The Little Burnt Bay Property
NTS Map Sheet 2E/06
Zone 21 NAD 27
Work Conducted Between
November 2007 and December 2008
Written and Compiled By
Eddie Quinlan
February 2008
Table of Contents
Page
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
Introduction and Work Completed
Location and Access
Previous Work
Newfoundland Geology
Regional Geology
Local Geology
Conclusion and Recommendations
References
Illustrations:
Fig. 1 Property Location
Fig. 2 Newfoundland Geology
Fig. 3 Regional Geology
Fig. 4 Local Geology
Fig. 5 Sample Locations
Fig. 6 Showing Locations
Tables:
Table I
Table II
Property Information
List of Personnel & Contractors
Appendices:
I
Statement of Expenditures
II Analytical Certificates
III Sample Descriptions
IV Pictures
1-5
6
7-10
11
12-13
14
15-16
17-23
I
Introduction and Work Completed:
Licence no. 14406m was staked in the fall of 2007. The Little Burnt Bay Property,
licence 14406m consists of ninety six contiguous map staked claims situated within the
north east portion of NTS Map sheet 2E/6 along the Little Burnt Bay Peninsula. The
property covers two communities, Little Burnt Bay and Embree.
The property was staked after discovering radioactive boulders and outcrops
within areas of the property. Radioactive rocks and boulders were discovered outside the
property area previously to discovering the areas within the property. This led to the
discoveries in the Little Burnt Bay area.GR-110 scintillometers were used for
prospecting.
Quinlan Prospecting Incorporated was contracted to supply personnel and
scintillometers to prospect the property for gold, nickel and uranium.
There is only one documented mineral occurrence located near the property; this
mineral occurrence is called The Powderhouse Cove gold Showing.
The Powderhouse Cove showing comprises a 2 m thick, east-west trending,
siliceous, aphanitic felsic dike which has intruded black graphitic shale's of the Dunnage
Melange. The dyke is offset by a series of small faults developed parallel to the regional
penetrative fabric in the shale's. These faults produced narrow (<3 cm), brittle, quartzfilled, fractures within the dike. Locally these quartz veins contain massive patches of
pyrite and arseneopyrite.
Selected grab samples collected by Sheppard (1990) assayed 4980 ppb Au, 21500
ppb Au, 8900 ppb Au and 1120 ppb Au.
Grab samples collected by Evans (1992) from the dyke assayed 92 ppb Au, 48
ppb Au, 222 ppb Au and from the quartz veins assayed 145 ppb Au, 78500 ppb Au.
The Dunnage Melange extends southwest from Dildo Run some 40 km across the Bay of
Exploits to Stanhope. Its outcrop width is 13 km from Boyd's Cove to New World Island.
The true thickness of the melange is impossible to determine because of its internal
chaos, though Horne (1968) has suggested that it is on the magnitude of a few thousand
metres. However, bordering rocks are all steeply dipping and the thickness could be
much more.
The Little Burnt Bay property was staked to cover the prospective rocks
(sediments and mafics) for uranium mineralization.
Shale, as the most abundant type of sedimentary rock, contains an average of
0.0003 or 0.0004 percent uranium. Black shale's probably have an average of 0.0008
percent uranium; and marine black shale's, excluding the thick marine black shale's
deposited in geosynclinal areas, have an average uranium content of about 0.0020 percent
and a general range of 0.0008 to 0.0250 percent. Greater concentrations of uranium in
marine black shale have been known for many years, however, from descriptions and
analyses of kolm lenses (0.1 to 0.7 percent uranium) in the alum shale's of southern
Sweden. (Vernon E. Swanson and Edward R. Landis USGS (1962))
1
The Scandinavian Alum Shale Formation (Middle Cambrian to Lower
Ordovician) contains high levels of organic carbon (up to 25 wt. %) and syngenetic
enriched trace elements. A regional survey of the uranium and organic carbon content
reveals that uranium is preferentially enriched in sections located palaeo-shorewards
compared with sections located farther offshore. This type of enrichment mode is evident
in the Upper Cambrian (above the A. pisiformis Zone) and Tremadoc interval. In the
Middle Cambrian no significant regional variation in uranium level is present. In the
most enriched Upper Cambrian biozone (Peltura scarabaeoides Zone) the average
concentrations of uranium (100 to 300 ppm) are inversely correlated to zone thickness.
The variable bed thicknesses are believed to represent primary differences in the rate of
deposition and the relationship thus indicates a strong time-dependency in the enrichment
processes governing uranium incorporation in sediments. The high uranium levels
generally found shorewards are interpreted to reflect a more vigorous bottom water
circulation that promoted higher rates of mass-transfer across the sediment/ water
interface relatively to the mud deposited farther offshore. Very high levels of uranium
(1000 to 8000 ppm) concentrated in discrete beds (known as kolm) are interpreted to
reflect resuspension of sediment in an anoxic water column that enhanced diffusive
exchange between suspended particles and sea-water. A Late Silurian to Early Devonian
thermal overprint towards the Caledonian Front affected the total organic carbon (TOC)
content but appears to have no effect on the uranium distribution in the thermally mature
sections. (Copenhagen K, Denmark)
The property was prospected intermittently for uranium, gold and nickel
mineralization. Gold was the least abundant mineralization found within the property. A
total of seventy nine samples were collected while prospecting. Forty one of these
samples were analyzed for gold and a 30 multi element package, thirteen of these were
also analyzed for uranium. The highest uranium value received was 423.6ppm the highest
gold value attained was 1949 ppb, all other samples were anomalous or below the
detection limit for gold. Sample 16263 was from a pod of massive arseneopyrite in a
10cm quartz vein in altered argillite. The sample was not reproducible. Thirteen of the
samples were analyzed for a 30 multi element package. These samples were taken to
determine the nickel/copper/cobalt content. The values obtained from theses samples was
0.40% nickel, 0.058% cobalt and 1.06% copper. The pulp from this sample was also
analyzed for platinum and palladium; values were below the detection limit. The nickel
mineralization was discovered in what was presumed to be an altered mafic plug or
discontinuous sill within the Dunnage Melange. The area was revisited after the results
were received from Eastern Analytical Limited. The presumed plug or sill is only small
and most likely does not have the potential to host an economic deposit but, prospecting
for other plugs or sills of similarity will have to done. Twenty five samples were
analyzed for uranium, rare earth elements and multi elements.
All samples analyzed for uranium were anomalous from 8.4ppm up to 423.6ppm.
These samples were taken from highly radioactive areas discovered in outcrop and
subcrop.
2
The Pit Showing was discovered first. Six areas within 100m of each other were
discovered by Andy Budden. All areas are > 10,000cps in outcrop. Gr-110 scintillometers
were used for prospecting. The alteration consists of an orange/red carbonate veins and
veinlets from 1cm to 10cm wide within argillites and black shale's. All areas were
sampled, the samples were taken to Baie Verte, where Bayswater Uranium was working
on the Whisker Valley Uranium Project, and the samples were checked with Bayswater's
spectrometer. The readings from the spectrometer were determined to be inconclusive
due to malfunctions with the spectrometer. After the failure of Bayswater's spectrometer,
a spectrometer was rented from Ucore Uranium for a weekend to determine what type of
mineralization we were looking at before the samples were sent for analysis.
Spectrometer readings ranged from 12,800 cps to 42,000 cps mainly in the range of 2032,000 cps. Potassium readings ranged from no detection to 39.0% (very odd readings,
these readings were determined to be unreliable). Thorium readings ranged from 0.30%
to 1.43%. Uranium readings ranged from 187.5ppm to 1589 ppm. Samples were taken
while these readings were taken. These samples were sent for analysis and after several
months waiting, the analysis was received. Fourteen samples were taken and sent for
analysis, Uranium values ranged from 17.4ppm to 364.7ppm, Potassium values ranged
from 1.99% to 3.80%, all samples were > 200ppm thorium. Potassium values were
highly elevated the same has the spectrometer, Thorium values were also all elevated, the
uranium values which were the most important were not even close to the readings from
the spectrometer.
The property was prospected while samples were being analyzed. The second
radioactive area was discovered (The Dump Showing). This area consisted of a narrow
felsic dyke cutting the shale's, the Felsic Dyke ranges from 10cm to close to 1m wide in
places. The alteration and Felsic Dyke can be seen on Google Earth, the dyke can be seen
in the gravel road. It has been traced for approximately 75m then it disappears to the
south and runs into the dump and a swamp area to the north. The alteration consisted of
the same red/orange carbonated veins and veinlets discovered in the Pit Showings. The
alteration was located on the edge of the Felsic dyke and disseminated for approximately
10 cm to each side of the felsic dyke. The spectrometer was not available at this time.
The scintillometer readings ranged from 400cps from the Felsic Dyke to > 10,000cps
from the shale outcrop. Seven samples were taken from this zone, six from the shale's
and one from the Felsic dyke. The Felsic Dyke sampled has not been analyzed yet. The
six sample values ranged from 47.1 ppm to 89.9 ppm uranium. Sample 15883 (Felsic
Dyke) has not been analyzed yet.
The next area of radioactivity was found on the shoreline (The Lost Dog
Showing). My dog went missing just before we found the showing early in the morning
and we did not see him any more until just before dark while we traversing back to the
trucks. This Showing consists of a rusty iron stained mafic outcrop at the salt waters edge
on the southern portion of the property. The unit is approximately 3-4m wide, exposed
strike 10m, the unit disappears into the water and the sandy shoreline. Scintillometer
3
Readings of up to 3000cps in outcrop and 600 cps bag count from this area at first were
not thought to be significant, due to the other areas that were discovered being mainly >
10,000 cps. Five samples were taken from this and the surrounding area. Sample (16043)
was not sent for analysis until several other areas were found and sampled. Sample 16043
was the highest uranium value to date within the property 423.6ppm and the lowest
thorium 80.5ppm and potassium value1.63%. The other four sample values were from
13.2 ppm to 90.3 ppm. The Lost Dog showing was revisited early this winter. The
majority of the outcrop was covered with bay ice and slob. The main area of radioactivity
was exposed along with a couple other areas. Three samples were collected and have not
been sent for analysis. Scintillometer reading from 1400cps up to 3000cps were recorded
from the sampled areas. One sample contained what was presumed to be uranophane
staining. This area has to be channel sampled this spring after the bay ice melts.
The next area of radioactivity (The Powerline Showing) was found at the edge of
a bog on the powerline near an old pit. Scintillometer readings from this area were from
4000 cps on the ground to > 10,000 cps when exposed. The alteration consisted of the
same red/orange carbonate veins and veinlets. Only one highly radioactive area was
found in this area. The value of sample 15886 was 73.7ppm uranium; no multi element
analysis was done on this sample. There has only been one sample taken from this area to
date.
The next area of radioactivity is approximately 100m south of the Powerline
Showing and is possibly a continuation of the same radioactive zone. A small area of
highly anomalous scintillometer (500-2000cps) readings were found on the edge of a pit
in outcrop, this lead to the discovery of the radioactive areas found in the wooded area
next to the pit (The Mystery Showing). The name of the showing came from being near a
highly radioactive zone, having the scintillometer waist high, the closer you put the
scintillometer to the ground the higher it would read, then you would raise the
scintillometer over your head and the readings would also elevate significantly from what
the scintillometer was reading at waist height. There are approximately six areas here that
are > 10,000cps within a 20+ m radius. Four of these areas have been exposed by test pits
dug by pick and shovel, no competent rock was found in any of the holes. The alteration
of the red/orange carbonate veins and veinlets can be easily viewed in these test pits. The
carbonate seems to be more extensive being disseminated throughout the fractured
shale's. A total of eight samples were taken from the radioactive areas, some samples
were taken before the test pits were dug. The test pits range from 1m to 1.6m deep, no
competent rock was found in the pits. Seven of the samples were sent for analysis.
Uranium values ranged from 8.4 ppm to 97.4ppm. Sample 15889 will have to be sent for
analysis
The last area of radioactivity that was sampled after it was discovered was The
Ditch Showing. The Ditch Showing consist of 5-6 areas of highly radioactive subcrop
and outcrop that was found along the edge of the highway and extended into the woods
away from the highway. A total of eight samples were taken from these areas. Some of
4
The samples were composed of more competent rock with less of the red/orange
carbonate. The fresher rocks were vuggy quartz breccias with minor to 1% pyrite. Some
of the vugs contained green and black granular crystals. Uranium values ranged from
17ppm to 366.9ppm.
A couple other areas with anomalous radioactivity were found along the northern
shoreline, one of these, the last one discovered was sampled. The uranium values ranged
from 35.3ppm to 56.3ppm. Scintillometer readings from the area sampled ranged from
700cps to 960cps. The radioactive areas that were not sampled had scintillometer
readings in the 600cps to 1500cps. These areas will have to be sampled in the future.
One sample from The Dump Showing, two samples from The Pit Showing, six
samples from The Ditch Showing and one sample from The Lost Dog Showing were
analyzed for a fifty four element plus uranium Whole Rock Fusion package to determine
the if there were any rare earth elements in the rocks. All the samples were highly
anomalous in lead, zinc, and arsenic. The highest values were 666.82 ppm, 463.7 ppm
and 1901.6 ppm consecutively. Thorium values ranged from 80.5 ppm to 844.6 ppm.
Uranium values ranged from 17.0 ppm to 423.6 ppm. The rare earth elements that were
presumed to be elevated were Yttrium 805.7ppm, Cerium 412.1 ppm, Praseodymium
62.2 ppm, Neodymium 351.7 ppm, Samarium 189.1 ppm, Europium 88.9 ppm,
Gadolinium 312.8 ppm, Terbium 53.3 ppm, Dysprosium 264.6 ppm, Holmium 35.1 ppm,
Erbium 65.6 ppm, Ytterbium 42.3 ppm, Rubidium 129.5 ppm, Niobium 114.8 ppm,
Gallium 28.91 ppm. Some research has been done on rare earth elements but due to lack
of knowledge of the elements and shortage an educational material found, not all the
element are highly anomalous.
Five samples from The Pit Showing were sent for a forty six element TD-MS plus
uranium Delayed Neutron Count. Uranium values ranged from 39.9 ppm to 305 ppm,
Thorium values were all> 200 ppm, Potassium values ranged from 1.99% to 3.80%.
Arsenic, Zinc and lead values were highly elevated also 887 ppm, 295 ppm and 380 ppm
consecutively. Yttrium was elevated in two samples 342 ppm and 212 ppm; Neodymium
was elevated in the same two samples 308 ppm and 165 ppm.
5
II
Location and Access:
Licence 14406m (Fig.1) consisting of ninety seven contiguous map staked claims
is situated within NTS map sheet 2E/6 within north central Newfoundland. The property
is located approximately 3 kilometres north of the town of Lewisporte. The property
encompasses the Little Burnt Bay and Embree Peninsula which runs from Lewisporte.
Access is gained to the property via Route 341 from Lewisporte. Access to the
shoreline can be gained by boat also from the town of Little Burnt Bay. The boat can be
used to access the shoreline on the western section of the property. Access to the majority
of the property is easily gained from the side streets and the main highway (Route 341) in
the communities of Little Burnt Bay and Embree.
6
III
Previous Work:
The earliest recorded geological work in the region is from the late 1800's when
A. Murray and J. Howley visited and explored the region (Murray and Howley, 1881).
Since then the area has been included in a number of geological mapping surveys carried
out by various government agencies and documented in a couple of thesis projects
completed at Memorial University. Included in those surveys, is the mapping by H.
Williams in 1964 and Blackwood in 1978. Williams mapped the area for the Geological
Survey of Canada (Williams, 1964). Blackwood mapped the 2E map sheets at a scale of
1:50,000 for the Newfoundland Department of Mines and energy (Blackwood, 1982).
This survey was part of the Canada-Newfoundland Regional Mineral Potential
Evaluation.
The earliest geological study in northeast Newfoundland was general
reconnaissance work by Heyl (1936) and Patrick (1956). These workers failed to
recognize the complex nature of the melange terrane, and it went unnoticed until the
work of Kay in the 1960? s. Since then numerous stratigraphic and structural studies have
been conducted by various workers.
Horne (1968, 1969) and Horne and Helwig (1969) were the first to provide
detailed descriptions of the melange and document its chaotic nature. Horne viewed the
Dunnage Formation as being conformable with surrounding units, and interpreted its
chaotic structure to be the result of slumping.
A meticulous 12-year study of the Bay of Exploits region was undertaken by Kay
in the early 1960? s. In a series of publications (Kay, 1970, 1972, 1975, 1976) he
portrayed the Dunnage Melange as a fault-bounded tectonic unit deformed in the trench
of a subduction zone. He also named and described the igneous intrusions of the
northeast Dunnage Melange, and published Rb/Sr, and K/Ar age for these units.
H. Williams began his work in the area at about the same time as Kay, and was
concerned with the regional correlation of rock units of the Twillingate map area
(Williams, 1963). Williams and Hibbard (1976), Hibbard (1976), and Hibbard and
Williams (1979) conducted a detailed study of the entire Dunnage Melange. They noted
that the melange is essentially conformable with surrounding units and suggested a back
arc basinal olistostromal origin for the melange. More recent work by Williams (1991,
1992, 1993, and 1994) has focused on reinvestigation and comparison of melange
occurrences as part of a regional study of melanges in the Newfoundland Dunnage Zone.
H. Williams and J.P. Hibbard completed a study on the relationships between the
Dunnage Melange and nearby rock groups in 1976. They determined that the exact
significance of the Dunnage Melange is unknown but intrusions (i.e. Coaker Porphyry)
7
that are localized to the Dunnage Melange and nearby Exploits Group suggest that a
direct link between the two and also that the intrusions are sitting above a deep crustal
feature (Williams and Hibbard, 1976).
A Ph.d thesis study was completed within and around the region in 1984 by B.E.
Lorenz. Lorenz carried out a petrgraphical study of several suites of igneous rocks to
determine their source, evolution, mode of emplacement and interrelationships. Lorenz
attempted to determine the physical and temporal relationships between the intrusions
and the formation of the Dunnage Melange (Lorenz, 1984).
A geochemical investigation of mafic volcanic rocks incorporated into the
Dunnage Melange was completed by J. Wasowki and R. Jacobi. The results of the
investigation suggest that the mafic volcanic blocks in the Dunnage Melange are
tholeiitic and alkalic basalts. It is also suggested that the mafic volcanics erupted as interplate basalts and are probably remnants of ocean islands or seamounts. It is also
suggested that the Dunnage melange formed in an arc-trench gap (Wawoski and Jacobi,
1985).
In 1991 an ice flow indicator map was published for the 2E/7 map sheet. The area
was mapped by L.St. Croix and D. Taylor.
In 1988, a regional lake bottom sampling program was completed by the
Newfoundland Department of Mines and Energy (Davenport and Nolan, 1988).
Anomalous gold values were set at 4ppb. An extensive area of gold enrichment was
revealed extending from Gander Lake, northeast to the Dog Bay/Gander Bay areas.
Between 1989 and 1993 B. O'Brien carried out geological mapping in the central
Notre Dame Bay area with more reconnaissance style study in the adjacent areas. The
2003 report by O'Brien provides a comprehensive overview of the Notre Dame Bay with
greater detail provided in the central portion of the Notre Dame Bay area (O'Brien, 2003).
Quincy Sheppard a local prospector discovered and grab sampled the showing in
1989 (Sheppard, 1990). The showing was mapped and sampled as part of a regional
epigenetic gold study by the Newfoundland Department of Mines and Energy,
Geological Survey Branch (Evans, 1992).
The 2E map sheet was mapped by Williams (1962) for the Geological
Survey of Canada at a scale of 1:250,000 as part of a regional synthesis of the Notre
Dame Bay area. This map identified the main lithologies present within the area and also
introduced the term Botwood Group.
In 1977 the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador’s Mineral Development
Division released a report on the geology and metallogeny of the Notre Dame Bay area
(Dean, 1977).
8
In 1986, the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador’s Mineral Development
Division released the results of a regional lake sediment survey for the 2E map sheet
(Davenport and Nolan, 1986). Due to the lack of ponds within the project area none of
the lake sediment samples were collected directly within the property boundaries.
In 1987 and 1989 the Geological Survey of Canada released a series of ten geophysical
maps for airborne magnetics and VLF as well as airborne gamma ray spectrometry (open
file NFLD/1734).
During the early 1990’s geological mapping of parts of several 1:50,000 scale
map sheets
(including parts of map sheet 2E/06) was carried out by O’Brien (1990, 1991, 1992 and
1993). O’Brien’s work filled in gaps between other detailed maps in the area and it was
the first time the area had been mapped in detail at the 1:50,000 scale.
The most recent work carried out in this area by O’Brien (2003) set out to resolve
some of the outstanding problems concerning the origin and evolution of the region’s
Ordovician and Silurian rocks.
During 2004 Cornerstone Resources completed prospecting and rock sampling
within the Porterville property. Prospecting was primarily focused along the coastline and
in road cuts where there is good exposure and easy access. A total of 61 rock samples
were collected within the claim group and from crown land near the property boundaries.
Of the 61 rock samples collected, 31 of the samples returned elevated Au values (> 5 ppb
Au) and 11 rock samples returned gold values greater than 1.0 g/t. The highest value
obtained was 8,059 ppb Au from a silicified-carbonatized gabbro containing 1 to 2%
disseminated to fracture fill fine to coarse grained arseneopyrite (Sample R18830).
(Hussey, 2005).
During the 2005 field season, soil sampling, prospecting and rock sampling were
completed by Cornerstone personnel. A total of 255 soil samples were collected from two
Reconnaissance soil grids within the Porterville property. The Porterville Northwest soil
grid results were not encouraging as none of the 34 soil samples collected returned
anomalous gold values (>5 ppb Au). The Porterville Southeast soil grid results were very
encouraging. Of the 221 soil samples collected 16 returned anomalous Au values (>5 ppb
Au) up to 3,203 ppb Au. A total of 54 rock samples were collected within and around the
Porterville property. Of the 54 rock samples, 31 samples returned anomalous Au (>5 ppb
Au) values and 14 samples returned values greater than 1,000 ppb Au. The best grab
sample assayed 13,215 ppb Au and was collected from an outcrop of weakly
carbonatized gabbro containing massive arsenopyrite (sample 11125). (Dyke, 2006).
The 2006 work program consisted of trenching and trench reclamation work. All
rock samples were shipped to Eastern Analytical Laboratories in Springdale, NL for
preparation and analysis. Samples were analyzed for Au by fire assay and multi-element
ICP-30 geochemistry. Trench locations were surveyed with a hand-held GPS in UTM
Zone 21 (NAD 27) coordinates and should be accurately located within 5 to 10 m
9
A total of 32 grab samples and 33 channel samples were collected from
mineralized and unmineralized gabbros, massive arseneopyrite, arseneopyrite filled
fractures, and quartz filled fractures, quartz veins, quartz clots/pods, felsic intrusives,
mafic dykes and feldspar porphyry gabbro during the course of the trenching. Fifty one of
the grab/channel samples returned anomalous Au values (>5 ppb Au) up to 27,494 ppb
Au (grab sample – 17422) and 9,326 ppb Au over 30 centimetres (channel sample –
17474). A channel sample with a weighted average of 2.8 g/t Au over 3.0 metres was cut
from the Crooked Line trench. See trench maps for a detailed representation of the
results.
10
IV
Newfoundland Geology:
The island of Newfoundland lies at the north-eastern edge of the Appalachian
Oregen. Newfoundland is divided into three major tectonic-stratigraphic subdivisions: the
Humber Zone, Central Mobile Belt and the Avalon Zone (Williams, 1978). The Humber
Zone, underlying the north-western part of the island is separated from the south-eastern
Avalon Zone by the Central Mobile Belt (Fig.2).
The Humber Zone, with it’s Precambrian crystalline basement of late Grenvillian
gneisses and plutonic rocks is overlain with Palaeozoic (Eocambrian to Ordovician )
shelf facies clastic and carbonate rock sequences (Ermer, P. 1986 ).
The Avalon Zone consists of a Precambrian basement of late Hadrynian metavolcanic, meta-sedimentary and plutonic rock overlain by early Palaeozoic (Eocambrian
to Ordovician) shallow marine sedimentary strata (Williams, H. 1972).
The Central Mobile Belt records the formation, development and later destruction
of the early Paleozoic ocean Impetus (Harland and Gayer, 1972). The Central Mobile belt
is divided into the Dunnage Zone and the Gander Zone and consists of island/back-arc
volcanic, sedimentary, amphibolites and plutonic rocks ranging in age from early
Ordovician to Jurassic. The pre-Silurian rocks of this zone record the intra-oceanic events
of island arc and back arc basins.
Two geological subzones, the Notre Dame and Exploits make up this zone. They
are separated by a large terrain boundary, (The Red Indian Line) with the Notre Dame
Sub zone to the west and the Exploits to the east. The Exploits sub zone represents
remnants of the southeast flank of the Iapetus Ocean and is in contact and in part overlies
the continentally derived sedimentary rocks of the Gander Zone. The sedimentary rocks
of the Gander Zone are said to have been deposited at or near the eastern continental
margin of the Iapetus Ocean (Colman - Sadd, 1980).
11
V
Regional Geology:
The Dunnage Melange extends southwest from Dildo Run some 40 km across the
Bay of Exploits to Stanhope. Its outcrop width is 13 km from Boyd's Cove to New World
Island. The true thickness of the melange is impossible to determine because of its
internal chaos, though Horne (1968) has suggested that it is on the magnitude of a few
thousand metres. However, bordering rocks are all steeply dipping and the thickness
could be much more.
The Dunnage Melange is bounded immediately to the southwest by arc volcanics
and basinal sediments of the Early and Middle Ordovician New Bay Formation of the
Exploits Group. This boundary has been interpreted as conformable (Hibbard and
Williams, 1979) or faulted (O'Brien, 1992). Gabbro sills, present in the New Bay
Formation, cut the Dunnage Melange, thereby establishing an intrusive link. Along its
southeast margin, the Dunnage Melange is bounded by the Reach Fault or truncated by
the Loon Bay Batholith (Williams, 1994).
Along its northwest side, on New World Island, the melange is bounded by
Middle Ordovician to Silurian, north-facing black shale’s and greywackes of the Dark
Hole and Samson formations, respectively. The nature of this contact is controversial, as
it has been interpreted as conformable (Horne, 1969; Hibbard and Williams, 1979), and
faulted (Kay, 1976; Lorenz, 1985; Van deer Pluijm, 1986), depending on where the
boundary is drawn (Williams, 1994).
The Dunnage Melange is a heterogeneous deposit composed of blocks of mainly
clastic sedimentary and mafic volcanic rocks enveloped in a dark scaly shale matrix. The
most obvious components of the melange are large round blocks of mafic volcanic rocks
with fragmental rocks, commonly associated with minor grey limestone. The volcanic
blocks range in size from metres to a kilometre in diameter. Micaceous quartz
greywackes are another abundant rock type. Other important components of the Dunnage
Melange are silicic volcanic rocks, limestones, conglomerates, cherts, and psammitic
shists. Less abundant rock types include fragmental mafic volcanic rocks with cobbles
and boulders of gabbro and granodiorite, mixtite with cobbles of quartzite and limestone,
and a block of ferrugenous manganiferous chert. Serpentinite, ultramafic rocks, or other
ophiolitic components are absent. Most blocks are indigenous to nearby volcanic groups;
however a few, such as mixtite and ferruginous manganiferous chert, are foreign.
The matrix of the melange is a pyrite-rich dominantly black, grey, green, and
locally red shale with streaky layers of former beds and disrupted folds of bedding. The
matrix displays a steeply dipping cleavage, the intensity of which is generally
12
proportional to the size and concentration of inclusions in the shale. An Ordovician age
of melange formation is defined by fossil ages of blocks and matrix, lack of younger
components, and Ordovician isotope ages of intrusions that cut the melange.
A variety of small intrusions that are localized within the melange are rare or
absent in surrounding country rocks. Of these the 467? 5 Ma Coaker Porphyry is most
extensive and well exposed. It is an S-type rhyodacite that occurs as a number of small
intrusions of irregular outline from 100 m to 2 km in diameter. The porphyry is a
distinctive fine grained grey rock with phenocrysts of plagioclase and quartz up to 1 cm
in diameter. Laths of biotite, phlogopite, and hornblende are largely altered to chlorite
and carbonate. The matrix of the rock consists of fine grained plagioclase and quartz.
Lobate, pillowed, corrugated, and pahoehoe-like igneous contact surfaces, complex
interlayering of host mudstone and dacite, and occurrences of peperite, all indicate that
magma intruded unconsolidated mud, and the adjacent sediment was fluidized. These
relationships indicate contemporaneity with melange formation.
The Causeway Diorite is a xenolith-rich phase of the Coaker Porphyry. It occurs
as a small distinctive intrusion of irregular outline that contains numerous maficultramafic inclusions from 1 cm to 10 cm in diameter. The mafic-ultramafic inclusions
may represent a sampling of ophiolitic rocks beneath the Dunnage Melange.
Relationships of gabbro sills at the southwest portion of the melange to the
Coaker Porphyry and other intrusions in the northeast are unknown. The Gabbro sills in
the southwest are interpreted as Ordovician as they are mainly confined to the New Bay
Formation of the Exploits Group and they do not cut Caradocian black shale’s or higher
units. A recent isotope age of 463.7? 2 Ma confirms this interpretation.
.
13
VI
Local Geology:
The property is predominantly underlain with rocks of the Dunnage Melange
which are host to several intrusions of the Thwart Island Gabbro, The Porterville Gabbro
and The Long Island Granadiorite in the northern, eastern and western areas. Siliciclastic
marine greywacke of the Badger Group occur in fault contact with the Porterville Gabbro
and The Long Island Granadiorite to the extreme northern portion of the claim group. is
bounded immediately to the southwest by arc volcanics and basinal sediments of the
Early and Middle Ordovician New Bay Formation of the Exploits Group. This boundary
has been interpreted as conformable (Hibbard and Williams, 1979) or faulted (O'Brien,
1992). Gabbro sills, present in the New Bay Formation, cut the Dunnage Melange,
thereby establishing an intrusive link. Along its southeast margin, the Dunnage Melange
is bounded by the Reach Fault or truncated by the Loon Bay Batholith (Williams, 1994).
The Dunnage Melange is a heterogeneous deposit composed of blocks of mainly
clastic sedimentary and mafic volcanic rocks enveloped in a dark scaly shale matrix. The
most obvious components of the melange are large round blocks of mafic volcanic rocks
with fragmental rocks, commonly associated with minor grey limestone. The volcanic
blocks range in size from metres to a kilometre in diameter. Micaceous quartz
greywackes are another abundant rock type. Other important components of the Dunnage
Melange are silicic volcanic rocks, limestone’s, conglomerates, cherts, and psammitic
shists. Less abundant rock types include fragmental mafic volcanic rocks with cobbles
and boulders of gabbro and granodiorite, mixtite with cobbles of quartzite and limestone,
and a block of ferrugenous manganiferous chert. Serpentinites, ultramafic rocks, or other
ophiolitic components are absent. Most blocks are indigenous to nearby volcanic groups;
however a few, such as mixtite and ferrugenous manganiferous chert, are foreign.
The matrix of the melange is a pyrite-rich dominantly black, grey, green, and
locally red shale with streaky layers of former beds and disrupted folds of bedding. The
matrix displays a steeply dipping cleavage, the intensity of which is generally
proportional to the size and concentration of inclusions in the shale. An Ordovician age
of melange formation is defined by fossil ages of blocks and matrix, lack of younger
components, and Ordovician isotope ages of intrusions that cut the melange.
Relationships of gabbro sills at the southwest portion of the melange to the
Coaker Porphyry and other intrusions in the northeast are unknown. The Gabbro sills in
the southwest are interpreted as Ordovician as they are mainly confined to the New Bay
Formation of the Exploits Group and they do not cut Caradocian black shale’s or higher
units. A recent isotope age of 463.7? 2 Ma confirms this interpretation.
14
VII
Conclusion and Recommendations:
Several days were spent prospecting the claim group with personnel from Quinlan
Prospecting Incorporated. The majority of the shoreline in the central and northern
portions of the claim group was prospected both for gold and nickel while GR-110
scintillometers were also carried with each prospector to prospect for uranium. Due to
prospecting with a hammer and lens for gold and nickel and also carrying a scintillometer
for uranium prospecting, ground coverage was slower than usual. Some days were spent
just prospecting for uranium; ground coverage was much faster these days. All the old
and new ATV and snowmobile trails were traversed. Also, the majority of the road cuts
and ditches in the central and northern portion of the claim group were prospected.
Several areas of alteration for gold and nickel were discovered along the
shorelines. Gold was found to be only slightly elevated in these areas. One area
discovered was highly anomalous in copper, nickel and cobalt but, due to the small
nature of the area no further work is recommended for this but, an eye will be kept out for
this type of mineralization anywhere else within the claim group.
Several highly radioactive areas were discovered in old pits, gravel roads and in
the ditches that are located along the highway. All these areas were sampled; all samples
were anomalous in uranium with a high value of 366 ppm. Several of the old pits had
areas of anomalous radioactivity of counts up 500cps; these areas will have to be
prospected in a little better detail in the coming months after spring thaw.
The Dump Showing was discovered in the road that leads to the town of Embree
and Little Burnt Bays community dump. The showing actually runs into the old garbage
pile. This area has had very little follow up work. This are should be mechanically
trenched.
The Lost Dog Showing located on the southern shoreline of the claim group was
considered not to be has significant has the other areas found with in the claim group due
to the scintillometer readings being a high of 3000cps compared to the other areas having
scintillometer readings of mainly > 10,000 cps. This proved to be the opposite with the
sample returning the highest uranium value discovered within the claim group to date.
Very little follow up work has been done in the vicinity of the Lost Dog Showing. This
area will be the first area to follow up in the spring to see if any other areas of
radioactivity can be found or the known one can be traced along strike. The radioactive
areas should be channel sampled in the spring.
A couple other areas of highly anomalous radioactivity were discovered along the
shoreline, only one of these was sampled due to the low scintillometer readings 250 -
15
1000cps. These areas along with the remaining shoreline will have to prospected again
and attention will have to paid to just the slightest spike in scintillometer readings, due to
the rocks being submerged under saltwater a majority of the time and uranium being
more soluble in saltwater than fresh water. The surface of the rock exposure may be
leached of uranium but underneath uranium should be more enriched. Numerous samples
will have to be taken from these areas.
The Mystery Showing will have to be exposed by mechanical trenching due to the
shearing of the rocks in the area; the shearing is due to a northeast-southwest trending
fault structure which cuts the entire peninsula. Trenching will also expose the whole area
to determine the extent of the radioactivity. More competent rock has to be exposed and
sampled to determine the amount of uranium in these areas. The Powerline Showing can
be mechanically trenched the same time has the Mystery Showing is being trenched due
to both of them are in close proximity to each other and are possibly related. Permitting
for this should be easy due to the showings being located on the edge of an old pit.
The Pit Showings should also be mechanically trenched. More competent rock
should be easily exposed in these areas due to the outcrops surrounding the showings
being quite competent, just slightly sheared and highly fractured. Permitting should also
be easy for this area due the showings being located within and old pit.
The Ditch Showing can be trenched mechanically further to the south where
subcrop boulders were discovered away from the highway. Permitting maybe a little
harder for this one due to it being located close to the highway.
The Little Burnt Bay Property should be optioned to an exploration company or
the company could come and do a certain amount of exploration for first right of refusal
for the property. This way the company could possibly fly an airborne radiometric survey
over the property, which would light up like a Christmas tree in the areas that have
already been discovered and most likely would highlight numerous other areas that have
not been discovered yet. If neither company is found by late Spring to fly an radiometric
survey, applications for permits should be sent, so approval can be received and the
trenching and sampling can be done during late Summer or early Fall.
.
16
VIII
References:
Blackwood, R.F.
(1982) Geology of the Gander Lake (2D/15) and Gander River (2E/2) area:
Newfoundland Department of Mines and Energy, Mineral Development Division, Report
82-4, 56 pages.
Colman-Sadd, S.P,
(1980) Geology of south central Newfoundland and evolution of the eastern margin of
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Currie, K L 1995: The northeastern end of the Dunnage Zone in Newfoundland. Atlantic
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Davenport, P.H. and Nolan, L.W.
(1986) – Gold and associated elements in lake
sediment from regional surveys in the Botwood map area [NTS 2E]. Mineral
Development Division, Department of Mines, Government of Newfoundland and
Labrador. 122 pages. [Open File 002E/0563]
Davenport, P. H. and Nolan, L. W.
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Botwood map area (NTS 2E), Newfoundland Department of Mines, Mineral
development Division, Assessment File 2E/0563.
Dean, P.L.
(1977) – A report on the geology and metallogeny of the Notre Dame Bay area, to
accompany metallogenic maps 12H/1, 8, 9 and 2E/3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11 and 12. edited
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Dean, P L and Gibbons, R V 1977: A report on the geology and metallogeny of the Notre
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Government of Newfoundland and Labrador Report 77-10, 20 pages. [GSB#
NFLD/0979]
17
Dyke
(2006): Assessment report of soil sampling, prospecting and rock sampling on the
Porterville gold property for licence 11104M and the Thwart Island gold property for
licence 10729M in the Bay of Exploits area Newfoundland, Cornerstone Resources Inc.,
Newfoundland and Labrador Geological Survey, 23 pages, (Non Confidential
Assessment Report)
Ermer, P.,
1986: Geology of the Long Range Inlier in the Sandy Lake map area: In Current
Research, Part B: Geol. Sur. Can., Paper 86-1B, p- 19-29
Evans, D T W 1992: Gold metallogeny of the eastern Dunnage Zone, central
Newfoundland. In Current Research. Geological Survey Branch, Department of Mines
and Energy, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador Report 92-01, pages 231-243.
[GSB# NFLD/2495
Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 5-7, DK-1350
Copenhagen K, Denmark;
Geological Survey of Canada
(1987) – Geophysical Series Map 35502(06) G, Point Leamington and Exploits Sheet,
Newfoundland. Scale 1:50,000, airborne gamma ray spectrometry. [Open File
NFLD/1734]
Geology of a Uranium-Bearing Black Shale of Late Devonian Age in North-Central
Arkansas By Vernon E. Swanson and Edward R. Landis USGS (1962)
Information Circular No. 22
Heyl, G.R.
(1936) – Geology and mineral deposits of the Bay of Exploits area.
Newfoundland and Labrador Geological Survey, Bulletin No. 3, 69 pages. [GSNL
002E/06/0028]
Helwig, J.A.
(1967) – Stratigraphy and structural history of the New Bay area, northcentral
Newfoundland. Unpublished Ph.D thesis, Columbia University, New York, United States
of America, 248 pages.
Harland, W.B, Gayer, R. A.,
(1972) The Artic Caledonides and Earlier Oceans: Geol. Mag., Vol. 109, p289-314.
18
Helwig, J A and Horne, G S 1969: Ordovician stratigraphy of Notre Dame Bay
Newfoundland. In North Atlantic-geology and continental drift. Compiled by M. Kay,
American Association of Petroleum Geologists, Memoir, No. 12, pages 388-407. [GSB#
002E/0218]
Heyl, G R 1936: Geology and mineral deposits of the Bay of Exploits area. Geological
Section, Newfoundland Department of Natural Resources Bulletin no. 03, 69 pages.
[GSB# 002E/06/0028]
Hibbard, J and Williams, H 1979: Regional setting of the Dunnage Melange in the
Newfoundland Appalachians. American Journal of Science, Vol. 279, pages 993-1021.
[GSB# 002E/0492]
Hibbard, J P 1976: The southwest portion of the Dunnage Melange and its relationships
to nearby groups. MSc thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland. 149 pages. [GSB#
002E/0383]
Hibbard, J P and Williams, H 1976: The Dunnage Melange, Newfoundland (2e). In
Report of Activities Part A. Geological Survey of Canada, Paper, No. 76-01A, pages
183-185. [GSB# NFLD/2007]
Horne, G S 1969: Early Ordovician chaotic deposits in the Central Volcanic Belt of
northeastern Newfoundland. Geological Society of America Bulletin, Vol. 80, pages
2451-2464. [GSB# 002E/0188]
Hussey, A.
(2005): Assessment report on prospecting, rock and stream sediment
sampling on the Notre Dame Bay Gold project for licences 9815M, 9816M, 9817M,
9818M and 9819M in the Bay of Exploits area, Newfoundland, Cornerstone Resources
Inc., Newfoundland and Labrador Geological Survey, 14 pages, (Non Confidential
Assessment Report).
Kay, M 1970: Flysch and bouldery mudstone in northeast Newfoundland. In Flysch
sedimentology in North America. Compiled by J. Lajoie, Geological Association of
Canada, Special Paper, No. 7, pages 155-164. [GSB# 002E/0221]
19
Kay, M 1972: Dunnage Melange and Lower Paleozoic deformation in northeastern
Newfoundland. In Section 3: tectonics. Compiled by J. E. Gill, International Geological
Congress, Proceedings, Vol. 24, No. 3, pages 122-133. [GSB# NFLD/0647]
Kay, M 1976: Dunnage Melange and subduction of the Protacadic Ocean, northeast
Newfoundland. Geological Society of America, Special Paper, No. 175, 49 pages. [GSB#
002E/0365]
Lorenz, B E 1984: A study of the igneous intrusive rocks of the Dunnage Melange,
Newfoundland. PhD thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland. 244 pages. [GSB#
NFLD/2160]
Lorenz, B.E
1985: The study of the igneous intrusive rocks of the Dunnage melange,
Newfoundland. Ph.D. thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John’s,
Newfoundland, 220 pages.
Murray, A., and Howley, J.P. (1881)
Reports of the geological Survey of Newfoundland from 1864-1880. Edward
Stanford, London, 536 pages.
O’Brien, B.H.
(1990) – Geology of the New Bay area [parts of 2E/6 and 2E/11], Notre Dame Bay,
Newfoundland. Scale 1:50,000. Newfoundland Department of Mines and Energy,
Geological Survey Branch, Map 90-124. [Open File 002E/0767].
O'Brien, B H 1991: Geology of the Western Arm Brook-Leading Tickles area [parts of
2E/5, 6, 11], Notre Dame Bay, Newfoundland. Unpublished Map 91-171 Geological
Survey Branch, Department of Mines and Energy, Government of Newfoundland and
Labrador Open File 002E/0809
O'Brien, B H 1992: Geology of the region around Lewisporte [parts of 2E/2, 3, 6, 7],
north-central Newfoundland. Unpublished Map 92-25 Geological Survey Branch,
Department of Mines and Energy, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador Open
File 002E/0852
20
O'Brien, B H 1993: A mapper’s guide to Notre Dame Bays folded thrust faults: evolution
and regional development. In Current Research. Geological Survey Branch, Department
of Mines and Energy, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador Report 93-01, pages
279-291. [GSB# NFLD/2496]
O'Brien, B. H.
(2003) Geology of the central Notre Dame bay region( Parts of NTS Areas 2E/3,6,11),
Northeastern Newfoundland, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, Department
of Mines and Energy, Geological Survey, Report 03-03, 147 pages.
Patrick, T O H 1956: Comfort Cove, Newfoundland. Geological Survey of Canada,
Paper, No. 55-31 [GSB# 002E/07/0096]
Sheppard, Q
1990: First year assessment report on prospecting and geochemical exploration for
licence 3773 on claim block 6331 in the Powderhouse Cove area, Newfoundland.
Sheppard, Q Unpublished report, 19 pages. [GSB# 002E/06/0749]
St.Croix, L & Taylor, D. (1991)
Ice Flow indicators, Comfort Cove map sheet, 2E/7, Geological Survey Branch,
Department of Mines and Energy, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, Open
File 2E/07/0771, Map 91-011.
Wasowski, J.J and Jacobi, R.D. (1985)
Geochemistry and tectonic significance of mafic volcanic blocks in the Dunnage
Melange, North Central Newfoundland, Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Volume 22
Number 9, pages 1248-1256.
Williams, H., Colman-Sadd, S. P., and Swinden, H. S.
(1988) Tectonostratagraphic Subdivisions of Central Newfoundland in Current Research,
Part B. GSC, Paper 88-1b, pages 91-98.
Williams, H 1962: Botwood, West Half, Map - Area, Newfoundland, 2e/w. Geological
Survey of Canada, Paper, No. 62-09 [GSB# 002E/0109]
Williams, H 1963: Botwood Map - Area. In Summary Of Research: Field, 1962.
Geological Survey of Canada, Paper, No. 63-01, pages 60. [GSB# NFLD/2035]
21
Williams, H 1964: Geology, Botwood, Newfoundland. Geological Survey of Canada,
Preliminary Map, No. 60-1963 [GSB# 002E/0115]
Williams, H 1969: Botwood Map Area, Newfoundland (2e). In Report of Activities Part
A, April to October 1968. Geological Survey of Canada, Paper, No. 69-01A, pages 3.
[GSB# NFLD/1999]
Williams, H. 1972
Stratigraphy of the Botwood map area, northeastern Newfoundland. Geological
Survey of Canada, Open File 113, 103 pages
Williams, H. and Hibbard, J.P. (1976).
The Dunnage Melange, Newfoundland (2E), E.M.R. Research Agreement No.
1135-D-4-94/75, Regional and Economic Geology Division, Geological Survey of
Canada, Paper 76-1A, pages 183-185.
William's. H. 1978
Tectonic Lithofacies of The Appalachian Orogen: Memorial University of
Newfoundland, Map 1
Williams, H 1991: Melanges and coticule occurrences in the northeast Exploits Subzone,
Newfoundland. In Lithoprobe East, report of Transect Meeting, November 29-30, 1991,
Memorial University of Newfoundland, St Johns, Newfoundland. Compiled by G. M.
Quinlan, Lithoprobe Report, No. 23, pages 49-60. [GSB# NFLD/2224]
Williams, H 1992: Melanges and coticule occurrences in the northeast Exploits Subzone,
Newfoundland. In Current Research, part D, eastern Canada and national and general
programs. Geological Survey of Canada, Paper, No. 92-01D, pages 121-127. [GSB#
NFLD/2562]
Williams, H 1993: Stratigraphy structure of the Botwood Belt and definition of the Dog
Bay Line in northeastern Newfoundland. In Current Research, part D, eastern Canada and
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19-27. [GSB# NFLD/2561]
22
Williams, H 1994: The Dunnage Melange, Newfoundland, revisited. In Eastern Canada
and national and general programs. Geological Survey of Canada, Current Research, No.
1994-D, pages 23-31. [GSB# NFLD/2589]
Willaims, H. (1995)
Dunnage Zone-Newfoundland: in Chapter 3 of Geology of the AppalachianCaledonian Orogen in Canada and Greenland, (Ed) H. Williams: GSC, Geology of
Canada, no: 6, p. 142-166.
23
Illustrations:
Tables:
Table I
Property Information
Licence
#
Licence
Holder
Issued
Date
Report
Due date
# of
Claims
Required
Expenditures
Excess
Expenditure
s
Map
Sheet
14406m
Eddie
Quinlan
December
24, 2007
February
23, 2007
96
$19200.00
$19774.71
2E/06
Table II
List of Personnel & Contractors
Personnel
NAME
LOCATION
TITLE
Eddie Quinlan
Birchy Bay, NL
Prospector
Andy Budden
Baytona, NL
Prospector
Fred Fudge
Baytona, NL
Prospector
Roland Quinlan
Birchy Bay, NL
Prospector
Wade Mugford
Baytona, NL
Prospector
Phillip Freake
Baytona, NL
Geological Technician
Contractors
NAME
LOCATION
DESCRIPTION/TITLE
Quinlan Prospecting Inc.
Birchy Bay, NL
Prospector & Scintillometer Supplier
Eastern Analytical Ltd
Springdale, NL
Geochemical Laboratory
Actlabs
Ontario, Canada
Geochemical laboratory
Appendices:
Appendix I
Statement of Expenditures
Appendix I
Statement of Expenditures
Licence 14406m
Prospecting
45 man days = $15,750.00
Scintillometer rental
Spectrometer Rental
50 days x $60 = $3000.00
5 days x $100 = $500.00
Analytical Cost
Shipping and Transport
Transportation
$3511.05
$2,000.00
Truck 50 days @ $75.00 = $3,750.00
ATV 10 days @ $50.00 = $500.00
50 days x $30 = $1,500.00
Gas
Trip to Baie Verte (Spectrometer)
Meals
$330.00
55 days @ $30.00 = $1650.00
Research
2 days
= $700.00
Report Writing
2 days
= $700.00
Subtotal $33,891.05
$5,083.66
Total $38,974.71
Administration 15%
Excess expenditures to be applied to consecutive years
Respectfully,
Eddie Quinlan, February 2008
Appendix II
Analytical Certificates
Sample
Au
Ce
Sr
Ba
Fe
P
Hg
Mg
As
V
Na
Mo
Al
Be
Ca
Zn
Cu
Sb
Ag
Pb
Bi
Ti
Cd
Number
ppb
ppm
ppm
ppm
%
%
ppm
%
ppm
ppm
%
ppm
%
ppm
%
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
%
ppm
Co
Ni
W
La
ppm ppm ppm ppm
K
Mn
%
ppm
Sn
Cr
ppm ppm
U
ppm
--------------------------------- ---------- -------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----------64374
26
429
53
157
9.77
0.15
1
0.28
696
1
0.09
15
0.82
9.8
0.12
51
119
5
0.2
155
2
0.08
2.0
9
20
10
39
0.19
1048
11
44
18.7
64375
46
237
>220
266
>10.00
0.79
1
0.20
604
1
0.11
4
1.35
>22
0.37
83
268
46
0.6
475
2
0.39
3.1
16
28
16
64
0.20
1728
31
1
108.4
64376
15
299
29
138
5.67
0.09
1
0.09
296
18
0.18
14
0.66
3.6
0.33
52
74
8
0.2
213
2
0.06
1.1
12
29
10
10
0.24
239
10
18
22.9
64377
5
376
180
402
>10.00
0.21
1
0.26
381
14
0.17
4
1.60
7.8
1.05
94
115
21
0.2
201
2
0.15
1.7
11
24
10
35
0.51
168
14
1
38.5
64378
18
319
26
>550
6.82
0.11
1
0.14
299
51
0.07
18
0.56
6.2
0.04
61
99
9
0.2
200
2
0.08
1.2
18
26
10
13
0.16
789
12
110
37.2
64379
5
>440
185
256
4.65
0.11
1
0.12
354
128
0.10
14
0.76
5.9
0.25
64
64
18
0.2
76
2
0.01
1.5
15
33
10
28
0.32
166
10
63
60
64380
5
235
137
237
>10.00
0.34
1
0.41
1105
1
0.11
9
0.84
20.3
0.63
153
175
43
0.2
289
2
0.22
2.3
20
47
10
57
0.17
2031
19
1
80.7
64381
5
285
161
110
7.58
0.08
1
0.03
310
43
0.13
8
0.61
6.0
0.05
70
48
5
0.2
144
2
0.01
2.3
6
16
10
49
0.16
472
10
49
47.1
64382
5
313
173
110
>10.00
0.37
1
0.12
307
1
0.11
3
1.76
6.1
0.42
68
152
5
0.2
315
2
0.27
2.4
9
21
10
96
0.11
4881
20
1
65.8
64383
184
423
48
103
3.97
0.03
1
0.03
399
38
0.14
4
0.49
1.1
0.01
24
53
10
2.6
22
2
0.01
1.1
4
11
10
11
0.13
74
10
115
8.4
64384
5
>440
>220
132
>10.00
0.70
1
0.16
213
1
0.12
1
1.70
14.1
0.07
960
388
29
0.2
475
2
0.99
2.1
5
4
11
>220
0.11
625
40
1
97.4
64385
5
203
163
155
>10.00
0.32
1
0.10
240
1
0.14
2
0.94
4.7
0.14
418
170
54
0.3
232
2
0.35
2.2
4
14
10
121
0.20
2734
18
1
39
64386
47
>440
>220
129
>10.00
0.39
1
0.14
250
1
0.16
4
1.56
20.1
0.06
847
341
22
0.3
387
2
0.80
1.2
11
19
22
>220
0.08
443
35
1
85.7
Appendix III
Sample Descriptions
Sample #
15841
15842
15857
15858
15859
15860
15861
15862
15863
15864
15865
15866
15867
15868
15869
15871
15872
15874
15875
15876
15877
15878
15879
15880
15881
15882
15883
15884
15885
15886
15887
15888
15889
15909
15915
15916
15917
15918
15919
15920
15921
15922
15923
15924
15925
15926
15927
15928
Licence #
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
Sample Easting
float
640212
float
640212
outcrop 640924
outcrop 640924
outcrop 640924
outcrop 640924
outcrop 640965
outcrop 640965
outcrop 640965
outcrop 640823
outcrop 640221
outcrop 640221
outcrop 640221
subcrop 639554
subcrop 639554
subcrop 639554
subcrop 639554
outcrop 640823
outcrop 640823
outcrop 640112
outcrop 640114
outcrop 640121
outcrop 640121
outcrop 640124
outcrop 640040
outcrop 640040
outcrop 640040
outcrop 640053
outcrop 640058
outcrop 639962
outcrop 639960
outcrop 639952
outcrop 639948
outcrop 640924
outcrop 640665
outcrop 640665
outcrop 640665
outcrop 640665
subcrop 640665
local float 640658
outcrop 640810
outcrop 640806
outcrop 640819
outcrop 640819
outcrop 641011
subcrop 640851
outcrop 640824
subcrop 640824
Northing
5464948
5464948
5465776
5465776
5465776
5465776
5465868
5465868
5465868
5465765
5465803
5465803
5465803
5464350
5464350
5464350
5464350
5465765
5465765
5465223
5465219
5465198
5465198
5465176
5464913
5464913
5464913
5464902
5464882
5465484
5465424
5465414
5465412
5465776
5465635
5465635
5465635
5465635
5465635
5465533
5465533
5465536
5465550
5465550
5465791
5465787
5465796
5465796
Rock Type Description
felsic
1.2m x 1m boulder, fine grain, coarse grain and medium grain, up to 4000cps in coarse grain
felsic
1.2m x 1m boulder, fine grain, coarse grain and medium grain, up to 4000cps in coarse grain
mafic
highly altered, minor rust, highly magnetic, trace py-cpy-po
mafic
highly altered, minor rust, highly magnetic, trace py-cpy-po, iron red
mafic
highly altered, minor rust, highly magnetic, trace py-cpy-po, 1% py-po-cpy
mafic
rusty zone, 2-3m x 8m
mafic
rusty, coarse grained, highly leached
mafic
rusty, coarse grained, highly leached
mafic
rusty, coarse grained, highly leached
mafic
rusty, coarse grained, highly leached
argillite
rusty, fractured, iron & sulphur stained, 1m wide exposed, 760cps outcrop, 140 bag count
argillite
highly sil,cherty, rusty, minor fracturing, 2-3% py diss & veinlets, iron stained, 700cps outcrop, 135 bag count
argillite
highly sil,cherty, rusty, minor fracturing, 2-3% py diss & veinlets, iron stained, 920cps outcrop, 125 bag count
mafic
highly carb,fractured carb, rusty, 650cps outcrop, 120 bag count
mafic
highly carb,fractured carb, rusty, 2000cps outcrop, 300 bag count
mafic
highly carb,fractured carb, rusty, 900cps outcrop, 200 bag count
mafic
highly carb,fractured carb, rusty, 1100cps outcrop, 300 bag count
mafic
rusty, leached, trace to minor sulphides
mafic
altered, minor rust, 1-2% py-po
sediment reddish/orange carb carb>10,000cps outcrop, 4120cps bag count
sediment reddish/orange carb carb>10,000cps outcrop, 2630cps bag count
sediment reddish/orange carb carb>10,000cps outcrop, 6133cps bag count
sediment reddish/orange carb carb>10,000cps outcrop, 4700cps bag count
sediment reddish/orange carb carb>10,000cps outcrop, 8400cps bag count
sediment sheared, fractured shale, rusty & carb, highly leached, adjacent to felsic dyke, reddish/orange carb rich, 8800cps outcrop
sediment reddish/orange carb carb>10,000cps outcrop, 8400cps bag count
felsic
felsic dyke adjacent to 881
sediment same zone as 882, >10,000cps outcrop,reddish/orange carb carb
sediment same zone as 882, >10,000cps outcrop,reddish/orange carb carb
sediment >10,000cps outcrop,reddish/orange carb carb
sediment >10,000cps outcrop,reddish/orange carb carb, more competent rock
sediment >10,000cps outcrop,reddish/orange carb carb
sediment >10,000cps outcrop,reddish/orange carb carb
mafic
very rusty/carb, minor shale frags & quartz, 3-4% po-py, trace cpy
q-vein
10cm wide, sil vol & shale frags, vuggy, trace asp-py-cpy
q-vein
15cm wide, sil vol & shale frags, vuggy, trace asp-py-cpy
breccia vein 4m wide, in shale/vol melange, highly sil frags, 1-2% fine& cubic asp-py
breccia vein same as before, same zone, 1-2% asp-py
q-vein
40cm wide block, with sil frags, 3-4% py, trace asp
porphyry
q-vein rich sil, 1-2% asp-py
mafic
q-calcite rich, 5-10% po-py
mafic
q-calcite rich, brecciated at contact edge, 5-6% po, 3-4% py-cpy
breccia vein q-vein rich melange, minor to 1% asp-py, trace cpy
breccia vein same zone, 2m W, minor to 15 py-asp
breccia vein q-vein rich melange, 1m wide zone, 3-4%py, trace asp
mafic
20cm x 10cm, highly leached, 10-15% po-py with cpy
mafic
plug in melange, minor q-calcite veining, rusty, 1-3% py-po or asp, minor cpy
mafic
q-calcite vein breccia, 60cm x 30cm, 6-10% po-asp-py, 5m S of 927
Outcrop CPS Bag Count CPS
4000
600
4000
600
760
700
920
650
2000
900
1100
140
135
125
120
300
200
300
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
4120
2630
6133
4700
8400
8000 4500
>10,000
8400
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
Sample #
15929
15930
16010
16011
16012
16013
16014
16015
16016
16017
16018
16043
64374
64375
64376
64377
64378
64379
64380
64381
64382
64383
64384
64385
64386
Licence #
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
14406m
Sample Easting Northing Rock Type Description
outcrop 640553 5465695 breccia vein highly sil, q-vein rich melange, 50cm wide zone, minor py-asp, quartz rich sample
outcrop 640553 5465695 breccia vein same zone as 929, wallrock rich sample, minor py-asp
subcrop 640116 5465347 breccia
highly sil, sheared shale, >10,000cps outcrop, red/orange carb veinlets along fractures, minor q-veins with py
subcrop 640145 5465272 breccia
highly sil, sheared shale, >10,000cps outcrop, q-vein rich, minor fine grain py with py
subcrop 640145 5465272 sediment highly sil, sheared shale, 20cm wide red/orange carb zone, adjacent to 1m wide felsic dyke (300-400cps on dyke)
subcrop 640069 5465472 breccia
highly sil shale, vuggy, sheared, minor q-veins, 1% fine diss py, very little red/orange carb, green crystals in vugs
subcrop 640071 5465456 breccia
highly sil shale, ext carb, calcite/quartz rich, minor py
subcrop 640073 5465455 breccia
highly sil shale, orange/red carb veinlets, minor py, vuggy, some black granular mass in vugs
subcrop 640078 5465442 breccia
highly sil shale, minor vugs and green crystal, minor py,minor red/orange carb
subcrop 640078 5465442 breccia
highly sil shale, minor vugs and green crystal, minor py,minor red/orange carb
subcrop 640076 5465455 breccia
highly sil, q-vein rich, vuggy shale, minor py, minor red/orange carb
outcrop 639554 5464350 mafic
minor rust, very hard compact rock
outcrop 640189 5465565 sediment sheared sed
outcrop 640204 5465535 sediment narrow seam of hematite in cooked seds
outcrop 640226 5465481 sediment sheared sed
outcrop 640219 5465498 sediment sheared sed
outcrop 640230 5465459 sediment sheared sed
outcrop 640161 5465666 sediment sil breccia in seds, 1-2% py
outcrop 640153 5465668 sediment breccia seds
outcrop 640127 5465119 sediment sheared sed
outcrop 640017 5465621 sediment mush….seds
outcrop 640030 5465627 sediment sheared sed
outcrop 640033 5465636 sediment rock fragments
outcrop 640024 5465621 sediment rock fragments
outcrop 640025 5465606 sediment rock fragments
Outcrop CPS Bag Count CPS
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
6700
6000
4000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
5000
>10,000
6500
3000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
>10,000
1300
7600
6500
600
Company
Freewest Resources Canada Inc.
SAMPLE No
UTM-Nad 83 EAST
UTM-Nad 83 NORTH
ASSAY LAB
SAMPLE TAKEN BY
DATE
ROCK DESCRIPTION
SAMPLE TYPE
MINERALIZATION
COMMENTS
64374
640189
5465565
Eastern
Daron Slaney
Sept 4,08
sheared sed
o/c…grab
tc > 9999 cps
64375
640204
5465535
Eastern
Daron Slaney
Sept 4,08
narrow seam of hematite in cooked seds
o/c…grab
tc > 9999
64376
640226
5465481
Eastern
Daron Slaney
Sept 4,08
sheared sed
o/c…grab
tc > 9999
64377
640219
5465498
Eastern
Daron Slaney
Sept 4,08
sheared sed
o/c…grab
tc > 9999
64378
640230
5465459
Eastern
Daron Slaney
Sept 4,08
sheared sed
o/c…grab
tc > 9999
64379
640161
5465666
Eastern
Daron Slaney
Sept 4,08
sil breccia in seds
o/c…grab
64380
640153
5465668
Eastern
Daron Slaney
Sept 4,08
breccia seds
subo/c…grab
tc > 9999
64381
640127
5465119
Eastern
Daron Slaney
Sept 4,08
sheared sed
o/c…grab
tc > 9999
64382
640017
5465621
Eastern
Daron Slaney
Sept 4,08
mush….seds
o/c…grab
tc > 9999
64383
640030
5465627
Eastern
Daron Slaney
Sept 4,08
sheared sed
o/c…grab
tc > 9999
64384
640033
5465636
Eastern
Daron Slaney
Sept 4,08
rock fragments
till…grab
tc > 9999
64385
640024
5465621
Eastern
Daron Slaney
Sept 4,08
rock fragments
till…grab
tc >6500
64386
640025
5465606
Eastern
Daron Slaney
Sept 4,08
rock fragments
till…grab
tc > 9999
1-2% py
tc > 9999
Appendix IV
Pictures: