March 12-15, 2014 Miami, FL - Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

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March 12-15, 2014 Miami, FL - Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine
 March 12-15, 2014
Miami, FL
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on About the Conference
The Southern Group on Educa onal Affairs (SGEA) is a professional development organiza on affiliated with the American Associa on of Medical Colleges (AAMC). The SGEA fosters excellence along the con nuum of medical educa on — undergraduate medical educa on, graduate medical educa on, and con nuing medical educa on — by providing a forum for discussing the concerns of the medical educa on profession, serving as a resource, and ac ng in an advisory capacity to the Group on Educa onal Affairs and the AAMC. This mission is accomplished through communica on, coopera on and shared respect among its members. Par cipants in the Southern Group on Educa onal Affairs (SGEA) annual conference include medical educators, staff and students from 46 regional medical schools. The 2014 conference tle is Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on. The program is focused around three main themes: What do we teach and measure? Changes in assessment and accredita on
How do we teach and assess? Innova ons in teaching and assessment
Who teaches and assesses? Faculty career paths in medical educa on
Conference Objec ves
Upon comple on of this educa onal ac vity, you will able to: 
Provide informa on on accredita on standards and changes in na onal level assessments in order to disseminate/guide their home ins tu ons.  Create strategies in order to implement innova ons in teaching and assessment methodologies in your home ins tu on.  Consider how new opportuni es and structures in medical schools are influencing faculty career paths that will ul mately lead to improved quality standards and sustainability in medical educa on. Accredita on and Credit Designa on Informa on | CME
This ac vity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essen al Areas and policies of the Accredita on Council for Con nuing Medical Educa on through the joint sponsorship of Florida Interna onal University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine (FIU/HWCOM) and the Southern Group on Educa onal Affairs (SGEA). FIU/HWCOM is accredited by the ACCME to provide con nuing medical educa on for physicians. Florida Interna onal University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine designates this live ac vity for a maximum of 15.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their par cipa on in the ac vity. There is no commercial support for this mee ng . Page 2 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Table of Contents
Welcome Welcome Le er Program Planning Commi ee Informa on on the Host Schools Informa on on the City of Miami Conference
Conference Schedule Invited Sessions Addi onal Workshops General/Useful Information
Relevant Financial Disclosures
Abstracts
Floor Map and Notes Page 3 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on WELCOME
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2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on On behalf of the 2014 Southern Group on Educa onal Affairs, we would like to welcome all conference a endees to the mee ng. Please take a moment to thank each of these individuals for their efforts to make this conference a reflec on me in Miami. Program Planning Committee
Program Chair: Karin Esposito, MD, PhD, FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Meeting Chair: Kelly Bounchareune, MPA, FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Erica Brownfield, MD, FACP, School of Medicine, Emory University George Dambach, PhD, FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine
Joanna Drowos, DO, MPH, MBA, FAU Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine
Lindsey Henson, MD, FAU Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine Barry Issenberg, MD, UM Miller School of Medicine Kathleen O'Kane Kreutzer, MEd, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University Carla Lupi, MD, FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine
Alex Mechaber, MD, UM Miller School of Medicine
Vivian Obeso, MD, FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine
Peer-Review Subcommittee
Chair: Carla Lupi, MD, FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine
Co-Chair: Ivette Motola, MD, UM Miller School of Medicine Joanna Drowos, DO, MPH, MBA, FAU Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine
Karin Esposito, MD, PhD, FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Barry Issenberg, MD, UM Miller School of Medicine Page 6 of 81
Florida Interna onal University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, a new public medical school in South Florida, is transforming the future of public health and educa onal opportunity in the region. Created in 2006 amid pressing community health concerns and a projected cri cal shortage of physicians na onally, the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine has developed a curriculum that reflects an innova ve, 21st century approach to health care and medical educa on. FACTS
Authoriza on by the State Board of Governors: March 2006 Opening of the FIU College of Medicine: Fall 2009 Number of students at full capacity: 480 First Green Family Founda on NeighborhoodHELPTM
household visit by interdisciplinary student team: Fall 2010 Full accredita on by the Liaison Commi ee on Medical
Educa on: February 2013 Gradua on of first class of 33 students: Spring 2013 Match rate of first class: 100% Percent of students who are Florida residents: approximately 80% Opening of FIU Health faculty group prac ce: 2011 ACCME Accredita on with Commenda on: 2013 Partners in Graduate Medical Educa on: Bap st Health System, Broward Health System, Citrus Health Network, Miami Children’s Hospital, Mt. Sinai Medical Center Clinical affiliates training clerkship students: Bap st Health South Florida, Broward Health, Citrus Health Network, Cleveland Clinic Founda on, Jackson Health System, Leon Medical Centers, Memorial Healthcare System, Miami Children's Hospital, Miami VA Healthcare System, Mt. Sinai Medical Center, South Florida Evalua on and Treatment Center, Universal Heritage Ins tute For further informa on, please visit our website: h p://medicine.fiu.edu/ Page 7 of 81
Fact Sheet on UHealth/Miller
 As South Florida’s only university medical system, UHealth is a vital component of the community. The University of Miami Health System delivers leading‐edge pa ent care by the region’s best doctors, powered by the groundbreaking research and medical educa on of the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine.  UHealth and the Miller School are dedicated to providing the latest in evidence‐based clinical care to pa ents, conduc ng breakthrough research, educa ng the next genera on of physicians, and being a valued community partner.  The Miller School and UHealth have 8,000 employees, including more than 1,400 physicians in more than 100 special es and subspecial es who annually have more than 2.7 million primary and specialty care pa ent encounters.  The UHealth system includes the University’s flagship University of Miami Hospital, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Ins tute – ranked as the na on’s No. 1 eye program for 10 consecu ve years – and more than 15 satellite loca ons in four South Florida coun es.  UHealth and the Miller School also provide physicians to the county‐owned safety net hospital, Jackson Memorial, which includes Holtz Children’s Hospital, and the Miami VA Medical Center. They train more than 1,000 residents at Jackson, and 84 at the regional campus in Palm Beach County.  The Miller School ranks in the top third among U.S. medical schools in total research funding awarded, with UHealth/Miller School physicians and scien sts currently pursuing more than 1,600 projects with $254 million in external grants and contracts.  UHealth/Miller School physicians and scien sts are conduc ng approximately 960 clinical trials aimed at improving the diagnoses and/or treatments for brain tumors, cardiovascular disease, stroke, pulmonary disease, burns and a myriad of other disorders.  UHealth and the Miller School are home to a number of acclaimed research ins tutes that are powered by grants and philanthropic support, including the Diabetes Research Ins tute, The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, the Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Ins tute, The John P. Hussman Ins tute for Human Genomics and The Dr. John T. Macdonald Founda on Biomedical Nanotechnology Ins tute at the University of Miami (BioNIUM). Page 8 of 81
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2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Informa on on the City of Miami
A
M
The tropics meet big‐city entertainment in this metropolis by the sea, where white sand beaches complement gli ering high rises, and a fascina ng intersec on of cultures creates an interna onal dining and entertainment scene like nowhere else in the United States. In the late 1800’s, Julia Tu le, the "Mother of Miami", convinced Standard Oil cofounder Henry Flagler to extend his railroad from central Florida to Miami, build a luxury hotel, and lay out a new town. She did so by sending him perfect Miami orange blossoms during a crop freeze north of Miami. The railroad arrived in 1896. The City of Miami was incorporated on July 28 that same year. Miami Facts:
 460+ hotels and motels and nearly 50,000 rooms  35 municipali es, including Miami‐Dade County, City of Miami, City of Miami Beach and Bal Harbour Village  Miami Interna onal Airport is currently the no. 2 gateway in the U.S. for interna onal passengers welcoming a total of 38.3 million passengers in 2011.  Professional Teams: Miami Marlins Baseball, Miami Dolphins Football, Miami Heat Basketball and Florida Panthers Hockey.  PortMIAMI, “Cruise Capital of the World,” handled more than 4 million passengers in 2011.  “Miami’s Cuban Coffee rated by Forbes Traveler as one of the country’s best “street food”.  Miami Beach’s Art Deco District contains the world’s largest collec on of Art Deco Architecture (800+ buildings)  Miami is also home to the largest concentra on of Bou que Hotels in the world.  Miami is home to the world’s only Everglades eco‐system.  Miami is home to 150+ ethnici es and 60+ languages. Miami provides the sun‐splashed se ng for all kinds of adventures—from teeing off on the golf course to taking off across the waves on a boat tour, or taking in the beauty and mystery of Everglades Na onal Park, the only subtropical preserve in North America. A thriving arts scene, dusk‐to‐dawn nightlife, great shopping and exci ng annual events are also a part of the mix in the Magic City, whose many charms never fail to enchant, cap vate and persuade visitors to come back for more. Transporta on: Miami Interna onal Airport is among the busiest airports in the world. There are over 80 airlines serving MIA to approximately 150 des na ons around the globe. See list below of ci es served by region (non‐stop flights). The Miami Interna onal Airport is located just 12 miles (just 18 minutes) from the Miami Beach Conven on Center. Page 10 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Informa on on the City of Miami—Con nued
When passengers arrive at the Miami Interna onal Airport, they have a number of op ons available to them for ground transporta on:  On demand: Taxicabs and SuperShu le services are available 24 hours a day/7 days per week (reserva ons not required).  Public TransportaƟon:
 Metrorail: Miami‐Dade County’s 25‐mile dual track, elevated rapid transit system provides service to Miami Interna onal Airport from downtown Miami.  Metrobus: Our public bus system is designed to intersect with Metrorail and Metromover and serves all major business, shopping, entertainment, and cultural centers, as well as major hospitals and schools.  Airport Flyer: Express bus provides convenient transporta on from the Miami Intermodal Center (Rental Car Center) to Miami Beach and downtown Miami.  Car Rental: Miami Interna onal Airport passengers now have a convenient, one‐stop shop for all their rental car needs just east of MIA. The MIA Rental Car Center (RCC), consolidates under one roof the opera ons of 16 rental car companies currently serving the area surrounding MIA. The MIA Mover transports travelers from MIA's 3rd level train sta on to the RCC’s spacious fourth‐level customer service lobby, where they can pick the company and vehicle of their choice from a combined inventory of 6,500 rental cars.  Hotel ShuƩles: Several Miami area hotels offer complimentary shu le service to and from the airport. MIA has wheelchair‐accessible taxicabs and SuperShu le vans available upon request, located on the ground level of the terminal, outside the baggage claim area. In addi on, the Greater Miami and Beaches area provide a wide variety of transporta on throughout the city, including:  TROLLEY: It’s FREE and it’s environmentally sustainable! There are two lines: one in Downtown Miami and one in Coral Gables. Both trolley lines connect with Metrorail sta ons, shopping, dining, art galleries and residen al areas. 
METROBUS: Cruise past traffic when you choose limited‐stop, express bus service on the I‐95 Dade‐Broward Express, the Miami Beach Airport Flyer, the Kendall Cruiser buses or the limited‐stop service buses on the South Miami‐Dade Busway. 
METROMOVER: This free people mover serves Downtown Miami and the Omni and Brickell areas. Service is available 5:00 a.m. to midnight, seven days a week. 
METRORAIL: Miami‐Dade County’s 25‐mile dual track, elevated rapid transit system provides service to Miami Interna‐
onal Airport (MIA) and runs from Kendall through South Miami, Coral Gables, and downtown Miami; to the Civic Center/
Jackson Memorial Hospital area; and to Brownsville, Liberty City, Hialeah, and Medley in northwest Miami‐Dade, with connec ons to Broward and Palm Beach coun es at the Tri‐Rail/Metrorail transfer sta on 
DECO BIKE: This bike sharing program provides access to about 1,000 Deco Bikes at over 85 convenient loca ons, 24 hours a day. 
SEGWAYS: Tour the South Beach Art Deco District on a Segway or rent a ride with a free self‐guided tour map. 
WATER TAXI: Water taxi service provides private charters for up to 38 passengers, pick‐up and drop‐off to and from special events, transporta on with fixed schedule hop‐on and hop‐off loca ons.
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2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on CONFERENCE
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2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 2014
TIMES
SESSION NAME
12:00 PM — 5:00 PM REGISTRATION
2:30 PM — 6:30 PM Pre‐Conference Workshop
LEAD (LEAD fellows only)
ABSTRACT #
LOCATION
PALM COURT—
LOBBY LEVEL WS1 JAPENGO—
LOBBY LEVEL ABSTRACT #
LOCATION
THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 2014
TIMES
SESSION NAME
8:00 AM — 5:00 PM REGISTRATION
RIVERFRONT HALL LOBBY SOUTH 8:00 AM—5:00 PM AAMC: PIVIO and MedEdPortal Exhibit Table
ORCHID A‐D LOBBY 8:00 AM — 12:00 PM Pre‐Conference Workshop
LEAD (LEAD fellows only)
WS2 ORCHID C 9:00 AM — 12:00 PM Pre‐Conference Workshop
MERC: Data Management and Preparing for the
Sta s cal Consulta on
WS3 HIBISCUS B 9:00 AM — 12:00 PM Invited Session
AAMC: ASSET and Curriculum Inventory
IS1 HIBISCUS A 9:00 AM — 12:00 PM Administrator Workshop
‐ Developing You: Steps to Develop Your Professional Footprint (WS4)
‐ Mee ng the Needs of a Diverse Student Popula on (WS5)
WS4—WS5 ORCHID D 12:00 PM — 1:00 PM Conference Welcome (lunch will be provided)
‐ Karin Esposito, MD, PhD, Program Chair, Florida Interna onal University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine ‐ Kelly Bounchareune, MPA, Mee ng Chair, Florida Interna onal University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine ‐ Kathy O'Kane Kreutzer, M.Ed., SGEA Chair, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine ‐ David J. Bjorkman, MD, MSPH, Dean and Execu ve Director of Medical Affairs, Florida Atlan c University Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine ‐ Pascal J. Goldschmidt, MD, Dean and Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs, University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine ‐ John A. Rock, MD, MSPH, Dean and Senior Vice President for Health Affairs, Florida Interna onal University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine ‐LEAD Fellows’ Gradua on and Introduc on of New Fellows  Ruth Levine, MD, Regional Director  Sheila Chauvin, PhD, and Bri a Thompson, PhD , Co‐
RIVERFRONT HALL SOUTH Directors For more informa on on Invited Sessions (IS), Workshops (WS), Oral Presenta ons (OP), Small Group Discussions (SG), Demonstra ons (DS),
and Poster Session (PS) refer to the Abstracts sec on in the program. Page 13 of 81
1:00 PM — 2:00 PM Opening Plenary
Deborah Powell, MD Dean Emeritus and Professor of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology University of Minnesota Medical School "New Models of Medical Educa on: The EPAC Project and What It Can
Teach Us"
2:00 PM — 2:15 PM RIVERFRONT HALL SOUTH BREAK
2:15 PM — 6:00 PM Workshop
MERC: Ques onnaire Design and Survey Research 2:15 PM — 3:45 PM Invited Session
AAMC: Student Survey Update
The Medical Student Surveys Evolve: The Transforma on of the GQ
2:15 PM — 3:45 PM WS6 HIBISCUS B IS2 HIBISCUS A Workshop
Shaping Your Curricular Iden ty
WS7 ORCHID A 2:15 PM — 3:45 PM Workshop
Transforming Educa onal Ac vi es into Scholarship
WS8 ORCHID B 2:15 PM — 3:45 PM Demonstra on
DS1 — DS2 ‐ Communica ng Effec vely During Medical Emergencies: Integra ng
an Online, Pre‐Session Learning Module with Medical Simula on to
Train Undergraduate Medical Students in Effec ve Communica on
Skills Using the SBAR (Situa on, Background, Assessment, Recommen‐
da on) Framework (DS1) ‐ Riding the Wave of Change: Using Interac ve Videos to Teach and
Assess How Faculty and Residents Learn About Changes in Assessment
and Accredita on. (DS2) JASMINE 2:15 PM — 3:45 PM Small Group Discussion
Improving Medical Educa on Across the Con nuum by Crea ng a
Posi ve Learning Environment
SG1 ORCHID D 2:15 PM — 3:45 PM Oral Presenta ons: Tracks and Partnerships Across the Con nuum
OP1 — OP5 ORCHID C ‐ Leveraging Partnerships with Historically Black Colleges and Universi‐
es (HBCUs) to Successfully Diversify the Physician Workforce (OP1)
‐ Relieving the GME Bo le‐neck in Florida (OP2)
‐ Transi oning Quality Community Hospitals into Academic Medical
Centers (OP3) ‐ Family Medicine Accelerated Track (FMAT) Update on the 3‐year MD
(OP4)
‐ HEAL‐X: Tulane's Accelerated Curriculum for PhD's Becoming MD's.
(OP5) 3:45 PM — 4:00 PM BREAK
4:00 PM — 5:30 PM Invited Session
LCME Update 4:00 PM — 5:30 PM Workshop
WS9 Presenta on Design for Medical Educators – A Missing Piece of Faculty
Development
IS3 Page 14 of 81
RIVERFRONT HALL SOUTH ORCHID A 4:00 PM — 5:30 PM Workshop
A Model for a Cross‐Clerkship Curriculum in Evidence Based Medicine
4:00 PM — 5:30 PM Oral Presenta ons: Pedagogy Across the Con nuum WS10 ORCHID B OP6 — OP11 HIBISCUS A ‐ Team Based Learning: The Poten al U lity for Student Commentary
for Faculty Development (OP6)
‐ Group Learning Rapidly Plateaus for New Student Learning Teams
Using the Team‐based Learning Method (OP7)
‐ Solving the Case of the Missing Person: Mapping Sociocultural
Themes Longitudinally Across the Pre‐clinical Curriculum (OP8)
‐ Have we Dehumanized the Pa ent in Problem Based Learning? (OP9)
‐ GME Concentra ons: Supplemen ng Residency Training with Key
Content (OP10) ‐ Teaching the Business of Medicine Across the Con nuum of Medical
Educa on (OP11)
4:00 PM — 5:30 PM Small Group Discussion
Learning the Ropes: What New Course Directors Need to Know
SG2 ORCHID C 4:00 PM — 5:30 PM Small Group Discussion
Fair Measures: A Call to Transform Our Thinking About the
Assessment of Professionalism
SG3 ORCHID D 5:30 PM — 7:30 PM Recep on on the Riverfront  Heavy hors d’ouerves  Music by Arianna Neikrug Quintet, University of Miami, Frost School of Music RIVERWALK OUTDOOR TERRACE FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 2014
TIMES
SESSION NAME
ABSTRACT #
LOCATION
6:45 AM—8:00 AM Con nental Breakfast
RIVERFRONT HALL SOUTH 7:00 AM — 8:00 AM Steering Commi ee Mee ng (Steering Commi ee Only)
RIVERFRONT HALL SOUTH 8:00 AM — 9:00 AM Plenary Session
Lois Nora, MD, JD, MBA President and Chief Execu ve Officer American Board of Medical Special es (ABMS) "Doctors Across the Con nuum: What Role for Medical Educators?"
RIVERFRRONT HALL SOUTH 8:00 AM — 5:00 PM REGISTRATION
RIVERFRONT HALL LOBBY SOUTH 8:00 AM—5:00 PM AAMC: PIVIO and MedEdPortal Exhibit Table
ORCHID A‐D LOBBY 9:00 AM — 9:15 AM BREAK For more informa on on Invited Sessions (IS), Workshops (WS), Oral Presenta ons (OP), Small Group Discussions (SG), Demonstra ons (DS),
and Poster Session (PS) refer to the Abstracts sec on in the program. Page 15 of 81
10:00 AM—4:00 PM NOTE: Poster Presenters, please set up your poster(s) in the Upper/Lower Promenade.
Each poster board will be numbered.
9:15 AM — 10:45 AM Invited Session
AAMC: Introducing the "Core Entrustable Professional Ac vi es for
Entering Residency (CEPAER)"
IS4 RIVERFRONT HALL SOUTH 9:15 AM — 10:45 AM Workshop
Cultural & Linguis c Competence (CLC) in Healthcare: How to Plan,
Write, Implement, and Evaluate Your CLC Plan
WS11 ORCHID A 9:15 AM — 10:45 AM Workshop
Organizing Your Academic Self: Educator’s Por olio
WS12 ORCHID B OP12 — OP17 HIBISCUS B Oral Presenta ons: Professionalism and Learning Environment
Across the Con nuum
‐ Professionalism: Can we Assess its Many Facets? (OP12)
‐ Learning Environment Surveys and Survey Fa gue: How Many Items
Are Necessary? (OP13)
9:15 AM — 10:45 AM ‐ What Happens on Facebook Stays on Facebook: Student Beliefs
about Social Media and their Rela onship to Measures of Professional
and Personal Iden ty (OP14)
‐ Rela onship Between Study Strategies and Self‐Directed Learning in
Entering Medical Students – A Two Ins tu on Study (OP15)
‐ Assessing Medical Students’ Intrinsic Mo va ons: A Pilot Study of the
TriMetrix™ HD System (OP16)
‐ Mapping a Longitudinal Professionalism Theme in a Pre‐clinical
Curriculum (OP17)
9:15 AM — 10:45 AM Small Group Discussion
Competency‐Based Educa on and the Challenge of the Evidence‐Based
Medicine Entrustable Professional Ac vity
SG4 ORCHID C 9:15 AM — 10:45 AM Small Group Discussion
Introverted Medical Students: Their Challenges and Strengths in
Today’s Medical Training Environment
SG5 ORCHID D IS5 HIBISCUS A 10:45 AM — 11:00 AM BREAK 11:00 AM — 12:30 PM Invited Session
USME Step 2 CS Update
11:00 AM — 12:30 PM Workshop
Educa onal Scholarship Boot Camp: Preparing Your Educa onal
Materials for Peer Review and Publica on and Cri cally Reviewing
Educa onal Products WS13 ORCHID A 11:00 AM — 12:30 PM Workshop
Using Assessments to Iden fy At‐Risk Medical Students and Impact
Learning and Performance
WS14 ORCHID B Page 16 of 81
Oral Presenta ons: Training Across the Con nuum
‐ Perceived Levels of Clinical Skills Among Fourth Year Medical
Students Before and A er a Clinical Skills Capstone Course (OP18)
‐ Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery: A Pilot Study to Test the
Transferability to Obstetrics and Gynecology Residents (OP19)
‐ Con nuity Clinical Experience: Implementa on of a Longitudinal
11:00 AM — 12:30 PM Student Experience (OP20)
OP18— OP23 HIBISCUS B 11:00 AM — 12:30 PM Small Group Discussion
The Impact of Using “Entrustable Professional Ac vi es” to Guide
Medical Student Educa on: A Discussion of the Issues and Evalua on
of Poten al Solu ons
SG6 ORCHID C 11:00 AM — 12:30 PM Small Group Discussion
Scholarly Collabora on at a Distance: The Poten als and Challenges of
Web‐based Solu ons for Establishing Peer‐to‐Peer Networking and
Communi es of Prac ce
SG7 ORCHID D 11:00 AM — 12:30 PM Small Group Discussion
Learning from the Interprofessional Educa on (IPE) Success Stories:
The Tales of Two Ins tu ons
SG8 GARDENIA ‐ Pharmacology for the 21st Century: The Successful Implementa on
of an Innova ve Integra ve Pharmacotherapeu cs Curriculum for
Medical Students (OP21) ‐ It’s about TIME—Doctoring Course for Premedical Students (OP22)
‐ Medical Students’ A tudes and Learning Approaches: The Impact of
Time and an Integrated Curriculum (OP23) 12:30 PM — 2:30 PM Lunch on your own 12:30 PM—1:30 PM GME Business Mee ng (lunch provided)
ORCHID A 12:30 PM—1:30 PM CEI Business Mee ng (lunch provided)
ORCHID B 12:30 PM—1:30 PM UME Business Mee ng (lunch provided)
ORCHID C 12:30 PM—1:30 PM MESRE Business Mee ng (lunch provided)
ORCHID D 1:30 PM—2:30 PM Invited Session (Lunch Provided)
Collabora ons Beyond Conferences 2014: SGEA Special Interest
Groups (SIGs)
IS6 RIVERFRONT HALL SOUTH IS7 HIBISCUS A WS15 ORCHID A 2:30 PM—2:45 PM 2:45 PM—4:15 PM 2:45 PM—4:15 PM BREAK
Invited Session
AAMC: PIVIO/MedAPS/MedEdPortal Update
Workshop
D.R.E.A.M.ING About Validity in Educa onal Assessment
For more informa on on Invited Sessions (IS), Workshops (WS), Oral Presenta ons (OP), Small Group Discussions (SG), Demonstra ons (DS),
and Poster Session (PS) refer to the Abstracts sec on in the program. Page 17 of 81
2:45 PM — 4:15 PM Demonstra on
‐ Using a Mobile Web Applica on to Improve Feedback a er Observed Medical Student Clinical Encounters (DS3) ‐ Suppor ng an Academic Healthcare Learning System at the Vanderbilt School of Medicine with VSTAR (DS4) ‐ PACTS: Preceptor Par cipa on And Creden aling Tracking System (DS5) 2:45 PM — 4:15 PM Oral Presenta ons: Assessment Across the Con nuum
‐ From Theory to Prac ce: Defining and Implemen ng Milestones in
Undergraduate Medical Educa on (OP24)
DS3 — DS5 JASMINE ‐ Data‐Driven, Mentor‐Facilitated Self‐Assessment Supports the
Development of Competency‐Based Individualized Learning Goals
Among First Year Medical Students (OP25)
‐ Educa on Decision Support: Using Natural Language Processing to
Provide Automated Personalized Feedback on a Trainee’s Clinical Notes OP24— OP28 (OP26)
HIBISCUS B ‐ Competency‐Tracking and Program Evalua on: Using a Web‐Based
Dashboard and a Longitudinal Data‐Warehouse to Know how Your
Students are Performing. (OP27) ‐ The Use and Evalua on of an Assessment Tool to Introduce
Pre‐Clinical Learners to Values‐Based Prac ce (OP28) 2:45 PM — 4:15 PM Small Group Discussion
Unan cipated Posi ve Consequences: Transforming Professional
Development for Medical Educators
SG9 ORCHID B 2:45 PM — 4:15 PM Small Group Discussion
Preparing Students for Residency During Their Fourth Year of Medical
School SG10 ORCHID C 2:45 PM — 4:15 PM Invited Session
LEAD fellows' presenta ons of Applied Leadership Focus Ac vi es
IS8 ORCHID D 4:15 PM — 4:30 PM BREAK
POSTER SESSION
PS1—PS77 4:30 PM—6:30 PM UPPER/LOWER PROMENADE Dinner on your Own
 Catch the Miami Heat vs Denver Nuggets at the American Airlines Arena at 7:30 pm.  Want to stay in? Sign up for Pure Verde Lounge in the Hya Regency at the Registra on Table– Reserved Area for A endees  Want to go out to dinner? Sign up for dinner groups @ Registra on Table Page 18 of 81
SATURDAY, MARCH 15, 2014
TIMES
SESSION NAME
ABSTRACT #
LOCATION
7:30—9:30 AM Con nental Breakfast
RIVERFRONT HALL SOUTH 8:00 AM — 9:00 AM SGEA Business Mee ng (All are Welcome)
RIVERFRONT HALL SOUTH 8:00 AM—12:00 PM AAMC: PIVIO and MedEdPortal Exhibit Table
ORCHID A‐D LOBBY 9:00 AM—9:15 AM 9:15 AM — 10:15 AM BREAK
Plenary Session
S. Barry Issenberg, MD Michael S. Gordon Professor of Medicine and Medical Educa on Associate Dean for Research in Medical Educa on Director of the Gordon Center for Research in Medical Educa on University of Miami Miller School of Medicine "Uncovering Evidence in Simula on‐Based Medical Educa on and
Understanding Its Complexity"
10:15 AM — 10:30 AM 10:30 AM—12:00 PM 10:30 AM—12:00 PM 10:30 AM—12:00 PM RIVERFRONT HALL SOUTH BREAK
Invited Session
AAMC: Introduc on to Teaching Quality
Workshop
How to Make Your FM Clerkship Orienta on Ac ve and Engaging or
How Can We Help Students Learn What We Really Want Them to
Learn? Demonstra on
‐ DREAM: The Directory and Repository of Educa onal Assessment
Measures (DS6) ‐ The Card Sor ng Game: An Educa onal Approach that Promotes
Coopera ve Peer Learning. (DS7) IS9 HIBISCUS A WS16 ORCHID A DS6—DS7 JASMINE OP29—OP32 HIBISCUS B Oral Presenta ons: Interprofessional Educa on Across the
Con nuum
10:30 AM—12:00 PM ‐ Early Pa ent Safety Interprofessional Educa on and Awareness (OP29) ‐ iCARE: Integrity, Compassion, Accountability, Respect and Excellence. An
Interprofessional Educa on (IPE) Experience for Medical and Pharmacy
Students. (OP30)
‐ Modeling Pa ent‐Centered Communica on in Interprofessional Small
Groups (OP31) ‐ Developing Professional Communica on Through Interprofessional
Simula on (OP32) 10:30 AM—12:00 PM Small Group Discussion
Do Scholarly Concentra on Programs Contribute To Las ng
Scholarship?
SG11 ORCHID B 10:30 AM—12:00 PM Small Group Discussion
Don’t Overcook the Medical Student! What is the Right Recipe for
Academic Assistance?
SG12 ORCHID C 12:00 PM—1:00 PM 2015 SGEA Planning Mee ng (Planning Commi ee Only)
ORCHID D Page 19 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on New Models of Medical Educa on:
The EPAC Project and What It Can Teach US
Thursday, March 13, 2014; 1:00—2:00 PM| Riverfront South Deborah E. Powell, MD| University of Minnesota Medical School Deborah E. Powell, M.D., joined the University of Minnesota Medical School in 2002 and served as Dean of the Medical School and Assistant Vice President for Clinical Affairs un l July 1, 2009. Currently she is Dean Emeritus, and Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology. She is cer fied in Anatomic Pathology by the American Board of Pathology. Dr. Powell is well‐known na onally for her exper se in medical educa on. She currently serves as a member of the Board of Advisors of Tu s University School of Medicine, a member of the U. S. Department of Educa on’s Na onal Commi ee on Foreign Medical Educa on and Accredita on (NCFMEA) and as a Senior Fellow of the Associa on of Pathology Chairs. She is an Associate Editor for Human Pathology. She is a member of the newly formed LCME Council and a member of the Advisory Council of the Na onal Center for Complementary and Alterna ve Medicine. She is the recipient of the 2013 Abraham Flexner Award for outstanding service to medical educa on from the AAMC. Dr. Powell recently served as a member of the Na onal Ins tutes of Health Scien fic Management Review Board, Chair of the Board of the Associa on of American Medical Colleges, past‐president of the American Board of Pathology, past board member of the Ins tute for Healthcare Improvement, and a past member of the board of trustees of the Accredita on Council for Graduate Medical Educa on. In 2000, she was elected to the Na onal Academy of Sciences Ins tute of Medicine. She received her M.D. from Tu s University School of Medicine and completed her residency in pathology at Georgetown University Medical Center and the Clinical Center of the Na onal Ins tutes of Health (NIH). Before joining the University of Minnesota, Dr. Powell was execu ve dean and vice chancellor for clinical affairs at the University of Kansas School of Medicine. Prior to that, she chaired the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Kentucky in Lexington. Page 20 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Doctors Across the Con nuum:
What Role for Medical Educators
Friday, March 14, 2014; 8:00—9:00 AM| Riverfront South Lois Nora, MD, JD, MBA| American Board of Medical Special es Dr. Lois Margaret Nora is President and Chief Execu ve Officer of the American Board of Medical Special es (ABMS). ABMS is a not‐for‐profit organiza on that supports its 24 medical specialty Member Boards in developing and implemen ng educa onal and professional standards to cer fy physician specialists and encourage lifelong learning and assessment. Through these efforts, ABMS helps ensure high quality health care for pa ents, families and communi es. Prior to ABMS, Dr. Nora served as Interim President and Dean of The Commonwealth Medical College (TCMC) in Scranton, Pennsylvania, one of the na on’s newest medical schools. Under Dr. Nora’s leadership, TCMC achieved major milestones en route to fulfilling its promise to improve health care in northeastern Pennsylvania through innova ve, community‐focused, pa ent‐centered, evidence‐based medical educa on. From 2002‐2010, Dr. Nora served as President and Dean of Medicine at Northeast Ohio Medical University (then NEOUCOM). During Dr. Nora’s tenure, ins tu onal accomplishments included the founding of a College of Pharmacy and College of Graduate Studies; a founding partnership in the Austen BioInnova on Ins tute in Akron; and selec on as one of Ohio’s best workplaces, among others. Previously, Dr. Nora served as Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Administra on and Professor of Neurology at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, and Assistant Dean and Assistant Professor of Neurology at Rush Medical College in Chicago. Dr. Nora’s scholarly work focuses on issues in medical educa on, par cularly the student environment, and issues at the intersec on of law and medicine. Her honors include the American Medical Women’s Associa on Presi‐
dent’s Recogni on Award, the AAMC Group on Educa onal Affairs Merrel Flair Award in Medical Educa on, The Phillips Medal of Public Service from the Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine, and the 2010 Northeast Ohio Medical University College of Pharmacy Dean’s Leadership Award, among others. Dr. Nora received her medical degree from Rush Medical College, a law degree and cer ficate in clinical medical ethics from the University of Chicago and a Master of Business Administra on degree from the University of Kentucky Ga on College of Business and Economics. She is Board Cer fied and par cipa ng in Maintenance of Cer fica on in neurology by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. Page 21 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Uncovering Evidence in Simula on‐Based Medical Educa on
and Understanding Its Complexity
Saturday, March 15, 2014; 9:15—10:15 AM| Riverfront South S. Barry Isenberg, MD| UM Miller School of Medicine S. Barry Issenberg is the Michael S. Gordon Professor of Medicine and Medical Educa on, Associate Dean for Research in Medical Educa on and Director of the Gordon Center for Research in Medical Educa on at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine (UMMSM). Dr. Issenberg is a graduate of the UMMSM (1995), where he joined the faculty in 1998 at the comple on of his training in Internal Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and University of Miami. Dr. Issenberg’s career focus has been in: 1) the research, development, implementa on, and evalua on of simula on and computer‐based teaching systems, 2) the development and evalua on of simula on‐based outcome measures to assess student and physician competencies, and 3) the development and implementa on of faculty development programs for teaching and research. Dr. Issenberg leads an interna onal consor um of clinicians and medical educators from 14 medical centers. The consor um meets quarterly to develop curricula in cardiology, neurology and emergency medicine and to design its outcomes research studies. The consor um has designed, implemented and published the results of several mul ‐center studies that have shown the effec veness of simula on technology to teach and assess clinical skills. Dr. Issenberg also collaborates with several interna onal ini a ves, including the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada for the purpose of integra ng simula on technology into their high stakes Internal Medicine cer fica on exam and maintenance of cer fica on program. Dr. Issenberg chairs the Topic Review Group on Simula on for the Best Evidence Medical Educa on (BEME) collabora on. The goal of this ini a ve is to provide systema c reviews of healthcare educa on to define the best evidence available to meet the needs of the user. Dr. Issenberg served as chair of the 14th Interna onal O awa Conference on the Assessment of Competence and previously served as chair of the AAMC’s Research in Medial Educa on (RIME) Planning Commi ee and currently serves as past‐chair of the AAMC’s Medical Educa on Research Cer ficate (MERC) program steering commi ee. Dr. Issenberg also serves on the Board of Directors for the Society for Simula on and Healthcare and serves as an Associate Editor for its journal Simula on in Healthcare. Page 22 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Addi onal Invited Sessions 
AAMC: ASSET and Curriculum Inventory| Thursday, March 13; 9:00 AM—12:00 PM Invited Speaker: Terri Cameron, Walter Fitz‐William, and Robby Reynolds 
AAMC: Student Survey Update, The Medical Student Surveys Evolve: The Transforma on of the GQ | Thursday, March 13; 2:15 PM—3:45 PM Invited Speaker: Anne Gill, DrPH, MS, BSN, Brenda Armstrong, MD, and Henry Sondheimer, MD 
LCME Update | Thursday, March 13; 4:00 PM—5:30 PM Invited Speaker: Barbara Barzansky, PhD, MHPE 
AAMC: Introducing the "Core Entrustable Professional Ac vi es for Entering Residency (CEPAER)" | Friday, March 14; 9:15 AM—10:45 AM Invited Speaker: Robert Englander, MD

USMLE Step 2 CS Update| Friday, March 14; 11:00 AM—12:30 PM Invited Speaker: Kim LaBlanc, MD, PhD  Collabora ons Beyond Conferences 2014: SGEA Special Interest Groups (SIGs) | Friday, March 14; 1:45PM—2:30 PM Invited Speaker: Janet F. Piskurich, PhD  AAMC: PIVIO/MedAPS/MedEdPortal Update| Friday, March 14; 2:45 PM—4:15 PM Invited Speaker Name: PJ Kania, Robby Reynolds, Emily Cahill, and Terri Cameron  AAMC: Introduc on to Teaching Quality| Saturday, March 15; 10:30 AM—11:45 AM Invited Speaker: Nancy Davis, PhD Page 23 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Addi onal Workshops
Administrator's Workshop

Developing You: Steps to Develop Your Professional Footprint| Thursday, March 13; 9:00 AM—12:00 PM Faculty: Ginger Wilson  Empowerment Not En tlement: Understanding Learning Styles To Meet the Needs of Your Student Popula on |Thursday, March 13; 9:00 AM—12:00 PM Faculty: Ken Staack
Leadership Educa on and Development (LEAD) Cer ficate Program
(Open to LEAD par cipants only) Ruth Levine, MD, Regional Director Sheila Chauvin, PhD, and Bri a Thompson, PhD , Co‐Directors 
Preconference LEAD Program | Wednesday March 13; 2:30 PM—6:30 PM Faculty: Karen Hughes‐Miller, PhD, MEd and Robert Casanova, MD
 LEAD Program| Thursday, March 13; 8:00 AM—12:00 PM Faculty: Kathy Kreutzer, MEd and Grady Carter, MD
 LEAD Program: Fellows’ presenta on of Applied Leadership Focus Ac vi es| Friday, March 14; 2:45 PM—4:15 PM Faculty: Shelia Chauvin, PhD and Bri a Thompson, PhD
Medical Educa on Research Cer ficate (MERC)
 Data Management and Preparing for the Sta s cal Consulta on | Thursday, March 13; 9:00 AM—12:00 PM Faculty: Ann Frye, PhD  Ques onnaire Design and Survey Research| Thursday, March 13; 2:15 PM—6:00 PM Faculty: Chris e Palladino, MD
Page 24 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on GENERAL | USEFUL INFORMATION Page 25 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on SGEA Leadership Educa on and Development (LEAD)
2012‐2014 Gradua ng Cohort
Modupeola Akinola, MD
Wake Forest University School of Medicine Carrie Calloway, MA
West Virginia University School of Medicine Erin Mundy, MPA
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University Grady Carter, MD, MDiv
Mercer University School of Medicine Mary Rocha, MD, MPH
Baylor College of Medicine Carol Dell, MD
University of Kentucky College of Medicine Roy Russ, PhD
Mercer University School of Medicine Karen (Sam) Hughes Miller, PhD
University of Louisville School of Medicine Page 26 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on 2014‐2016 SGEA Leadership Educa on and Development (LEAD) Fellows:
Mutuza “Zee” Ali, MD Louisiana State University School Mohammed Khalil, of Medicine DVM, Med, PhD University of South Carolina School of Medicine ‐ Greenville Sarah Bean, MD Duke University Health System Json Liebzeit, MD Emory University School of Medicine Andrea Berry, MPA University of Central Florida College of Medicine Carol Motycka, BCACP University of Florida Julie Byerley, MD, MPH University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine Alvaro erez, MD, MS San Juan Bau sta School of Medicine Bill Cutrer, MD, MEd Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Tammy Salazar, PhD Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center at El Paso Paul L. Foster School of Medicine Aliesa English, MD, PharmD University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine Dawnelle Scha e, MD University of Texas Medical School at Houston Nadia Ismail, MD Baylor College of Medicine Joshua Wallenstein, MD Mohammed Jaffar, MD, FCCM University of Arkansas for Medi‐ Litao Wang, MD cal Sciences College of Medicine Emory University School of Medicine Texas A&M Health Sciences Center College of Medicine 2014‐2016 SGEA Leadership Educa on and Development (LEAD) Faculty:
Kathleen Kreutzer, MEd Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine Grady Carter, MD Mercer University School of Medicine Robert Casanova, MD Texas Tech University Health Cathy Lazarus, MD Sciences Center at El Paso Paul L. Foster School of Medicine Tulane University College of Medicine Sonia Crandall, PhD, MS Wake Forest School of Medicine John Luk, MD University of Texas Aus n/University of Texas Medical Branch Gerald Crites, MD, MEd Georgia Regents University Medical College of Georgia Karen Hughes Miller, PhD, MEd University of Louisville School of Medicine Alix Darden, PhD University of Oklahoma College of Medicine Page 27 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on 2014‐2016 SGEA Leadership Educa on and Development (LEAD) Regional Director:
Ruth Levine, MD Mercer University School of Medicine 2014‐2016 SGEA Leadership Educa on and Development (LEAD) Na onal Directors:
Shelia Chauvin, PhD, MEd Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center – New Orleans Bri a Thompson, PHD, MS University of Oklahoma College of Medicine Page 28 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on SGEA MESRE Grants
The Southern Group on Educa onal Affairs (SGEA) supports and encourages scholarship in medical educa on. To help its members par cipate in opportuni es that provide educa onal scholarship, the SGEA provides funding to ini ate new Medical Educa on Scholarship, Research and Evalua on Sec on (MESRE) proposals. Two grants were awarded in 2013. Congratula ons to the following grant award recipients. Deborah DiazGranados (Virginia Commonwealth University): Understanding pa ent safety a tudes and
percep ons about error repor ng across professions.
Denise Kay (University of Central Florida): What fosters professional iden ty development in medical school?
MESA Scholarship Award Program 2013 The SGEA Medical Educa on Scholarship Award (MESA) program was established in 2003 to promote and recognize achievements in educa onal scholarship demonstrated by ac ve members of the SGEA from SGEA member schools. MESA will offer six peer‐reviewed awards to presenters at the 2014 annual mee ng. Outstanding Poster by a Trainee Award This award recognizes the most outstanding poster presenta on by a student or trainee who is a first‐ me presenter at the annual SGEA mee ng. The award will be selected through a peer‐review process of the proposal and presenta on at the 2014 annual mee ng and recognized at the Business Mee ng at the 2015 annual SGEA mee ng. Awardees receive a le er recognizing this achievement and a framed cer ficate designa ng their award status. Outstanding Poster by a Professional Medical Educator Award This award recognizes the most outstanding poster presenta on by a professional medical educator at the annual SGEA mee ng. The award will be selected through a peer‐review process of the proposal and presenta on at the 2014 annual mee ng and recognized at the Business Mee ng at the 2015 SGEA annual mee ng. Awardees receive a le er recognizing this achievement and a framed cer ficate designa ng their awards. Outstanding Presenta on Awards These four annual awards recognize the most outstanding medical educa on presenta on by an SGEA member for each of the SGEA sec ons, including UME, GME, CME, and MESRE. Oral presenta ons, workshops, small group discussions, oral briefs and demonstra ons qualify to be considered for this award. These awards will be selected through a peer‐review process of the proposal and presenta on at the 2014 annual mee ng and recognized at the SGEA Business Mee ng at the 2015 AAMC mee ng. Awardees receive a le er recognizing this achievement and a framed cer ficate. Page 29 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on SGEA Medical Educa on Scholarship Awards (MESA) Program
2013 Conference MESA Awards
Outstanding Presenta on Award for GME:
Achieving Cultural Competence by Building Advocacy Skills Joslyn Weiner Fisher (Baylor), Steffanie Campbell, Nancy Hardt and Patrick Remington Outstanding Presenta on Awards for MESRE:
Team Cohesiveness, Team Size, and Team Performance in Team‐Based Learning Teams Bri a M. Thompson (OUHSC), Lisa Carchedi, Brenda Roman, Mark Townsend, Agata Butler, Paul Haidet, David Swanson, Ruth E. Levine A Comparison of Team Cohesiveness and Performance in Team‐Based Learning Teams versus Conven onal Student Groups Ruth E. Levine, (UTMB Galveston) Lisa Carchedi, Brenda Jean Barth Roman, Mark H. Townsend, Jeffrey S. Cluver, Julia B. Frank, Aggie Butler, Paul Haidet, Dave Swanson, Bri a May Thompson Outstanding Presenta on Award for UME:
Differences in First Year and Fourth Year Medical Students’ A tudes Towards Pursing a Career in Academic Medicine Mary B. Carter (U of Louisville) and Monica Hagan Ve er Outstanding Presenta on Award for Con nuing Professional Development:
Building Bridges across Campus with the Teaching in Medical Educa on Faculty Fellows (TiME) Program Authors: Teresa Carter, Henry T. Clark, and Allison A. Vanderbilt (VCU) Outstanding Poster by a Trainee:
The Evolu on of Clinical Skills Demonstrated by Interprofessional Health Care Student‐Teams Compared to Medical Student‐Only Teams in Standardized Pa ent Encounters Clinton Morgan, Cris na Farkas, Gretchen Edwards, Heather Davidson and Richard Latuska Outstanding Poster by a Professional Educator:
Interdisciplinary Teaching: Integra ng Medical Science Educa on using Interac ve, Team‐Taught Sessions Virgil Thomas Gaddy (GRU/UGA Medical Partnership), Michael Russell, and Amy Medlock Page 30 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on SGEA Special Interest Group (SIGs)
An SGEA Special Interest Group (SGEA‐SIG) is a community with an interest in advancing a specific area within the SGEA where members communicate, collaborate and meet to promote research, and effect or produce solu ons within their par cular area. SGEA‐SIGs are self‐perpetua ng groups in which the membership is responsible for ensuring the ongoing ac vi es of the group. Any SGEA member can join an SGEA‐SIG and can be a member of more than one SIG. Student Academic Enhancement (SAE)
The mission of the SAE‐SIG is to establish a community for the administrators, researchers and educators of academic support centers or those who are interested collabora ng and suppor ng the work of academic support centers on their own campuses. This community will address the unique academic challenges across medical educa on and support the implementa on of best prac ces and research in educa onal support centers within the AAMC. For more informa on about the SAE‐SIG, please contact: Tammy T. Salazar, Ph.D. ([email protected] uhsc.edu) or Angie Hairrell, Ph.D. ([email protected]) Science Educa on in Integrated Curricula (SEIC)
Many medical curricula are undergoing revision in an effort to integrate basic science knowledge with clinical decision‐making skills. The mission of the SEIC‐SIG is to establish a forum of communica on in which basic science faculty and others can share ideas about how to best accomplish this common goal. Proposed ac vi es include organizing a dedicated oral presenta on session and workshop at the annual SGEA mee ng that will allow faculty to share experiences with alterna ve teaching pedagogies, as well as ideas on how to organize, priori ze, and integrate the learning of science knowledge in an integrated curriculum. For more informa on about the SEIC‐SIG, please contact: Thom Gaddy, Ph.D. ([email protected]) Program Evalua on (PE)
The mission of the Program Evalua on SIG (PE‐SIG) is to establish a community for administrators, researchers and educators whose professional focus is curriculum and program evalua on within medical schools and academic medical centers. This community will address the challenges and opportuni es facing program evaluators across the spectrum of medical educa on, and support the implementa on of best prac ces in program evalua on within the SGEA and the AAMC. For more informa on about the PE‐SIG, please contact: Elizabeth Bradley, Ph.D. ([email protected]) or Deb Stark, Ph.D. ([email protected]) Page 31 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on SGEA Special Interest Group (SIGs)
Evidence‐Based Teaching (EBT)
The mission of the Evidence‐Based Teaching SIG (EBT‐SIG) is to help establish medical educator and medical librar‐
ian partnerships for teaching and learning. This community will strive to iden fy and share effec ve models of collabora on between health science librarians and medical educators to support evidence‐based teaching and learning in medical curricula. It will facilitate ongoing communica on among librarians and medical educators from medical and health sciences schools in Southern Region. For more informa on about the EBT‐SIG, please contact: Kathleen O. Kreutzer, M.Ed. ([email protected]) Faculty Development in Medical Educa on (FD)
The mission of the FD‐SIG is to establish a learning and collabora ve community of those engaged in the develop‐
ment of faculty to best serve in their teaching, research and leadership roles. This community will address the unique challenges across the con nuum of medical educa on and support the implementa on of best prac ces and research in faculty development.
For more informa on about the FD‐SIG, please contact: Lisa Howley, Ph.D. ([email protected]) The following SIGs are not yet finalized:
Coordinators & Administrators in UME (CAUME): Ginger L. Wilson (ginger‐[email protected]) or Martha Chan‐
dler ([email protected]) E‐learning: Leslie Bofill ([email protected]) or Sherry Vafa ([email protected]) Faculty Health & Wellness: Charlene Dewey, M.D., M.Ed., F.A.C.P. ([email protected]) Page 32 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on 2013 SGEA Steering Commi ee
Chair Kathy O’Kane Kreutzer, MEd
Assistant Dean for Faculty Development Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine [email protected] Chair Elect Sonia J. Crandall, PhD, MS
Professor Wake Forest University School of Medicine [email protected] Past Chair Gary C. Rosenfeld, PhD
Professor & Assistant Dean for Educa onal Programs The University of Texas Medical School at Houston [email protected] 2014 Conference Co‐Chairs Karin Esposito, MD, PhD
Associate Dean for Academic Advising And for Women in Medicine and Science Professor and Vice Chair, Psychiatry & Behavior Health FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine [email protected] Kelly Bounchareune, MPA
Assistant Director, Medical Educa on FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine [email protected] Past 2013 Conference Planning Chairs Andria Thomas, PhD
Associate Dean for Evalua on Professor of Medicine Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University [email protected] Chris e Palladino, MD, MSc
Educa onal Researcher, Educa onal Innova on Ins tute Program Director and Associate Editor, Directory and Repository of Educa onal Assessment Measures (DREAM) Assistant Professor, Obstetrics and Gynecology Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University [email protected] UME Sec on Representa ve Kim Lomis, MD
Associate Dean, Undergraduate Medical Educa on Vanderbilt University School of Medicine [email protected] GME Sec on Representa ve Alisa Nagler, MA, JD, EdD
Assistant Professor of Medical Educa on Assistant Dean, Graduate Medical Educa on Duke University Hospital [email protected] CEI Sec on Representa ve Chitra Subramaniam, Ph.D. Director, Con nuing Medical Educa on Duke University School of Medicine [email protected] MESRE Sec on Representa ve Andria Thomas, PhD
Associate Dean for Evalua on Professor of Medicine Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University [email protected] OSR Representa ve Laura Douglass Tulane University School of Medicine [email protected] Members‐at‐Large Karen Hughes Miller, Ph.D. Director for Graduate Medical Educa on and Non‐Clinical Curriculum University of Louisville School of Medicine [email protected] Gerald E. Crites, M.D., M.Ed. Associate Professor of Medicine Director of Program Evalua on and Educa onal Research Georgia Regents University/University of Georgia Medical Partnership Campus (GRU/UGA) [email protected] Special Interest Group Coordinator Janet Piskurich, Ph.D. Associate Professor Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, TTUHSC‐El Paso [email protected] uhsc.edu SGEA LEAD Regional Chair Ruth E. Levine MD
Clarence Ross Miller Professor of Psychiatry Assistant Dean for Educa onal Affairs The University of Texas Medical Branch—Galveston [email protected] Co‐Directors, AAMC LEAD Sheila W. Chauvin, Ph.D., M.Ed. Professor and Director, Office of Medical Educa on Research and Development (OMERAD), School of Medicine Louisiana State University School of Medicine in New Orleans [email protected] Bri a Thompson, Ph.D. Assistant Dean for Medical Educa on Director, Office of Medical Educa on The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine bri a‐[email protected] 2015 Conference Planning Chair Lisa D. Howley, PhD Assistance Vice President of Medical Educa on & Physician Development Associate DIO, Carolinas Medical Center Associate Professor of Medical Educa on, UNC Division of Medical Educa on Carolinas Health Care System [email protected] Page 33 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Relevant Financial Disclosures
Page 34 of 81
CME DISCLOSURE INFORMATION
The Following PLANNERS Have No Relevant Financial Relationships To Disclose:
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Alex J. Mechaber
Barry Issenberg, MD
Britta Thompson, PhD
Chitra Subramaniam, PhD
Erica Brownfield MD
George Dambach, PhD
Ivette Motola, MD
Joanna Drowos, DO, MPH, MBA
Karin Esposito MD, PhD
Kathleen O'Kane Kreutzer, M.Ed.
Kelly Bounchareune, MPA
Laura Douglass
Lindsey Henson, MD
Ruth E. Levine, MD
Sheila W. Chauvin, PhD
Sonia J. Crandall, PhD, MS
Vivian Obeso, MD
The Following PLANNERS/SPEAKERS/AUTHORS Have No Relevant Financial Relationships To Disclose:
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Alisa Nagler, JD, MA, EdD
Andria Thomas, PhD
Carla Lupi MD
Christie Palladino, MD, MSc
Gary C. Rosenfeld, Ph.D.
Gerald E. Crites, MD
Janet F. Piskurich, PhD
Karen Hughes Miller, PhD
Kimberly Lomis, MD
Lisa D. Howley, PhD
The Following SPEAKERS/AUTHORS Have No Relevant Financial Relationships To Disclose:
 Barbara Barzansky,
 Celina Mankey, MD
Aditee Narayan, MD,
PhD, MHPE
 Chadburn B. Ray,
MPH
 Barry Linger
MD, FACOG
Alexandria Lewis
 Bernard Davidson,
 Chassity White
Alicia D. H. Monroe,
PhD
 Cheryl Erwin, PhD, JD
MD
 Bernardo Obeso
 Cheryl J. Ellis Vaiani,
Alix Darden
 Betsy Jones
PhD
Allen L. Pelletier, MD
 Bonnie M. Miller
 Chris Candler, MD,
Allesa English
 Bonnie Mason
EdD
Amy Fleming, MD
 Brenda Armstrong,
 Christine Matthews
Anderson Spickard
MD
 Christopher M. Estes
Andrea Berry, MPA
 Brent Parnell
 Constance Tucker,
Andrew Moses
 Brittany Ange, MS
MA
Angela Hairrell
 Byron Crawford
 Courtney West, PhD
Ann W. Frye, Ph.D.
 Carin McAbee
 David Graham, MD,
Anne C. Gill, DrPH,
 Carol L. Elam, Ed.D.
MBA
MS
 Carol R. Thrush, EdD
 David Henzi, Ed.D.
Anne Rudnicki, Ed.D.
 Carolyn Castro-Pagan
 Dawn M Schocken,
Ansley Splinter, MD,
 Catherine Kuhn
MPH, PhDc
MACM
 Catherine L. Hatfield,
 Deborah Powell, MD
Anupam Kumar
Pharm.D.
 Denise Kay
 Cayla R. Teal, PhD
 Diane Fitz
Page 35 of 81
CME DISCLOSURE INFORMATION
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Donna Rosenstiel,
LCSW
Dorothy Sendelbach,
MD
Ebony Whisenant
Elizabeth Nelson, MD
Elizabeth Tombs
MNS, RN, IBCLC
Elza Mylona, PhD
Emily Cahill
Erini Serag-Bolos,
PharmD
Gauri Agarwal, M.D.,
F.A.C.P.
Geoffrey Fleming
Ginger Wilson
Gordon Churchward,
PhD
Hannah Kittel
Heather Ridinger
Heidi Saliba, BA
Henry Sondheimer,
MD
Hugh A. Stoddard
Ingrid Bahner
Irmanie Eliacin, MD
J. William Eley, M.D.,
M.P.H.
James Halbert BA,
MS
James Powers
Jane Gagliardi
Jay Johnson
Jennifer Brooke
Cowart, MD
Jennifer Gibson
Jennifer Green
Jesse Ehrenfeld, MD
John Luk, MD
John Nash
Josh Denny
Julie Bridges, PhD
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Julie C. Servoss, MD,
MPH
Julie Gaines, MLIS
Karen Szauter, MD
Kathryn Andolsek
Kathy Davies
Kathy Gibbs, M.Ed.,
M.S.
Kelli M Braun, MD
Ken Staack
Kim LaBlanc, MD,
PhD
Lance Evans, PhD
Lara Stepleman
Laura Haubner
Leslie Bofill, MA, MS
Lindsay Blake, MLIS,
AHIP
Lisa Martinez, MD
Lois Nora, MD, JD,
MBA
Lori Graham, Ph.D.
Malford Tyson
Pillow, MD, M.Ed.
Marc Kahn
Margaret Orr, BA
Maria van Zuilen,
PhD
Mariah Rudd, BS
Marin Gillis, PhD
Mario Davidson
Mark A. Clark, PhD
Mark Holden, MD
Marquita Samuels,
BA
Martha Hutchinson
Mary E M Rocha,
MD, MPH
Mary Elizabeth Roth
Melissa WardPeterson
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Micah D. Marshall,
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Michael J.L. Smith,
DrPH, MPH
Michael Pilla, MD
Michelle Schwartz,
MD
Mitch Heflin
Mobeen Rathore,
MD
Monica Bailey
Morayma M. Cubero
Morgan McDonald
N. Kevin Krane, MD
Nadia Ismail, MD
Nancy Davis, PhD
Nancy Giunta, MHA,
FACMPE
Naomi L Lacy, PhD
Oma Morey, PhD
Pablo Rabosto
Paul E. Mendez
PJ Kania
Rajunor Ettarh
Ralph Gillies, PhD
Rebecca L. Toonkel,
MD
Rita A. Dello Stritto,
PhD, RN, ENP
Robby Renolds
Robert Casanova,
M.D.
Robert Englander,
MD
Rodolfo Bonnin,
Ph.D.
Ron Cook
Ryan Lisk
S. Toufeeq Ahmed,
PhD, MS
Saumil Chudgar
Scott Cottrell, EdD
CME DISCLOSURE INFORMATION
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Shari Whicker
Shelia Crow
Shyam Gelot,
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Simon C. Williams,
PhD
Soraya Smith
Stefanie Brown, MD
Stephen B.
Greenberg, MD
Stephen McKenzie
Steven Lieberman
Susan M. Gerik, MD
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Susan Pross, PhD
Suzanne Minor, MD
Suzette S. Sookdeo,
M.S. Ed
Tammy T. Salazar,
Ph.D.
Tepparit
Wiphatphumiprates
Terri Cameron
Terry Stratton
Thomas Lynch,
Pharm.D.
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Tiffani Wise MSN,
RN, CCRN, FNP-c
Vaughan Lee, Ph.D.
Vinita C. Kiluk, MD
Virginia Niebuhr
W. Scott Richardson,
MD
Walter Fitz-William
William Allen
William B. Cutrer,
MD, M.Ed.
Yamel Hall
The Following REVIEWERS Have No Relevant Financial Relationships To Disclose:
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Adriana Foster
Allen D. Andrade
Amar R. Deshpande
Amy Medlock
Ana Maria Viamonte Ros
Anthony Panos
Arlene Chapman
Arvey I. Rogers
Barbara A. Wood
Beatrice Boateng
Brian Higgins
Carl Schulman
Carrie Calloway
Charles Griffith
Charles L. Maddow
Charles R. Woods
Christine McFarlin
Craig Ziegler
Daniel M. Lichtstein
Deborah Diaz Granados
Deborah Louda
Deborah Richardson
DeLoris Hesse
Eneida O. Roldan
Era Buck
Eve Gallman
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Frederic Rahbari-Oskoui
Grady Carter
Gregory A. Zych
Hilit Mechaber
J. Brosco
Jennifer Brueckner
Joan St. Onge
Jonathan Murrow
Jorge Camilo Mora
Jorge Luis Sotelo
Joshua Thornhill
Juan Acuna
Juan Rios
Julia Belkowitz
Julio M. De Pena
Jyotsna Pandey
Kelly Best
Kelly Lockeman
Kenneth Goodman
Kenneth Stahl
LaTasha B. Craig
Lesley Smith
M. Marie Dent
Malorie Novak
Mark O'Connell
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Meaghan McNulty
Michael L. Rowland
Mike Russell
Monique Espinosa
Morton Levitt
Nicholas Namias
Panagiota Caralis
Rachael L. Ruiz
Rani Gereige
Richard Weisman
Ross J. Scalese
Shara Steiner Brody
Stephanie Wragg
Susanne Doblecki-Lewis
Teresa J. Carter
Thom Gaddy
Thomas H. Champney
Timothy Scialla
Wacharee Seeherunvong
William J. Hardman, III
Yvonne Diaz
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on ABSTRACTS Page 38 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Abstracts
Invited Sessions
(IS1) AAMC: ASSET and Curriculum Inventory
ASSET Workshop
Walter Fitz‐William, Terri Cameron, and Robby Reynolds
The Accredita on Standards Self‐Evalua on Tool (ASSET) is of one the tools in AAMC’s Medical Academic Performance Services (MedAPS). ASSET assists medical schools in accredita on prepara on by providing an online workflow that can be tailored to meet each school’s needs, with much of the quan ta ve data pre‐populated from AAMC and LCME sources, including the Annual LCME Ques onnaires, the Student Record System, FAMOUS (the AAMC Faculty Database), and the Curriculum Inventory. By providing a centralized online tool with workflow op ons, pre‐populated data, and a repository to collect referenced documents, ASSET allows schools to focus on analysis of data and development of the qualita ve responses to accredita on ques ons. The ASSET Workshop will provide an overview of the system, a tutorial on working with the system, and a discussion of how schools can use ASSET to assist with the LCME accredita on cycle, as well as school‐based accredita on standard compliance reviews, and con nuous quality improvement. (www.aamc.org/asset) Curriculum Inventory Workshop
Terri Cameron, Walter Fitz‐William, and Robby Reynolds
The Curriculum Inventory (CI) is of one the tools in AAMC’s Medical Academic Performance Services (MedAPS). It is a repository of curriculum data from US and Canadian medical and osteopathic schools that gathers data from school curriculum management systems to avoid duplicate data entry. Data is collected on an annual basis and is used in conjunc on with Annual LCME Ques onnaire Part II data to create Curriculum Inventory Reports, and to pre‐populate ASSET for schools preparing for accredita on. Curriculum Inventory Reports provide graphical benchmarking reports regarding curriculum structure, content, pedagogy, and competencies. The Curriculum Inventory Workshop will provide details of the data elements for upload to the Curriculum Inventory, how those elements are organized into an xml file based on the MedBiquitous Curriculum Inventory data exchange standard, how competencies are referenced in the file, and how to document challenging curriculum content such as clerkships, elec ves, selec ves, tracks, regional medical campuses, and small group learning. (www.aamc.org/cir ) (IS2) AAMC: Student Survey Update
The Medical Student Surveys Evolve: The Transforma on of the GQ
Anne Gill, DrPH, MS, BSN, Brenda Armstrong, MD, and Henry Sondheimer, MD
This session will highlight findings from analyses of the 2013 student surveys with a par cular emphasis on revisions to the Gradua on Ques onnaire (GQ). An updated Matricula ng Student Ques onnaire (MSQ) was piloted in 2013 with an increased focus on the personal characteris cs, interests, and goals of entering students. For the first me in 2013, all second‐year medical students were invited to par cipate in an anonymous ques onnaire, the Medical Student Life Survey (MSLS), which focused on the rela on among medical school learning climate, personal characteris cs, and student well‐being. This survey also included ques ons on gender iden ty and sexual orienta on. Ques ons from the MSLS will serve as the founda on for a new second‐year survey that will launch in the fall of 2014. Most importantly, the complete transforma on of the Gradua on Ques onnaire (GQ) has begun. The 2014 GQ was trimmed down, allowing new ques ons to be piloted on topics such as medical student competencies, entrustable professional ac vi es, and the learning climate in an cipa on of a completely re‐
vised GQ in 2016. (IS3) LCME Update
Barbara Barzansky, PhD, MHPE
The presenta on will describe recent and an cipated changes in LCME policies and standards, including the revision of accredita on standards that will go into effect for medical schools with surveys in the 2015‐2016 academic year. There also will be a discussion of research that iden fied factors correlated with the severe LCME accredita on ac ons.” Page 39 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (IS4) AAMC: Introducing the “Core Entrustable Professional Ac vi es for Entering Residency (CEPAER)”
Robert Englander, MD
A li le over a year ago the AAMC convened a panel of experts to delineate the Core Entrustable Professional Ac vi es (EPAs) that any MD entering residency should be able to do on day one without direct supervision. EPAs are ac vi es that professionals in a given stage in their career engage in on a day‐to‐day basis. EPAs are observable and measurable, have a defined outcome, and require cri cal competencies on the part of the learner to reach entrustment. The core EPAs were mapped to their competencies and milestones were created to describe the novice and competent learner for the competencies that mapped to the EPAs. At two stages in the process, we engaged a Reactor Panel with diverse perspec ves for feedback. This session will introduce these Core EPAs for Entering Residency, their descrip ons, cri cal competencies, and behavioral vigne es. (IS5) USMLE Step 2 CS Update
Kim Edward LeBlanc, MD, PhD
Discussion on the origin of the Clinical Skills exam, as well as data of examinees, men on of enhancements and sugges ons on improving the clinical encounter to assist examinees in passing. (IS6) Collabora ons Beyond Conferences 2014: SGEA Special Interest Groups (SIGs)
Janet F. Piskurich, PhD
Come to meet with, join or create an SGEA SIG! These member communi es share a common interest and foster communica on that may result in collabora ve research projects and/or implementa on of innova ve prac ces in their field of medical educa‐
on. Ac ve SGEA SIGs currently include student academic enhancement, science educa on in integrated curricula, program eval‐
ua on, evidence‐based teaching and faculty development in medical educa on. Others are now forming. This session will also describe the process to create your own new special interest group within the SGEA. (IS7) AAMC: PIVIO/MedAPS/MedEdPortal Update
Pivio Update
PJ Kania
Manage your Records, Master your Career Using Pivio ‐ A New Service from AAMC and NBME: An update and demonstra on of the new lifelong learning and career planning tool by AAMC and NBME called Pivio. The Pivio system will store and transfer data necessary for medical students, residents, and physicians across their careers. The tool will be a secure “lock box” that will enable users to share data with CVOs and others at the individual’s control. The session will focus on the intended purpose of the Pivio system specific to residents, provide a demonstra on of the system, and obtain a endee feedback on features and future system considera ons of this new and innova ve tool. MedAPS/MedEdPORTAL Update
Robby Reynolds, Emily Cahill, and Terri Cameron
AAMC’s development of the Medical Academic Performance Services (MedAPS) suite of services (Curriculum Inventory and Re‐
ports, Accredita on Standards Self‐Evalua on Tool, and ASSET Dashboard) is rapidly moving toward implementa on, and MedEdPORTAL has exci ng new features. This session will provide an update on the current status of each of these ini a ves and present an opportunity for par cipants to provide input for these and future projects and demonstrate how these tools will provide new, robust op ons that will help medical schools enhance their efforts to ins ll an environment of con nuous quality improvement across their missions and across the con nuum of medical educa on. (www.aamc.org/medaps; www.mededportal.org ) (IS8) AAMC: Teaching for Quality (Te4Q)
Nancy Davis, PhD, Director, Prac ce Based Learning and Improvement, AAMC
Provides an overview of the report, competencies for faculty and recommenda ons. Will provide some examples of topics and curricula for QI/PS across the con nuum. Time for par cipants to ask ques ons and offer sugges ons for the new program. Page 40 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Abstracts
Addi onal Workshops
(WS3) MERC: Data Management and Preparing for the Sta s cal Consulta on
Ann Frye, PhD
This workshop helps par cipants prepare their data for analysis and be able to answer ques ons about their data that a sta s cian will likely ask when providing consulta on. At the end of the workshop the par cipants will be able to: Collect data, Set up data files, enter data into data files, Check and clean data prior to analysis, Compare my sample to my popula on, and Address sta s cal issues discussed during consulta on with a sta s cian. (WS4) Administrator’s Workshop: Developing You: Steps to Develop Your Professional Footprint
Ginger Wilson
Coordinators/Administrators are great promoters of residents, faculty, students and even their families, but how are they at self promo on? This workshop will provide ways of taking on the challenge of flipping the a endee thought process to focus on self promo on and their added value. The a endee will be supplied with the knowledge of how to develop their self brand. The workshop will provide them with the understanding of why to transi on from a resume to a CV and the steps to develop one of the most im‐
portant sources of self promo on the por olio. This workshop will explain how to implement all of these skill sets into their professional development and to learn the fine line between self promo on and self boas ng. It will explore ways that these tools can help the a endee surpass their greatest challenge of “Developing You” and being comfortable with presen ng their added value and self promo on on their own behalf. (WS5) Administrator’s Workshop: Empowerment Not En tlement: Understanding Learning Styles To Meet the Needs of Your
Student Popula on
Ken Staack, MEd
Par cipants will be introduced to the characteris cs of adult learners and the different learning preferences a er comple ng a personal learning style assessment. Learning styles will be applied to case studies in small group discussion to recognize how iden fying learning styles empower students to ac vely monitor how they accept and master new informa on. Par cipants will understand student challenges from me management to test accommoda on and available resources. (WS6) MERC: Ques onnaire Design and Survey Research
Chris e Palladino, MD
This workshop will provide some basic principles in ques onnaire/survey design and give workshop par cipants an opportunity for hands‐on experience designing a ques onnaire. Par cipants in this workshop will learn to: Design a blueprint for a survey/
ques onnaire appropriate to their own applica on, Construct and edit ques ons to avoid common problems in wording and framing, Select an appropriate response format from a menu of alterna ves, and Design the overall format of the survey/
ques onnaire to facilitate data management and analysis. Page 41 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Abstracts
Workshops
(WS7) Shaping your Curricular Iden ty
Andrea Berry, Denise Kay, and Monica Bailey
Medical educators play an important role in defining instruc onal strategies u lized in medical school curricula. Using teaching, learning and student percep on‐based paradigms as a framework for discussion, par cipants will explore each paradigm and be able to make informed decisions about personal and ins tu onal pedagogic strategies that are congruent with their curricular and student development goals. (WS8) Transforming Educa onal Ac vi es into Scholarship
Shelia Crow and Alix Darden
Faculty engaged in academic medicine have full schedules requiring them to balance their teaching, research, and / or clinical ac vi es. All too o en, scholarship is an a erthought, if it is thought of at all. In 1990, Ernest Boyer outlined ways tradi onal scholarship should extend beyond research to include the scholarship of teaching, applica on, integra on, and discovery. This workshop will use a case‐based approach to show par cipants how to turn their teaching and learning ac vi es into high quality scholarship. Using a combina on of resources, including resources published on MedEdPORTAL, par cipants will apply a set of characteris cs to their own teaching and create an ac on plan for educa onal scholarship. (WS9) Presenta on Design for Medical Educators – A Missing Piece of Faculty Development
Malford Pillow
One of the cri cal pieces in becoming an invaluable educator is the ability to design and deliver effec ve presenta ons. O en, the tools used to supplement the lecture, usually Powerpoint, do not fully u lize educa onal and design principles to op mize learning. In addi on, educators may be unfamiliar with all of the so ware skills necessary to create effec ve presenta ons. The goal of this session will be to discuss, demonstrate, and prac ce the applica on of key educa onal design principles and several easy presenta on so ware elements that can be used to enhance your presenta ons for op mal learning and reten on. (WS10) A Model for a Cross‐Clerkship Curriculum in Evidence Based Medicine
Paul Mendez, Maria van Zuilen, Christopher Estes, and Stefanie Brown
This workshop showcases a third year cross‐clerkship curriculum in evidence based medicine designed to foster skills in the genera on of clinical ques ons, cri cal appraisal, and applica on of evidence to pa ent care. Workshop a endees will ac vely par cipate in segments of the structured “journal club” and discuss the poten al advantages and challenges of using this methodology at their own home ins tu ons. Individual flash drives will be distributed to all par cipants with a pre‐loaded toolkit they can take home with sample ar cles, quizzes, appraisal tools, OSCE materials and other resources to be used at their home ins tu ons. (WS11) Cultural & Linguis c Competence (CLC) in Healthcare: How to Plan, Write, Implement, and Evaluate Your CLC Plan
Heidi Saliba, Mobeen Rathore, and Nancy Giunta
With the passage of the Affordable Care Act, all clinical and other prac ces receiving federal funding are required to provide care in a culturally and linguis cally competent manner. This requires the wri ng, implementa on, and evalua on of an annual cultural and linguis c competence plan for each prac ce or organiza on. This workshop is designed so that a endees will leave with a working knowledge of what CLC is, what they as providers are required to do, and how to best analyze the strengths and opportuni es of their prac ce in delivering the most appropriate care to their clients. (WS12) Organizing Your Academic Self: Educator’s Por olio
Alix Darden and Sheila Crow
Educa on is considered one of the major ac vi es at medical colleges and yet many faculty do not know how to appropriately iden fy and document the quan ty and quality of their educa onal ac vi es. By contextualizing educa onal ac vi es with Glassick’s defini on of scholarly work and using published tools we will provide a framework for educators to appropriately represent themselves, and evaluate others, as educators. Page 42 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (WS13) Educa onal Scholarship Boot Camp: Preparing Your Educa onal Materials for Peer Review and Publica on and Cri ‐
cally Reviewing Educa onal Products
Maria van Zuilen and Carla Lupi
This workshop will prepare clinician‐educators to submit educa onal products for peer‐reviewed publica on and to par cipate in the peer‐review process. During the workshop, par cipants will review the elements of educa onal scholarship and the submission prepara on process for the most widely used online portal for medical educa on resources, AAMC’s MedEdPORTAL (MEP); they will also gain hands‐on prac ce in peer review using mock examples of MEP submissions of variable quality. The workshop will offer mentored me to prepare and/or revise submissions to MEP. This session is geared toward faculty in the early stages of developing educa onal materials as well as those with materials closer to submission. We encourage par cipants to bring in an educa onal resource for poten al publica on and a laptop to work on during the session. (WS14) Using Assessments to Iden fy At‐Risk Medical Students and Impact Learning and Performance
Kathy Gibbs, Angela Hairrell, David Henzi, Janet Piskurich, and Tammy Salazar
Medical students’ performance on assessments can be prescrip ve and/or preven ve. Integra ng and applying resources with results can make “the pieces fit” and impact students’ progression through the curriculum and scores on board and shelf examina ons. The purpose of this workshop is to iden fy assessments and the applica on of prescrip ve and preven ve resources, approaches and strategies used at four ins tu ons. The audience will be involved in case vigne e applica ons iden fying assessments and resources that could be used in their programs. *This proposal stems from feedback received from the session “Learning Environment – Academic Support Part 1: Logis cs of Academic Support Centers” given at the 2013 SGEA conference in Savannah, GA. (WS15) D.R.E.A.M.ING About Validity in Educa onal Assessment
Mary Rocha, Chris e Palladino, Lance Evans, Lara Stepleman
Educators are expected to evaluate learners and programs using valid methods, yet many lack training in the psychometric proper es of assessment tools. The goal of this workshop is to prepare par cipants to understand and apply validity evidence principles by performing a cri cal analysis of an assessment instrument through methods outlined by MedEdPORTAL's new Directory & Repository of Educa onal Assessment Measures (DREAM; www.mededportal.org/dream). DREAM is a 'user‐friendly, one‐stop shop repository for assessments' including a reflec ve summary of the validity evidence associated with their use. Par cipants will immediately apply validity concepts by cri cally appraising a published instrument for assessing consulta on skills. Par cipants will hone their skills in iden fying and cri quing validity evidence, which will prepare them to evaluate the quality of assessments they may wish to use in their curricula. A basic understanding of construct validity principles will maximize Par cipant success in this workshop, but is not essen al. (WS16) How to Make Your FM Clerkship Orienta on Ac ve and Engaging or How Can We Help Students Learn What We Really
Want Them to Learn?
Suzanne Minor, Ebony Whisenant, Irmanie Eliacin, and Marquita Samuels
Ac ve learning is an evidence‐based method for effec vely teaching students. Ac ve learning involves student engagement through ques oning, ac vi es, or wri ng o en during class and is different than passive learning which o en involves powerpoint or lecture. We revamped our orienta on into a more ac ve learning session in order to further help student understand our expecta ons of them during the clerkship as well as how to use the syllabus during the rota on. A endees at this workshop will be guided in upda ng their own orienta on into a more ac ve learning experience through ac ve learning techniques, including ques oning and discussion. Page 43 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Abstracts
Small Group Discussion
(SG1) Improving Medical Educa on Across the Con nuum by Crea ng a Posi ve Learning Environment
Alisa Nagler, Lisa Howley, and Carol Thrush
A posi ve learning environment fosters learner success and is something undoubtedly UME and GME programs and ins tu ons strive to create. However, survey data and anecdotal feedback suggest there are mes and places where this is not the case. Much of crea ng a posi ve learning environment comes from the role faculty play as teachers. Academic faculty across the con nuum of medical educa on o en have li le or no training on how to be good educators. Changes in accredita on and medical educa on training require faculty development, and faculty are beginning to be held accountable for their performance as educators. Ins tu ons must play a role in developing faculty in their teaching role. As we require for l earners, faculty performance expecta ons should be clear with resources and tools provided to teach and support faculty in exceeding competence. This session will demonstrate a faculty development ini a ve using faculty par cipa on to iden fy and promote faculty competencies and a posi ve learning environment. (SG2) Learning the Ropes: What New Course Directors Need to Know
Carol Elam and Elza Mylona
New course directors may be appointed to their roles because of their content knowledge, teaching ability, and skill in interac ng with students. O en, however, they assume their du es without much insight into the ins tu on, the students, the curriculum, available support resources, and/or policies and procedures that may influence their effec veness as (SG3) Fair Measures: A Call to Transform our Thinking about the Assessment of Professionalism
Marin Gillis, Bill Allen, Cheryl Erwin, and Simon Williams
A major difficulty in assessing professionalism lies in deciding what one is to measure, whether it is knowledge, skills, behaviors, ap tude, virtues or a tudes. Knowledge, skills, and behaviors associated with being professional may be validly and reliably assessed. But what being professional is supposed to mean is being a good doctor and this leads into the grey territory of judgment and values. We contend that there are effec ve ways to manage assessment of the grey areas of professionalism, including effec ve professionalism remedia on. We invite par cipants to join educators from three different medical schools who have decades of teaching experience in academic affairs, professionalism, law, ethics and humanism in this interac ve session. (SG4) Competency‐Based Educa on and the Challenge of the Evidence‐Based Medicine Entrustable Professional Ac vity
Carla Lupi, Gerald Crites, W. Sco Richardson, and Stefanie Brown
The development of the “Core Entrustable Ac vi es for Entering Residency” poses several exci ng challenges to medical educators, especially for those ac vi es drawing on complex competencies for which feasible and robust curricular and evalua on tools have yet to be developed. This session will familiarize par cipants with the dra EPA on the evidence‐based medicine cycle and its rela onship to common themes in the prac ce‐based learning and improvement competencies within the exis ng GME milestones. Par cipants will develop a working defini on of this EPA and devise a recommenda on for the developmental milestones within the UME curriculum. The presenters hope to present this document to other groups (including GME and CME) to form a synthesized recommenda on for an integrated EBM educa onal policy across the con nua. (SG5) Introverted Medical Students: Their Challenges and Strengths in Today’s Medical Training Environment
Ralph Gillies, Bernard Davidson, and Allen Pelle er
Learners with an introverted thinking and social style may face greater challenges as medical schools adopt more interac ve teaching strategies and learning environments. Par cipants in this small group discussion will consider current defini ons and measures of introversion, examine medical educa on environments from the introverted learners’ perspec ve, and generate prac cal op ons for increasing the learning of both introverted and extraverted learners. Page 44 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (SG6) The Impact of Using “Entrustable Professional Ac vi es” to Guide Medical Student Educa on: A Discussion of
the Issues and Evalua on of Poten al Solu ons
Hugh Stoddard, Gordon Churchward, Erica Browfield, and J. William Eley
In recent years, na onal and interna onal medical organiza ons have specified the desired outcomes from medical training (e.g. ACGME Competency Domains, CanMEDS, Sco sh Doctor, MSOP, etc.). In addi on, the LCME dictates that each medical school must have objec ves that are, “stated in outcome‐based terms” (Standard 6.1/ED‐1‐A). Simultaneously, there has a trend towards the use of Entrustable Professional Ac vi es (EPA) (e.g. tenCate & Scheele; Acad Med 2007; 82: 542‐547) to define program outcomes of medical educa on (J of Grad Med Educ, “Milestones Supplement”, v5:1 supplement, March 2013). Most notable are the ACGME Milestones project (www.ACGME.org) and the AAMC project for Core Entrustable Professional Ac vi es for Entering Residency (h ps://www.mededportal.org/icollabora ve/resource/887). Transla ng the construct of EPAs into an outcomes framework that is meaningful for medical student educa on requires a nuanced understanding of what “entrustable” means, as well as defining professional ac vi es for students who are, by defini on, pre‐professional. This session will iden fy and address these two issues and will compare and contrast the viewpoints elicited from the session a endees with those adopted at one medical school.
(SG7) Scholarly Collabora on at a Distance: The Poten als and Challenges of Web‐based Solu ons for Establishing
Peer‐to‐Peer Networking and Communi es of Prac ce
Julie Gaines, Stephen McKenzie, Andrea Berry, Denise Kay, and Gerald Crites
Through a recent literature search and brainstorming session with SGEA leadership, one author iden fied me, distance, cost and communica on as barriers to doing peer‐to‐peer collabora on at a distance. With this small group discussion, they intend to lead par cipants into a reflec ve inquiry about the perceived goals of an online community, technical needs for distance collabora on, provide an overview of the available proprietary and nonproprietary web‐based solu ons, and iden fy the issues that remain unresolved with these solu ons or are inherent in them (e.g., logis cal, security, ins tu onal policy). Post‐session, the authors will capture and organize the discussion, post it on one of the free web‐based u li es and invite par cipants to a end an ongoing dialogue through this portal. (SG8) Learning from the Interprofessional Educa on (IPE) Success Stories: The Tales of Two Ins tu ons
Lori Graham, Elizabeth Nelson, Nadia Ismail, and Courtney West
Two ins tu ons share their experiences in determining how to effec vely design, implement and share best IPE prac ces. Interac ve discussion will form the basis of one approach to problem solving and working toward crea ng successful, sustainable curricula. Strategies will be addressed that will allow ins tu ons to move forward with respect to interprofessional educa on. (SG9) Unan cipated Posi ve Consequences: Transforming Professional Development for Medical Educators
Carol Elam, Elizabeth Nelson, Kathy Kreutzer, Gary Rosenfeld, and Sco Co rell
This session provides an opportunity for SGEA members to provide input into the development of the new AAMC medical educa on conference. A endees can share their ideas about pressing topics in medical educa on to be addressed in a na onal forum, and suggest unique approaches for presenta on that foster more peer‐to‐peer learning. Leaders from five professional organiza ons will discuss how their organiza ons may respond to changes in AAMC educa onal programming. (SG10) Preparing Students for Residency During Their Fourth Year of Medical School
Lisa Mar nez, Paul Mendez, Gauri Agarwal, Michelle Schwartz, Pablo Rabosto, and David Graham
The fourth year of medical school is o en a point of much discussion, as its role in the educa on of medical students is o en not clear. During this interac ve small group discussion, a endees will review components of the fourth year of medical school that have been debated in the literature. They will also discuss different fourth year curricular models, the strengths of each model, and poten al methods of incorpora ng these strengths into their own programs. Page 45 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (SG11) Do Scholarly Concentra on Programs Contribute To Las ng Scholarship?
Ingrid Bahner, Susan Pross, and Alex Mechaber
This session will discuss the complex issue of assessing the long‐term outcomes and impacts that scholarly concentra on programs have on the prac ce of medicine. Although most programs monitor the scholarly progress of their par cipants while in school, currently there is no study repor ng the long‐term integra on of scholarship in the prac ce of medicine by program graduates. Many challenges are associated with doing such long‐term outcome analyses including, but not limited to, defining scholarship in the prac ce of medicine and obtaining relevant data from program graduates. The goal of this session is to explore these challenges, develop strategies to address them and to share data as available. (SG12) Don’t Overcook the Medical Student! What is the Right Recipe for Academic Assistance?
Tammy Salazar, Janet Piskurich, David Henzi, Kathy Gibbs, and Angela Hairrell Research indicates that learning strategies are significant factors in achievement in medical schools (West & Sadoski, 2011). Other aspects of the learning environment such as communica on skills and social media use may also play apart in the success of students. Early learners tend to have deficits in medical knowledge, clinical reasoning, me management and organiza on, communica on, and mental well‐being while advanced learners may have deficits in professionalism, clinical judgment, me management and organiza on and interpersonal skills (Guerrasio, 2013). Iden fying areas of difficulty, overcoming barriers, and remedia ng these issues can be a challenge for medical professionals who work with students. Some of the barriers that exist are ming, lack of willingness of evaluators to report, fears of repercussions, poor feedback, and resistance of the student. Building a remedia on plan to support the student should consist of iden fying the issue, deliberate prac ce, feedback and self‐assessment. This type of assistance does not end at the first year of medical school and goes across the con nuum of medical educa on. The goal of this session is to discuss this type of support. Page 46 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Abstracts
Demonstra ons
(DS1) Communica ng Effec vely During Medical Emergencies: Integra ng an Online, Pre‐Session Learning Module with
Medical Simula on to Train Undergraduate Medical Students in Effec ve Communica on Skills Using the SBAR (Situa on,
Background, Assessment, Recommenda on) Framework
Ansley Splinter, Vivian Obeso, Melissa Ward‐Peterson, Rebecca Toonkel, Leslie Bofill, Chris ne Ma hews
Communica on is an essen al skill for medical professionals and simula on has been shown to be a valuable method of training and assessment in this area. In an effort to train students to use effec ve, organized, and accurate communica on skills in an emergent situa on, a pre‐session, online learning module was created for students to complete prior to par cipa ng in a simula on scenario. To create the online module, faculty adapted the SBAR (Situa on, Background, Assessment, and Recommenda on) framework originally proposed by Michael Leonard and colleagues. Students were instructed to complete this interac ve, self‐paced module prior to the simula on session in order to arrive at the session prepared to appropriately apply the SBAR framework to the clinical scenario. This blended approach to learning has helped standardize the curriculum, maximize the amount of hands‐on training me during the simula on scenario, and provide opportuni es to assess for mul ple Entrustable Professional Ac vi es (EPAs) early on in undergraduate medical educa on. (DS2) Riding the Wave of Change: Using Interac ve Videos to Teach and Assess How Faculty and Residents Learn About
Changes in Assessment and Accredita on.
Constance Tucker
This demonstra on will present three on‐line interac ve learning modules (~15min/module) developed to teach faculty and residents about changes in assessment and accredita on. Topics demonstrated will include ACGME milestones, core competencies, and clinical competency commi ees. Through interac ve webinars, par cipants are able to experience innova ve methods of engaging in and assessing faculty and resident development with the use of technology. (DS3) : Using a Mobile Web Applica on to Improve Feedback A er Observed Medical Student Clinical Encounters
Anupam Kumar, Jay Johnson, Yamel Hall, Tepparit Wiphatphumiprates, Amy Fleming, and S.Toufeeq Ahmed
During this session we will demonstrate the use of a mobile applica on VSTAR Compass (h p://vstarcompass.com) we implemented and are currently pilot tes ng to improve the clerkship student feedback process from supervising residents and physicians. We will show how students can open the applica on on any mobile device or computer and select the faculty member or resident who observed them . This will trigger the app to send an email to the faculty member, who will provide feedback a er clicking a link. The student will be able to immediately view this feedback both in the applica on itself, and through a dashboard linked to the exis ng learning management system. Lastly, we will demonstrate the ability of a mentoring faculty member to view all aggregated feedback in order to provide meaningful guidance for improvement. (DS4) Suppor ng an Academic Healthcare Learning System at the Vanderbilt School of Medicine with VSTAR
S. Toufeeq Ahmed, Amy Fleming, Jay Johnson, Mario Davidson, William Cutrer, Michael Pilla, Donna Rosens el,
Kimberly Lomis, Bonnie Miller, and Anderson Spickard
VSTAR, a highly interac ve, secure, web‐based pla orm, is the founda on for an academic healthcare learning system suppor ng the vision of self‐aware, self‐direted students progressing through a competency‐based medical school curriculum. Its integrated features include a learning management system, student por olio, assessment data, social networking, calendar func on, and mobile technology. Addi onally the outcomes database allows real‐ me compila on of outcomes data for the school of medicine on individual or class‐wide levels. Page 47 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (DS5) PACTS: Preceptor Par cipa on And Creden aling Tracking System
Morayma Cubero, Micah Marshall, Margaret Orr, Carolyn Castro‐Pagan, Chassity White, Soraya Smith, Alexandria Lewis
PACTS is a mul ‐faceted database developed at the University of Central Florida College of Medicine (UCF COM), which allows users to overcome two opera onal challenges: hospital creden aling for medical students (years 1‐4) at mul ple clinical sites; and determining pre‐clinical placement venues for student as part of the Prac ce of Medicine course (years 1 and 2). The database was created to address challenges faced by all the stake holders, including students, hospital affiliates, and college faculty and staff. The goal of this project is to standardize and streamline our processes through the crea on of a secured database that shares creden aling process and improves communica on that be er serves all stake holders. Prior to PACTS, the college was dependent on mul ple Excel spreadsheets to track a student’s hospital creden aling from their pre‐clinical years through their clinical years. It is essen al to have a college system that is centralized to protect the iden ty of the stu‐
dent, the ins tu ons reputa on and the hospitals. (DS6) DREAM: The Directory and Repository of Educa onal Assessment Measures
Chris e Palladino, John Nash, Lindsay Blake, Emily Cahill, Christopher Candler, Kathy Davies, Lance Evans, James Halbert,
Hannah Ki el, and Lara Stepleman
The mission of DREAM is to achieve excellence in health sciences educa on by providing easyto‐ locate, publically accessible informa on about assessment tools to health science educators, educa onal researchers, and program/curriculum evaluators. This demonstra on will be useful to a) educators, who can u lize DREAM as a resource to iden fy assessments appropriate for their courses, clerkships, or curricula; b) educa onal administrators, who are responsible for the evalua on of their overall educa onal program and the quality of the assessments which make up that evalua on; and c) educa onal researchers, who can u lize assessments in DREAM for their research and who may be par cularly interested in serving as an author or peer reviewer for the DREAM Collec on. (DS7) The Card Sor ng Game: An Educa onal Approach that Promotes Coopera ve Peer Learning
Maria van Zuilen
The card sor ng game format is the basis for two small group teaching sessions in the Geriatrics part of the curriculum at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. The purpose of this session is to demonstrate the card sor ng game format, present strategies for effec ve implementa on, and showcase how these teaching sessions fit into a broader competency‐based curriculum. In these highly interac ve sessions, learners apply their medical knowledge by sor ng cards in the appropriate category. While learners are challenged to explain their own ra onale for their selec ons, this instruc onal format also allows students to pool their knowledge and help each other learn. This coopera ve learning format promotes peer learning and establishes a safe learning environment. Page 48 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Abstracts
Oral Presenta ons: Tracks and Partnerships Across the Con nuum
(OP1) Leveraging Partnerships with Historically Black Colleges and Universi es (HBCUs) to Successfully Diversify the
Physician Workforce
Julie Servoss, Barry Linger, and Michael Smith
The na onal call to diversify the physician workforce is based on two main reasons: to provide culturally competent care to an increasingly diverse popula on and to address growing health inequi es in minority popula ons. HBCUs are an enriched source of minority, par cularly African‐American, pre‐medical students. HBCUs are also the most successful at recrui ng, retaining and gradua ng students interested in STEM disciplines, including medicine. Partnerships between HBCUs and medical schools are an important and underu lized strategy to diversify the physician workforce. (OP2) Relieving the GME Bo leneck in Florida
Mary Elizabeth Roth and Bernardo Obeso
In 2013 Florida medical school graduates from LCME and AOA program face the dilemma of too few GME posi ons to stay in Florida in careers of their choice. As much as 40 % of Florida medical school graduates leave the state for residency and fellowship. Loaded on this burden, thousands of off shore and overseas medical school graduates, many born and raised in Florida, feel shut out of GME in Florida. This has become known as the GME bo leneck at the AAMC. (OP3) Transi oning Quality Community Hospitals into Academic Medical Centers
Mary Elizabeth Roth, Bernardo Obeso, and Diane Fitz
Today's shortage of teaching hospitals for medical students and GME creates the challenge to develop new academic medical centers from the quality hospitals remote form the medical school that win quality awards and generate secondary and ter ary care. This team describes the steps to bring a community's leadership and hospital into the 21st century academic medical center answering the calls to teach, serve the public and generate scholarly ac vity. ACGME and LCME needs new resources for clinical educa on with academic standards of the tradi onal medical school hospital. (OP4) Family Medicine Accelerated Track (FMAT) Update on the 3‐year MD
Betsy Jones, Simon Williams, Ron Cook, and Vaughan Lee
Our ins tu on has implemented a 3‐year accelerated medical school curriculum that culminates in the MD degree and prepares students for a standard 3‐year family medicine residency. Par cipants in this session will be able to describe the program’s progress to date, evaluate its likely impact, and offer input, advice and collabora on on this and similar innova ons. (OP5) HEAL‐X: Tulane's Accelerated Curriculum for PhD's Becoming MD's
N. Kevin Krane, Byron Crawford, Rajunor E arh, Marc Kahn, and Jennifer Gibson The curriculum for medical educa on in most medical schools has undergone significant change over the past decade by incorpora ng integra on of basic and clinical sciences, ac ve and self‐directed learning and early clinical experiences. However, the criteria for the selec on of students and the length of their educa on have undergone li le if any change. Tulane University School of Medicine therefore implemented a new, concurrent curriculum, the Health Educa on Adap ve Learning Experience (HEAL‐X), for 15 students with PhDs in the biomedical sciences, who matriculate into a 3 1/2 yr program that runs parallel to the tradi onal curriculum. The preclinical curriculum is designed as an integrated, systems‐based modular, non‐lecture forma ed curriculum that focuses on self‐directed and ac ve learning. We will present the ini al experience with Tulane's HEAL‐X Program and discuss the op ons and opportuni es for accelerated medical educa on programs. Page 49 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Abstracts
Oral Presenta ons: Pedagogy Across the Con nuum
(OP6) Team Based Learning: The Poten al u lity for Student Commentary for Faculty Development
Andrew Moses and Carla Lupi
Team based learning is a rela vely new pedagogy in medical educa on yet challenging for faculty. Data to guide faculty development needs are lacking. We conducted a survey of students exposed to mul ple TBL’s by a variety of faculty and elicited specific comments to guide faculty development. (OP7) Group Learning Rapidly Plateaus for New Student Learning Teams Using the Team‐Based Learning Method
Gerald Crites
No research to date has es mated the number of group learning exercises needed for students assigned to new Team‐based Learning (TBL) teams to show a plateau in group performance and social learning. The author shows that, with 106 second year medical students experienced with the TBL method, both group performance on TBL tasks and social learning appear to plateau a er three group learning ac vi es. If these results can be confirmed, then reassigning students to new teams should have a very brief impact on group learning. (OP8) Solving the Case of the Missing Person: Mapping Sociocultural Themes Longitudinally Across the Pre‐Clinical
Curriculum
Mark Clark, Mark Holden, Anne Rudnicki, and Oma Morey
This session will present a method for reviewing and improving the ways that sociocultural competency themes are addressed in PBL cases. Par cipants will develop and share cultural backstories for an otherwise dehumanized PBL pa ent, and will discuss strategies for making PBL cases more robust through narra ve processes. (OP9) Have We Dehumanized the Pa ent in Problem Based Learning?
Karen Szauter, Mark Clark, Anne Rudnicki, Susan Gerik, Ann Frye, Cheryl Vaiani, Virginia Niebuhr, Oma Morey, and Mark Holden
Medical school curricula have embraced Problem Based Learning (PBL) methodology to engage learners in explora on of biomedical and behavioral science principles in pre‐clinical coursework. PBL case development is challenging and requires careful mapping of learning objec ves. Prompted by recent discussions on pa ent centered care and cultural awareness, we ques oned whether our PBL cases gave adequate descrip ons of the “person”, and whether demographic and socio‐cultural variables of the people represented in the cases included broad representa on when assessed across the curriculum. (OP10) GME Concentra ons: Supplemen ng Residency Training with Key Content
Alisa Nagler, Mariah Rudd, Jane Gagliardi, Mitch Heflin, Shari Whicker, Aditee Narayan, Kathryn Andolsek, Saumil Chudgar, and
Catherine Kuhn
In light of recent calls for residency training reform, teaching ins tu ons must implement effec ve means of delivering content previously not included in tradi onal GME training programs. Individual programs may struggle to provide the necessary knowledge, skills, and experiences required to meet trainee career interests and goals. Duke University Hospital has successfully addressed this challenge with an ins tu on‐wide GME Concentra ons Program. (OP11) Teaching the Business of Medicine Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on
Karen Miller and Bonnie Mason
The University of Louisville School of Medicine has introduced both an undergraduate Dis nc on in Business Track and a blended learning business course for senior residents. Working with local business experts and a na onal not for profit physician educa on group, OPM™, we have created a useful model for introducing basic business concepts. Page 50 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Abstracts
Oral Presenta ons: Professionalism and Learning Environment Across the Con nuum
(OP12) Professionalism: Can We Assess Its Many Facets?
Chris e Palladino, James Halbert, Lindsay Blake, Kathy Davies, Steven Lieberman, and Lara Stepleman
Professionalism is seen as a central component of physicians’ responsibility to pa ents and society. Yet professionalism, as currently defined in medical educa on, is an evolving, mul ‐faceted domain of competence. To measure professionalism in our learners, we need a variety of assessment tools that can capture the different facets of professionalism. As part of a larger curriculum development project, we designed a systema c literature review to iden fy assessments that capture seven facets of professionalism. (OP13) Learning Environment Surveys and Survey Fa gue: How Many Items are Necessary?
Hugh Stoddard, Erica Brownfield, Gordon Churchward, and J. William Eley
To demonstrate compliance with LCME accredita on standards ED‐31‐A, medical schools o en rely on student surveys of the learning environment. Students are requested to respond to a large number of evalua on surveys on a regular basis throughout their medical school career. Furthermore, all senior students at AAMC schools in the United States are expected to complete the Gradua on Ques onnaire which takes 45 minutes or more to complete. This large burden of evalua on surveys can lead to survey fa gue and a consequent reduc on of response rates or unreliable responses (Porter, 2004). At one medical school, a learning environment survey was distributed to students monthly leading to an concern amongst the leadership about students’ investment of me and survey fa gue. To reduce survey fa gue for students, results from a learning environment survey about instruc onal quality during required clerkships were analyzed to find an underlying factor structure that would guide a redesign of the survey form to reduce the burden on students. (OP14) What Happens on Facebook Stays on Facebook: Student Beliefs about Social Media and Their Rela onship to
Measures of Professional and Personal Iden ty
Cayla Teal and Stephen Greenberg
Literature suggests that medical students use and perceive social media in ways that can raise professionalism concerns. Recent studies of student and faculty perspec ves on social media has suggested that students make a more dis nct separa on between their professional and personal iden es than do faculty and administrators, and that perhaps students’ unprofessional behavior is linked to this dis nc on. This study explored the rela onships between students’ beliefs about social media prac ce and iden ty. (OP15) Rela onships Between Study Strategies and Self‐Directed Learning in Entering Medical students ‐ A Two Ins tu on
Study
Tammy Salazar, Courtney West, Janet Piskurich, Mark Sadoski, Naomi Lacy, and Angela Hairrell
Although research suggests that prematricula on data such as MCAT and science GPA can help iden fy students who may have academic difficulty in medical school (Donnon, 2007), there is too much variability to accurately predict which students may be considered at‐risk. An emerging concept for predic ng medical students’ performance is the role of study skills. Findings in a recent study (West & Sadoski 2011) indicated that two study strategies, me management and self‐tes ng, predicted academic performance in medical school. Since there is a separate emphasis for medical schools to encourage self‐directed and life‐long learning (AAMC, 1993), we hypothesize that study skills and self‐directed learning are similar and should be examined together to be er understand students with academic difficulty. This study explores rela onships between study skills and self‐directed learning readiness. This is the first step in deepening our understanding of skills that lead to success in medical school. Page 51 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (OP16) Assessing Medical Students’ Intrinsic Mo va ons: A Pilot Study of the TriMetrix™ HD System
Terry Stra on and Ryan Lisk
Using the online version of the TriMetrix™ HD personal assessment, a human resources tool used in business, we found modest rela onships were among specific mo vators and MCAT subtests and USMLE Step 1 performance ‐ but not with performance in the first two years of medical school. (OP17) Mapping a Longitudinal Professionalism Theme in a Pre‐Clinical Curriculum
Mark Holden, Virginia Niebuhr, Karen Szauter, Mark Clark, Anne Rudnicki, Oma Morey, Cheryl Vaiani, Susan Gerik, and Ann Frye
Principles highly relevant to the prac ce of medicine o en do not fit within specific disciplines or training levels, but rather span the con nuum and should be integrated broadly within medical training. To address this, our medical school introduced five longitudinal themes into our curriculum. Content related to professionalism, one of the themes, has been interwoven into all courses and clerkships. To ensure that we were reaching our goal of achieving ver cal and longitudinal coordina on of theme content, we elected to perform a detailed review of the theme content in our pre‐clinical educa onal materials. The pre‐clinical curriculum is organized into ten basic science/organ system courses. Page 52 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Abstracts
Oral Presenta ons: Training Across the Con nuum
(OP18) Perceived Levels of Clinical Skills Among Fourth Year Medical Students Before and A er a Clinical Skills Capstone
Course
Vivian Obeso, Ansley Splinter, Rodolfo Bonnin, and Melissa Ward‐Peterson
In an effort to inform curriculum, reinforce pa ent safety, and standardize clinical experiences for a new medical school’s first gradua ng class, a simula on‐based capstone course was developed focused on procedures and scenarios likely encountered in early residency. This study evaluated whether there was any change in perceived levels of clinical abili es as a result of the course. Results showed improved confidence levels in all items. The top ten items with the most significant improvement related to procedures, wri ng orders, pa ent hand‐offs, team skills, and ini al management of a deteriora ng pa ent. (OP19) Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery: A Pilot Study to Test the Transferability to Obstetrics and Gynecology
Residents
Kelli Braun, Chris e Palladino, Brent Parnell, Chadburn Ray, and Lance Evans
The Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) is a non‐specialty specific validated curriculum to teach basic laparoscopic skills and knowledge. Extensively tested in general surgery, gradua ng surgical residents are now required to pass the FLS examin a on for board cer fica on. Our goal was to test the transferability of the FLS curriculum to Ob‐Gyn residents at all stages of training and to evaluate the resources required for implementa on and maintenance of the program. (OP20) Con nuity Clinical Experience: Implementa on of a Longitudinal Student Experience
Jesse Ehrenfeld, Jennifer Green, Morgan McDonald, Heather Ridinger, Carin McAbee, Martha Hutchinson, and Kim Lomis
The Con nuity Clinical Experience (CCX) course is new required longitudinal course that was launched in the fall of 2012 at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. CCX is a four‐year curriculum that integrates students into clinical teams to care for individual pa ents while learning about the larger care‐delivery system. Students spend ~one halfday a week in the same clinical se ng across all four years. Seminar groups, with a designated small group facilitator, meet monthly to teach clinical and system‐analysis skills in a consistent small‐group se ng. (OP21) Pharmacology for the 21st Century: The Successful Implementa on of an Innova ve Integra ve
Pharmacotherapeu cs Curriculum for Medical Students
Thomas Lynch and Julie Bridges
An en rely new clinically‐focused pharmacotherapeu cs curriculum was developed to replace a tradi onal didac c‐based pharmacology curriculum for second‐year medical students. Developed and taught by a clinical pharmacist and u lizing interac ve learning strategies including TBL, the course exceeded all expecta ons and resulted in high a endance rates, excellent evalua ons, and Pharmacology Subject exam and USMLE Step 1 exam scores higher than previous years. (OP22) It’s about TIME—Doctoring Course for Premedical Students
John Luk, Celina Mankey, and Dorothy Sendelbach
In partnership with two undergraduate academic campuses in the University of Texas System, the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School has implemented two doctoring courses for premedical students involving professional iden ty forma on and early clinical immersion experiences and u lizing local clinical educa on resources. This ac vity will explore the opportuni es and challenges raised by the design and implementa on of the two experiences‐‐one in Dallas and the other in Aus n. What are the lessons learned and poten al impact of such experiences on the con nuum of medical educa on? This session will prime par cipants to cri cally reflect on this ques on. (OP23) Medical Students’ A tudes and Learning Approaches: The Impact of Time and an Integrated Curriculum
Bri any Ange and Andria Thomas
The purpose of this study was to determine if medical students’ learning approaches, a tudes about health care issues, and beliefs about the medical school learning environment changed over me. Our secondary aim was to evaluate if medical students changed in the above aspects due to a curriculum change. The purpose of the curriculum change, which began in academic year 2004‐2005, was to shi the emphasis of teaching of the basic sciences towards core principles, and the assessment towards understanding over memoriza on. Page 53 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Abstracts
Oral Presenta ons: Assessment Across the Con nuum
(OP24) From Theory to Prac ce: Defining and Implemen ng Milestones in Undergraduate Medical Educa on
Kimberly Lomis, S. Toufeeq Ahmed, William Cutrer, Amy Fleming, Geoffrey Fleming, Anderson Spickard, and Bonnie Miller
We present the implementa on of standardized milestone anchors to describe student performance throughout our curriculum. This evidence populates learner por olios to support a process of informed self‐assessment and competency‐based personalized learning plans. (OP25) Data‐Driven, Mentor‐Facilitated Self‐Assessment Supports the Development of Competency‐Based Individualized
Learning Goals Among First Year Medical Students
Amy Fleming, S. Toufeeq Ahmed, Mario Davidson, Donna Rosens el, Jay Johnson, Kimberly Lomis,
Anderson Spickard, and Bonnie Miller
With the goal of training and educa ng self‐directed, life‐long learners, we have ins tuted a formal structure for competency‐based self‐assessment. This process is supported by a highly interac ve web‐based pla orm called VSTAR. First year medical students complete data‐driven, mentor‐facilitated self‐assessment and create a personalized learning plan with learning goals. Early results support distribu on of student‐generated learning goals across all six ACGME competencies sugges ng student understanding of the importance of all domains. (OP26) Educa on Decision Support: Using Natural Language Processing to Provide Automated Personalized Feedback on a
Trainee’s Clinical Notes
Anderson Spickard, Josh Denny, and James Powers
The AAMC has enumerated 8 geriatric competencies of medical student graduates. We u lize computa onal linguis cs with an electronic search engine to iden fy two geriatric competencies in the electronic medical record (EMR) of student’s clinical notes: 1) discussion of advance direc ves (AD) and, 2) assessment of altered mental status (AMS). (OP27) Competency‐Tracking and Program Evalua on: Using a Web‐Based Dashboard and a Longitudinal Data‐Warehouse
to Know How Your Students are Performing
Andria Thomas
Competency tracking is essen al in closing the loop on student performance in medical school. Evalua ng students and their learning experiences at sites other than the main campus is important to ensure and document comparability, and to make necessary adjustments when needed. This presenta on will describe how one medical school developed a dashboard of data elements taken from different sources in order to track student success in mee ng competency‐based objec ves. (OP28) The Use and Evalua on of an Assessment Tool to Introduce Pre‐Clinical Learners to Values‐Based Prac ce
Allesa English, Suze e Sookdeo, Dawn Shocken, and Alicia Monroe
Descrip on and ra onale Understanding the ideas, concerns and expecta ons that a pa ent brings to a consulta on is well recognized to be crucial for effec ve communica on. But a dis nguishing feature of values‐based prac ce is the extent to which it takes seriously and engages with the perspec ves of the clinicians, as well as the pa ents and caregivers. As a part of the SELECT program, students are introduced to the principles of values‐based prac ce as well as the ICE‐StAR approach to pa ent interviewing in their pre‐clinical years. Student mastery of this approach is then assessed through performance in a simulated pa ent experience. Page 54 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Abstracts
Oral Presenta ons: Interprofessional Educa on Across the Con nuum
(OP29) Early Pa ent Safety Interprofessional Educa on and Awareness
Anne Gill, Elizabeth Nelson, Jennifer Cowart, Catherine Ha ield, Rita Dello Stri o, and Cayla Teal
Quality Improvement and Pa ent Safety (QI/PS) have become na onal priori es in health care training and delivery. A recent survey of medical schools revealed that most schools (62%)1 include QI/PS in their curriculum but few schools provide training using interprofessional educa on (IPE). We propose that IPE is an ideal framework to both explore and teach interpersonal communica on, teamwork and other pa ent safety concepts. (OP30) iCARE: Integrity, Compassion, Accountability, Respect and Excellence. An Interprofessional Educa on (IPE)
Experience for Medical and Pharmacy Students
Dawn Shocken, Allesa English, Erini Serag‐Bolos, and Shyam Gelot
Healthcare is undergoing a comprehensive paradigm shi towards Interprofessional team‐based prac ce; therefore demanding the educa onal system make this shi as well. The purpose of this IPE experience was to provide medical and pharmacy students with three enriched sta ons that simulated didac c materials both groups learned, providing opportuni es to teach each other about their respec ve fields. (OP31) Modeling Pa ent‐Centered Communica on in Interprofessional Small Groups
Vinita Kiluk, Laura Haubner, Allesa English, Dawn Shocken, and Alicia Monroe
Medical school curricula have tradi onally focused on students’ acquisi on and synthesis of the vast body of basic science and clinical knowledge essen al to the diagnos c and therapeu c skills of the physician. Affec ve, communica ve, and professional development were le to the vicissitudes of the appren ceship phase of the curriculum, when observa on and mentorship by experienced physicians were expected to transmit the expected behaviors to the student. The randomness of this process and the realiza on that some physicians are lacking in fundamental communica on competency has driven the public to demand a higher communica on standard from their physicians. (OP32) Developing Professional Communica on Through Interprofessional Simula on
Robert Casanova, Elizabeth Tombs, and Tiffani Wise
Errors in the healthcare arena are the eighth largest cause of death in the United States with miscommunica on among healthcare professionals accoun ng for 70% of actual and near miss events. Interprofessional Educa on (IPE), the process of teaching healthcare professionals from two or more disciplines in an environment of coopera on and teamwork, is one strategy to improve communica on and collabora on. In IPE, learners and teachers learn how the different disciplines can work together to provide be er care for our pa ents. True IPE requires collabora on between par cipants, the teacher becoming more of a facilitator, encouraging interac on between the disciplines. "Interprofessional educa on has been associated with enhanced pa ent care and health outcomes in a range of clinical contexts" (Silver & Leslie, 2009). The purpose of this program was to introduce nursing students, medical students and residents to TeamSTEPPS at an early stage in their educa on with emphasis on SBAR (Situa on, Background, Assessment, Recommenda on) style communica on techniques with the goal of addressing stereotypes and barriers to communica on affec ng pa ent care. Page 55 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Abstracts
Poster Session
(PS1) Leadership Educa on and the Development of Professional Competencies in US and Canadian Based Medical Schools
Jaime Franco, Marin Gillis, and Eneida Roldan
Today, now than ever before, medical schools are required to provide assurances that medical students and graduates exhibit specific professional competencies that are appropriate and that serve as the founda on for providing quality health care in various se ngs and to various popula ons. To this end, various leadership development tools used in the corporate business environment (e.g., emo onal intelligence and mul ‐rater assessments) can be used in medical educa on to coach‐‐and to a certain degree‐‐train students to leverage their inherent [emphasis added] knowledge, skills, and abili es. In prac ce, professional competencies are vast, elusive, and integrated into the medical curriculum o en mes haphazardly. However, research suggests that professional competencies must be integrated at various touch‐points along the medical curriculum and co‐curriculum such as in the classroom and at the pa ent bedside. Given pervasive cost containment ini a ves in higher educa on, most medical schools are challenged to do more with less such as forever expanding the curriculum to meet accredita on standards and ins tu onal requirements within a confined period of me. Furthermore, given the impending changes to our health care system, it is impera ve that medical educators prepare students to effec vely and efficiently navigate evolving health care systems without compromising pa ent care. And, this is accomplished by training them how to leverage and maximize their competencies. The curricular integra on of leadership development content in medical educa on appears promising because it has a tradi on of focusing on developing an individual’s competencies in the various roles he or she may play. In addi on, leadership development content is mul ‐disciplinary and mul ‐dimensional. (PS2) Competency Linking Student Self‐Assessments in a Pediatric Clerkship
Jeremy Gibson, Katherine Gallagher, Theresa Lykins, and Collen Colbert
Studies comparing student self‐assessments to external measures during clerkships have shown poor correla ons between the two (1‐4). Physician self‐assessment skills are typically considered to be poor (5). In a purposeful review of the literature, no studies could be found where student narra ve assessments were linked to competencies to enable program improvement and enhance student assessment. (PS3) A Preceptor Based Surgery Clerkship: A Successful Alterna ve to the Tradi onal Model
Joan St. Onge, Robert Kozol, Julie Belkowitz, Amy Zito, Daniel Lichtstein, Gauri Agarwal
An increasing number of medical schools are using alterna ves to the tradi onal clerkship structure to train medical students. The community preceptor model has been used in primary care based clerkships at some ins tu ons. Longitudinal integra on has also been used in place of tradi onal clerkships in the third year. Studies describing these programs and their effect on educa onal outcomes have been mixed. The Regional Campus of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine (UMMSMRC) has implemented an integrated surgery clerkship which incorporates a preceptor based model. We describe the clerkship, and major outcomes including the learning opportuni es, student evalua ons, assessment of medical knowledge, as well as career choice. (PS4) A Longitudinal Integrated Radiology Clerkship: The Implementa on and Evolu on of a Teaching Culture at a
Community Hospital
Gauri Agarwal, Joan St. Onge, Steven Falcone, Suzanne LeBlang, Daniel Lichtstein, and Amy Zito
Beginning in 2009, Radiology has been incorporated into the longitudinal integrated clerkships at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine (UMMSM) Regional Medical Campus (RMC). The Integrated Medicine Clerkship spans twelve weeks and combines the disciplines of Internal Medicine, Geriatrics, Pallia ve Care, and Radiology. The Integrated Surgery Clerkship also spans twelve weeks and combines the disciplines of Surgery, Anesthesia, and Radiology. The RMC u lizes the same core curriculum and clinical objec ves as the main campus of UMMSM, but the delivery of the objec ves differ significantly. On the RMC, these radiology objec ves are delivered over 24 weeks. Page 56 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (PS5) Nursing Students and Medical Students Learning Together: An Interprofessional Educa on Team Based Learning
Experience
Julia Belkowitz, Terry Eggenberger, Kathryn Keller, and Amy Zito
Pa ent care is improved when members of disciplines from wide‐ranging fields such as medicine, nursing, pharmacy, social work, and physical therapy work in collabora on to share their unique pa ent care perspec ve (Ins tute of Medicine 2001, WHO). The Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collabora ve Prac ce (2011) were developed in an effort to generate trust, respect, shared accountability and decision‐making and effec ve teamwork to op mize pa ent care. Interprofessional educa on (IPE) is defined as “when two or more professions learn with, from and about each other to improve collabora on and the quality of care”(1). The Carnegie Founda on (2009) recommends that healthcare educators create new models that teach their students to not only collaborate with one another, but form teams with shared goals to improve pa ent outcomes through IPE(5) . Building upon an experience in which second year medical students and nursing students worked in small groups to enhance and role play communica on skills, we developed an IPE experience using the modality of team based learning focusing on communica on skills to minimize the occurrence and the ethics of disclosure of medical errors. The medical school and nursing school faculty worked in partnership to develop and implement this experience. (PS6) Peer Mentoring Academic Program (PMAP)
Ella Uwaibi, Tené Sablo, and Lou Ann Cooper
Star ng medical school can be a difficult transi on. Students struggle with developing effec ve study methods, adjus ng to the rigorous pace, and dealing with the psychological pressures of medical school. Failure to adjust quickly enough to the pace of medical school and the absence of a strong science background are frequently cited in the literature. A needs assessment for the University of Florida College of Medicine (UFCOM) was conducted by implemen ng four focus groups comprised of students from the Class of 2016 during the summer between their first and second years. Students were asked ques ons about their experiences and opinions regarding their transi on into their first year of medical school. An analysis of the tran‐
scrip ons of the focus groups suggested several common themes, including: difficul es establishing studying techniques and the need for academic mentorship from upperclassmen. The analysis also suggested that students would prefer a longitudinal program over a tradi onal pre‐matricula on program. Therefore, in August 2013 we ins tuted an op onal on‐campus Peer Mentoring Academic Program (PMAP), available to all incoming first year UFCOM students (h p://counseling.med.ufl.edu/
pmap). PMAP has two components: ‐ Peer‐led academic support workshops to teach incoming students the study skills needed to foster success in the medical school curriculum ‐ A peer mentorship component to provide incoming students with social/emo onal support, encouragement, and guidance (PS7) Ins tu onal Climate and Medical Students’ Percep ons of their A tudes, Needs, and Skills in the Conduct of Re‐
search: Does Gender Ma er?
Carol Elam, Craig Ziegler, Karen Miller, Linda Dunatov, Susan McDowell, and Michael Rowland
We sought to determine whether there were gender differences in percep ons about, and interests in, the conduct of research across osteopathic and allopathic medical students in Kentucky. We administered an electronic survey to 1200 medical students to gauge their percep ons regarding their research a tudes and needs, the research climate at their medical school, and their level of research skills. As compared to males, women medical students gave lower ra ngs to their research a tudes and needs and their research skills. Addi onal research should be conducted to determine ini a ves that medical educators can take to increase the research interests and skills of their female medical students. (PS8) Library Collabora on: Best Prac ces for EBM‐Related Curriculum and Methods for Competency Building
Kathryn Kerdolff and Sarah Knox‐Morley
Two medical librarians used separate grants to travel to each other’s libraries to observe classroom instruc on, and begin formula ng best prac ces for providing instruc on in EBM‐related skills in health sciences competency based curriculums. Page 57 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (PS9) A Unique Community Collabora on for Rural Health Care Exposure
Joanna Drowos, Sarah Wood, and Lawrence Brickman
Each third year medical student from the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlan c University is assigned to spend one day observing medical care in a geographically isolated rural and culturally unique community hospital in Palm Beach County. This brief experience is coordinated through a partnership with the local taxing district that owns Lakeside Medical Center, as well as an Osteopathic Family Prac ce Residency Program based there. Program goals include exposure to rural health care, medically underserved pa ents, culturally unique popula ons and collabora on with resident teams. Preliminary feedback reveals that students enjoy the experience and share though ul insights about the community and care they receive. (PS10) A Hybrid Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship Model: Blending Inpa ent and Outpa ent Experiences
Sarah Wood, Lawrence Brickman, Joanna Drowos, and Lindsey Henson
The Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine is a new community‐based medical school without an academic health center. A core principle agreed by faculty is that con nuity with pa ents, faculty, peers, advisers, and health care systems is fundamental to developing students’ clinical skills and knowledge. We therefore were commi ed from the ini al planning stages to delivering Longitudinal Integrated Clerkships (LICs) during year three (1‐4). Our challenge was to create an LIC model that would be sustainable given our resources and could blend the need for con nuity within the inpa ent and outpa ent se ngs. (PS11) Development, Implementa on, and Assessment of a Longitudinal Simula on Curriculum for the Management of
Medical Emergencies: The RAPID Training Program
Vivian Obeso, Ansley Splinter, Rebecca Toonkel, Melissa Ward‐Peterson, and Chris ne Ma hews
To address the need for a longitudinal approach to residency preparedness, our faculty developed the RAPID (Responding Appropriately to a Pa ent In Distress) training program, a simula on‐based curriculum that fosters progressive implementa on and deliberate prac ce throughout undergraduate medical training. The RAPID training program will assess student performance in emergency situa ons before they enter residency. (PS12) A Novel Task‐Based Learning Por olio: Developing Medical Students’ Reflec ve Prac ce Ability by Integra ng
Across Competencies
Suzanne Weiner, Ellen Eisenberg, George Luck, Joseph Ouslander, and Lindsey Henson
Por olios are used across the medical educa on con nuum, o en serving as collec ons of evidence about procedures, pa ents, exam scores, work products, or feedback from pa ents, peers, or supervisors. Learning por olios include such evidence but also require 1) ac ve reflec on to iden fy areas of rela ve strength and weakness, 2) development and implementa on of learning plans to improve performance, and 3) reflec on on outcome – a reflec ve prac ce cycle. Medical school learning por olios usually address individual competencies, while professional competence is a contextual capacity that demands integra on of competencies (JAMA 2002:287;226). Our novel por olio uses tasks to focus students’ reflec ve prac ce skills on integra ng the mul ple competencies needed in prac ce. Our first class matriculated in 2011 in a curriculum that starts with 18 months of integrated basic science and clinical courses, with 10 hours a week in small group ac vi es, followed by a 3rd year with two 6‐month Longitudinal Integrated Clerkships, and a tradi onal elec ve/selec ve 4th year. The curriculum structure provides the context for the yearly tasks for our learning por olio. Page 58 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (PS13) Integra ng Basic and Clinical Science Using Macronutrient Nutri on
Amy Medlock and Stephen Goggans
The GRU UGA Medical Partnership is a four year regional campus with a highly integrated curriculum where basic and clinical faculty work closely to implement the program of study. Basic science faculty contribute depth and new informa on to several sessions in the first year doctoring course and clinical faculty are called upon to add help add relevance and authen city to basic science sessions. These collabora ve efforts and sessions have facilitated the integra on of basic and clinical sciences in the curriculum. One integrated session presented in the doctoring course focuses on macronutrient nutri on. This session uses a new ac ve learning format in which students work in teams to first synthesize informa on and then apply that informa on to complex cases. The objec ves of the session include learning important dietary recommenda ons, rela ng those to the underlying biochemistry and applying the informa on to common outpa ent clinical situa ons. Prior to the session each student analyzed their own 24 hour food recall using the online USDA resource Super Tracker. In class the students worked in teams to review the team members’ 24 hour food recall analyses. The class as a whole then discussed trends and surprises from the analysis. Teams then worked through a two part case in which they were asked to assess and provide recommenda ons for a pa ent during an office visit. Students answered several ques ons which were discussed with the class as a whole and the faculty provided clarifica on and depth. The overall response from students of the session was posi ve and student performance on seven exam ques ons averaged 89%. The class discussion during the session provided insight to the instructors on addi onal informa on to include for clarifica on and depth in subsequent years. In addi on, planning and debriefing of the session highlighted addi onal areas in which nutri on could be incorporated into the exis ng curriculum. (PS14) Integrated Management of Fragmented Parts: Re‐conceptualizing the Structure of the Curriculum Commi ee
Erica Brownfield, Hugh Stoddard, Gordon Chruchward, and J. William Eley
An innova ve organiza onal structure for the curriculum commi ee was created and implemented to increase faculty involvement, expand oversight of the program, and improve communica on between stakeholders. In 2007, the Emory University School of Medicine ini ated a new curriculum. The curriculum was integrated across all 4 years of the MD program and offered many op ons for students. As a consequence of this integra on and individualiza on, management of the curriculum became disjointed, me consuming, and inefficient. Educa on leaders in the school of medicine designed a new structure for curriculum management. Founda onal to the new structure were the iden fica on and delega on of all tasks of a curriculum commi ee to mul ple sub‐commi ees and a system design that facilitated communica on. (PS15) The Journey of Cri cal Thinking and Evidence‐Based Medicine ‐‐ The CARE Experiences of the College of Medicine,
Texas A&M Health Science Center
Litao Wang, Wei‐Jung Chen, Suzanne Shurtz, and Phillips Nagsuk
Future physicians must be educated to efficiently and effec vely conduct literature search and apply formal rules of evidence evalua ng the clinical literature. Cri cal Thinking and Evidence‐based Medicine is not new to our medical school, however, we believe, by introducing an integrated, interac ng, and inter‐related 5‐year course of ac on, the overall effec veness of the MD program in cri cal thinking and EBM will be further improved. Our CARE curriculum will be evaluated by clearly defined and documented learning outcomes, including data from course embedded assignments, United States Medical Licensing Exam Step 1 & 2, Associa on of American Medical Colleges Gradua on Ques onnaires etc. (PS16) Interprofessional Educa on: Evalua on of a Pilot Program
Mario Jacomino, Mira Sarsekeyeva, Michelle Duhaney, Jo Ann Bamdas, Michele Hawkins, Kathryn Keller,
Lindsey Henson, and Joseph Ouslander
This poster describes the design, curriculum, early outcomes, and lessons learned in the successful launch of an Interprofessional Educa on (IPE) program which annually involves >200 students and faculty from Medicine, Nursing, andS ocial Work at Florida Atlan c University, addresses the Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collabora ve Prac ce, and includes a unique component (interprofessional student team visits with geriatric mentors). Page 59 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (PS17) Mentorship in a BS‐MD Program: The Road to FAME
Allison Pye, David Henzi, and Tracy Lopez
To assist and fully support a new, accelerated BS‐MD program, a mentorship program was conceived and implemented to match incoming undergraduate freshmen at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) with rising second‐year medical students at The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio Medical School (UTHSCSA). The purpose of this study is to inves gate students’ sa sfac on with the mentorship program in its inaugural year. (PS18) Use of a Mul ‐ICU Course To Improve Understanding of Cri cal Care Topics in 4th Year Medical Students
William Cutrer, Tracy McGrane, Liza Weavind, Arna Banerjee, and Kimberly Lomis
Tradi onal curricula situate the teaching of founda onal sciences predominantly in the classroom, pre‐requisite to clinical experiences. Much of this material would be developmentally more appropriate in later stages of training. However, variability of student experiences has been cited as a limita on to the consistent delivery of content in the clinical se ng. Faculty were charged to create courses that incorporate explicit teaching of the underlying science into the learning and delivery of clinical medicine. Cri cal care medicine prac ced in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) environment offers a unique opportunity for learners to interact tangibly with core physiology and pharmacology principles and pair the learning of founda onal science with clinical care. (PS19) U lizing Team‐Based Learning for Content Review in an Integrated First‐Year Medical Curriculum
Deborah Louda, Ana Maria Azzarolo, Michelle Lizo ee‐Waniewski, Lindsey Henson, Vijaya Iragavarpu, and Pablo Rabosto
The Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlan c University has an integrated curriculum for the basic sciences that uses Problem‐Based Learning (PBL) and other small‐group learning experiences along with didac c lectures. Team‐Based Learning (TBL), although conducted in a large‐group se ng, offers many of the same poten al benefits as PBL, such as increased depth of learning, improved ability to apply knowledge, development of interpersonal skills, and enhanced mo va on through student engagement. Since the principles of TBL fit well with our educa onal philosophy, we recently introduced some TBL sessions in the first‐year courses while s ll retaining many didac c lectures. Our ini al TBL sessions received a mixed response from students. While students perceived the sessions as both useful and enjoyable, they reported that mixing TBL sessions with didac c lectures on the same general topic within the same meframe produced a somewhat disjointed experience. To avoid this issue and at the same me exploit the benefits of TBL, we decided to use TBL as a format for review and integra on of content rather than for the introduc on of new content. (PS20) Integra on of Lifelong Learning Skills into the First Year Medical Curriculum at the Charles E. Schmidt College of
Medicine
Michelle Lizo e‐Waniewski, Ana Maria Azzarolo, Deborah Louda, Rainald Schmidt, Tiffany Moxham, and Lindsey Henson
It is widely accepted that a key characteris c of successful physicians is the ability to obtain and u lize lifelong learning (LLL) skills throughout their careers (Li et al, 2010; Murdoch‐Eaton and Whi le, 2012). Many medical schools now incorporate some type of student‐directed learning as part of their curricula. It has been theorized that integra on of such methods can intrinsically impart LLL skills such as self‐directed learning, resource organiza on and integra on, and self‐evalua on (Dunlap, 2003). We hypothesize that a more explicit approach to learning and incorpora ng these essen al skills may be more beneficial to medical students. (PS21) Improving the Internal Medicine Subspecialty Clinic Experience Through a Learner‐Directed Interven on
Emily Castellanos and Leora Horn
The ambulatory clinical experience is an integral component of the general internal medicine residency. However, the crea on of a suitable educa onal outpa ent subspecialty experience is challenging due to the scheduling constraints of the rota on. With limited me allo ed for each subspecialty clinic, residents may work with mul ple faculty members in a two week block. This can result in an inconsistent, heterogeneous experience for the resident as faculty members have varying familiarity with each resident’s skills, background, and interests. We hypothesized that familiarizing faculty with individual resident interests, background knowledge, and needs prior to their clinic rota on would help overcome the problem of transiency in the outpa ent educa onal se ng and improve the resident‐faculty experience. Page 60 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (PS22) Correlates to Exam Performance in the Preclinical Years of Medical School: Our Ini al Experience within an Integrated
Systems‐Based Curriculum
Kyle Diamond, Douglas McConnell, Nick Warren, Mavis Brown, Deborah Louda, and Lindsey Henson
Medical educa on is a mul ‐dimensional process that encompasses a variety of teaching modali es. Our ins tu on has adopted a hybrid approach to its curriculum in which didac c lectures are presented in combina on with a variety of small group learning ac vi es. Medical students encounter educa onal content in each of these formats concurrently, with the objec ve of comprehensively covering material within a framework that maximizes assimila on of knowledge. (PS23) Providing Mentoring and Facilita ng Collabora on through Faculty Learning Communi es
Terri Kurz, Courtney West, and Lori Graham
In the spring of 2013, The Academy of Dis nguished Medical Educators in the College of Medicine at Texas A&M Health Science Center launched a pilot program designed to provide mentoring to faculty. Recognizing the logis cal challenges of one‐on‐one mentoring, it was decided that a group mentoring process could be implemented by forming Faculty Learning Communi es (FLC). While the original aim of the program was to provide mentoring to faculty who wish to engage in scholarly teaching, it was apparent that by forming FLCs a venue was provided that fostered collabora on between and among basic science and clinical science faculty. (PS24) Student Facilitated Imagery: A New Twist on Geri‐Anatomy Curriculum
Andrea Berry, Mariana Dangiolo, Monica Doctor, and Sco Furer
In the spring of 2013, The Academy of Dis nguished Medical Educators in the College of Medicine at Texas A&M Health Science Center launched a pilot program designed to provide mentoring to faculty. Recognizing the logis cal challenges of one‐on‐one mentoring, it was decided that a group mentoring process could be implemented by forming Faculty Learning Communi es (FLC). While the original aim of the program was to provide mentoring to faculty who wish to engage in scholarly teaching, it was apparent that by forming FLCs a venue was provided that fostered collabora on between and among basic science and clinical science faculty. (PS25) The Development and Evolu on of a Consulta on Service for Educators and Educa onal Researchers: Needs,
Challenges, and Opportuni es
Lara Stepleman, Lance Evans, and Chris e Palladino
Within academic medical centers, educators and educa onal researchers o en lack the formal resources and supports for career and program development afforded to basic science, clinical, and transla onal researchers. The purpose of this presenta on is to describe the consulta on needs, challenges, and opportuni es that have emerged for an educator‐focused consulta on service within an academic medical center over the course of its four year evolu on. (PS26) Breaking Bad News: An Opportunity to hone Interprofessional Communica on Skills
Nadia Ismail, Cayla Teal, Catherine Ha ield, Rita Dello Stri o, and Elizabeth Nelson
This interdisciplinary exercise of medicine, nursing and pharmacy students focuses on communica on skills and requires that par cipants discuss responsibility for a pa ent error and then disclose the error to a pa ent's emo onal family member. Actor observa ons from the exercise reveal both desirable and undesirable communica on strategies. Students appear unaware that team‐based communica on strategies are more effec ve and more posi vely received by pa ents or family members. The simulated experience causes students to iden fy with another and serves as a founda on for a debriefing exercise in which facilitators help students to recognize common barriers to discussing pa ent care issues with members of other disciplines. Page 61 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (PS27) Effec ve Learning Resources for an Integrated Neuroscience and Behavior Course: Ge ng Neurology Out
of the Textboxes
Rainald Schmidt‐Kastner
The experience of a course director with selec ng proper textbooks for an integrated Neuroscience and Behavior course delivered in the curriculum at a new medical school is described. A specific problem encountered was the lack of a text covering common neurological disorders at the level appropriate for first year medical students. (PS28) How do Engineering Majors Perform in the Pre‐Clinical Years of Medical School Compared to Their Peers?
Bri any Ange, Andria Thomas, and Paul Wallach
Students are entering medical school with varying undergraduate degrees and diverse backgrounds. An undergraduate engineering degree is designed with an emphasis on problem solving skills development. The preclinical curriculum at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University has more of an emphasis on learning large amounts of informa on through memoriza on. This study examined how medical students with an engineering degree performed in the first two years of medical school compared to their peers. A er adjus ng for undergraduate GPA, there was not a sta s cally significant difference among pre‐clinical GPA across the categories of majors used in this study. This informa on could be useful for medical school admissions offices and undergraduate engineering programs. (PS29) Purposeful Use of Different Models of Problem‐Based Learning as an Integral Component of the Curriculum at a New
Medical School
Michelle Schwartz, Philip Robinson, Ana Maria Azzarolo, Michelle Lizo e‐Waniewski, Deborah Louda, Mahyar Nouri‐Shirazi,
Rainald Schmidt‐Kastner, and Lindsey Henson
The Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine is a new medical school that relies on problem‐based learning (PBL) throughout its basic science curriculum to foster self‐directed learning, communica on skills, and teamwork while linking basic science content to pa ent problems. Students spend 1/3 of basic science contact me in these small groups. Most schools adhere to one PBL format, but our experience suggested that purposefully changing the model across the two years could improve student engagement and development of lifelong learning skills. We therefore designed our curriculum using sequen al disclosure PBL cases in Year 1 (J Med Ed 1974:49;1040) and the case inquiry method (IQ) in Year 2 (h p://casemed.case.edu/curriculum/educa on/iq‐program.cfm). (PS30) Integra ng An ‐Microbial Pharmacology in an Undergraduate Medical Curriculum: Linking the Clinical and Basic
Sciences using Diverse Pedagogic and Self‐Directed Learning Approaches
Adrienne Laurel Gorman, Jamie Carrizosa, David Balkwill, and Michael Lee
Designing and implemen ng novel approaches to deliver an ‐microbial pharmacology principles effec vely across an integrated medical curriculum is a challenging endeavor. By presen ng an ‐microbial drugs in an organ system infec ous disease context in the first and second year of the UCF College of Medicine curriculum, students learn at an early point when and how to use these drugs. Structured didac c and small group case‐based an ‐microbial instruc on is integrated with medical microbiology and immunology during the first year (M1), and scaffolded during year two (M2) to promote student‐directed selec on of an bio cs, an ‐fungals, and an ‐virals for treatment of organ‐based infec ous disease cases. Diverse M2 pedagogy include student self‐directed learning modules, small‐group cases with student directed treatments, and high fidelity simula ons requiring students to synthesize, evaluate, and apply complex clinical and basic pharmacology to treat sep c shock and pneumonia scenarios. In preliminary outcomes, students performed be er on an ‐microbial pharmacology NBME‐style mul ple choice ques ons and demonstrated effec ve clinical reasoning skills in essays a er the topic was reinforced in clinically relevant cases and simula ons. Page 62 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (PS31) Making the Pieces Fit: Using Mul disciplinary High Fidelity Medical Simula ons to Facilitate Integra on of Pharma‐
cology across the Preclinical Undergraduate Educa onal Con nuum
Adrienne Laurel Gorman, David Harris, Analia Cas glioni, Abdo Asmar, and Juan Cendan
A clinically integrated pharmacology curriculum must be designed to lay a strong founda on that supports the teaching of safe and ra onal prescribing across the educa onal con nuum. At the University of Central Florida College of Medicine (COM), we have incorporated the teaching of pharmacology into first and second year high fidelity medical simula ons (HFMS) to enhance curricular integra on, both ver cally and horizontally, while minimizing didac c curricular load. In our curriculum, first year (M1) HFMS session are designed to integrate physiology, basic drug selec on, and clinical skills. During second year (M2), HFMS sessions integrate pathophysiology, clinical presenta ons, basic diagnos cs and disease management. Higher order clinical reasoning is promoted as M2 students apply clinical and basic pharmacology during simula ons integrated with the cardiopulmonary, renal, and neurological systems modules. Survey data indicate that students perceive high value to using HFMS to integrate pharmacology and assessment outcomes data show strong performance on mul ple choice pharmacology assessments in areas reinforced through HFMS. (PS32) The Resident as Teacher: A New Elec ve Incorpora ng Reflec ve Wri ng, Concept Mapping, and Adult Educa on
Theory
Bret Simon and Kanapa Kornsawad
Upper level residents contribute to the educa on of medical students and first‐year residents, yet few resources are commi ed to developing the teaching competencies of these near‐peer educators. We have developed and implemented a one‐month elec ve rota on for mee ng this need that incorporates adult learning theory, reflec on, and concept mapping as means of both instruc on and evalua on. (PS33) Family Medicine Accelerated Track: Integra ng Ultrasound Skills Throughout a Summer Experience Within an
Innova ve Curricular Program
Vaughan Lee, Jennifer Mitchell, David Edwards, Jongyeol Kim, Ron Cook, and Betsy Jones
The Family Medicine Accelerated Track (FMAT) is a 3‐year curriculum that culminates in the MD degree and links medical students to affiliated family medicine (FM) residency programs at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) campuses in Lubbock, Amarillo or the Permian Basin. The purpose of FMAT is to prepare primary care physicians more efficiently and with less cost. The FMAT program was approved by the LCME in February 2010; the first class of 8 students graduated in June 2013 and began residency training in July. The FMAT program offers students a seamless transi on between predoctoral and residency training se ngs and curricula, as they spend 2 years in Lubbock, followed by at least 4 years on the campus where they complete both the final year of medical school and 3 years of FM residency training. (PS34) Encouraging Community Engagement Among Medical Students: An Honors Project in a Doctoring Course
Betsy Jones, Pa Pa erson, Lara Johnson, and Simon Williams
The Honors Project is an op onal ac vity within our first‐year doctoring course for which M1 student groups are expected to iden fy community needs that affect health outcomes, collect data to assess the current status for a par cular popula on, and plan community projects driven by their data. During 2012‐13, groups could submit ques ons to an Omnibus survey, a single vehicle for data collec on for those groups that iden fied a popula on of interest within our ins tu on. In all, 22 student groups chose to complete Honors Projects. Page 63 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (PS35) Building an Integrated Four‐Year Competency‐Based Ethics Program
Marin Gillis
This poster will describe the first stage of a three stage construc on and assessment of an ethics program which began in 2011 for medical students at the HWCOM. This first stage includes ethics integra on into all “strands” (Human Biology; Human Disease, Illness, and Injury; Clinical Medicine; Professional Development; and Medicine and Society) and across all years of study: in total, twenty‐three courses. The program been designed around three goals: (1) Commitments to Social Accountability, including professional ethics, research ethics, and popula on‐based health ethics; (2) Proficiency in Shared Decision‐Making, including clinical ethics and law, advocacy, and communica on skills; (2) Capacity to address Moral Distress, including self‐reflec on, self‐knowledge and moral courage. The program evalua on includes the degree of success in mee ng these goals as well as: whether the program is structured to develop moral literacy, which is defined as competency in three areas: (1) moral percep on/sensi vity; (2) moral reasoning; (3) moral imagina on/empathy; the College’s Educa onal Program Objec ves; and LCME accredita on standards. (PS36) “Speed Designing” Peer Coaching Workshops: Innova ve Faculty Development Suppor ng Change
Jeanne Schlesinger, Katherine Tucker, Kathleen Kreutzer, and Teresa Carter
How do you teach me‐strapped faculty about innova ve, interac ve learning strategies? We faced this challenge with a newly integrated preclinical and clinical curriculum and a new building designed for collabora ve learning. Drawing on the speed da ng process, where par cipants rotate among 5‐10 minute “dates,” we designed a workshop where faculty rotated among several demonstra ons of poten al instruc onal strategies. The “Speed Designing” workshop began with a large group overview of curriculum design. It then broke into small groups of faculty who spent 12‐15 minutes at 8 tables learning about an innova ve instruc onal strategy. The sta ons featured a faculty expert who delivered a short presenta on on an instruc onal strategy, followed by discussion and Q&A. The topics were TBL, POGIL, Case‐Based Learning, JiTT, Simula on, Standardized Pa ents, Objec ve Wri ng, and Crea ng Effec ve Learning Environments. In 3 hours, faculty received an introduc on to mul ple curricular strategies and networked with expert faculty who introduced web and other resources for further explora on. The program was well received by par cipants and presenters. “Speed Designing” is an engaging and me‐efficient process to support busy teaching faculty in learning about poten al instruc onal strategies and how to implement them in their own teaching situa ons. (PS37) Using the ACGME Core Competencies to Evaluate Faculty Teaching
Sara Multerer, Charles Woods, Michael Rowland, and Karen Miller
The Accredita on Council on Graduate Medical Educa on (ACGME) core competencies have been the cornerstone of evalua on of young physicians in training for the 21st century, but there are no published faculty evalua on tools to date that use these same core competencies. We present the first published evalua on of faculty using the core competencies to assess clinical faculty as teachers. This 17 item evalua on tool, validated over 3 years, included 7079 total resident evalua ons (5616 complete, 79.3%) of 233 faculty members. The scale mean was 79.5 with variance of 73.2 (total possible score of 85). The mean score per item was 4.68 ± .50. Cronbach α was 0.98. (PS38) Qualita ve Analysis of Faculty Evalua ons by Pediatrics Residents Provides Valuable Insight into Exemplary Teaching
Karen Miller, Michael Rowland, Charles Wood, and Sara Multerer
Learner evalua ons of faculty o en are an important factor in promo on for academic faculty. Studies have been done to validate evalua on tools, but most evalua on instruments focused valida on on internal structure and content validity. Qualita ve analysis of faculty evalua on comments seldom has been u lized. This poster presents the results of a qualita ve analysis of a faculty teaching evalua on instrument based on the Accredita on Council for Graduate Medical Educa on (ACGME) core competencies. Learners tend to rate teachers highly and this qualita ve analysis reveals essen ally posi ve comments. There are, however, clear differences in comments regarding faculty considered to be excellent teachers which can provide insight and feedback for teaching faculty. Page 64 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (PS39) Using Mixed Media to Teach Cultural Competency
Karen Miller, Padip Patel, Michael Rowland, and V. Faye Jones
“Trea ng the Pa ent not just the Disease” is a mixed media teaching module designed to provide medical students with a prac cal framework for understanding diverse pa ents’ cultural beliefs and a tudes that could impact their ability and willingness to comply with treatment protocols. The module includes a professionally narrated online component, a PowerPoint presenta on of the Slavin et al. 4 C’s of Cultural Competence for face‐to‐face presenta on, and a validated rubric to assess reflec ve wri ng. (PS40) Assessment of Professionalism During Transi on of Care: Preliminary Results of a Simula on Project
Anne e Rebel, Amy DiLorenzo, Paul Sloan, Regina Fragneto, Faith Lukens, Rana La ff, Kari Berh Chris e,
Gary Loyd, Zaki Hassan, and Randall Schell
Transfer of pa ent care (ToC) is an important element in the safe prac ce of anesthesiologists, and thus essen al that we demonstrate communica on, leadership and organiza on skills throughout the process. These skills are tested during a crisis because of me constraints and need for urgent ToC. The aim of this study is to assess the ability of anesthesia residents to lead a team during a crisis pa ent simulator (PS) scenario, and safely transfer pa ent care. (PS41) Transi on of Care Assessment: Preliminary Results of a Simula on Project
Anne e Rebel, Amy DiLorenzo, Paul Sloan, Regina Fragneto, Faith Lukens, Rana La ff, Kari Berh Chris e,
Gary Loyd, Zaki Hassan, and Randall Schell
Transfer of pa ent care (ToC) is an important element in the safe prac ce of anesthesiologists, and thus essen al that we minimize informa on loss in the process. Transfer of important pa ent informa on is most cri cal during a crisis. The aim of this study is to assess the ability of anesthesia residents to safely transfer essen al pa ent care informa on during a crisis situa on, using a pa ent simulator (PS) scenario. (PS42) A Simula on Based Intern Prep Course at the Conclusion of the Fourth Year Medical Student Curriculum
Zaki Hassan, Amy DiLorenzo, Erich Maul, and Emily Garrison
Historically, our ins tu on's intern preparatory course prior to medical school gradua on, included primarily tradi onal lecture
‐style didac cs. It was felt that a more hands‐on simula on based approach would represent a progressive curriculum change in this se ng. (PS43) Don’t Leave Part of Yourself at the door!
Oma Morey, Lisa Cain, Susan Gerik, Jeffrey Rabek, Mark Clark, Anne Rudnicki, Jerome Crowder, and Ma hew Dacso
In order to emphasize the importance of maintaining one’s personal crea ve iden ty, medical school faculty, as members of the UTMB Arts in Health Professional Educa on Consor um, organized a crea ve expression exhibit. This exhibit allows both students and faculty the freedom to express themselves as crea ve individuals and to express a component of their personal iden ty. Two shows have been held and 97 people presented their crea ve works. The crea ve expression exhibit was well a ended and enjoyed by all. (PS44) Crea ng a Case Authoring Toolbox to Enhance Problem‐Based Curriculum
Oma Morey, Era Buck, Anne Rudnicki, and Gregory Asimakis
This poster presents a new case authoring tool box that scaffolds the process of developing rich, pa ent entered problem‐based learning cases. The toolbox includes tools for developing 1) case objec ves, 2) a storyboard, 3) clinical reasoning, 4) PowerPoint slides of student case materials, and 5) a comprehensive facilitator’s guide. The poster highlights the process of developing the toolbox, conduc ng a pilot study, challenges encountered, and next steps in the implementa on of the toolbox. Page 65 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (PS45) Teaching Ac on Based Research in the Clinical Se ng
Suze e Sookdeo, Allesa English, Kathy Bradley‐Klug, Emily Shaffer‐Hudkins, Kira Zwgart
Pa ent‐centered care is being taught in many medical schools across the country. The essen al skill of physicians knowing both their pa ent’s illness state as well as their personal values helps clinicians place a primary focus on the holis c care of their pa ents. The SELECT program was developed to specifically train future physicians to learn these skills throughout medical school. The content and competencies of this innova ve program include: leadership knowledge and skills, values‐based pa ent‐centered care, and health systems. Ac on‐Based Research, in the clinical se ng, allows the researcher (student) to quan fy observed values‐based pa ent centered care and/or the health systems under which the healthcare team func ons. To demonstrate comprehension, proficiency and confidence in their understanding of these competencies, students are asked to complete an ac on based research project in a clinical se ng, following the model of Plan, Do, Study, and Act (PDSA), during their first year. (PS46) Student percep on of mentors in a medical school: Do characteris cs of the mentors ma er?
Shelley Kumar, Cayla Teal, and Elizabeth Nelson
Medical schools are exploring learning communi es and/or mentoring programs to provide guidance to students. Li le is known about the student evalua ons of their mentors and the rela onship of mentors’ characteris cs to student percep ons of mentoring quality. This exploratory study examined 3 mentor characteris cs that are commonly accessible to program evaluators ‐ gender, academic rank, and degree. (PS47) Incorpora ng Developmentally Appropriate Team Building and Small Group Learning Strategies into a Large Group
Session Early in an Integrated Basic Science Curriculum
Michael Russell and Amy Medlock
The GRU UGA Medical Partnership is a four‐year regional campus where basic science faculty work closely across disciplines and with clinical faculty toward the aim of horizontal and ver cal integra on of basic science and clinical concepts. Learning is organized around clinical cases discussed in small groups and is supplemented with large group, laboratory, and self‐paced learning ac vi es. Basic science faculty contribute mul disciplinary large group sessions with integrated learning objec ves and assessment items and co‐facilitate small group cases with a clinician. One integrated large group session presented in the first module of the first year focuses on membrane structure and func on and introduces the concepts of ion and fluid movements across membranes that contribute to whole‐body fluid balance. This session uses mul ple ac ve learning formats in which students work in teams to synthesize informa on and solve increasingly complex scenarios which emphasize whole‐body homeostasis. Prior to the session students are required to read a three‐page introduc on to physiology handout and a short book chapter which provides the more detailed physiology and biochemistry informa on necessary to answer in‐class problems. The unique feature of this ac ve learning environment is the conscious a empt to facilitate and emphasize the benefits of team learning in a large group se ng early in the curriculum. (PS48) Using Maintenance of Cer fica on Part IV to Link Physician Con nuing Educa on Needs and ACGME Clinical Learning
Environment Requirements with Health System Needs
Bonnie Miller, Donald Brady, and Donald Moore
This poster will illustrate how organiza onal structures that bring together representa ves from both the educa onal enterprise and the quality/safety/clinical enterprise can align educa onal needs, cer fica on requirements and accredita on requirements with improvement needs of the health system. Page 66 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (PS49) The Benefits of Student‐Composed Survival Guides in Medical Educa on
Sean Hernandez and Carla Lupi
Of the several resources available for medical students on adap ng to lifestyle changes and a new educa onal program, the highly valued advice from upper class students comes through mechanisms such as social networking sites, internet storage sites for class notes, survival guides, and informal mentoring and communica on. Students in new medical schools with fewer numbers of gradua ng classes and an o en rapidly evolving curriculum are faced with addi onal demands in crea ng and upda ng useful tools. Students at Florida Interna onal University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, now in its fi h year, have developed several mechanisms for communica ng between classes and have also par cipated in formal learning communi es that foster such communica on. However, the first wri en survival guide ‐ a 100 page electronic document was authored in the summer by the class of 2016 (M1s) for the entering class of 2017(M2s). M1 students volunteered and Conducted surveys of their classmates on topics of importance, and general advice that would have been useful but was not available during their first year. Groups of writers were recruited for each of the six chapters and they submi ed their work to a central editor who assembled the guide. During orienta on week, this document was distributed through an online storage website along with the 4 years of notes from the previous medical classes, and was also posted to the class Facebook site. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived usefulness of the first version of this survival guide. (PS50) Predic ng Early Success in a Clinical‐Presenta on Based Curriculum Model
Tammy Salazar, Janet Piskurich, and Naomi Lacy
The rapidly changing field of medicine requires both study skills and life‐long learning skills for success in medical school and beyond. Theore cally, we an cipate that early interven ons designed to improve these important skills in medical school will foster life‐long learning while decreasing students’ risk for failure. However, there is as yet no reliable way to iden fy which students would benefit the most from these interven ons. A recent study (Med. Educ., 2011; 45:696‐703) by West and Sadoski showed that several scales on the Learning and Study Strategy Inventory (LASSI) were predic ve of early academic success in medical students. This study a empts to broaden our knowledge of predictors in an integrated curriculum. (PS51) A Ventricular System Team Based Learning (TBL) Module for Second Year Medical Students
Anthony Oliva and Diana Barra
We have converted second‐year medical neuroscience lectures into Team‐Based Learning (TBL) ac ve earning sessions. We present here a module that was designed to reinforce the basic science and clinical understanding of the ventricular system through case‐based problems, and results from its implementa on. Specifically, the module was created to clarify the ventricular system; cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) produc on and flow; the blood‐brain barrier (BBB) and blood‐CSF barrier (BCB); and hernia on syndromes, hydrocephalus, and other clinically‐relevant disorders. To maximize the effec veness of this module, we have created a detailed reading guide and quiz‐bank for the students to independently study from prior to a ending the session. The module appears highly effec ve, assessed in part on student exam performance. We have also run this module on residents, where it was highly received. The goals of this module are aligned with the AAN Integrated Neural Science Core Curriculum, and this study was conducted with approval from the FIU ins tu onal review board (# IRB‐13‐0064). (PS52) The Effect of a Simulated Pa ent‐Role Ac vity on the Self‐Reported Empathy Scores of First‐Year Medical Students
Chris an Giordano and Caridad Hernandez
Empathy is a core a ribute of medical professionalism and an essen al element of doctor‐pa ent communica on. Mul ple studies have demonstrated the deteriora on of empathy during medical training and efforts are being made to iden fy educa onal strategies that promote and sustain empathy throughout medical educa on. This study sought to determine whether there was any change in self‐reported empathy scores following a role‐play interven on. Page 67 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (PS53) Virtual Microscopy for Teaching Pathology to Medical Students
Philip Robinson and Morton Levi
Pathology is a basic medical science taught to medical students through lectures and laboratories. In lab sessions, students examine gross specimens and the histopathologic glass slides of those specimens. Florida Atlan c University is a new Florida medical school (class size 64 students) which enrolled its first class in the fall of 2011. The school did not have a collec on of pathology teaching materials. A set of 218 pathologic and 144 normal digitalized microscopic slides were obtained from the Pathology Department of Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester, New York. The digitalized slides were in the NDPI format of Hamamatsu, Bridgewater, New Jersey. PathXL Ltd., in Belfast, Ireland was selected to host the slides on a remote server which was op mized for 80 users. The images were delivered to the student devices via the internet. The system became opera onal for the students in the spring of 2013. (PS54) Histology and Histopathology Manual for Teaching Freshman and Sophomore Medical Students Pathology
using Virtual Microscopy
Philip Robinson
Pathology is a basic medical science taught to medical students through lectures and laboratories. Florida Atlan c University (FAU) is a new Florida medical school (class size 64 students) which enrolled its first class in the fall of 2011. The school did not have a collec on of pathology teaching materials. A set of 218 pathologic and 144 normal digitalized microscopic slides as well as a student manual were obtained from the Pathology Department of Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester, New York. The digitalized slides were in the NDPI format of Hamamatsu, Bridgewater, New Jersey. PathXL Ltd., in Belfast, Ireland was selected to host the slides on a remote server which was op mized for 80 users. The images were delivered to the student devices via the internet. The system became opera onal in the spring of 2013. (PS55) Quality Improvement in Health Literacy for an Interprofessional Team of Learners
Mary Coleman, Angela McLean, Khaleeha Hasan, Lakeisha Williams, and Ellen Lee
A program integrates clinical service with educa on by introducing quality improvement principles focusing on health literacy into a PCMH at an Internal Medicine Residency ambulatory training site. A team of learners from nursing, medicine, pharmacy, and social work that provide care management for a high risk popula on of uncontrolled diabe c pa ents respond to results of a health literacy assessment tool and introduce health literacy screening, medica on adherence tools, and group visits. (PS56) Standardized Professional Pa ents, Simula on Center Experiences and Peer Teaching in Anatomy: Innova ve
Methods to Develop the Physician Professional Iden ty in Minority Middle and High School
Julie Servoss, Gloria McAllister, Mark Goldstein, Mira Sarsekeyeva, Bruce Jones, and Mario Jacomino
The goal of healthcare careers outreach programs is to increase the number of underrepresented minori es in medicine (URMs) thereby diversifying our healthcare workforce. Two challenges to retaining URMs in the workforce pipeline include feelings of social isola on and a lack of empowerment. Increased physician professional iden ty will result in higher reten on rates for URM students. (PS57) How Students See the Value in a Doctoring Curriculum
Jennifer Simpliciano, Paul Wallach, and Chris e Palladino
The Essen als of Clinical Medicine course (ECM) at the Medical College of Georgia (MCG) is the only component of our pre‐clinical curriculum that teaches pa ent care skills. A previous project showed that students ques oned the u lity of ECM. Given its pivotal role, our project aimed to describe and understand student perspec ves on the course. Page 68 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (PS58) A UME‐GME Collabora ve Approach to Understanding Match Goals and Outcomes
Ed Buckley, Alisa Nagler, Colleen Grochowski, Deborah Engle, Mariah Rudd, and Catherine Kuhn
The Na onal Resident Matching Program, also known as the Match provides an impar al venue for matching applicants' preferences for residency posi ons with program directors' preferences for applicants. Many ins tu ons are the home to both a school of medicine and graduate medical educa on training programs. Li le is ar culated about ins tu onal goals for the number of SOM graduates matching in GME programs at their home ins tu ons. While Duke has no stated goal, the community gasped when this number dropped in 2011. (PS59) Curriculum Enhancement Through Implementa on of a Global Health Program in Obstetrics and
Gynecology Residency Training
Chadburn Ray, Daron Ferris, and Michael Macfee
The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Georgia Regents University sought to integrate global health educa on into the core curriculum for residency training. Our objec ve was to determine the feasibility of and the resources needed to successfully integrate global health for educa onal enhancement. (PS60) General Internal Medicine Statewide Preceptorship Program: An Overview of 20 Years
Karen Szauter, Eugene Stokes, and Claire Foster
Outpa ent clinical experiences in the community provide students with a different perspec ve on medical prac ce and careers than university‐based experiences. In the early 1990s, the General Internal Medicine Statewide Preceptorship Program was created to provide pre‐clinical medical students with an opportunity to work with community‐based physicians. The focus of the GIMSPP is to provide early exposure to internal medicine (IM) with a goal of increasing interest and subsequent career selec on in IM. We describe the program and outcome measures. (PS61) If Given More Time with your Pa ent, What Would You Do?
Karen Szauter and Lori Kusnerik
Assessment of medical students by standardized pa ent (SP)‐based examina ons provides an opportunity for a purposeful review of clinical skills. Examina ons are resource intensive, resul ng in limita ons such as strict me restric ons for the pa ent encounter. When provided with an opportunity to return to the pa ent’s room, students frequently “revisit” with the pa ent to perform addi onal por ons of the interview or physical examina on. For this project, we studied students’ descrip ons of informa on they would obtain if given an opportunity for more me with the pa ent. (PS62) Se ng the Stage for Innova on: Providing Online Pre‐Orienta on Modules to Introduce Novel Learning Modali es
Courtney Baker, Monica Bhu ani, and Kimberly Lomis
Many medical schools are incorpora ng novel learning formats that emphasize teamwork and self‐directed learning. Pilot programs of ac ve‐learning modali es in our ins tu on demonstrated that novel learning formats can be unse ling for first year students. This highlighted the need for explicit preliminary instruc on in the ra onale behind specific methodologies. To that end, an op onal, online pre‐orienta on course was created and offered to students prior to matricula on in AY 2013‐2014. We report on the efficacy of this course in introducing students to innova ve learning modali es. (PS63) The Educator Development Program: A Mul faceted Program Tailored to Needs of Educators
Leora Horn, Mary Ann Nichols, and Charlene Dewey The Educator Development Program (EDP) is a faculty development ini a ve at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) targeted to enhance the medical educa on knowledge, a tudes and skills, and educa on research and scholarship for all VUMC faculty members (physicians, nurses, scien sts), learners (students, residents and fellows) and others who teach in the medical center. The EDP consists of monthly two hour in‐person workshops, self‐directed on‐line learning modules, a residents as teachers and leaders program (RATL™), peer teaching consulta ons and individual educa onal consulta ons. Here we present data on the first two years of the EDP program. Page 69 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (PS64) Teaching Basic Science to Medical Students in a Dynamic Scien fic Environment: Educator Percep ons and Prac ces
Michele Monteil, Barbara Schuster, Jane e Hill, and Ralph Gillies
Basic Science Educators currently exist in a difficult place in medical educa on. On the one hand, the me allo ed to basic science educa on, in medical curricula, has been steadily decreasing. On the other side, there has been an exponen al increase in our understanding of gene c, molecular and cellular mechanisms in health and disease with a concomitant explosion in biomedical literature (Boissier, 2013), which includes informa on, which would be of value to medical students in their training. Further, there is the concern that basic science educa on in medical curricula is not keeping pace with changes in biomedical sciences and could lead to future doctors having insufficient scien fic competencies to deal with unexpected challenges in their future prac ce (Pawlina, 2009). These factors have implica ons for the training of medical students. However, what is not clear is how BSE perceive these changes, and how these changes may be impac ng their prac ces as educators. The purpose of this research project is to obtain preliminary data on how BSE perceive the pace of change in their respec ve disciplines and how this is reflected in their teaching of Year 1 and 2 medical students. (PS65) Using a Mobile Web Applica on to Improve Feedback a er Observed Medical Student Clinical Encounters
Anupam Kumar, Jay Johnson, Yamel Hall, Tepparit Wiphatphumiprates, Amy Fleming, and Toufeeq Ahmed
Effec ve feedback is instrumental in helping medical students to improve their interview, physical exam, and presenta on skills in the clinical se ng. The process of collec ng feedback largely occurs without medical student par cipa on and provides mentoring physicians with scant data with which to guide student improvement. Such feedback is typically limited to evalua ons collected at the midpoint and conclusion of clinical clerkships. When informal, verbal feedback is provided in real me, the observer may feel uncomfortable providing a cri cal performance assessment in the presence of the student. Addi onally, many students feel uncomfortable when asking an a ending or resident for direct feedback on their performance. We are currently pilot‐tes ng VSTAR Compass (h p://vstarcompass.com), a mobile web applica on that seeks to remove some of these barriers to providing effec ve feedback. A er being observed, students can open the applica on on any mobile device or computer and select the faculty member or resident who observed them. This will trigger the app to send an email to the faculty member, who will be able to provide quick feedback by following the link embedded in the email. This feedback will be immediately viewable by the student (through both the app itself and the student's e‐por olio). A mentoring faculty member, such as a clerkship director, is able to view all feedback provided to the student in order to provide meaningful guidance for improvement. (PS66) Use of an Anesthesia Informa on Management System to Give Residents and Program Directors
Automated Feedback Concerning Two Core Competencies Using Quality Metrics
Jesse Ehrenfeld, Jonathan Wanderer, William Furman, Dylan Snyder, Michael Pilla, and Warren Sandberg
Finding the appropriate means by which to assess & report on resident performance on the milestones & core competencies may prove daun ng. We describe the development of a near real‐ me performance feedback system u lizing data collected as part of rou ne care via an exis ng informa on management system to provide residents & program directors (PD) feedback concerning a number of the milestones under the SBP and PBLI core competencies. (PS67) Parents of Pediatric Hematology‐Oncology (H‐O) Pa ents' Use of the Internet or Mobile Applica ons in
Finding Health Informa on
Xiomara Mar nez and Carolyn Carter
Recently‐published research shows that more than 90% of parents have Internet access, and 70% use it to find health informa on relevant to their children. However, only about 30% ever discuss their findings with their children’s pediatrician. Many studies explore parents’ use of the Internet for researching specific, serious health condi ons such as cancer, but few look at which internet sites or mobile applica ons they are visi ng. Page 70 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (PS68) In the Breach: Exploring the Rela onship of Professional and Personal Iden ty to Self‐Reported
Unprofessional Behavior
Cayla Teal and Stephen Greenberg
The increasing focus on medical student professional behavior has lead educators to consider why students may behave unprofessionally. Some researchers have suggested that that unprofessional behavior (or professionalism breaches) is related to a student’s developing iden ty as a physician, as well as how that professional iden ty is integrated with the student’s personal iden ty. This study explored student self‐reported professionalism breaches and their rela onship to students beliefs about personal and professional iden ty. (PS69) Evalua ng a Peer Mentoring Network at FIU HWCOM, a New Medical School
Alexandra Kovar, Cynthia Lopez, and Chris ne McFarlin
Medical school is a stressful me that can lead to burnout (1). The high work demands, loss of me to pursue leisure ac vi es, tensions in personal rela onships, and confronta on of death contribute to burnout, depression, substance abuse, suicide, and professional misconduct (2). Mentoring programs and iden fying peer role models have been shown to improve mental well‐being and combat these adverse consequences in health profession students (2). In a new medical school, there are fewer peers and a less established culture to provide support and guidance to new students. Peer mentoring programs have been studied in nursing (3) and dental students (4) but research on peer mentoring in medical students is lacking. FIU HWCOM welcomed its first class in 2009. Students are encouraged to implement innova ve programs to further educa on and play an integral role in establishing a unique culture at this new ins tu on. The Peer Resource Network (PRN) was implemented in August 2013 because students saw a need for more interac on between classes within the medical school. Student interac on has been par cularly challenging at FIU HWCOM due to layout of our campus and the loca on of our clerkships being off campus, throughout the greater Miami area. (PS70) Ideology and Communica on in a Cross‐Cultural E‐Learning Forum. Cri cal Discourse Analysis
Zareen Zaidi, Danielle Verstegen, Rahat Naqvi, Timothy Doran, and Page Morahan
Construc vist theories state that learning is embedded in social rela ons and social ac on is mediated by language. Discourse Analysis studies how language constructs the social world and can impact learning. The rise in mul cultural e‐learning programs has implica ons on discourse and need for faculty training in facilita on. To study the impact of par cipants’ ideological backgrounds (geopoli cal, cultural, etc.) in e‐learning we explored e‐discourses which were part of an interna onal health professions educa on fellowship program conducted by FAIMER training faculty to act as research scholars and change agents, while developing a global Community of Prac ce. (PS71) Implemen ng Virtual Microscopy and In‐Class Vigne e Discussions to Integrate Concepts in Eye Histology
with Common Eye‐Related Clinical Problems
Virgil Gaddy
This poster describes the design of a large group session that combines the in‐class use of virtual microscopy and discussions of authen c clinical vigne es of common eye abnormali es to illustrate how basic science knowledge is applied in clinical situa ons. This approach incorporates principles of construc vism, problem‐solving, and knowledge applica on to improve student learning and may serve as a template for other sessions where the primary outcome is enhancing students’ ability to link derangements in normal structure and func on to common clinical problems. (PS72) Evalua on of a Program Designed to Increase the Number of Underrepresented Minori es in a Medical School
Johnathan Franklin, Denna Wheeler, and Machelle Linsenmeyer
High‐poten al, disadvantaged students were given the opportunity to par cipate in a modified curriculum to help them achieve success in undergraduate medical educa on. These modifica ons along with student performance were assessed. Results from this study can provide informa on to help other ins tu ons implement a similar program. Page 71 of 81
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Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on (PS73) What Factors Influence a 4th Year Medical Student’s Rank Order List?
Kevin Cronin, Pete Peterson, and Frazier Stevenson
Each year, fourth year medical students from across the country and abroad vie for the more than 26,000 first‐year residency program posi ons at U.S teaching hospitals. To be considered for one of these slots, students must construct a Rank Order List (ROL) – a list of each residency program where the student interviewed and is willing to a end, ranked from most to least desirable. Though this is one of the most stressful aspects of a student’s journey, li le to no recent data exist on how medical students priori ze their ROL. In comparison, the Matricula ng Student Ques onnaire (MSQ) taken by most medical students during the first few weeks of the first year provides much data as to how students chose a given medical school. We hypothesized that students’ most important priori es for their ROL would be their interac ons on their interview day with current residents and faculty members as well as loca on and perceived pres ge of a program. (PS74) Preserva on of Knowledge Reten on Using Resource‐Efficient, Cost Effec ve Virtual Classrooms in an Electronic TBL
Rajunor E arh, Dave Jerre , Chayan Chakrabor , and Kevin Krane In direct contrast to tradi onal didac c educa on that is commonly discipline‐based and teacher‐centered, team based learning (TBL) is a mode of instruc on involving small groups of students that is characteris cally learner‐centered, instructor‐led, with very structured processes for individual and group accountability. One advantage of TBL is the principle of learning by interac ve associa on – between students, facilitators and teams. However, in common with other new educa onal interven ons, TBL is resource intensive and involves significant investment in terms of faculty, materials and me to sa sfy requirements for logis cal and infrastructural support: class size, venues, sta onery, prepara on of assessments and exercises, and class facilita on by faculty. Consequently, there is a need for exploring ways to manage and op mize resources for team‐based approaches to teaching and learning without compromising the educa onal benefits of TBL. This leads to the ques on: can the requirements for the significant ancillary support that go towards a TBL be modulated by adjustments that preserve the educa onal elements and goals inherent in a tradi onal TBL? (PS75) Iden fying Students with Weak Founda ons in the Basic Sciences: Strategies to Facilitate Successful Transi on to
Medical School and Academic Success
Ana Maria Azzarolo, Michelle Lizo e‐Waniewski, Deborah Louda, Viaya Iragavarapu, Mahyar Nouri‐Shirazi, Yoshmi Shibata,
Lindsey Henson, Barry Linger, Julie Servoss, Stuart Markowitz
As medical schools con nue the trend of accep ng students with varied science backgrounds, new challenges have arisen in teaching basic science material in the first year. The number of students matricula ng without undergraduate majors in tradi onal scien fic fields is growing. One strategy to address this is to establish prerequisites for acceptance; e.g., to accept students with any major but require that all students complete courses such as basic biochemistry. Another approach to ensuring a basic level of understanding is to iden fy students who may benefit from pre‐ and post‐matricula on assistance by the school. (PS76) Implementa on and Adap on of an Integrated Evidence Based Medicine Program Across the First Year Curriculum in
a New Medical School
Tiffany Moxham, James Cresanta, Mira Sarsekeyeva, and Mario Jacomino
Implemen ng an evidence based medicine [EBM] curriculum in a new medical school requires determining which concepts to introduce in each year of the medical school program and balancing clinical and classroom applica on across curricula. This poster describes the ini al implementa on and subsequent adap on of the first year cross‐curricula EBM program within a new medical school. (PS77) Increasing Awareness of the Need of Primary Care Physicians to Premedical college Students Through
Shadowing Resident Physicians at a Family Medicine Urban Track Residency Program
Cecilie Ony and Alisahah Cole
The purpose of the shadowing program is to provide minority college students at a historically black college & university (HBCU) the opportunity to work with Resident Physicians at an underserved family medicine clinic located in an underserved community in Charlo e, NC. It is to expand the awareness of the need of minority physicians in these professional roles to help increase the amount of primary care physicians, especially Family Physicians, as the need of healthcare providers rises. Page 72 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Proposal Reviewers
Reviewers
School
Reviewers
School
Juan Acuna Florida Interna onal University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Susanne Doblecki‐Lewis University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Gauri Agarwal University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Monique Espinosa University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Julia Belkowitz University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Karin Esposito Florida Interna onal University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Andrea Berry University of Central Florida, College of Medicine Adriana Foster Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University Kelly Best University of Florida. College of Medicine Ann Frye University of Texas Medical Branch Beatrice Boateng University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Thom Gaddy GHSU‐UGA Medical Partnership Erica Brownfield Emory University, School of Medicine Eve Gallman GRU‐UGA Medical Partnership Jennifer Brueckner University of Louisville Jenny Gibson Tulane University School of Medicine Era Buck University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston Marin Gillis Florida Interna onal University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Carrie Calloway West Virginia University Kenneth Goodman University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Grady Carter Mercer University School of Medicine Brian Higgins GRU‐UGA Medical Partnership Teresa J. Carter Virginia Commonwealth University, School of Medicine Karen Hughes Miller University of Louisville School of Medicine Robert Casanova Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Nadia Ismail Baylor College of Medicine Thomas H. Champney University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Kevin Krane Tulane University School of Medicine LaTasha B. Craig University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Kathy O'Kane Kreutzer Virginia Commonwealth University, School of Medicine Gerald Crites GRU‐UGA Medical Partnership Ruth Levine University of Texas Med Branch‐Galveston Sheila Crow University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine Morton Levi Florida Atlan c University, Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine Julio M. De Pena University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Daniel M. Lichtstein University of Miami Miller School of Medicine M. Marie Dent Mercer University School of Medicine Kelly Lockeman Virginia Commonwealth University, School of Medicine Amar R. Deshpande University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Kimberly Lomis Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Deborah Louda Florida Atlan c University, Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine Deborah Diaz Granados Virginia Commonwealth University, School of Medicine Page 73 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on Proposal Reviewers
Reviewers
School
Reviewers
School
Lisa Mar nez Florida Atlan c University, Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine Michael L. Rowland University of Louisville School of Medicine Chris ne McFarlin Florida Interna onal University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Mike Russell GRU‐UGA Medical Partnership Meaghan McNulty University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Ross J. Scalese University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Hilit Mechaber University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Timothy Scialla University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Amy Medlock GRU‐UGA Medical Partnership Wacharee Seeherunvong University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Paul Mendez University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Jorge Luis Sotelo University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Bonnie Miller Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Joan St. Onge University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Suzanne Minor Florida Interna onal University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Kenneth Stahl University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Jorge Camilo Mora Florida Interna onal University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Shara Steiner Brody University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Ive e Motola University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Karen Szauter University of Texas Medical Branch Jonathan Murrow GRU‐UGA Medical Partnership Andria Thomas Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University Alisa Nagler Duke University School of Medicine Joshua Thornhill University of South Carolina School of Medicine Fauzia Nausheen Florida Interna onal University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Constance Tucker University of Tennessee Health Science Center Malorie Novak Georgia Regents University Ana Maria Viamonte Ros Florida Interna onal University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Mark O'Connell University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Richard Weisman University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Janet Piskurich Paul Foster School of Medicine, Texas Tech, El Paso Barbara A. Wood University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Frederic Rahbari‐
Oskoui Emory University, School of Medicine Charles R. Woods University of Louisville School of Medicine Deborah Richardson Georgia Regents University Stephanie Wragg University of Illinois College of Medicine Juan Rios University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Craig Ziegler University of Louisville School of Medicine Eneida O. Roldan Florida Interna onal University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Page 74 of 81
2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The 2014 SGEA Planning Commi ee extends gra tude to the following individuals and organiza ons for their me and in‐kind dona ons. Your contribu ons and support have been invaluable. Florida Interna onal University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine
John Rock MD, Karin Esposito MD/PhD, Kelly Bounchareune MPA, George Dambach PhD, Carla Lupi MD,
Vivian Obeso MD, Megan Grimm, Sergio Gonzalez‐Arias MD, David E elson PhD, Lucinda Greenaway, Mario Sosa,
and Melissa Ward‐Peterson
University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine
Pascal J. Goldschmidt MD, Alex Mechaber MD, Barry Issenberg MD, Ive e Motola MD, and Ani Mar nez
Florida Atlan c University, Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine
David J. Bjorkamn MD/MSPH, Lindsey Henson MD, and Joanna Drowos DO/MPH/MBA
Emory University, School of Medicine
Erica Brownfield MD
Virginia Commonwealth University, School of Medicine
Kathleen O’Kane Kreutzer MEd
HERA Founda on Inc
Carolyn Runowicz, MD
Hya Regency Miami Hotel
Julie Hernandez, Brooke Miller, Catering Staff, and Mee ng Staff
Visual Aids Electronics (VAE)
Isaac Lutkoff, Chris Jenkins, and Jesse Hawkes
Conference Resources & Solu ons, Inc.
University of Miami, Frost School of Music
Arianna Neikrug Quintet
Associa on of American Medical Colleges
Nathalie Tavel, Stephen McKenzie, and Torya McGee
Greater Miami Conven on & Visitors Bureau
Patricia Bayona
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2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on HYATT REGENCY MIAMI — FLOOR MAP
SECOND LEVEL
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2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on HYATT REGENCY MIAMI — FLOOR MAP
LOWER LEVEL
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2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on NOTES
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2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on NOTES
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2014 SGEA Conference Program
Making the Pieces Fit: Across the Con nuum of Medical Educa on NOTES
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Created by: Kelly Bounchareune, MPA
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