JCCC BUILDING MAP AND - About the KC Japan Fest

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JCCC BUILDING MAP AND - About the KC Japan Fest
JCCC BUILDING MAP AND
FESTIVAL VENUES
NOTE:
CC is the Carlsen Center
RC is the Regnier Center
NMOCA is the Nerman Museum
of Contemporary Art
GEB is the General Education Building
ATM
ATM
JOIN THE HEART OF AMERICA JAPAN-AMERICA SOCIETY TODAY
Do you want to enjoy the Japanese culture 365 days a year? Join the Heart of America
Japan-America Society. Members of the Society enjoy various Japanese cultural events
and activities throughout the year. The Greater Kansas City Japanese Festival is only one of
our major activities (although it is our largest cultural and outreach event).
Sign up for membership at the JAS booth in the lobby of the Carlsen Center, go to our
website at kcjas.org or fill out the application near the back of this program and mail it in.
THE 17TH ANNUAL GREATER KANSAS CITY
JAPAN FESTIVAL
TABLE OF CONTENTS
General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4, 5, 6
Greater Kansas City Japan Festival Pictures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Opening Ceremonies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Performing Arts Schedule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Other Performances and Cultural Presentations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Exhibits.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17
Japanese Cultural Village.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Other Activities and Events .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Anime and Manga.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Vendors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Featured Artist – Miyuki the Candy Artist. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Featured Performers.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23, 24
Schedule/Timetable of Events.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 26, 27, 28
Featured Performers (continues). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29, 30, 31, 32
Cultural Presentations/Demonstrations.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33, 34, 35
General Workshops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36, 37, 38
Martial Arts Demonstrations and Workshops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39, 40, 41
Musical Workshops. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Greater Kansas City Japan Festival Pictures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Displays .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44, 45
Japan-Related Booths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
K-16 Teacher’s Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Fun and Useful Japanese Words and Phrases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Map of Japan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Map of Japan/Participating Organizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Financial Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
Participating Vendors/Anime and Manga Vendors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
GKC Japan Festival Executive Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
3
WELCOME TO THE 17TH ANNUAL
GREATER KANSAS CITY JAPAN FESTIVAL
GENERAL INFORMATION
FESTIVAL HOURS: Saturday, Oct. 11: 10 a.m.-7:30 p.m.
ADMISSION
Admission Fee – adults $12, students $10 and children (5-13) $8, children under 5 free
ristbands – Everyone who pays an admission and children under 5 will receive a WHITE wristband.
W
Please wear your wristband at all times as it will serve as your admittance to all Festival venues. Persons without the proper wristbands will not be allowed to attend or participate
in any event or activity.
VIDEO AND STILL PHOTOGRAPHY POLICY: No flash photography. No video including cell phone
video allowed. Still photography without flash is allowed.
WORKSHOPS/DEMONSTRATIONS/CULTURAL PRESENTATIONS – Workshop, Demonstration and
Cultural Presentation admittance is on a first-come, first-served basis. If you desire to attend a Workshop,
Demonstration or Cultural Presentation, please proceed to the Workshop, Demonstration or Cultural
Presentation room prior to the scheduled start time.
THE
THE OPENING
OPENING CEREMONY
CEREMONY
Honored
Honored guests,
guests, including
including government
government officials
officials and
and dignitaries
dignitaries from
from sponsoring
sponsoring
organizations,
will
officially
open
the
2014
Greater
Kansas
City
organizations, will officially open the 2014 Greater Kansas City Japan
Japan Festival
Festival on
on
Saturday,
October
11,
at
10
a.m.
in
Polsky
Theatre,
Carlsen
Center.
Saturday, Oct. 11, at 10 a.m. in Polsky Theatre, Carlsen Center.
The Opening
Opening Ceremonies
Ceremonies will
will include
include music,
music, remarks
remarks by
by distinguished
distinguished guests
guests and
and the
the
The
ritual
ritual of
of Kagamiwari
Kagamiwari –– the
the breaking
breaking of
of aa sake
sake barrel
barrel and
and toast
toast to
to open
open the
the 2014
2014 GKC
GKC
Japan
Japan Festival.
Festival.
4
THE 17TH ANNUAL GREATER KANSAS CITY
JAPAN FESTIVAL
GENERAL INFORMATION – continued
FINDING YOUR WAY AROUND
A campus map is located on the inside cover of this program. Large maps of various Festival venues will
be found at the information booths throughout the Carlsen Center and Regnier Center.
INFORMATION BOOTHS AND FESTIVAL STAFF MEMBERS WEARING RED (AND A FEW BLUE)
HAPPI COATS and RED VESTS
There are Information Booths on the first floor of the Carlsen Center near the Torii Gate, across from the
elevator on the second and third floors of the Carlsen Center and in the lobby of the Regnier Center.
Festival staff members wearing red or blue Happi Coats or red vests will be stationed throughout the Festival
venues. They will be able to assist you, answer your questions and give directions. There are also maps
of the Festival venues at the information booths and in the inside cover of the Festival program.
Look for Festival staff members wearing red or blue Happi Coats or red vests shown above – they can
answer your questions.
FOOD SERVICE
TRADITIONAL JAPANESE FOOD – CAPITOL FEDERAL CONFERENCE CENTER
IN THE REGNIER CENTER
11 a.m.-6 p.m. Enjoy traditional Japanese food served by local Japanese restaurants and JCCC Dining Services.
Featured Japanese restaurants include: One-Bite/Sama Zama, Nara, Siki
Kaiyo and JCCC Dining Services.
JCCC FOOD SERVICE
CAFÉ TEMPO IN THE NERMAN MUSEUM – 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
ENCORE!ESPRESSO IN THE CARLSEN CENTER – 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
TRADITIONAL JAPANESE SNACKS AND SWEETS – ORIENTAL SUPERMARKET
Second Floor, Carlsen Center – 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
5
THE 17TH ANNUAL GREATER KANSAS CITY
JAPAN FESTIVAL
BAZAAR
Carlsen Center Rooms: 126A,128, 232 and 234 – 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
FIRST AID
In case of an accident or a medical emergency, please contact a Festival staff member wearing a red or
blue Happi Coat or a red vest or go to an information booth located on the first, second or third floor
of the Carlsen Center and in the lobby of the Regnier Center. These individuals will contact Security
immediately to address your situation. Volunteers wearing the red or blue Happi Coats or red vests will
be stationed throughout the Festival areas to assist you in case of an emergency.
LOST AND FOUND
In case you have lost an item or have found an item that doesn’t belong to you, please contact a Festival
staff member wearing a red or blue Happi Coat or a red vest or go to an information booth located on
the first, second or third floor of the Carlsen Center and in the lobby of the Regnier Center.
2014 GKC JAPAN FESTIVAL “PROP” WEAPONS POLICY
Prop weapons of any kind are not allowed on the Festival grounds at the Johnson County Community
College during the GKC Japan Festival on Saturday, October 11, 2014. This includes plastic swords,
knives, or other weapons including those used for Cosplay. If a Festival Volunteer observes any attendee
carrying such a prop, they will be asked to remove the prop from the Festival grounds immediately.
The only exceptions will be prop weapons used by entrants in the Cosplay Contest and weapons used by
Festival martial arts groups for demonstrations and workshops. These props may not be carried around
the Festival grounds during the day and may only be used during the Cosplay Contest. Prop weapons
used in the Cosplay Contest must be carried directly backstage to the Polsky Theatre just prior to the
Cosplay Contest from 6:15 to 6:30 p.m. The Cosplay Contest will be held from 6:30 to 7 p.m. in Polsky
Theatre. After the Contest the props must be removed from the Festival grounds.
EMERGENCIES
In case of an emergency please use the “RED PHONES”
on the walls of the various venues.
ATM
ATMS ARE LOCATED IN THE CARLSEN CENTER LOBBY
AND THE REGNIER CENTER LOBBY.
HELP US GO “GREEN” – RECYCLE YOUR FESTIVAL PROGRAM
RETURN ANY UNWANTED GKC JAPAN FESTIVAL PROGRAMS AT THE EXIT DOORS
OF THE CARLSEN CENTER OR REGNIER CENTER
SO THAT OTHER ATTENDEES MAY USE THEM.
6
TOHOKU TRIBUTES
TOHOKU TRIBUTES
(The Tohoku Area of Japan is the location of the
Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011)
THE KIZUNA PROJECT PRESENTATION
BY REPERTORY THEATRE STUDENTS AT OLATHE SOUTH HIGH SCHOOL
11 a.m. and 1 p.m. in the GEB 233
The Kizuna Project Presentation is based on the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami (東日本大震災)
Higashi nihon Daishinsai.
It was created from tanka (a classic form of Japanese poetry related to the haiku with five unrhymed lines
of five, seven, five, seven, and seven syllables) published in Voices of Japan, pictures that were published
in the New York Times, dramatic interpretations by the Olathe South Advanced Repertory Theatre class, and
original music by Isaiah Hastings. This performance is based on a student trip to the affected areas in the
spring of 2013.
TOHOKU TOMO FILM SCREENING
BY WESLEY JULIAN
1, 3 and 5 p.m. in Carlsen Center Room 212
10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Information Booth in the Carlsen Center Lobby
The Kansas City premiere of the Kickstarter Documentary Tohoku Tomo, a story of true friendship and
commitment to Japan’s recovery by the international community following the Great East Japan Earthquake.
Director Wesley Julian will be leading a Q&A following each shoowing of the 60 min. film and will introduce
you to the 113 Project, an upcoming short film series about Tohoku.
Mr. Julian will be at an Information Booth in the Carlsen Center Lobby between showings to discuss the
Tohoku 113 Project.
TOHOKU DAISHINSAI: QUILTS DEPICTING THE MARCH 11, 2011 EVENTS
PRESENTATION BY CINDY PARRY
1 p.m. in Recital Hall
March 11, 2014 marks the third anniversary of the triple disaster in Japan: 9.0 earthquake (5th worst in recorded
history) followed by a devastating tsunami followed by a nuclear disaster (worst in recorded history) created
when four of the six nuclear reactors at Fukushima failed as a result of both the earthquake and tsunami.
Mrs. Parry has been working on this quilt series, Tohoku Daishinsai (Tohoku Disaster), for over two and
one-half years. There are 12 quilts. I would like my friends to see what I’ve been working on.
QUILT EXHIBIT BY CINDY PARRY
10 a.m. to 7 p.m. in Carlsen Center Room 107
Come to Carlsen Center Room 107 to enjoy Mrs. Parry’s quilt series, “Tohoku Daishinsai” (Tohoku Disaster)
There are 12 quilts.
7
OPENING CEREMONIES
IN POLSKY THEATRE
10-10:30 a.m.Festival Overview, Highlights and Introduction
of Featured Artists
Honored guests, including government officials and dignitaries from sponsoring organizations,
will officially open the 2014 Greater Kansas City Japan Festival on Saturday, October 11, at 10 a.m.
in Polsky Theatre, Carlsen Center.
The Opening Ceremonies will include music, remarks by distinguished guests and the ritual of
Kagamiwari – the breaking of a sake barrel and toast to open the 2014 GKC Japan Festival.
8
PERFORMING ARTS
YARDLEY HALL, POLSKY THEATRE AND
REGNIER CENTER FOOD COURT (actual performance times may vary slightly)
IN YARDLEY HALL
11:30 a.m.
11:55 a.m.
12:30 p.m.
1 p.m.
1:25 p.m.
1:55 p.m.
2:25 p.m.
3 p.m.
3:30-4 p.m.
4 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
4:50 p.m.
5:20 p.m.
6 p.m.
6:35 p.m. 7 p.m.
CONCERT – 11:30 a.m-7:30 p.m.
Three Trails Taiko / Ki-Daiko
Min’yo Folk Songs – Molly Adkins Jeon with Yoshiko Yamanaka
Aya Uchida with Shin Suzuki and Jo Yamanaka
Kyogen (Japanese Comedy) – Dr. June Compton
K-State Yosakoi Dance Group
Mai Tadokoro – Marimba Denver Taiko
Yoko Hiraoka (Koto) and David Wheeler (Shakuhachi)
INTERMISSION
Three Trails Taiko / Ki-Daiko
Mai Tadokoro – Marimba
Min’yo Folk Songs – Molly Adkins Jeon with Yoshiko Yamanaka
Aya Uchida with Shin Suzuki and Jo Yamanaka
Yoko Hiraoka (Koto) and David Wheeler (Shakuhachi)
Kyogen (Japanese Comedy) – Dr. June Compton
Denver Taiko
Yardley Hall
Yardley Hall
Yardley Hall
Yardley Hall
Yardley Hall
Yardley Hall
Yardley Hall
Yardley Hall
Yardley Hall
Yardley Hall
Yardley Hall
Yardley Hall
Yardley Hall
Yardley Hall
Yardley Hall
Yardley Hall
IN POLSKY THEATRE
10-10:30 a.m.Opening Ceremony – Festival overview, highlights and Introduction
of Featured Artists
10:45-11:30 a.m. Ottawa Suzuki Strings
11:40 a.m.-12:20 p.m.Denver Taiko Workshop
12:25-1:10 p.m. Yosakoi Workshop – K-State Yosakoi Dance Group
1:30-2:20 p.m. Tea Ceremony Demonstration with Yoko Hiraoka, Omotesenke Tea School
2:30-5 p.m. Martial Arts Demonstrations
5:15-6:05 p.m. Tea Ceremony Demonstration with Dale Slusser, Urasenke Tea School
6:30-7 p.m. Cosplay Fashion Show and Contest
Polsky Theatre
Polsky Theatre
Polsky Theatre
Polsky Theatre
Polsky Theatre
Polsky Theatre
Polsky Theatre
Polsky Theatre
FOOD COURT PERFORMANCES
11 a.m.-6 p.m.Musicians will perform throughout the day, including
• Aya Uchida, Shin Suzuki and Jo Yamanaka,
• Emporia State Sakura Choir
Regnier Center – Food Court
9
CULTURAL PRESENTATIONS
IN RECITAL HALL, HUDSON AUDITORIUM, GEB 233 AND CC 212
Recital Hall
11 a.m.
Noon
1 p.m.
2 p.m.
3 p.m.
4 p.m.
Samurai Armor Presentation – “Samurai on the Battlefield” by Tora Lawson
“Working Effectively With Japanese Colleagues” by Dr. Sarah Fremerman Aptilon
Tohoku Daishinsai – Quilt depicting the March 11, 2011 events by Cindy Parry
“Wearing the Red Kimono” by Jan Morrill
“Introduction to Wagashi – Japanese Sweets” by Dr. Ayako Mizumura
Samurai Armor Presentation – “Samurai on the Battlefield” by Tora Lawson
Hudson Auditorium (Nerman Museum)
12:30 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
4 p.m.
The Sculpture of Isamu Noguchi – Jan Schall
Woven Gold – Traditional Costumes in Japan – Yayoi Shinoda
Kimono Demonstration – Sachie Stroder
Haiku Presentation – Jan Morrill
GEB 233
11 a.m.
Noon
1 p.m.
3 p.m.
Kizuna Project Presentation – Olathe High School Students
The Samurai Sword – Earle Brigance
Kizuna Project Presentation – Olathe High School Students
The Samurai Sword – Earle Brigance
CC 212
1, 3 and 5 p.m.
10
Tohoku Tomo Film Screenings
EXHIBITS
IN THE VIRGINIA KREBS COMMUNITY ROOM 107
CARLSEN CENTER – FIRST FLOOR
AND REGNIER CENTER EAST LOBBY (IKEBANA EXHIBIT)
JAPANESE SWORD EXHIBIT
The Japanese swords on display in Carlsen
Center Room 107 (Virginia Krebs Community
Room) are locally owned and collected.
A Japanese sword (nihonto) is one of several
types of traditionally made swords from Japan.
There are many types of Japanese swords that
differ by size, shape, field of application and
method of manufacture.
In modern times the most commonly known type
of Japanese sword is the Shinogi-Zukuri katana,
which is a single-edged and usually curved long
sword traditionally worn by samurai from the 15th
century onwards. Other types of Japanese swords
include the tanto, which is a smaller knife-sized
sword.
The word katana was used in ancient Japan and is
still used today.
The forging of a Japanese blade typically took
weeks or even months and was considered a sacred art. As with many complex endeavors, rather than a single
craftsman, several artistswere involved. There was a smith to forge the rough shape, often a second smith
(apprentice) to fold the metal, a specialist polisher (called a togi) as well as the various artisans who made the
koshirae (the various fittings used to decorate the finished blade and saya (sheath) including the tsuka (hilt),
fuchi (collar), kashira (pommel) and tsuba (hand guard)). It is said that the sharpening and polishing process
takes just as long as the forging of the blade itself.
The legitimate Japanese sword is made from Japanese steel “Tamahagane.” The most common lamination
method the Japanese sword blade is formed from is a combination of two different steels: a harder outer jacket
of steel wrapped around a softer inner core of steel. This creates a blade which has a unique hard, highly razor
sharp cutting edge with the ability to absorb shocks in a way which reduces the possibility of the blade breaking
or bending when used in combat. The hadagane, for the outer skin of the blade, is produced by heating a block
of high quality raw steel, which is then hammered out into a bar, and the flexible back portion. This is then
cooled and broken up into smaller blocks, which are checked for further impurities and then reassembled and
reforged. During this process the billet of steel is heated and hammered, split and folded back upon itself many
times and re-welded to create a complex structure of many thousands of layers. Each different steel is folded
differently to provide the necessary strength and flexibility to the different steels. The precise way in which the
steel is folded, hammered and re-welded determines the distinctive grain pattern of the blade, the jihada, (also
called jigane when referring to the actual surface of the steel blade) a feature which is indicative of the period,
place of manufacture and actual maker of the blade. The practice of folding also ensures a somewhat more
homogeneous product, with the carbon in the steel being evenly distributed and the steel having no voids that
could lead to fractures and failure of the blade in combat.
11
EXHIBITS
IN THE VIRGINIA KREBS COMMUNITY ROOM 107
CARLSEN CENTER – FIRST FLOOR
AND REGNIER CENTER EAST LOBBY (IKEBANA EXHIBIT)
TRADITIONAL JAPANESE DOLL DISPLAY
Japanese traditional dolls are known by the name “Ningyo” in Japan, which literally means human shape. There
are various types of Japanese dolls, some representing children and babies, some of the imperial court, warriors
and heroes, fairy-tale characters, gods and (rarely) demons, and also people representing the daily life of
Japanese cities. Many have a long tradition and are still made today, for household shrines, for formal gift-giving,
or for festival celebrations such as “Hinanatsuri,” the doll festival, or “Kodomo no Hi,” Children’s Day. Some are
manufactured as a local craft, to be purchased by pilgrims as a souvenir of a temple visit or some other trip.
KIMEKOMI NINGYO
These are wooden dolls with Japanese costumes made from cloth with
the edges tucked into grooves in the wood.
Kimekomi dolls are traditional Japanese dolls. Kimekomi Ningyo
were created by Takahashi Tadashige, a priest at a Kyoto shrine, in the
middle of the Edo period (1600-1868). He made a small wooden doll
that he had carved from scraps of willow, which were left over from
boxes used in a festival at Kamigamo shrine in Kyoto. Then using
remnants of fabric from his priest’s clothing, he dressed the doll by
inserting the ends of the fabric into the wooden torso. At first, they were
called Kamigamo dolls after the place where they were made.
Later, however, they were called Kimekomi dolls because of the way
that the fabric was inserted into slits in the wood, and the name stuck.
“Ki” means wood, “Mekomi” means the technique that is used to tuck
the fabric into the grooves on the doll’s body. Subsequently, they were
brought to Edo (Tokyo) where the craft became established.
HAKATA NINGYO
Hakata dolls are ceramic dolls depicting nobles, samurai,
beautiful ladies, geisha and working people.
Hakata Dolls are traditional clay dolls, originally from the city of
Fukuoka prefecture, which lies in the north of the Kyushu Island.
In 1608 Lord Kuroda Nagamasa was having Fukuoka Castle built.
One of the workmen making the clay roof also made dolls from the
clay. Lord Nagamasa asked the artisan, Sochichi Masaki, to make
more dolls, thus starting a tradition that continues today. Modern
masters still create dolls from the clay found in the vicinity of the
castle. The dolls are molded in a plaster cast, fired in a kiln
with no glaze, then hand painted.
Kuroda Bushi (Hakata Samurai Dolls): A special type of
Hakata Ningyo dolls are those that depict samurai.
12
EXHIBITS
IN THE VIRGINIA KREBS COMMUNITY ROOM 107
CARLSEN CENTER – FIRST FLOOR
AND REGNIER CENTER EAST LOBBY (IKEBANA EXHIBIT)
MUSHA NINGYO (BOY’S DAY DOLLS)
Musha Ningyo generally translated as “warrior dolls,” refers to the elaborately costumed figures displayed on
May 5 for the Boy’s Day festival. They feature great figures and heroic episodes from Japan’s martial past.
Stories about these figures, told by older people to young males, instill ethics and values, and pass on heritage
and pride in the past. They are usually made of materials similar to the hina dolls, but the construction is often
more complicated, since the dolls represent men seated on camp chairs, standing or riding horses. Armor,
helmets and weapons are made of lacquered paper, often with metal accents. On Children’s Day, families with boys
fly huge carp-shaped streamers (koinobori) outside the house and display dolls of famous warriors and
other heroes inside. The carp was chosen because it symbolizes strength and success; according to a Chinese
legend, a carp swam upstream to become a dragon.
RYUKYU BUYO NINGYO (OKINAWAN DANCE DOLL)
Ryukyu buyo was developed at the Royal Court during the Ryukyu
Kingdom era, and was performed to entertain Chinese envoys and
Japanese clans.
Ryukyu buyo dance can be divided into four types: classical dance
(koten buyo), popular dances (zo-odori), folk dances (minzoku
buyo), and creative dance (sosaku buyo).
A Koten buyo doll represents classical dance and movements are
generally slow in tempo, with dancers keeping their feet on or close
to the floor at all times, and wearing colorful clothing called Ryukyu
Binga. Zo-odori dolls depict dancers performing popular dances
that portray images of ordinary people’s lives and sentiments.
Minzoku buyo or folk dancing consists of dances performed at
religious rituals from ancient times passed down in different parts of
the archipelago. Sosaku buyo dolls depict creative dances that are
new and combine modern elements with traditional dance.
13
EXHIBITS
IN THE VIRGINIA KREBS COMMUNITY ROOM 107
CARLSEN CENTER – FIRST FLOOR
AND REGNIER CENTER EAST LOBBY (IKEBANA EXHIBIT)
UNISHI KIMEKOMI NINGYO –
junishi (12). Your year of birth determines your zodiac animal sign.
Junishi Kimekomi Ningyo are the 12
Japanese zodiac dolls. There are an
increasing number of Japanese who
are aware of their zodiac sign in the
astrological system we use in the West:
Scorpio, Cancer, Taurus, etc. But the
chances are that if you ask a Japanese
“What’s your sign?” the answer you get
will be “I’m a rat” or “I’m a horse.” What
they are referring to is the 12-year cycle
of animal years, known in Japan as
The 12 zodiac animals are: horse, sheep, monkey, rooster, dog, pig, rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon and snake. Stop
by Carlsen Center Room 107 (the Virginia Krebs Community Room) to see what your Japanese zodiac sign is and
what your characteristics are. And, see the 12 beautiful Japanese zodiac dolls on display.
KABUKI BUYO NINGYO
Kabuki is a classical Japanese performing art translated as “the art of
singing and dancing.” Buyo ningyo represent a main character of Kabuki
dance.
“Yaegaki Hime”: The princess Yaegaki is the heroine of a five-act
drama named Honcho Nijushiko, the 24 models of filial piety. This
historical drama was first performed in Bunraku – traditional Japanese
puppet theater. Later on, the drama rapidly became the source of
numerous Kabuki versions.
Yaegaki-hime is a very famous Kabuki
character and one of the three important
princesses in Japanese folklore.
“Renjishi”: Another kabuki play,
Renjishi, shows a white lion dancing
with its red-maned cub. Renjishi dolls
depict “men’s lion dance” actors in
this kabuki play.
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EXHIBITS
IN THE VIRGINIA KREBS COMMUNITY ROOM 107
CARLSEN CENTER – FIRST FLOOR
AND REGNIER CENTER EAST LOBBY (IKEBANA EXHIBIT)
ICHIMATSU NINGYO
Ichimatsu dolls represent little girls or
boys, correctly proportioned and usually
with flesh-colored skin and glass eyes.
The original Ichimatsu were named after
an 18th-century Kabuki actor Ichimatu
Sanogawa and must have represented
an adult man, but since the late 19th
century the term has applied to child
dolls, usually made to hold in the arms,
dress, and pose (either with elaborately
made joints or with floppy cloth upper
arms and thighs). Baby boy dolls with
mischievous expressions were most
popular in the late 19th and early 20th
century, but in 1927, the friendship
doll exchange, involved the creation of
58 32-inch dolls representing little girls,
to be sent as a gift from Japan to the
United States, and the aesthetic of these dolls influenced doll makers
to emulate this type of a solemn, gentle-looking little girl in an elaborate kimono.
MATSURI (FESTIVAL
COSTUME DOLLS)
Festival Costume Dolls
represent dolls in the
costumes that Japanese
typically wear when attending
Matsuri (Festivals) in Japan.
Mrs. Harumi Oshima made
these very cute dolls. She
began studying the art of
Western ceramics doll
making in 1980. She became
instructor qualified in such
doll making in 1982.
Beginning in 1992, she
became an original doll
maker. The dolls, which she
makes, express old Japanese
fashion and customs.
15
EXHIBITS
IN THE VIRGINIA KREBS COMMUNITY ROOM 107
CARLSEN CENTER – FIRST FLOOR
AND REGNIER CENTER EAST LOBBY (IKEBANA EXHIBIT)
HINA DOLL DISPLAY
Every year on March 3, Japan
celebrates the Doll Festival
(Japanese, Hina Matsuri).
On this day every year,
families set up a special
multi-level step-altar on which
to arrange the Emperor and
Empress dolls, called hina
in Japanese. They decorate
the altar with boughs of peace
blossoms and make offerings
to the hina dolls of freshly
made rice cakes (mochi),
either flavored with a wild herb
or colored and cut into festive
diamond shapes. In addition
to the beautiful dolls, these altars display many beautiful and luxurious decorative accessories.
Enjoy this beautiful and elaborate hina doll display. Carefully look at the exquisite clothing and the many
accessories on each level of the display. It is rare to see such a complete collection.
CHILDREN’S DAY (BOY’S WARRIOR) DOLL
May 5 of each year is a National Holiday that celebrates
Children’s Day in Japan. Originally the day was celebrated
as “Boy’s Day” to correspond to the Doll Festival for Girls
(where families display the Hina Dolls described in the
previous section) that is held on March 3.
However, the symbols of courage and strength mainly
honor boys on May 5. It is the custom for families
with male children to fly koinobori outside of the
home. They represent a symbol of success. Families
also eat chimaki and kashiwamochi (different
types of special rice cakes) and display warrior dolls
(“musha ningyo”) in the home during this
celebration. Large koinobori more than 30 feet in
length are displayed in the Carlsen Center lobby.
Enjoy the beautiful “musha ningyo” warrior doll
in a samurai costume. Once again, it is rare to see such
an exquisite example of one of these dolls on display.
16
EXHIBITS
IN THE VIRGINIA KREBS COMMUNITY ROOM 107
CARLSEN CENTER – FIRST FLOOR
AND REGNIER CENTER EAST LOBBY (IKEBANA EXHIBIT)
TRADITIONAL SAMURAI ARMOR DISPLAY
The Samurai armor on display in our exhibit area is a replica of
traditional Samurai armor worn many centuries ago in Japan.
The manufacturer of the armor, Marutake Sangyo, is Japan’s,
and the world’s, premier producer of fine Samurai Yoroi
Armor. Located in Satsuma-Sendai city of Japan’s southwestern
Kagoshima prefecture, the firm’s reputation for creating products
of unparalleled quality has given them more than a 90-percent
share of the Japanese armor market. From television dramas,
such as Yoshitsune, to feature films, including Akira Kurosawa’s
classics, Kagemusha, and Ran, Marutake Sangyo has shared
the spirit of the Samurai with the world. Having produced
thousands of suits of armor, their clientele extends from the
entertainment industry to temples, museums and even the
Queen of England.
Each suit of armor manufactured by Marutake Sangyo is
researched and modeled after examples found in museums,
private collections, temples, shrines, hidden storehouses of
Samurai clans and other historical sources. All pieces are
painstakingly handcrafted by experienced artisans, using authentic
methods and materials. For instance, one of their helmets can consist of up to 42 hand-spliced iron plates.
Even a small header board, splint or helmet lining will be completed by a skilled, veteran artisan. In fact,
a single suit of armor may require the specialized skills of more than 20 craftsmen. Furthermore, all of the
company’s body armors and helmets are made solely of iron or genuine leather.
HAIKU DISPLAY
CARLSEN CENTER LOBBY
Enjoy looking at examples of Japanese Haiku from the masters. Also you will find Haiku written by
contestants in the Festival Haiku contest.
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JAPANESE CULTURAL VILLAGE
The “Village” is open 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
Carlsen Center Rooms 124, 126A and 128
Featured again at this year’s Festival is the Japanese Cultural Village operated by the Kansas City Japanese School.
All proceeds from sales are used to support the Kansas City Japanese School.Young and old attendees will be
entertained with many opportunities to experience the “real” Japan here in Kansas City. No babysitting services
will be provided. Adult supervision is required for all children 10 and under.
Kimono and Samurai Armor Portraits – Room 124
Dress up in an authentic Kimono (both women’s and men’s Kimono are available)
or in a suit of Samurai Armor and have your picture taken. An opportunity of a lifetime!
Japanese Handmade Craft Bazaar and Hands on Craft Making – Room 126A
Enjoy shopping for beautiful Japanese handicraft items.
Also learn how to make traditional Japanese handcraft items.
Japanese Bazaar, Face and Nail Painting – Room 128
Come to the “Village” and have your face or nails painted using Japanese designs and characters and
enjoy shopping at the “Village” Bazaar for Japanese toys, books and more.
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OTHER ACTIVITIES AND EVENTS
Bazaar Shopping Extravaganza
10 a.m. to 7 p.m. in Carlsen Center Rooms 126A, 128, 232 and 234
Shop for unique Japanese crafts, Kimono, yukata, happi coats, kokeshi dolls, games, books,
Japanese serving ware, ceramics (sake sets and tea sets) and much more.
Participating organizations are the Heart of America Japan-America Society,
the Greater Kansas City Japan Club, the Independence Sister City Committee
and the Kansas City Japanese School.
The Games of Go and Shogi
11 a.m. to 7 p.m. in Carlsen Center Room 216
Go and Shogi are two popular board games in Japan. Go is the oldest board game in the world
and originated about 1000-2000 BC in China. The game came to Japan around 400 AD.
Shogi is similar to chess and originated in Japan.
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ANIME AND MANGA
ANIME AND MANGA ACTIVITIES
Carlsen Center Third Floor
Come and enjoy Anime and Manga with the vendors displaying your favorite Anime and Manga products.
Follow the signs to experience Anime at its finest.
All Anime, Ange De Nuit, Anime Source KC, Asylum Anime, Far East Emporium, Fir3h34rt
Studios, Motaku, Naka-kon, Pachinko Fever and Studio Tip Top
PACHINKO
10 a.m.-6 p.m. – Carlsen Center Room 329
Come and play real Japanese Pachiko machines for free.
Lectures on the history of Pachinko will be given throughout the day.
VIDEO GAMES
10 a.m.-6 p.m. – Carlsen Center Room 332
Come and play video games.
MOTAKU MARIO KART TOURNAMENT
1 p.m. – Carlsen Center Room 332
Come and play Mario Kart at the Motaku game tournament. The three top players will win prizes.
Please register in advance in the Motaku Game Room, spaces are limited. Spectators are welcome.
MOTAKU PERSONA 4 ARENA TOURNAMENT
3:30 p.m. – Carlsen Center Room 332
Come and play Persona 4 Arena at the Motaku game tournament. The three top players will win prizes.
Please register in advance in the Motaku Game Room, spaces are limited. Spectators are welcome.
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ANIME AND MANGA
ANIME MOVIES
10 a.m.-7 p.m. – Carlsen Center Rooms 312 and 314
Come, relax and watch some Anime Movies, sponsored by Sentai Filmworks.
ANIME CEL PAINTING WORKSHOP
2-3:30 p.m. in Regnier Center Room 175
Come to this fun workshop to learn how Anime was made before computer technology took over.
In this hands-on workshop, you can paint your own film “cel” while learning about the history of Anime.
Presented by Motaku
COSPLAY FASHION SHOW AND CONTEST
6:30 p.m. in Polsky Theatre
(Meet at 6:15 p.m. in Polsky Theatre)
Come to Polsky Theatre and enjoy a Cosplay Fashion Show and Contest. Monetary prizes will be awarded
to the top three winners. You must preregister to participate. Presented by Motaku. Contestants must register
by 4 p.m. in Carlsen Center Room 325. There is a limit of one costume per contestant.
JAPANESE/ASIAN BALL-JOINTED DOLL EXPERIENCE
10 a.m.-7 p.m. – Carlsen Center Room 316
Asian ball-jointed dolls were influenced by Japanese traditional dolls such as Ichimatsu dolls.
Ichimatsu dolls are on display in the Japanese Doll Exhibit in Carlsen Center Room 107.
A ball-jointed doll is any doll that is articulated with ball and socket joints. The earliest Asian dolls
were influenced by the anime. Come, see and learn about these beautiful dolls from an expert.
•
•
BALL JOINTED DOLLS PANEL DISCUSSIONS
all Jointed Dolls for Beginners: Noon-2 p.m. in Carlsen Center Room 316
B
Join us for an introduction to the world of ball jointed dolls.
Learn where to get them, how to take care of them, and more.
Ball Jointed Dolls Meetup: 2-4 p.m. in Carlsen Center Room 316
Get together with other BJD owners and trade tips and tricks, and don’t forget to bring your dolls!
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VENDORS/EXHIBITORS
VENDORS
10 a.m.-7 p.m.
FOOD VENDORS
11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Regnier Center
Cap Federal Conference Center
One-Bite Sama Zama
Japanese Grill
425 Westport Road,
Kansas City, M0 64111
816-756 3600
www.samakc.com
Siki Japanese Steak House
and Sushi Bar
Oriental Supermarket
10336 Metcalf Avenue,
Overland Park, KS 66212
913-652-9140
CC, Second floor alcove
Jan Morrill, Author
The Red Kimono
www.janmorrill.com
CC, First floor lobby
Innovative Pedal Wheelchair
Dr. Kenri Honda
9233 Ward Parkway, Suite 333
Kansas City, MO 64114
816-444-0204
www.innovativePedalWheelchair.com
CC, Second floor top of stairs
Welcome Mat
Judo Jujitsu Sambo Sumo
Steve Scott
www.welcomematjudoclub.com
CC, First floor lobby
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KIE/Kinstetsu International
Travel Agency
Yosuke Kameda, Account Executive
One Pierce Place, 135C
Itasca, IL 60143
630-250-8840 ext 210,
[email protected]
www.kieusa.net
CC, First floor lobby
bimi bakery /Japanese
Sweets
Dr. Ayako Mizumura
Lawrence KS
CC, First floor lobby
Konara Han
Tora Lawson Sensei
(Japanese Martial Arts Dojo –
Samurai armor and other items)
Wichita, KS
CC, First floor alcove
Ange de Nuit BJDs
Alicia Thomas
angedenuitbjd.com
CC Room 316
601 NW Blue Parkway
Lee’s Summit, MO 64063
816-525-4877
www.siki-kc.com
Kaiyo Japanese Resturant
4308 W 119th Street
Leawood, KS 66209
913-663-1663
www.kaiyosushi.com
Nara Restaurant
1617 Main Street
Kansas City, MO 64108
816-221-6272
www.narakc.com
JCCC Dining Services
Sushi with Gusto
Café Tempo
FEATURED ARTIST
MIYUKI THE CANDY ARTIST
JAPANESE CANDY ART – MIYUKI SUGIMORI
11 a.m.-2 p.m.
3-5 p.m.
6-7 p.m.
Carlsen Center Room 211
Ms. Sugimori is a candy artist who demonstrates her skill at Disney World. She is the only female
professional who can skillfully shape candy material into flowers and animals by blowing air into it.
Ms. Sugimori then finishes the candy by shaping it with her fingers and scissors and colors her creations
with edible dye. She has been a favorite at past Japan festivals.
23
PACHINKO
PACHINKO
Presented by Pachinko Fever
10 a.m.-6 p.m. in Carlsen Center 329
Presentations about Pachinko history throughout the day
This year, thanks to Pachinko Fever, we will have actual Japanese Pachinko machines at the Festival.
Attendees can play pachinko machines that were built in 1961 to the present.
Learn all about pachinko machines from experts in the room with the pachinko machines. Short lectures will
be given which will explain the pachinko machine, how pachinko machines are used in Japan (it is very, very
popular!) and the actual pachinko machines provided by Pachinko Fever.
Pachinko is a mechanical game originating in Japan and is used as both a form of recreational arcade game and
much more frequently as a gambling device, filling a Japanese gambling niche comparable to that of the slot
machine in Western gaming.
A pachinko machine resembles a vertical pinball machine, but has no flippers and uses a large number of small
balls. The player fires balls into the machine, which then cascade down through a dense forest of pins. If the balls
fall into certain locations, they may be captured and sequences of events may be triggered that result in more
balls being released.
The object of the game is to capture as many balls as possible. These balls can then be exchanged for prizes.
Pachinko machines were originally strictly mechanical, but modern ones have incorporated extensive electronics,
becoming similar to video slot machines.
Pachinko parlors are widespread in Japan, and they usually also feature a number of slot machines (called
pachislo or pachislots); hence, these venues operate and look similar to casinos.
Modern pachinko machines are highly customizable, keeping enthusiasts continuously entertained. Directly
gambling on pachinko is illegal in Japan. Balls won cannot be exchanged directly for money in the pachinko
parlor. The balls are exchanged for tokens or prizes, which are then taken outside and exchanged for cash at a
place nominally separate from the parlor!
Enjoy playing the several original pachinko machines from Japan on the third floor of the Carlsen Center. It is free
to play and try out an actual Japanese pachinko machine. But, sorry, there are no prizes for successful players
here at the Festival – it is illegal!
24
FEATURED PERFORMERS
AYA UCHIDA WITH SHINTAROU SUZUKI (“SHIN”) AND JO YAMANAKA
12:30 and 5:20 p.m. IN YARDLEY HALL
AYA, SHIN AND JO WILL PERFORM AT 2 AND 3:30 p.m.
IN THE CAPITOL FEDERAL CONFERENCE CENTER REGNIER CENTER (FOOD COURT)
The GKC Japan Festival is proud to feature
Ms. Aya Uchida a Japanese professional pop
singer who has come all the way from Kyoto,
Japan to perform for us again this year. She will
perform this year with violinist Shintarou Suzuki
(“Shin”). Mr. Jo Yamanaka will accompany
them on guitar.
Ms. Aya Uchida was born in Kyoto, Japan. In
2009, she met with guitarist, Jo Yamanaka and
they started to produce and sing their original
songs. Their first collaborative single,
“Mahalo-Arigato,” was originally created for
the Kansas City Japan Festival and was very well
received in the U.S.
Aya’s official debut as a professional singer took
place in June 2010 when her first album was
released. At the same time Aya started her own
show/program for a local radio station. Not only in
Japan, Aya has performed in many Japan festivals
in the U.S. and has also frequently visited the
Republic of Haiti to entertain members of the Japan Self-Defense Force, dispatched to provide international
relief activities after the 2010 earthquake and has also visited children’s orphanages to share her songs and
support.
Aya’s new music video “Long Road / J-Country Version” was filmed at an old ranch near Kansas City. And, her
new music video “MAHALO~ALOHA” was performed in Kansas City. You can find these videos on YouTube.
Mr. Shintarou Suzuki (“Shin”), a Japanese violinist, is 19, and was
born in Nagoya City, Japan. His first musical instrument was a piano and
he started learning the violin from age of five under the Suzuki Method.
In 2004 and 2005, he participated in the Japan-Seattle Suzuki Institute
International.
At 11, Shin joined the NHK Nagoya Youth Symphony Orchestra. During
high school he participated in a music camp in Prague of the Czech
Republic. He has received many prizes in various music contests. He is
a sophomore at the Kunitachi College of Music in Tokyo, joining many
musicians in recording settings and live concerts.
We are very happy to bring Shin to the 2014 Greater Kansas City Japan
Festival to perform with Aya Uchida live in concert.
25
FEATURED PERFORMERS
KOTO AND SHAKUHACHI PERFORMANCE
YOKO HIRAOKA AND DAVID WHEELER
3 and 6 p.m. IN YARDLEY HALL
Yoko Hiraoka is a senior master performer of Biwa, Koto, Shamisen and Jiuta voice. She is a native of
Kyoto, Japan, and studied classical and modern koto and shamisen music from an early age. She studied the
5-string Biwa for many years with Kõka Suga, the head of Kõmyõji-ryû Chikuzen Biwa and direct disciple of
Yamazaki Kyokusui the Living National Treasure.
Her performance career originated in Japan and spans almost 30 years. Her repertoire includes contemporary
compositions by Japanese and American composers as well as the entirety of the classical Japanese repertoire.
Since moving to the U.S. in 1993, she has performed extensively at festivals, concerts, lectures, recitals and
on television/radio and studio recordings. Her performances have included concerts at the Art Institute of
Chicago, Princeton University, Yale University, UCLA, Bowdoin, Smith and Colby colleges, and many other
major universities and music festivals throughout the USA, such as the Lotus Festival, Atlanta Japanfest and
the St. Louis Japan Festival. She is a regular performer at our Greater Kansas City Japan Festival and a
favorite among festival attendees.
Musician and musicologist, David Wheeler, visited Japan in 1977 as an exchange student and entered the
tutelage of shakuhachi master Junsuke Kawase III. In 1981, he returned to Japan on a Japanese Education
Ministry scholarship for graduate study at the Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music, where he recieved his
M. A. in musicology in 1985.
Since 1982, David has been performing, teaching, lecturing and writing about the shakuhachi and Japanese
music both in Japan and around the world, and has made numerous performance appearances on Japanese
television and radio. While he specializes in the classical traditions of Sankyoku ensemble and Kinko-ryu
Honkyoku, his performance activities cover the full range of music today, everything from Japanese to
Western, from classical to the avant garde.
David was a visiting Japanese music lecturer and shakuhachi instructor at the College of Music at the
University of Colorado, where he co-organized and prepared the World Shakuhachi Festival 1998 at CU
Boulder, and also lectures and instructs students at Naropa University. He lives in Boulder, Colorado, and
teaches, lectures and performs around the U.S., in Japan and elsewhere.
26
FEATURED PERFORMERS
DENVER TAIKO
2:25 and 7 p.m. in Yardley Hall
Denver Taiko is a percussive group that has been in existence for 38 years. Using traditional Japanese drums
and other instruments, Denver Taiko combines both modern and ancient rhythms into a style and sound which
is uniquely their own. This group provides an outlet for cultural and personal expression that is both visually
exciting and emotionally moving.
Denver Taiko is an important part of Colorado and the West’s cultural landscape, playing at concerts, festivals
and diversity celebrations throughout the region. Denver’s Mayor Wellington Webb honored the group in 2001
when it received the Mayor’s annual award for Excellence in the Arts.
Be sure to come to see the energy, spirit and artistry of Denver Taiko that has “rocked” audiences for more than
30 years! A Festival favorite and back by popular demand is DENVER TAIKO! Denver Taiko, a professional Taiko
ensemble, was founded in 1976 and is an ensemble of third, fourth and fifth generation Japanese Americans.
Currently the group includes 14 musicians, comprised of not only veterans who have performed with Denver
Taiko since its inception, but also energetic and talented teens.
27
FEATURED PERFORMERS
MIN’YO FOLK SONGS
MOLLY ADKINS JEON WITH YOSHIKO YAMANAKA/DANCE
11:55 a.m. and 4:50 p.m.in Yardley Hall
Japanese folk songs have been passed down from generation to generation for hundreds of years. The songs
were traditionally learned by rote memorization during daily activities including work, celebrations and even
pilgrimages. But with the industrialization of Japan in the late 1800s, the songs began to lose popularity in
the traditional form. Songs become less part of the daily lives of the people and used more for entertainment
adding instrumental accompaniment and dances.
The Japanese folk songs in today’s performance represent the wide variety of songs that still survive today.
Free rhythm songs are accompanied by shakuhachi (bamboo flute) and follow the lead of the singer, while
bon-odori songs are accompanied by the steady beat of the shamisen (3-stringed banjo-like instrument) and
include a dance performed at festivals and other celebrations. Much can be learned about the Japanese culture and people by understanding traditional Japanese folk songs.
MOLLY ADKINS JEON
The 2014 Festival Committee is again pleased to offer a special presentation of Min’yo folk songs by
Molly Adkins Jeon. This year Yoshiko Yamanaka will dance to several of Ms. Jeon’s folk songs.
Ms. Jeon conducts workshops regarding traditional Japanese music in general and folk songs in particular.
She has been a consultant for the Indiana University International Vocal Ensemble. In addition she teaches
Japanese language at Bloomington High School North in Bloomington, Indiana.
She gives solo performances for educational institutions such as elementary, junior and senior high schools,
libraries, and university-level Japanese or music classes. In addition to her solo appearances, she performs
with artists from Japan.
Ms. Jeon is a certified master teacher of Japanese folk song and possesses a master’s degree in
ethnomusicology from the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music. She studied with a master
of Japanese folk song, Baisho Matsumoto, in Japan for nearly 10 years and is a certified instructor of
Japanese folk songs.
While she was pursuing a vocal degree at the University of Colorado, Ms. Jeon developed an interest in
Japan. A teacher suggested that she travel to Japan to teach English. In Japan her interest in Japanese folk
music increased. She performed in several competitions. She counts being named Grand Champion in a
major Japanese regional contest among one of her greatest accomplishments. It was remarkable that
Ms. Jeon was the only Westerner in these vocal competitions!
She uses Japanese folk songs to introduce the cultural aspects of Japan. Dressed in a Kimono, she talks
about traditional clothing, music and instruments. She explains the lyrics and background of each song.
Ms. Jeon is the only non-Japanese who performs Japanese folk songs professionally.
YOSHIKO YAMANAKA
Japanese Buyo dancer Yoshiko Yamanaka was born and grew up in Kyoto. She began studying Buyo Dance
at age six. At age 12 she became a dancer of the Wakayagi School of Buyo Dance. At 21 she was certified as a
teacher in the art. In addition, she has studied and is a qualified teacher in the Tea Ceremony of the Ura Senke
School, of Ikebana (flower arranging) and is a certified lecturer in the art of classical Kimono wear.
Mrs. Yamanaka has studied all of the disciplines of a classical Japanese female and has attained top-level
expertise in each of them. Even in Japan it is rare to find an individual with her extremely high level of training
and expertise in these traditional arts.
28
FEATURED PERFORMERS
KYŌGEN (JAPANESE COMEDY)
DR. JUNE COMPTON
1 and 6:35 p.m. in Yardley Hall
The 2014 GKC Japan Festival Committee is pleased to offer a special presentation of Kyōgen (Japanese comedy)
again this year by Dr. June Compton. Dr. Compton is Professor of Asian Theatre at The Theatre Conservatory,
Chicago College of Performing Arts, Roosevelt University in Chicago.
Dr. Compton lived in Japan for six years, studying and performing Kyōgen. She now teaches Asian theatre at
the Theatre Conservatory of Roosevelt University in Chicago. Each summer she returns to Japan to continue her
studies and perform and lecture on Kyōgen. During the school year, in addition to her classes at Roosevelt, she
performs, lectures and leads workshops on Kyōgen for groups in the U.S. She has lectured on Kyōgen at the
National Noh Theatre in Tokyo and the Japan Society of New York. Excerpts from her book, “Kyogen Women,”
are available at www.kyogen-in-english.com.
Kyōgen (literally “mad words” or “wild speech”) is a form of traditional Japanese comic theater. It developed
alongside Noh, was performed along with Noh as an intermission of sorts between Noh acts, on the same Noh
stage, and retains close links to Noh in the modern day; therefore, it is sometimes designated Noh-Kyōgen.
However, its content is not at all similar to the formal, symbolic, and solemn Noh theater; Kyōgen is a comical
form, and its primary goal is to make its audience laugh. Kyōgen is sometimes compared to the Italian comic
form of commedia dell’arte, which developed around the same period (14th century) and likewise features stock
characters.
Kyōgen is thought to derive from a form of Chinese entertainment that was brought to Japan around the 8th
century. This entertainment form became known as sarugaku and initially encompassed both serious drama and
comedy. By the 14th century, these forms of sarugaku had become known as Noh and Kyōgen, respectively.
Noh had been the official entertainment form of the Edo period, and was therefore subsidized by the government.
Kyōgen, performed in conjunction with Noh, also
received the patronage of the government and the
upper class during this time.
Movements and dialogue in Kyōgen are typically
very exaggerated, making the action of the play
easy to understand. Elements of slapstick or satire
are present in most Kyōgen plays. Some plays are
parodies of actual Buddhist or Shinto religious
rituals; others are shorter, more lively, simplified
versions of Noh plays, many of which are derived
from folk tales.
Today, Kyōgen is performed and practiced
regularly, both in major cities (especially Tokyo
and Osaka) and throughout the country, and
is featured on cultural television programs. In
addition to the performances during Noh plays,
it is also performed independently, generally in
programs of three to five plays.
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FEATURED PERFORMERS
MARIMBA PERFORMANCE
MAI TADOKORO
1:55 and 4:25 p.m. in Yardley Hall
Mai Tadokoro moved to the United States in 2002 from Nara,
Japan. She is an active percussionist and educator in Kansas City,
Raymore and Lawrence area. She is also a founding member
of Ad Astra Percussion, a new music percussion ensemble group
in Lawrence.
Ms. Tadokoro has performed with the Kansas City Civic Orchestra,
Kansas City Wind Symphony, Northland Symphony Orchestra,
Lawrence Chamber Orchestra, Lawrence Civic Choir, and Fountain
City Brass Band. She has recently played timpani and percussion
for the Opera Festival Neue Eutiner Festspiel, in Eutin, Germany.
Ms. Tadokoro has been awarded multiple prizes at national and regional competitions. She received an associate
of arts degree from Cottey College, bachelor of music from University of Missouri at Kansas City, master of music
from The University of Texas at Austin, and is currently working on her DMA at the University of Kansas at Lawrence.
Ms. Tadokoro will be performing three marimba solos composed by Keiko Abe (安倍圭子). Keiko Abe is a
world famous Japanese marimba player and composer who has contributed to expand the marimba repertoire
and to develop the instrument. Ms. Abe is the first woman inducted into the Percussive Arts Society Hall of
Fame. Mai will perform Michi (道), Memories of the Seashore (遙かな海) and variations on Japanese
Children’s Songs(わらべ歌による譚章).
KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY YOSAKOI DANCE GROUP
1:25 p.m. in Yardley Hall
Workshop: 12:25 p.m. in Polsky Theatre
Yosakoi is a unique style of dance that originated in Japan. Yosakoi started in the city of Kochi in 1954, as a
modern rendition of Awa Odori, a traditional summer dance. As of 2005, Yosakoi-style dancing has spread
throughout much of Japan. The style of dance is highly energetic, combining traditional Japanese dance
movements with modern music.
The K-State Yosakoi dancers traveled to Hokkaido, Japan, in June of 2006 to participate in the large Yosakoi
festival there. With more than 43,000 dancers and 370-plus teams, K-State Yosakoi Dance Group was awarded
with a “Performance Award”!
They will perform the following dances: Shachihoko, Soran Bushi and Gakko Soran.
EMPORIA STATE UNIVERSITY JAPANESE ASSOCIATION SAKURA CHOIR
DURING THE DAY THEY WILL PERFORM IN THE “CAP FED” ROOM IN THE REGNIER CENTER (FOOD COURT)
The Emporia State University Japanese Association Sakura Choir was originally formed to perform at the Emporia
State University International Food Festival in March of 2011. But the Great East Japanese Earthquake happened
on March 11, 2011, so they started doing fundraising performances with their choir. The choir performed at
two major concerts at ESU two years ago, at the Japan Festival at Kansas University and at several churches in
Emporia. They performed on stage at the 2013 Greater Kansas City Japan Festival.
At the Greater Kansas City Japan Festival the choir will perform Japanese folk songs in the Food Court. We hope
that everyone will enjoy the beautiful world of Japanese folk songs.
30
SCHEDULE/TIMETABLE OF EVENTS
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11
PERFORMANCES IN YARDLEY HALL / POLSKY THEATRE
YARDLEY HALL
11:30 a.m.
Three Trails Taiko / Ki-Daiko
Yardley Hall
11:55 a.m.
Min’yo Folk Songs – Molly Adkins Jeon with Yoshiko Yamanaka
Yardley Hall
12:30 p.m.
Aya Uchida with Shin Suzuki and Jo Yamanaka
Yardley Hall
1 p.m.
Kyogen (Japanese Comedy) – Dr. June Compton
Yardley Hall
1:25 p.m.
K-State Yosakoi Dance Group
Yardley Hall
1:55 p.m.
Mai Tadokoro – Marimba Yardley Hall
2:25 p.m.
Denver Taiko
Yardley Hall
3 p.m.
Yoko Hiraoka (Koto) and David Wheeler (Shakuhachi)
Yardley Hall
3:30-4 p.m.
INTERMISSION
4 p.m.
Three Trails Taiko / Ki-Daiko
Yardley Hall
4:25 p.m.
Mai Tadokoro – Marimba
Yardley Hall
4:50 p.m.
Min’yo Folk Songs – Molly Adkins Jeon with Yoshiko Yamanaka
Yardley Hall
5:20 p.m.
Aya Uchida with Shin Suzuki and Jo Yamanaka
Yardley Hall
6 p.m.
Yoko Hiraoka (Koto) and David Wheeler (Shakuhachi)
Yardley Hall
6:35 p.m. Kyōgen (Japanese Comedy) – Dr. June Compton
Yardley Hall
7 p.m.
Denver Taiko
Yardley Hall
Yardley Hall
POLSKY THEATRE
10-10:30 a.m.Opening Ceremony – Festival overview, highlights and Introduction
of Featured Artists
Polsky Theatre
10:45-11:30 a.m. Ottawa Suzuki Strings
Polsky Theatre
11:40 a.m.-12:20 p.m. Denver Taiko Workshop
Polsky Theatre
12:25-1:10 p.m.
Yosakoi Workshop – K-State Yosakoi Dance Group
Polsky Theatre
1:30-2:20 p.m.
Tea Ceremony Demonstration with Yoko Hiraoka, Omotesenke Tea School Polsky Theatre
2:30-5 p.m.
Martial Arts Demonstrations
Polsky Theatre
5:15-6:05 p.m.
Tea Ceremony Demonstration with Dale Slusser, Urasenke Tea School
Polsky Theatre
6:30-7 p.m.
Cosplay Fashion Show and Contest
Polsky Theatre
31
FOOD COURT PERFORMANCES – Capitol Federal Conference Center – Regnier Center
Noon-6 p.m.Musicians will perform throughout the day, including:
• Aya Uchida, Shin Suzuki and Jo Yamanaka
• Emporia State Japanese Assocation Sakura Choir
ANIME AND MANGA ACTIVITIES
All Day
Anime and Manga Vendors featuring: All Anime, Ange De Nuit, Anime Source KC,
Asylum Anime, Far East Emporium, Fir3h34rt Studios, Motaku, Naka-kon,
Pachinko Fever and Studio Tip Top
10 a.m.-6 p.m.Video Gaming......................................................................... Carlsen Center Room 332
10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Pachinko Fever, Pachinko ..................................................... Carlsen Center Room 332
10 a.m.-7 p.m.
Anime Videos – By Funimation Filmworks................... Carlsen Center Rooms 312, 314
10 a.m.-7 p.m.
Ange De Nuit – Ball Jointed Dalls.......................................... Carlsen Center Room 316
1 p.m.
Mario Kart Tournament / Ninetendo 64.................................. Carlsen Center Room 332
2-3:30 p.m.
Anime Cell Painting Workshop.............................................. Regnier Center Room 175
3:30 p.m.
Motaku Persona 4 Arena Tournament / Playstation 3............. Carlsen Center Room 332
6:15-6:30 p.m.
Cosplay Fashion Show Meeting...............................................................Polsky Theatre
6:30-7 p.m.
Cosplay Fashion Show and Contest.........................................................Polsky Theatre
JAPANESE CULTURAL VILLAGE – for children and adults
10 a.m.-7 p.m. Japanese Cultural Village. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carlsen Center Rooms 124, 126A, 128
Kimono and Samurai Armor Portraits, Face and Nail Painting, Japanese Bazaar,
Japanese Handicraft Items, Workshops for Making Handicraft Items
EXHIBITS
All DayWedding Kimono, Kimono, Japanese Hina Dolls,
Boy’s Day Doll and Samurai Armor .....................................Krebs Room CC 107 (CC, First Floor)
All Day
Traditional Japanese Doll Display..........................................Krebs Room CC 107 (CC, First Floor)
All Day
Japanese Sword Display.........................................................Krebs Room CC 107 (CC, First Floor)
All DayTorii Entry Gate (Depiction of the Torii Gate
at the Itsukushima Shrine).............................................Entry to Carlsen Center – First Floor Lobby
All Day
Japanese Garden Display.................................................Carlsen Center – Outside South Doorway
All Day
Tohoku Daishinsai Quilt Display............................................Krebs Room CC 107 (CC, First Floor)
All Day
Haiku Display.................................................................Carlsen Center Lobby – Outside of CC 107
All Day
Ikebana Display – Sogetsu School of Ikebana........................... Carlsen Center – First Floor Lobby
All Day
Bonsai Display – Bonsai Society of Greater Kansas City...... Carlsen Center – Second Floor Lobby
All Day
Ikebana Display – Sogetsu School of Ikebana....................Regnier Center – First Floor Lobby East
FOOD SERVICE
11 a.m.-6 p.m. Traditional Japanese Food Service. . . . . . . . . . Regnier Center – Capitol Federal Conference Center
9 a.m.-4 p.m. Café Tempo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nerman Museum
10 a.m.-6 p.m. Encore!Espresso.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carlsen Center Lobby
JAPANESE SNACK SERVICE
10 a.m.-7 p.m. Oriental Super Market – Japanese Packaged Snacks and Treats...Carlsen Center – Second Floor
BAZAAR
10 a.m.-7 p.m. Kansas City Japanese School.............................................. Carlsen Center Room 126A, 128
10 a.m.-7 p.m. Japan-America Society/Independence Sister City...........................Carlsen Center Room 232
10 a.m.-7 p.m. Japan Club......................................................................................Carlsen Center Room 234
32
CULTURAL PRESENTATIONS
Recital Hall
11 a.m.
Noon
1 p.m.
2 p.m.
3 p.m.
4 p.m.
Samurai Armor Presentation – “Samurai on the Battlefield” by Tora Lawson
“Working Effectively With Japanese Colleagues” by Dr. Sarah Fremerman Aptilon
Tohoku Daishinsai – Quilts Depicting the March 11, 2011 Events by Cindy Parry
Wearing the Red Kimono by Jan Morrill
“Introduction to Wagashi – Japanese Sweets” by Dr. Ayako Mizumura
Samurai Armor Presentation – “Samurai on the Battlefield” by Tora Lawson
Hudson Auditorium (Nerman Museum)
12:30 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
4 p.m.
The Sculpture of Isamu Noguchi – Jan Schall
Woven Gold – Traditional Costumes in Japan – Yayoi Shinoda
Kimono Demonstration – Sachie Stroder
Haiku Presentation– Jan Morrill
GEB 233
11 a.m.
Noon
1 p.m.
3 p.m.
Kizuna Project Presentation – Olathe High School Students
The Samurai Sword – Earle Brigance
Kizuna Project Presentation – Olathe South High School Students
The Samurai Sword – Earle Brigance
MIYUKI THE CANDY ARTIST
11 a.m.-2 p.m., 3-5 p.m., 6-7 p.m.
Miyuki the Candy Artist..............................................................................Carlsen Center Room 211
JAPAN-RELATED BOOTHS
All Day
See Festival Program for list of Japan-Related Booths.................................... Carlsen Center Lobby
THE GAMES OF GO and SHOGI
111 a.m.-7 p.m. The Games of Go and Shogi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carlsen Center Room 216
MARTIAL ARTS DEMONSTRATIONS – POLSKY THEATRE
2:30 p.m.
2:35 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
3:20 p.m.
3:40 p.m.
4:00 p.m.
4:20 p.m.
4:40 p.m.
Introduction to Martial Arts Program........................................................................................ Polsky Theatre
Kansas City Kendo Club (John Drakey)................................................................................... Polsky Theatre
After School Judo Academy (Don Hinchsliff)........................................................................... Polsky Theatre
Midland Ki Society (Vic Montgomery)..................................................................................... Polsky Theatre
Sumo (Andre Coleman)............................................................................................................ Polsky Theatre
Jujitsu (Derrick Darling)........................................................................................................... Polsky Theatre
Zanshin Aikido School (Bill Witthar)........................................................................................ Polsky Theatre
Tameshi Kiri / Sword Cutting (Mic Chambers)....................................................................... Polsky Theatre
MARTIAL ARTS WORKSHOPS – LIBRARY PLAZA (OUTSIDE)
Noon
Midland Ki Society (Vic Montgomery)........................................................................Library Plaza (Outside)
Noon
Kendo Workshop – Kansas City Kendo Club (John Drakey).....................................Library Plaza (Outside)
33
MUSICAL / DANCE WORKSHOPS
11:40-12:20 p.m.
12:25-1:10 p.m.
1-1:50 p.m.
Denver Taiko Workshop..................................................................................................Polsky Theatre
K-State Yosakoi Dance Workshop...................................................................................Polsky Theatre
Shakuhachi Musical Workshop with David Wheeler.............................................. Regnier Center 183
JAPANESE CULTURAL WORKSHOPS / DEMONSTRATIONS
11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. Bonsai Demonstration / Workshop – Mr. Ben Oki..........................................Carlsen Center Room 224
Noon-12:50
Calligraphy Workshop – Yayoi Shinoda..........................................................Regnier Center Room 175
1-1:50 p.m.
Japanese Conversation Workshop – Kazuyo Rumbach..................................Regnier Center Room 181
1-1:50 p.m.
Origami Workshop / “Unfolding the Basics” – Kotoko Nakata.......................Regnier Center Room 145
1-1:50 p.m.
Introduction to the Soroban: Japanese Abacus – Ikuyasu Usui......................Regnier Center Room 146
2-2:50 p.m.
Kanji Made Easy – Tracie Whiting-Kipper.......................................................Regnier Center Room 181
2-3:30 p.m.
Anime Cell Painting Workshop -- Motaku.......................................................Regnier Center Room 175
2-2:50 p.m.
Japanese Garden Design and Maintenance – Koji Morimoto.........................Regnier Center Room 145
2-4 p.m.
Kamishibai Folk Stories....................................................................................Regnier Center Room 183
3-3:50 p.m.
Japanese Conversation Workshop – Kazuyo Rumbach..................................Regnier Center Room 181
3-3:50 p.m.
Bonsai Demonstration / Workshop..................................................................Carlsen Center Room 224
3-3:50 p.m.
Origami Workshop / “Unfolding the Basics” – Kotoko Nakata.......................Regnier Center Room 145
4-4:50 p.m.
Introduction to Reading Japanese – Tracie Whiting-Kipper............................Regnier Center Room 181
4-4:50 p.m.
Calligraphy Workshop – Yayoi Shinoda..........................................................Regnier Center Room 175
4-4:50 p.m.
Japanese Garden Design and Maintenance.....................................................Regnier Center Room 145
5-5:50 p.m.
Introduction to the Soroban: Japanese Abacus – Ikuyasu Usui......................Regnier Center Room 146
VENDORS/ EXHIBITORS
10 a.m.-7 p.m.
10 a.m.-7 p.m.
10 a.m.-7 p.m.
10 a.m.-7 p.m.
10 a.m.-7 p.m.
10 a.m.-7 p.m.
10 a.m.-7 p.m.
10 a.m.-7 p.m.
10 a.m.-7 p.m.
11 a.m.-6 p.m.
11 a.m.-6 p.m.
11 a.m.-6 p.m.
11 a.m.-6 p.m.
11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Sprint – Charging Station and Mobile Marketing Vehicle..... Carlsen Center – First Floor Lobby/Plaza
Wagashi Japanese Sweets – Ayako Mizumura...............................Carlsen Center – First Floor Lobby
Jan Morrill – Author “Wearing the Red Kimono”............................Carlsen Center – First Floor Lobby
Oriental Supermarket.................................................................Carlsen Center – Second Floor Alcove
Innovative Pedal Wheelchair..........................................Carlsen Center – Second Floor at top of stairs
KIE / Kintetsu International Travel Agency .....................................Carlsen Center – First Floor Lobby
Konara Han (Japanese Martial Arts Dojo) – Tora Lawson .. Carlsen Center – First Floor Lobby South
Welcome Mat Judo Jujitsu Sambo Sumo..................................Carlsen Center – First Floor Lobby
Ange de Nuit BJDs.......................................................................................Carlsen Center Room 316
One Bite / Sama Zama ........................................................................Regnier Center – Cap Fed Room
Siki Japanese Steak House & Sushi Bar............................................Regnier Center – Cap Fed Room
Kaiyo Japanese Restaurant.................................................................Regnier Center – Cap Fed Room
Nara Restaurant...................................................................................Regnier Center – Cap Fed Room
JCCC Dining Services........................................................................Regnier Center – Cap Fed Room
TOHOKU TOMO FILM SCREENING
1, 3 and 5 p.m.
Tohoku Tomo Film Screening and Discussion by Wesley Julian.................Carlsen Center Room 212
TEACHERS K-16 WORKSHOP – REGNIER CENTER
9:30 a.m. – NoonTeachers Workshop by KU Center for East Asian Studies –
Ikebana Presentation by the Sogetsu School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lobby of the Regnier Center
Advance signup required through Center for East Asian Studies
34
FEATURED PERFORMERS
THREE TRAILS TAIKO
11:30 a.m.and 4 p.m. in Yardley Hall
Three Trails Taiko is a community group, currently consisting of approximately 12 volunteers. They have
performed for local festivals, relief events, libraries, organizations and business events in Greater Kansas City
area. Their goal is to become better taiko players in mind, body and spirit while sharing the tradition, culture and
art of Kumi Daiko and Japan with the surrounding community. Three Trails Taiko formed in the summer
of 2010 from the collaboration of some passionate taiko players from Denver Taiko and Ki-Daiko.
The group is available to perform for various events. Please visit www.threetrailstaiko.com or email
[email protected] for more information.
KI DAIKO OLATHE HIGH SCHOOL
TAIKO GROUP
11:30 a.m.and 4 p.m. in Yardley Hall
Ki Daiko is comprised of students from the Olathe
public schools. The group started in 2003 and has
performed extensively throughout the Kansas City
region. Students learn the basics of gumi daiko playing; develop traditional as well as creative repertoire;
care for the instruments and respect for one another.
The group’s founder and director is Dianne
Daugherty. Keiko Okada Brown and Karen Reed serve
as instructors and leaders. The group practices once
a week and are grateful to Olathe North High School
for hosting our practices and allowing storage space
for our drums.
35
FEATURED PERFORMERS
OTTAWA SUZUKI STRINGS INSTITUTE
10:45 a.m. in Polsky Theatre
The Ottawa Suzuki Strings Institute is an ensemble of young violinists, violists and cellists from two to 20 years of
age. These young string players receive their music education in Ottawa, Kansas, at the Carnegie Cultural Center.
Directed by violinist, Alice Joy Lewis, their music study is based on the Talent Education approach of Dr. Shinichi
Suzuki. The Ottawa Suzuki Strings have partnered with the Ottawa Community Arts Council to establish and
maintain the Carnegie Cultural Center in Ottawa.
They host two summer music events in Ottawa annually in June – a 10-day “Sound Encounters” program for
advanced string players and a five-day Suzuki Institute Mid-Southwest program. These programs draw registrants
internationally and from across the United States. Concerts are open to the public without charge.
THE KIZUNA PROJECT PRESENTATION
BY REPERTORY THEATRE STUDENTS AT OLATHE SOUTH HIGH SCHOOL
11 a.m. and 1 p.m. in GEB 233
The Kizuna Project is based on the the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami (東日本大震災) Higashi
nihon daishinsai.
It was created from tanka (a classic form of Japanese poetry, related to the Haiku with five unryhmed lines of
five, seven, five, seven and seven syllables) published in Voices of Japan, pictures that were published in the
New York Times, dramatic interpretations by the Olathe South Advanced Repertory Theatre class, and original
music by Isaiah Hastings. This performance is based on a student trip to the affected areas in the spring of 2013.
36
CULTURAL PRESENTATIONS/
DEMONSTRATIONS
SAMURAI ARMOR PRESENTATION
Samurai on the Battlefield
TORA LAWSON, KONARA HAN: KONARA BUJUTSU
11 a.m. and 4 p.m. in Carlsen Center Recital Hall
Individual duels during mass combat and head-taking! Tora Lawson sensei will bring you onto the battlefields
of feudal Japan from the vantage point of the Samurai warrior.
Lawson Sensei will also have a booth with samurai armor and other items in the Carlsen Center First Floor
South, where Festival attendees can discuss armor and martial arts with him.
Lawson Sensei has 30 years studying Japanese Bujutsu (Military Disciplines of the Samurai Class).
He currently teaches Konara Bujutsu in Wichita, Kansas. His studies include Kenjutsu (Swordsmanship),
Sojutsu (Japanese Spear) and more.
Lawson Sensei will also have a booth with samurai armor and other items in the Carlsen Center First Floor
South, where Festival attendees can discuss armor and martial arts with him.
TOHOKU DAISHINSAI: EARTHQUAKE TSUNAMI, NUCLEAR DISASTER
CINDY PARRY
1 p.m. in Carlsen Center Recital Hall
March 11, 2014 marks the third anniversary of the triple disaster in Japan: 9.0 earthquake (5th worst in recorded
history) followed by a devastating tsunami followed by a nuclear disaster (worst in recorded history) created
when four of the six nuclear reactors at Fukushima failed as a result of both the earthquake and tsunami.
Mrs. Parry has been working on this quilt series, “Tohoku Daishinsai” (Tohoku Disaster), for over 2-1/2 years.
There are 11 quilts. I would like my friends to see what I’ve been working on.
WEARING THE RED KIMONO
JAN MORRILL
2 p.m. in Carlsen Center Recital Hall
Through excerpts and photographs, Ms. Morrill will talk about what she learned about
her family, her culture and the history of internment while writing The Red Kimono,
a historical fiction about the clash of cultures during World War II.
The Red Kimono tells a story of the clash of cultures between Japanese Americans
Sachiko Kimura, her brother, Nobu, and his African-American friend, Terrence Harris.
Taking place in California and Arkansas, The Red Kimono is woven with the themes
of bigotry and betrayal, treachery and tradition, friendship and forgiveness.
Published in February 2013 by the University of Arkansas Press, The Red Kimono was selected by The
Historical Novel Society as an Editor’s Choice. For more information, visit her website at www.janmorrill.com
or her blogs www.TheRedKimono.com or www.HaikubyHaiku.wordpress.com.
Ms. Morrill will be selling and signing copies of her novel in the lobby of the Carlsen Center.
Jan Morrill is Sansei, the term used in many English-speaking countries to specify the third-generation
children born to Japanese people in their new country. (Nisei are considered the second generation. Children
of at least one Nisei parent are called Sansei.) Her novel, The Red Kimono, (University of Arkansas Press,
February 2013), as well as many of her short stories, reflect memories of growing up in a multicultural,
multi-religious, multi-political environment.
37
CULTURAL PRESENTATIONS/
DEMONSTRATIONS
WORKING EFFECTIVELY WITH JAPANESE COLLEAGUES
DR. SARAH FREMERMAN APTILON
Noon in Carlsen Center Recital Hall
“Why do Japanese take so long to make decisions?” “Why don’t Japanese give clear instructions?” “How
can I tell a Japanese person that I disagree without offending them?” Americans who work with Japanese
colleagues often have questions like these. Using real-life examples and case studies, this presentation will
give participants insight into how U.S. and Japanese business cultures differ. Some themes to be discussed
include verbal vs. nonverbal communication, direct vs. indirect communication styles, power structure,
decision-making styles, and individual vs. group orientation.
As a senior consultant for Japan Intercultural Consulting, Sarah Fremerman Aptilon has been leading crosscultural training courses for Japanese companies and their partners throughout the U.S. and Mexico
for the past eight years. She holds a bachelor’s degree in East Asian Studies from Yale University and a
doctorate in Japanese religion from Stanford University, and she lived and practiced in a Buddhist monastery
in Kyoto for seven years. She also currently serves as a translator and editor of Buddhist texts for Bukkyo
Dendo Kyokai America.
INTRODUCTION TO WAGASHI — JAPANESE SWEETS
DR. AYAKO MIZUMURA
3 p.m. in Carlsen Center Recital Hall
The traditional Japanese sweets known as wagashi have evolved over several centuries, influenced first
by Chinese culture later by western European confectionaries. While adaptation of new ingredients and
techniques from other cultures was important to development of Japanese sweets, the Japanese people have
incorporated their artistic sense, creativity and sensitivity to seasonal changes into their confectionaries and
refined them as wagashi.
Today, wagashi continues to be an integral part of Japanese culture as they begin to draw more interest and
attention from overseas. This presentation introduces various types of wagashi produced in Japan and talks
about their cultural meanings and significance. There is also explanation of what makes wagashi distinct from
Western confectionaries, focusing on ingredients, cooking methods, techniques and their designs used as
expressions of natural beauty and seasonal changes.
Ayako Mizumura, assistant director of the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Kansas, earned her
master’s degree and doctorate in sociology at K.U. She also has a bachelor’s degree in international studies
from the University of Oregon. She was born in Saitama, Japan. Her research interests are interracial marriage,
the sociology of Japan, Asian military wives, and globalization in East Asia. She has taught numerous courses
on contemporary East Asia across the disciplines at KU, focusing on Japan. Along with teaching, she manages
the new master’s program in contemporary East Asian studies that the Center for East Asian Studies at K.U.
offers starting in the 2014-2015 academic year. Beyond her academic life, she
practices the Japanese tea ceremony in Lawrence with Dale Slusser, a master of
the urasenke school of the tea ceremony.
She also is owner and proprietor of bimi bakery, a local Lawrence bakery
specializing in Japanese sweets. They offer a variety of sweets inspired by
Japanese recipes. They sell matcha (powdered green tea) cookies, sesame
seed cookies, steamed and baked azuki (sweet red beans) buns, strawberry
daifuku mochi and more!
38
TEA CEREMONY
DEMONSTRATIONS
YOKO HIRAOKA – OMOTO SENKE TEA SCHOOL
1:30 p.m. in Polsky Theatre
Attendees at the 2014 GKC Japan Festival will have the opportunity to witness, and several attendees will have
the opportunity to participate in, a traditional Japanese Tea Ceremony. The Tea Master who will perform this
beautiful and special ceremony is Ms. Hiraoka who is a native of Kyoto, Japan, and who currently resides in
Colorado. Ms. Hiraoko will perform the Tea Ceremony dressed in a formal Kimono. Attendees will all have the
opportunity to learn about the history and practice of the Tea Ceremony.
This is a special opportunity to see the traditional Japanese Tea Ceremony performed by a Japanese Tea
Master whose training started in Kyoto as a young child.
Yoko Hiraoka, a native of Japan, began her study of the Japanese Tea Ceremony at the age of 14 in the
Ura-senke style, later moving to the Omote-senke tradition in Kyoto Japan. Her core training took place in
Shõgaku-ji Temple in Hyogo prefecture. She is an Omote-senke licensed teacher with the tea name: ‘Sôrei’,
meaning ‘Clear Awareness’.
She now teaches tea from her home in Colorado where she has a traditional tea garden and teahouse named
‘Busshin-an’ (House of Buddha’s Heart). She is also a senior master performer/teacher of classical Koto, Biwa
and Shamisen.
DALE SLUSSER – URA SENKE TEA SCHOOL
5:15 p.m. in Polsky Theatre
Attendees at the 2014 GKC Japan Festival will have the opportunity to witness a traditional Japanese Tea
Ceremony. Mr. Dale Slusser, who resides in Lawrence, Kansas, will preside over this beautiful and special
ceremony. Mr. Slusser will provide an overview of the history and goals of a tea gathering.
This is a special opportunity to see the traditional Japanese Tea Ceremony performed by Japanese Tea Master.
Dale Slusser has been practicing tea for over 30 years, including 4 years of intensive study in Kyoto, Japan. He
began teaching tea in Los Angeles in 1989, and currently offers classes in Lawrence, Kansas. He is the author
of “The Transformation of Tea Practice in Sixteenth-Century Japan, in Japanese Tea Culture: Art, History, and
Practice,” Routledge Press, 2003.
THE TRADITIONAL JAPANESE TEA CEREMONY
The Tea Ceremony, also called the Way of Tea, is a traditional Japanese cultural activity involving the ceremonial
preparation and presentation of matcha, powdered green tea. In Japan, the tea is called chanoyu or chado.
The formal Japanese Tea Ceremony is a choreographic ritual of preparing and serving Japanese green tea,
matcha, together with traditional Japanese sweets to balance with the bitter taste of the tea. Preparing tea in this
ceremony means pouring all one’s attention into the predefined movements. The whole process is not about
drinking tea, but is about aesthetics, preparing a bowl of tea from one’s heart. The host of the ceremony always
considers the guests with every movement and gesture. Even the placement of the tea utensils is considered
from the guest’s point of view (angle).
By the 16th century, tea drinking had spread to many levels of society in Japan. Sen no Rikyu, perhaps the
most well-known – and still revered – historical figure in Japanese tea, is said to have promoted the concept of
ichi-go ichi-e, a philosophy that each meeting should be treasured, for it can never be reproduced. His teachings
profoundly influenced many newly developed forms in architecture and gardens, art, and the full development
of the Way of Tea. The principles he set forward – harmony (和 wa), respect (敬 kei), purity (清 sei), and
tranquility (寂 jaku) – are still central to the tea ceremony as it is performed today.
39
CULTURAL PRESENTATIONS/
DEMONSTRATIONS
THE SAMURAI SWORD
EARLE BRIGANCE
Noon and 3 p.m. in GEB 233
In Mr. Brigance’s opinion the Samurai sword is one of the most
unique and in depth art objects in the history of the world.
Through the fog of antiquity, there remain Three Sacred
Treasures of Japan, which are still held in reverence by the
people of Japan to this day. They are the Sacred Mirror, the
Coma-Shaped Beads and the Samurai sword.
The Samurai sword is often referred to as the soul of the
Samurai. The most prized possessions of all wealthy Japanese
family is their families’ Samurai sword collection, which reflects
their families’ history and has been passed down from one generation to the next generation. It takes
approximately six months to produce a traditional Samurai sword. The skill level required to make such
a sword is as high as any treasured art objects requiring years of dedicated study and training.
Collectors of Samurai swords consider them to be not so much as a weapon but rather a work of art.
Throughout history the great Samurai sword smiths, such as Masamune and Sadamune, are held in very
high esteem, and thought of as some of the world’s greatest artists. Their exceptional and extraordinary work
is valued on a level with artists such as Rembrandt, Michelangelo or Picasso.
Mr. Brigance has studied and collected Samurai swords for over 30 years. He is a member of the JSSUS,
Japanese Sword Society of the United States. He is one of the original members of Florida Token Kai, which
is an organization established in 1990, devoted to the study of Samurai swords. Mr. Brigance has attended
numerous Samurai sword shows, over almost four decades, and has exhibited Samurai swords at the annual
Florida Token Kai International Samurai Sword show, held in Tampa, Florida. He has lectured on the history
of the Samurai sword, at the St. Petersburg College in Clearwater, Florida, and groups who have an interest
in swords. Mr. Brigance will be with us again this year, giving two lectures on the Samurai sword and will
display Samurai swords from his personal collection.
THE SCULPTURE OF ISAMU NOGUCHI
JAN SCHALL
12:30 p.m. in the Hudson
The sculptures of Isamu Noguchi reflect his identity as a Japanese-American artist and citizen of the world.
Raised in both Japan and the United States, he worked with Gutzon Borglum, sculptor of Mount Rushmore
and was an assistant in Constantin Brancusi’s Paris sculpture studio. Noguchi carved, cast and oversaw the
installation of his dynamic, stainless steel relief sculpture over the entrance to the Associated Press Building
in New York’s Rockefeller Plaza. In later years, he explored the serene poetics of stone in sculptures carved
at his Takamatsu studio on the island of Shikoku.
Jan Schall is Sanders Sosland Curator of Modern Art at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. She holds a
doctorate in art history from the University of Texas, Austin and a master’s degree in art history from
Washington University, St. Louis. Schall is the author of and contributor to numerous publications and has
curated many exhibitions during her 18 years at the Museum. She is currently lead curator for the exhibition,
“World War I and the Rise of Modernism,” opening in January 2015.
40
CULTURAL PRESENTATIONS/
DEMONSTRATIONS
WOVEN GOLD – TRADITIONAL COSTUMES IN JAPAN
YAYOI SHINODA
1:30 p.m. in Hudson Auditorium
Yayoi Shinoda will talk about traditional Japanese costumes, with a focus on Noh theater costumes and their
production. She will introduce current practices of how they are made, accompanied by photographs that
she recently took in Japan.
Ms. Shinoda is a Department Assistant, East Asian Art, at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.
KIMONO DEMONSTRATION
SACHIE STRODER
2:30 p.m. in Hudson Auditorium
Learn from Mrs. Stroder all about traditional Japanese Kimonos and Yukata. Also, you will be able to see
them demonstrate what is involved in putting on a Kimono or Yukata.
HAIKU WORKSHOP
JAN MORRILL
4 p.m. in Hudson Auditorium
Ms. Morrill will discuss the various forms of haiku and will read haiku from her book, Life: Haiku by Haiku,
as well as haiku from masters such as Basho, Buson and Issa.
She will also have writing exercises where attendees will have the opportunity to share haiku that they write
in the session.
In addition to her book, Life: Haiku by Haiku, Ms. Morrill is also the author of The Red Kimono, a historical
novel published in February 2013 by the University of Arkansas Press. She has also written a book of essays
titled, Doll in the Red Kimono. For more information, visit her website at www.janmorrill.com or her blogs,
www.TheRedKimono.com or www.HaikubyHaiku.wordpress.com.
Ms. Morrill will be selling and signing copies of her books in the lobby of the Carlsen Center.
THE KIZUNA PROJECT PRESENTATION
BY REPERTORY THEATRE STUDENTS AT OLATHE SOUTH HIGH SCHOOL
11 a.m. and 1 p.m. in the GEB 233
The Kizuna Project Presentation is based on the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami (東日本大震
災) Higashi nihon Daishinsai.
It was created from tanka (a classic form of Japanese poetry related to the haiku with five unrhymed lines
of five, seven, five, seven, and seven syllables) published in Voices of Japan, pictures that were published
in the New York Times, dramatic interpretations by the Olathe South Advanced Repertory Theatre class, and
original music by Isaiah Hastings. This performance is based on a student trip to the affected areas in
spring 2013.
41
GENERAL WORKSHOPS
Workshop admittance is on a first-come, first-served basis as space is limited. If you desire to attend a workshop
or demonstration, please proceed to the workshop or demonstration room prior to the scheduled start time.
BONSAI WORKSHOP
BEN OKI
11:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.
Carlsen Center Room 224
Up to 30 participants per session,
ages 10 and older
Mr. Ben Oki is the Curator of the Bonsai
Collection at the Huntington Library and
Botanical Gardens in San Marino, California.
Mr. Oki is one of the most respected
Japanese-American bonsai masters in the
world. He travels widely, teaching bonsai
through demonstrations, workshops and
lectures. He is the recipient of many national
and international awards.
Mr. Oki also designs and creates Japanese
gardens throughout the world. He has created
several such gardens in the Kansas City area.
Mr. Oki will explain the various types of
bonsai styles and will have examples of many
of the types in the workshop. He will
demonstrate the process of creating a bonsai
from raw plant material.
JAPANESE CONVERSATION WORKSHOP
KAZUYO RUMBACH
1 and 3 p.m. in Regnier Center Room 181
Up to 30 participants per session, ages 13 and older
Attend a Japanese language workshop to learn about the Japanese language, and with the aid of the instructor,
learn some basics of the language. This workshop is for those who are interested in Japanese language – no
previous knowledge of the language is required. You will learn basic words, everyday greetings and writing
systems. Mrs. Rumbach is a Japanese Language teacher at Johnson County Community College.
ANIME CEL PAINTING WORKSHOP
2-3:30 p.m. in Regnier Center Room 175
Come to this fun workshop to learn how Anime was made before computer technology took over. In this
hands-on workshop, you can paint your own film “cel” while learning about the history of Anime.
42
GENERAL WORKSHOPS
KANJI MADE EASY
TRACIE WHITING-KIPPER
2 p.m. in Regnier Center Room 181
Up to 30 participants per session (age 13 and over)
Is it possible to learn to read Kanji in less than a year? Try out the Heisig method of Kanji acquisition in
this fast-paced and fun session while exploring the written word from authentic sources. True beginners
and seasoned students will all find ways to expand their reading levels from average to extraordinary.
All ages 13 and older are welcome, but all should have an interest in learning to read Japanese.
INTRODUCTION TO READING JAPANESE
TRACIE WHITING-KIPPER
4 p.m. in Regnier Center Room 181
Up to 30 participants per session (age 13 and over)
Whether you are a student or just curious in this workshop you can venture into the world of written Japanese.
Explore the different writing systems, how they came to be, and fast methods to learning them.
All ages 13 and older are welcome, but all should have an interest in learning to read Japanese.
Tracie Whiting-Kipper is the Japanese language and culture lecturer at the Kansas City Art Institute and the
Japanese language adjunct instructor at the University of Central Missouri. Prior to entering academia, she was the
JET program coordinator for the Consulate General of Japan at Kansas City for five years and served several years
as the English manager of the Nagano Olympic Committee in Nagano, Japan, for the 1998 Olympic Winter Games.
She is passionate about introducing students to Japanese culture and empowering them to read Kana and Kanji.
INTRODUCTION TO SOROBAN: JAPANESE ABACUS TUTORIAL
IKUYASU USUI
1 and 5 p.m. in Regnier Center Room 146
In this workshop you will obtain a brief introduction of the soroban (Japanese abacus) and instructions on how
to use it to do summation and subtraction. Younger attendees are welcome so that they can learn how to
perform math without the “new” devices! Mr. Usui is developing a website that teaches one how to use soroban.
CALLIGRAPHY WORKSHOP
YAYOI SHINODA
Noon and 4 p.m. in Regnier Center Room 175
Up to 25 participants per session, ages 13 and older
Try your hand at writing Japanese characters with a brush
and ink with Japanese native experts. Ms. Shinoda is a
department assistant, East Asian Art, at The Nelson-Atkins
Museum of Art.
43
GENERAL WORKSHOPS
JAPANESE GARDEN DESIGN AND MAINTENANCE
KOJI MORIMOTO
2 and 4 p.m. in Regnier Center Room 145
Up to 25 participants per session, ages 10 and up
Come and hear Japanese garden master Koji Morimoto discuss the principles of Japanese garden design
and maintenance.
Koji Morimoto has designed, built and maintained traditional Japanese gardens in New York, Kansas and
Missouri for more than 20 years. He will show how to balance all aspects in the garden and explain the
techniques and principles of making an outdoor living space.
Do you have any questions about Japanese gardens, creating them or maintaining them? Get them
answered at this great workshop! Your future dream Japanese garden is “coming to your way.”
Mr. Morimoto is the owner of Japanese Landscaping Company in Kansas City.
THE GAMES OF GO AND SHOGI WORKSHOP
STEVE WOODSMALL AND THE FOUR DRAGONS GO CLUB
11 a.m. to 7 p.m. in Carlsen Center Room 216
Come to this workshop to play actual games, see demonstrations and competition games, and hear a brief
discussion of the history and rules of “go” and “shogi.”
Steve Woodsmall is an international attorney who lived and worked in Japan for 12 years. He learned to play
“go” and “shogi” during that time. The Four Dragons Go Club is a Kansas City based group of go players
who have been spreading the game of “go” together since 2010.
44
GENERAL WORKSHOPS
KAMISHIBAI WORKSHOP
K-STATE STUDENTS
2-4 p.m. in Regnier Center Room 183
Kamishibai (紙芝居), literally “paper drama”, is a form of storytelling that originated in Japanese Buddhist
temples in the 12th century, where monks used emakimono (picture scrolls) to convey stories with moral
lessons to a mostly illiterate audience. Kamishibai endured as a storytelling method for centuries, but is
perhaps best known for its revival in the 1920s through the 1950s. The gaito kamishibaiya, or kamishibai
storyteller, rode from village to village on a bicycle equipped with a small stage. On arrival, the storyteller
used two wooden clappers, called hyoshigi, to announce his arrival. Children who bought candy from the
storyteller got the best seats in front of the stage. Once an audience assembled, the storyteller told several
stories using a set of illustrated boards, inserted into the stage and withdrawn one by one as the story was
told. The stories were often serials and new episodes were told on each visit to the village.
Kamishibai is considered a precursor to modern manga and anime. They often featured art styles, including
a wide-eyed look, similar to what would later characterize manga and anime. Some of the most famous
kamishibai characters included Ogon Bat (debuted in1930) and Prince of Gamma (debuted in early 1930’s),
considered as Japanese superheroes, appearing earlier than the later American comic book superheroes
Superman (debuted in 1938) and Batman (debuted in 1939).
Students from K-State University will lead this interesting and fun workshop.
ORIGAMI WORKSHOP:
“UNFOLDING THE BASICS”
KOTOKO NAKATA
1 and 3 p.m.
Regnier Center Room 145
Up to 20 participants per session
In this workshop you will learn how to
fold various origami pieces. Suggested
for children ages 10 and older as well
as teachers and others interested in
origami.
Ms. Nakata came to Kansas three years
ago and has been teaching Japanese
at Kansas University as a teaching
assistant. She is currently working on
her doctorate in linguistics at KU.
45
MARTIAL ARTS DEMONSTRATIONS
AND WORKSHOPS
MARTIAL ARTS DEMONSTRATIONS
2:30-5 p.m. in Polsky Theatre
INTRODUCTION TO MARTIAL ARTS PROGRAM (JOHN DRAKEY)
2:30 p.m. in Polsky Theatre
SUMO (ANDRE COLEMAN)
3:40 p.m. in Polsky Theatre
Sumo is another of the Japanese Martial Arts that practiced as a competitive sport and has been around for
hundreds of years. It is full contact and the Dohyo is the name of the circular ring in which two wrestlers called
Rikishi face each other. The Rikishi’s life is very regimented with rules and culture as dictated by the Sumo
Association. Most wrestlers live in group conditions called stables.
The objective is to force the opponent out of the Dohyo or to make that opponent touch the floor of the Dohyo
with some part of their body other than the soles of their feet. The Dohyo is actually a manmade platform
of bales of clay and sand mixed and covering bales of rice straw and has a ring in the middle of it roughly
15 feet in diameter.
While Sumo is famous for having players that have quite a large stature, the competition is not all about
strength. A lot of training is required for the finer points of leveraging an opponent out of the ring without
resulting to only using brute strength.
The tournaments are called Basho and last for 15 days. There are six of these Grand Tournaments each year.
The wrestler with the most wins over the Basho wins the tournament. Each bout usually lasts only a few
seconds but some may last for several minutes. Each bout starts out with ritualistic greetings that include the
throwing of salt into the ring and a display of balance and power by alternating the stomping of feet by shifting
their body significantly from side to side.
At the amateur level Sumo is practiced all across Japan in colleges, high schools etc. There are also amateur
tournaments very similar to the professional Sumo events but without as much ritualism.
JUJITSU (DERRICK DARLING)
4 p.m. in Polsky Theatre
Jujitsu is a full combat martial art that incorporates kicks, punches, take downs, locks and other techniques for
self defense. The name Jujitsu breaks down into two characters, the first JU meaning “Soft, Gentle or Flexible”
and the second JUTSU meaning “Technique or Art.” It goes back hundreds of years and was developed by
the Samurai to combat armed and unarmed opponents. This was especially true of trying to face an opponent
unarmed when the other side is armored and striking with the hands or feet is not very effective. In Jujitsu the
objective is to use the opponents energy against them. This is taken to a narrower extreme in the evolution of
Jujitsu into Judo which is a sport that emphasizes this use of the opponents energy to gain control and pin
that opponent. Where Jujitsu differs is that it maintains all the techniques to cover battlefield situations and
maintains all aspects of using the body including locks, pins and chokes along with the punches, kicks and
throwing.
There are many different styles called ryu, each ryu having its own specialties. Some of the older ryu are in a
class called Koryu. Sport forms and forms practice by law enforcement in Japan also exist. Jujitsu has also
gone on to influence Aikido, Sambo and Brazilian Jiujitsu.
46
MARTIAL ARTS DEMONSTRATIONS
AND WORKSHOPS
AIKIDO
MIDLAND KI SOCIETY (VIC MONTGOMERY)
3:20 p.m. in Polsky Theatre
ZANSHIN AIKIDO SCHOOL (BILL WITTHAR)
4:20 p.m. in Polsky Theatre
Using the energy of the attacking person and redirecting it to control the actions of the attacker without the
intent of injuring the attacker is at the heart of applying the techniques of Aikido Ki (internal energy) training.
This technique helps practitioners to control their own body in such a way as to get the attacker to overuse
their strengths and be controlled themselves.
Like Karate, techniques are practiced to handle attacks of both an armed or unarmed nature. The techniques
in Aikido contain mostly blocks, locks and takedowns by the proper use of grappling techniques that are
applied by trying to harmoniously get in tune with the attacker’s efforts.
JUDO
AFTER SCHOOL JUDO ACADEMY (DON HINCHSLIFF)
3 p.m. in Polsky Theatre
The “Gentle Way,” which is what the characters for Judo stand for was founded by Mr. Jigoro Kano from
his roots in Jujitsu. Jujitsu is a fully developed martial art with kicks, strike, etc. Judo was founded by
harnessing the throws, locks, takedowns and other holds from Jujitsu. While there are strikes and kicks
in Judo they are reserved for Kata practice.
Judo strives to control an opponent using the principles of “Maximum Efficiency and Minimum Effort” and
“Softness Controls Hardness.” Freestyle sparring practice called Randori is emphasized over Kata for attaining
proficiency in the Waza (techniques) of Judo. Judo has two combat phases. The first is the Standing Phase
and then the Ground Phase. The popularity of Judo has spread to such an extent that since 1968 it has been
an Olympic Sport for men. Since 1992 Judo became an Olympic Sport for women. In competition, men and
women compete separately and each group is divided into weight classes.
TAMESHIGIRI/SWORD CUTTING SCHOOL (MIC CHAMBERS)
4:40 p.m. in Polsky Theatre
Tameshigiri is the Japanese art of target test cutting. The kanji literally mean “test cut.” This practice was
popularized in the Edo period (17th century) for testing the quality of Japanese swords and continues through
the present day.
During the Edo period, only the most skilled swordsmen were chosen to test swords, so that the swordsman’s
skill was not a variable in how well the sword cut. The materials used to test swords varied greatly. Some
substances were wara (rice straw), goza (the top layer of tatami mats), bamboo and thin steel sheets.
In addition, there were a wide variety of cuts used on cadavers and occasionally convicted criminals, from
tabi-gata (ankle cut) to O-kesa (diagonal cut from shoulder to opposite hip).
In modern times, the practice of tameshigiri has come to focus on testing the swordsman’s abilities, rather
than the sword’s. Thus, swordsmen sometimes use the terms Shito (sword testing) and Shizan (test cutting, an
alternate pronunciation of the characters for tameshigiri) to distinguish between the historical practice of testing
swords and the contemporary practice of testing one’s cutting ability. The target most often used at present is
the goza or tatami “omote” rush mat. To be able to cut consecutive times on one target, or to cut multiple
targets while moving, requires that one be a very skilled swordsman.
47
MARTIAL ARTS DEMONSTRATIONS
AND WORKSHOPS
KENDO
KANSAS CITY KENDO CLUB (JOHN DRAKEY)
2:35 p.m. in Polsky Theatre
The art of Kendo derives from sword skills developed by the samurai of the 12th century called Kenjutsu. During
the 14th to 16th centuries, accomplished swordsmen opened schools to teach the art of the sword. The more
peaceful Edo period (1600-1868) saw the moral and spiritual elements of the practice come to the forefront, and
the art of Kenjutsu continued.
Kendo practitioners train using a bamboo sword called a shinai. They wear a helmet and body armor called
bogu that allows for full-contact sparring with low risk of injury and gives the practitioner the ability to
dynamically adjust to real speed attacks to a limited number of targets in a competitive environment. The
Kendoka uses spirit, sword and body in unison to successfully complete an attack against the opponent.
MARTIAL ARTS WORKSHOPS
All Martial Arts Workshops are held outside at the Library Plaza
Martial Arts workshop admittance is on a first-come, first-served basis. There is a limit on the number of
participating attendees for each workshop. Additional observers will be admitted into workshops on a space
available basis. If you desire to attend a workshop, please proceed to the workshop area prior to the
scheduled start time. Following is a list of Martial Arts workshops, times and rooms.
AIKIDO WORKSHOP
MIDLAND KI SOCIETY (VIC MONTGOMERY)
Noon in Library Plaza (outside)
This workshop will introduce you to the Martial Art of Aikido.
KENDO WORKSHOP
KANSAS CITY KENDO CLUB (JOHN DRAKEY)
Noon in Library Plaza (outside)
This workshop will introduce you to the Martial Art of Kendo which uses a bamboo sword called a shinai.
48
MUSICAL WORKSHOPS
Musical workshop admittance is on a first-come, first-served basis, so please proceed to the assigned room
prior to the scheduled start time. Following is a list of musical workshops, times and rooms.
YOSAKOI DANCE WORKSHOP
THE K-STATE YOSAKOI DANCE GROUP
12:25 p.m. in Polsky Theatre
Aerobic dance moves based on Japanese folk dances with jazzed-up Japanese music. It is fun, it is
energizing and it burns calories. Join members of the K-State Yosakoi group and become a fan of this
wonderful and popular dance form. (Limit: 20, but spectators are welcome)
TAIKO DRUM WORKSHOP
DENVER TAIKO
11:40 a.m. in Polsky Theatre
Learn all about Taiko drumming from the experts, members of Denver Taiko. This is a hands-on workshop
for those wanting to learn the basics of Taiko drumming. (Limit: 15, but spectators are welcome)
SHAKUHACHI WORKSHOP
DAVID WHEELER
1 p.m. in Regnier Center Room 183
Learn how to play the Japanese bamboo flute from master David Wheeler.
49
TEACHERS’ K-16 WORKSHOP
CENTER FOR EAST ASIAN STUDIES TEACHERS WORKSHOP
IKEBANA – “JAPAN’S WAY WITH FLOWERS”
Members of the Sogetsu School of Ikebana
9:30 a.m. to Noon – Regnier Center Lobby
A special educational workshop will be held at the 2014 GKC Japan Festival for area K-16 teachers to learn more
about Japan and its culture. The staff of the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Kansas presents this
workshop.
Teachers attending the workshop are provided with ideas and material to use in their classrooms and with their
students. Attendance is limited to K-16 teachers who have pre-registered for the workshop.
Ikebana (ee-kay-bah-na) is a Japanese word, which means roughly “the way of flowers.” This distinctively
Japanese art form was derived from the Chinese tradition of floral offerings to Buddha. Originally practiced by
Buddhist priests, it soon became popular in the Japanese courts as well. From this aristocratic beginning, the art
form passed on to the masses and is now practiced worldwide.
Members of the Kansas City Sogetsu School of Ikebana will present this workshop on Ikebana. Mrs. Sue Looney
and Mrs. Sachiko Colom will present an interesting session on this beautiful Japanese art form.
In 1927, when everybody believed practicing ikebana meant following established forms, Sofu Teshigahara
recognized ikebana as a creative art and founded the Sogetsu School. Anyone can enjoy Sogetsu Ikebana
anytime, anywhere, using any material. You can place Sogetsu Ikebana at your door, in your living room or on
your kitchen table. Sogetsu Ikebana enhances any hotel lobby or banquet room, shop windows and huge public
spaces. It will suit any kind of space, Japanese or Western and enrich its atmosphere.
“Anytime, anywhere, by anyone,” Sogetsu Ikebana can be created. It suits alcoves and dining tables at home as
well as hotel lobbies, banquet rooms, shop windows, large public spaces and anywhere to be enhanced by
adding color to the modern world.
By attending this unique and special workshop you can educate your students on this beautiful Japanese art form.
This workshop is limited to area K-16 teachers who have preregistered for the
workshop through the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Kansas.
50
DISPLAYS
JAPANESE LANDSCAPE EXHIBIT BY KOJI MORIMOTO
All day outside on the south side of the Carlsen Center
Japanese gardening makes artistic use of stones, sand, artificial hills, ponds and flowing water, in addition
to plant material to create a peaceful expression of nature on a small scale. Mr. Morimoto is the owner of
Japanese Landscaping of Kansas City and does an extensive amount of Japanese garden work in the Greater
Kansas City area including design, installation, maintenance and trimming/pruning of plant material in the
traditional Japanese garden style.
IKEBANA DISPLAY BY THE SOGETSU SCHOOL
All day in the lobby of the Carlsen Center
Ikebana is the art of Japanese flower arrangement. Take time to enjoy the Ikebana display in the lobby of the
Carlsen Center provided by members of the Sogetsu School.
IKEBANA EXHIBIT BY THE SOGETSU SCHOOL OF IKEBANA
Regnier Center East Lobby
Learn about the Japanese art of flower arranging (Ikebana) from masters Mrs. Colom and Mrs. Looney of
the Sogetsu School and their students.
This exhibit of the beautiful art of Ikebana will give everyone an opportunity to see both traditional and
contemporary styles of this distinctively Japanese art form. Members and students of the Sogetsu School
will be on hand at the exhibit to answer questions and explain the techniques used so that attendees can
better appreciate this increasingly popular style of flower arranging.
BONSAI DISPLAY BY THE BONSAI SOCIETY OF GREATER KANSAS CITY
All day in the second floor lobby of the Carlsen Center
The Bonsai Society of Greater Kansas City has been in existence since 1968 and was formed to promote the
interest and appreciation of the art of bonsai through education, training, information and exhibitions. We are
privileged to have the Society provide an exhibition of a wide variety of bonsai styles and plant material for
our Festival again this year. Society members will be at the exhibit to answer questions and demonstrate how
plants are pruned, shaped, trained and wired.
TORII GATE ENTRYWAY TO THE FESTIVAL
All day in the first floor lobby of the Carlsen Center
The large Torii Gate that leads all visitors into the GKC Japan Festival is a depiction/large model of one of
the most famous Torii Gates in all of Japan. The Torii gate at the Festival is approximately 14 feet tall and the
top crossbar is about 16 feet long.
This famous Torii gate is found in the bay at the entrance to the Itsukushima Shrine on Miyajima Island
in Hiroshima Prefecture. The shrine dates back to the 6th century. The huge Torii gate has existed since
1168 although the current gate dates back to 1875. The gate is about 16 meters (53 feet) high and was
built in a four-legged (yotsu-ashi) style to provide stability. The gate appears to float in the water.
A “Torii” gate is a traditional Japanese gate commonly found at the entry to a “Shinto” shrine. It has two
upright supports and two crossbars at the top and is usually painted vermilion (a orange/red color).
Some Torii have tablets with writing mounted between the crossbars.
To fit with this years’ “Sakura” theme, there are two flowering cherry trees, one on each side of the Torii.
51
DISPLAYS/JAPAN-RELATED BOOTHS
HAIKU DISPLAY
All day in the first floor lobby of the Carlsen Center
View an informative display of the life and works of great Japanese haiku masters: Matsuo Basho, Kobayashi
Issa, and Yosa Buson. Also learn about haiku around the world, contemporary Japanese literature, poetry
and book stores in Japan. Also on display: our very own Greater Kansas City Japan Festival 2014 Haiku
Contest winners!
The tradition of haiku ties to Buddhist temples of 16th century Japan and the brevity of a three-line poem.
Haiku poems are generally written in 3 lines, of 5-7-5 syllables. Learn more about haiku from this exhibit.
THE FOLLOWING JAPAN-RELATED BOOTHS ARE LOCATED
ON THE FIRST FLOOR OF THE CARLSEN CENTER:
Heart of America Japan-America Society
Center for East Asian Studies, University of Kansas and KU Study Abroad
Heartland Japan Exchange and Teaching Program Alumni Association (JETAA)
Johnson County Community College International Education
Colleges with Japanese Language Programs in Kansas:
Kansas State University (Kumiko Nakamura)
Washburn University (Yuka Nito-Billen)
Wichita State University (Yumi Foster)
JCCC (Kazuyo Rumbach)
ANIME AND MANGA VENDORS
All Anime
8508 East 24th St.
Tulsa, OK 74129
918-519-1885
http://www.theanimeshop.com
Anime Source KC
10132 W 119th St .
Overland Park, KS 66213
888-945-0809
www.animesourcekc
52
Ange De Nuit
Fir3h34rt Studios
Asylum Anime
913 N. Broadway
Pittsburg, KS
620-231-0922
http://www.asylum-anime.com
Motaku
http://motaku.org
Far East Emporium
1941 West Highway 50
Fairview Heights, IL 62208
618-628-8870
See owner’s store video on YouTube
Naka-kon
Neko Knickknacks
Independence, MO
Facebook Page
http://www.nekoknickknacks.etsy.com
Pichinko Fever
Studio Tip Top
FUN AND USEFUL JAPANESE WORDS
AND PHRASES
JAPANESE/ENGLISHPRONUNCIATION
HIRAGANA
Ohayo gozaimasu
Good morning
おはようございます
Oh-hah-yoh goh-zye- mahss
KonnichiwaKohn-nee-chee-wahこんにちは
Good afternoon
KonbanwaKohn-bahn-wah こんばんは
Good evening
Watashi wa … desu
I am (My name is…)
Wah-tah-shee-wah … dess
わたしは、~です
HajimemashiteHah-jee-meh-mahss-teh
はじめまして
How do you do?
ArigatoAh-ree-gah-tohありがとう
Thank you
SayonaraSah-yoh-nah-rahさようなら
Good bye
Ja mata
See you again
Jah mah-tah
じゃ(では)また
ItadakimasuEe-tah-dah-kee-mahss
いただきます
Said before eating/drinking
GochisosamadeshitaGo-chee-soo-sah-mah-deh-shee-tah
ごちそうさまでした
Said after eating/drinking
DoitashimashiteDoh-ee-tah-shee-mahsh-teh
どういたしまして
You are welcome
SumimasenSoo-mee-mah-sen すみません
I am sorry/Excuse me
HaiHi
Yes
はい
EeEe-eh
No
いいえ
DozoDoh-zoh
Please
どうぞ
Ikura desu ka?
How much (money) is it?
いくらですか
Ee-koo-rah dess kah
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MAP OF JAPAN
The country of Japan is comprised of four major islands, Hokkaido in the north, the main island of
Honshu, Shikoku, the small island west and south of Honshu, and the southern island of Kyushu.
In addition, the southern islands of Okinawa are also a part of the country of Japan. Japan has 47 prefectures
(states to us in America).
The Island of Honshu contains the largest population of any of the four “islands” of Japan with more than
100 million people. Honshu* is divided into several different regions that are shown on the map as different
colored areas. The regions are: Chugoku (southern), Kansai (southern, above Chugoku), Chubu (central),
Kanto (eastern) and Tohoku (northern).
Hokkaido
*The Island of Honshu
is divided into “Regions”
as shown.
Honshu
Tohoku
Kanto
Chugoku
Chubu
Kansai
Shikoku
Kyushu
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Okinawa
JAPAN/PARTICIPATING ORGANIZATIONS
AREA AND POPULATION OF JAPAN
CALIFORNIA
153,330 square miles
Population: 33,900,000
JAPAN
145,883 square miles
Population: 127,500,000
And approximately 90 percent of Japan
is mountainous and not inhabitable!
PARTICIPATING ORGANIZATIONS LISTED IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER
After School Judo Academy (Don Hinchsliff)
Bonsai Society of Greater Kansas City
Consulate General of Japan at Chicago
Emporia State University Sakura Choir
Four Dragons Go Club
Heart of America Japan-America Society
Independence/Higashimurayama Sister City Committee
Japan Club of Kansas City
Japan Culture Club
Japanese Landscaping, Inc. – Koji Morimoto
Ottawa Suzuki Strings
JET Alumni Association
Shawnee Mission School District
Johnson County Community College
Sogetsu School of Ikebana
Kansas City Igo and Shogi Club
Tameshi Kiri/Sword Cutting (Mic Chambers)
Kansas City Japanese School
Three Trails Taiko
Kansas City Kendo Club (John Drakey)
University of Kansas Center for East Asian Studies
Kansas City / Kurashiki Sister City Committee
Washburn University (Yuka Nito-Billen)
Kansas State University (Kumiko Nakamura)
Welcome Mat Judo Jujitsu Sambo Sumo (Steve Scott)
Ki Daiko (Olathe)
Wichita
State University (Yumi Foster)
K-State Yosakoi Dance Group
Zanshin
Aikido School (Bill Witthar)
Midland Ki Society (Vic Montgomery)
And many talented and dedicated groups and individuals
Olathe School District
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GKC JAPAN FESTIVAL
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Executive Director: Francis Lemery
JCCC Representative: Tom Patterson
Fundraising Chairperson: Jim Kanki
Treasurer: Joyce Williams
Committee Members: Hiroko Bray, Lindsay Dobbins, Matthew Dobbins, John Drakey, Dustin Dye,
Christina Hoffman, Janette Jasperson, Carolyn Kadel, Denny Kurogi, Koji Morimoto, Natsuko Nishimune,
Beth Olson, Carole Owsley, Kyoko Peters, Sheilah Philip, Janet Redding, Patrick Redding,
Hideko Schackmann, Alan Swarts, Patty Woods, Tami Woodsmall,Yoshiko Yamanaka and Lindsay Rice Yoshida.
Honorary/Advisory Member: Shunichi Fujishima, Japan
Festival Art Designer: Tadashi Isozaki
Festival Web Master: Christina Hoffman
Mr. Isozaki created the beautiful Festival poster design, the front cover
of the Festival program and our postcard fliers. He also designed our
Festival T-shirt. Isozaki is a graphic designer in Taiwan.
Ms. Hoffman revised and created the new 2014 GKC
Japan Festival Website.
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FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTORS
We would like to recognize the following donors (as of Sept 17, 2014)
The Greater Kansas City Japan Festival Committee wants to take this opportunity to thank all of our very generous contributors
that make our Festival a reality. Without their financial support it would not be possible to hold this great event for the Greater
Kansas City area. Please look for the complete list of our contributors in the Carlsen Center and the Regnier Center.
FESTIVAL
CO-SPONSORS
OYAKATA SUMO
GRAND MASTER
YOKOZUNA
SUMO
GRAND
CHAMPION
Ash Grove Charitable Foundation
Consulate General of Japan at Chicago
John and Misa Haas
Haystak Digital Marketing
Francis and Charlene Lemery
Marshall Miller and Company, P.C.
Richard J. Stern Foundation for the Arts
Jo and Yoshiko Yamanaka
OZEKI
SUMO
CHAMPION
Agrex, Inc.
Gunze Plastics and
Engineering Corp. of America
IHI Inc.
Kawasaki Motors Mfg. Corp USA
Dr. Douglas and Mizuki McGregor
SEKIWAKE
SUMO
CHAMPION
Jane Drury and Russ Amos
Jim Steele
KOMUSUBI SUMO
CHAMPION
Anonymous
Warren and Kazuyo Kozue Beyer
Ruth Chiga
Mickey Coalwell and Patty Woods
Dustin and Kaori Dye
Andrew and Anne Freeman
Edmond and Michiko Gross
Independence Sister City Committee
Japan Club of Kansas City
Wynne and Marcea Jennings
Wilbur and Susan Jones
Jim and Lydia Kanki
Kansas City Japanese School
Allen and Terry Kipper
Drs. David Kreiner and Atsuki Mori
Denny Kurogi
David and Hiromi Lessmann
Lt. Col. Robert Roger & Chie Lippold
Eric and Mindy Looney
John Matthews
Gary and Ann Modrcin
Takamasa and Chiharu Morita
Hiroko Nichols
Bob and Kazuyo Rumbach
Akikuzu Shibasaki
South KC Shotokan, LLC (Eric Banks)
Howard and Lou Snyder
Sachie Stroder
Chris and Mayumi Wagner
Donald and Emiko West
Joyce Williams
Masami and Eunice Willis
Steve and Tami Woodsmall
PATRON
Yoshi & Patricia Kipper
Deepak & Rohini Phadke
Robert & Hiroko Bray
Dr. Jack & Chris Haden
Patricia Knott
Charles & Brenda Reinecke
Lolly Buxton
Rolf & Atsuko Hammann
Noriko Lowell
Leroy & June Seat
Robert & Phyllis Carlson
Kaoru Harvey
Gary & Jo Anne Lucas
Hideko Schackmann
Andrew & Sachiko Colom
Robert Hendricks
Dr. Murle Mordy
Michael & Leslie Sciolaro
Miyo Cullen
Frank & Yoshiko Hoback
Hiroshi & Natsuko Nishimune
Bruce & Mary Jane Short
Doug & Saralu Evans
Darlene Jones
Kinji & Peggy Oba
Walt Thompson
Yoji & Katsuko Evans
Nobuko Kawase
Ben Oki
Gary Uchiyama
Billie & Valerie Fabregat
Sadako Kimes
Carole Owsley
Yael Abouhalkah & Beci Bosley Ryan Grass
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Heart of America
Japan-America Society
Become a Member of the Heart of America
Japan-America Society!
The Heart of America Japan-America Society (JAS) was founded in May 1962. Our mission is to further
understanding between the peoples of Japan and the Greater Kansas City area by promoting social, cultural
and educational exchanges. We are a nonprofit, nonpolitical 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization.
Events and Activities
Members get together many times, in many different ways. We begin the year with a special dinner to
celebrate the Japanese New Year (Shinnenkai). Throughout the year our members enjoy presentations and
events such as movies, speakers and restaurant visits. We maintain a close relationship with Kansas City’s
sister city Kurashiki, and are involved with many of their programs, including homestay visits.
JAS is a major supporter of and contributor to the Ethnic Enrichment Festival, Greater Kansas City Japan
Festival, and Mid-America Japanese Language Contest. Our members do more than just attend these events;
they volunteer and participate in them as well.
Membership Benefits
• Volunteer and meet other members with
• Receive email alerts, including
• Interact with Japanese speakers
• Discounts to local businesses and some events
• Learn about Japan and share your own experiences
• Access to helpful contacts and resources
• Interesting cultural activities and programs
• Students eligible to apply for
similar interests
• Scholarships and Student Ambassadors
the Nichibei News, our newsletter
Student Ambassador scholarship
The Japan-America Society (JAS) sponsors a scholarship program with JCCC to assist local students studying
Japanese or Japanese students studying here in the U.S. High-school students in the Student Ambassador
program spend three weeks in a homestay, visiting our sister city, Kurashiki, Japan. This program is partially
subsidized by JAS.
To join JAS, fill
out the application
on the reverse
side of this page
and send it to us!
2014 Kurashiki Youth Friendship
delegation at Kauffman Stadium.
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Heart of America Japan-America Society Membership Form
Interested in joining? It’s a lot of fun, a great learning experience, and you’ll make lifelong friends who have
interests in Japan. Joining is easy and inexpensive.
Name _______________________________________________________________________
Address _____________________________________________________________________
(house/apt. number, street, city, state, ZIP code)
Home Phone__________________________________________________________________
Cell ________________________________________________________________________
Email _______________________________________________________________________
Other family members (and email addresses)____________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
Type of Membership:
Annual dues – Join today and receive 3 months additional membership!
❑ Individual ($20)
❑ Family ($35)
❑ Student ($10)
❑ Corporate Member ($200)
I’d be interested in volunteering for the following:
❑ Programs and Events
❑ Hospitality Committee
❑ Board Membership
❑ Communication & Membership Support
❑ Study Japanese Language & Culture
Make check payable / mail to:
Heart of America Japan-America Society
P.O. Box 22487 Kansas City, MO 64113-2487
Questions?
Contact us at [email protected]
Visit us at kcjas.org and on Facebook!
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❑ Japanese Garden Cleanup
❑ Student Exchange Hosting (Summer)
❑ Student Exchange Activities (Summer)
❑ Ethnic Enrichment Festival (August)
❑ Japan Festival (October)
2015 Greater Kansas City
Saturday Oct. 3, 2015
FESTIVAL
Johnson County Community College
Visit www.kcjapanfestival.org