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Print T ime: 7-29-2013 10:07:00 PM
...
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Lighten
the load
5 questions
for the volunteers
six essential back-toschool apps to help
students in and out
of the classroom
life, e1
quarterbacks not only concern
as practice begins this week, d1
To Give the News Impartially, Without Fear or Favor
Tuesday, July 30, 2013
Vol. 144, No. 228 • • •
One day, 16 stops
Stephen Hargis’ prep football tour covers 293 miles
By Stephen Hargis
Staff Writer
On the first day that area high school
football teams began practicing in full pads,
even Mother Nature was in midseason
form.
The first day in pads is typically accompanied by stifling heat and humidity, but
for the first time in the 14 years that I have
crammed as many area teams’ practices
into one day as possible, it actually felt like
football weather.
As I exited my car just before 7 a.m. for
the first of 16 stops, the temperature gauge
on my car read 59 degrees. It never climbed
above 83. “If you can’t enjoy a first day like
this, you may as well find something else
to do,” Ridgeland coach Mark Mariakis said
as his team took the field just after 8 a.m.
While Georgia high school teams must
practice in shorts for two days before
putting on full pads later this week, I
also was able to stop by Ridgeland, which
reached the Peach State’s Class AAAA
state title game last season.
Beginning at first-year program Sale
Study finds
diverse world
of atheism
Creek and working into town for the morning practices, then out to Cleveland and
back into town in the afternoon and evening, I covered 293 miles.
Optimism and the sound of pads popping
filled the day at most schools. And with the
season kicking off in less than a month, there
are very few days to make preparations for
what could be a memorable season for several area teams that believe this fall can end
with a deep playoff run.
Contact Stephen Hargis at [email protected]
timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6293.
Staff Photo by C.B. Schmelter
Ridgeland High School freshman quarterback Hunter McKenzie throws a ball to quarterbacks coach
Brient Hobbs during practice Monday.
In sports
n Read all about our sports reporter’s annual trek to
high school football practices around the region, D1
Presidential Preparations
Nonbelievers can’t be lumped
together, researchers say
By Kevin Hardy
Staff Writer
Hunched in front of wire shelving, hangers and
a bright orange bottle of Tide, the woman ducked
from her family members to answer questions about
her faith.
Do you consider yourself religious, spiritual or
nonreligious?
How do you define atheism? Freethinker? Secularist?
She couldn’t risk her religious family members
overhearing her answers. As an atheist, she was
literally in the closet.
The woman, from the American Southwest, was
among dozens of people who helped round out
a national study of nonbelievers by researchers
at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. And the
“If you hang
results might make you quesout with six
tion everything you think you
atheists,
know about atheism. Because
you’re going
atheists aren’t all playing to
to have six
the typecast. Their beliefs —
different
or lack thereof — are so comviews of the
plex and surprising that some
are even sitting in the church
world”
pews on Sunday morning.
Chris Silver,
The very word “atheist”
UTC psychology
could
be on the way out,
instructor
as researchers contend it
doesn’t come close to describing the variation of
beliefs, values and practices of America’s nonbelievers. Because the views nonbelievers hold are every
bit as complicated and varied as those of Christians,
Jews and Muslims.
Sure, some atheists may agree with vocal, liberal figureheads like Richard Dawkins and the late
Christopher Hitchens, both prominent authors and
speakers on atheism. Some want to convince others that there is no God, that creation is a myth and
Staff Photo by Tim Barber
Stephanie King, left, and her sons, Mark and Malek Grayson, make welcome President Barack Obama signs
Monday with dozens of others at the Urban League offices on M.L. King Boulevard.
Many ready to welcome Obama
E
By Kevin Hardy
Staff Writer
ven a glimpse of the limo will
be enough for Sarah Steffner
and her two children. They’re
among the hundreds planning
to welcome President Barack
Obama to the Scenic City
today, when he’ll lay out his proposal
for recharging the nation’s economic
engines through manufacturing and
other high-wage jobs during a visit
to the Amazon distribution center at
Enterprise South industrial park. The
company announced Monday that it
is adding full-time jobs at the Chatta-
nooga and Charleston, Tenn., plants as
part of a national employment boost of
about 5,000.
So far, news of the president’s visit
to Chattanooga has generated plenty of
disdain, mockery and contempt.
The Chattanooga Tea Party plans
to picket near the Amazon fulfillment
center. The Tennessee Republican
Party aired a television ad touting the
state’s economic boom so the president
could “see what real leadership looks
like.” And Rep. Chuck Fleischmann’s
faux post card made its way through
See OBAMA, Page A5
See Atheists, Page A5
Pope Francis
gestures as he
answers reporters’ questions
during a news
conference
aboard the
papal flight on
the journey
back from Brazil
on Monday.
‘Who am I to judge?’
pope says of gay priests
By Nicole Winfield
The Associated Press
ABOARD THE PAPAL AIRCRAFT — A remarkably candid Pope Francis struck a conciliatory stance
toward gays Monday, saying “who am I to judge” when
it comes to the sexual orientation of priests.
“We shouldn’t marginalize people for this. They must
be integrated into society,” Francis said during an extraordinary 82-minute exchange with reporters aboard his plane
See POPE, Page A5
Today’s poll
atheists
Q Are
misunderstood’?
© 2013 Chattanooga Publishing
The Associated Press
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Yes: 46 percent No: 53 percent
For up-to-the-minute
coverage, live blogs,
photos and more of
the president’s visit to
Chattanooga, go to
timesfreepress.com.
PRESIDENT’S
APPEARANCE
The president’s remarks at
Amazon will be for distribution
center employees and invited
guests. The event is not open
to the public.
don’t call
it cancer
A group of experts has
recommended changing
the definition of cancer and
eliminating the word entirely from
some common diagnoses. A4
ONLINE POLL results
Yesterday’s
as of 9 p.m. Monday
Should government do more
to help the poor of all races?
LIVE COVERAGE
fbi busts pimps
More than 100 children were
rescued in a federal operation
targeting pimps who forced
youths into prostitution. A4
Editorials. . . . . B6-7
Life. . . . . . . . . . . . E1
Metro. . . . . . . . . . B1
National. . . . . . . . A4
Newsmakers. . . . A2
Obituaries. . . . B2-3
Puzzles. . . . . E2, F3
Sports . . . . . . . . . D1
Stocks. . . . . . . . . C4
Television. . . . . . E5
Weather. . . . . . . . C6
World. . . . . . . . . . A6
2
• • • timesfreepress.com....
Breaking News: 423-757-News
A2 • Tuesday, July 30, 2013
CONTACTus
minute read
METRO/
REGION
FOR BREAKING NEWS THROUGHOUT THE DAY, GO TO timesfreepress.com
n COOL WEATHER It’s cool.
And that’s weird. Temperatures dropped to a balmy 62
degrees in the Scenic City
on Monday morning, sparking a citywide water cooler
debate on the cause of the
unseasonable weather. It’s
an early fall, some said. All
the hot air is in Washington,
argued others. Hell froze
over. Witchcraft. Obama’s
visit today is causing the
temps to drop. But National
Weather Service meteorologist Anthony Cavallucci
begged to differ. “Well, it’s
probably not because of
that,” he said, laughing. “We
had some cool air from Canada that has filtered into the
area.
n POLICE DANGERS The
No. 1 threat to police, in
many people’s eyes, is gunfire. The common belief is
that the biggest danger to
those who keep the peace is
Early Email
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latest news. Sign up for
the Times Free Press
morning update at www.
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armed men who look to disturb it. In reality, however,
the biggest dangers to police
are cars, everyday injuries and a variety of other
dangers that don’t always
come to mind when someone thinks of police work.
Examples include needles,
clotheslines and holes in the
ground. Unarmed suspects
are nothing to be taken
lightly either.
n CLEVELAND SHOOTING
Some Cleveland residents
have a message for Chattanooga folk: Get yourself
and your problems out of
here. On Monday night,
Cleveland police issued a
warrant for the arrest of
Cordarrius Dewon Cochran
IN LIFE
on 12 charges: 10 counts of
reckless endangerment, and
two counts of aggravated
assault. The warrants come
after a shooting outside Luv
2 Dance Studio, located at
2007 Cleveland Ave. S.E., on
Sunday morning. A Chattanooga resident had rented
the building for a party.
Police say Cochran, 23, fired
10 shots around 2 a.m. Sunday.
36.86
14.03
Dow
15,521.97
Nasdaq
3,599.14
n SCHOOL APPS To anyone
who remembers the strained
back muscles and poor posture of school days spent lugging around a stuffed backpack, substituting a 1-pound
tablet for 40 pounds of textbooks should be a no-brainer.
A study released in March by
the Pew Internet and American Life Project reported that
23 percent of American teens
ages 12 to 17 own an iPad or
similar tablet device.
IN SPORTS
n Making the grade
Some UTC players say last
year’s offense wasn’t good
enough. The offense now
has more experience with
10 returning starters and
a coordinator with more
spread experience in Jeff
Durden. When asked about
what grade they expect the
offense to get this season,
Kevin Revis and Jacob Huesman had the same answer
— an “A.”
BUSINESS
n ALSTOM LAYOFFS
Alstom’s boiler services
facility in Chattanooga is
laying off about 40 workers,
or roughly 10 percent of its
workforce, an official said
Monday. The reduction is
the second for Alstom in
Chattanooga this year.
newsmakers
Lea Michele breaks silence
after Cory Monteith’s death
The Associated Press
This publicity image
released by CBS shows
Cote de Pablo in a scene
from “NCIS.”
CBS: It was
de Pablo’s
decision to
exit ‘NCIS’
The Associated Press
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif.
— CBS Corp. chief executive Les Moonves says every
effort was made to keep the
actress who plays Ziva David
on TV’s highest-rated show,
“NCIS.”
Moonves said Cote de
Pablo was offered, in his
words, “a lot of money”
because the network didn’t
want to lose her from the
crime drama. Moonves said
the offer was then upped.
But he said the actress
decided she didn’t want to
continue on the show.
He noted the social media
outcry from de Pablo’s disappointed fans, but asserted
CBS did everything possible
to keep her.
A representative for de
Pablo didn’t immediately respond to a request for
comment.
“NCIS” stars Mark Harmon as head of a Navy criminal investigations division.
It returns for its 11th season
this fall.
LO S A N G E L E S — L e a
Michele is breaking her silence
online after her “Glee” co-star and
real-life boyfriend Cory Monteith
died of an overdose earlier this
month.
The actress posted a photo of
her and Monteith on Twitter on
Monday, along with a message
thanking her followers for “helping me through this time with
your enormous love & support.”
“Cory will forever be in my
heart,” Michele wrote.
Monteith was found dead July
13 in Vancouver, British Columbia.
An autopsy revealed the 31-yearold actor died of an overdose of
heroin and alcohol.
He and Michele played an
on-again, off-again couple in the
popular Fox series and were an
off-screen couple for about a
year.
The Associated Press
In this January photo, Cory Monteith, left, and Lea Michele
arrive at the 19th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at the
Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles.
The Associated Press
The Associated Press
This 2009 photo shows “Real
Housewives of New Jersey”
stars Teresa Giudice, left, and
her husband Joe Giudice.
to have earned nearly $1 million,
the government said.
The reality TV stars are scheduled to make their initial court
appearances today.
Teresa’s attorney, Henry
Klingeman, said she would plead
not guilty. Joe’s attorney did not
immediately return a message
seeking comment.
Teresa also issued her own
statement, saying it was a difficult
day for her family, that she supports her husband, and that she
hopes to resolve the case with the
government as quickly as possible.
“I am committed to my family
and intend to maintain our lives
in the best way possible, which
includes continuing my career,”
she said.
U.S. Attorney Paul Fishman
said the indictment alleges “the
Giudices lied to the bankruptcy
court, to the IRS and to a number
of banks.”
“Everyone has an obligation to
tell the truth when dealing with
the courts, paying their taxes and
applying for loans or mortgages.
That’s reality,” he said.
When Teresa filed for a
mortgage loan of $121,000 in
2001, she falsely claimed she
worked as an executive assistant, submitting fake W-2 forms
and fake paystubs as part of
the ruse, the indictment said.
Angelina Jolie speaks out against rape in war
The Associated Press
TOKYO — Movie star and
director Angelina Jolie urged a
Japanese audience Monday to join
her fight to stop sexual violence in
war zones.
Jolie said she hoped “In the
Land of Blood and Honey,” her
first film as writer and director,
would inspire viewers to think
about rape in war.
In April, the Group of Eight
leaders agreed to work to end rape
and sexual violence in conflict and
the United Nations Security Council adopted text urging sanctions
against perpetrators of sexual violence during armed conflict.
“This is just a beginning,” she
said. “Our aim must be to shatter
impunity, so that rape can no longer be used as a weapon of war
anywhere in the world as it was
in Bosnia, and as it is today from
Congo to Syria.”
Jolie, who serves as special
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Rates
‘Real Housewives’ stars charged with fraud
NEWARK, N.J. — Two stars
of the “Real Housewives of New
Jersey” were indicted Monday on
federal fraud charges, accused of
exaggerating their income while
applying for loans before their TV
show debuted in 2009, then hiding their improving fortunes in a
bankruptcy filing after their first
season aired.
Teresa Giudice, 41, and her
husband Giuseppe “Joe” Giudice,
43, of Montville Township, were
charged in a 39-count indictment
with conspiracy to commit mail
and wire fraud, bank fraud, making false statements on loan applications and bankruptcy fraud.
The couple submitted fraudulent mortgage and other loan applications from 2001 through 2008, a
year before their show debuted on
Bravo, making phony claims about
their employment status and salaries, the indictment said.
Joe Giudice also failed to file
tax returns for the years 2004
through 2008, when he is alleged
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envoy for the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, was speaking at a special screening event
Monday at the U.N. University in
Tokyo, as part of her campaign
launched with British Foreign Secretary William Hague.
Jolie said she hoped her film
would inspire the Japanese viewers to think further about the
problem and take action, just as
the campaign had taken her across
the globe.
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Correction
A story about elder abuse on Page
1 of Monday’s edition should have
stated that Bill Tobin has been
coordinator of the SARAH project
since December 2011.
A
Fresh
Take
Angelina Jolie smiles as she
delivers a statement before
screening her film “In the
Land of Blood and Honey.”
Walter E. Hussman Jr.
Chairman and Publisher
Jason Taylor
President & General Manager
Leslie Kahana
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On
News
• • • Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • A3
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National
A4 • Tuesday, July 30, 2013
105 teens rescued in nationwide prostitution sweep
National
news
The sweep included arrests
in the tri-state cities of
Atlanta; Birmingham, Ala.;
Knoxville and Memphis,
according to the FBI.
of what officials say is the
much larger national problem
of child prostitution.
“We are trying to take this
crime out of the shadows,
and put a spotlight on it,”
Ron Hosko, assistant director
of the FBI’s Criminal Investigative Division, said at a
news conference.
The 72-hour sweep that
lasted through the weekend
was the seventh round of
a campaign begun in 2003.
State, local and federal investigators joined in the latest
operation.
The alleged pimps could
face various trafficking and
other charges. Some pimps
arrested in past versions of
Operation Cross Country are
now serving life sentences
or were sentenced to prison
terms as long as 50 years.
The rescued juveniles,
meanwhile, face a hard road
of recovery from what officials say can be a common
history of sexual, emotional
and physical abuse. Nearly
all of prostitutes rescued this
past weekend are female.
They are all also painfully
young: One, rescued in Sacramento is 14, the FBI said.
“This is a particularly
House collapses, injures 9
WASHINGTON — D.C.
police say a woman has been
arrested at the Washington
National Cathedral in connection with vandalism there.
Assistant Chief Peter
Newsham said the woman
was arrested in the area
of the cathedral Monday
after green paint was found
splattered there.
He said the woman
would likely face charges of
destruction of property.
Green paint also was
found early Friday at the
Lincoln Memorial and
on another statue on the
National Mall.
Police haven’t yet determined whether the vandalism is connected.
Agency will probe
blown Gulf well
ON THE GULF OF
MEXICO — Scientists
from several universities
are working to learn whether a gas well that blew wild
last week off the Louisiana
coast has polluted the Gulf
of Mexico.
Joseph Montoya, a Georgia Tech biology professor,
was leading a research
project on a vessel near the
site of the 2010 BP oil spill
when the gas well, owned
by Houston-based Walter
Oil & Gas Corp., blew out
on July 23 and later caught
fire. All 44 people aboard
the rig were evacuated
safely. The rig is owned by
Hercules Offshore Inc., also
based in Houston.
The federal Bureau of
Safety and Environmental
Enforcement said Monday
that its Gulf of Mexico
Regional Director, Lars
Herbst, was organizing
a panel investigation to
determine the cause of the
accident.
Doctor to return
to face trial
PITTSBURGH — A
University of Pittsburgh
medical researcher arrested in West Virginia agreed
Monday to be returned to
Pennsylvania to face charges
in the cyanide poisoning
death of his neurologist wife.
Dr. Robert Ferrante
agreed to the transfer in a
brief hearing in West Virginia, where he was taken
into custody last week.
Detectives were to take him
to Allegheny County today,
defense attorney William
Difenderfer said. A preliminary arraignment was
scheduled for this afternoon.
Ferrante’s wife, Autumn
Klein, chief of women’s
neurology at the University
of Pittsburgh Medical Center, died April 20.
The Associated Press
By Tara Parker-Pope
New York Times News Service
The Associated Press
Debris pours into the street as emergency crews assess the situation outside a
house collapse in Philadelphia on Monday. A natural gas explosion was blamed for
the row house collapse that severely damaged neighboring houses and hurt nine
people, including a baby and a critically injured contractor.
Manning verdict due today
New York Times News Service
WASHINGTON — A
military judge has reached
a verdict and will announce
it this afternoon in the
high-profile court-martial
of Pfc. Bradley Manning, the
former Army intelligence
analyst whose release of
700,000 secret documents to
WikiLeaks opened a window
into American military and
diplomatic activities.
The judge, Army Col.
Denise Lind, will read the
verdict from the bench at 1
p.m. at Fort Meade, Md., the
Army said in a statement.
Manning has already confessed to being WikiLeaks’
source for the files, which
included videos of airstrikes
in which civilians were killed,
hundreds of thousands of
frontline incident reports from
the Afghanistan and Iraq wars,
dossiers on men being held
without trial at the Guantánamo Bay prison, and about
250,000 diplomatic cables.
But while Manning has
pleaded guilty to a lesser version of the charges he is facing, which could expose him
to up to 20 years in prison,
the government decided to
press forward with a trial on
a more serious version of the
charges, including “aiding the
enemy” and violations of the
Espionage Act, which could
result in a life sentence.
His court-martial began
in early June, and the merits
portion wrapped up last week
with closing arguments in
which a prosecutor portrayed
Manning as an anarchist and
a traitor who was merely out
to make a splash, while his
defense lawyer portrayed
him as a young, naïve, but
well-intentioned humanist
who wanted to spark debate
and bring about change.
Beyond the fate of Manning as an individual, the
“aiding the enemy” charge
— which is unprecedented
in a leak case — could have
significant long-term ramifications for investigative journalism in the Internet era.
The government’s theory
is that providing defense-related information to an entity that published it for the
world to see constituted aiding the enemy because the
world includes adversaries
like al-Qaida, who could read
the documents online.
Ex-FBI agent says Bulger
denied informant role
The Associated Press
The Associated Press
James Comey
Senate OKs
Comey as FBI
director
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
Senate overwhelmingly
confirmed James Comey
on Monday to become FBI
director, elevating the onetime Justice Department
official who defied efforts by
President George W. Bush’s
White House to renew a program that allowed warrantless eavesdropping.
Comey was approved 93-1
after one of the Senate’s leading conservatives abruptly
ended delaying tactics that
had blocked a vote on the
nomination.
Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky.,
mentioned as a possible 2016
GOP presidential candidate,
had been thwarting the vote
over his concerns about the
FBI’s domestic use of drones.
Minutes before a showdown
vote that seemed likely to
force an end to his delays,
Paul announced he would
allow a vote on Comey, saying he’d received a letter
from the FBI that answered
his questions about drones.
That letter said the FBI
has seldom used drones.
BOSTON — A former FBI
supervisor who wrote a book
on reputed gangster James
“Whitey” Bulger testified
Monday that he tried to fire
him as an FBI informant, but
his bosses would not do it.
Robert Fitzpatrick, a former assistant special agent
in charge of the FBI’s Boston
office, said that in 1981 he was
given the task of assessing
Bulger to see if he was providing the FBI with useful
information on the Mafia. At
that point, Bulger had been
an FBI informant for about
six years.
Fitzpatrick said that
when he met with Bulger, he
repeatedly changed the subject, “played the tough guy,”
and said he would never testify against anyone.
“At one point, he even said
he was not an informant,”
Fitzpatrick said. “Basically,
he was not giving me any
information that I was out
there trying to get,” he said.
Bulger, 83, is on trial in a
massive racketeering indictment charging him with
playing a role in 19 killings
while he allegedly led the
Winter Hill Gang in the 1970s
and ’80s.
A group of experts advising
the nation’s premier cancer
research institution has recommended sweeping changes in the approach to cancer
detection and treatment,
including changes in the very
definition of cancer and eliminating the word entirely from
some common diagnoses.
The recommendations,
from a working group of the
National Cancer Institute,
were published on Monday
in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
In one example, they say
that some premalignant conditions, like one that affects
the breast called ductal carcinoma in situ — which many
doctors agree is not cancer
— should be renamed to
exclude the word carcinoma.
That way, patients are less
frightened and less likely to
seek what may be unneeded
and potentially harmful treatments that can include the
surgical removal of the breast.
The group, which includes
some of the top scientists in
cancer research, also suggested that many lesions
detected during breast, prostate, thyroid, lung and other
cancer screenings should not
be called cancer at all but
should instead be reclassified as IDLE conditions,
which stands for “indolent
lesions of epithelial origin.”
While it is clear that some
or all of the changes may not
happen for years, and that
some cancer experts will disagree, the report from such
a prominent group of scientists with the clear backing
of the National Cancer Institute brings the discussion to
a much higher level and most
likely will change the national conversation about cancer,
its definition, its treatment
and future research.
“We need a 21st-century
definition of cancer instead
of a 19th-century definition of
cancer, which is what we’ve
been using,” said Dr. Otis
Panel backs lung
cancer screening
for some smokers
The Associated Press
For the first time,
government advisers are
recommending screening
for lung cancer, saying
certain current and former
heavy smokers should get
annual scans to cut their
chances of dying of the
disease. If it becomes final
as expected, the advice
by the U.S. Preventive
Services Task Force would
clear the way for insurers to
cover CT scans, a type of
X-ray, for those at greatest
risk. That would be people
ages 55 through 79 who
smoked a pack of cigarettes
a day for 30 years or the
equivalent, such as two
packs a day for 15 years.
Whether screening would
help younger or lighter
smokers isn’t known, so
scans are not advised for
them. They also aren’t for
people who quit at least
15 years ago, or people
too sick or frail to undergo
treatment for cancer.
W. Brawley, the chief medical officer for the American
Cancer Society, who was not
directly involved in the report.
The impetus behind the
change is a growing concern
among doctors, scientists and
patient advocates that hundreds of thousands of men
and women are undergoing
needless and sometimes disfiguring and harmful treatments for premalignant and
cancerous lesions that are
so slow growing they are
unlikely to ever cause harm.
“We’re still having trouble convincing people that
the things that get found as
a consequence of mammography and PSA testing and
other screening devices are
not always malignancies in
the classical sense that will
kill you,” said Dr. Harold
Varmus, the director of the
National Cancer Institute.
Driver who ignored flood may be charged
The Associated Press
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. —
Authorities are looking into
whether a tour bus driver
bound for Las Vegas violated what’s popularly known
as Arizona’s “Stupid Motorist
Law” when he drove into a
flooded wash after a trip to
the Grand Canyon’s west rim.
Flash floodwaters swept
the bus —with 33 people
aboard— hundreds of yards
down a northwestern Arizo-
na wash Sunday. The vehicle
flipped on its side onto an
embankment, and the passengers escaped on their
own uninjured.
Mohave County sheriff’s
spokeswoman Trish Carter
said Monday that authorities are determining whether a 1995 law requiring that
drivers pay for emergency
response when they enter
flooded areas applies in this
situation.
North Carolina governor signs
abortion clinics rules bill
The Associated Press
RA L E I G H , N.C . —
North Carolina Gov. Pat
McCrory on Monday signed
into law a measure directing state officials to regulate
abortion clinics based on the
same standards as those for
outpatient surgical centers,
a change that critics say will
force most to close.
Critics say the move represents a shift by the firstyear Republican executive,
who pledged as a candidate
last fall that he wouldn’t
approve any new abortion
restrictions if elected.
“We are appalled that Gov.
McCrory broke his campaign promise and we will
do everything in our power
to let the women of North
Carolina know they cannot
trust him to stand up to lawmakers intent on denying
women access to safe and
legal abortion,” said Paige
Johnson, a spokeswoman for
Planned Parenthood Action
Fund of Central NC.
McCrory, however, said
he wasn’t limiting access to
the procedure, but rather was
signing a measure that “will
result in safer conditions for
North Carolina women.”
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Woman arrested
in D.C. vandalism
will use violence and drugs
to keep the juveniles in line.
Customers are often
found at big-time sporting
events, Hosko said, or they
may be found through online
advertising. Unlike Craigslist, the other big popular
classified ad website, Backpage, still includes a listing
for “escorts.”
Since the FBI-led operation began a decade ago,
more than 2,700 children
have been recovered.
Tighten definition
of cancer, experts say
Ohioan indicted
in deaths of 3
COLUMBUS, Ohio
— A man accused in the
deaths of three women
whose bodies were found
wrapped in trash bags was
indicted Monday on 14
counts including multiple
charges of aggravated murder and kidnapping.
Michael Madison is
being charged in connection with the deaths of
Shirellda H. Terry, Angela
H. Deskins and Shetisha D.
Sheeley.
East Cleveland police
responded to a call about
a foul odor July 19 and discovered a body in a garage
in a dilapidated neighborhood. Within hours, they
identified Madison as a
suspect and went to his
mother’s house, where he
was arrested after a brief
standoff.
vulnerable population,” said
Drew Oosterbaan, chief of
the Justice Department’s
Child Exploitation and
Obscenity section. “Traffickers are preying on youth with
low self-esteem and minimal
support,” he said.
Many of the teenagers
caught up in the sex trade
come from broken homes,
officials say. Hosko said the
pimps may recruit their prey
relatively gently, using compliments and rewards, but then
35951211
WASHINGTON — An
operation targeting child
prostitution rescued 105
teenagers and swept 150
alleged pimps off the streets
of cities nationwide, the FBI
announced Monday.
The juveniles, ranging in
age from 13 to 17, had been trafficked through social media,
online classified ad services
and conventional street trolling. They are only a small part
Closer to home
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35838019
By Michael Doyle
McClatchy Washington Bureau
...timesfreepress.com • • •
.
HOW THEY DID IT
UTC psychology instructor
Chris Silver’s yearlong
research project was
actually two studies.
Researchers first conducted
interviews with about 60
nonbelievers from around
the country to gauge the
variety within nonbelief.
They then compiled a
300-question written survey
of psychological measures
that was filled out online by
more than 1,000 subjects
who self-selected to
participate.
because the believing world
is much more complex than
it used to be.”
In fact, the worlds of belief
and nonbelief can sometimes
begin to mirror each other.
UTC researchers said some
atheists thought their study
pointed to a need for nonbelievers to come together in a
more organized way, since so
many people still find comfort in the ritual and fellowship provided by churches.
And atheists in our area
already do connect with
each other often, said Jennifer Ross. A local group
of atheists, agnostics and
the like have built an online
community. They meet up
for dinners and beers. And
they even perform charitable
work — which is sometimes
hard for some community
members to come to grips
with.
“They look at me like,
‘You’re not going to hurt me,
are you?’” Ross said. “I’m like,
‘No, I’m a regular person just
trying to help.”
Many members of the
group are closeted, she said,
and afraid of the business,
social and family implications of being labeled an
atheist. But 36-year-old Ross
has been calling herself an
atheist since high school. She
doesn’t shy away from it, but
expects most people would
never know.
“Probably in everyday life,
people don’t know I’m an
atheist,” she said, “unless the
subject comes up or someone asks me.”
Contact staff writer Kevin
Hardy at [email protected] or 423-757-6249.
Protest moves
• Continued from Page A1
a news cycle, thanks in part to its many
spelling errors.
And though she supports people’s right
to protest, Steffner said she’s surprised by
the reaction, even in a conservative stronghold like Tennessee.
“Some of it just really seemed so aggressive, and I was really bothered by that,”
she said. “Southerners pride themselves
on hospitality. And that means hospitality
to everybody, not just the people you like.”
Steffner and other supporters met Monday to make signs before the president’s
arrival. They plan to line Bonny Oaks Drive
near the Redoubt Soccer complex. She said
she’s had to warn her kids that they could
spend hours waiting only to see the presidential motorcade buzz by in a few seconds.
“But to me it’s important to be a part of
the group that is welcoming him, regardless
of if we get to see him,” she said. “It’s still a
chance to do what I see as doing the right
thing.”
And even those who find little common ground with Obama’s policies plan to
attend his event. Republican County Mayor
Jim Coppinger, along with GOP members
of the Hamilton County Commission, will
be in attendance today.
“I certainly don’t agree with the president on a lot of issues,” said Hamilton
County Commission Chairman Larry
Henry. “But I’ll go out of respect for the
office.”
Chattanooga Mayor Andy Berke plans to
attend as do several City Council members.
Local supporters held two media events
Monday to highlight Obama’s agenda.
At Niedlov’s Breadworks, owner John
Sweet touted the president’s focus on
improving the middle class. He said he’s
supportive of Obama’s vision for strengthening the middle class, especially since the
gap between the rich and poor seems to
continually widen.
But as a small-business owner, Sweet
said he doesn’t know what the answer is for
Pope
• Continued from Page A1
returning from his first papal
trip, to celebrate World Youth
Day in Brazil.
“If someone is gay and he
searches for the Lord and
has good will, who am I to
judge?” the pope asked.
Francis’ first news conference as pope was wide-ranging and open, touching on
everything from the greater role he believes women
should have in the Catholic
Church to the troubled Vatican Bank.
While his predecessor,
Pope Benedict XVI, responded to only a few pre-selected
questions during his papal
trips, Francis did not dodge
a single query, even thanking the journalist who asked
about reports of a “gay lobby”
inside the Vatican and allegations that one of his trusted
monsignors was involved in
a gay tryst.
Francis said he investigated the allegations against the
clergyman according to canon
law and found nothing to back
them up. He took journalists
to task for reporting on the
matter, saying it concerned
issues of sin, not crimes like
sexually abusing children.
And when someone sins and
confesses, he said, God not
only forgives — he forgets.
“We don’t have the right to
t
Y
ect
our
Favorite Memorie
s By
Due to security issues, the location of
the Rally to Protest President Barack
Obama’s policies has changed to 5615
Lee Highway, the site of the old Target
shopping center.
People are welcome to attend the rally
and present their messages with familyfriendly signs, flags, and banners in a
peaceful manner.
The Chattanooga Tea Party is a
nonpartisan grass-roots organization
seeking to educate and inform its
members and the public at large of the
fundamental issues and struggles our
country is facing.
boosting the nation’s economic prospects.
He hopes to hear that from Obama today.
Niedlov’s does about $1 million in annual
sales and employs about 25 people, about
half of whom are full-time.
“I don’t know if I really want help from
the government,” Sweet said. “I think if
I’m being a conscientious good employer,
a good provider of a service, an excellent
producer of bread, then we’re kind of doing
our part for the community, our neighborhood. My family and I live next door. Our
kids go to school down the street. We’re the
proverbial Main Street business.”
Obama supporters also met at the Kingdom Center of Olivet Baptist Church to
create welcome signs for the president’s
motorcade. Felt tips squeaked as marker
aroma and an excited buzz filled the air
among talks of Obama’s speech.
Jeremy Finch, a high school social studies teacher, said the answer to a stronger
workforce begins with education. He hopes
the president illustrates how a workforce
relies on the school system.
“Education is something that is important, but sometimes gets ignored,” Finch
said. “Teachers are what produce all other
jobs.”
Staff writers Louie Brogdon and Jeff
LaFave contributed to this report.
Contact staff writer Kevin Hardy at [email protected] or 423-757-6249.
not forget,” he said.
While the comments did
not signal a change in Catholic
teaching that homosexual acts
are “intrinsically disordered,”
they indicated a shift in tone
under Francis’ young papacy
and an emphasis on a church
that is more inclusive and
merciful rather than critical
and disciplinary.
Francis’ stance contrasted
markedly with that of Benedict, who signed a document
in 2005 that said men who had
deep-rooted homosexual tendencies should not be priests.
Gay leaders were buoyed
by Francis’ approach, saying
the change in tone was progress in itself, although for
some the encouragement was
tempered by Francis’ talk of
gay clergy’s “sins.”
“Basically, I’m overjoyed at
the news,” said Francis DeBernardo, executive director of
the U.S.-based New Ways
Ministry, a group that promotes justice and reconciliation for gay, lesbian, bisexual
and transgender people and
the wider church community.
“For decades now, we’ve had
nothing but negative comments
about gay and lesbian people coming from the Vatican,”
DeBernardo said in a telephone
interview from Maryland.
The largest U.S. gay rights
group, Human Rights Campaign, said in a statement that
the pope’s remarks “represent
a significant change in tone.”
Still, said Chad Griffin, the
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HRC president, as long as gays
“are told in churches big and
small that their lives and their
families are disordered and sinful because of how they were
born — how God made them
— then the church is sending a
deeply harmful message.”
In Italy, the country’s first
openly gay governor, Nichi
Vendola, urged fellow politicians to learn a lesson from
the pope.
“I believe that if politics
had one-millionth of the
capacity to … listen that the
pope does, it would be better
able to help people who suffer,” he said.
Vendola praised the pope
for drawing a clear line
between homosexuality and
pedophilia. “We know that a
part of reactionary clerical
thought plays on the confusion between these two completely different categories,”
he said.
Francis also said he wanted
a greater role for women in
the church, though he insisted
“the door is closed” to ordaining them as priests. In one of
his most important speeches
in Rio, Francis described the
church in feminine terms, saying it would be “sterile” without women.
—Theresa Turner,
representative for
Chattanooga teachers
“I would hope that (critics)
would at least respect the
office. They don’t have
to like Obama, but they
should respect that he is our
president and commanderin-chief.”
— Angelia Stinnett, 2012
write-in Senate candidate
“Watching these
elementary school students
come in here is just exciting
for America. Obama’s got
to talk education, and that’s
what I’ll be listening to.”
— Kemmer Anderson,
resident of Chattanooga for
36 years
“President Bush came
to town in 2007, but
Tennessee voted for
President Bush and really
didn’t support President
Obama in the general
election. This is a surprise
for me. Even though the
county didn’t go blue, the
city did. This is a reflection
of the tremendous energy
that the president has.”
— Jermaine Edward
Freeman, acting deputy
& state director for
“Organizing for Action”
advocacy group
Compiled by staff writer Jeff LaFave
Funny and candid, Francis’
exchange with the media was
exceptional. While Pope John
Paul II used to have on-board
talks with journalists, he would
move about the cabin, chatting
with individual reporters so it
was hit-or-miss to hear what
he said. After Benedict’s maiden foreign voyage, the Vatican
insisted that reporters submit questions in advance so
the theologian pope could
choose three or four he
wanted to answer with prepared comments.
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To read more on the UTC
study about disbelief, visit
atheismresearch.com.
Obama
“We support the idea
that all people have the
opportunity to participate
in the democratic process.
If you don’t, you don’t have
much of a say.”
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T.J. McKenzie with the Ortwein Sign Co. puts the finishing touches on a new sign at the Amazon Fulfillment Center in preparation for President Barack Obama’s visit today.
D
35726867
that organized religion is for
suckers. But others keep their
beliefs and doubts quiet, with
little interest in evangelizing.
Plenty more may not be quite
convinced one way or another
or are looking for something
they just haven’t found yet.
The study was in part
designed to dig into that differentiation, because most
academic research tends to
treat all nonbelievers as a common group, said Chris Silver,
a UTC psychology instructor
who wrote his doctoral dissertation on the research project.
“If you hang out with six
atheists, you’re going to have
six different views of the
world,” he said. “To sit and
make the massive assumption
as a researcher they’re somehow all the same is kind of
stigmatizing, actually.”
After interviewing and
surveying hundreds, Silver’s
research compiled six categories of nonbelievers. He found
everything from hardcore,
vocal atheists to those who
attend church weekly because
they still find meaning in the
ritual, if not the dogma.
“You can’t say, ‘I’ve met one
atheist, I’ve met them all.’ It
means different things to different people,” said Thomas
Coleman, an undergraduate
UTC student who also worked
on the yearlong study.
Coleman gained local
notoriety as an atheist with
his federal lawsuit challenging
the Hamilton County Commission’s practice of public
prayers at meetings. That suit
is still making its way through
the court system.
Coleman and Silver said
they weren’t wildly surprised by the study’s results,
because they’ve come to
understand the variety of disbelief through their interactions with family and friends.
But the research could prove
consequential in the wider
academic community, as the
nation continues to grow less
religious as a whole.
The number of Americans who identify as religiously unaffiliated is constantly growing, according
to the Pew Research Center’s
Forum on Religion and Public Life. According to 2012
data, one-fifth of the adult
population has no religious
affiliation and one-third of
adults under 30 have no religious affiliation — the highest percentages ever recorded by Pew.
That mass loss of religious identity — and thus
the rise in atheism — may
seem threatening to believers, especially in the South,
where Bible verses dot the
highways and our public officials are regularly criticized
for being too religious. But
this trend can actually be
good for Christians, especially if the nonbelievers are
in their midst, said Terry
Cross, dean of the School of
Religion at Lee University, a
socially conservative liberal
arts college sponsored by the
Church of God.
“Sometimes if we’re
just amongst ourselves, we
become rather incestuous,”
Cross said of Christians. “We
tend not to be challenged.
And unchallenged Christianity, I think, becomes a very
aberrant and misunderstood
form of the faith. Because it
has no connection to the real
world at that point.”
Cross, a former pastor,
says it comes as no surprise
that atheists are coming to
church. He knew of nonbelieving spouses who would
regularly accompany their
family members to church
just to appease them.
It’s probably easier to
evangelize atheists when they
willingly show up on Sunday.
But their presence can also
help church leaders refine
their message and practice.
He said pastors shouldn’t shy
away from them, but should
engage them and pick their
brains on the church.
What did you see in this
service that was strange?
What is it that affects you?
What do you like the most?
And there should be
some level of understanding, because people lose
faith — or never find it —
for all kinds of reasons. Some
experience a personal trauma, while others are turned
off by the actions of certain
Christian groups, Cross said.
“ I t h i n k i n c re a s i n gly churches are having to
come to an understanding
that the nonbelieving world
is much more complex than
it used to be,” he said. “But
that shouldn’t surprise us
In arguing that “atheism”
is too generic a term, UTC
researchers came up with
six categories of nonbelief.
They include:
n Intellectual atheist/
agnostic: These people are
highly motivated to study
and read up on matters of
belief, science, philosophy,
“rational” theology. These
people often belong to
skeptic, free-thinking or
rationalist groups that meet
online or face to face.
n Activist atheist/
agnostic: These people
aren’t content to just hold
positions of nonbelief, but
are vocal and proactive
in the atheist community.
Their activism often stems
from or spills over into other
social areas, like feminism,
gay rights, environmental or
political concerns.
n Seeker-agnostic: These
people aren’t sure about
the existence of God or
the divine, hold no strong
ideological positions and
often keep an open mind
in the debate between
the religious, spiritual and
antitheist elements of
society.
n Anti-theist: These
are some of the most
assertive nonbelievers
and are diametrically
opposed to religious
ideology. They tend to
view religion as ignorance
and see any individual or
institution associated with
it as backward and socially
detrimental.
n Non-theist: These are
people who are apathetic
or disinterested. They’re
not active in social or
intellectual pursuits having
to do with religion or antireligion.
n Ritual atheist/agnostic:
These people hold no belief
in God or the divine but
aren’t always open about
their lack of belief. Yet they
may find some usefulness
with religious teachings
— viewing them as good
philosophical teachings on
how to live life, not a path
toward spiritual fulfillment.
Some even partake
in religious-like rituals
including meditation, yoga
or holiday traditions.
o
• Continued from Page A1
Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • A5
DIFFERENT SHADES
OF DISBELIEF
Pr
Atheists
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• • • timesfreepress.com....
International
A6 • Tuesday, July 30, 2013
Familiar cast as U.S. launches new Mideast peace bid
WASHINGTON — With
a cast of characters that has
presided over numerous
failed Middle peace efforts,
the Obama administration
launched a fresh bid Monday to pull Israel and the
Palestinians into substantive
negotiations.
Despite words of encouragement, deep skepticism
about the prospects for success surrounded the initial
discussions, which were
Cash Bond for visas
British
migrant
curb stirs
anger
opening with a dinner hosted by Secretary of State John
Kerry. He named a former
U.S. ambassador to Israel
to shepherd what all sides
believe will be a protracted
and difficult process.
Former envoy Martin
Indyk, who played key roles
in the Clinton administration’s multiple, unsuccessful
pushes to broker peace deals
between Israel and Syria and
Israel and the Palestinians,
will assume the day-to-day
responsibility for keeping the
talks alive for the next nine
months.
Kerry called Indyk a “seasoned diplomat” and said he
“knows what has worked
and he knows what hasn’t
worked.” Neither Kerry nor
the State Department would
say what has worked in the
past, although the fact that
there is no peace deal now
would seem to indicate
that nothing has worked in
resolving the Israeli-Palestinian standoff.
President Barack Obama
echoed Kerry’s hopeful sentiment in a White House statement that said Indyk “brings
unique experience and
insight to this role, which
will allow him to contribute
immediately as the parties
begin down the tough, but
necessary, path of negotiations.”
The Israeli side will
be led by chief negotiator
Tzipi Livni, a former foreign
minister who was active in
the Bush’s administration’s
ill-fated Annapolis peace
Head-on train crash
talks with the Palestinians,
and Yitzhak Molcho, a veteran adviser to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
who was part of the Israeli
team involved in Obama’s
two previous attempts to
broker negotiations. Those
two efforts relied heavily on
Dennis Ross, a former Indyk
colleague and Mideast peace
envoy, and veteran negotiator
George Mitchell.
The Palestinian team will
be led by chief negotiator
Saeb Erekat and President
French Riviera jewel heist
may be biggest in history
By Carol J. Williams
Los Angeles Times
The Associated Press
LAGOS, Nigeria — Defying protests, the British government said Monday it will
go ahead with a pilot plan to
curb illegal immigration by
demanding visitors from six
of its ex-colonies post a cash
bond to obtain visas.
An email from the Home
Office to The Associated
Press confirmed that the plan
would focus on countries
with a high proportion of
The Associated Press
visa overstayers and examine
ways of using the proceeds Rescue personnel work at the site where two passenger trains collided head-on in
of forfeited bonds to ease the Granges-pres-Marnand, western Switzerland, Monday. Police said at least 35 people
burden illegal immigrants put were injured, five of them seriously.
on public services.
The department confirmed reports that began
circulating last month that
the bonds could amount to
around midnight with a huge
The explosions raised
$4,600 per visitor, but said
fears among the city’s main- explosion, said intelligence
the sum hadn’t been fixed
ly Muslim population, who
officials, speaking on condinor a date set for implemenusually go out for midnight tion of anonymity because
BAGHDAD — More
tation.
prayers during this holy
they were not authorized to
The six countries targeted than a dozen explosions,
month of Ramadan.
talk to reporters.
are Ghana, India, Pakistan, mainly from car bombs,
Khalid Abbas, head of
Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, ripped through marketplacthe prison department in
as well as Nigeria, whose es, parking lots, a cafe and
surrounding Khyber Pakhpopulation of 160 million is rush-hour crowds in Iraq
tunkhwa province, said the
Africa’s biggest, and whose on Monday, killing at least
jail held 40 “high profile”
TUNIS,
Tunisia
—
Gunprotests have been strongest. 58 people and pushing the
prisoners.
men
ambushed
a
Tunisian
When reports of the plan country’s death toll for the
“We are not sure if any
army
patrol
Monday
in
a
emerged, Nigerian Foreign month of July toward the
of them escaped,” Abbas
mountainous border region
Affairs Minister Olugbenga 700 mark, officials said.
known as an Islamic militant said.
The bombings — 18 in
Ashiru called in the British
stronghold, killing at least
ambassador last month to all — are part of a wave of
eight soldiers, the presidenexpress “strong displeasure” bloodshed that has swept
tial spokesman said.
over the “discriminatory” across the country since
“An entire patrol carryApril, killing more than 3,000 ing out a search operation
policy.
DAMASCUS, Syria —
He suggested it could people and worsening the
in this mountainous region
Syria’s
beleaguered opposiharm trade between the two already strained ties between was decimated,” said prestion forces suffered another
Iraq’s
Sunni
minority
and
the
countries that grew nearly
idential spokesman Adnan
blow Monday when governfivefold from $2.35 billion in Shiite-led government.
Mancer, adding that his
ment troops captured a key
With two days left in
2010 to $11.57 billion last year,
information came from the district in the embattled city
July,
the
month’s
death
toll
with the value of Nigerian
defense ministry.
of Homs that has been a rebel
now stands at 680, accordimports doubling.
The attack comes just
stronghold since the beginThe British have sought ing to an Associated Press
five days after a left-wing
ning of the country’s uprising.
count.
Most
of
those
have
politician was shot dead
to calm the outcry, with the
The capture of Khaldiin front of his house by an
British ambassador to Nige- come during Ramadan,
yeh
brings President Bashar
alleged Islamic militant.
ria, Andrew Pocock, saying the Muslim holy month of
Assad’s regime closer to
“the vast majority would not dawn-to-dusk fasting that
its goal of capturing all of
be required to pay a bond.” began July 10, making it
Homs, Syria’s third-largest
He said about 70 percent of Iraq’s bloodiest since 2007.
city.
the 180,000 Nigerians applyThe opposition acknowling annually to visit Britain
DERA ISMAIL KHAN, edged the loss of Khaldiyeh,
get visas.
Pakistan — Taliban milithough some activists said
India protested last month
tants disguised as police and there were still scattered
as British Prime Minister
KANO, Nigeria — Mul- armed with guns, rocket-pro- clashes in northern sectors
David Cameron was visiting, tiple explosions rocked a
pelled grenades and exploof the district where rebcausing him to declare that a Christian area in Nigeria’s
sives attacked a prison in
els were still putting up a
final decision had not been northern Kano city Monday northwestern Pakistan hold- fight. A senior member of
taken.
night, with security forces
ing 40 “high profile” inmates the Western-backed Syria
Immigration, legal and ferrying scores of wounded Monday night in an apparent National Coalition said the
illegal, is a sensitive political to hospitals.
attempt to free their colregime’s gains in Homs are
issue in Britain, especially
A mortuary attendant
leagues, officials said.
not irreversible.
with the unemployment and at Murtala Mohammed
Pakistani Taliban spokesThe Associateds Press
austerity measures brought Specialists Hospital said
man Shahidullah Shahid
on by the economic crisis. It at least 10 bodies had been
claimed responsibility for
was a big issue in his election brought in from the scene.
the attack, saying 150 milicampaign and he has pledged He spoke on condition of
tants took part and around
to cut net immigration from anonymity because he was
300 prisoners were freed.
252,000 a year in 2010 to not authorized to speak to
The attack in the town
below 100,000 a year by 2015. reporters.
of Dera Ismail Khan began
Internationalnews
Bombings in Iraq
kill at least 58
8 Tunisian
soldiers killed
Syria captures key
neighborhood
Explosions rock
Nigrerian area
Mahmoud Abbas’ adviser,
Mohammed Shtayyeh, both
of whom have been major
players in failed negotiations
with the Israelis since 1991.
Despite the presence of
so many people whose past
experience does not include
success, Kerry and other officials voiced cautious optimism about the resumption
of talks which he painstakingly negotiated during six
months of shuttle diplomacy that began with Obama’s
own trip to Israel in March.
Militants attack
Pakistan prison
A jewel thief who struck
the lavish Carlton International Hotel in the French
Riviera resort of Cannes
made off with $136 million in
diamond-encrusted watches
and gems, making it one of
the biggest jewel heists in
history, French authorities
reported Monday.
Initial estimates of the stolen jewels after the brazen
midday theft Sunday put their
value at $53 million. A subsequent inventory disclosed that
more had been taken from a
poorly guarded hotel room,
where other items were being
stored for a diamond exhibit
by Dubai-based Leviev diamond house, Philippe Vique
of the regional prosecutor’s
office told local media.
Nice Matin, a leading newspaper in the region, speculated that the heist might be the
most costly in history, eclipsing a $119 million take from a
2008 robbery at a similar jewel
exhibit in Paris.
Security for the diamond
exhibit, which opened July 20
and was to continue through
August, was grossly insufficient, the newspaper said. It
quoted unnamed detectives
as saying the Carlton is difficult to protect because its
doors open onto the Croisette
promenade, which is teeming
with tourists and celebrities
On Sunday, a man wearing
a ball cap and a scarf across
his face broke into the landmark hotel — which featured
prominently in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1955 film “To Catch a
Thief,” starring Cary Grant
and Grace Kelly — and made
off with bags of Chopard diamond jewelry that were in the
private room of an American
employee of the famed jeweler, news agencies reported.
The raid, which occurred
swiftly and without gunfire
or injury, raised suspicions
that the notorious “Pink Panthers” jewel thieves were
rebuilding their network.
Two recent prison breakouts
freed three key members of
the gang that Interpol says
has stolen more than $400
million in jewels over the
past 15 years.
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HISTORIC HOME: Civil rights landmark on verge of collapse, B8
q
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TEEN JOBS PROGRAM: Director says she’s not giving up despite obstacles, B5
B
RICK DAVIS
The one
speech
you won’t
hear
Columnist’s note: President
Barack Obama is scheduled to
speak this afternoon at Amazon.
Odds are, his speech is already
written. If not, I humbly offer
this one in its stead.
My fellow Americans,
Good afternoon. Thank you
for having me in Chattanooga.
Some of you
are surprised
I’m here. A
liberal president in a state
as Republican
as this? Look
around. I have
few friends
David Cook here. Did your
U.S. senators
Commentary
even bother to
come today? Did your governor
or Rep. Fleischmann?
So why did I?
I came because Chattanooga
is the exception to the rule. I
came because Chattanooga has
something most places around
this country covet.
Chattanooga has jobs and
innovation, creativity and
excitement. At a time when
poverty is becoming commonplace, when four out of five
Americans will taste the bitter
cup of economic insecurity at
some point in their lives, I both
love and fear what your city
offers.
I love it because it’s reminiscent of the America that once
was.
But I fear we may never
return to those days again.
For the past few weeks,
I’ve been traveling the country, talking about jobs and the
economy. Mainly, it’s theater
and spectacle. Like a magician, I juggle one illusion after
another, trying to prop up your
faith with press-conference
words and flowery, vigorous
speeches about a broken system that’s supposed to serve
you, the people.
I’m not going to do that
today. Our hearts are beginning to crack, and our ears are
growing deaf. My choir has
heard me preach enough; today
I am in the lion’s den.
Today, let’s tell the truth.
The reality of the American
Dream is that it’s becoming an
American nightmare.
Look at where I am today:
Amazon’s distribution center.
I’m supposed to praise this as
a place to rebuild the middle
class?
It’s preposterous to come
here, a place that hires temp
workers. And if you’re not a
See COOK, Page B5
Officials say
violence
‘spilling over’
to Cleveland
Court time
By Tyler Jett
Staff Writer
Staff Photo by Dan Henry
Jordan Sharp, 11, left, and his cousin Anthony Byrd, 7, play basketball Monday in the First
Bible Methodist Church parking lot in East Lake.
See violence, Page B5
JULY WEATHER
BY THE NUMBERS
n 7: Days above 90
degrees
n 4.47: Inches of rain in an
average Chattanooga July
n 7.79: Inches of rain this
July
n 80: Chattanooga’s
average temperature in July
n 78.2: Average
temperature this July so far
Source: National Weather Service,
Morristown, Tenn.
Northern air cooling Tennessee Valley
By Shelly Bradbury
Staff Writer
It’s cool. And that’s weird.
Temperatures dropped to a balmy
62 degrees in the Scenic City on
Monday morning, sparking a citywide water cooler debate on the
cause of the unseasonable weather.
It’s an early fall, some said. All
the hot air is in Washington, argued
others. Hell froze over. Witchcraft.
Obama’s visit today is causing the
temps to drop.
But National Weather Service
meteorologist Anthony Cavallucci
begged to differ.
“Well, it’s probably not because
of that,” he said, laughing. “We had
some cool air from Canada that has
filtered into the area.”
The Northern air mass is drier
and cooler than the more-tropical air
Rand Paul says he’s ‘very
supportive’ of Alexander
By Andy Sher
Nashville Bureau
NASHVILLE — Republican
Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky says
he’s “very supportive” of fellow
U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander of
Tennessee. Thinks he’s a “great
senator.” Really hopes Alexander
doesn’t get an opponent. Wants
him to win re-election in 2014.
But the tea party firebrand said
Monday that’s not an endorsement
of two-term incumbent Alexander
as the two senators stood side by
side in Nashville.
Paul’s comments came as he
and Alexander met with reporters
before heading into a joint forum
they sponsored on public charter
schools.
With Tennessee and national
tea party groups and other hardright conservatives vowing to field
a GOP primary challenge to Alexander next year, Paul, a potential
2016 presidential candidate, was
asked if he plans to endorse the
Tennessean. “I think it’s a sort of
a fun parlor game that the media
gets involved with,” Paul chided
Some Cleveland residents
have a message for Chattanooga
folk: Get yourself and your problems out of here.
On Monday night, Cleveland
police issued a warrant for the
arrest of Cordarrius Dewon
Cochran on 12 charges: 10 counts
of reckless endangerment and
two counts of aggravated assault.
The warrants come after a shooting outside Luv 2 Dance Studio
at 2007 Cleveland Ave. SE on
Sunday morning. A Chattanooga
resident had rented the building
for a party.
Police say Cochran, 23, fired
10 shots around 2 a.m. Sunday.
Bullets shattered a car window,
spraying glass on a passenger.
Cochran’s shots allegedly injured
two other people, pierced another car and struck at least one
house. The victim’s injuries were
not life threatening.
Freddy Mora and his wife,
Nadya, operate Luv 2 Dance Studio, and about a year ago they
began renting the event hall to
make a little extra money. Most
of the parties have ended in
peace, he said, but there have
been exceptions. In particular,
he blames visitors from Chattanooga.
Since about April, with violence here causing Chattanooga
police to crack down on local
event halls, some Chattanooga
residents have begun to rent
Mora’s dance studio. Before the
last three parties, Mora said, he
has alerted Cleveland police and
advised them to increase patrol
in the area.
For last weekend’s party,
which began Saturday night and
crawled into early Sunday, Mora
rented the property to Chattanooga native Mon Franklin.
“We don’t want Chattanooga
people coming up here; I guess
I should have realized it,” Mora
said Monday. “But they told me
they weren’t going to cause any
more problems, and we had
more police officers in the area.
I don’t know what else you can
do. People want to shoot with
police around? That’s crazy.”
Last week, Chattanooga Dep-
that typically blows through Chattanooga from the Gulf of Mexico,
Cavallucci said. And that’s what’s
dropping temperatures.
This month has been one of the
coolest and rainiest in Chattanooga’s
recent history — with rain falling on
20 of the month’s 28 days by Monday. More than 46 inches of rain has
See WEATHER, Page B5
Radio station
becomes ‘Kidd 96’
in honor of host
“
Staff report
Rand Paul has
certainly earned my
respect for the way he
speaks out and works on
education, and I hope I
can earn his.
”
— Sen. Lamar Alexander
reporters. “I’d rather not go there
but I hate to be painted as, ‘Oh, I’ve
come here and I’m not endorsing
him,’ OK, because I think that’s the
wrong message to send,” Paul continued. He said he hopes Alexander
“accepts that.”
”I hope he wins re-election and
I’m very supportive of him, he said.
“I’m here for education. I’m here to
learn from Sen. Alexander’s expertise and Tennessee’s.”
On Sunday, Paul attended a Williamson County fundraiser for state
Sen. Jack Johnson, R-Franklin, at
which he endorsed Johnson, who
has no opponent.
Alexander said he does under-
The Associated Press
U.S. Sens. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., right, and Rand Paul, R-Ky.,
speak to reporters Monday at a charter school in Nashville.
stand and noted the only other
U.S. senator who has endorsed him
at this point is fellow Tennessee
Republican Bob Corker, who joined
most of the state GOP’s political
establishment in doing so.
“We’re not here to endorse each
other,” Alexander said. “What I try
to do is earn the respect of my colleagues. And Rand Paul has certainly earned my respect for the
way he speaks out and works on
education, and I hope I can earn
his.”
Alexander, the ranking Republican on the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, said, “We’re not here about
endorsements. We’re here about
how can we help teachers, and
See Alexander, Page B5
■ To contact Local News • Phone: 423-757-6317 • Fax: 423-668-5062 • Email: [email protected]
WDOD-FM 96.5 will honor
the life of nationally syndicated
disc jockey Kidd Kraddick by
renaming the station “KIDD 96”
on Wednesday for 24 hours, station officials said. Kraddick died
Saturday from a brain aneurysm
while playing golf in New Orleans.
“This is just a small way we
can give back to a man who gave
Chattanooga, and his listeners,
so much,” WDOD operations
manager Danny Howard said
in a news release. “He has provided countless laughs, raised
thousands of dollars for Kidd’s
Kids, and made memories we
will never forget.”
The station will relive some
of Kraddick’s best moments
throughout the week with “Best
Of” editions of “Kidd Kraddick
in the Morning.”
The change takes effect
Wednesday morning after “Kidd
Kraddick in the Morning” at 10
a.m. and will honor Kidd for 24
hours, a news release stated.
“Hits 96” will return Thursday.
• • • timesfreepress.com....
Breaking News: 423-757-News
B2 • Tuesday, July 30, 2013
OBITUARIES
HAMILTON COUNTY
Mary Lynn Bingham
Mary Lynn McGuffey Bingham, of Hixson, went home to
be with her
Lord and
Savior on
Monday, July
29, 2013. She
was 75 years
old.
M a r y
Ly n n w a s
a longtime
resident of
the Chattanooga area
and a 1955 graduate of Central
High School.
She was a member of Stuart Heights Baptist Church, the
Sand Zansen Sunday School
Class and the Ball Club.
Mary Lynn loved to play the
piano and organ at churches
and on Wednesday mornings at
Morning Pointe Assisted Living
in Hixson.
Mary Lynn was a loving wife,
mother, grandmother and great
friend to many.
She is survived by her loving husband of 48 years, Sam
Bingham; three children, Samuel
Montgomery Bingham Jr., Mitchell Blain Bingham and Melody
Lynn (Marc) Puglise; four grandchildren, Austin Blain Bingham,
Reagan Bingham, Arthur Puglise and Owen Puglise; brother,
Arthur Blain (Kaye) McGuffey;
several nieces and nephews.
The family will receive
friends from 4 to 8 p.m. on
Wednesday and noon to 1 p.m.
on Thursday at the North Chapel.
A celebration of life service
for Mary Lynn will be held at 1
p.m. on Thursday at the funeral
home with Rev Darrell Davenport officiating.
Burial will be in National
Cemetery.
Arrangements are by the
North Chapel of Chattanooga Funeral Home, Crematory
and Florist, 5401 Highway 153,
Hixson.
Please share your thoughts
a n d m e m o r i e s a t w w w.
chattanooganorthchapel.com.
Gene Brown
Joseph Eugene “Downtown”
Brown, 70, of Chattanooga died
Saturday, July 27, 2013, after a
brief battle with cancer.
Graveside services will be
held 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, July
31, at Chattanooga National
Cemetery.
Please share your thoughts
a n d m e m o r i e s a t w w w.
chattanoogaeastchapel.com.
Arrangements are by Chattanooga Funeral Home, East
Chapel, 404 S. Moore Road,
Chattanooga.
Alfred Burton
Alfred Taylor Burton, 78, of
Chattanooga passed away Saturday, July 27, 2013, in a local
hospital.
He was
of the Baptist faith. He
was a veteran of the U.S.
Army having
served in
Germany.
Survivors
include his
wife, Ruthie F. Burton; two sons, Tony
Burton, of Fairview, Tenn., and
Shane Burton, of Chattanooga;
one daughter, Hayley L. (Josh)
Headrick, of Chattanooga; three
grandchildren; two stepgrandchildren; one sister, Sandra Dixson, of East Ridge.
A graveside service will be
held at 3 p.m. Wednesday at
Chattanooga National Cemetery.
There will be no visitation.
Memorial contributions may
be made to the American Lung
Association 1301 Pennsylvania
Ave. NW, Suite 800, Washington,
DC 20004.
Please share your thoughts
a n d m e m o r i e s a t w w w.
C h a t t a n o o ga E a s t B ra i n e rd
Chapel.com.
Arrangements are by the East
Brainerd Chapel of Chattanooga Funeral Home, Crematory &
Florist, 8214 East Brainerd Road.
Ursula Cornish
Ursula Bartlett Cornish, 69,
of Chattanooga, passed away
Saturday, July 27, 2013.
Funeral arrangements to be
announced by Lane Funeral
Home, Ashland Terrace, 8773524.
ane Funeral Home
Lt. Col. Andy Cupp
Lt. Col. John Andrew “Dixie”
Cupp III USAF Ret. of Chattanooga passed away on Saturday,
July 27, 2013, at the home of his
father, former Hamilton County
Sheriff John A. Cupp, Jr., after a
28-month battle with Metastatic
Melanoma.
He was born on Sept. 29, 1959
in Chattanooga.
He attended Boyd Buchanan School
and served
33 years, 4
months and
12 days in
the Air Force.
He provided
support to
Operations
Deliberate
Force, Allied
Force, Iraqi
Freedom and
Enduring Freedom.
He was preceded in death
by his mother, Carolyn Bridges
Cupp.
Survived by his father, John,
stepmother, Dotsy Weaver
Cupp; his wife, Margie Cupp and
son, Ryan, of Jacksonville, Fla.;
son, Adam Cupp and daughter,
Alyssa Clausen, of Omaha, Neb.;
sisters, Phyllis (George) Taylor;
Darlene Smyth; brother, George
(Lisa) Cupp. He is survived by
three nieces, Jennifer, Laura and
Sarah.
Andy requests no flowers but
please consider The American
Cancer Society, 6221 Shallowford
Road, Suite 102, Chattanooga,
TN 37421, and Hospice of Chattanooga, 4411 Oakwood Drive,
Chattanooga, TN 37416.
Andy and his family would
like to thank the doctors, nurses
and staff at Tennessee Oncology
and the San Antonio Military
Medical Center where his care
was outstanding.
Also a special thanks to Captain/Doctor Holly Hoffman for
all her assistance.
Visitation will be from 3
until 8 p.m. Wednesday, July 31,
2013, at the Chattanooga Funeral
Home East Chapel, 404 S. Moore
Road, Chattanooga.
A Celebration of Life service will be held at 11 a.m. on
Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013, at Tyner
Church of Christ, 6620 Bonny
Oaks Drive, Chattanooga, with
Col. J.D. Willis and ministers
George and John Cupp officiating.
Burial will follow in Chattanooga National Cemetery with
full military honors provided
by the 118th Base Honor Guard,
Department of the United States
Air Force.
Please share your thoughts
a n d m e m o r i e s a t w w w.
ChattanoogaEastChapel.com.
Arrangements are by the Chattanooga Funeral Home Crematory
& Florist, East Chapel, 404 S.
Moore Road, Chattanooga, TN
37412.
Agnes Eustice
Agnes Marie Eustice, 86, of
Hixson, passed away Saturday
July 27, 2013.
Services will be held at 2 p.m.
today in the funeral home chapel with the Rev. Melvin Walker
officiating.
Condolences and memories may be shared at www.
williamsonandsons.com.
Arrangements are by Williamson & Sons Funeral Home,
8852 Dayton Pike Soddy-Daisy,
TN 37379.
Mike Faulkner
Mike R. Faulkner, 60, of Chattanooga, passed away Sunday,
July 28, 2013.
He was formerly of Rosalie,
Ala., and was
a member of
IATSE, Local
140.
He was a
loving husband, father,
papaw and
friend.
He was
preceded in
death by his
father, Ralph
E. Faulkner; and brother, Ray
Dee Faulkner.
Survivors include his wife,
Laura E. Parker Faulkner; daughters, Stacey Vaughn and Heather
Merriman; sons-in-law, Jimmy
Cannon and Ken Merriman;
stepdaughter, Meghan O’Connor; five grandchildren, Carlie,
Caitlin, Cassie, Cade and Madilyn; one great-granddaughter,
Harper; mother, June Harvey
Faulkner, of Rosalie, Ala.; brother, Archie L. Faulkner, of Birmingham, Ala.; sister, Donna
(Jim) Phillips, of Athens, Ga.;
mother-in-law, Jean D. Parker, of Chattanooga; nieces and
nephews, Susan Faulkner, Becky
Phillips Kushner, Daniel Phillips
and David Phillips.
Funeral services will be 1
p.m. Wednesday at Lane Funeral Home, Ashland Terrace with
the Rev. Jim Phillips officiating.
Interment will follow in
Rosalie Baptist Church Cemetery. Visit www.landfh.com to
share condolences. Visitation is
4:30-8:30 p.m. today and 11:30-1
p.m. Wednesday at Lane Funeral Home, Ashland Terrace, 8773524.
ane Funeral Home
Hamilton County
Mary Lynn Bingham
Gene Brown
Alfred Burton
Ursula Cornish
Lt. Col. Andy Cupp
Agnes Eustice
Mike Faulkner
Adele Hampton
Adella Harris
Martha Haynes
Carlos Hood Sr.
Mary Hutton
Ruby McCallie
Patricia McDaniel
Bryan Moody
Elinora Scruggs
Johnnie Snyder
Mary Speed
Robert Stinnett Sr.
Tennessee
Johnny Carter
Mary Hamilton
Paul Isbell
Daniel Merrell
Aileen Porter
Charles Ridings
Georgia
Crystal Baker
William Basham
Donald McGill
Alabama
Virginia Biddle
Elizabeth Mayes
Leonard Smith
EDITOR’S NOTE: Obituaries printed in today’s edition
are submitted by funeral homes. The newspaper prints
the notices as provided. The first 50 words are free.
A charge of 50 cents per word is made for each word
after that. The photo charge is $25. For information on
an individual obituary, contact the appropriate funeral
home. The deadline for obituaries is 3 p.m. daily.
n For more information about obituaries or to order a
laminated memorial bookmark, call 423-757-6348 or go
to memorialbookmarks.netfirms.com/chattanooganew.
n To place an In Memory ad, contact the classified
advertising department at 757-6200.
Adele Hampton
Adele Bethel Hampton, 88,
daughter of the late Edwin Alexander Bethel and Katharine Lasley Bethel,
passed away
early Sunday
morning,
July 28, 2013,
as a result
of complications from
Pa rk i n s on s
disease.
Born on
Nov. 16, 1924,
in Montgomery Ala., her father
was a major in the Army and a
graduate of the famed class of
1915 at West Point.
The family lived in Paris for
several years in the 1920s where
Major Bethel was stationed at
the War College.
Following his untimely death
in 1934, Adele and her mother
Katharine moved to Lookout
Mountain to live with grandparents William Lasley and Adele
Marshall Lasley.
Adele briefly attended Sweetbriar College but graduated from
the University of Chattanooga
with degrees in chemistry and
music.
It was there that she met her
late husband, Dr. John Cantrell
Hampton. They were married
in 1949.
Adele worked for several
years at the Chattanooga Medicine Co. before becoming a fulltime mother and civic leader.
Her accomplishments
include zone chairman of the
Garden Club of America, a longtime board member of the AIM
Center in Chattanooga, and most
significantly, a founder and first
board president for the Tennessee River Gorge Trust in 1981.
The Trust created the Adele
Hampton Lifetime Achievement
award in her honor in 1995.
She is survived by three children, John Bethel Hampton, of
Marietta Ga., William Lasley
Hampton, of Durham N.C., and
Mary (Al) Hampton Ceren, of
Ooltewah; and a grandson, Peter
Hampton Ceren.
A memorial service will take
place at the Church of the Good
Shepherd, Lookout Mountain at
a yet to be determined date in
August.
The family would like to
express their gratitude to Danielle Tate, Stacy Bridges, Tammy
Hirschkorn and Jennifer Walls of
Amara Healthcare, and to Hospice of Chattanooga.
They also request that, in lieu
of flowers, a donation be made
to Tennessee River Gorge Trust,
Church of the Good Shepherd,
Hospice of Chattanooga or the
charity of their choice.
Visit www.heritagefh.com to
share words of comfort to the
family.
Arrangements are by Heritage Funeral Home, 7454 East
Brainerd Road, Chattanooga, TN
37421.
dy (Otis) Smartt and Christy
(Carl) Smith; seven brothers,
Norman (Crystal) Harvey Jr.,
Andre (Toni) Williams, Marcel
(Tanya) Williams, Kevin (Gaye)
Mckenzie, Sean (Dawn) Smith,
Lamonte Smith, of Huntsville,
Lamonte Bowman and a host of
other relatives and friends who
loved her dearly.
The body will lie in state
after 1 p.m. today.
Family will receive friends
from 6-7 p.m. at Advantage
Funeral & Cremation Services
at 1724 McCallie Ave.
Funeral services will be held
at 2 p.m. Wednesday, July 31,
2013, at the Church of the First
Born, 1813 St. Elmo Ave.
Interment will follow at
Tyner Cemetery.
Arrangements are by Advantage Funeral & Cremation
Service Franklin-StricklandPinkard-Bryan-Smith Funeral
Directors, 1724 McCallie Ave.,
Chattanooga.
Martha Haynes
Martha Jean Hill Haynes, 87,
of Chattanooga, died on Monday,
July 29, 2013.
Funeral services will be held
at 11 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 1, at St.
Martin’s Episcopal Church.
Interment will follow in
Lakewood Memory Gardens,
South.
The family will receive
friends from 4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, July 31, at Heritage Funeral
Home, East Brainerd Road.
Carlos Hood Sr.
parents, Anderson and Mamie
Lively Hood; one granddaughter,
Kristen Hood; three brothers,
Edward, James and Hoyt Hood.
He is survived by his loving
wife of over 46 years, Sharon
Ford Hood; and two sons, Carlos
Jr. (Gwen) Hood, of Georgetown,
Joey Hood, of Ooltewah; three
daughters, Tammy (Ryan) Babb,
of Chattanooga, Beth Hood, and
Angie (Greg) Moore, both of
Ooltewah; one brother, Henry
Hood and Elizabeth Gentry, both
of Harrison; grandchildren, Jake,
Britani, Dustin, Hilary, Cody,
Kayla, Bailey, Alexis, Leila, Vincent, Kyree and Mckenzie; three
great-grandchildren, Braxton,
Nolan and Gavin; several nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services will be at
2 p.m. Wednesday, July 31, in
the funeral home chapel with
Rev. Steven Granger officiating.
Burial will be in New Mcdonald
Cemetery.
The family will receive
friends from 5 to 9 p.m. today at
the funeral home.
You may visit our online
guestbook at www.turnerfamily
funeralhome.com.
Arrangements by the Highway 58 Chapel of Turner Funeral
Home, 3913 Webb Road. 622-3171.
Mary Hutton
Mary Elizabeth Evans Hutton, 75, of Chattanooga, on Sunday, July 28,
2013, passed
over to her
heavenly
home surrounded by
her children
and family.
Mary was
born in Newport, Ky., on
Nov. 22, 1937
to the late Oliver and Marjorie
Kerr Evans and was the widow
of Albert Grover Hutton.
She was a member of One
Accord Community Church.
Mary loved her church family,
they were special to her.
She was also preceded in
death by her children, Arthur,
Brian and Melissa; and two
brothers, Melvin Kelley and
John Evans.
Left to celebrate her life are
her daughters, Kathleen (Jay)
Newman, of Tarzana, Calif.,
Marjorie Hutton, of Red Bank,
Angela (Vernon) Geering,
of Cincinnati, Ohio, Beverly
(Danny) Fowler, of Soddy-Daisy, Lisa Hutton, of East Ridge,
and Carolyn (Randy) Hutton,
of Red Bank; 21 grandchildren;
23 great-grandchildren; one
great-great-grandchild; nieces,
nephews, cousins, in-laws and
friends.
Funeral services will be 11
a.m. Wednesday at Lane Funeral Home, Ashland Terrace with
Rev. Ray Williams officiating.
Interment will follow in Hamilton Memorial Gardens.
Justin Fowler, Bradley Nelson, Paul Howard Jr., Matthew
Austin, Danny Cope and David
Evans will serve as pallbearers.
Visit www.lanefh.com to
share condolences. Visitation is
3-9 p.m. today at Lane Funeral
Home, Ashland Terrace, 8773524.
Carlos Lebron Hood Sr., a
beloved father, husband and
friend died suddenly Sunday,
July 28, 2013.
He was 64.
Carlos
was a lifelong resident
of Harrison
and was of
the Baptist
faith. He was
retired from
the Harrison
Bay State
Park and Roark Construction
Co.
An avid softball player, he
enjoyed model cars and listening to bluegrass music. He
was preceded in death by his
Ruby Jewell Langford McCallie, 96, of Chattanooga went
home to be with the Lord on
Sunday, July 28, 2013 at her home
surrounded by her children.
She was born on Dec. 22,
1916, to the late William Henry
Langford and Mary Melissa Beavers Langford, was a member of
The Church of God of Prophecy
of Rossville, retired in 1979 from
Borg Textile Corporation with 10
years of service, and had previ-
IN MEMORY
IN MEMORY
ously worked
at Peerless
Wo o l e n
Mills.
Her passions in life
we re G o d ,
church, family and cooking. Her love
and generosity will be
truly missed by all who knew her.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Floyd R. McCallie;
son, Howard L. “Billy” McCallie;
grandson, Arthur Christopher
McCallie; granddaughter, Mary
P. McCallie; brother, Jesse J. Langford; sister, Minnie M. Langford
Bullard; nephew, Bobby Lemons; great-grandson; and two
great-granddaughters. Survivors
include two sons, Charles R.
McCallie and Arthur L. (Regina)
McCallie; two daughters, Lynda
J. McCallie and Glenda Faye
McCallie (Edgar) Sosebee; brother, A.J. (WilloDean) Langford; 12
grandchildren; 22 great-grandchildren; 19 great-great-grandchildren; several nieces and
nephews.
Condolences may be sent to
www.lane-southcrestchapel.com.
Contributions may be made
to the American Cancer Society
at www.cancer.org.
Funeral services will be held
Friday at 1 p.m. in the South Crest
Chapel with Pastors Douglas R.
Stephenson and Harry Cooper
officiating.
Interment will follow in Lakewood Memory Gardens, South.
The family will receive
friends from 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday at the South
Crest Chapel of Lane Funeral
Home and Crematory, located
at the end of historic Missionary
Ridge, Rossville.
See OBITUARIES, Page B3
IN MEMORY
Nicholas Scott
Clayton
July 30, 1990-June 4, 2011
Happy 23rd Birthday, our
loving son, Today the angels
are singing Happy birthday
to you, while our hearts our
filled with your love and
wonderful memories. Twenty-three years ago God gave
us this precious baby boy,
that we love and cherish. We
watched you grow from a
child to being a man that we
were very proud of. You were
a loving son, brother, uncle,
husband, and Dad, but most
of all a best friend to us all.
Happy birthday son, we love
and miss you with all of our
hearts. Mom, Dad, Sean,
Alisha, Kayla and Lexi
IN MEMORY
ane Funeral Home
Ruby McCallie
Jamaha A. Garner
“Chops”
July 30, 1979 - Nov. 19, 2009
Missing you on your birthday.
Love forever, Mom
IN MEMORY
TERRY YATES
Nov. 25, 1954 - July 30, 2012
I can’t believe it’s already
been a year. Lots of love and
we miss you like crazy.
Broderick and Terri Smith
Adella Harris
Adella Vanessa Harris, 49,
went home to be with her Lord
and Savior Jesus Christ Monday,
July 22, 2013.
She lived
a full life and
graduated
from City
High School
class of 1982.
She dedi c a te d h e r
life to Christ
and became
a member of
the Church of the First Born.
She was preceded in death by
her grandmother, Addie Harris;
brother, Michael Harris; and her
father, Norman Harvey.
She leaves to cherish her
loving son, Brandon Moon;
her mother, Theresa (Robert)
Williams; three sisters, Lisa
(Edward) Richmond, Melo-
GARY KELLY
IN MEMORY
Valencia (Lencie)
Mosley
July 30, 1959 - Sept. 29, 2011
Thinking of you today with
love. April, Cedric, Kai, CJ,
Family and Friends.
Roland Hughes Jr.
May 18, 1935 - July 30, 2009
In loving memory of our
father and step-father who
went to be with the Lord four
years ago today. We miss
you so much. We will always
love you.
Eric, Cora Ann, Cheryl, Coleman, Kathy, grandchildren
and great-grandchildren
In loving memory on
your birthday, July 28th
We love and miss you
so much. Jane, Chris,
Khristie and grandsons
Gil&Curt
tremont
423.756.8603
35670076
...timesfreepress.com • • •
.
Obituaries
• Continued from Page B2
Patricia McDaniel
Patricia Elnora McDaniel,
77, of Chattanooga, passed away
Sunday evening, July 28,
2013 at her
home.
A lifelong
resident of
Chattanooga, she was
a 1954 graduate of Tyner
High School
and
was
a member of Red Bank Cumberland Presbyterian Church,
where her grandparents were
charter members.
She was preceded in death by
her husband of 50 years, Billy Joe
McDaniel; parents, Frank and
Loma Martin; sisters, Nell Manning, Kate Mauldin, Iva Haynes;
brothers, Yank Martin, Kenneth
Martin; sister-in-law, Mary Martin and brothers-in-law, Carl
Manning, Jimmy Mauldin and
Gordon Haynes.
She is survived by her sons,
Joe Billy (Maury) McDaniel,
Akie (Gayla) McDaniel, both of
Chattanooga and Marty (Kelly)
McDaniel, Knoxville; grandchildren, Jake, Andrew and Lindsey McDaniel, Casey (Jacob)
Hamby; great-grandchildren,
Lilith and Iris Hamby; sisters-inlaw, Betty Martin, Judy McDaniel, Jane Wooten; brother-in-law,
Bobby McDaniel; several nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services will be held
at 1 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 1, in the
funeral home chapel with Dr.
Jeff Sledge officiating.
Burial will follow in Chattanooga National Cemetery. Visit
www.heritagefh.com to share
words of comfort and view the
memorial tribute.
The family will receive
friends from 1 to 3 and 5 to 8
p.m. Wednesday and from 11
a.m.- 1 p.m. Thursday at Heritage Funeral Home, 7454 East
Brainerd Road.
Tracy, DesJarlais offer
jabbing welcomes to Obama
Staff Report
NASHVILLE — Republican U.S. Rep. Scott DesJarlais and his GOP primary
rival Jim Tracy don’t agree
on much, but the the two
4th Congressional District
candidates both are offering jabbing welcomes to
President Barack Obama
in advance of the president’s Chattanooga visit
today.
Tracy, a state senator
from Shelbville, released
a video in which the lawmaker sits in a rocking
chair and offers a folksy
but barbed welcome to
the president, saying, “We
conservatives in Tennessee just have to thank you.
Your left-wing polices have
created such a backlash we
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be 1
p.m. Wednesday, July 31, 2013, at
Heritage Funeral Home Chapel
with Rev. Al Kaschimer, officiating.
The interment will follow in
Chattanooga National Cemetery.
Visit www.heritagefh.com to
share words of comfort to the
family. The family suggests that
any memorial contributions be
made to the American Diabetes
Association Knoxville Office,
900 E. Hill Ave., Suite 240 Knoxville, TN 37915.
The family will receive
friends 4-8 p.m. today at Heritage Funeral Home, 7454 East
Brainerd Road.
Johnnie Snyder
Johnnie Snyder, 87, of Soddy-Daisy, passed away on Monday, July 29, 2013.
She was a member of Mountain View Baptist Church.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Pete Snyder; and
daughter, Judy Creasman.
Survivors include her sons,
Troy (Jane) Snyder, Sidney
(Regina) Snyder and Jackie
(Glenda) Snyder, all of Soddy-Daisy; sisters, Peggy Crittenden, Barbara Coffee, and Ann
Whitstone; seven grandchildren;
nine great-grandchildren; several great-great-grandchildren;
and several nieces and nephews.
Services will be at 2 p.m.
Wednesday, July 31, 2013, in the
funeral home chapel with the
Rev. Paul Forgey officiating.
Interment will follow at Presbyterian Cemetery.
Visitation is from 5 to 9 p.m.
today at the funeral home.
Condolences and memories
may be shared at www.williamson
andsons.com. Arrangements are
by Williamson & Sons Funeral
Home, 8852 Dayton Pike Soddy-Daisy, TN 37379.
Mary Speed
Bryan Moody
Bryan D. Moody Sr., 80, a resident of Tallahassee, Fla., passed
away July 29. 2013.
A son of the late Warren and
Albin Stephens Moody, he was
born July 30, 1932 in Chattanooga.
A retiree of the U.S. Navy,
he also retired as a comptroller from the Federal Correction
Institute.
He was a member of the
Shriner’s Club in Chattanooga
and loved fishing. He attended
Immanuel Baptist Church and
Morningside Baptist Church.
He is survived by his wife,
Juanita Lowe Moody; children,
Bryan Moody Jr. (Sherry), Stephen (Kay) Moody, Jan (Antony)
Capstic, Rhonda Darling, Monica Neal; stepchildren, Jack L.
Gillam (Robyn), Allan Gillam
(Sheila); brother, Bud Moody;
sisters, Kathy Hixon, Mary Jackson; numerous grandchildren
and five great-grandchildren.
The funeral is 6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013, at Abbey Funeral Home, Tallahassee, Fla., with
visitation to follow until 7:30
p.m.
Memorial donations may be
made to Cancer Research. The
online guestbook may be signed
at www.abbeyfh.com.
Elinora Scruggs
Elinora Bernadina “Bunt”
Scruggs, 80, of Chattanooga,
passed away Saturday, July 27,
2013.
She was a longtime resident
of Chattanooga and was of the
Church of Christ faith. “Bunt”
was retired from AT&T with 18
years of service.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, Marshall M.
Scruggs; brothers, Marvin and
Cecil McDowell; sisters, Ruby
Helton and Dorothy Waters.
Surviving relatives; sons,
Jeff Scruggs and Gary (Adina)
Scruggs, both of Hixson; sister,
Wilma Hicks, of Chattanooga;
grandchildren, Jessica Leigh
(Ben) Stansberry, Natalie Faith,
Kendall Mark, Jacob Lee, and Ian
David Marshall Scruggs; several
Missionary Mary E. Speed,
89, of Chattanooga, passed away
Saturday, July 27, 2013, at her residence.
She was a member of John
Mark Baptist Church.
She was preceded in death by
her parents, Fletcher and Azzie
Collins; brother, William Colvin;
and adopted daughter, Beverly
King.
Survivors: sister, Lucille
Davis (Robert) Williams; brother, Fletcher Collins; a host of
nieces, nephews, cousins; special friends.
The body will lie in state
after 9:30 a.m. Wednesday at
Taylor Funeral Home with the
funeral to follow at 2:30 p.m.
with Pastor Robert Williams as
the eulogist.
Burial: Highland Memorial
Gardens.
Robert Stinnett Sr.
Robert N. Stinnett Sr., 80, of
Soddy-Daisy, passed away on
Sunday, July 28, 2013.
Robert attended Lupton
Drive Baptist Church, where
he was active in the Super Sonshiners, until his failing health
prevented him from attending.
He was an active mason and
was a member of the F&AM
Lodge in Red Bank.
A painter by trade, Robert
worked with TVA for many
years. Following his retirement,
he worked for Goodwill Industry.
He was preceded in death by
a beloved grandson, Christopher
Stinnett; mother and step-father,
IN MEMORY
Philip Lloyd Cronnon
online
Go to www.timesfreepress.
com to see a video
now have control over the
Tennessee General Assembly and our congressional
delegation.
“And it’s been good for
the people of Tennessee,”
Tracy says. “You see, we
do things differently down
here. While you’ve been in
Washington racking up our
national debt of over $16
trillion, here in Tennessee
we have the lowest debt
ratio in the nation. There’s
a lot you can learn from
us.”
DesJarlais’ office issued
a release in which the congressman says the presiSue and Bill Williams; sister,
Inez Parker; brother, James Williams; and brother-in-law, Bobby
Clark.
Survivors
include his
wife of 59
years, Juani t a Ro ge rs
Stinnett;
two sons,
Bobby and
Randy Stinnett, both of
Soddy-Daisy;
five grandchildren, Amanda,
Blake, John, Daniel and Patrick
Stinnett; two great-grandchildren, Olivia and Emery Stinnett;
sister, Wilma Clark, of Ringgold,
Ga.; sister-in-law, Virginia Miller, of Jacksonville, Fla.; many
nieces and nephews.
A celebration of his life will
be held at 12:30 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013, in the funeral
home chapel with Rev. Roger
DeHart officiating.
Interment will follow in
Chattanooga National Cemetery
with military honors.
The family will receive
friends for visitation from 2 to
7 p.m. on Wednesday, July 31,
2013, at the funeral home. Flowers, condolences and memories
may be shared with the family
by visiting www.hamiltonfuneral
options.com.
Arrangements are by Hamilton Funeral Home & Cremation Services, 4506 Hixson Pike,
Hixson, TN 37343. 423-531-3975.
TENNESSEE
Johnny Carter
RICEVILLE — Johnny Clifton “Clif” Carter, 68, died Saturday, July 27, 2013, at Athens
Regional Medical Center. Funeral services 8 p.m. Wednesday in
chapel.
Burial 5 p.m. Thursday in
Short Creek Cemetery. Visitation 4-8 p.m. Wednesday at
Ziegler Funeral Home, Athens
is in charge of arrangements.
Mary Hamilton
ATHENS — Mary Eyvonne
Gourley Hamilton, 63, passed
away at her home Sunday, July
28, 2013.
Survivors include husband,
Rev. Larry Hamilton and seven
children.
Funeral 7 p.m. Wednesday
at Walker Valley Community
Church with visitation 4-7 p.m.
prior Interment at 11 a.m. Thursday, in Chestuee Cemetery.
Paul Isbell
DUNLAP — Paul Edward
Isbell, 83, formerly of Walbridge,
Ohio, passed away Sunday, July
28, 2013.
Born in Walbridge, Ohio, Paul
worked for the C & O Railroad,
Hostess Bakery, and Dana Corp.
He was preceded in death
by his wife, Lois Isbell; son,
Doug Isbell; parents, Kenneth
and Esther Isbell; brothers,
Clark Isbell and Keith Isbell;
sister, Marlene Troxel; stepsons, Michael Brock and Harlan
Brock.
Paul is survived by his daughters, Terri (Isbell) Kiener and
Marcia Isbell; son-in-law, Jeff
Kiener; daughter-in-law, Vicki
Brock; stepson, Brian Brock;
and many grandchildren and
great-grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held
at 10 a.m. CDT Wednesday, July
31, 2013 in the Ewton Funeral
Home chapel.
Burial will follow in Condra Cemetery. The family will
receive friends from 4 to 8 p.m.
CDT today at the funeral home.
dent “could certainly learn
a thing or two about creating jobs from Tennessee.
Thanks to our state’s low
taxes, right-to-work policies and pro-jobs regulatory framework, Tennessee
is leading the country in
innovation and opportunity.
“Unfortunately,” DesJarlais added, “President
Obama’s approach of bigger government, more
spending and higher taxes
has created a situation
where the federal government is actually hurting
economic growth across
our state.”
DesJarlais, Tracy and
state Rep. Joe Carr, R-Lascassas, are duking it out in
the GOP’s 2014 primary.
Arrangements by Ewton
Funeral Home, 6936 Highway 28,
Dunlap, TN 37327 www.ewton
funeralhome.com (423-949-2112).
Daniel Merrell
GREASY CREEK — Daniel
W. Merrell, 52, died Sunday, July
28, 2013.
Service will be 7 p.m.
Wednesday, July 31, in the chapel of Serenity Funeral Home of
Etowah.
Please visit guestbook at
www.serenityfunerals.com. The
family will receive friends from
5 to 7 p.m. prior to the service.
Aileen Porter
SPRING CITY — Aileen A.
“Nana” Porter, 85, died Sunday,
July 28, 2013, at her daughter’s
home.
A lifetime resident of Spring
City, Aileen was the daughter of
the late Walter and Viola Hall
Alley. She was a graduate of
Spring City High School.
Aileen was a retired dental
assistant and worked for Dr. B.E.
LeNoir in Spring City for over
30 years.
She was a member of Wolf
Creek Baptist Church and
served as the Sunday school
secretary for 50 years and also
taught GA’s for many years.
Aileen was preceded in death
by her husband, Wallace W. Porter; and sister, Ada A. Frye.
Survivors include her daughter, Jane (Harold) Fisher, Spring
City; sisters, Helen Duckworth,
of Decatur and Lucille Davison, of Calhoun, Ga.; brothers,
Gene Alley, of Jackson, Tenn.,
Chester (Barbara) Alley, of Dayton and Walter (Jo) Alley and
Charles (Betty Jane) Alley, both
of Hixson; grandchildren Bethany (Brian) Horton, of Spring
City, Brittany (Curtis) Dean, of
Dayton and Aaron (Terri) Fisher, of West Lafayette, Ind.; and
great-grandchildren, Chandler
and Chase Horton, Keyli Hickey,
Jack Simmons and Lauren and
Matthew Fisher.
Funeral service will be
held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, July
31, 2013, at Wolf Creek Baptist Church with the Rev. Paul
Forgey officiating.
The body will lie in state at
the church 30 minutes prior to
the service. Interment will follow in Spring City Memorial
Gardens. The family will receive
friends from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6
to 8 p.m. today at the funeral
home. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Wolf Creek
Baptist Church, 5225 Wolf Creek
Road, Spring City, TN 37381.
Vaughn Funeral Home,
Spring City is in charge of
arrangements. www.vaughn-funeral-home.com.
Charles Ridings
MARY VILLE —Charles
“Bus” Ridings is now at Jesus’
feet waiting on the rest of us.
He has spent the last 91 years
preparing for this moment.
Funeral services at 2:30 p.m.
today, July 30, at Smith Chapel,
Maryville. Interment at West
Millers Cove Baptist Church
Cemetery. 865-983-1000, www.
SmithMaryville.com.
GEORGIA
Crystal Baker
RISING FAWN — Crystal
Clarise Bird Baker, 51, departed
this life Saturday, July 27, 2013
following a car accident.
She was preceded in death by
her father, Alfred Atlee Bird and
her husband, Steven Ellis Baker.
Crystal attended First Pentecostal Church in Bowling Green,
Ky.
Survivors include her daughter, Danielle Baker (Tommy)
Martin, of Bowling Green, Ky.;
mother, Dee Ann (Frank) Butler, of Summerville, Ga.; siblings,
Todd (Tonya) Bird, of Rising
The Associated Press
HARRISBURG, Pa. —
William Warren Scranton, a
former Pennsylvania governor, presidential candidate
and ambassador to the United Nations, has died. He was
96.
Scranton died of a cerebral
hemorrhage Sunday night at
a retirement community in
Montecito, Calif., where he
lived with his wife, a family
spokesman said Monday.
Scranton, a progressive
Republican from the northeastern Pennsylvania city
named after his wealthy
family, was elected to Congress in 1960. He served one
term before he was elected
as Pennsylvania’s 38th governor in 1962.
His foray into presidential politics occurred in 1964,
Fawn, Ga., Jeana (David) Harrer, of Bowling Green, Ky., Jason
McCullough, of Walker County,
Ga.; granddaughter, Alexis Summer Bush; and several nieces
and nephews.
Family will receive friends
from 2 until 8 p.m. today at the
funeral home. Graveside services will be held 1 p.m. CDT
Wednesday, July 31, 2013 at
White House Memorial Gardens, White House, Tenn.
Arrangements are by W.L.
Wilson & Sons Funeral Home,
Fort Oglethorpe.
William Basham
LaFAYETTE — William
Basham, 70, passed away Saturday, July 27, 2013, at a Dalton
Hospital.
He was born in Roxanne,
Ill., and spent the last 30 years
in Paducah, Ky., before moving
to Lafayette to be closer to his
family.
He was preceded in death
by his parents, William and
Ella Mae Duncan Basham; sisters, Paula Kay Cox and Sharon
Basham; and a grandson, Bobby
Joe Basham.
He is survived by his children, Velva (Tommy) Butler,
of LaFayette, Charles Burke, of
Sacramento, Calif., John (Kim)
Burke, of Howell, Mich., Robin
Burke, of East Prairie, Mo., Rodney (Misty) Basham, of Wyatt,
Mo., and Ron Eakin, of Roxanne,
Ill. A special Friend Freddy
Woodard of Paducah, Ky also
survives.
A private family memorial
service will be held at a later
date.
We invite you to visit the
Basham family guest book
and send a message of comfort to www.serenityfunerals.
com. Serenity Funeral Home
and Cremation Center, LLC
of Cleveland is in charge of
arrangements.
Donald McGill
RINGGOLD — Donald Herbert “Fuzz” McGill, 65, passed
away Sunday, July 28, 2013.
He was born in LaFayette, Ga.
to the late
Bart Herbert “B.H.”
and Tommie
Mullinax
McGill.
He was a
lifelong resident of the
Northwest
Georgia area
and a graduate of Gordon Lee High School
Class of 1966.
He was a former welder with
Combustion Engineering, Gaston County and Signal Machine.
He enjoyed playing golf and
watching all sports. He had also
enjoyed coaching his children
in sports.
He was a member of Fellowship Baptist Church in Chickamauga, Ga.
Along with his parents, he
was preceded in death by his
brother: Alan McGill.
He is survived by his wife,
Kim McMahan McGill, of Ringgold; his children, Mark (Laura)
McGill, of Franklin, Tenn., Cynthia (Kevin) Guest, of Rock
Spring, Ga., Rachel McGill,
of Ringgold; stepdaughter,
Michelle (Jarod) Floyd, of Soddy-Daisy; grandchildren: Megan
McGill, Kayla McGill, Lanier Guest, Justis Floyd, Jayden
Floyd; sister-in-law, Sherry
McGill, of Debary, Fla.; several
nieces and nephews.
The family will receive
friends from 5 to 8 p.m. today
and Wednesday morning an
hour prior to the service.
Funeral services will be held
at 11 a.m. Wednesday, July 31,
2013 in the chapel with the Rev.
Terry Burns officiating.
Burial will follow in Chickamauga Cemetery, Chickamauga.
during his one term as governor, when he emerged as
a moderately liberal alternative to conservative Arizona
Sen. Barry Goldwater after
New York Gov. Nelson A.
Rockefeller dropped out of
the race.
Scranton said he ran
because he thought “someone had to oppose Goldwater,” but that he knew he
didn’t have a chance.
He committed to the race
barely a month before the
Republican convention but
lost the nomination by a 4-1
margin after a hoped-for
endorsement from former
President Dwight D. Eisenhower failed to materialize.
In the general election,
Goldwater lost to President
Lyndon B. Johnson by a landslide.
Online register book at
w w w.w i l s o n f u n e r a l h o m e .
com. Arrangements by Wilson
Funeral Homes, Chickamauga
Chapel, Chickamauga.
ALABAMA
Virginia Biddle
FORT PAYNE — Virginia S.
Biddle, 88, died Sunday, July 28,
2013.
Funeral will be 2 p.m. CDT
today, July 30 with the Rev.
Chester Shankles officiating.
Visitation will be from 10
a.m.-2 p.m. CDT at chapel of
Burt Funeral Home, Fort Payne,
Ala.
Elizabeth Mayes
STEVENSON — Elizabeth
Ann Thompson Mayes, 72, died
Sunday, July 28, 2013, at her
home.
Visitation 10 a.m-9 p.m. today
at Rudder Funeral Home in Stevenson.
Funeral at 2 p.m. Wednesday, July 31, at the funeral home
chapel. Interment in Price Cemetery in Hollywood, Ala www.
rudderfuneralhomes.com.
Leonard Smith
HENAGAR — Leonard L.
Smith, 81, died Sunday, July 28,
2013,at his residence.
Survivors include wife,
Doris Smith; daughter, Susan
(Jack) Walls; sons, Roger (Patsy)
Morelock, Bobby (Essie) Morelock, Chase Morelock; brother,
Nelson (Willodean) Smith; sisters, Letha Mae Myrick, Lorene
Pedigo; grandchildren, Kim,
Bradley, Brittney, Mandy, Kerri,
Derrick, Tammy, Jamie, Danny;
eight great-grandchildren; several nieces and nephews.
Mr. Smith was preceded in
death by his parents, John and
Rosie Creswell Smith; grandson, Jerry Morelock; son, Jimmy
Morelock; sister, Ludie Justice;
brothers, L.V., Lawson, Eason
and Melvin Smith.
Leave condolences online at
www.cornerstonefuneralchapel.
com.
Funeral services are at 11
a.m. Wednesday at Corner
Stone Funeral Chapel with Rev.
Nellon Smith officiating. Burial will follow in New Cannan
cemetery. Family will receive
friends from 4 to 8 p.m. today.
IN MEMORY
EDDIE D. WHITE
“Bobby Q. Day”
April 19, 1939 - July 30, 2011
With love, your wife, Carole
Ann Elmore White
IN MEMORY
James Tate Thomas
July 28, 1919 -Sept. 29, 2011
This date has two wonderful
memories, the day your were
born, so happy birthday, and
the day years later you married your beautiful wife Sue,
so happy anniversary.
You may have traveled on,
but you are in her heart and
memories every day. You are
missed, my sweet Uncle, by
me and all your friends and
family.
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Love, Mother
Former presidential
candidate Scranton dies
423-855-2051 • 8000 A E. Brainerd Rd.
Chattanooga, TN 37421
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35863503
The Associated Press
NASHVILLE — Gov.
Bill Haslam took office with
a 45-day freeze on implementing any new government rules.
Since that time, the administration has been using less
dramatic and less direct ways
of affecting the bureaucratic
regulatory process.
According to the Knoxville News Sentinel, there is
an effort in the Legislature to
end a practice of automatically approving proposed
rules promulgated by state
departments, boards and
commissions.
Sen. Mike Bell, a Riceville Republican, is chairman
of a committee reviewing all
rules.
Bell said some new rules
are required, but dated ones
need to go. Since Haslam took
office, 33 rules have ended.
Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • B3
35430606
State rules get
tighter scrutiny
Breaking News: 423-757-News
501-B Alamar Street, Fort Oglethorpe, GA • 706-866-3522
35863503
B4 • Tuesday, July 30, 2013
Region
• • • timesfreepress.com....
Breaking News: 423-757-News
Marion
court fine
plan not
working
Region
Digest
TRION, Ga.
Man charged
in dog stomping
Trion police Chief
Chad Spraggins said a man
stomped on a puppy’s head
Friday and then kicked the
animal off his front porch.
Michael David Brown
was booked into the Chattooga County Jail on Friday
on a charge of animal cruelty, the sheriff said.
Brown was released Saturday, Spraggins said.
By Ryan Lewis
Correspondent
JASPER, Tenn. — Marion County’s attempt to collect unpaid fines and court
costs has failed, and now
county leaders are going
to re-examine the issue in
hopes of coming up with a
permanent solution.
DALTON, Ga.
The County Commission
hired a collection agency
two years ago in hopes of
recouping the lost money,
but last week County Mayor
Dalton police have
John Graham said it’s just not
released a surveillance photo
working out.
of a truck investigators
“We’re not paying anybelieve was used in a July
Staff Photo by Shawn Paik
thing [for the collection ser23 vandalism spree that left
A van drives on U.S. Highway 41 in Marion County, Tenn., near Nickajack Lake. Road conditions,
vice],” he said. “The collector
more than 40 area businesses
although drivable, are in need of repair, especially on the shoulders. Railings are warped and the edges
gets a fixed rate off anything
with damaged windows.
of the road are easily chipped off.
he collects, but he’s not colInvestigators hope somelecting much money at all.”
one will recognize the vehiIn talking with officials at
cle and contact the police
the
collection agency, Gradepartment.
ham
said they “just make
The surveillance image
excuse after excuse,” and the
shows what appears to be a
county is still not getting any
late model Ford F-150 drivof the unpaid fines.
ing past Pye Honda about
“Maybe we need to send
4 a.m. on July 23. The truck
him
on packing and hire
is a light color, most likely
somebody else,” Commissilver, with silver wheels.
sioner Tommy Thompson
Investigators believe
said.
vandals used some type of
Tate, 59, and Thomas, 73, are comBy Ben Benton
Graham said he thinks the
slingshot and marbles to
Staff Writer
mercial catfishermen in Riverside
county
should look at replacRough
Roughtogether the last
damage the windows.
RIVERSIDE, Tenn. — Mother
who have worked
ing
the
firm.
Anyone with information
Nature has been unkind to the old
few decadesroad
at Thomas’
business,
road
work
work
127
127 “It’s not working,” he said.
is asked to call Detective
route U.S. Highway 41 takes around
Jay’s Furniture and Catfish. They
“It worked pretty good iniGreg Bates at 706-278-9085,
Aetna Mountain between Haletown
travel up and down old U.S. 41 on a
tially, but it’s not anymore.”
extension 137.
and Lookout Valley.
daily basis.
The contract between the
A seven-mile section of the road
“They need to redo it. It’s rough,”
county and the agency can
OAK RIDGE, Tenn.
in Marion County is marked with
Tate said early Monday as he stood
be terminated by either side
abrupt dips and bumps, collapsing
alongside his small fishing boat.
at any time without penalty,
shoulders, damaged guardrails and
“That boat’ll jump up off
he said.
41
41 the
some areas where guardrails dangle
trailer this high,” he said, indicating
Thompson said the counin the air above the ground.
about a foot in
height. “And that’s Tenn. ty’s Sessions Court is doing
24
24
Tenn.
24
24
Two security police
The road isn’t used the same way
just at 30 [mph].”
“a pretty good job” of collectofficers at the Y-12 nuclear
it was in its heyday, but it still gets
The stretch of U.S. 41 the catfish
ing fines and court costs right
weapons plant were slightly
plenty of traffic, according to TenGa.
business and the two 59
fishermen callGa.
now by tying the payments to
59
injured Saturday when a
nessee Department of Transportahome used to be called the “Mile
offenders’ probation.
firearm discharged.
tion officials. In 2012, 2,246 vehicles Staff Graphic by Laura W. McNutt
Straight”Staff
because
the road
carved
a
Graphic
by Laura
W. McNutt
“If you deny them probaA federal spokesman told
traveled between Haletown and the
near-straight line through the little
tion, they’re going to come
the Knoxville News Sentinel
county line every day, records show. “rough road ahead” and “speed limit community of Riverside, they said.
up with some fine money,”
both officers were released
The battered section of asphalt 35 mph.”
“It was straight, but it’s not
he said.
after treatment at the Oak
that runs through the Riverside comLongtime Marion County resi- straight no more. The road just
The county’s circuit
Ridge Methodist Medical
munity is due for almost $1 million dents Terry Tate and Jay Thomas keeps sinking,” Tate said.
judges
need to do the same,
Center. Steven Wyatt of the
in work to make it a little smoother agree the old road needs help, espeThomas said TDOT’s battle with
Thompson
said, and that will
National Nuclear Security
and safer, officials say. Meantime, cially with the recent rains, but they
help bring more revenue in
Administration described
a portable sign warns drivers of a both doubt any fix will last long.
See ROUte, Page B8
for the county.
their injuries as minor.
Officials estimated the
The incident overnight
county
had more than
Saturday was described as
$201,000
in
uncollected fines
the accidental discharge of
and costs in 2011.
a firearm. No details were
In April 2011, commission
available, and the officers’
Chairman
Gene Hargis estinames were not released.
By Kimberly McMillian and Tourism Council, and tian Athletes’ summer camp Kid a Chance” event at the mated the county has lost
Correspondent
was discontinued nearly two was a success, and that near- high school. She said Cuon- nearly $1.5 million in unpaid
WARTBURG, Tenn.
DAYTON, Tenn. — Rhea years ago.
ly 350 students had attend- zo Martin, the University of court fines over the past
County officials say the Rhea
Berger said Dayton cham- ed the two-week Summit’s Tennessee men’s basketball decade.
County Leadership Program ber officials had decided to Worldview Conference.
“We need to do somecoach, would speak at the
is coming back, possibly by oversee the applications and
The program, Holcomb annual banquet today at 6 thing because we’ve got so
much money outstanding
organization, and that they’d said, helped train students in p.m. at the college.
Tennessee mental health November 2014.
“We’re starting on that,” made progress on “the early ministering to fellow college
In other matters, John on it,” Thompson said. “It’s
and prison officials are
Payne, executive director of getting to where we try to
classmates.
opening a statewide Recov- Dayton Chamber of Com- stages.”
merce
President
Vaughn
the economic and tourism rob the property owners [by
“A
lot
[of
students]
fall
D
ay
to
n
M
ayo
r
G
a
r
y
ery Court this week in MorBerger said during Rhea Eco- Louallen said he’d been from the church,” he said, council, said the paperwork raising taxes] every time
gan County.
nomic and Tourism Council’s n o t i f i e d a b o u t s e v e r - many facing uncertainty for a $15,000 state economic [the county] turns around
There’s a ribbon-cutting
al industries seeking to about entering college and and community development for money.”
recent monthly meeting.
today in Wartburg where
The board’s f inance
grant has been submitted and
The program was formed expand in the county, but living away from home.
the court will be located.
committee
will discuss the
is
awaiting
approval.
Christine
Ralph,
execthat
he
couldn’t
yet
say
in
1996
to
allow
leaders
and
The aim is to move addicted
issue at its next meeting and
Kimberly McMillian is
utive director of the Rhea
inmates from prison into res- emerging leaders to improve more about them.
make a recommendation to
David Holcomb, fund County United Way, said based in Rhea County.
idential recovery. The center their leadership skills. It forthe county commission next
Contact
her
at
[email protected]
more
than
300
students
had
director
with
Bryan
College,
merly
was
under
the
direcwill have 100 beds, and the
month, officials said.
intent of the project is to free tion of the Rhea Economic said the Fellowship of Chris- attended last week’s “Give a bellsouth.net.
inmates from addiction to
reduce the rate of recidivism.
Police seek truck
in vandalism spree
‘Rough road ahead’
Old U.S. 41 route suffering from weather damage
Officers hurt
at nuclear plant
Rhea officials to reinstate leadership program
New statewide
drug court opens
CARRABASSETT
VALLEY, MAINE
Tennessee hiker
search narrowed
The Maine Warden
Service has narrowed the
search area for a Tennessee
hiker who disappeared from
the Appalachian Trail in
that state.
Officials say the search
area for 66-year-old Geraldine Largay, of Brentwood,
Tenn., was narrowed Monday to a 14-mile section of
the trail in the Carrabassett
Valley region of western
Maine. Wardens believe the
area of highest probability
is a nine-mile section of the
trail between Lone Mountain and a dirt road west of
Sugarloaf Mountain.
—Staff and Wire Reports
region Contact
n Region editor:
Alex Chambliss
423-757-6306
[email protected]
.com
Police say guns aren’t the only danger they face
By John Davidson
The Gadsden Times
GADSDEN, Ala. — The
No. 1 threat to police, in many
people’s eyes, is gunfire. The
common belief is that the
biggest danger to those who
keep the peace is armed men
who look to disturb it.
In reality, however, the
biggest dangers to police are
cars, everyday injuries and
a variety of other dangers
that don’t always come to
mind when someone thinks
of police work. Examples
include needles, clotheslines
and holes in the ground.
Unarmed suspects are
nothing to be taken lightly
either.
“There’s several things that
get us hurt that have long and
lasting effects beyond what’s
in popular culture, like getting
shot at a traffic stop or running into a gunfight,” Gadsden
Police Capt. Paul Cody said.
“It’s the small things that
get us.”
So while a hail of bullets
Slug:073013bUSHwy41Damage
Section:b
Size: #COL x #INCHES
Photo by the Gadsden Times
This wrecked police car at the Gadsden Fleet Mainte(initials)
nance shop in Gadsden,
Ala., stands as a testament to
the danger of police work.
Proofed by:
is often the most publicized
and Artist
gruesome Reporter
hazard for
police, cars do more damage.
An officer can be in danger from other vehicles
in myriad situations, from
intense ones such as a vehicle pursuit to the mundane
ones such as traffic stops.
Cody said he has been
clipped
Editor by mirrors during
a traffic stop by a drunken
driver and knows one of his
officers has been hit while
directing traffic.
He said it’s possible to
be hit both day and night.
During the day, nosy peo-
ple who want to see what is
going on are the most likely
culprits. At night, drunks are
most likely to veer too close.
On March 4, Officer Mark
Harris was lucky he survived
an encounter with a distracted
driver. Harris was in his vehicle, writing a report after a
fatal accident on Interstate 759,
when someone plowed into
his stopped vehicle, crumpling
the car like a piece of paper.
Blood-borne pathogens
such as HIV and hepatitis
are another real — and scary
— danger. Police can come
into contact with them either
through blood at a crime
scene of a shooting or stabbing or, more commonly, by
getting pricked by syringes
when searching someone for
weapons.
“People who use intravenous drugs have a habit of
not capping [syringes],” Cody
said. “When we come into
contact with their bodily fluids, it starts a whole process.”
It begins with subpoenaing the offender’s blood, then
testing it as well as the officer’s. The interim between
the contact and the results is
hard on the officer as well as
his family. He brings everything he deals with at work
home with him, and family
members can be exposed to
some of the same dangers.
HIPAA regulations can
further complicate the issue,
Cody said. For example, if an
officer gets stuck by a needle and he and the offender
get tested, with the offender testing HIV-positive and
the officer HIV-negative, the
officer cannot warn his colleagues about the HIV-positive offender because it is a
violation of privacy laws.
Physical injuries from foot
pursuits and struggles to
arrest people also are common. Officer Tim Humphries
injured a shoulder assisting
on an arrest in 2011, and
reinjured it July 14 taking a
19-year-old, Rashad Denzel
Freeman, into custody inside
the band room in Litchfield
Middle School.
...timesfreepress.com • • •
.
Breaking News: 423-757-News
Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • B5
Teen jobs program finds obstacles, success
Staff Writer
More than 700 teenagers came to the Alton Park
Development Corp. seeking
jobs this summer. A local
dentist and mom helped 146
of them find work.
Dr. Elenora Woods, executive director of the Alton
Park Development Corp.,
had to turn away the others
because she couldn’t find
jobs. Some of them didn’t
have transportation. Some
lacked interviewing skills
and some went to their interviews dressed inappropriately for the job, she said.
The summer didn’t go
exactly as planned, said
Woods, but she’s not giving
up her efforts to help.
She’ll start operating an
after-school program on
Sept. 8, she said.
Violence
• Continued from Page B1
uty City Attorney Phillip
Noblett told the Times Free
Press that the city attorney’s
office is looking into whether officials can shut down a
pair of local event halls after
recent shootings on the properties. The attorneys are targeting an unnamed venue at
2510 E. Main St. and Emotion
Event Hall, located at 1622
Dodds Ave. Some know the
second venue as Da Building.
If certain illegal activities
occur at a location, according
to state law, that place can be
labeled a nuisance. City officials can then shut the venue
And before she sends
more teens out for jobs, she’ll
have them wear their interview outfits to the center.
She’s still seeking to
develop partnerships with
potential employers, she said.
Woods also provided
summer enrichment for
youths not old enough for
the workforce. That was
also a challenge, according
to some teens.
The goal was for the teens
and pre-teens to earn money
by cutting grass and doing
yard work. But there were
more teens willing to cut
grass than Woods had lawn
equipment.
Woods still didn’t give up.
She asked people to donate
lawn mowers. Then she
started forming partnerships
with several companies and
professionals willing to share
their expertise and resources
with the children.
Double Cola came on
board, hired a few teens to
work for the company and
supplied the youths with
drinks, water and sunglasses
to take on nature walks, said
Adam Kelman, marketing
assistant for Double Cola.
Parks and Recreation
therapeutic art teacher Jerry
Allen volunteers on his days
off to teach art classes. Some
of the students’ work will be
on display at the Hunter Art
Museum of American Art
from Aug. 1-31.
And Rex Grant, founder
of Solarex Southeast Tennessee, has set up a solar power
demonstration outside the
Piney Woods Resource Center where the group meets.
He gives the youths hands-on
demonstrations about solar
energy.
Woods partnered with
First Things First, which
offers anger management
classes, and Horace and Reba
Ratliff Hatcher volunteer to
teach gardening.
“There are not enough
grocery stores around here,
so we’re showing them how
to grow their own fruits and
vegetables,” said Reba Hatcher. She and her husband have
been gardening as a hobby
for 30 years and have won
two Scenic Cities Beautiful
awards for their yard.
The youths have gone
on field trips to Greenway
Farms, taken a trip to City
Hall to learn more about
city government, and visited
the Chattanooga Community Kitchen to hand out flipflops to people who needed
them.
The summer program
ends this week. Woods said
she hopes to have brought
in enough money to give all
the children a $500 stipend
before school starts to help
them prepare for the school
year.
She has received no city
funding, but did get funding
from Bank of America and
some area churches.
In September she will
start the after-school program involving many of the
same youth. She will offer
art, and tutoring in math,
reading and science.
Alecia Miree, a 16-yearold hired as an office assistant at the Piney Woods
Resource Center, said she has
no complaints about the program. She’s just glad to have
found work. She said she put
in applications at Wendy’s,
Arby’s, McDonald’s and tried
for hotel housekeeping jobs,
but never got hired.
“It’s hard to find a job,”
she said. “If I had not been
hired here, I would probably
still be looking.”
Al Chapman, president
of the Front Porch Alliance,
said he supports Wood’s
efforts this summer and
throughout the school year.
The Front Porch Alliance
gave her a $10,000 grant to
help feed the youths over
the sumer.
“She’s not just babysitting kids,” he said. “She getting them involved with the
environment, tutoring them
and some of them are being
hired.”
Contact staff writer
Yolanda Putman at [email protected] or
423-757-6431.
down through an injunction
filed in Criminal, Chancery
or Circuit courts.
Cleveland police Spokeswoman Evie West said the
department has had issues
with Luv 2 Dance Studio
dating back to March 2012.
Though no arrests have been
made at the location, West
said there have been reports
of shootings, drug deals and
fights. The incidents have
increased this summer.
“We believe [the violence
is] spilling over to Cleveland,” West said. “I know that
Chattanooga PD is cracking
down on these, so maybe
people are saying, ‘Hey, let’s
go over to Cleveland.’”
Mora pointed out that his
event hall is not a bar, but
renters were allowed to bring
alcohol to their parties. On
Sunday morning, after the
shots were fired, Mora came
to the building and found
beer bottles littering the
ground. No more, he said.
Going forward, he promised that no alcohol will be
allowed on the premises.
Roger Webb, of 2030 Century Ave. SE, lives about a
block from the event hall.
He can see it from his back
porch. And on Sunday morning, about 15 minutes after
going to sleep, he awoke to
the sound of gunfire. He and
his wife jumped out of bed.
She checked the front door;
he checked the back.
The shots were so loud,
he thought they came from
his yard. He heard someone
yell, “Get down!”
Webb felt nervous.
From his back porch, he
saw a crowd outside the
dance studio. And he saw
police.
Webb has lived in his
house for 4 1/2 years. The
area’s never had many problems. It’s never been violent
— not until this year.
“It scares me to death,” he
said Monday. “I got grandkids here all the time. They
sleep in the back bedroom. If
they start shooting again and
don’t know where they’re
aiming …”
Contact staff writer Tyler
Jett at [email protected]
com or 423-757-6476.
Weather
fallen on Chattanooga so far
this year, which is more than
15 inches above the normal
rate. Just over two inches of
that rain fell on July 7 alone,
breaking an 85-year-record
for the most daily precipitation.
The rain is another key
factor in keeping temps
down, Cavallucci said.
“When the soil is wet, the
temperatures are generally
cooler,” he said. “Last year it
was very dry for a couple of
weeks, and we got really hot.
If it’s really wet, it’s not going
to be very warm.”
Temperatures will climb
a bit as the week goes on,
he added. Today’s high is
expected to be 87. Wednesday will hit the mid-80s
with a 30 percent chance of
rain. He expects Thursday
to hit 88 or 89 degrees, then
a storm system will move in
for the weekend, with a 50
percent chance of rain on
Saturday and Sunday.
Channel 3 WRCB meteorologist Paul Barys said he
expects the cool weather to
last through the fall. There
may be a few days that hit
higher temperatures, he said,
but the overall pattern will
be cooler.
“My best guess on this is
that we’ll have a cool August
and go into a cool fall,” he
said. “It’s not unexpected.
This year if you look at a
weather map you see a current of air coming out of the
Northwest. This time of year,
that brings normal to below
normal temperatures.”
That’s bad news for some
local businesses that thrive
during soaring temps. At
Reliable Heating & Air Conditioning, the cool weather
has led to the slowest summer in recent memory.
“This is the mildest summer we’ve had in 40 years,”
vice president David Cornell said. “This is typically
our busiest time of the year.
We’ve seen a noticeable dropoff in service calls because
the equipment doesn’t have
to work as hard. We’re still
busy, but not the crazy busy
we usually are.”
Up in Cleveland, Tenn.,
Baskin-Robbins franchise
owner Brad Benton agreed
that the cooler weather is
having a quantifiable impact
on business.
“If it’s March and it turns
out to be 83 degrees, everyone wants to eat ice cream,”
he said. “If it’s July and it
turns out be 83 degrees, then
people say, ‘Oh it’s a nice day’
and ice cream is not at the
top of the list. This summer
has been less than favorable,
weather-condition wise.”
But over at Painter Ready,
owner Ken Morris’ crew is
breathing a sigh of relief.
“Between the monsoon we
had and then the heat wave
afterward, the cooler weather
is a welcome change,” Morris
said. “It’s affected us in a very
positive way. It’s a better work
environment.”
Contact staff writer Shelly
Bradbury at [email protected]
timesfreepress.com or 423757-6525.
American conscience, and
decide: What kind of America do we want?
My presidency has been
an embarrassment to Dr.
King’s legacy. I have been
a failed leader. I have
authored drone strikes that
killed overseas civilians.
I have presided over the
breaking dam of national
poverty. I have turned a
blind eye to the militarism
that infects our national
budget. I have danced with
the oligarchy and toasted
the mighty powers and
principalities despite pledg-
ing to the exact opposite to
get this job.
I’ve joined in the circus
that sequesters our ethics
and morality in the name of
far lesser things.
But this question from
King still hangs in the air,
waiting for us to give a proper answer.
The truth is: Our economy won’t get fixed until we
do.
Contact David Cook at
[email protected]
or 423-757-6329. Follow him
on Facebook and Twitter at
DavidCookTFP.
Man shot on Chamberlain Sharing
Chattanooga police are
searching for information after
a Monday morning shooting
at 2707 N. Chamberlain Ave.
Gentle Jackson, 30, was
reportedly shot in the leg
after fighting with three
armed suspects trying to rob
him. Jackson was taken to a
Alexander
• Continued from Page B1
parents and children, and I
appreciate very much what
he has to say.”
The senator recently
began airing a spot featuring Paul and touting the two
senators’ role blocking the
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ plans to stop Tennesseans and Kentuckians from
fishing below dams on the
Cumberland River.
“Nobody wants to say no
to Lamar Alexander,” Paul
says in a video taken from
a news conference and used
in the ad.
But Paul’s aides later
said that shouldn’t be construed as an endorsement,
and Alexander has noted it
was not intended to imply
that, although Tennessee Tea
Party leaders fumed.
“My TV ad, I hope, gives
the impression that we’re
local hospital for treatment
of the non-life-threatening
injury.
The case is ongoing and
more information will be
released when available.
Anyone with information on
this crime is asked to call the
Chattanooga Police Department at 423-698-2525.
pretty effective when it
comes to defending the
rights of fishermen and that
if we can be half as effective
at improving the schools, the
kids will be a lot better off,”
Alexander said.
Later, Alexander and Paul
listened to state Education
Commissioner Kevin Huffman
as well as a former student,
parents of students and officials at Kipp Academy, a grade
5-8 public charter school.
Republican Gov. Bill
Haslam and Huffman have
pushed publicly funded but
privately operated charter
schools as part of the solution to improving public education.
Alexander and Paul are
working on a Republican
alternative to Senate majority Democrats’ education bill.
The GOP alternative would
promote more school choice.
Contact staff writer Andy
Sher at [email protected]
press.com or 615-255-0550.
Cooper says annex laws constitutional
Staff Report
NASHVILLE — Tennessee cities’ use of annexation
by ordinance generally meets
muster under both the Tennessee and U.S. Constitutions, State Attorney General
Robert Cooper says.
In his new legal opinion,
Cooper says the process
“absent invidious [tending
to raise resentment] discrimination or an intent to circumvent the ‘one person, one
vote’ principle, annexation
by municipal ordinance is
constitutional.”
According to Cooper, neither constitution “recognizes a
right for a person to retain his
or her real property in a particular unit of local government.”
The Tennessee Constitution grants state lawmakers
the “exclusive authority to
develop the process for creating and altering municipal
boundaries in the state.”
Under legislation sponsored by Rep. Mike Carter,
R-Ooltewah, and Sen. Bo Watson, R-Hixson, the state this
year imposed a temporary
moratorium on annexations by
ordinance. That was intended
to give the Tennessee Advisory
Commission on Intergovernmental Relations, a joint state
and local research group, time
to study the state’s current
annexation procedures and
how the system has worked
since a landmark planning
requirement passed in 1999.
The legal opinion was
sought by Rep. Tony Shipley,
R-Kingsport.
In yet another Cooper opinion released Monday, the attorney general says state Department of Health family life educators are immune from a 2012
law that says educators in public schools “may not endorse
‘student non abstinence’ as
an appropriate or acceptable
behavior” or promote “gateway
sexual activity.”
The opinion was requested by state Health Commissioner John Dreyzehner.
Staff Photo by Shawn Paik
Anslie Crowe, 2, left, offers some of her green apple
shaved ice Monday to her shy cousin Jackson Sharp,
2, under the Walking Bridge.
Cook
• Continued from Page B1
temp worker, you’re earning
$13 an hour full time. That’s
less than $30,000 a year: a
full-time job that delivers a
paycheck-to-paycheck life.
There is no security in
that. You can’t plan for your
kid’s college. You can’t go on
vacation. It’s not a bargain
for the middle class. Maybe
for Jeff Bezos, but not the
middle class.
Amazon swallows up
Mom and Pop small businesses. Amazon is a warehouse with a call center;
small business is folks you
know behind the scratched
counter. Amazon exists
everywhere and nowhere,
produces nothing of substance, creates nothing of
societal value.
But America was built
on Mom and Pop, the small
business and the homegrown economy. Will they
ever return?
Driving here from the airport, I saw crowds of protesters. I wasn’t surprised. My
only surprise is that there
are so few. Each day, I look
out from the Oval Office and
wonder: Why is everyone not
taking to the streets? Why is
Washington not being overrun?
This economy, based on
competition and money
lust, values profit before
people. We’ve given it godlike powers; it can make
people sick, kick them out
of their homes, out-source
their paychecks and livelihoods.
Each day, Cain kills Abel,
and we nod acceptingly, and
call it Wall Street.
I’ve traveled all across
this country. You know the
character trait that’s so hard
to find? Joy. There is no joy
left. America is leaning
toward Mudville; no longer
mighty, too many striking
out.
We’ve come to believe
the lie that our work should
not elevate, enlighten or
strengthen our souls. We
don’t whistle while we
work; we sigh. We don’t
have careers, we have jobs
… sometimes two or three of
them. As economist David
Korten points out: We’ve fallen into the beartrap lie that
people are here to serve the
economy, not the other way
around.
Fifty years ago next month,
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. led
the famous March on Washington when he asked us to
look inside ourselves, at our
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Breaking News: 423-757-News
B8 • Tuesday, July 30, 2013
Police arrest man after grand jury
indicts on vehicular homicide charge
city of Chattanooga investigated by Chattanooga police.
The average age of the victims is 37 with the youngest
being 9-yearsold. Last year,
more than 20
people were
killed in traff ic crashes
in the city.
In 2011, there
were 19 peoDale Ferrell ple killed.
In a previous interview, Chattanooga
police said a 10-year review
of traffic fatalities showed
that 34 percent of the collisions were alcohol related.
On Monday afternoon,
Ferrell was released on a
$25,000 bond.
Staff Report
A 22-year-old man was
booked into the Hamilton
County Jail on Monday on
charges of vehicular homicide and driving under the
influence after he reportedly
crashed into a motorcycle on
Interstate 75 in March.
A Hamilton County grand
jury recently indicted Dale
Edward Ferrell, of Mississippi, after police said he struck
the rear of a motorcycle
while traveling south in the
inside lane near mile marker
nine on March 16.
The motorcyclist, 59-yearo l d Edwa rd B a n k s to n ,
crashed and died at the scene
as a result.
Year to date, there have
been 13 traffic fatalities in the
Bus driver sentenced on child porn charges
that 57-year-old Stanley Keith
Johnson of Mableton ordered
about 180 DVDs from a foreign
company between November
2010 and April 2011 featuring
nude boys who were between
8 and 14 years old.
The Associated Press
State Sen. Hank Sanders, D-Selma, stands outside a deteriorating Selma house that once served as
headquarters for the voting rights movement in 1965.
Funding falls short to save
historic Alabama home
SELMA, Ala. — One of the
most important structures linked to
America’s voting rights movement
appears on the verge of collapse, and
local leaders are calling it an embarrassment to Selma and Alabama.
It’s the former home of the late
Sam Boynton and his wife, Amelia,
a black couple who began voter registration efforts in Selma long before
“Bloody Sunday” in 1965.
What makes their house at 1315
Lapsley St. so important is a letter
written there and sent to the Rev.
Martin Luther King Jr. inviting him
to come to Selma to lead a voting
rights movement.
King, who would not come unless
invited, arrived Jan. 2, 1965, and
began to organize a movement that
galvanized Selma’s black community
and attracted national attention.
The letter to King was signed
inside the house where strategy
sessions were held during the voting rights movement that swept the
nation. The Boyntons also welcomed
numerous civil rights leaders, many
of whom slept there.
After Sam Boynton died in 1963,
his wife moved to Tuskegee, where
she has lived for the past 40 years.
She turns 103 in a few weeks.
Built in 1916, their house has battled the elements for nearly a century and looks it. Efforts to save it have
hit several roadblocks, not the least
of which is a lingering dispute over
just how to do it.
“This house has great historic
value not only to Selma, but to the
entire country,” said state Sen. Hank
Sanders, D-Selma. “Its condition now
is contrary to the spirit of the Boyntons, who worked so hard for so long
to help black people register to vote.”
A restoration project began a few
years ago, but funding efforts have
not attracted much money. Instead,
there has been friction and recrimination between supporters of the
Boynton House Initiative in Atlanta
and Amelia Boynton Robinson, who
remarried following the death of her
first husband.
“What can I leave to the people?” said Boynton Robinson, who
suffered a stroke a few years ago.
“I hoped my house could be turned
into a museum, but I’m not sure
that’ll ever happen.”
She criticized Jim Brown, director
of the Gateway Educational Foundation, which currently owns her
former house.
“He said he would take care of
me, but he made me look like some
kind of poor child standing on a
street corner. I want to get back
everything he took from me.”
Brown denies her claims, saying
he and his wife, Genise, have used
their own money to do all they could
to help Boynton and support her legendary status within the civil rights
community.
“All we’ve done for her has come
out of our own pockets,” Jim Brown
said. “What some people say about
us is not true. We’re not trying to
take advantage of her. We’re raising
money for the house, and if the good
Lord is willing, we hope to have a
new roof on it soon.”
Boynton Robinson was much
more than a voter registration advocate dating back to the 1930s. She
also was an activist who put her
life on the line March 7, 1965, when
she was badly beaten by Alabama
state troopers on the Edmund Pettus
Bridge in Selma.
That day became known as
“Bloody Sunday” when Alabama
authorities routed 600 peaceful
black marchers seeking to walk to
Montgomery to ask state officials
to ease restrictions on voter registration.
When Sanders dropped by the
house last Wednesday, it wasn’t long
before he was joined by a resident
who lived across the street as well
as Selma Mayor George Evans.
“That house is beyond repair,”
said Sheila Simpson, pointing back
to the sagging structure. “I sit on
my porch and watch the tour buses
come by, and it’s embarrassing. We
want to be proud of our ward, not
ashamed of it.”
Evans agreed with her, saying the
deteriorating condition of the building needs to be addressed quickly
before it’s too late.
One way, he said, might be to see
if the house can be placed on the
National Register of Historic Places
“because that might help us get some
funding to renovate it.”
Cost estimates on the house have
ranged up to $1 million basically to
turn it into a voting rights facility as
well as a wax museum.
Route
CRIMINAL DEFENSE
Riverside’s piece of U.S. 41 is
nothing new.
“They’ve been fighting
that road for 50 years,” he
said. “They built the road on
the bedrock, but the mountain keeps moving.”
TDOT spokeswoman
Jennifer Flynn said the state
plans more than $909,000
worth of work on the road
over the next two years. The
first part of the project —
resurfacing — is about to
start.
“The resurfacing project
will begin soon at McBrien
Lane and go eastward 6.5
miles to the Hamilton County line,” Flynn said in an
email. That project will be
finished by Oct. 31.
Later this summer, another contractor will begin
soil-nailing work “to stabilize the sections [of mountainside] between Haletown
and McBrien Lane that are
sliding. Then next spring,
another project will be let
to resurface the route from
Haletown to McBrien Lane,”
Flynn said.
Contact staff writer Ben
Benton at [email protected] or 423-7576569.
1110 Market St., Ste. 500 • Chattanooga, TN
• Continued from Page B4
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Mom arrested on child abuse charges
By Jeff LaFave
items to do so.
Shirley Baker of the Child
Protective Service said Sanchez has a history of abusing
her children.
CPS took Sanchez’s children into custody, and she
was booked into the Hamilton
County Jail with $15,000 bail.
Sanchez’s court date is
scheduled for Aug. 2 with
Judge Gary Starnes.
Staff Writer
Chattanooga police arrested Claudia Sanchez, 34, on
three counts of aggravated
child abuse at approximately
9:32 p.m. Saturday.
Ernque Herrera, who was
staying at the 113 Sequoia
Drive residence, said he saw
Sanchez abuse her three children with items including an
iron, cable cords and various
toys in the home, as well as
her fist.
Herrera provided cellphone pictures of bruises on
the children. The children
indicated their mother had
beaten them when police
spoke to them, and police
found previous marks on
their bodies.
Sanchez admitted to disciplining her children, but did
not indicate if she used any
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• • • timesfreepress.com....
Opinion
B6 • Tuesday, July 30, 2013
Established 1869 Adolph S. Ochs,
Publisher 1878-1935
PAM SOHN
Times Page Editor
Contact:
757-6346
[email protected]
commentary
Obama’s
defensive
offensive
President Obama sounds like a man
back on the offensive.
The president is reprising his core
message that what the economy needs
is more federal spending on popular
priorities such as infrastructure and education,
not less.
And his stump
speeches last week in
Illinois, Missouri and
Florida (and today
in Chattanooga) put
Republicans on notice
that he will blame them
Doyle
if a standoff over spendMcManus
ing results in a government shutdown or a financial crisis
over the federal debt ceiling this fall.
“Repealing Obamacare and cutting
spending is not an economic plan,”
Obama lectured his opponents. “You
can’t just be against something; you’ve
got to be for something.”
But is that true?
House Speaker John A. Boehner,
R-Ohio, doesn’t seem to think so. When
asked about the glacial pace of legislation in the House, he responded: “We
should not be judged on how many new
laws we create. We ought to be judged
on how many laws that we repeal.”
Boehner has a point. The number of
bills a Congress passes is no guarantee
that it’s doing important work. Roughly
a third of the measures Congress passes are inconsequential actions such as
renaming post offices.
But there’s also a flaw in Boehner’s
argument. Although Congress is on
pace to pass even fewer laws than the
previous one, it hasn’t succeeded in
repealing many laws either. The GOPled House has voted nearly 40 times to
repeal all or part of Obama’s health care
law, but hasn’t succeeded in overturning the act.
Boehner has said he has no intention of shutting down the government
during budget talks this fall, a move he
believes would be counterproductive.
As one of his allies, Rep. Tom Cole,
R-Okla., put it last week: “The only way
Republicans will lose the House is to
shut down the government or default
on the debt. Shutting down the government is not in the best interests of
the American people, and it makes you
look politically irresponsible.”
But Boehner doesn’t always control
the majority of his own caucus. Tea
party radicals in both chambers of Congress are demanding a hard line, with
some, including Florida Sen. Marco
Rubio, promising to block any increase
in the federal debt ceiling unless
Obama’s health care law is repealed —
a proposal another Republican, Sen.
Richard M. Burr of North Carolina,
called “the dumbest idea I ever heard.”
That’s no guarantee it won’t gain
traction. Members of Congress in safely
partisan districts can be remarkably
indifferent to broader public opinion.
That’s one reason Congress’ approval
rating dropped last week to an all-time
low of 12 percent in the NBC NewsWall Street Journal Poll, far below
Obama’s anemic rating of 45 percent.
Obama hasn’t given up hope that
he can spur legislators to action. He’s
trying to win legislative battles on
both immigration and the budget by
striking bipartisan compromises in the
Senate, which still has a sizable faction
of Republicans who say they want to
negotiate with the president.
Obama is doing everything he
can to cast the opposition as being
obstructionist. But will his return to the
campaign trail have any real effect on
Congress?
The too-easy answer is no. He’s
given speeches like these before. He’s
got no new proposals to unveil. And the
House members who stand in his way
aren’t worried about pressure from voters who support the president; they are
more worried about primary challenges
from even more conservative Republicans to their right. Speeches from the
president aren’t going to change their
minds.
But that’s not what Obama’s campaign is about. On one level, it’s about
influencing votes in the Senate, not the
House. And on another, it’s about making sure that if this fall’s budget battles
do result in a government shutdown or,
even worse, a financial crisis over the
debt ceiling, the president and his party
don’t get blamed.
Obama may look and sound as if he’s
on the offensive, but his strategy has an
awful lot of defense in it too.
McClatchy Newspapers
editorial
Welcome,
Mr. President
GOP ads, obstructionism are shameful
J
ust when we think Republicans can sink no
lower, they surprise us with a deep dive.
They run a misleading ad on TV to welcome President Barack Obama to Chattanooga and Tennessee, and then claim the new
jobs at VW and Amazon are here “in spite” of
“liberal policies” and are here “thanks to Republican leadership.”
Hardly. But then honesty and accuracy have
not been recent Republican virtues.
Tennessee Democratic Gov. Phil Bredesen
and Hamilton County Mayor Claude Ramsey,
who is a Republican, were key in the successful
recruitment of both Volkswagen and Amazon to
Chattanooga.
And then there’s also the Gig City infrastructure, as well as Chattanooga’s smart and money-saving streetlights — all largely made possible by Obama’s stimulus package, the American
Reinvestment and Recovery Act. Pretty much no
Republicans voted for the stimulus, by the way.
Tennessee Democratic Party spokesman Brandon Puttbrese called the GOP effort to rain on
Obama’s Chattanooga visit “phony.”
“The real record of [current GOP Gov.] Bill
Haslam and the Republican majority is soaring
unemployment, falling workers’ wages and multimillion-dollar state contracts for old business
partners and well-connected cronies,” he said. “I
doubt the millions of Tennesseans who work multiple jobs and still struggle to get by are impressed
by this phony attempt to sell Republicans’ failed
top-down agenda.”
The reality is simple and indisputable: Getting
VW and Amazon here required officials of both
parties — all parties — to work together.
A better future for Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama and the rest of the country still depends on
that, but it’s not happening now. The GOP is in
total shutdown mode except to engage in juvenile
name-calling and obstructionism.
Now all we hear are pathetically bad reenactments of the worst cat-fight reality shows ever
filmed as our politicians send fake postcards
and make trumped-up and misleading ads to
bash the nation’s leader no matter what the facts
really show.
In the meantime, sequestration is robbing Tennessee:
n $25.5 million in funding has been lost for
education — about 340 teachers and aide jobs.
n $2.2 million in environmental funding was
lost and is not ensuring clean water and air quality.
n $1.2 million in grants were lost for fish and
wildlife protection.
n $681,000 in funding was lost for job search
assistance.
n $2.3 million in public health money is gone.
n $1.9 million was cut for Tennessee army base
civilian work, forcing 7,000 civilian employees to
take furloughs.
n $1 million was lost that once provided meals
for seniors.
n Child care for 800 children was lost, and
Head Start services for another 1,200 children
is gone.
Georgia, Alabama and North Carolina have
all faced similar cuts — as have states all across
the country.
But the pain and cruelty apparently isn’t over if
the GOP’s most rabid talkers have their way. Some
Republican lawmakers are threatening a government shutdown unless “Obamacare” is defunded.
Fortunately at least one GOP senator from
Tennessee has a better head on his shoulders:
Republican Sen. Bob Corker said GOP senators
are meeting with White House aides to “deal
with our fiscal issues in more intelligent ways
than now exist.”
The president is in Chattanooga today to tell
us there is hope with compromise and real leadership: Chattanooga proves it, with new jobs and
new initiatives that make us attractive to still
more new employers.
President Obama is in Chattanooga today
because we’re a city that can find ways to compromise and come out ahead.
Sen. Corker knows this. Let’s hope he can prevail on others in Congress to be leaders, not just
actors in childish games.
Facebook
feedback
Do you think
Obama has done
a good job as
president?
As well as can
be expected with
an obstructionist
Congress like we
have currently.
— Charlie Nelson
•••
He’s pretty cool. the
whole Affordable Care
Act has allowed me
to stay on my parent’s
insurance while I’m
in college, and now
I won’t go broke
because I dared to
get sick or injured.
— Aaron Moyer
•••
Mixed. Great social
agenda, great
at trying to get
Americans back to
work despite having
an obstructionist
GOP Congress.
Foreign agenda: not
so great — continued
the Bush years of
spying on Americans.
— Donald Baxter
•••
The worst ever, even
worse than Carter.
— John Bradford
•••
Whether I like or
agree with the
president, I have
always respected the
office. I think it’s nice
he is coming here,
and I it will be good
for our city.
— Diane Phillips
•••
He has proved time
and again that we
can’t trust or believe
anything he says. I
don’t want to hear
any more of his
noise.
— Dottie Curvin
A recovery for the middle class
With his visit to Chattanooga,
President Obama could not have
picked a better place to highlight
the economic recovery already in
place and the need for all of us to
work together to
bolster the middle class. The
president’s plan
ignites a needed
discussion on
how we spur a
renaissance in
manufacturing,
make strategic
Andy
investments in
Berke
technology, education and infrastructure, and create new ladders of opportunity
for Chattanooga, for Tennessee,
and for the nation.
In many ways, Chattanooga is
not very different from industrial cities throughout the nation.
We boomed in the 1950s and
1960s only to see sharp economic
declines in the 1970s and 1980s.
Good jobs in steel and textile mills
went overseas. In the 1980s, Chattanooga lost more than 10 percent
of our population, and we headed
the way of dozens of other U.S.
cities where economic decline
foreshadowed abandonment.
But we came back. With a
strong partnership between local
government and our civic sector,
Chattanooga began its rise again
in the 1990s — becoming the only
U.S. city with more than 100,000
residents to lose 10 percent of
its population in the preceding
decade and begin to gain population in the 1990s.
Our comeback has continued.
Manufacturing jobs have begun
to return, with major new investments by VW and Wacker as well
as the new Amazon distribution
facility that President Obama is
visiting today. At the same time,
we have seen new jobs and new
investment across all sectors of
the economy. And with access to
the fastest Internet connections
in North America, Chattanooga’s
21st century economy will be
driven by the investment in the
Gig — an investment made possible with the support of funding
under the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act.
We have weathered the Great
Recession and are on the road
to recovery. There are now more
people working in Chattanooga
than when President Obama took
office. But we know that is not
good enough for those still without a job or for those who need
to work two jobs. It is not good
enough for parents and students
struggling to pay for college.
By creating manufacturing
hubs and networks, a better bargain for the middle class recognizes that our greatest asset – and
the key to new manufacturing
jobs — is the innovative and
entrepreneurial spirit of our people. We need to continue investing in research and development
in manufacturing here because
we know that for every new job
in manufacturing, there will be
nearly two additional jobs created
by suppliers and others.
At the same time, the President recognizes education, innovation and opportunity are inextricably linked. Tennessee and
Hamilton County leaders from
both parties have worked hard
to fix a broken public school system. But real reform requires a
strong and active federal partner.
As a co-sponsor of the legislation
that brought $500 million into our
state, I know the importance of
Race to the Top to school reform.
Continued federal leadership and
support for education is critical,
from the president’s proposal for
universal early child care to the
administration’s efforts to lower
the cost of higher education.
And just as we need to grow
our human capital, we need a
strong federal partner who recognizes that investment in physical
capital — infrastructure — creates both middle class jobs and
long term opportunity for growth.
Nearly 75 years ago, another President — Franklin Roosevelt —
came to the Tennessee Valley to
lay the cornerstone of the Chick-
amauga Dam. It is inconceivable
to think of what our region would
be like today without the past,
transformative federal investment
that was the TVA. We need to
place new cornerstones for our
budding economy.
Finally, ladders to opportunity
and reducing poverty are critical
to building a bigger and stronger middle class. For individuals living in neighborhoods with
high concentrations of poverty,
the president’s efforts through
Promise Neighborhoods and
Choice Neighborhoods — and
now through Promise Zones
— recognize that opportunity
requires federal, state, local and
nonprofit partners to create jobs
and great communities. Through
the Administration’s Strong Cities, Strong Communities effort,
the federal government promises
to work with cities to overcome
the same challenges Chattanooga
once faced.
For people who live in places like Chattanooga and the
Tennessee Valley, we understand the challenges and the
opportunities moving forward.
I am confident we will build
a stronger middle class, with
our best days still ahead of us.
Andy Berke is a former Tennessee senator and is now mayor
of Chattanooga.
...timesfreepress.com • • •
.
Opinion
Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • B7
Established 1936
Roy McDonald
Founder & Publisher, 1936-1990
Frank McDonald
President & Chairman, 1969-2000
Lee Anderson
Editor, 1958-2012; Publisher, 1990-1999
Drew Johnson
Editor
commentary
TENNESSEE
What America
should look like
By Chris Devaney
President Obama arrives in Chattanooga today. With Air Force One
and an army of staff and Secret Service, his presence will be impressive.
Unfortunately, the same cannot be
said of his record on jobs, economic
development, or anything of importance to working Americans right
now.
The “new normal” has taken hold
in America under Mr. Obama’s watch.
That “new normal” is persistently
high unemployment, unchecked
wasteful spending that has led to
unprecedented debt, and the belief
that government bureaucracy — not
the innovation of Americans — holds
the key to our future.
Median household income has
fallen five percent since the recession “ended” and Mr. Obama came
into office. Gross domestic product
growth under Obama was a scant
1.8% in the first quarter of 2013. Add
to these statistics the albatross of the
Obamacare regulatory labyrinth that
has scared businesses into either hiring part-time workers only or none
at all. Mr. Obama’s moves and their
results force us to pose the question:
Does he know what he is doing?
Anyone with a basic understanding of the economic success of our
nation’s history knows we achieve
greatness when opportunity abounds
for all citizens. That said, instead of
lamenting the President’s failure of
leadership, I want to use this opportunity to give him the benefit of the
doubt. I believe Mr. Obama is coming
to Tennessee to see exactly what
success looks like, first-hand. It is
hard to ignore the fact Tennessee has
achieved some remarkable success
recently — even in the face of the
negative headwinds emanating from
Washington because of Obamanomics.
Let me attempt to summarize a
few of the accolades our state has
received thanks to Republican policy-making. Since Governor Bill
Haslam took office and Republicans
gained legislative majorities, Tennessee is fourth in job creation. The
Bureau of Economic Analysis finds
Tennessee is No. 1 in the South for
GDP in 2012 and No. 1 for personal
income growth. The U.S. Commerce
Department ranks Tennessee No. 1 in
the Southeast in manufacturing job
growth for 2012.
In stark contrast to the federal
government’s ballooning national
debt, Tennessee has the lowest debt
per capita of the 50 states. It should
be noted this achievement has been
attained while taxes were being cut
across the board for all Tennesseans.
In fact, the Tax Foundation recently
cited Tennessee as having the third
lowest tax burden in the country.
Companies like Volkswagen and
Amazon have come here because of
our right-to-work status — ensuring that greedy unions do not gain
the upper hand on employees and
employers — and also because of
our infrastructure and global access,
another No. 1 ranking. In fact, Chief
Executive magazine routinely ranks
Tennessee in the top five for business.
These statistics and others led
Barron’s magazine recently to place
Tennessee as the third best-run state.
Imagine how much Washington
could benefit if these conservative
Tennessee principles were applied in
the federal government’s executive
branch?
While you certainly will not hear
this from the President, we’re succeeding not because of his liberal
policies but in spite of them. While
America languishes under his guidance, Republican leaders here are
going about the quiet business of
growing the economy, passing policies that foster career creation across
the state, and providing the opportunity for every individual to succeed
on his or her own merits.
Mr. President, I hope you’re taking
notes. Tennessee showcases a recipe
for broad-based success up and down
the economic ladder. This is what
America should look like.
Chris Devaney serves as the Chairman of the Tennessee Republican
Party. He resides in Chattanooga.
editorial
Tweets
of the week
take your jobs plan
and shove it, Mr. President
U.S. Rep. Marsha
Blackburn, R-Tenn.
@MarshaBlackburn
Your policies have harmed Chattanooga enough
President Obama,
Welcome to Chattanooga, one of hundreds of
cities throughout this great nation struggling to
succeed in spite of your foolish policies that limit
job creation, stifle economic growth and suffocate
the entrepreneurial spirit.
Forgive us if you are not greeted with the same
level of Southern hospitality that our area usually
bestows on its distinguished guests. You see, we
understand you are in town to share your umpteenth different job creation plan during your time
in office. If it works as well as your other job creation programs, then thanks, but no thanks. We’d
prefer you keep it to yourself.
That’s because your jobs creation plans so far
have included a ridiculous government spending
spree and punitive tax increase on job creators that
were passed, as well as a minimum wage increase
that, thankfully, was not. Economists — and regular
folks with a basic understanding of math — understand that these are three of the most damaging
policies imaginable when a country is mired in
unemployment and starving for job growth.
Even though 64 percent of Chattanooga respondents said they would rather you hadn’t chosen
to visit our fair city, according to a survey on the
Times Free Press website, it’s probably good that
you’re here. It will give you an opportunity to see
the failure of your most comprehensive jobs plan
to date, the disastrous stimulus scheme, up close
and personal.
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
of 2009 helped fund the Gig to Nowhere project, a
$552 million socialist-style experiment in government-owned Internet, cable and phone services
orchestrated by EPB — Chattanooga’s government-owned electric monopoly.
•••
The Gig to Nowhere is a Smart Grid, a high tech
local electricity infrastructure intended to improve
energy efficiency and reduce power outages. After
lobbying for, and receiving, $111.6 million in stimulus money from your administration, EPB decided
to build a souped-up version of the Smart Grid
with fiber optics rather than more cost-effective
wireless technology. This decision was supposed
to allow EPB to provide the fastest Internet service
in the Western Hemisphere, a gigabit-per-second
Internet speed that would send tech companies
and web entrepreneurs stampeding to Chattanooga
in droves.
In reality, though, the gig, like most of the proj-
ects funded by your stimulus plan, has been an
absolute bust.
While the Smart Grid will cost taxpayers and
local electric customers well over a half-billion dollars when all is said and done, there has been little
improvement in the quality of EPB’s electric service. Worse, despite being heavily subsidized, EPB’s
government-owned Internet, cable and telephone
outfit that competes head-to-head against private
companies like AT&T and Comcast is barely staying afloat, often relying on loans from electric service reserve funds to afford its business expenses.
Further, there has been no credible evidence to
suggest that EPB can even provide a gig of service
consistently and reliably. Any companies hoping
to utilize the Gig to Nowhere are quoted monthly
billing costs that make the service unfeasible. As a
result, Chattanooga has remained a relative ghost
town for technological innovation. Almost no economic development whatsoever has resulted from
the gig.
•••
What the gig has brought, however, is that
shocking price tag. Because of your unwillingness
to balance the budget, Mr. President, the $111.6
million federal handout to subsidize the Gig to
Nowhere will actually cost federal taxpayers $158.2
million, due to interest. Once EPB received the
stimulus infusion to fund the pork project, the
electric monopoly took out a $219.8 bond that will
balloon to $391.3 million by the time Chattanoogans
are done paying it off.
The bond’s first payment comes due this fall and
there remain significant questions about how EPB
can manage to pay the debt without hiking electric
rates on EPB customers.
Building a Smart Grid to get into a telecom sector already well-served by private companies was
a bad idea from the start. But getting government
involved in places it doesn’t belong is a hallmark of
your administration. As a result, you and your policymakers were happy to fund the Gig to Nowhere.
You claimed that the Smart Grid would create
jobs for Chattanooga. But in reality, all it did was
push America deeper in debt and lure a local government agency into making a terrible financial
decision that will weigh on Chattanoogans like a
millstone for decades to come.
So excuse us, Mr. President, for our lack of
enthusiasm for your new jobs program. Here in
Chattanooga we’re still reeling from your old one.
— The Free Press
The President should
pick up an economics
textbook during his
visit to Amazon in
Chattanooga.
•••
U.S. Rep. Scott
DesJarlais, R-Tenn.
@DesJarlaisTN04
The President will
be in #CHA to talk
manufacturing. But
under his watch, our
country lost 592,000
manufacturing jobs.
•••
Robin Smith,
Tennessee
Republican Party
@robints
Welcome to Chatt,TN
Mr Pres. Take notes
but don’t rewrite our
story of success. It’s
the opposite of your
polices.
•••
U.S. Sen. Lamar
Alexander, R-Tenn.
Pres. Obama, how
will TN employers
add new jobs & at
the same time pay
new costs b/c of
Obamacare?
•••
Bill Colrus,
Writer at Nooga.com
@billcolrus
President Obama
knows it’s not
an Amazon
REdistribution center,
right?
•••
Chattanooga
Bystander
@ChattBystander
JUST IN: Obama
plans to pardon
Cee Lo Green from
Riverbend Ban
during visit.
Your community | Your voice
To Submit
Letters
Keep them topical,
short (200 words or
fewer), legible and
not more often than
one every 30 days.
Letters chosen for
publication may be
edited and should
not previously have
been published.
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name, address and
telephone number.
Send to:
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(either Times or
Free Press)
P.O. Box 1447
Chattanooga, TN
37401
Fax: 423-757-6383
Email: [email protected]
timesfreepress.com
Alexander, corker
show lack of respect
pare story unveils
corker’s character
Columnist off-base
on hispanics’ arrests
Senators Lamar Alexander and
Bob Corker lost my support when
they recently voted for amnesty
for illegals. They — and most
everyone who addresses it —
repeat the mantra that “the current
system is broken.” Just what is
broken besides enforcement?
If a stranger breaks into your
house, raids your refrigerator and
sleeps in your bed, will you call
the police or invite him to stay?
Should he have squatters’ rights?
So then why should those who
break into our country and steal
work and benefits be rewarded
with citizenship? Why should
those who stay home and abide
by the rules be shoved out of line
by the burglars?
With the unemployment rate
more than 8 percent in Chattanooga,
our problem is not too few workers.
And it is obvious that millions
willing to work for low wages can
only cause wages to decline.
I love Latin Americans; I travel
to Latin America frequently. That’s
why I know that if you break their
laws you will be swiftly jailed or
deported with no talk of amnesty.
Such is their right — and ours.
This is why I conclude that
Sens. Alexander and Corker have
less respect for the U.S. and its
citizens than those countries do
for theirs.
Nathan Schwenk
Spring City, Tenn.
Often the fabrications of
politicians go unchallenged by
the media. So I appreciate the
article by Mike Pare that shines
the light of reality on Bob Corker’s
fictionalized accounts of the
role of the UAW in Detroit and
American Auto making.
Corker’s attempt at historical
revision is pathetic. To advance his
management-friendly, anti-worker
agenda, Corker claims that the
UAW drove American automakers
into bankruptcy. Is this ignorance
or deceit?
The reality is that stupid
management drove American
automakers into bankruptcy.
Management decided to make
clunkers and gas guzzlers year after
year, while Germany and Japan
were making more economical, fuelefficient, durable and drivable cars.
The unions made automakers the
king of the hill for decades by making
superior products until CEOs were
too busy counting their money to pay
attention to the real world.
Corker gives us an insight into
his character when he complains
about union stewards asking
waiters if they would work beyond
their shift to serve Corker’s group.
He obviously believes that waiters
should be ordered to serve him,
even after their quitting time.
The Senate is full of do-nothings
with a sense of entitlement.
TERRY STULCE
Ooltewah
In a July 23 article, columnist
David Cook discussed the arrest
of four Hispanic men caught fishing on the Tennessee River without a license. Cook seemed aghast
that the men were arrested and
taken into custody when none of
them could produce a valid fishing license or proper identification,
implying that their arrest had noting to do with these two critical
facts, but was because they were
Hispanic. He stated that he’s fished
many times without a license and,
since he’s white, doubts if he’d have
been arrested had he been caught.
Contrary to Cook’s supposition,
I seriously doubt race had anything
to do with these arrests. Fishing
without a license and/or proper
identification would appear to be
the operative factors here. If Cook,
or any other nonminority, were
caught in similar circumstances
they would have been subject to
exactly the same treatment.
Shame on you, Mr. Cook, not
only for trying to make this into
a racial incident, but for flaunting
our fish and game laws and failing to support the preservation of
wildlife resources in Tennessee.
HOWARD BROWN
Lookout Mountain
Bible Wisdom
Phil 4:19: And my God will meet
all your needs according to his
glorious riches in Christ Jesus.
... ...timesfreepress.com • • •
..
Breaking News: 423-757-News
Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • C1
C
Business
timesfreepress.com/business
EXPRESS SCRIPTS: Second quarter net income increses, C2
q
q
SAKS: Hudson’s Bay deal announced, C2
• • • Tuesday, July 30, 2013
Two more
Pilot Flying J
employees
plead guilty
Stock
watch
NaSDaQ
3,599.14
S&P 500
1,685.33
6-Mo
t-BILLS
.06%
30-YR
t-BoNDS
3.68%
cRUDE
oIL
$104.55
GoLD
$1,328.40
q
q
q
n
p
q
p
-36.86
-14.03
-6.32
By Travis Loller
...
NASHVILLE — Two
more members of the Pilot
Flying J sales staff pleaded
guilty Monday to defrauding
customers at the truck-stop
chain owned by the family
of Cleveland Browns owner
Jimmy Haslam and Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam.
The pleas by Regional Sales Manager Michael
Scott Fenwick and Regional Account Representative
Janet Welch bring the total
number of sales employees
pleading guilty in the case
to seven. Two others have
agreed to cooperate with
prosecutors in exchange for
immunity from prosecution.
Court documents case
show that the scheme to
cheat customers out of
rebate and discount money
was well-known among sales
staff. According to the plea
agreements filed on Monday, both Welch and Fenwick
participated in a November
training session that taught
employees how to defraud
trucking companies without
getting caught.
Welch’s plea agreement
says she “actively participated in the discussion.” And
Fenwick told a group of sales
employees that if a customer
ever caught him reducing a
rebate, he would blame the
reduction on other sales staff
or a computer error, according to his plea agreement.
Welch’s agreement says
she prepared and emailed
monthly spreadsheets for
approval to other sales staff
containing the actual rebate
amounts due along with a
“deceptively reduced rebate
amount” for some of the
customers. Once approved,
Welch would cause checks
to be sent with deceptive
amounts.
Both Welch and Fenwick
are charged with conspiracy to commit mail fraud.
Prosecutors have agreed
to hold them responsible
only for those illegal acts in
which they were personally
involved. Both have agreed
to cooperate with prosecutors and testify truthfully if
called.
Welch’s attorney declined
to comment; Fenwick’s attorney, Randy Reagan, said of
his client, “He’s accepted
responsibility for his actions
and looking forward to
putting this behind him.”
The Associated Press
+.06
-.15
+6.70
Business
Briefing
Staff File Photo
Shaw adds 60
Dalton workers
Shaw Industries is
adding 60 employees at its
plants in the Dalton, Ga.,
area, the company’s talent
acquisition manager, Bridget Bailey, said Monday.
The Georgia Department of Labor will host a
jobs fair Wednesday from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Dalton Career Center, 1406
Chattanooga Ave. Shaw is
seeking experienced yarn
extrusion workers and
other sales and production
employees.
“These are new positions to support our
growing capacity needs
created by the increase
in the residential housing
market,” Bailey said.
Alstom cuts 40 jobs
official says loss of workers does not affect staffing,
operations at the turbomachinery manufacturer
A
By Mike Pare
Staff Writer
lstom’s boiler services
facility in Chattanooga
is laying off about 40
workers, or roughly 10
percent of its workforce, an
official said Monday.
The reduction is the second
for Alstom in Chattanooga this
year. In March, the company
cut 80 jobs at its adjacent turbomachinery plant on Riverfront Parkway.
Adam Pratt, Alstom’s U.S.
media relations manager, said
the company is adjusting the
workforce size and makeup
at the boiler facility based
on current market conditions
Georgia sues
payday lenders
Georgia Attorney General Sam Olens has filed a
lawsuit against two companies accusing them of providing illegal payday loans.
In a lawsuit filed in
Fulton County Superior
Court, Olens accuses
South Dakota-based
Western Sky Financial,
the company’s owner
Martin Webb and California-based Cash Call
Inc. of violating a state
law prohibiting lenders
from offering payday loans
over the Internet. Olens’
spokeswoman Lauren
Kane said a lawyer representing Western Sky said
in a May 2012 letter that
the company would stop
offering loans in Georgia.
Kane said Western Sky
continued offering loans,
and consumers reported
abusive collections practices to state officials.
“
and to make its operations as
lean as possible. The facility
employs about 380 people.
“We are taking steps to support affected employees and
ensure they are treated fairly,”
Pratt said. “This includes close
coordination with local union
management.”
He said the loss of the 40
hourly labor positions does
not impact staffing or operations at the turbomachinery
manufacturing site.
J.Ed. Marston, the Chattanooga Area Chamber of
Commerce’s vice president of
marketing, said he’s hopeful
Alstom will find opportunities
to grow again in the city in the
We always hate to hear about job reductions.
future.
“We always hate to hear
about any job reductions,” he
said, adding that the Alstom
situation renews the need
for the Chamber to focus its
attention on helping to create
high-paying jobs in Hamilton
County.
Today, President Barack
Obama is slated to visit Chattanooga for the first time
since becoming president,
and he is to deliver a message on ways to grow the
nation’s sluggish economy.
Obama will speak at Amazon’s Enterprise South indusSee ALSTOM, Page C2
”
— J.Ed. Marston,
Chattanooga Area Chamber of Commerce
vice president of marketing
See PILOT, Page C2
Staff Reports
BigFive
Biggest employers
in Hamilton County
The largest employers in Hamilton
County are government or nonprofit employers.
Hamilton County Schools, 4,480 fulltime and 1,419 part-time employees
BlueCross BlueShield of
Tennessee, 4,282 full-time and 38
part-time employees
Tennessee Valley Authority, 4,180
full-time employees
Erlanger hospital, 3,176 full-time
and 367 part-time employees
Memorial hospital, 3,171 full-time
and 595 part-time employees.
1
2
3
4
5
Source: Mayor Employers list for 2013, Chattanooga
Area Chamber of Commerce
smallbiz
Business focuses on women’s safety
n Name: Women’s
Empowerment and Self
Defense Chattanooga
n Owner: Richard
Temmerman
n Location: 7315 Lee
Highway, Suite 173,
Chattanooga
n Opens: Thursday
n Service: Temmerman
offers a range of selfdefense courses and
training for women.
His nonfighting classes
focus on prevention
and steps a woman can
take to help avoid being
targeted by a predator.
He teaches women how
to be aware of their
environment and take
initiative in potentially
dangerous situations.
His fighting classes
teach students how to
defend themselves with
punches, grabs and
various street fighting
techniques. Classes are
female-only.
n Prices: $75 for two
nonfighting sessions;
$40 for two fighting
classes; $75 for four
fighting classes. Each
session is one hour.
n Staff: One
n Initial investment:
$20,000
n How it got started:
Temmerman has been
teaching martial arts and
self-defense for 25 years.
After running two schools
in Illinois, he and his wife
moved to Chattanooga
to retire. Temmerman
was working as an armed
guard just to “stay busy,”
but he has a passion for
teaching women how
to stay safe and defend
themselves, and he
couldn’t stand to be out
of the teaching business
for long, he said.
n Quick tip: “If a guy
walked up with a gun or a
knife and said, ‘Get in the
car,’ you’re probably going
to get in the car, right?
Don’t do that. Scream,
Staff Photo by Shawn Paik
Richard Temmerman’s program is directed toward
women 13 and up and gives them the tools to
avoid becoming victims.
kick, get attention — don’t
get into the car. If you
don’t get in, you have
a high percentage of
nothing happening to you.
If you get into the car,
you’re done.”
n Web site: www.
womensempowermentchattanooga.com
n Phone number: 423315-0418
— Compiled by Shelly
Bradbury, who may be
reached at 757-6525.
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*24 month lease payment, excludes tax. Tag, title, $395 customer service fee, first payment, and $2499 cash down due at signing. No security
deposit required. Msrp $43480 lease sale price $38420. 10,000 miles/year. Offer ends 07/31/2013. 2 available at this price, st#id022 & id023.
■ To contact Business • Phone: 423-757-6340 • Fax: 423-668-5085 • Email: [email protected]
35943458
Dow
15,521.97
• • • timesfreepress.com....
Breaking News: 423-757-News
C2 • Tuesday, July 30, 2013
Express
Scripts net
income
climbs
Nashville
Airport hits
passenger
milestone
The Associated Press
The Associated Press
The Nashville International Airport saw more than
10 million passengers during
fiscal year 2013.
According to a news
release from the Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority the airport
reached that milestone only
once before — in 1993 at the
peak of the American Airlines hub.
Airport Authority CEO
Rob Wigington said the
numbers underscore Nashville’s thriving economy and
vibrant tourism market.
In the past 12 months,
Nashville International Airport has announced 14 new
nonstop flights to New York
The Associated Press
City, Los Angeles, Cleveland,
A
shopper
uses
a
Fifth
Avenue
exit
from
Saks,
in
New
York
on
Monday.
Saks
Inc.
agreed
to
sell
itself
to Hudson’s
Newark, N.J., Pittsburgh, Pensacola, Fla., Boston and Ath- Bay Co., the Canadian parent of upscale retailer Lord & Taylor, for about $2.4 billion.
ens, Ga.
The total number of passengers travelling through
BNA in the fiscal year ended
on June 30 was 10,064,661.
That’s a 3 percent increase
from fiscal year 2012.
Hudson’s Bay buying Saks
Alstom
• Continued from Page C1
trial park distribution center, which is adding jobs and
shifting “dozens” of employees from part-time to fulltime. Amazon announced
Monday it is adding 7,000
full- and part-time jobs
nationwide to handle its
growing Internet sales.
Chattanooga has seen ups
and downs in its job-growth
efforts over this year, with
Pilgrim’s Pride announcing
earlier this month it will
lay off 200 workers at one
of its chicken processing
plants. Before that, however, Southeast Mahindra USA
announced it would build a
new facility in Chattanooga, and Convergys unveiled
plans to add 500 workers to
its local call center.
“On the whole, we’re seeing bigger jobs announcements than reductions,”
Marston said.
But, he added, officials
locally are seeing job additions that often require higher skills.
“In some ways, the local
economy is emblematic of
the national economy,” Marston said. “We seeing a major
shift of kinds of work and
skills required.”
This spring, Paris-based
Alstom said it was slashing
its turbomachinery plant
workforce in Chattanooga,
citing a lack of orders for
nuclear power components.
That $300 million facility
opened in 2010 with the hope
of cashing in on a renaissance
in nuclear power. However,
that ramp up has been slow
to come about in the wake of
the Fukushima, Japan, nuclear power plant accident as
well as the emergence of
plentiful and relatively cheap
natural gas from U.S. shale
reserves.
Contact Mike Pare at
[email protected]
or 423-757-6318.
Stocks jump as deal is announced
The Associated Press
Luxury retailer Saks is being purchased by the parent of Lord & Taylor
for approximately $2.4 billion.
The news comes a little over a
month after reports surfaced that Hudson’s Bay Co. was interested in buying
Saks Inc.
Hudson’s Bay, which also runs some
Canadian department stores, will pay
$16 per share for Saks, a 5 percent premium over the company’s Friday closing price of $15.31.
The companies put the deal’s total
value at about $2.9 billion including
debt. FactSet says the New York-based
retailer has about 150.2 million outstanding shares.
Saks’ stock jumped more than 3
percent in Monday premarket trading.
Shares are up 46 percent for the year
to date.
“We are excited about what this
opportunity and being part of a much
larger enterprise can mean for the
future of the Saks Fifth Avenue brand,”
Saks Chairman and CEO Steve Sadove
said in a statement.
Saks will continue to run as a separate company under Hudson’s Bay and
will have its own merchandising, marketing and store operations employees.
Key management personnel are expected to remain with the company.
Saks will have a 40-day period in
which to seek out alternative third-party bids.
The buyout, which was approved
by both companies’ boards, is targeted
to close before year’s end. It still needs
approval from Saks’ shareholders.
Hudson’s Bay said that it will look
at strategic options for the combined
property portfolio, which could include
establishing a real estate investment
trust.
Founded in 1924 by Horace Saks and
Bernard Gimbel, Saks’ flagship store
on Fifth Avenue in New York City is a
landmark of retailing and sits on some
of the most valuable real estate in the
world. The company employs about
15,000 people across 41 stores.
Saks added stores and expanded
across the nation in the 1970s and 1980s.
It became a publicly traded company
in 1996.
The Knoxville-based Proffitt’s, then
headed by former Memphis state legislator Brad Martin, purchased Saks
Holdings Inc. in 1998, 11 years after
the company began its acquisition of
other retail chains by buying the former Loveman’s Department Stores in
Chattanooga. Upon closing of the Saks
acquisition, Proffit’s changed its name
to Saks Inc.
Saks had 42 Saks Fifth Avenue stores
and 66 Saks Fifth Avenue Off 5th stores
at the first quarter’s end.
Hudson’s Bay was founded in 1670 as
a trading firm for furs and other goods.
It is considered the oldest company in
operation in North America.
Pending sales of U.S. homes slip from 6-year high
The Associated Press
The number of Americans
who signed contracts to buy
homes dipped in June from
a six-year high in May, a sign
that sales could stabilize over
the next few months.
The National Association
of Realtors said Monday
that its seasonally adjusted
Pilot
• Continued from Page C1
Jimmy Haslam has denied
any personal wrongdoing.
Gov. Bill Haslam maintains
he is not involved with operating Pilot Flying J, though he
continues to hold an undisclosed ownership stake in
the company posting annual
revenues of about $30 billion.
After the pleas on Monday, Pilot Flying J released a
statement expressing disappointment in the actions of
Welch and Fenwick.
“We reiterate that the
company, led by CEO Jimmy
index for pending home sales
ticked down 0.4 percent to
110.9 in June. The May reading was revised lower by a
percentage point to 111.3, but
it was still the highest since
December 2006.
The slight decline suggests higher mortgage rates
may be starting to slow
sales. Still, signed contracts
are 10.9 percent higher than
they were a year ago. There
is generally a one- to twomonth lag between a signed
contract and a completed
sale.
Economists were relieved
after seeing only a modest decline. They said that
Haslam, is committed to do
what is right, to pay back every
customer affected by these
actions, to implement policies
and procedures to ensure this
does not happen again, and to
restore our customers’ trust
and confidence, which is still
well-placed in Pilot Flying J,”
the statement reads.
The company says it has
already sent checks to customers who were cheated
out of rebates and discounts.
A group of nine companies
that was suing Pilot over
the rebates has reached
a class-action settlement.
Another nine companies
have said they will opt out
of the settlement and pursue
their own lawsuits.
Former Pilot Flying J executive Scott Fenwick, left, with
attorney Randall Reagan, leaves court after pleading
guilty in connection with a federal investigation into
alleged fuel rebate fraud on Monday.
shows higher mortgage
rates are having only a small
impact on the home sales
market.
“All told … pending home
sales held up fantastically
well,” Dan Greenhaus, chief
global strategist at BTIG, an
institutional brokerage, said
in a note to clients.
The Associated Press
Express Scripts says its
second-quarter net income
more than tripled compared
to last year, when costs from
the pharmacy benefits manager’s acquisition of competitor Medco Health Solutions
dented its performance.
The results topped Wall
Street estimates but shares
edged lower in after-hours
trading.
The St. Louis company
said Monday that it earned
$543 million, or 66 cents per
share, in the quarter ended
June 30. That compares to
$149.6 million, or 18 cents per
share, a year ago.
Express Scripts said it
earned $1.12 per share if onetime items are excluded.
Revenue fell 4 percent to
$26.43 billion.
Analysts surveyed by
FactSet expected earnings
of $1.10 per share on $25.50
billion in revenue.
Express Scripts Holding
Co. is the nation’s largest
pharmacy benefits manager. It runs prescription drug
plans for employers, insurers
and other customers. Express
Scripts other PBMs process
mail-order prescriptions and
handle bills for prescriptions
filled at retail pharmacies.
They use large purchasing
power to negotiate lower
drug prices and make money
by reducing costs for health
plan sponsors and members.
The company said prescriptions fell 7 percent
after it lost a contract with
UnitedHealth Group Inc., the
largest U.S. health insurer.
Express Scripts said it handled 369.4 million adjusted
claims from continuing operations during the quarter.
Adjusted prescriptions
count 90-day mail order
prescriptions as three onemonth prescriptions.
The company said it
is looking for a new chief
financial officer and current
CFO Jeff Hall’s last day on
the job will be Tuesday. It
said Matthew Harper will
be its interim CFO. Harper
has been with the company
since 2004 and became its
vice president in charge of
financial planning and analysis in April.
Hall has been Express
Scripts’ CFO since 2008,
and the company said he
will serve in a different role
through Sept. 1 as part of its
transition plan.
Express Scripts closed
its $29.1 billion acquisition
of Medco at the start of last
year’s second quarter. The
deal created a company big
enough to handle the prescriptions of more than one
in three Americans. Express
Scripts has seen its revenue
and prescription counts
swell since the deal closed.
Express Scripts raised its
full-year guidance to a range
of $4.26 to $4.34 per share, up
from its previous estimate of
$4.23 to $4.33 per share. Analysts expect $4.29 per share
on average.
Express Scripts said it
should earn between $1.05
and $1.09 per share in the
third quarter. Analysts
expect $1.08 per share.
EDUCATION:
BUILDING BLOCK
OF A STRONG
COMMUNITY
When you support United Way of Greater Chattanooga,
you support children from cradle to career, preparing
the community comes together to help children, youth,
and families in ways that benefit us all.
Find out more and get invovlved!
LiveUnitedChattanooga.org
35898268
them for success in school, and life. United Way is where
• • • Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • C3
Mountain
Living
SIGNAL MOUNTAIN
Signal Mtn. 902 CROWN POINT RD W.
Located in the convenient Birnam Woods neighborhood, on one of the best lots on the mountain.
Classic Cape Cod styling 5 BR 4 Baths 3837 sq
ft. relaxing den, living and Dining rooms made
for entertaining, a large rec room, and a fabulous
kitchen renovated with custom cabinets and quality applicances . Master is on main as well as two
additional bedrooms. Upstairs bedrooms are very
large and one could be a bonus room for other
uses. Ready to move in!! Mls#1192144
$339,000 George Patten Cell: 423-503-1296
OPEN SUNDAY 2-4PM
Signal Mtn. 852 ARDEN WAY
Beautiful one level home with full finished basement. 3 BR 3 Bath Master on main. 3409 sq ft
Stainless steel appliances and gorgeous granite
counter tops. Use the basement as a multipurpose room or in-law suite. This wonderful home
is located in the prime area of Hidden Brook.
Mls#1193394 $339,500.
Margaret Patten Cell: 423-598-6423
George Patten
423-402-8411
LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN
Will only get better with added lights, changing seasons
to the West! See farmlands, mountains, amazing
sunsets, from your nearly level 1.7 acres. Brick 1.5 story.
4 BR, 3 full baths. 2 fireplaces. Double heated garage.
Asking only $439,000. Adjacent barn, acreage, brow lot
available. Charlie or Nathan Walldorf 423-756-2400.
Private Wooded Lot-Historic Setting
“My love is matching people
with that perfect home.”
Like new 3 or 4 BR. Huge deck. Built-in kitchen. Huge
master. Only $299,000, new price. Call Nathan or
Charlie Walldorf 423-756-2400.
Lois Killebrew, Broker/Owner,
ABR, CRB, CRS, GRI
Nathan & Charlie
Walldorf
Margaret Patten
423-503-1296
Proudly serving satisfied clients
in the Signal Mountain, Greater
Chattanooga and the Tri-State
areas for over 30 years.
Your Bluff View
423-598-6423
Cell 423-544-7700
Office 423-756-2400
www.SearchChattanoogaArea.com
6110 Shallowford Rd. #1000
Chattanooga, TN
35965206
109 E. 8th Street • Chattanooga, TN 37402
Private/Convenient Executive home in Walden/
Summertown, close to East Brow and the W-Road.
3,652 Sq. Ft., 4 BR, 3.5 BA – Spacious traditional
styling. All the amenities you expect – beautiful
hardwood, granite, stainless Bosch appliances. 17’
vaulted ceilings and open floor plan make this a
wonderful home for entertaining. Patio with fire
pit and deck provide inviting spaces outdoors as
well. Owner/Agent. MLS#1196060
Brenda Purcell
35965166
Brow Rim Beauty. 1810 Ridge Cliff Dr. Brick
and siding, split floor plan. Palladian style
window in kitchen, wall of windows to view
from Great Room and Dining Room. 3/2
1583 sf. MLS#1452701 $224,000
Reduced Price!
35969285
505.4084 or 265.0088
CarrieGallantHomes.com
35969304
mountaincityrealtors.com
Innisfree on Clifftops Lake. 2334 Westlake
Ave. 5.2 acres. Long lake frontage, docks.
Swim, fish or canoe/kayak. Great landscaping. 3/2 1066 sf on main floor, plus guest
bedroom and bath upstairs.
MLS#1468783 $580,000
Don’t miss Open House! Aug. 4 from 2-4.
See Open House Directory Aug.3 for info.
1122 Mountain Terrace RD. A wonderful Lookout
Mountain home. Come enjoy small town living!
This home was built in 2003 & features 5 bedrooms,
Award Winning
4.5 bathrooms w/3,200(+/-) sqft. Stacked stone
Fairyland Elementary!
fireplace in the family room creating such a warm
cozy feeling. Beautiful spacious kitchen w/granite
counter tops, white custom cabinetry, and stainless
steel appliances w/gas range cook top, double oven
and double stainless steel sink. Master is on main has
an abundance of windows & private entrance to the
back deck. MLS 1186213. $399,000.
Broker, ABR, SRES
[email protected]
Cell: 423-322-0011
423-756-5700
www.
Lookout
Mountain, GA
Signal Mountain - Reduced - $549,000
RE/MAX Renaissance Realtors
423-886-1300 x202 • Cell: 423-309-1671
Fax 888-316-6524
35965184
www.REBHomeShop.com
Blue Bird Hill 1610 Clifftops Ave. Panoramic
views on 5.5 acres. SS appliances, circular
drive. Mountain stone fireplace, spacious screened porch to view. 3/2 1700 sf.
MLS#1364293 $429,000
Lost In The Clouds 336 Nancy Winn Rd
Sewanee. 7.8 acres with long range view of
Sweetons Cove and rural farms below. Log
home is 1/1 plus sleeping loft and 33x28
garage below. MLS#1431163 $179,900
Monteagle Sewanee, REALTORS®
VISIT: www.monteaglerealtors.com
then call
Diane Rizzo
D
931-924-7253
35966259
35963281
timesfreepress.com
Signal Mountain
4423.842.8887 o | 423-309-7653 c | [email protected]
LLicensed in TN and GA
111 Norvell, Signal Mtn.
3 BR 2.5 BA - 2 car garage, situated on a wonderful
lot with mature trees. Hardwood floors, warm
soothing colors and a beautifully updated kitchen.
Attractive granite counters, travertine tile flooring,
stainless appliances, and a private outdoor living
area. $309,000 MLS# 1195492
2 Northfield, Signal Mtn.
Signal Mountain
301 Monte Roquero Lane
4 BR, 4 BA/2 Half BA
$517,900
MLS# 1192196
1413 E. Brow, Signal Mtn.
5 BR 3.5 BA - 3/4 brick and well appointed. Lush
mountain gardens, creek bed, and outdoor kitchen
on a 1 acre+ double lot. Hardwood floors, media
room, and a sunroom. Natural stone potting shed,
deck, and fenced yard. $549,000 MLS# 1194185
6 BR 6.5 BA - .5 acres, Extraordinary entrance with
dual winding stairways, Living room with floor to
ceiling windows, Entertainment deck, Jacuzzi tub,
Mother in law suite, and a workshop that has an
additional utility garage. $998,000 MLS# 1190436
Doug & Sherry Lawrence
423-886-2601
Go to www.ChattanoogaHomeFinders.com
and take a Visual Tour of these homes.
423-802-2014
423-838-5011
423-886-6729
35980714
35971542
The Lawrence Team
SIGNAL MOUNTAIN
brick rancher on 5.3 acres w/commercial bld.
Very private, peaceful setting. Soaking tub with
heated back rest, and heated floor in the master
bath. Wood burning fireplace,
heated in ground pool, two car
garage, lighted court for basketball, badminton, or volleyball.
Large workshop (12’ x 26’)
located in the garage area.
3298 US Highway 127. 3BR/2BA. Opportunity,
privacy, acreage, low taxes, a nearly 2000 sf wellmaintained one-level home and a 2400 sf commercial block building offering business or pleasure...
These are just a few of the perks that come with this
beautiful property. Situated on over 5 acres just 3
miles north outside Hamilton County on Taft Hwy/
US Hwy 127, this is a great place for someone who
prefers to be outside the city limits, yet remain close
enough to be downtown Chattanooga in 25 minutes
or Dunlap in 15. Home is in great condition inside
and out and sits on a gorgeous lot w/many lovely
areas for gardening or play. Architectural roof only 2
years old, heat pump only 5 years old.
MLS 1196687. $249,000.
35977093
5001 Central Ave, Signal Mtn.
3 BR 3 BA - Updated home sits on 4 Acres. Privacy,
nature, pond, and a wonderful home with a huge
Rocking chair porch. 20+ foot ceiling, mountain
stone fireplace, hardwood floors, granite counters,
and stainless appliances. Bonus room and partial
unfinished basement. $449,900 MLS# 1184277
Johnny Alvis
503.3693 or
265.0088
MOUNTAIN LAKE ESTATES
The Ledge 8761 Scenic Hwy
Beautiful view from this custom home. From the moment you enter the view is GORGEOUS!
3 BR 2 Bath Cozy up to the fireplace in the winter and entertain from the deck/porch and patio in the
other seasons! Hardwood floors, master on main, patio doors from master to deck; 2nd floor
boasts beautiful view from both bedrooms, $319,900 mls1188765
Multi-level decking with screened porch overlooking
private, lush, wooded back. Bonus room, Generous crowns,
and Hardwoods. Completely updated kitchen with granite
counters. Beverage center features U-line Wine cooler and
separate icemaker. Oversized master with sitting area provides
an evening retreat to unwind. Beautifully situated on a quiet
cul-de-sac in this small enclave of homes in Brow View but convenient to Signal Mountain shopping
and off & on routes from & to the mountain from Taft Hwy and the W Road.
$595,000 MLS 1193484
Linda Brock
Linda Brock
www.LindaBrockHomes.com
(423) 364-4663
(423) 899-5943
35980776
www.LindaBrockHomes.com
(423) 364-4663
(423) 899-5943
Each office independently
owned and operated
SIGNAL MOUNTAIN
7027 Sawyer Pike - 4 BR, 2.5 BA
5 acres of country living at its best! Zoned for top
notch Signal Mountain schools. Beautiful pasture
in front, and fruit trees in the back. All hardwood!
4 BR, 2 bathrooms, bonus room, screened in
porch, and 3 stall barn.
$419,000 MLS 1196640
121 Golf Dr - 4 BR, 2 BA
Great family home under $230,000 on Signal
Mountain! 4 BR, 2 bathrooms, screened
porch, and finished basement. This home sits
on almost an acre and is located across from
Signal Mtn. golf course. Beautiful!
$229,000 MLS 1197599
1222 Sunset Dr
One of few remaining lots in beautiful Majestic
Views on the side of Signal Mountain! Zoned for
Signal Mountain schools! Build your dream home!
$100,000 MLS 1197190
35980782
Each office independently
owned and operated
Lookout Mountain
The Ledge 8659 Scenic Hwy
Cloudland at Lookout 131 S Stewart Ln
Breathtaking View From All Windows And Decks.
Beautiful Custom Home in gated community 5 to
3
Bedrooms,
Great Room With Stacked Stone
6 bedrooms, 4 Baths office, fireplace, hardwoods,
large deck, granite countertops screened porch, split Fireplace, Eat-In Kitchen, Top Of The Line Appliances,
Corian Tops, Hardwood And Tile. Whirlpool, Heated
bedrooms with private master jetted tub and tile
Floor And Separate Shower In Master Bath. Highest
shower. Basement with large rec room
Quality Construction. $299,900 mls1195985
$459,900 mls1186065
BELL AGENCY REALTORS, LLC
CAREYEE BELL, BROKER
Proudly serving Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee!
Office: 706.657.3000
Cell: 423.240.0208
www.BellAgencyRealtors.com
35980794
829 N Bragg Ave - 7 BR, 7.5 BA
Privacy! Master bed has refreshment center, heated floor in bath, television behind mirror, separate
steam shower with multi jets. Terrace with exercise
area, sauna, mahogany bar, hot tub, heated pool,
kitchen and fireplace all overlooking
Chattanooga. Whole house generator, sauna and steam, theater, temp
controlled wine cellar, heated salt
Cell: 423-316-4706
pool, commercial outdoor kitchen,
climate controlled 3 car garage
wired for surround sound, air purification and water purification systems, security cameras, safe room,
(423) 756-0771
screen porch, observation
deck. 4 fireplaces, plus an
outdoor fireplace that is
wood burning, by the pool.
And much more!
Sue Markley
35980784
29 Rock Crest Dr - 5 BR, 4.5 BA
Located in beautiful Carriage Hill! You‘ll love
the, “living with nature”, feel as the seasons
change with the many huge windows of this
well maintained home. 5 large BR, 4 bathrooms, finished basement, lots of storage,
and a low maintenance yard!
$429,000 MLS 1197375
8975 Balata Dr - 4 BEDROOMS, 3 FULL & 2 HALF
BATHS. Light, neutral decor throughout with generous
detail from crowns to the two story family room coffered
ceiling featuring a wall of Pella windows overlooking the
picturesque Snow Hill valley capturing the beautiful contours
of Chattanooga. Spacious keeping room, kitchen & eating
area provides the perfect gathering space for friends &
family. Master suite with perfectly planned bath and closet
on main and three large bedrooms, huge bonus with half bath over garage capturing both east
and west views and spacious media room located on second level. Oversized three car garage
with extensive rear entry parking. Community pool and club house. $695,000 MLS#1193362
35980755
105 Brow View Lane - 5 BR, 4 BA
$2,500,000
MLS# 1187931
100 Scenic Hwy #19 Stonedge
Lovely 2 bedroom, 2 bath condo in sought-after
Stonedge with spacious living room, dining room,
den with fireplace and bookshelves, plus office.
Inviting patio with lots of spaces to put planters,
if desired. Screened porch. MLS 1190658.
Priced below appraisal $249,000.
109 East Brow Road
Extraordinary landmark home on the eastern brow
of Lookout Mountain, TN. Beautiful, sweeping views. 5
bedrooms, 4 full baths, plus 2 half baths. Timeless beauty
within the interior, but marvelously updated with a dream
kitchen. American Chestnut paneling. Luxurious amenities.
Generator. Elevator. MLS 1195806. $1,350,000
109 E. 8th Street
Chattanooga, TN 37402
PATTI COLE
Graham Burns
GRI
Cell: 423-309-6485
(423) 886-2880
ABR, CRS, GRI
(423) 821-2840
Julie Fisher
(423) 304-5227
35980802
(423) 756-2400
• • • timesfreepress.com....
Breaking News: 423-757-News
C4 • Tuesday, July 30, 2013
THE MARKETS
Closing prices for Monday, July 29, 2013
Commodities
Stocks Recap
1,720
15,640
S&P 500
Close: 1,685.33
Change: -6.32 (-0.4%)
1,680
1,640
10 DAYS
15,400
16,000
1,650
15,500
1,600
15,000
1,550
14,500
1,500
14,000
1,450
F
M
A
M
DIARY
Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
NYSE
NASD
2,721
2,709
917
2146
93
42
1,511
1,728
793
1699
103
18
J
DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000
HIGH
15557.14
6464.63
507.98
9601.53
3618.86
1690.92
1230.58
17942.75
1048.78
10 DAYS
13,500
J
LOW
15482.27
6396.30
503.22
9554.91
3592.80
1681.86
1219.97
17834.03
1038.93
F
M
CLOSE
A
CHG.
15521.97
6401.65
505.78
9571.79
3599.14
1685.33
1223.06
17871.47
1040.66
Oats
Cocoa
Coffee
Sugar
Cotton
Wheat
Rough rice
Heating oil
Light sweet crude
Gas blend
Natural gas
Close: 15,521.97
Change: -36.86 (-0.2%)
15,520
1,700
COMMODITY
Dow Jones industrials
-36.86
-71.27
+1.37
-48.34
-14.03
-6.32
-5.21
-71.28
-7.85
M
%CHG.
-0.24%
-1.10%
+0.27%
-0.50%
-0.39%
-0.37%
-0.42%
-0.40%
-0.75%
J
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
t
s
s
s
s
s
s
YTD
+18.45%
+20.63%
+11.63%
+13.36%
+19.20%
+18.17%
+19.86%
+19.18%
+22.52%
Market Summary
LAST
3.15
2.26
29.02
7.15
40.39
5.32
8.65
5.69
12.17
2.75
CHG.
+1.55
+.80
+9.81
+2.09
+10.79
+1.17
+1.80
+1.09
+2.17
+.41
MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
NAME
Lightbrdge
Reliv Intl
USEC rs
SyntaPhm
BakerM
UranmR rs
Spherix rs
Interphase
CitizFst
HudsonTc
%CHG.
+96.9
+54.8
+51.1
+41.3
+36.5
+28.2
+26.3
+23.7
+21.7
+17.5
NAME
Dataram rs
ShandaGm
Changyou
TurqHillRs
GeoMet pf
OldSecBc
FurnBrd rs
Sohu.cm
ValVis A
ProUltCmdy
LAST
3.11
4.99
32.90
4.27
6.40
6.01
2.80
63.05
5.58
18.63
CHG.
-1.59
-1.26
-8.17
-1.05
-1.40
-.75
-.31
-6.95
-.60
-1.97
%CHG.
-33.8
-20.2
-19.9
-19.7
-17.9
-11.1
-10.0
-9.9
-9.7
-9.6
NAME
Facebook
Elan
BkofAm
Intel
S&P500ETF
iShJapan
iShEMkts
Saks
MicronT
Pfizer
VOL (00s)
1217992
874772
864666
848792
726416
600783
489172
443505
381306
370565
LAST
35.43
15.46
14.52
23.24
168.59
11.13
39.33
15.95
12.47
29.54
Tkr
Last Chg
NAME
Air
ACL
ACG
AOF
GSF
Table shows name, price,and ticker symbol .
24.88 -.13
9.75 +.13
7.25
#
.50 -.13
7.50
#
TKR LAST CHG
NAME
A-B-C
CLECO CNL 48.73 -.12
CMS Eng CMS 28.28 +.08
CNOOC CEO 179.76 -3.56
CSX
CSX 24.65 -.03
CalaCvHi CHY 12.44 -.20
Cameron CAM 57.08 -.10
CapsteadMCMO 11.95 -.08
Caterpillar CAT 83.02 +.96
CedarF FUN 42.77 +.23
Cemex CX 11.38 -.32
CenterPnt CNP 24.67 -.15
CntryLink CTL 36.15 +.12
ChesEng CHK 22.75 -.10
Chevron CVX 126.17 -1.39
ChicB&I CBI 59.45 -1.27
Chicos CHS 16.91 +.24
ChinaUni CHU 14.51 -.06
Chubb
CB 87.06 -.17
Cisco
CSCO 25.33 -.17
Citigroup C
51.64 -.57
CleanEngy CLNE 12.69 -.12
ClearEnFdCEM 27.58 -.56
CliffsNRs CLF 20.02 +.31
Clorox
CLX 85.92 -.05
CloudPeak CLD 16.68 -.27
Coach
COH 57.85 -1.33
CobraEl COBR 2.58 +.07
Coeur
CDE 13.54 -.19
ColgPalm sCL
60.08 -.17
Colmbus CMCO21.93 -.35
CmtyBkSy CBU 33.08 -.10
CmtyHlt CYH 47.23 +2.63
CompDivHd CODI 17.25 -.16
CompuwreCPWR 11.10 -.02
ComstkRs CRK 17.87 -.20
ConocoPhilCOP 65.18 -.54
ConEd ED 60.27 +.34
ConstellA STZ 51.11 +.51
Copart CPRT 32.20 -.18
Corning GLW 15.39 +.14
Crane
CR 61.10 -.88
CSVelIVST XIV 25.96 -.36
CrSuisInco CIK
3.71 -.04
CSVS2xVx rs TVIX
1.85 +.03
CrosTim CRT 27.56 +.10
CrosstxLP XTEX 20.92 +.04
Cryolife CRY 6.96 -.27
CubistPh CBST 55.96 +.06
Culp Inc CFI 19.33 -.03
Cummins CMI 116.44 +.56
Cytec
CYT 76.77 +.54
AAR
AIR 24.97 -.44
ABB Ltd ABB 21.96 -.18
AFLAC AFL 61.01 -.08
AGCO
AGCO 54.42 +.08
ATMI Inc ATMI 24.84 +.07
AbtLab s ABT 36.74 -.04
ActivsBliz ATVI 18.27 +.81
Actuant ATU 34.45 -.19
AdamsEx ADX 12.46 +.01
AdvAuto AAP 82.33 -.31
AMD
AMD 3.75 -.07
Aegon
AEG 7.68 -.11
Aetna
AET 63.40 -1.30
Agilysys AGYS 11.71 +.02
Agnico g AEM 29.02 +.09
AirProd APD 104.64 +.52
AlcatelLuc ALU 2.20 +.08
Alcoa
AA
8.04 -.03
AllnceRes ARLP 76.75 +.75
AlliBGlbHi AWF 14.66 -.02
AlliBInco ACG 7.24 -.04
AlliBern AB 22.15 -.07
AlliantEgy LNT 52.80 -.37
Allstate ALL 51.35 -.17
AlphaNRs ANR 5.59 +.05
AlpGPPrp AWP 7.47 -.07
Altria
MO 35.67 -.23
Amazon AMZN306.10 -5.91
AMCOL ACO 35.39 -.86
Ameren AEE 36.11 +.16
AMovilL AMX 20.82 -.78
AMovilA AMOV 20.84 -1.09
ACapAgy AGNC 21.85 +.21
AEagleOutAEO 19.26 +.06
AEP
AEP 46.70 +.23
AmIntlGrp AIG 46.27 -.27
ARltCapPr ARCP 14.88 +.23
AmSupr AMSC 2.68 -.08
Amerigas APU 44.97 -.44
Ametek AME 45.73 -.03
Amgen AMGN109.37 -.23
Anadarko APC 88.65 +.14
Andrsons ANDE 59.22 +.20
Annaly NLY 11.90 +.10
ApolloInv AINV 8.11 -.13
Apple Inc AAPL447.79 +6.80
ApldMatl AMAT 16.02 -.11
AquaAm WTR 34.09 -.08
Arbitron ARB 45.83 +.11
ArchCoal ACI
4.12 -.05
AresCap ARCC 17.71 +.06
ArlingAst AI
25.44 -.42
AstraZen AZN 50.55
AtlPwr g AT
4.29 -.05
AtlasPpln APL 38.58 -.69
Atmel
ATML 7.72 +.08
ATMOS ATO 44.56 +.28
AutoData ADP 72.10 -.38
AutoZone AZO 440.73 +1.07
B&G Foods BGS 34.90 -.28
B/E Aero BEAV 68.51 -.57
BHP BillLt BHP 64.05 -.24
BHPBil plcBBL 58.11 -.37
BP PLC BP 43.12 -.46
BP Pru BPT 90.77 -.25
BabCPtInvMPV 14.29 -.10
Baidu
BIDU 129.33 +1.77
BcoBrad pf BBD 12.52 -.12
BcoSantSASAN
7.30 +.01
BancrftFd BCV 17.90 +.15
BariPVix rs VXX 15.71 +.20
Bard
BCR 113.80 -.66
BarrickG ABX 17.55 -.27
BassettF BSET 16.03 -.24
Beam Inc BEAM 63.95 -.82
BectDck BDX 103.11 -.14
BerkHa A BRK/A174505-1421
BerkH B BRK/B116.42 -.92
BlackBerryBBRY 8.67 -.21
BobEvans BOBE 50.88 -.35
Boeing BA 104.81 -.79
Boise Inc BZ
9.09 +.03
BoltTech BOLT 18.10 -.33
BostonSci BSX 10.97 +.01
Braskem BAK 15.35 +.06
Brinker EAT 39.80 +.76
BrMySq BMY 43.76 -.46
Broadcom BRCM 27.40 +.10
BrcdeCm BRCD 6.46 +.07
BrwnBrn BRO 32.76 -.24
CBRE GRE IGR
8.72 -.18
CF Inds CF 202.30 +21.30
CGG
CGG 24.82 -.40
TKR LAST CHG
D-E-F
DR HortonDHI 19.67
DTE
DTE 70.60
DeckrsOut DECK 53.27
Deere
DE 83.02
Delhaize DEG 65.48
Dell Inc DELL 12.87
DeltaAir DAL 21.32
DiaOffs DO 67.44
DxSCBr rsTZA 25.80
DxGldBll rs NUGT 7.61
DxSCBull sTNA 57.41
Div&Inc rs DNI 16.49
DoleFood DOLE 12.83
DollarTree DLTR 52.94
DomRescs D
59.36
DmRsBW DOM 4.53
DonlleyRRRRD 16.25
Dover
DOV 85.06
DukeEngy DUK 71.22
DukeRlty DRE 16.83
DynMatl BOOM17.77
Dynatrn rs DYNT 2.34
DynexCap DX
9.67
eBay
EBAY 51.64
EMC Cp EMC 26.32
ErthLink ELNK 6.26
EastChem EMN 75.03
Eaton
ETN 67.62
Ebix Inc EBIX 11.81
EchelonC ELON 2.29
EdwLfSci EW 71.01
Elan
ELN 15.46
EldorGld gEGO 8.22
ElectArts EA 25.48
EllswthFd ECF 7.86
EmersonEl EMR 59.78
EmersnR h MSN 1.70
EnbrdgEPtEEP 32.65
Energen EGN 56.49
Energizer ENR 106.36
EngyTsfr ETP 51.34
Enerpls g ERF 16.27
+.34
+.45
-.28
+.21
-.78
-.07
-.58
-.49
+.54
-.24
-1.17
-.02
-.03
-.19
-.16
-.08
+.50
+.39
+.43
-.21
-.33
-.07
-.61
-.18
-.10
+.87
-.41
+.26
-.79
+.53
+.14
-.34
+.03
-.02
+.01
-.15
-.72
-.33
-.07
-.13
NAME
MONTH
OPEN INT.
Sep 13
Sep 13
Sep 13
Sep 13
Sep 13
Mar 14
Sep 13
Aug 13
Sep 13
Aug 13
Aug 13
VOL.
1756
68277
88863
1950
114
15292
12125
1
33837
7867
14582
365623
17075
6855
9393
634
17356
198574
37665
11865
SETTLE
CHG.
336
2280
121.15
19.90
84.71
673.25
15.840
301.62
104.55
3.0125
3.459
+4.75
-53
-1.10
-.03
-.41
+1.75
-.045
+.61
-.15
-.0319
-.096
CHG.
+1.42
+.53
-.21
-.02
-.52
-.25
-.50
+.64
-.12
+.17
DATE
OPEN
HIGH
LOW
SETTLE
CHG.
DATE
OPEN
HIGH
LOW
SETTLE
CHG.
SOYBEANS
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Aug 13
1345.50
1368
1328.75
1367.50 +17.75
Sep 13
1271
1276.75
1257.25
1272
-2.75
Nov 13
1223
1228
1208.50
1220
-7.50
Jan 14
1228.75
1233
1214.50
1225.50
-7.75
Mar 14
1227
1234.50
1217.25
1227.75
-8
May 14
1226
1214.50
+
Est. sales: Fri’s sales: 66597 Fri’s open int: 495508 off 11998
SOYBEAN MEAL
100 tons- dollars per ton
Aug 13
428.00
442.00
422.20
438.90
+8.60
Sep 13
404.00
412.40
398.00
411.50
+7.50
Oct 13
370.30
376.70
366.20
376.00
+2.40
Dec 13
367.00
373.00
362.70
371.60
+1.70
Jan 14
369.70
373.10
364.20
372.20
+1.40
Mar 14
367.70
373.20
364.30
372.40
+1.40
Est. sales: Fri’s sales: 105903 Fri’s open int: 270416 off 6603
SOYBEAN OIL
60,000 lbs- cents per lb
Aug 13
43.60
43.68
42.41
42.47
-1.11
Sep 13
43.59
43.70
42.49
42.58
-1.04
Oct 13
43.64
43.66
42.55
42.67
-.98
Dec 13
43.73
43.77
42.68
42.82
-.91
Jan 14
43.84
43.84
42.83
42.96
-.91
Mar 14
43.98
44.02
43.06
43.19
-.90
Est. sales: Fri’s sales: 88004 Fri’s open int: 339103 off 5097
Mutual Funds
Stock Footnotes: g - Dividends and earnings in
Canadian dollars. h - Does not meet continued-listing
standards. lf - Late filing with SEC. n - Stock was a
new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low
figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf - Preferred stock issue. rs - Stock
has undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year. s - Stock has
split by at least 20 percent within the last year. vj - Company in bankruptcy or
receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the
name. Source: The Associated Press.
ACE Ltd
ACMIn
ACM Op
ACM Sc
ACMSp
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
10 metric tons- $ per ton
37,500 lbs.- cents per lb.
112,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
50,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
2,000 CWT- dollars per CWT
42,000 gal, cents per gal
1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl.
42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon
10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu
CATTLE
40,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
Aug 13
122.17
122.70
118.97
122.10
+.30
Oct 13
126.20
126.55
122.82
125.97
+.12
Dec 13
128.95
129.20
124.80
128.72
+.07
Est. sales: Fri’s sales: 40937 Fri’s open int: 280303 up 381
FEEDER CATTLE
50,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
Aug 13
152.97
153.80
152.87
153.27
+.67
Sep 13
156.27
157.40
156.27
156.85
+.85
Oct 13
158.15
158.95
158.15
158.92
+.82
Est. sales: Fri’s sales: 5554 Fri’s open int: 34147 up 524
HOGS-Lean
40,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
Aug 13
98.07
98.37
97.40
97.90
+.13
Oct 13
84.95
85.10
83.97
84.50
-.30
Dec 13
81.92
81.95
80.97
81.55
-.30
Feb 14
83.65
83.80
82.45
83.75
+.15
Est. sales: Fri’s sales: 44626 Fri’s open int: 305058 off 290
CORN
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Sep 13
492
497.50
488.25
489.25
-1.25
Dec 13
475
479.25
471.25
473.25
-1.25
Mar 14
488
491.50
484
486
-1.25
Jul 14
503.75
505.75
498.25
500.25
-1.25
Sep 14
503.25
507
500
502.25
-1.75
Est. sales: Fri’s sales: 176979 Fri’s open int: 1169570 off 3778
Combined Stocks NYSE and Nasdaq
Name
UNIT
CBOT
ICE
ICE
ICE
ICE
CBOT
CBOT
NYMX
NYMX
NYMX
NYMX
AG Futures
J
WK MO QTR
EXCHANGE
TKR LAST CHG
Enersis ENI 15.40 -.37
Ennis Inc EBF 18.76 -.14
Entergy ETR 70.53 +.40
EntPrPt EPD 61.72 -.83
EnzoBio ENZ 2.14 -.10
EqualEn g EQU 4.36 -.13
EscoTech ESE 34.31 -.37
ExcelTrst EXL 13.43 -.15
Exelon EXC 31.69 +.04
Expedia EXPE 46.03 -1.17
ExpdIntl EXPD 40.16 -.64
ExpScriptsESRX 66.93 -.73
ExxonMbl XOM 94.03 -.76
EZchip EZCH 30.87 +.35
FBL Fn FFG 44.41 -.30
Facebook FB 35.43 +1.42
FamilyDlr FDO 68.50 -.02
FedExCp FDX 103.39 -1.19
Ferrellgs FGP 22.51 +.43
FifthThird FITB 19.21 -.16
FirstEngy FE 39.18 +.27
Fluor
FLR 60.30 -1.30
FordM
F
17.08 +.06
FBHmSec FBHS 40.96 -.69
FosterWhl FWLT 20.65 -.35
FrankEl s FELE 37.41 -.22
FrkUnv FT
7.03 -.02
FMCG
FCX 28.56 -.37
FresenM sFMS 32.18 -.13
FrontierCm FTR
4.29 +.02
Frontline FRO 2.66 -.13
FullerHB FUL 40.28 -.06
FultonFncl FULT 12.45 -.13
G-H-I
GT AdvTc GTAT 4.75 +.01
GabelliET GAB 6.87 -.06
GabHlthW GRX 9.90 -.19
GabUtil GUT 6.70 +.03
Garmin GRMN36.86 +.03
GnCable BGC 30.80 -.50
GenDynamGD
85.02 -.84
GenElec GE 24.49 -.16
GenMills GIS 51.83 +.32
GenMotors GM 36.38 -.29
Gensco GCO 71.00 +.18
Gentex GNTX 22.18 +.22
GenuPrt GPC 81.54 -.56
Gerdau GGB 6.39 -.06
Gibraltar ROCK 14.84 -.62
GileadSci sGILD 62.02 -.55
GlaxoSKln GSK 51.14 -.36
Goldcrp g GG 28.61 -.13
GoldmanS GS 163.17 -2.09
Goodyear GT 17.04 +.26
Google GOOG882.27-3.08
GreenbCosGBX 22.39 -.06
Groupon GRPN 8.92 -.42
GulfportE GPOR 51.70 -.05
Hallibrtn HAL 45.53 -.45
HanesbrdsHBI 59.79 -.02
HarleyD HOG 56.42 +1.05
HarrisTtr HTSI 49.22 -.02
HartfdFn HIG 30.78 -.58
Hasbro HAS 47.15 +.07
HatterasF HTS 20.13 -.14
HawaiiEl HE 26.81 +.04
HltMgmt HMA 14.92 -.05
HelixEn HLX 24.93 -.47
Herbalife HLF 60.57 +2.12
Hershey HSY 94.97 +.51
Hertz
HTZ 26.23 -.66
HewlettP HPQ 25.67 -.32
HimaxTch HIMX 7.18 -.12
HollyEn s HEP 39.00 -.50
HollyFront HFC 45.62 +1.26
HomeDp HD 78.67 -.07
HomexDev HXM 1.53 -.69
Honda
HMC 37.39 -.69
HonwllIntl HON 82.76 -.12
HovnanE HOV 5.20 -.15
HugotnR HGT 8.86 -.13
Humana HUM 90.64 +.90
HuntBncsh HBAN 8.47 -.13
IFM Invest CTC 2.73 -.16
INGPrRTr PPR 6.22 -.02
ING US n VOYA 30.43 -.79
iShBrazil EWZ 44.20 -.46
iShJapan EWJ 11.13 -.25
iShChinaLC FXI
34.31 -.41
iShEMkts EEM 39.33 -.50
iShLatAm ILF 36.45 -.62
iSh20 yrT TLT 107.35 -.79
iS Eafe EFA 60.22 -.58
iShR2K IWM 103.39 -.73
iSGblMatl MXI 56.69 -.19
NAME
TKR LAST CHG
iShREst IYR 67.60 -.54
iStar
SFI 11.30 -.15
Imation IMN 4.34 -.08
Inteliqunt s IQNT 8.00 -.14
IBM
IBM 196.21 -1.14
Interpublic IPG 16.61 +.74
IntervestB IBCA 7.29 -.14
IntSurg ISRG391.00 +8.71
ItauUnibH ITUB 12.74 -.07
J-K-L
JPMorgCh JPM 55.69
Jabil
JBL 22.50
JacobsEng JEC 58.19
JoesJeansJOEZ 1.31
JohnsnCtl JCI 41.09
KKR
KKR 20.77
KC Southn KSU 108.17
KA MLP KYN 36.02
Kellogg K
66.89
KeyEngy KEG 6.37
Keycorp KEY 12.17
KindME KMP 83.29
KindMM KMR 80.95
Kinross g KGC 5.36
Kirklands KIRK 17.82
KodiakO g KOG 9.70
KraftFGp n KRFT 56.49
KrispKrm KKD 20.62
Kroger KR 39.85
LSI Corp LSI
7.66
LabCp
LH 98.03
LegacyRes LGCY 27.83
LeggPlat LEG 30.76
LifeTech LIFE 74.60
LillyEli
LLY 53.56
LimeEn hlfLIME
.81
LincNat LNC 41.42
LinnEngy LINE 27.24
LockhdM LMT 119.99
Lowes
LOW 43.44
-.36
-.10
-.80
-.03
+.13
+.10
-1.96
+.17
-.09
-.45
-.23
-1.12
-2.22
-.11
-.04
+.04
+.04
-.03
+.20
-.01
-.32
-.21
+.05
MFA Fncl MFA 7.96
MGF
MGF 5.77
MGIC
MTG 7.42
Macerich MAC 63.34
MagelMPt s MMP 55.04
ManitowocMTW 19.12
MannKd MNKD 7.27
Mannatech MTEX 11.50
Manulife g MFC 17.73
MarathPet MPC 72.23
MktVGold GDX 27.23
MarkWest MWE 67.25
MStewrt MSO 2.47
MarvellT MRVL 12.10
Masco
MAS 19.74
MasterCrd MA 597.02
Mattel
MAT 42.53
MaximIntg MXIM 28.18
MeadJohn MJN 72.89
MeadWvco MWV 36.17
MediCo MDCO30.78
Merck
MRK 48.34
MetLife MET 48.61
MicronT MU 12.47
MidAApt MAA 68.11
MdsxWatr MSEX 21.16
MitsuUFJ MTU 6.12
Modine MOD 11.05
Molycorp MCP 7.14
Mondelez MDLZ 31.61
MorgStan MS 27.31
Mosaic MOS 53.21
MurphO MUR 67.17
NIC Inc EGOV 17.66
Nabors NBR 14.86
NBGre pfA NBGpA14.45
NatFuGas NFG 63.82
NatResPtrsNRP 22.01
NewmtM NEM 30.11
NewsCpA n NWSA 15.51
NextEraEnNEE 84.79
NiSource NI
30.81
NikeB s NKE 62.71
NokiaCp NOK 3.97
NordicAm NAT 10.05
Nordstrm JWN 61.63
NoestUt NU 44.04
NthnTEn NTI 25.37
NorthropG NOC 91.39
Novartis NVS 71.32
NovoNord NVO 168.52
Nucor
NUE 46.81
NustarEn NS 45.11
OGE Egy sOGE 37.48
OReillyAu ORLY123.57
OfficeDpt ODP 4.27
OfficeMax OMX 11.31
Olin
OLN 23.93
Omnicom OMC 64.75
OptCable OCC 4.40
Oracle
ORCL 32.48
OshkoshCp OSK 40.48
OtterTail OTTR 31.19
+.05
M-N-0
PNC
P-Q-R
+.20
-.11
-.13
-.17
-.01
-.53
-.08
-.29
-.68
+.01
-.19
-.19
-.11
+.32
-.35
-.52
-.01
+.21
-.10
-1.13
-.24
+.15
-.79
-.18
+.10
-.15
-.32
-.12
-.07
-.37
-.20
-.45
-.29
+.03
-.34
+.60
-.52
-.27
-.07
-.16
+.66
+.06
-.27
-.38
+.84
-.37
+.18
-.04
+.05
+.11
-.19
+.18
+.83
-.48
+.67
-.10
-.50
-.10
+.51
-.21
-.52
+.40
-.36
+.13
-.06
+.09
-.32
PNC 75.87 -.03
NAME
TKR LAST CHG
PPG
PPG 161.17 +4.06
PPL Corp PPL 31.69 +.36
PVR Ptrs PVR 26.59 -.30
PacSunwr PSUN 4.10 -.14
PanASlv PAAS 12.74 -.11
Paychex PAYX 39.27
PeabdyE BTU 16.60 -.23
Pembina gPBA 31.28 -.07
Pengrth g PGH 5.74 -.08
PennWst g PWE 11.99 -.14
Penney JCP 16.52 +.03
Penske PAG 35.17 +.92
PepcoHold POM 20.54 +.12
PepsiCo PEP 85.25 -.06
Perrigo PRGO125.17 -9.06
PetroArg sPZE 4.25 -.10
PetrbrsA PBR/A14.79 -.36
Petrobras PBR 14.11 -.35
PetRes PEO 26.64 -.19
Pfizer
PFE 29.54 +.17
Phillips66 PSX 58.96 -.04
PiedNG PNY 34.85 -.20
PiedmOfc PDM 18.40 -.24
PimcoStrat
RCS 10.48
PitnyBw PBI 14.72 +.30
PlumCrk PCL 48.69 -.42
Polaris PII 108.89 +.03
Polypore PPO 40.82 -.18
Potash POT 37.90 +.75
PwShs QQQ QQQ 75.23 -.14
priceline PCLN888.11-11.97
Primerica PRI 40.67 -.21
ProctGam PG 80.09 -.30
ProgrsSoft PRGS 25.71 -.18
ProgsvCp PGR 25.96 -.04
PrUShSP rs SDS 36.89 +.19
Prudentl PRU 78.84 -.32
PulseEl rs PULS 4.00 +.08
PulteGrp PHM 16.39 +.03
PMMI
PMM 6.72 -.02
PPrIT
PPT 5.25 -.02
Qualcom QCOM64.24 -.37
QualitySysQSII 22.00 +.85
QstDiag DGX 58.75 +.25
RF Inds RFIL 6.19 +.09
RF MicD RFMD 5.28 -.23
RPM
RPM 34.80 +.04
RadioShk RSH 2.65 -.10
Rayonier RYN 58.93 -.10
RedwdTr RWT 16.87 +.04
ReynAmer RAI 49.85 -.58
RiteAid RAD 2.94 -.04
RockwlAut ROK 90.55 -.26
RockwdH ROC 67.33 +1.24
RosettaGnROSG 3.60 -.03
RoyalBk g RY 63.54 +.20
RylCarb RCL 36.68 -.37
RoyDShllARDS/A67.68 -.83
S-T-U
SCANA SCG 52.13 -.02
SpdrGold GLD 128.47 -.31
S&P500ETF SPY 168.59 -.52
SpdrLehHYJNK 40.21 -.18
SPX Cp SPW 74.59 -.42
SafegdSci SFE 14.98 -.02
StJoe
JOE 22.12 +.10
Saks
SKS 15.95 +.64
SanDisk SNDK 55.40 -1.60
SandRdge SD
5.36 +.01
SandRdgPPER 15.74 -.14
Sasol
SSL 45.99 -.23
Schlmbrg SLB 81.15 -.76
Schwab SCHW21.99 -.13
SeadrillLtd SDRL 42.11 +.02
SearsHldgsSHLD 44.04 +.66
SempraEn SRE 87.08 -.16
SequenomSQNM 3.06 -.16
ServiceCp SCI 18.56 +.02
ShandaGmGAME 4.99 -1.26
Sherwin SHW 174.31 +1.48
ShipFin SFL 16.15 +.06
SiderurNac SID
3.15 +.05
SigaTech h SIGA 3.31 -.05
SigmaAld SIAL 83.13 +.42
SilvStd g SSRI 7.71 -.10
SiriusXM SIRI 3.75 -.01
SmithWes SWHC 11.07
Smucker SJM 112.05 +.51
SnapOn SNA 94.57 +.48
SnydLance LNCE 31.05 -.28
SocQ&M SQM 37.11 -.26
SonicAut SAH 21.88 -.30
SouthnCo SO 45.40 +.06
SthnCopper SCCO 27.78 -.35
SwstAirl LUV 13.70 -.09
SpecOpps SPE 17.42 -.03
SpectraEn SE 36.36 -.39
SpeedM TRK 18.97 -.41
SpiritRC n SRC 9.54 -.09
Sprint n S
5.74
SprottGoldPHYS 11.08 -.02
SP Matls XLB 40.72 +.23
SP HlthC XLV 50.99 -.15
SP CnSt XLP 41.44 -.09
SP Engy XLE 82.31 -.69
SPDR Fncl XLF 20.49 -.15
SP Inds XLI 44.81 -.12
NAME
TKR LAST CHG
SP Util XLU 39.42 +.07
StdPac SPF 8.04 +.02
StanBlkDk SWK 84.06 +.04
StarGas SGU 5.03 -.01
Starbucks SBUX 72.45 -.91
Statoil ASA STO 21.66 -.13
SteinMart SMRT 13.87 -.29
Stericycle SRCL115.49 -1.28
Sterlite SLT
5.05 -.27
StewInfo STC 31.63 +.13
Stryker SYK 70.35 -.59
SubPpne SPH 48.90 +.15
SunHydrl SNHY 31.81 -.20
Suntech STP 1.44 +.03
SupEnrgy SPN 25.73 -.96
Suprtex SUPX 26.73 +1.38
Supvalu SVU 8.06 +.02
SusqBnc SUSQ 13.25 -.06
Symantec SYMC 24.07 -.20
Synovus SNV 3.31 +.04
SyntaPhm SNTA 7.15 +2.09
TCW Strat TSI
5.47
TECO
TE 17.65 -.01
TaiwSemi TSM 16.70 -.20
Target
TGT 71.51 +.05
TeekOffsh TOO 32.02 -.24
Teleflex TFX 79.48 -.20
Tenneco TEN 48.43 -.31
Terex
TEX 28.13 -.36
TerraNitro TNH 228.13 +8.13
TeslaMot TSLA134.62 +5.23
Tesoro TSO 54.99 +.48
TexInst TXN 38.59 -.24
ThomCrk g TC
2.98 -.08
3D Sys s DDD 50.52 +3.17
3M Co
MMM 116.61 -.30
TW Cable TWC 115.23 -1.62
TimeWarn TWX 62.50 -.52
TollBros TOL 31.89 -.12
Torchmark TMK 70.35 +.01
Toyota
TM 120.25 -4.24
TractSupp TSCO119.37 +.19
TrCda g TRP 45.85 +.62
TrnsMont TLP 42.90 -.03
TriContl TY 18.61 -.05
TrinaSolar TSL 7.37 -.09
Trinity
TRN 37.95 +.58
TurqHillRs TRQ 4.27 -1.05
21stCFoxA FOXA 29.91 -.52
TycoIntl s TYC 34.21 -.38
US Airwy LCC 19.23 +.14
USG
USG 24.79 -.48
UltraPt g UPL 21.00 -.26
UnderArmr UA
67.66 -.87
Unilife
UNIS 2.92 -.08
UnionPac UNP 157.22 -2.18
UtdCmBksUCBI 13.76 +.01
UPS B UPS 86.81 -.18
USecBc ALUSBI 8.64 -.15
US Bancrp USB 37.49 -.05
US NGas UNG 18.45 -.49
USSteel X
18.98 +.04
UranmR rs URRE 5.32 +1.17
V-W-X-Y-Z
VCA Ant WOOF28.25 +.35
Vale SA VALE 14.12 -.27
VangDivAp VIG 69.68 -.20
VangEmg VWO 39.56 -.50
VectorGp VGR 16.77 +.24
Vectren VVC 36.51 +.04
VerizonCm VZ
51.49 +.47
VMware VMW 83.06 +.70
WGL Hold WGL 46.25 +.10
Wabtec s WAB 57.41 +.09
Walgrn WAG 50.62 -.20
WalterEn WLT 11.09 -.05
WarnerCh WCRX21.29 +.25
WREIT WRE 27.70 -.09
WsteMInc WM 41.85 -.20
WeathfIntl WFT 13.79 -.01
WeinRlt WRI 31.65 +.01
WellsFargo WFC 43.25 -.26
Wendys Co WEN
7.07 -.07
WstAsWw SBW 12.84
WstnUnion WU 16.98 +.02
Weyerhsr WY 27.99 -.81
WmsCos WMB 33.99 +.08
Windstrm WIN 8.28 +.11
WirelessT WTT 1.51 +.02
WiscEngy WEC 43.31 -.27
WTJpHedg DXJ 44.78 -1.27
WldW Ent WWE 10.77 -.07
Wynn
WYNN131.27 +.29
Xerox
XRX 9.65 -.04
YRC Wwde YRCW 28.51 -2.96
Yahoo
YHOO 27.93 -.18
Yamana g AUY 10.65 -.21
YingliGrn YGE 4.05 +.04
YumBrnds YUM 73.52 -.48
ZaZaEngy ZAZA 1.27
ZebraT ZBRA 46.07 -.07
Zimmer ZMH 83.62 -.86
Zix Corp ZIXI 4.50 +.04
Zogenix ZGNX 1.51 -.08
Zoltek
ZOLT 14.06 -.31
Zynga
ZNGA 3.02 +.01
4-wk
NAV Chg %Rtn
Name
AAL Mutual:
Bond p
9.44
CaGrp
14.52
MuBd
10.44
SmCoSt 10.28
Fund Footnotes: b - Fee covering market costs is paid
from fund assets. d - Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. f - front load (sales charges). m - Multiple fees
are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales
or redemption fee. NA - not available. p - previous day´s net asset value. s - fund split
shares during the week. x - fund paid a distribution during the week. Source:
Morningstar and The Associated Press.
+.09
+.17
+.09
+.19
+2.2
+3.9
+3.3
+2.1
4-WK.
NAV CHG %RTN
FUND
Acadian
EmgMkts d 17.88 -.16 +2.0
Alger Group
SmCapGrA m 9.43 -.06 +6.6
SmCapGrB m 8.22 -.05 +6.6
Alliance Bernstein
DiscValA m 21.25 -.12 +6.0
DiscValB m 20.32 -.11 +6.0
American Cent
EmgMktInv d 8.18 -.09 +1.2
EqIncA m
8.91 -.02 +3.0
EqIncInv
8.91 -.02 +3.0
GlGold d
10.92 -.05+12.3
HeritA m
25.44 -.17 +6.3
InfAdjI
12.16 -.01 +0.5
SelectInv
49.19 -.11 +5.2
ShTmGovIv
9.66 ... +0.1
SmCoIv
11.18 -.07 +7.9
SmCpValAdv m 10.20 -.07 +6.5
SmCpValIv
10.26 -.06 +6.5
ValueA m
7.72 -.03 +4.9
ValueInv
7.72 -.04 +4.9
VeedotInv d
8.55 -.05 +4.5
American Funds
AMCAPA m 25.53 -.15 +5.6
BalA m
22.80 -.08 +3.3
BondA m
12.49 -.01 +0.3
CapIncBuA m 56.23 -.13 +3.2
CpWldGrIA m 41.17 -.21 +4.6
EurPacGrA m 43.79 -.32 +4.2
FnInvA m
47.44 -.22 +3.9
GrthAmA m 40.50 -.24 +5.3
HiIncA m
11.29 -.01 +2.0
IncAmerA m 19.65 -.07 +3.1
InvCoAmA m 35.43 -.16 +5.3
MutualA m
32.93 -.07 +4.3
NewPerspA m 35.26 -.21 +4.5
NwWrldA m 55.40 -.41 +3.4
SmCpWldA m 46.32 -.26 +5.2
WAMutInvA m 37.06 -.12 +4.5
Ariel
ApprecInv b 52.37 -.23 +5.9
ArielInv b
63.92 -.26 +6.0
Baron
Asset b
58.69 -.40 +4.4
BlackRock
EqDivA m
22.59 -.06 +4.2
EqDivI
22.64 -.06 +4.2
FleEqInvA m 13.26 -.03 +3.1
GlobAlcA m 21.08 -.11 +3.0
GlobAlcC m 19.60 -.10 +3.0
GlobAlcI
21.18 -.10 +3.1
HthScOpC m 37.69 -.17 +8.3
Brandywine
BlueFd
28.96 -.20 +3.3
Bridgeway
AggrInv
45.27 -.12 +4.8
CGM
Focus
35.82 -.11 +6.0
Mutual
31.80 -.18 +3.0
Century Funds
SharesIns d 21.09 -.10 +5.7
Champlain Investment
ChSmlComp b 16.79 -.05 +5.5
Columbia
AcornC m
30.15 -.19 +5.5
AcornIntC m 42.26 -.32 +2.7
AcornZ
35.09 -.22 +5.6
ComInfoA m 45.64 -.22 +3.6
HiYldBdA m
2.97 ... +2.1
TaxExmptA m 13.38 ... -1.2
Copley
Copley d
60.81 ... +4.0
DFA
EmMkCrEqI 18.71 -.20 +2.1
EmMktValI
27.04 -.29 +2.9
USLgValI
28.37 -.16 +5.7
DWS-Investments
LgCoGrS
37.32 -.12 +5.5
DWS-Scudder
EqDivC m
39.75 -.12 +4.6
GdPrMS d
8.34 -.02+12.4
GrIncS
21.92 -.08 +5.7
LC RetS
11.97 -.03 +2.0
SmCrS d
24.11 -.20 +7.3
TechA m
16.09 -.07 +4.3
Davis
NYVentA m 39.14 -.11 +5.2
RealEstA m 30.12 -.27 +1.8
Delaware Invest
DiverIncA m
8.91 -.01 +0.6
USGrowB m 17.40 -.08 +5.2
Dodge & Cox
Bal
90.28 -.48 +3.8
Income
13.54 -.01 +0.4
FUND
4-WK.
NAV CHG %RTN
IntlStk
38.64 -.32 +5.8
Stock
149.03 -1.03 +4.9
Dreyfus
AMTFrMuBdZ 13.53 ... -1.0
AppreciaInv 48.75 -.16 +4.7
DiscStkR b 38.23 -.18 +5.8
FdInc
11.34 -.06 +5.8
GrowInc
18.88 -.11 +6.0
MuniBd
11.26 ... -1.1
OppMdCpVaA f 39.31 -.22 +5.5
Dupree
TNTxFInc
11.12 +.01 -1.1
Eaton Vance
TMG1.1A m 31.66 -.11 +4.8
FAM
EqInc
23.88 -.11 +4.5
FPA
Capital d
43.64 -.14 +2.9
Cres d
31.74 -.03 +2.6
Federated
KaufmanR m 6.07 -.04 +5.4
Fidelity
AstMgr85
16.01 -.08 +4.8
Bal
22.22 -.06 +3.8
BlChGrow
59.38 -.18 +6.6
Canada d
55.38 +.20 +6.4
CapInc d
9.62 -.01 +2.1
Contra
89.93 -.40 +5.0
DivrIntl d
32.97 -.21 +5.0
EmergAsia d 28.48 -.28 +1.7
EmgMkt d
22.58 -.22 +1.7
EuCapApr d 21.12 -.03 +6.5
Fifty
24.46 -.16 +6.3
FltRtHiIn d
9.98 ... +1.2
FourInOne
33.18 -.14 +4.4
Free2020
15.12 -.05 +2.9
Free2030
15.46 -.05 +3.6
GrStr d
25.09 -.07 +4.5
GrowCo
112.53 -.37 +7.1
IntGovt
10.65 ... +0.2
IntSmOpp d 12.55 -.10 +3.7
LargeCap
24.64 -.10 +6.2
LatinAm d
38.51 -.55 -1.0
LevCoSt d
39.14 -.13 +4.8
LowPriStk d 47.57 -.21 +4.5
Magellan
87.03 -.32 +6.3
MeCpSto
14.32 -.06 +5.3
MtgSec
10.98 -.01 -0.1
NewMille
36.71 -.18 +5.5
NewMktIn d 16.13 -.02 +1.7
OTC
77.83 -.04+10.4
Puritan
21.27 -.08 +3.8
RelEstInc d 11.77 -.02 +1.1
ShIntMu d
10.68 ... +0.1
StkSelec
33.83 -.14 +5.7
TotalBd
10.59 ... +0.4
Fidelity Advisor
NewInsI
27.02 -.13 +5.2
Fidelity Select
AirTrans d
50.49 -.64 +6.1
Biotech d
162.61 -1.62+14.7
BrokInv d
63.83 -.66 +5.5
DefAero d 108.18 -.08 +6.4
Electron d
55.74 -.01 +3.7
Energy d
58.44 -.38 +5.0
EnergySvc d 78.01 -.71 +3.5
Gold d
22.39 -.12+16.6
MedDeliv d 69.20 -.12 +6.0
MedEqSys d 34.56 -.17 +6.7
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxAdvtg 59.78 -.22 +5.0
500IdxInstl
59.78 -.22 +5.0
IntlIdxIn d
37.24 -.28 +5.0
TotMktIdAg d 49.40 -.19 +5.3
First Eagle
GlbA m
52.59 -.19 +3.7
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m
7.02 +.01 -1.9
DynaTechA m 39.18 -.25 +6.2
GrowthA m
58.11 -.25 +4.8
HighIncC m
2.10 ... +2.4
Income C m
2.37 ... +3.5
IncomeA m
2.35 ... +4.0
SmCpGrA m 16.23 -.09 +4.6
SmCpValA m 54.79 -.42 +5.3
Utils A m
15.39 +.03 +4.2
FrankTemp-Mutual
DiscovA m
32.53 -.06 +4.4
Euro Z
23.91 +.01 +6.4
FrankTemp-Templeton
GlBondA m 13.03 -.03 +0.9
GlBondAdv
12.99 -.03 +1.0
GlOp A m
20.82 -.12 +5.7
GrowthA m 22.45 -.12 +6.2
FUND
4-WK.
NAV CHG %RTN
GE
IsUSEq
15.47 -.05
GMO
IntItVlIV
22.59 -.24
Gabelli
AssetAAA m 61.93 -.27
EqIncomeAAA x 26.84 -.19
GloTeleAAA m 22.48 -.09
Goldman Sachs
GrOppB m
23.27 -.12
MidCapVaB m 45.21 -.24
SmCpValB m 44.14 -.24
TollkpA m
15.09 -.07
Harbor
CapApInst
49.55 -.23
IntlInstl
65.53 -.25
Hartford
GlobGrowB m 16.76 -.11
HealthcarA m 26.58 -.12
HealthcarC m 23.76 -.11
HiYldC m
7.56 ...
MidCapB m 19.75 -.07
Heartland
ValuePlus m 34.48 -.22
INVESCO
EqWSP500B m 41.03 -.16
PacGrowB m 20.67 -.32
SmCapEqA m 15.94 -.09
Ivy
EuroOppB m 24.12 -.01
JPMorgan
CoreBondSelect 11.67 -.01
Janus
ContrT
18.14 -.17
EntrprsT
77.51 -.36
GlbLfScT
39.75 -.33
GlbSelT
11.39 -.06
GlbTechT
21.88 -.02
Gr&IncT
40.64 -.13
OverseasT
34.49 -.57
PerkinsMCVT 25.03 -.11
T
36.62 -.09
TwentyT
70.87 -.29
John Hancock
FinclIndA m 15.13 -.13
FinclIndB m 14.00 -.12
LifBa1 b
14.58 -.05
LifGr1 b
15.04 -.07
TaxFBdA m
9.69 ...
Kinetics
Medical d
23.49 -.10
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d 18.15 -.15
Legg Mason/Western
ApprecA m 18.52 -.04
EquityO
15.88 -.05
Loomis Sayles
BdInstl
15.05 -.02
Lord Abbett
ShDurIncA m 4.57 ...
MFS
GlGrowB m 29.02 -.10
MidCapGrB m 10.63 -.06
NewDiscB m 22.74 -.17
ResearchB m 31.81 -.13
TotRetC m
16.92 -.04
UtilA m
20.95 -.03
UtilC m
20.85 -.04
ValueI
31.03 -.07
Mairs & Power
BalInv
78.51 -.16
Marsico
Grow m
24.10 -.15
Matthews Asian
DivInv d
15.53 -.18
Meridian
MeridnGr d 45.99 -.30
Value d
39.61 -.25
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdI
10.60 ...
TotRtBd b
10.60 ...
Morgan Stanley Instl
EmgMktI d
24.59 -.21
Muhlenkamp
Muhlenkmp
64.07 -.28
Munder Funds
Idx500A m
20.71 -.08
InternetB m 28.54 -.07
Mutual Series
Beacon Z
15.70 -.04
Needham
Growth m
41.62 -.25
Nicholas
Nichol
57.71 -.16
Nichol II I
25.12 -.09
4-WK.
NAV CHG %RTN
FUND
Table shows fund name, net asset value (NAV),
daily change, and four week percent return.
+5.8
+5.9
+5.1
+5.0
+4.9
+5.5
+4.7
+6.0
+5.9
+6.5
+5.1
+5.7
+8.0
+8.0
+1.8
+5.7
+5.7
+4.9
+1.6
+5.1
+5.4
0.0
+4.7
+4.7
+9.4
+6.7
+6.5
+3.7
+4.6
+4.2
+5.1
+6.0
+6.0
+5.9
+3.4
+4.4
-1.6
+5.6
+1.5
+4.8
+4.6
+1.4
+0.5
+4.8
+4.6
+3.5
+5.0
+3.2
+3.8
+3.7
+5.5
+3.9
+4.6
+3.2
+3.8
+6.5
+0.4
+0.4
+1.8
+4.9
+5.0
+4.2
+3.8
+5.7
+5.2
+4.4
Northern
HYFixInc d
7.57 ...
IncomeEq
15.24 ...
SmCapVal
20.22 ...
Tech
18.00 ...
Nuveen
HiYldMunC m 15.60 ...
MlMnLCVlA m 25.75 -.05
TNMuniBdA m 11.34 ...
TNMuniBdC m 11.32 ...
Oak Associates
BlkOakEmr
3.34 +.01
HlthSinces
17.79 -.05
RedOakTec 12.95 -.03
Oakmark
EqIncI
32.06 -.11
Global I
28.16 -.19
Intl I
24.51 -.17
Oakmark I
58.93 -.31
Select I
37.34 -.23
Oppenheimer
DevMktA m 35.21 -.30
DevMktY
34.86 -.30
DevMktsC m 33.63 -.29
DiscoverA m 73.06 -.43
DiscoverB m 59.40 -.35
GlobOpprC m 32.13 -.17
PIMCO
AllAssetC m 12.12 -.03
AllAssetI
12.16 -.03
AllAuthIn
10.28 -.03
CmRlRtStC m 5.41 -.02
ComRlRStI
5.65 -.03
HiYldIs
9.55 ...
LowDrIs
10.28 ...
RealRtnB m 11.26 -.02
TotRetA m
10.79 ...
TotRetAdm b 10.79 ...
TotRetC m
10.79 ...
TotRetIs
10.79 ...
TotRetrnD b 10.79 ...
TotlRetnP
10.79 ...
PRIMECAP Odyssey
AggGr
26.30 -.18
Parnassus
EqIncInv
34.86 -.10
Permanent
Portfolio
46.68 -.06
Pioneer
HiYldC m
11.02 -.01
MuniA m
13.39 ...
Prudential Investmen
NaturResA m 45.75 -.29
Putnam
AmGovtInA m 8.89 ...
DivrInA m
7.82 ...
DynAstAlBalA m 13.15 ...
GlbUtilB m
11.46 -.03
GlobNatB m 17.90 -.11
IntlNewA m 17.23 -.21
NewOppM m 59.78 -.28
Royce
PAMutInv d 13.56 -.08
TotRetInv d 16.11 -.08
ValPlSvc m 16.20 -.15
Rydex
InNs100Inv
7.97 +.02
Schwab
1000Inv d
46.00 -.17
S&P500Sel d 26.51 -.10
Schwartz
AvMaRiDiv
16.14 -.03
AveMraCat b 20.32 -.12
Growth b
27.54 -.11
State Farm
Balanced
59.94 -.14
T Rowe Price
BlChpGr
54.45 -.31
CapApprec
25.45 -.04
EmMktBd d 12.88 -.04
EmMktStk d 31.13 -.29
EqIndex d
45.44 -.17
EqtyInc
31.34 -.15
FinSer
18.67 -.13
GrowInc
26.65 -.10
GrowStk
44.38 -.27
IntlDisc d
50.68 -.36
IntlStk d
15.01 -.12
LatinAm d
31.73 -.36
MidCpGr
68.54 -.27
NewAsia d
16.09 -.13
NewEra
44.41 -.36
NewHoriz
42.38 -.30
NewIncome
9.44 -.01
Real d
22.60 -.19
Rtmt2020
19.53 -.09
Rtmt2030
21.15 -.11
SI
11.57 -.01
SciTech
32.90 -.04
SpecGrow
22.19 -.14
SumMuInc
11.16 ...
TrRt2030Ad b 20.98 -.12
Value
32.73 -.15
Thornburg
IntlValI d
29.51 -.24
Thrivent
SmCapStkA m 17.42 -.09
+2.7
+4.9
+8.8
+8.8
-2.3
+5.9
-1.2
-1.3
+7.4
+6.7
+5.4
+4.9
+5.6
+7.1
+5.2
+5.3
+3.8
+3.9
+3.8
+6.5
+6.4
+5.6
+1.4
+1.6
+0.6
+2.1
+2.2
+1.8
+0.4
+0.5
+0.4
+0.5
+0.4
+0.5
+0.5
+0.5
+6.5
+5.1
+3.9
+2.5
-2.0
+5.1
+0.4
+1.3
+4.6
+3.7
+5.4
+4.7
+5.6
+5.7
+5.2
+4.2
-5.6
+5.2
+5.0
+5.2
+4.3
+5.8
+3.0
+6.4
+3.8
+1.1
+0.6
+5.0
+4.7
+4.8
+5.3
+5.7
+4.2
+4.5
-0.7
+5.6
+1.5
+5.1
+6.5
+0.2
+3.5
+3.8
+4.4
+0.8
+6.4
+5.3
-1.5
+4.4
+5.4
+5.1
+4.3
FUND
4-WK.
NAV CHG %RTN
Tocqueville
Gold m
40.13 -.02+14.2
UBS
GlobAllA m 10.09 -.04 +3.1
GloballC m
9.84 -.04 +2.9
USAA
EmergMkt
16.45 -.15 +1.7
Grow
20.03 -.09 +5.1
GrowTax
15.46 -.03 +2.1
Intl
27.78 -.16 +5.1
PrcMtlMin
15.97 -.08+14.9
SmCapStk
18.21 -.13 +5.6
TaxEInt
13.18 ... -0.5
TaxELgTm
13.08 ... -1.2
TaxEShTm
10.73 ... 0.0
Value Line
PremGro b 32.74 -.11 +4.1
Vanguard
500Adml
155.52 -.57 +5.0
500Inv
155.50 -.58 +5.0
BalIdx
26.07 -.07 +3.2
BalIdxAdm
26.08 -.06 +3.2
CapOp
42.75 -.29 +5.0
CapVal
14.22 -.11 +5.3
Convrt
14.13 -.02 +3.6
DevMktIdx
10.59 -.09 +5.1
DivEqInv
27.85 -.13 +5.3
DivGr
19.79 -.07 +4.2
EmMktIAdm 32.86 -.36 +1.6
EmerMktId
25.02 -.28 +1.6
EnergyAdm 120.81 -1.16 +5.5
EqInc
28.67 -.08 +4.4
EqIncAdml
60.10 -.17 +4.5
EuropeIdx
27.67 -.11 +7.0
ExtndIdx
56.33 -.30 +6.3
GNMA
10.45 ... -0.1
GNMAAdml 10.45 ... -0.2
GroInc
36.09 -.12 +5.3
HYCorAdml
6.00 ... +2.0
HltCrAdml
74.97 -.42 +5.8
ITGradeAd
9.83 -.01 +0.8
InfPrtAdm
26.33 -.03 +0.4
InfPrtI
10.72 -.01 +0.4
InflaPro
13.41 -.02 +0.4
InstIdxI
154.49 -.57 +5.0
InstPlus
154.50 -.57 +5.0
InstTStPl
38.46 -.15 +5.3
IntlExpIn
16.62 -.16 +5.1
IntlGrAdm
66.07 -.29 +6.9
IntlStkIdxAdm 25.69 -.22 +4.6
IntlStkIdxIPls 102.77 -.87 +4.7
LTGradeAd
9.86 -.05 +0.5
LTTsry
11.57 -.07 -2.2
LifeInc
14.23 -.02 +1.1
LifeMod
21.97 -.08 +3.1
MuIntAdml
13.71 ... -0.5
MuLtdAdml
11.02 ... +0.3
PrecMtls
11.02 -.06 +6.2
Prmcp
85.00 -.49 +3.8
PrmcpAdml
88.21 -.51 +3.8
PrmcpCorI
18.21 -.08 +4.4
REITIdx
23.47 -.19 +2.8
REITIdxAd 100.16 -.81 +2.8
STBond
10.52 ... +0.3
STCor
10.69 ... +0.4
STGradeAd 10.69 ... +0.4
SelValu
26.10 -.10 +5.5
Star
22.51 -.08 +3.4
StratgcEq
26.58 -.08 +5.8
TgtRe2015
14.30 -.04 +2.9
TgtRe2020
25.85 -.09 +3.2
TgtRe2030
25.99 -.11 +4.0
TgtRe2035
15.85 -.07 +4.4
TgtRe2040
26.26 -.12 +4.6
TgtRe2045
16.48 -.08 +4.6
TgtRetInc
12.39 -.03 +1.7
Tgtet2025
14.93 -.05 +3.7
TotBdAdml
10.67 -.01 +0.2
TotBdInst
10.67 -.01 +0.2
TotBdMkInv 10.67 -.01 +0.2
TotBdMkSig 10.67 -.01 +0.2
TotIntl
15.36 -.13 +4.6
TotStIAdm
42.44 -.17 +5.3
TotStIIns
42.45 -.16 +5.3
TotStISig
40.96 -.16 +5.3
TotStIdx
42.43 -.16 +5.3
USGro
24.89 -.09 +5.6
WellsI
25.05 -.05 +2.0
WellsIAdm
60.70 -.11 +2.0
Welltn
37.58 -.11 +3.4
WelltnAdm
64.91 -.19 +3.5
WndsIIAdm
62.03 -.17 +4.7
WndsrII
34.96 -.09 +4.8
Wasatch
LgCpVal d
16.83 -.04 +5.1
SmCapVal d 4.97 -.03 +5.3
UltraGr d
23.53 -.28 +4.3
Yacktman
Focused d
24.65 -.10 +3.1
Yacktman d 23.01 -.10 +3.2
Stocks of Local Interest
AGL Resources
AT&T Inc
Astec Inds
BB&T Corp
Bank of America
CBL & Associates
CBL & Assoc pfD
Cigna Corp
Cintas Corp
Coca Btl Cns
CocaCola Co
Coca-Cola Ent
Comcast Corp A
Comcl Metals
ConAgra Foods
Convergys Corp
Corrections Corp
Covenant Transp
Cracker Barrel
Darden Rest
Dean Foods Co
Dillards Inc
Dixie Group Inc
DuPont
Fst Horizon Natl
First Security Grp
Intel Corp
Johnson & Johnson
La-Z-Boy Inc
Medtronic Inc
TICKER
GAS
T
ASTE
BBT
BAC
CBL
CBLpD
CI
CTAS
COKE
KO
CCE
CMCSA
CMC
CAG
CVG
CXW
CVTI
CBRL
DRI
DF
DDS
DXYN
DD
FHN
FSGI
INTC
JNJ
LZB
MDT
52-WK RANGE
LO
36.90
32.71
26.09
26.86
7.10
19.47
24.08
40.00
39.16
58.00
35.58
28.44
32.08
12.20
24.07
14.67
24.87
4.25
60.07
44.11
5.50
63.94
2.95
41.67
7.96
1.30
19.23
66.85
11.46
38.53
CLOSE
HI
CLOSE CHG %CHG
0 46.16
6 39.00
9 37.50
0 35.90
0 15.03
6 26.95
5 26.00
0 79.25
9 48.17
6 70.93
6 43.43
9 39.40
9 45.63
7 17.47
0 37.13
9 19.47
6 39.90
8 7.50
9 102.95
4 57.93
0 10.89
6 94.86
8 9.38
9 60.40
0 12.68
2 7.45
6 26.90
0 92.93
9 22.33
0 55.63
45.96
35.88
35.51
35.47
14.52
23.43
25.02
77.20
46.91
64.64
40.28
37.53
43.40
15.46
36.59
18.70
33.27
6.60
97.22
49.02
10.78
81.56
7.79
57.54
12.29
2.38
23.24
93.21
20.48
55.32
-.18
+.28
-.05
-.27
-.21
-.10
-.07
-.37
-.38
-.44
-.36
-.32
-.33
-.09
+.10
-.07
-.16
...
+.50
+.09
+.08
-.28
-.03
-.12
-.04
...
-.02
+.38
+.14
-.28
-0.4
+0.8
-0.1
-0.8
-1.4
-0.4
-0.3
-0.5
-0.8
-0.7
-0.9
-0.8
-0.8
-0.6
+0.3
-0.4
-0.5
...
+0.5
+0.2
+0.7
-0.3
-0.4
-0.2
-0.3
...
-0.1
+0.4
+0.7
-0.5
YTD 1YR
WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN
VOL
(Thous)
s +15.0 +19.4
s +6.4
+3.0
s +6.4 +33.9
s +22.7 +14.1
s +25.1 +106.0
s +10.5 +27.9
t -0.1
...
s +44.4 +95.7
s +14.7 +24.4
s -2.8
+0.1
s +11.1
+5.8
s +18.3 +32.6
s +16.2 +40.6
s +4.0 +33.0
s +24.0 +55.6
s +14.0 +29.1
t +12.0 +39.1
s +19.3 +35.0
s +51.3 +59.4
t +8.8
...
s +38.4 +63.4
t -2.6 +37.3
t +137.5 +112.5
s +27.9 +21.8
s +24.0 +55.6
s +6.7
-4.8
t +12.7
-5.3
s +33.0 +38.7
s +44.7 +75.5
s +34.9 +50.9
243
16553
28
2357
86467
768
23
864
256
8
10015
1082
7931
513
1731
268
636
41
127
993
1817
166
34
3166
2939
43
84879
7844
217
2816
t
s
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
s
t
t
r
s
s
s
t
t
t
t
r
t
s
s
t
s
s
s
s
s
s
t
s
s
s
t
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
t
s
t
t
s
s
s
t
s
t
s
P/E
DIV
18
27
22
15
26
40
1.88
1.80
0.40
0.92
0.04
0.92
1.84
0.04
0.64f
1.00
1.12
0.80
0.78
0.48
1.00
0.24
1.92
...
3.00f
2.20f
...
0.20a
...
1.80f
0.20
...
0.90
2.64
0.16
1.12f
17
19
21
21
25
18
18
17
20
19
39
20
16
11
12
20
dd
13
21
24
15
7
The symbol above illustrates a
stock’s price in relation to its
low and high closing prices
during the past two weeks.
NAME
TICKER
Microsoft Corp
Miller Inds
Mohawk Inds
Mueller Water Pdts
Natl Hlth Inv
Ntl Hlthcare Cp
Norfolk Sthn
Panera Bread Co
Raymond James Fncl
Regions Fncl
Reliance Steel Alu
Rock Tenn
Ruby Tuesday
Sanofi
Sonic Corp
Suntrust Bks
Unum Group
Vodafone Group
Vulcan Matl
WalMart Strs
Whirlpool
MSFT
MLR
MHK
MWA
NHI
NHC
NSC
PNRA
RJF
RF
RS
RKT
RT
SNY
SONC
STI
UNM
VOD
VMC
WMT
WHR
52-WK RANGE
LO
26.26
14.00
64.22
3.49
51.00
41.55
56.05
152.26
31.93
6.19
49.22
56.47
6.01
39.64
8.99
22.88
18.39
24.42
35.69
67.37
65.93
Relax. Enjoy a great cigar.
A Fresh Take
On News
35868954
NAME
Downtown 723 Cherry St. • East 110 Jordan Dr. • CBCBurns.com
CLOSE
HI
CLOSE CHG %CHG
6 36.43
8 17.25
9 120.70
9 7.92
6 72.99
0 50.41
8 81.00
4 194.77
8 48.22
9 10.52
9 72.90
0 114.56
4 9.90
8 55.94
0 15.98
9 36.29
0 32.01
9 30.80
6 59.48
9 79.96
0 134.09
31.54 -.08
16.50 -.27
114.60 +.18
7.29 -.13
63.70 -.93
49.78 -.25
73.86 -.06
166.36 -2.29
43.66 -.22
10.06 -.17
69.35 -.45
112.36 +.49
7.37 -.39
52.58 -.45
15.41 -.14
34.52 -.37
31.43 -.15
29.88 +.05
47.93 -1.03
77.99 -.01
130.56 +.17
-0.3
-1.6
+0.2
-1.8
-1.4
-0.5
-0.1
-1.4
-0.5
-1.7
-0.6
+0.4
-5.0
-0.8
-0.9
-1.1
-0.5
+0.2
-2.1
...
+0.1
YTD 1YR
WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN
VOL
(Thous)
+18.1 +11.5
+8.2 +10.0
+26.7 +62.0
+29.9 +112.8
+12.7 +26.2
+5.9 +21.7
+19.4
+4.0
+4.7
+7.4
+13.3 +39.8
+41.1 +45.5
+11.7 +48.0
+60.7 +97.1
-6.2 +36.6
+11.0 +38.8
+48.0 +56.3
+21.8 +50.1
+51.0 +72.8
+18.6 +10.6
-7.9 +29.5
+14.3
+8.2
+28.3 +98.1
28042
9
551
1409
44
16
1165
586
575
13253
320
370
1254
492
382
2760
731
4013
441
3434
787
t
t
s
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
s
t
t
t
t
t
s
t
r
s
t
s
s
s
s
s
s
t
s
s
s
s
t
s
s
s
s
s
t
s
s
t
s
s
s
s
s
s
t
s
s
s
s
t
s
s
s
s
s
t
s
s
P/E
DIV
12
22
31
66
20
14
14
26
18
12
15
13
39
0.92
0.56
...
0.07
2.94f
1.28f
2.08f
...
0.56
0.12
1.32f
1.20
...
1.86e
...
0.40f
0.58f
1.57e
0.04
1.88
2.50f
23
9
10
dd
15
14
Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends
paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock
dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.
...timesfreepress.com • • •
.
Breaking News: 423-757-News
Dollar
TODAY
Argent
5.4920
Australia
1.0866
Brazil
2.2672
Britain
.6511
Canada
1.0256
China
6.1372
Denmark
5.6198
Egypt
7.0053
Euro
.7537
Hong Kong 7.7571
India
59.275
Indnsia
10271.00
Israel
3.5764
Japan
97.88
Mexico
12.7379
N. Zealand 1.2458
Poland
3.17
Russia
32.8251
Saudi Arab 3.7503
Singapore
1.2663
So. Africa
9.7948
Sweden
6.4740
Switzerlnd
.9304
Taiwan
29.92
Venzuel
6.2950
PREV.
DAY
5.4830
1.0802
2.2528
.6501
1.0284
6.1365
5.6164
7.0016
.7534
7.7571
59.065
10265.00
3.5835
98.24
12.6680
1.2373
3.19
32.8061
3.7504
1.2639
9.7921
6.4680
.9287
29.91
6.2877
1 YR.
AGO
4.5740
.9549
2.0217
.6358
1.0041
6.3817
6.0417
6.0682
.8122
7.7571
55.245
9478.00
4.0448
78.60
13.2346
1.2353
3.35
32.0405
3.7505
1.2466
8.1665
6.8699
.9757
30.07
4.2950
Interest rates
TODAY WK. AGO
3.25
3.25
0.75
0.75
.00-.25
.00-.25
Prime Rate
Discount rate
Fed funds
Treasuries
3-month T-bill
6-month T-bill
1 year T-bill
1 year T-note
2 year T-note
5 year T-note
10 year T-note
30 year T-bond
0.03
0.065
0.11
0.14
0.32
1.38
2.60
3.38
0.035
0.07
0.11
0.13
0.31
1.30
2.48
3.55
London Inter-Bank Offered Rate
3-month Libor
6-month Libor
0.27
0.40
0.26
0.40
0.951
3.94
0.951
3.99
0.01
0.24
0.01
0.24
Housing
FHLB Cost of Funds
Fixed 30 yr. mortgage
Money Moarket and CDs
Money market avg yld
90 day CD
Gold
DATE
HIGH
LOW
SETTLE CHG.
100 troy oz.- dollars per troy oz.
Jul 13
1328.40
Aug 13 1338.10 1322.60 1328.40
Sep 13 1338.10 1323.70 1328.80
Oct 13 1338.10 1322.80 1329.00
Dec 13 1338.50 1323.10 1329.60
Feb 14 1338.80 1327.80 1330.70
Apr 14 1336.50 1330.80 1331.90
Jun 14 1337.00 1331.00 1333.10
Aug 14
1334.30
Est. sales: Fri’s sales: 251685
Fri’s open int: 406052
5,000 troy oz.- cents per troy oz.
+6.70
+6.90
+7.40
+7.40
+7.70
+7.80
+7.90
+7.90
+7.90
Silver
DATE
HIGH
LOW
Jul 13 1986.5
1985.4
Aug 13 2016.0
1970.0
Sep 13 2020.0
1966.0
Dec 13 2023.0
1973.5
Jan 14
Mar 14 1996.1
1982.5
May 14
Jul 14 2002.2
1994.0
Sep 14
Est. sales: Fri’s sales: 43640
Fri’s open int: 131461
SETTLE CHG.
1985.4
1985.2
1986.4
1991.1
1992.7
1996.1
1999.2
2002.2
2005.1
+8.9
+9.1
+9.3
+9.3
+9.3
+9.4
+9.4
+9.4
+9.4
Tennessee Livestock
Reported auctions on Saturday,
July 27, 2013, at Carthage and
Greeneville.
Cattle receipts: 1,469
Trends: Comåpared to same sale
one week ago: Slaughter cows/
bullssteady. Feeder steers/bulls
steady to 6.00 higher. Heifers 2.00 to
4.00 higher.
Slaughter Cows Boners 80-85 pct
lean 69.00-82.50; Slaughter Cows
Lean 85-90 pct lean 67.00-77.50;
Slaughter Bulls 1100-2200 lbs 87.50105.00. Feeder Steers Medium and
Large 1-2: 300-400 lbs 156.00-168.00;
500-600 lbs 130.00-164.50; 600700 lbs 124.50-146.75; 700-800 lbs
124.50-137.50. Feeder Bulls Medium
and Large 1-2: 400-500 lbs 132.00158.50; 500-600 lbs 118.00-152.00;
600-700 lbs 115.00-138.50; 700-800
lbs 100.00-118.50. Feeder Heifers
Medium and Large 1-2: 300-400 lbs
128.00-150.00; 400-500 lbs 123.00145.50; 500-600 lbs 118.00-141.00;
600-700 lbs 114.00-139.75.
Source: Tennessee Department of
Agriculture of Agriculture-USDA
Market News, Nashville
Boeing expands
beacon checks
The Associated Press
Boeing Co. has expanded
inspections of emergency locator beacons made by Honeywell International to include
five more aircraft types after
problems were discovered
with the transmitters on 787
jets.
Boeing’s marketing vice
president Randy Tinseth says
in a blog dated Sunday that the
aircraft manufacturer is asking
operators of 717, Next-Generation 737, 747-400, 767 and 777
airplanes to inspect the battery-operated beacons which
activate in a crash to help rescuers find a plane.
United Airlines and All
Nippon Airways last week
disclosed issues with the wiring on their Boeing 787’s emergency transmitters, the same
part of the plane that is getting
close scrutiny after a parked
Ethiopian Airlines jet caught
fire at London’s Heathrow earlier this month.
Boeing said its expanded
request for inspections follows
a recommendation by the U.K.
Air Accidents Investigation
Branch that airplane models
with the Honeywell locator
beacons be scrutinized.
“The purpose of these
inspections is to gather data to
support potential rulemaking
by regulators,” said Tinseth.
Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • C5
Industry fights safety retrofit of older rail cars
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
oil industry and U.S railroads
are resisting the Obama
administration’s attempt to
boost safety standards for the
type of rail car involved in a
fiery, fatal explosion in Canada, citing costs and technical
challenges.
Industry groups say it is
impractical to retrofit tens
of thousands of existing tank
cars used to haul oil, even as
they have adopted voluntary
standards to ensure that cars
ordered after October 2011
meet tough requirements recommended by federal transportation experts following
a deadly ethanol train derailment and explosion in Illinois
two years earlier.
A proposed rule to beef
up rail-car safety was initially
scheduled to be put in place
last October, but it has been
delayed until late September at the earliest. Officials
blamed the delay on the time
it has taken to seek and review
petitions from industry groups
and the public. A final rule
isn’t expected until next year.
The agency is considering
a plan intended to fix a dangerous design flaw in a rail
car commonly used to haul
oil and other hazardous liquids from coast to coast. The
soda-can shaped car, known as
the DOT-111, has come under
scrutiny from safety experts
because of its tendency to split
open during derailments and
other major accidents.
Defects in the car’s structure were noted as far back
as 1991.
The rail industry estimates
that retrofitting older cars
would cost at least $1 billion,
not including lost-service time
for cars removed from the
fleet for repairs. “By comparison, derailment costs totaled
approximately $64 million
over the past five years,” the
Association of American Railroads said in a 2011 petition to
the federal government. Extra
weight from retrofitting cars
might even cause overloads,
potentially making them less
safe, the group said.
Officials from an Illinois
town near the site of a 2009
ethanol train derailment call
the railroads’ stance illogical.
Changing federal rules to
impose safety standards for
new tank cars without requiring a retrofit of existing cars
“will provide no real protection to the general public
in derailment situations for
decades to come,” the village
of Barrington, Ill., said in testimony submitted to the U.S.
Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.
Perrigo
to buy Elan
for $8.6 billion
The Associated Press
U.S. drugmaker Perrigo
agreed Monday to buy Ireland’s Elan for $8.6 billion in
a deal that should allow the
rapidly growing company to
reduce its tax bill and boost its
royalty stream.
Perrigo Co. said it would
pay Elan Corp.’s investors $6.25
per share in cash and $10.25 in
Perrigo stock, an 11 percent
premium over Elan’s closing
price Friday. Elan shares in
Dublin surged 13 percent higher to 12.58 euros ($16.71), above
Perrigo’s offer price, following
news of the takeover.
After spending four months
defeating a series of hostile,
lower-priced takeover bids by
Royal Pharma, Elan earlier in
July said it was open to better
offers. Several potential U.S.
suitors sought to acquire Elan’s
flow of royalties from drugs it
helped develop, particularly
the multiple sclerosis fighter
Tysabri.
Perrigo, which has been
headquartered in the small
western Michigan town of
Allegan since 1887, said it
would move its tax residence
to Ireland and hopes to cut its
tax liabilities nearly in half as it
grows non-U.S. sales.
Perrigo is already the largest maker of generic drugs
for major retail chains in the
United States, including Walgreens and Wal-Mart. It has
rapidly expanded overseas
since 2005 with acquisitions
in Israel, Britain, Mexico and
Australia.
A new Irish base would
allow Perrigo’s non-U.S. sales
to be taxed at a much lower
rate. Ireland imposes 12.5 percent tax on corporate profits, one of the lowest rates in
Europe, whereas the United States levies 35 percent.
The Associated Press
Firefighters shower railway cars the day after a train derailed causing explosions of cars carrying crude oil in Lac
Megantic, Quebec.
An unattended Montreal,
Maine & Atlantic Railway
train came loose July 6 and
hurtled down a 7-mile incline
before derailing and igniting
in Lac-Megantic, near the
Maine border. The fiery explosion killed at least 47 people.
Seventy-two of the train’s
73 cars were carrying crude
oil, and at least five exploded,
setting off massive explosions
that devastated the small lakeside town of 6,000 people. The
cars were the DOT-111 model.
The derailment and resulting explosion are under investigation. It’s unclear whether
retrofitted cars would have
been able to withstand the
impact. Still, transportation
experts say the car’s underlying design makes it prone to
damage and catastrophic loss
of hazardous materials.
The pipeline safety agency
said in a report this month that
the delay was needed to allow
“additional coordination”
among officials and interested
groups, including rail and oil
industry representatives, who
have lobbied against a rulechange for existing cars.
Among the possibilities:
splitting the proposed rule
into one that addresses new
tank cars and another that
addresses possible retrofits.
In comments submitted
to the pipeline safety agency, industry groups asked
the Obama administration to
focus its rule-making on cars
built after October 2011.
since 2000. In the previous
decade, there were just two
breaches.
Sen. Charles Schumer,
D-N.Y., is urging the Obama
administration to phase-out
DOT-111 tank cars or require
freight rail carriers to retrofit them to prevent potential
explosions or spills.
While freight rail should
not be “demonized,” increased
traffic of rail cars carrying
crude oil “warrants increased
safety measures, and that
begins with putting the safest,
most up-to-date tank cars on
the tracks,” Schumer said at a
news conference last week in
Albany, N.Y.
Democratic Reps. Mike
Michaud and Chellie Pingree
of Maine said the government
should conduct a wide-ranging safety review as transportation of oil by train increases.
The train that derailed in Quebec was scheduled to cross
Maine on its way to a refinery
in St. John, New Brunswick.
A spokeswoman for the
Association of American Railroads, which represents the
rail industry, said the group
shares Schumer’s belief in putting safety first.
“If safer and better DOT111s can be had, then it makes
good sense to ensure that the
design and standards that
these cars are built to, must be
tougher than the federal standards that exist today,” said
spokeswoman Patricia Reilly.
Reilly said the industry has
Requiring retrofits “could
increase compliance costs
significantly,” the American Petroleum Institute, the
Renewable Fuels Association,
the American Chemistry
Council and other groups said.
In the first half of this year,
U.S. railroads moved 178,000
carloads of crude oil. That’s
double the number during the
same period last year and 33
times more than during the
same period in 2009. The
Railway Association of Canada estimates that as many as
140,000 carloads of crude oil
will be shipped on Canada’s
tracks this year, up from 500
carloads in 2009.
Much of that increase is
from oil produced in the Bakken oil patch in North Dakota
and surrounding areas. The
train that crashed in Quebec
was carrying oil from North
Dakota to a refinery in New
Brunswick, Canada.
The DOT-111 tank car represents more than two-thirds
of the rail fleet carrying crude
oil.
The Associated Press
reported in September that
the DOT-111 tank car has been
allowed to haul hazardous liquids from coast to coast even
though transportation officials
were aware of the design flaw.
The AP had reviewed 20 years
of federal rail accident data
involving DOT-111 cars used
to haul ethanol and found that
the cars had been breached in
at least 40 serious accidents
adopted voluntary standards
ensuring that all DOT-111s
ordered after October 2011
meet tough requirements
recommended by the NTSB
after the 2009 crash outside
Rockford, Ill., which killed a
woman and injured 11 others.
But those voluntary standards do not apply to an estimated 40,000 cars built before
October 2011 that carry oil,
ethanol and other flammable
liquids.
The industry’s proposal “ignores the safety risks
posed by the current fleet,” the
NTSB said in a report on safety recommendations last year.
Older tank cars “can almost
always be expected to breach
in derailments that involve
pileups or multiple car-to-car
impacts,” the report said.
The NTSB cited the car’s
“inadequate design” in the
2009 crash.
The DOT-111 car’s steel
shell is too thin to resist puncture in accidents, the NTSB
said, and the ends of the car
are vulnerable to ruptures.
Valves used for unloading and
other exposed fittings on the
tops of the tankers can also
break during rollovers.
The railroads group said
about half of the tank cars
used to transport oil today
meet the higher safety standards.
“Industry is out ahead of
regulations,” Delcambre said.
“They’re moving forward,
which is good.”
Is it a Best Buy?
It’s still a work in progress, but investors are warming
to the turnaround story under way at Best Buy.
The stock of the electronics retailer is up 144
percent this year after being clobbered in 2012.
Best Buy stock fell 49 percent last year as the
company faced increased competition from online
retailers and discount stores.
To get back on track, Best Buy brought in new
leadership. Hubert Joly, the former head of global
hospitality company Carlson and a turnaround
expert, became CEO and president last August.
In his first year, Joly has cut jobs and invested in
training employees and upgrades for the Best Buy
website. He has also partnered with the likes of
Apple, Microsoft and Samsung to roll out dedicated
mini-stores within Best Buy locations.
Wall Street is encouraged. There have been a
series of analysts who have upgraded their rating of
the stock this year. Gary Balter of Credit Suisse
calls Best Buy his firm’s “best three-year idea,”
noting that there will be some lingering investor
anxiety. He has an “Outperform” rating on
the stock with a $40 price target.
Monday’s close: $28.86
Best Buy (BBY)
52-week range
$11
P/E ratio*
Total return
12
30
YTD 1-yr 10-yr^
Best Buy 147 % 69 % 2 %
S&P 500 20
25
8
5-yr avg. P/E*
10
Market value: $9.8 billion Avg. broker rating
26 analysts
Revenue (in billions)
2013
SELL
HOLD
BUY
$49.6
2014 $43.0
(est.)
Net Income (in millions)
2013
-$249
2014
(est.)
$752
CEO: Hubert Joly
Double play After declining for three years, Best Buy
$60
stock is up 144 percent so far this year.
July 25
$38.29
July 29
$28.86
40
20
Source: FactSet
0
’08
*based on next 12 months’ expected results
’09
^annualized
Dec. 31
$11.85
’11
’12
’10
’13
Trevor Delaney; Jenni Sohn • AP
Manufacturing drop shows weakness in the Japanese economy
The Associated Press
TOKYO — Japan’s industrial output fell in June for
the first time in five months,
the government said Tuesday as it released data highlighting the fragility of the
recovery in the world’s No.
3 economy. Manufacturing
slipped 3.3 percent from the
month before in June and
was 4.8 percent lower than a
year before, the Ministry of
Economy, Trade and Industry said. However, other
data showed the jobless
rate edging to 3.9 percent,
its lowest level since October 2008, when the economy was slammed by the
global financial crisis. The
jobless rate had remained
at 4.1 percent during the
previous few months. The
most recent data have officials questioning whether
the government should go
ahead with a promised sales
tax increase that economists
say could derail progress
in restoring growth and
breaking free of deflation.
Channel 3
7-Day ForeCast
Nick Austin
THURSDAY
1
FRIDAY
Partly Cloudy
Showers, Storms
Few Clouds
High: 88; Low: 68
High: 86; Low: 69
High: 90; Low: 70
30
Regional
Local
Nashville
85/70
40
Cookeville
82/67
Murfreesboro
85/70
Shelbyville
85/69
TN
Monteagle
82/64
Bridgeport
87/67
Huntsville
89/69
Scottsboro
88/68
59
75
Athens
89/69
Chattanooga
Cleveland
88/68
89/65
Fort
Payne
84/68
Guntersville
85/70
Dayton
87/65
LaFayette
87/67
High Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Low Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Normal High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Normal Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Record High . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 in 1952
Record Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 in 1994
Dalton
87/68
New
8/6
Today Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
81/64/pc 79/64/t
89/69/s
87/68/t
92/72/s
90/73/t
91/74/s
89/75/t
84/62/s
82/64/sh
88/75/t
87/75/t
89/72/pc 88/73/t
93/72/s
91/72/t
91/74/t
89/75/t
90/77/s
88/76/t
87/70/s
85/70/t
89/69/pc 87/71/t
92/76/t
90/77/t
City
Key West
Knoxville
Memphis
Miami
Mobile
Montgomery
Myrtle Beach
Nashville
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Savannah
Tallahassee
Today
Hi/Lo/F
89/81/t
85/65/s
88/73/t
89/80/t
91/74/s
93/74/s
85/75/s
85/70/mc
94/75/t
89/77/t
91/75/s
88/76/t
95/72/t
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
89/81/t
86/68/sh
92/75/t
89/76/t
88/74/t
93/75/t
86/75/t
85/70/t
92/76/t
88/76/t
88/75/t
87/75/t
91/73/t
Today
Hi/Lo
City
Today
Hi/Lo
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Atlanta
99/83
102/82/s
79/63
81/63/s
88/73
92/75/t
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
89/69
87/71/t
Partly cloudy
Charlotte
Las Vegas
Sunny
87/71
82/71/t
Sunny
Los Angeles
Mostly cloudy
Chicago
75/66
78/66/t
Thunderstorms
Cincinnati
Memphis
Thunderstorms
81/66
81/67/t
Sunny
Nashville
85/70
85/70/t
83/67
83/70/s
94/75
92/76/t
78/60
81/63/pc
92/78
92/77/t
85/68
85/70/sh
Mostly cloudy
Dallas
97/77
99/80/s
Sunny
New York
Sunny
Denver
86/63
86/64/s
78/64
80/67/t
Sunny
Sunny
Orlando
Pittsburgh
Ft. Lauderdale
88/79
90/76/t
Houston
Tampa
Thunderstorms
95/75
95/77/s
Sunny
Washington
Sunny
Sunny, Warm
Few Clouds
Few Storms
Few Storms
High: 90; Low: 68
High: 91; Low: 70
High: 91; Low: 70
High: 89; Low: 72
2
Today
Tomorrow
Full
8/20
Norm
1280’
1691’
692 .2’
1928’
1075’
682 .5’
1002’
1710’
813’
595’
1526’
795’
634’
880’
1020’
1775’
830 .76’
815’
886 .8’
741’
564’
556’
Curr
1276 .9’
1686 .4’
633 .0’
1925 .1’
1069 .5’
681 .7’
992 .8’
1704 .4’
812 .7’
594 .6’
1520 .5’
794 .0’
633 .9’
875 .3’
1019 .9’
1775 .3’
829 .0'
812 .7’
888 .0'
740 .4’
563 .6’
555 .9’
Last
8/28
Chng
-0 .1’
0 .0’
-1 .2’
0 .0’
0 .0’
-1 .3’
+0 .7’
+0 .5’
-0 .2’
+0 .4’
+0 .1’
0 .0’
+0 .8’
-0 .2’
-0 .2’
0 .0’
+0 .1’
-0 .2’
+0 .1’
+0 .1’
-0 .2’
0 .0’
Pollen
PREDOMINANT POLLEN . . Grasses
FORECAST
Today . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Low-Medium
Tomorrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Medium
Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Low-Medium
Weather Updates 24/7
FREE
HOME
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LINDA BROCK
MARK HITE
667-2459 • 664-1900
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LindaBrockhomes.com
MarkHite.com
Cooling off
110s
100s
90s
80s
70s
60s
50s
40s
30s
20s
10s
0s
H
H
L
National Extremes
High: 113° in Bullhead City, Ariz .
Low: 33° in Stanley, Idaho
City
Albany
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Baton Rouge
Billings
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Dayton
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Fargo
Today
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
80/56/s
84/61/s
95/65/s
97/67/s
71/56/mc 69/55/mc
82/65/s
82/71/s
98/74/s
99/73/s
85/72/s
85/69/sh
94/75/s
94/75/t
84/59/t
85/60/t
85/63/s
85/65/s
75/60/s
80/65/s
85/68/s
85/70/sh
87/71/s
82/71/t
75/66/t
78/66/t
81/66/pc 81/67/t
77/59/s
81/67/s
97/77/s
99/80/s
78/65/s
80/66/t
87/61/s
89/63/s
76/66/t
83/62/mc
78/64/s
80/67/t
98/76/s
100/75/s
82/54/pc 81/57/pc
81/59/t
78/55/s
City
Grand Rapids
Greensboro, NC
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Lincoln
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Macon
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Peoria
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Today
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
77/63/s
78/65/t
87/69/s
84/69/t
80/53/t
82/53/t
88/78/pc 89/77/pc
95/77/s
96/77/s
77/65/t
78/67/t
80/69/t
85/68/s
102/81/s 104/82/s
81/67/mc 87/64/s
93/74/mc 93/74/pc
79/63/mc 81/63/s
84/68/pc 79/68/sh
91/69/s
90/70/t
76/65/mc 79/61/t
78/65/t
80/57/t
89/80/s
89/78/t
83/67/s
83/70/s
87/70/s
88/72/s
92/72/t
92/73/s
80/67/mc 85/62/pc
76/66/t
80/66/t
85/67/s
86/68/s
106/84/s 109/87/s
City
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St . Louis
Santa Fe
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
San Jose
Seattle
Topeka
Tucson
Tulsa
Washington
Wichita
Wilmington, DE
Today
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
78/60/s
81/63/mc
78/60/s
77/61/s
80/57/s
78/56/s
84/62/s
84/65/s
89/70/s
87/70/t
84/61/t
80/62/s
89/57/s
87/54/s
88/66/s
86/69/t
87/56/s
87/55/s
77/68/t
84/69/pc
84/59/s
85/59/s
90/72/s
94/74/s
96/76/pc 97/75/s
73/68/pc 72/67/pc
64/54/pc 67/54/s
73/57/mc 72/55/s
78/58/pc 74/58/pc
83/67/t
88/68/s
103/78/s 105/79/s
91/72/t
93/72/s
85/68/s
85/70/sh
86/69/t
87/69/s
84/65/s
86/68/s
City
Jerusalem
London
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
New Delhi
Paris
Today
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
88/63/s
87/63/s
67/61/ra
75/61/sh
79/53/t
79/54/t
74/57/pc 79/57/s
78/59/pc 77/61/s
94/81/pc 88/79/t
74/65/pc 82/66/pc
City
Port-au-Prince
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
Seoul
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Today
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
98/74/t
98/77/t
76/59/pc 77/59/s
90/71/s
91/70/s
86/77/cl
87/75/t
70/54/pc 65/51/sh
89/75/t
87/76/t
77/57/s
77/65/pc
International
City
Athens
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Frankfurt
Hong Kong
Today
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
98/75/s
96/74/s
94/73/s
90/72/pc
76/60/sh 75/63/pc
67/56/cl
67/54/sh
96/74/s
95/75/s
77/59/ra
76/61/pc
88/81/pc 89/81/t
Weather (Wx): cl/cloudy; fl/flurries; pc/partly cloudy; mc/mostly cloudy; ra/rain;
rs/rain & snow; s/sunny; sh/showers; sn/snow; t/thunderstorms; w/windy
Saving frogs, toads in Sierras:
Residents ask at what cost?
The Fresno Bee
The Associated Press
Bosnian boys cool down by diving in to a local creek during a heat wave Monday in
Sarajevo. People in Bosnia are looking for refreshment in the rivers and lakes as the
country is hit by a heat wave with temperatures exceeding 104 degrees.
Hawaii braces for flooding, mudslides
The Associated Press
4
L
By Mark Grossi
HONOLULU =— A tropical storm making its way
toward Hawaii had residents
of Maui and the Big Island on
Monday bracing for possible
flooding, 60 mph wind gusts
and waves that could reach as
high as 18 feet.
Tropical Storm Flossie
could also bring mudslides,
tornadoes and waterspouts,
forecasters said.
Local television stations
statewide extended morning
news, pre-empting syndicated
daytime shows to cover the
storm’s approach. With the
storm still miles away, footage
shown live showed minimal
effects on the Big Island and
Maui beyond some drizzles
and big waves.
But state and local officials
repeatedly warned residents
and tourists to prepare for the
worst and hope for the best.
“Please stay home and in
a secured, sheltered area,”
Hawaii County Mayor Billy
Kenoi said.
The center of the storm
was about 90 miles northeast
of Hilo on the Big Island on
Monday morning. It had sustained winds of about 40 mph
MONDAY
5
Residents and tourists across Hawaii are experiencing heavy rains and strong winds from Tropical Storm
Flossie . The Northeast will see partly cloudy to cloudy skies, with the highest temperature of 89º in
Taunton, Mass . The Southeast will experience mostly clear skies and scattered thunderstorms, with the
highest temperature of 96º in Albany, Ga . In the Northwest, there will be mostly clear skies and isolated
thunderstorms, with the highest temperature of 97º in Lewiston, Idaho . The Southwest will see mostly clear
skies, with the highest temperature of 109º in Gila Bend, Ariz .
LAKE LEVELS
Sunny
Thunderstorms
Tomorrow
First
8/14
Lake
Apalachia
Blue Ridge
Center Hill
Chatuge
Cherokee
Chickamauga
Douglas
Fontana
Fort Loudoun
Guntersville
Hiwassee
Melton Hill
Nickajack
Normandy
Norris
Nottely Lake
Ocoee No. 1
Tellico
Tims Ford
Watts Bar
Weiss
Wheeler
Thunderstorms
Detroit
Today
Sunrise . . . . . . 6:49 a .m . . . . . . 6:50 a .m .
Sunset . . . . . . 8:45 p .m . . . . . . 8:44 p .m .
Atlanta
88/68
Airports
City
SUN
Moonrise . . . . . 1:05 a .m . . . . . . 1:45 a .m .
Moonset . . . . . 3:06 p .m . . . . . . 4:00 p .m .
Southeast
City
Asheville
Athens, GA
Augusta, GA
Birmingham
Bristol
Charleston, SC
Columbia, SC
Columbus, GA
Daytona Bch .
Destin
Greenville, SC
Huntsville
Jacksonville
Precipitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 .00"
Month to Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 .79"
Normal Month to Date . . . . . . . . . . 4 .62"
Year to Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 .93"
Normal Year to Date . . . . . . . . . . . 31 .49"
MOON
GA
75
AL
NC
Murphy
85/61
Blue
Ridge
84/65
Calhoun
90/67
Rome
92/67
PRECIPITATION
35493293
65
24
at Chattanooga through 4 p.m. Yesterday.
Knoxville
85/65
Crossville
79/64
SUNDAY
National
TEMPERATURE
75
SATURDAY
3
but was breaking apart as it
approached the islands, creating separate fronts of wind
and rain expected to pelt the
archipelago.
The National Weather
Service on Sunday issued a
tropical storm warning for
Oahu, Hawaii’s most populous island with the city of
Honolulu, to go along with
previous warnings for the
Big Island, Maui, Molokai
and Lanai. It later issued a
warning for Kauai and Niihau, saying a small change in
Flossie’s track could result in
higher winds.
The warnings mean the
storm represents a threat to
life and property.
“For the folks on the Big
Island and Maui, if you’re preparing your home, you should
be rushing those preparations
to completion,” said Michael
Cantin, a warning coordination meteorologist with the
service in Honolulu.
Hawaii Gov. Neil Abercrombie signed an emergency proclamation in anticipation of the storm, allowing
the state to use its disaster
fund to pay for staff overtime,
supplies and other resourc-
es. The proclamation also
allows the state to call Hawaii
National Guard members to
duty, if necessary.
Although the storm had
weakened somewhat by
Monday, the weather service
warned that it could remain
a threat through Wednesday.
“I woke up to blue skies. It
was just a beautiful day out,”
Ian Shortridge, 22, of Kealakekua, on the west side of
the Big Island, said Monday.
“It hasn’t rained all morning.
We are waiting for the rain.”
Despite the lack of action,
people were busy preparing
on Sunday, Shortridge said.
He was having lunch at a
McDonald’s restaurant, when
he started to hear drilling and
saw that employees were
boarding up the windows.
Store shelves were running
low of essentials like bottled
water and toilet paper, he
said.
Television footage aired on
Hawaii News Now from Maui
showed high surf breaking on
rocks near Hana at around 7
a.m. local time. Forecasters
also reported dangerous
waves hitting the eastern
shores of the Big Island.
FRESNO, Calif. — Mountain residents and the Fresno
County sheriff are squaring off
against a federal wildlife agency over frogs and toads — an
Endangered Species Act fight
that spreads like wildfire along
the Sierra Nevada.
People are reacting to proposed protection for the dwindling amphibians, fearing it
will “seal off” land to logging,
grazing and hiking, and threaten use of foothill reservoirs.
The economy will be devastated, they say.
Fish and Wildlife leaders
say they are not proposing to
shut down forests.
“We don’t have the authority to do that,” Fish and Wildlife
spokesman Robert Mole said.
“The proposed critical habitat does not block growth or
restrict access. We’re trying to
minimize or avoid impacts on
the species.”
The species in question
are two distinct populations
of the mountain yellow-legged
frog and the Yosemite toad. A
widespread fungus, fish predation and loss of habitat are
decimating them.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service in April proposed protection under the Endangered
Species Act after years of pressure from environmentalists.
In the process, the service
also proposed 1.83 million
acres of critical habitat for
the amphibians in 17 counties,
including Fresno. The areas are
considered essential for the
amphibians to survive.
But worried people in counties from Lassen to Tulare
asked for a delay so they
could make more in-depth
comments. Fish and Wildlife
obliged, extending the comment period from June to Nov.
18.
In Fresno County, the mention of the protections stirred
bad memories of logging cutbacks in the 1990s as a result of
U.S. Forest Service protections
for such sensitive species as
the California spotted owl.
The owl was not an endangered or threatened species.
But the U.S. Forest Service
plans were designed to protect
large, old trees — preferred
owl habitat. Logging was dramatically cut back, and most
lumber mills shut down in this
part of the mountain range.
Towns such as Auberry and
North Fork were hit hard.
Fresno County Sheriff Margaret Mims worries now about
the Endangered Species Act
creating an additional impact
on funding for law enforcement and public safety. She
spoke at a jammed town hall
meeting in Prather last month.
“What I don’t want to see is
any more damage to the local
economy,” she said at the meeting. “I don’t want people who
live 3,000 miles away dictating what we do.” Mims later
said she was concerned about
the added red tape for new or
expanding businesses.
Fish and Wildlife leaders
say they were not invited to
the Prather meeting. They say
there may be a misunderstanding about the 1.83 million acres
designated as critical habitat.
The designation applies
only to federal land or projects needing federal permits,
spokesman Mole said. Under
those scenarios, Fish and Wildlife must be consulted. The
agency is routinely involved in
many kinds of these projects.
In California’s San Joaquin
Valley, for instance, the Madera
Water Bank is in the habitat
for the protected blunt-nosed
leopard lizard, Fresno kangaroo rat, San Joaquin Kit Fox
and other protected species.
To get the project going,
there were studies, added
expense and requirements to
set aside land as mitigation.
Throughout California,
more than 300 species of
plants and animals are under
federal protection — more animals than any other state and
second-most for plants.
Environmentalists and some
scientists have been pushing
for a decade to list the Sierra
amphibians under the Endangered Species Act. The dieoff of these animals has been
swift and alarming in the past
two decades, say biologists.
35971588
Paul Barys
WEDNESDAY
31
TODAY
Start With Trust
SM
bbb.org
Better Business Bureau®
35877422
David Karnes
• • • timesfreepress.com....
Breaking News: 423-757-News
C6 • Tuesday, July 30, 2013
...
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D
SPORTS
timesfreepress.com/sports
SEC SERIES: Missouri hoping better health pays off this year, D5
q
q
BRAVES: Colorado takes Atlanta to extra innings, D4
• • • Tuesday, July 30, 2013
Five key
questions
as Vols
crank up
By Patrick Brown
Staff Writer
Staff Photos by C.B. Schmelter
Members of the Baylor School Red Raiders wear special helmets designed to reduce the risk of concussion during practice.
THE PREP TOUR
Annual tour on first day
of Tennessee high school
practice in full pads
includes seeing 16 teams
By Stephen Hargis
B
THE TOUR,
BY THE
NUMBERS
Staff Writer
ecause Tennessee high school football teams were allowed to
begin practicing in helmets and shoulder pads last week to acclimate to the heat, not as many area teams opted for two-a-day
practices this year. That made visiting as many schools as usual for
full-pads opening day more difficult, and other annual
stops, like at Boyd-Buchanan, weren’t possible
because the Buccaneers left Sunday evening for
weeklong camp at Fort Bluff near Dayton.
But with the weather cooperating more than
normal, here are the highlights from the first day
of practice in pads for area teams:
■ 6:59 a.m., Sale Creek: This will be the
Panthers’ inaugural varsity season, and for a
first-year 1A program, numbers are good with 30
players. Most already are on the field stretching
before practice begins, but what catches coach
Ron Cox’s eye are the several who are just
arriving and trying to trot unnoticed toward
the field.
“You’re late! You’ll pay for that!” Cox
yells.
Since spring practice wrapped up a
couple of months ago, Sale Creek has
had 11 players choose not to remain
with the team, including seven rising
seniors, leaving the team with just
Red Bank High
five seniors. Some of the juniors
School receiver
Number of
consecutive
years touring
the area:
14
Number of stops:
16
Number of teams
that believe this will
be a better season
than last year:
16
Jerome Hughley,
left, attempts to
make a catch
while defensive
back Blake
Cagle goes for
the deflection.
Number of coaches
who broke into
salty-language
tirades during the
visit:
9
“
Number of miles
traveled:
See PREP TOUR, Page D6
1
Who emerges as the starting
quarterback?
After taking most of the firstteam snaps during spring practice,
Justin Worley may open training camp
as the slight favorite, but the junior
figures to share reps with redshirt
freshman Nathan Peterman and true
freshmen Josh Dobbs and Riley Ferguson as the Vols try to determine their
starter.
We’re dragging quite
a bit now. We probably got to bed
around 4, so I know I am.
293
Number of states:
2
”
— Red Bank Lions coach E.K. Slaughter,
on his team’s lack of energy
the morning after a two-hour
“midnight madness” practice
2
Hall of Fame voters going too far with outrage
Jay
Greeson
Commentary
We all hate steriods. Well, all of us
except Lance Armstrong. Lance and
steroids are tight.
The rest of us? No thanks. As a
sports world, we have wasted too
much time, energy and ink discussing
and rediscussing, hashing and rehashing the topic.
But after there were no living players inducted into the Baseball Hall
of Fame this past weekend, the fact
that now even suspicion or innuendo
can prevent a player from being in
the Hall of Fame is simply too much.
We are throwing the bonus babies
out with the tainted bath water of a
selected few known users.
We get the moral message to the
Bondses and the McGwires and
Sosas. We even get the reasoning to
not vote on the first ballot for Roger
Clemens, who never failed a confirmed steroids test that the public
knows of despite being in the center
of the storyline for the better part of a
Congress-heavy 18 months.
But Craig Biggio and Mike Piazza?
C’mon.
OK, the high and mighty position
of the Hall of Fame voters now has
forced us to contemplate a different
view.
Let ’em all in. It was the steroid era
and they were the best of the steroid
See GREESON, Page D4
Staff Writer
Jacob Huesman and Kevin
Revis didn’t sugarcoat anything.
They said the University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga football team’s offense last season
— the Mocs’ first running the
spread full time — wasn’t good
enough.
How would the Mocs’ starting quarterback and right
guard grade the 2012 offense,
which was fifth in the Southern Conference in scoring (25.5
points per game) and eighth in
total offense (349.8 yards per
game)?
“I would give it a ‘C,’” said
the senior Revis, a preseason
second-team All-SoCon pick by
the league’s coaches.
“I was going to say a high ‘C,’
maybe a low ‘B,’” said Huesman,
a sophomore who also was a
second-team All-SoCon pick.
“We were too up and down to
give ourselves a good grade.”
A young group in 2012, the
offense now has more experience with 10 returning starters
and a coordinator with more
See MOCS Page D5
How ready is freshman receiver MarQuez North?
The 6-foot-4, 215-pounder
from Charlotte was Tennessee’s highest-rated signee in February and has
created some buzz since his arrival
in June, and the Vols need some consistent playmakers to step up from a
young and inexperienced receiving
corps.
3
How healthy is linebacker Curt
Maggitt?
To repair a defense in 2012 that
statistically was the the worst in Tennessee’s history, the Vols must identify some disruptive players. A healthy
Maggitt, who tore an ACL in his knee
against Missouri last November yet
has maintained a leadership role, has
the potential to fill that need.
4
Where are the answers in the
secondary?
At safety, Tennessee has three
solid options in Brian Randolph, Byron
Moore and LaDarrell McNeil, but the
Vols have holes at cornerback, where
Justin Coleman is the lone returning
player with significant experience, and
nickelback, where a void remains after
the offseason loss of Eric Gordon.
Mocs offense expects
‘A’ grade this season
By John Frierson
KNOXVILLE — Butch Jones can go
ahead and grab the wireless microphone
from storage.
Tennessee’s first-year football coach
soon will be declaring directives via his
preferred teaching tool.
The Volunteers report for training
camp Thursday and open preseason
preparations with their first practice
Friday afternoon.
There are many orders of business,
from finding a starter at quarterback and
identifying defensive
difference-makers to
finding help at receiver and determining
which newcomers
can provide immediate help, and there’s
little time to waste.
Jones hopes his
first Tennessee team
can quickly shake the
rust from more than Butch Jones
three months without
one of his practices
and build off a summer program geared
toward improving players physically and
developing team leadership.
“Leadership is nothing more than
influence,” the coach said at SEC media
days last month. “That’s why there’s
good leaders and that’s why there’s bad
leaders. We really did a lot so when we
move forward to the summer months,
there was a foundation in place.
“Our players have gravitated toward
that. They’ve done a tremendous job,
and the big thing about leadership is
holding everyone accountable to your
standards and your expectations when
nobody’s watching. Our players right
now have a great confidence about
themselves [because] they can see the
change in their bodies.”
With the season looming, the Vols
now have a month of practices to capitalize and improve.
Here are five basic questions they
face as they begin preseason practice:
5
Staff Photo by Dough Strickland
UTC Mocs quarterback Jacob Huesman, left, and wide receiver
Terrell Robinson have high expectations for this season.
■ To contact Sports • Phone: 423-757-6273 • Fax: 423-668-5049 • Email: [email protected]
What tweaks do Butch Jones
and his staff make to practice?
With the season opener rapidly
approaching, Tennessee’s coaches and
players can’t focus on the feeling-out
process as they did during spring practice, which could lead to a greater sense
of urgency, a quicker pace in practice
and some other differences as Jones
runs his first camp with the Vols.
Contact Patrick Brown at [email protected]
timesfreepress.com or 901-581-7288. Follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/patrickbrowntfp.
..
timesfreepress.com ..
PAGE2BITS
Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • • •
INTHEBLEACHERS
BASEBALL
Southern League
North Division
W L Pct.
Tennessee (Cubs)
22 14 .611
x-Birmingham (White Sox) 22 15 .595
Huntsville (Brewers)
17 19 .472
Jackson (Mariners)
15 19 .441
Chattanooga (Dodgers)
14 22 .389
South Division
W L Pct.
Jacksonville (Marlins)
20 16 .556
Mississippi (Braves)
18 17 .514
Pensacola (Reds)
18 18 .500
x-Mobile (Diamondbacks) 18 19 .486
Montgomery (Rays)
16 21 .432
x-clinched first half
———
Monday’s Games
Jacksonville 12, Chattanooga 4
Tennessee 8, Birmingham 4
Pensacola 2, Mobile 0
Mississippi 4, Montgomery 2
Huntsville 5, Jackson 3
Tuesday’s Games
Chattanooga at Jacksonville, 7:05 p.m.
Birmingham at Tennessee, 7:15 p.m.
Montgomery at Mississippi, 8 p.m.
Mobile at Pensacola, 8 p.m.
Huntsville at Jackson, 8:05 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Chattanooga at Jacksonville, 1:05 p.m.
Birmingham at Tennessee, 7:15 p.m.
Mobile at Pensacola, 8 p.m.
Montgomery at Mississippi, 8 p.m.
Huntsville at Jackson, 8:05 p.m.
Breaking News: 423-757-News
GB
—
1
⁄2
5
6
8
Glantz-Culver Line
SOCCER
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Sporting Kansas City 10 6 6 36 31 21
New York
10 7 5 35 33 27
Montreal
10 5 5 35 32 29
Philadelphia
9 6 7 34 33 30
New England
8 7 6 30 27 19
Houston
8 6 6 30 23 20
Chicago
7 9 4 25 25 30
Columbus
6 10 5 23 24 27
Toronto FC
3 10 8 17 19 29
D.C.
2 15 4 10 10 35
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake
11 7 4 37 36 24
Portland
8 3 10 34 31 20
Colorado
9 7 7 34 28 24
Los Angeles
10 9 3 33 32 27
Vancouver
9 7 5 32 33 29
FC Dallas
8 5 8 32 27 27
Seattle
8 7 4 28 24 22
San Jose
7 9 6 27 23 33
Chivas USA
4 12 5 17 19 37
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
———
Sunday’s Game
Seattle FC 2, Chivas USA 1
Wednesday’s Game
Roma at MLS All-Stars, 9 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 3
Chicago at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Montreal at D.C. United, 7:30 p.m.
New York at Sporting Kansas City, 8 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Columbus at Houston, 9 p.m.
Chivas USA at San Jose, 10 p.m.
FC Dallas at Seattle FC, 10:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Portland, 11 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 4
Toronto FC at New England, 7:30 p.m.
NASCAR
Sprint Cup Leaders
Through July 28
Points
1, Jimmie Johnson, 740. 2, Clint Bowyer, 665.
3, Carl Edwards, 655. 4, Kevin Harvick, 648. 5,
Dale Earnhardt Jr., 616. 6, Matt Kenseth, 615. 7,
Kyle Busch, 610. 8, Greg Biffle, 565. 9, Kasey
Kahne, 564. 10, Jeff Gordon, 559.
11, Tony Stewart, 558. 12, Martin Truex Jr.,
554. 13, Brad Keselowski, 553. 14, Kurt Busch,
546. 15, Jamie McMurray, 537. 16, Ryan Newman, 534. 17, Aric Almirola, 529. 18, Joey
Logano, 524. 19, Paul Menard, 520. 20, Jeff
Burton, 499.
Money
1, Jimmie Johnson, $6,177,084. 2, Kyle Busch,
$4,150,397. 3, Matt Kenseth, $4,043,085. 4,
Kevin Harvick, $3,886,677. 5, Brad Keselowski,
$3,835,924. 6, Dale Earnhardt Jr., $3,622,748.
7, Carl Edwards, $3,597,609. 8, Tony Stewart,
$3,580,714. 9, Ryan Newman, $3,430,048. 10,
Jeff Gordon, $3,410,123.
11, Clint Bowyer, $3,350,158. 12, Martin Truex
Jr., $3,321,679. 13, Joey Logano, $3,260,974.
14, Kasey Kahne, $3,243,083. 15, Ricky
Stenhouse Jr., $3,185,243. 16, Greg Biffle,
$3,095,464. 17, Aric Almirola, $3,033,446. 18,
Kurt Busch, $2,985,698. 19, Jamie McMurray, $2,916,113. 20, Juan Pablo Montoya,
$2,867,634.
GOLF
GOLF
Chattanooga Chapter
Tenn. PGA Pro-Am
Webcom Money Leaders
Senior British Open
THE ODDS
Major League Soccer
Sports Editor Jay Greeson provides
a morning look at sports developments Monday
through Friday at www.timesfreepress.com.
Monday at Black Creek Club
Low professional: 72—Gregg Juster, Ty Gosnell.
Pro skins: Gibby Gilbert No. 5; Juster Nos. 8
& 9; Trey Stansell Nos. 14 & 16; Gosnell No.
15. Amateur skins: Matt Lowery No. 2; Shane
Vandeventer No. 6 (eagle).
Top teams: 62—Stansell, Jimmy McGarry,
Chris Romito, Tom Saxen. 64—Lamar Mills, Guy
Carpenter, David Broyles, Gary Allen; Stansell,
Lowery, Bob Timm, Dan Johnson; Gilbert, Jeff
Howard, Brad Hall, Gary Bryant.
GB
—
11⁄2
2
21⁄2
41⁄2
Major League Baseball
National League
FAVORITE
LINE UNDERDOG
LINE
at Chicago (G1) -115 Milwaukee
+105
at Pittsburgh (G1) -125 St. Louis
+115
St. Louis (G2)
-110 at Pittsburgh
+100
at Philadelphia
-130 San Francisco +120
at Atlanta
-160 Colorado
+150
at Miami
-115 New York
+105
at Chicago (G2) -120 Milwaukee
+110
Cincinnati
-155 at San Diego +145
American League
at Baltimore
-250 Houston
+220
at Cleveland
-140 Chicago
+130
at Boston
-175 Seattle
+165
at Texas
-130 Los Angeles
+120
Kansas City
-130 at Minnesota +120
at Oakland
-145 Toronto
+135
Interleague
at Detroit
-140 Washington
+130
at Tampa Bay
-140 Arizona
+130
at Los Angeles (NL)-175 New York (AL) +165
———
NFL Preseason
ORITE
OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Sunday
Hall of Fame Game
At Canton, Ohio
Dallas
1 1
(34)
Miami
Aug. 8
at Tampa Bay
21⁄2 3
(341⁄2) Baltimore
at Tennessee
21⁄2 3
(34) Washington
at Cleveland
3 3
(331⁄2) St. Louis
at Atlanta
4 3
(36) Cincinnati
at San Francisco 31⁄2 3
(36)
Denver
at San Diego
Pk Pk (351⁄2)
Seattle
Aug. 9
at Jacksonville OFF OFF (OFF)
Miami
at Detroit
4 31⁄2 (351⁄2) N.Y. Jets
at Philadelphia
3 31⁄2 (39) New England
at Green Bay
6 5
(351⁄2)
Arizona
at Carolina
21⁄2 21⁄2 (351⁄2) Chicago
at New Orleans 31⁄2 3
(371⁄2) Kansas City
at Minnesota
11⁄2 1
(35)
Houston
at Oakland
OFF OFF (OFF)
Dallas
Aug. 10
at Pittsburgh
3 3
(351⁄2) N.Y. Giants
Aug. 11
at Indianapolis
3 3
(36)
Buffalo
Off Key
Miami plays Aug. 4
Dallas plays Aug. 4
LOOK DAILY FOR ‘5 AT 10’
SPORTSONAIR
TUESDAY TELEVISION
■ Baseball
MLB: St. Louis at Pittsburgh, MLB Net, 4 p.m.
MLB: Colorado at Atlanta, SSouth, 7 p.m.
MLB: Seattle-Boston or Colorado-Atlanta, MLB Net, 7 p.m.
MLB: Cincinnati at San Diego, FoxSS, 10 p.m.
MLB: Cincy-San Diego or Yankees-Dodgers, MLB Net, 10 p.m.
■ Football
CFL: British Columbia at Toronto, NBCSN, 7:30 p.m.
TUESDAY RADIO
■ Baseball
MLB: Colorado at Atlanta, 1370 AM & 104.1 FM, 7 p.m.
SL: Chattanooga at Jacksonville, 105.1 FM, 7 p.m.
FOOTBALL
TENNIS
NFL Preseason
Southern California Open
Sunday’s Game
Miami vs. Dallas at Canton, 8 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 8
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Tennessee, 8 p.m.
Cincinnati at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Cleveland, 8 p.m.
Denver at San Francisco, 9 p.m.
Seattle at San Diego, 10 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 9
N.Y. Jets at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Jacksonville, 7:30 p.m.
New England at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Kansas City at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Arizona at Green Bay, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Oakland, 10 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 10
N.Y. Giants at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 11
Buffalo at Indianapolis, 1:30 p.m.
WTA
Monday
At La Costa Resort and Spa
Carlsbad, Calif.
Purse: $795,707 (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
First Round
Sam Stosur (5), Australia, def. Varvara Lepchenko, United States, 7-5, 6-1.
Francesca Schiavone, Italy, def. Flavia Pennetta,
Italy, 7-6 (4), 6-7 (6), 6-4.
Virginie Razzano, France, def. Svetlana
Kuznetsova, Russia, 6-2, 6-4.
Doubles
First Round
Anna-Lena Groenefeld, Germany, and Kveta
Peschke (1), Czech Republic, def. Liga Dekmeijere, Latvia, and Olga Savchuk, Ukraine,
6-2, 6-3.
Chan Hao-ching, Taiwan, and Janette Husarova,
Slovakia, def. Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic,
and Tamira Paszek, Austria, 6-3, 6-3.
TENNIS
bet-at-home Cup Kitzbuehel
Citi Open
A U.S. Open Series event
Monday
At William H.G. FitzGerald Tennis Center
Washington
Purse: Men, $1.55 million (WT500); Women,
$235,000 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Men
First Round
Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, def. Steve
Johnson, United States, 7-6 (3), 6-3.
Somdev Devvarman, India, def. Rhyne Williams,
United States, 7-5, 6-1.
Mardy Fish, United States, def. Matthew Ebden,
Australia, 2-6, 6-1, 6-3.
Sam Groth, Australia, def. Denis Kudla, United
States, 7-6 (2), 6-2.
Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, def. Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, 6-3, 6-4.
David Goffin, Belgium, def. Yen-hsun Lu, Taiwan,
6-4, 6-4.
Marinko Matosevic, Australia, def. James Blake,
United States, 6-2, 7-6 (6).
Xavier Malisse, Belgium, def. Rajeev Ram,
United States, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2.
Lukas Lacko, Slovakia, def. Alejandro Falla,
Argentina, 1-6, 6-4, 6-4.
Tobias Kamke, Germany, def. Ricardas Berankis, Lithuania, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2.
Women
First Round
Magdalena Rybarikova (7), Slovakia, def. Christina McHale, United States, 2-6, 6-4, 6-2.
Paula Ormaechea, Argentina, def. Beatrice
Capra, United States, 6-1, 6-1.
Jana Cepelova, Slovakia, def. Kiki Bertens,
Netherlands, 6-4, 0-6, 6-3.
Olga Puchkova, Russia, def. Sloane Stephens
(2), United States, 7-5, 6-3.
Andrea Petkovic, Germany, def. Jessica Pegula,
United States, 6-2, 7-5.
Melanie Oudin, United States, def. Anastasia
Rodionova, Australia, 7-5, 6-3.
Doubles
Men
First Round
Mariusz Fyrstenberg and Marcin Matkowsk,
Poland, def. Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, and
Dmitry Tursunov, Russia, 6-3, 7-6 (4).
Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, and Michael Llodra,
France, def. Max Mirnyi, Belarus, and Horia
Tecau, Romania, 3-6, 6-3, 15-13.
Women
First Round
Eugenie Bouchard, Canada, and Taylor
Townsend, United States, def. Jennifer Elie and
Lena Litvak, United States, 6-1, 6-0.
Alexandra Mueller, United States, and Adriana
Perez, Venezuela, def. Alison Riske, United
States, and Nicola Slater, Britain, 7-6 (6), 6-3.
Maria Fernanda Alvarez Teran, Bolivia, and Keri
Wong, United States, def. Anamika Bhargava
and Ashley Weinhold, United States, 6-0, 36, 10-7.
TENNESSEE LOTTERY
Monday’s winning numbers:
Cash 3 Midday: 1-6-3
Lucky Sum: 10
Cash 4 Midday: 8-8-1-0
Lucky Sum: 17
Cash 3 Evening: 4-6-1
Lucky Sum: 11
Cash 4 Evening: 1-1-3-3
Lucky Sum: 8
Tennessee Cash: Not available
Cash Ball: Not available
Sunday’s winning numbers:
Cash 3: 6-6-2
Lucky Sum: 14
Cash 4: 2-9-7-5
Lucky Sum: 23
CONTACT
SPORTS
ATP World Tour
Monday
At Mercedes-Benz Sportpark Kitzbuehel
Kitzbuehel, Austria
Purse: $621,000 (WT250)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Singles
First Round
Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, def. Kenny de
Schepper, France, 6-4, 6-4.
Marcel Granollers (8), Spain, def. Mate Pavic,
Croatia, 7-6 (2), 6-2.
Albert Montanes (7), Spain, def. Adrian Ungur,
Romania, 6-4, 6-2.
Horacio Zeballos, Argentina, def. Martin Fischer,
Austria, 7-5, 1-6, 6-3.
Daniel Gimeno-Traver, Spain, def. Antonio Veic,
Croatia, 6-1, 6-3.
Dominic Thiem, Austria, def. Andrey Kuznetsov,
Russia, 6-2, 7-5.
Doubles
First Round
Lucas Arnold Ker and Juan Monaco, Argentina,
def. Carlos Becke and Philipp Kohlschreiber,
Germany, 6-3, 7-5.
Daniel Brands, Germany, and Michal Mertinak,
Slovakia, lead Julian Knowle, Austria, and Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, 6-4, 0-1, susp., rain
BASKETBALL
WNBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pct
Chicago
12 5 .706
Atlanta
11 5 .688
Washington
9 9 .500
Indiana
8 9 .471
New York
7 11 .389
Connecticut
4 12 .250
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pct
Minnesota
14 3 .824
Los Angeles
12 6 .667
Phoenix
9 9 .500
Seattle
7 10 .412
San Antonio
6 12 .333
Tulsa
6 14 .300
———
Wednesday’s Game
New York at Washington, 7 p.m.
GB
—
1
2 ⁄2
1
5 ⁄2
7
1
8 ⁄2
91⁄2
Fight Schedule
Aug. 1
At Bangkok, Thailand, Kompayak Porpramuk
vs. Koki Eto, 12, for Porpramuk’s interim WBA
World flyweight title.
Aug. 2
At Buffalo Run Casino, Miami, Okla. (ESPN2),
Javier Fortuna vs. Luis Franco, 10, featherweights.
Monday’s winning numbers:
Cash 3 Midday: 4-4-9
Cash 4 Midday: 7-7-0-7
Georgia FIVE Midday: 7-1-8-9-5
Cash 3 Evening: 2-0-0
Cash 4 Evening: Not available
Georgia FIVE Evening: 2--1-5-8-0
Fantasy 5: Not available
Decades of Dollars:
Presidents Cup Standings
At Muirfield Village Golf Club
Dublin, Ohio
Oct. 3-6
Top 10 for each team qualify automatically plus
two Captain’s picks:
Through July 28
United States
1. Tiger Woods
18,481,771
2. Brandt Snedeker
14,831,427
3. Phil Mickelson
14,152,641
4. Matt Kuchar
13,814,215
5. Bill Haas
9,594,542
6. Hunter Mahan
9,562,588
7. Keegan Bradley
8,822,950
8. Webb Simpson
8,317,603
9. Steve Stricker
8,209,513
10. Dustin Johnson
8,133,408
11. Bubba Watson
7,669,908
12. Zach Johnson
7,636,029
13. Billy Horschel
6,841,635
14. Jason Dufner
6,809,039
15. Kevin Streelman
6,292,426
International
1. Adam Scott
Aus
7.58
2. Louis Oosthuizen
SAf
4.75
3. Charl Schwartzel
SAf
4.71
4. Ernie Els
SAf
4.69
5. Jason Day
Aus
4.38
6. Branden Grace
SAf
3.34
7. Hideki Matsuyama
Jpn
3.05
8. Richard Sterne
SAf
2.99
9. Angel Cabrera
Arg
2.61
10. Tim Clark
SAf
2.34
11. Thongchai Jaidee
Tha
2.29
12. George Coetzee
SAf
2.09
13. Marc Leishman
Aus
2.07
14. Graham Delaet
Can
2.04
15. Geoff Ogilvy
Aus
1.87
LPGA Money Leaders
GB
—
1
⁄2
31⁄2
4
1
5 ⁄2
71⁄2
BOXING
GEORGIA LOTTERY
Monday
At Royal Birkdale, Southport, England
Purse: $2 million
Yardage: 7,082; Par: 70
Final
a-amateur
Wiebe won on fifth playoff hole
Mark Wiebe, $315,600
70-65-70-66 — 271
Bernhard Langer, $210,500 68-67-66-70 — 271
Corey Pavin, $97,813
69-71-69-65 — 274
Peter Senior, $97,813
68-71-69-66 — 274
David Frost, $97,813
68-68-68-70 — 274
Peter Fowler, $66,280
69-68-70-69 — 276
Sandy Lyle, $56,800
70-68-69-70 — 277
Tom Pernice Jr., $44,870 70-72-70-66 — 278
Jeff Hart, $44,870
69-69-73-67 — 278
Gene Sauers, $37,820
67-70-70-72 — 279
Steve Elkington, $33,650 72-68-71-69 — 280
Gary Wolstenholme, $33,650 70-72-68-70 — 280
Kohki Idoki, $30,320
71-68-73-69 — 281
Jamie Spence, $27,220
75-69-70-68 — 282
Russ Cochran, $27,220
71-73-70-68 — 282
Des Smyth, $27,220
76-69-69-68 — 282
Tom Kite, $27,220
70-72-71-69 — 282
Rocco Mediate, $24,040 70-68-75-70 — 283
Steve Pate, $24,040
70-72-68-73 — 283
Greg Turner, $22,960
70-69-75-70 — 284
Barry Lane, $21,040
72-68-74-71 — 285
Larry Mize, $21,040
71-73-70-71 — 285
Fred Couples, $21,040
74-72-68-71 — 285
Steve Jones, $21,040
73-70-70-72 — 285
Colin Montgomerie, $21,040 72-71-69-73 — 285
Michael Allen, $17,297
75-70-72-69 — 286
Katsuyoshi Tomori, $17,297 71-72-73-70 — 286
Steen Tinning, $17,297
71-74-71-70 — 286
Tom Lehman, $17,297
72-72-70-72 — 286
Mark O’Meara, $17,297
74-68-72-72 — 286
Mark McNulty, $17,297
70-67-76-73 — 286
Rod Spittle, $17,297
71-72-70-73 — 286
Brad Faxon, $14,647
74-69-74-70 — 287
Gary Hallberg, $14,647
69-75-73-70 — 287
Pedro Linhart, $14,647
73-72-72-70 — 287
Kirk Hanefeld, $13,230
73-75-70-70 — 288
Tom Watson, $13,230
73-71-73-71 — 288
David J. Russell, $13,230 72-73-72-71 — 288
Bob Tway, $13,230
74-72-69-73 — 288
Paul Wesselingh, $11,600 70-76-74-69 — 289
Seiki Okuda, $11,600
73-72-73-71 — 289
Duffy Waldorf, $11,600
76-72-70-71 — 289
John Inman, $11,600
71-76-70-72 — 289
Peter Mitchell, $11,600
75-72-68-74 — 289
Willie Wood, $10,340
75-71-72-72 — 290
M. Angel Martin, $10,340 72-75-65-78 — 290
Mark James, $9,800
74-73-71-73 — 291
Boonchu Ruangkit, $8,540 73-73-73-73 — 292
Lu Chien Soon, $8,540
71-77-71-73 — 292
Mike Goodes, $8,540
71-74-73-74 — 292
Dick Mast, $8,540
72-73-73-74 — 292
Santiago Luna, $8,540
72-74-72-74 — 292
a-Chip Lutz
71-71-75-75 — 292
Eduardo Romero, $8,540 75-70-72-75 — 292
Bruce Vaughan, $7,110
73-74-72-74 — 293
Philip Golding, $7,110
74-74-71-74 — 293
Esteban Toledo, $6,160
74-72-74-74 — 294
Mark Brooks, $6,160
74-73-73-74 — 294
Jeff Sluman, $6,160
71-75-72-76 — 294
Anders Forsbrand, $6,160 73-70-73-78 — 294
Massy Kuramoto, $5,130 70-77-74-74 — 295
John Cook, $5,130
69-79-73-74 — 295
Frankie Minoza, $5,130
68-78-72-77 — 295
Carl Mason, $5,130
74-70-73-78 — 295
Hendrik Buhrmann, $4,315 76-72-75-73 — 296
Philip Walton, $4,315
70-76-75-75 — 296
Joe Daley, $4,315
75-73-73-75 — 296
Mark Calcavecchia, $4,315 75-72-73-76 — 296
Fred Funk, $3,770
75-71-78-73 — 297
Bill Longmuir, $3,770
73-69-77-78 — 297
Andrew Oldcorn, $3,410 74-72-75-77 — 298
Peter Dahlberg, $3,410
76-72-73-77 — 298
Phil Gresswell, $3,410
74-71-79-77 — 301
Mitch Kierstenson, $2,960 74-72-77-81 — 304
Through July 21
Trn
1. Inbee Park
15
2. Stacy Lewis
17
3. I.K. Kim
15
4. Suzann Pettersen
14
5. So Yeon Ryu
15
6. Beatriz Recari
15
7. Paula Creamer
15
8. Karrie Webb
13
9. Angela Stanford
16
10. Na Yeon Choi
15
11. Cristie Kerr
13
12. Catriona Matthew
13
13. Hee Young Park
16
14. Lizette Salas
16
15. Jiyai Shin
13
16. Jessica Korda
13
17. Shanshan Feng
12
18. Anna Nordqvist
16
19. Ai Miyazato
13
20. Jodi Ewart Shadoff
15
21. Pornanong Phatlum
15
22. Jennifer Johnson
16
23. Haeji Kang
17
24. Caroline Hedwall
14
25. Ilhee Lee
16
26. Chella Choi
17
27. Karine Icher
16
28. Lexi Thompson
15
29. Mika Miyazato
13
30. Yani Tseng
15
31. Morgan Pressel
15
32. Gerina Piller
16
33. Amy Yang
13
34. Giulia Sergas
16
35. Mo Martin
15
Money
$2,134,844
$916,799
$909,957
$860,056
$847,207
$784,023
$628,715
$565,764
$551,300
$511,469
$498,885
$496,291
$493,013
$465,539
$459,605
$448,434
$441,715
$421,863
$402,759
$355,915
$329,901
$328,017
$327,282
$327,210
$325,038
$320,373
$307,190
$300,155
$285,149
$273,743
$267,099
$263,254
$250,241
$245,376
$234,579
Through July 28
Trn
16
13
16
16
15
11
16
14
13
15
17
12
15
6
16
15
16
16
14
6
10
15
17
14
14
16
15
16
16
16
15
16
14
16
17
1. Michael Putnam
2. Edward Loar
3. Chesson Hadley
4. Ben Martin
5. Will Wilcox
6. Kevin Tway
7. Alex Aragon
8. Mark Anderson
9. Tim Wilkinson
10. Jamie Lovemark
11. Danny Lee
12. Benjamin Alvarado
13. Alex Prugh
14. Brendon Todd
15. Jim Renner
16. Kevin Kisner
17. Brice Garnett
18. Kevin Foley
19. Mathew Goggin
20. Patrick Cantlay
21. Steven Alker
22. Scott Parel
23. Ashley Hall
24. Wes Roach
25. Alexandre Rocha
26. Bronson La’Cassie
27. Daniel Chopra
28. Whee Kim
29. Byron Smith
30. Shane Bertsch
31. Scott Dunlap
32. D.J. Brigman
33. Franklin Corpening
34. Chad Collins
35. Tyrone Van Aswegen
Money
$430,684
$300,471
$290,474
$274,749
$232,050
$219,794
$216,041
$208,134
$197,836
$173,426
$166,803
$157,304
$155,667
$152,828
$152,248
$151,209
$139,615
$138,977
$137,477
$135,105
$130,302
$128,957
$124,808
$118,448
$117,463
$111,629
$103,360
$99,862
$99,396
$98,006
$93,521
$92,416
$91,251
$90,109
$89,023
TRANSACTIONS
Monday’s Moves
BASEBALL
Major League Baseball
MLB—Suspended Toronto minor league OF
Brian Van Kirk (New Hampshire-EL) 50 games
after a second violation for a drug of abuse.
American League
DETROIT TIGERS—Sent LHP Darin Downs to
Toledo for a rehab assignment.
HOUSTON ASTROS—Traded RHP Jose Veras
to Detroit for OF Danry Vasquez and a player
to be named. Agreed to terms with RHP Justin
Hess on a minor league contract. Recalled
RHP Chia-Jen Lo from Corpus Christi (Texas).
Selected the contract of RHP Josh Zeid from
Oklahoma City (PCL).
LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Traded LHP Scott
Downs to Atlanta for RHP Cory Rasmus.
Assigned RHP Billy Buckner outright to Salt
Lake (PCL). Recalled LHP Nick Maronde from
Arkansas (Texas).
MINNESOTA TWINS—Reinstated C Joe Mauer
from the restricted list. Optioned C Drew Butera
to Rochester (IL).
NEW YORK YANKEES—Optioned 3B David
Adams to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Agreed
to terms with 3B Brady Steiger on a minor
league contract.
OAKLAND RAIDERS—Signed LB Omar
Gaither.
SEATTLE MARINERS—Activated OF Michael
Morse from the 15-day DL. Designated OF
Jason Bay for assignment.
TAMPA BAY RAYS—Acquired RHP Jesse Crain
from the Chicago White Sox for players to
be named or cash. Transferred RHP Brandon
Gomes to the 60-day DL.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES—Activated RHP Brandon
Beachy from the 15-day DL. Placed LHP Paul
Maholm on the 15-day DL. Designated RHP
Kameron Loe for assignment.
CHICAGO CUBS—Sent RHP Scott Baker to
Daytona (FSL) for a rehab assignment.
COLORADO ROCKIES—Recalled INF Charlie Culberson from Colorado Springs (PCL).
Optioned INF Jordan Pacheco to Colorado
Springs.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Placed C Michael
McKenry on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July
28. Recalled OF Alex Presley from Indianapolis
(IL).
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Designated RHP
Yusmeiro Petit for assignment.
American Association
AMARILLO SOX—Traded RHP Jeff Lyman to
San Angelo (United) for future considerations.
EL PASO DIABLOS—Released C Moises
Montero.
KANSAS CITY T-BONES—Released LHP Justin Albert and RHP Connor Graham.
LAREDO LEMURS—Released INF Joe Urtuzastegui. Traded RHP Jon Kountis to the Greys
(Frontier) for 1B Balbino Fuenmayor.
LINCOLN SALTDOGS—Released LHP Matt
Bywater. Purchased OF Brian Joynt and RHP
Luis Chirinos from El Paso. Traded OF Stephen
Douglas to Laredo for a player to be named.
Atlantic League
LONG ISLAND DUCKS—Signed OF Matt
Fleishman. Released RHP Pete Budkevics.
Can-Am League
NEWARK BEARS—Released RHP Ryan Carr.
Frontier League
FRONTIER GREYS—Traded 1B Balbino Fuenmayor to Laredo (AA) for RHP Jonathan Kountis.
Signed RHP Ryan Berry.
ROCKFORD AVIATORS—Signed C Gabe
DeMarco. Released OF Will Howard.
SCHAUMBURG BOOMERS—Released RHP
James Jones.
TRAVERSE CITY BEACH BUMS—Released
SS Andrew Cohn.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
DALLAS MAVERICKS—Signed G Shane Larkin.
HOUSTON ROCKETS—Signed C Marcus
Camby.
LOS ANGELES LAKERS—Named Kurt Rambis
and Johnny Davis assistant coaches.
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS—Named Chris Heck
chief revenue officer.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BALTIMORE RAVENS—Signed FB Vonta Leach
to a two-year contract.
CINCINNATI BENGALS—Activated TE/LS
Bryce Davis, OT Andre Smith comes from the
active/non-football illness list and WR Brandon
Tate from the active/pup list.
GREEN BAY PACKERS—Signed S Chris
Banjo and WR Omarius Hines. Waived S Ryan
McMahon.
HOUSTON TEXANS—Activated S Orhian Johnson from the active/non-football injury list.
TENNESSEE TITANS—Agreed to terms on a
contract with G Chance Warmack.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Signed D Bryan
Rodney to a one-year contract.
WINNIPEG JETS—Agreed to terms with D
Zach Bogosian on a seven-year contract.
American Hockey League
HAMILTON BULLDOGS—Signed D Drew Schiestel to a one-year contract.
COLLEGE
BARTON—Named Benny Benton sports information director.
CLEMSON—Named Marvin Gibson and Althea
Thomas assistant track coaches and Danielle
Hepburn women’s graduate assistant volleyball
coach.
ETSU—Named Billy Taylor defensive coordinator.
N.C. STATE—Named Dereck Whittenburg men’s
assistant basketball coach.
SANTA CLARA—Named Sean Riley assistant
baseball coach.
SHENANDOAH—Named Melissa Kraft women’s assistant basketball coach.
UTICA—Named Aris Bird volleyball coach.
WESTERN NEW ENGLAND—Named Dan
Gomez interim baseball coach.
WISCONSIN-OSHKOSH—Named Cameron
Wengrzyn athletics marketing & development
specialist.
AROUNDTHEREGION
Covenant given
full D-III status
Covenant College announced Monday that
it officially has been accepted as an active
member of NCAA Division III, eligible to play
for postseason championships and national
awards after a four-transitional period from
the NAIA. “NCAA Division III is the ideal
athletic affiliation for Covenant College and
our athletic department,” athletic director and
men’s basketball coach Kyle Taylor said in a
release from the Lookout Mountain school.
“Division III’s core values align very well with
our philosophy of athletics. I am grateful to
everyone in our campus community who has
contributed to our reclassification process. It
has been an arduous four-year process, but
praise God it is finally over!” Covenant officials
said much of the credit should go to former
AD Tami Smialek and to Laura Mlynski,
who was the compliance coordinator when
the process began. “The dedication of those
two women to this transition laid the foundation for full membership in the NCAA that we
have now achieved,” associate AD Tim Sceggel said. “I want to say a special thank-you to
our student-athletes for being patient through
this process,” Taylor said. “Their continued
support, matriculation and work ethic did not
go unnoticed.”
TENNIS
■ Jack Webb, a local 1975 graduate of
McCallie School, was inducted last week into
the University of Kentucky Tennis Hall of
Fame. He was the second 2013 inductee into the
hall, and his wife of 30 years and their daughter
and grandson were able to enjoy with him the
ceremony at the UK tennis stadium. Webb was
a two-year captain for the Wildcats and played
No. 1 or 2 singles for three seasons, earning
All-SEC honors in 1978 when he was the No. 2
singles runner-up in the league tournament. He
won an SEC doubles title as a freshman.
WRESTLING
■ Cumberland University
in Lebanon, Tenn., announced
the signings of two wrestlers
from East Ridge High School
to scholarship papers for the
2013-14 season: Kendall Small
and Coby Walker. Both lettered four years for the Pioneers, with Small going 48-6
as a senior
a n d Wa l k e r Kendall
winding up his Small
career as a captain for coach
Brad Laxton. He also lettered
in soccer for two years, while
Small played four seasons of
football and won the JROTC
Cadet Challenge two years in
a row. They brought the list of
Coby
Bulldogs wresting recruits to
Walker
14.
AUTO RACING
■ Eric Boyd from Flintstone won the
$1,500 top prize in the Super Pro class Saturday night at the Brainerd Optimist Drag Strip.
The Astec Co. electrical engineer won with a
4.84-second run on a 4.83 dial in his dragster
— at 136.25 mph the fastest car in the class.
Steve Dowdy from Ringgold was second with
a 5.05 run on a 5.04 dial in his Chevy dragster.
Veteran strip Hall of Famer L.C. Bigham from
Tunnel Hill won again in the Foot Brake class
with an 8.37-second run on an 8.35 dial in his
1972 Dodge Dart Swinger, and his son David
from Calhoun was second in a ’69 Dodge.
Mike Griep and Marty Goldsmith were
third and fourth. Mattie Keener and Chloe
Keener from Dunlap were first and second
in Junior Dragster.
Staff Reports
drop us a line
Have an opinion you’d like to share? Let us know.
Mail your comments to:
Sports Letters
400 East 11th St.
Chattanooga, TN 37403
E-mail to:
[email protected]
Fax to: (423) 668-5049
Responses should be 500 or fewer words and
must include a name, address and phone number
for verification.
MARKTRAIL
Sunday’s winning numbers:
Cash 3 Midday: 6-5-5
Cash 4 Midday: 3-3-5-8
Georgia FIVE Midday: 9-2-4-0-3
Cash 3 Evening: 5-4-2
Cash 4 Evening: 2-0-1-9
Georgia FIVE Evening: 3-0-9-4-0
Fantasy 5: 6-14-21-27-33
■ SPORTS EDITOR
Jay Greeson (423) 757-6273
[email protected]
■ DEPUTY SPORTS EDITOR
Ron Bush (423) 757-6291
[email protected]
■ ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Jim Tanner (423) 757-6478
[email protected]
■ ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Ward Gossett (423) 757-6288
[email protected]
by phone: (423) 757-6364 or 1-800-733-2637 • by fax: (423) 668-5049 • by e-mail: [email protected]
■ ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Stephen Hargis (423) 757-6293
[email protected]
...
. timesfreepress.com
• • • Tueday, July 30, 2013 • D3
Breaking News: [email protected]
NFL ROUNDUP
Titans reach deal with first-round pick
The Associated Press
NASHVILLE — The Tennessee Titans agreed to terms Monday with offensive guard Chance
Warmack, who had been the last
remaining unsigned first-round
draft pick.
The Titans announced that
Warmack had agreed to a deal
but did not release any details
of the contract. Warmack sent
out a tweet saying, “Time to get
to work! (hash)Blessed.”
The Tennessean reported the
former Alabama All-American
agreed to a four-year contract
that features a fifth-year team
option and has a total value of
$12.17 million with a $7.2 million
signing bonus.
Warmack, the
10th overall pick
in the draft, was a
three-year starter at Alabama
who was part of
three national
championship
teams during his
college career.
Chance
Te n n e s s e e
Warmack
is counting on
Warmack to contribute right
away, but the rookie had missed
the Titans’ first four trainingcamp practices. The Titans
didn’t practice Monday.
The Titans thought highly
enough of Warmack to use a firstround draft pick on an offensive
lineman for the first time since
they took Illinois’ Brad Hopkins
with the 13th overall pick in 1993.
Warmack is expected to play a
key role in the reconstruction
of the Titans’ interior of their
offensive line.
The Titans needed to beef up
their line after struggling to open
running room for Chris Johnson
and ranking last in the NFL in
time of possession in 2012.
During the offseason, the
Titans lured free-agent guard
Andy Levitre away from Buffalo
with a six-year, $46.8 million contract. After picking up Warmack
in the first round of the draft,
they also used a fourth-round
selection on California guard/
center Brian Schwenke.
The Associated Press
Cincinnati Bengals defensive tackle Terrence Stephens hits a sled during practice at the
team’s training camp Monday in Cincinnati.
After the Titans drafted
Warmack, Tennessee coach Mike
Munchak said he could foresee a
line that had Levitre at left guard
with Warmack at right guard.
Warmack had practiced with
the first-team offense during the
Titans’ offseason program.
The Titans had been rotating Fernando Velasco and Rob
Turner at right guard during
their first four training-camp
practices while Warmack was
unsigned.
Ravens sign Leach
At Owings Mills, Md., the
Baltimore Ravens never gave
up hope of getting back fullback
Vonta Leach, and Monday they
got their wish.
Leach signed a two-year contract with the defending Super
Bowl champions after failing to
find a proper suitor in the free
agent market.
“I’m excited about it. It’s
great news,” coach John Harbaugh said. “We’ve been in
contact; we’ve been talking all
along. It worked out great for
the Ravens.”
Leach paved the way for running back Ray Rice to gain 1,143
yards last season. Leach ran
nine times for 32 yards during
the regular season and scored a
touchdown against Indianapolis during Baltimore’s run to the
Super Bowl.
Phillips tears ACL
At Philadelphia, Eagles linebacker Jason Phillips tore his
right ACL in Monday’s practice.
Phillips is the second Eagle to
sustain a season-ending injury in
three days. Starting wide receiver
Jeremy Maclin tore his right ACL
on Saturday.
Phillips played in 16 games
for Carolina last year, mostly on
special teams. He spent his first
1
2 ⁄2 seasons with Baltimore and
was entering his fifth year in the
NFL.
Phillips has 17 tackles in 30
career games, including two
starts for the Panthers last
year.
No. 5 to be retired
At Philadelphia, Donovan
McNabb’s No. 5 will be retired by
the Philadelphia Eagles, becoming the ninth player in franchise
history to receive that honor.
The six-time Pro Bowl quarterback formally announced his
retirement Monday, though he
hasn’t played in the NFL since
2011. McNabb will be inducted
into the team’s Hall of Fame and
have his jersey retired on Sept. 19
when the Eagles play the Kansas
City Chiefs.
Former Eagles coach Andy
Reid, who drafted McNabb with
the No. 2 overall pick in 1999, now
coaches the Chiefs. Eagles owner
Jeffrey Lurie praised McNabb’s
toughness and “impeccable character.”
“For me, it wasn’t anything
that I was expecting, but when
the decision was made, what can
you say?” McNabb said of retiring
his number. “To have your name
mentioned in the likes of [Eagles
greats] is truly an honor.”
White knows 1,000 yards is new standard
By Charles Odum
The Associated Press
FLOWERY BRANCH, Ga. — Roddy
White knows better than most how the Atlanta Falcons’ expectations have changed.
White, a first-round pick in 2005,
launched his NFL career when Atlanta
had never managed back-to-back winning
seasons. Only one Atlanta receiver, Andre
Rison, had posted three straight 1,000-yard
seasons.
It’s a new era in Atlanta. The Falcons are
working to extend a streak of five straight
winning seasons. A major reason for the
success is White, whose active streak of
six straight 1,000-yard seasons has doubled
Rison’s previous team record.
Anything short of a repeat trip to the
NFC championship game will be a disappointment. Anything less than 1,000 yards
from White would be a letdown.
White said the bar has been raised from
his first years in Atlanta.
“We’ve changed faces around here. We’ve
taken off and haven’t looked back,” White
said Sunday. “We’ve had a lot of success.
We’ve won a lot of games and had a lot of
great moments. We’ve set the expectations
bar very high around here, and every year
Network, said White is “the standard” for
Atlanta receivers.
“Roddy is one of the best in his generation,” Sanders said while watching White
in Monday’s practice. “He consistently has
good hands and runs good routes. He can
go underneath across the middle. He’s not
scared to do any of that. He’s a big guy.”
Sanders said White has contributed to the
success of Julio Jones, the team’s emerging
star at wide receiver. White has not missed
a game in his eight seasons, and Sanders
said that gives Jones an important example
to follow.
“That right there is unbelievable,” Sanders said of White’s iron man streak of 128
games. “People don’t realize that’s one of
the reasons Julio is so good. You get to
The Associate Press watch this guy practice. You get to watch
The Atlanta Falcons’ Roddy White autothis guy show up for every game. You get
graphs a football while leaving the field
to watch this guy put in the work. He’s the
following training camp at the team’s
standard.”
practice facility Monday in Flowery
White, 31, caught 92 passes for 1,351 yards
Branch, Ga.
and seven touchdowns in 2012 as the Falcons finished 13-3 in the regular season and
advanced to the NFC championship game.
He is only the fifth NFL player to post three
we’ve got to live up to it.”
Former Falcons standout cornerback consecutive seasons with 90-plus catches
Deion Sanders, now an analyst for NFL and 1,200-plus yards.
SPORTBRIEFS
Wiebe outlasts
Langer in Senior
British Open
SOUTHPORT, England — Bernhard
Langer gave Mark Wiebe one too many
chances at the Senior British Open. Wiebe
took advantage of Langer’s failure to close
out the golf tournament, beating the German
on the fifth playoff hole Monday at Royal
Birkdale for his first senior major title. The
American used a superb approach shot from
the rough to set up a two-putt for par, while
Langer failed to get up and down, seeing his
par putt stay out. “I’m speechless,” Wiebe
said. “I think it’s always better for both players had there been a birdie to win the playoff
instead of a bogey, but right now, I don’t really care. I’m glad it’s over, and I’m honored.”
Langer led by two shots going into the final
hole of regulation Sunday, only to settle for
a double bogey when he struggled to get out
of a bunker. The playoff was then halted after
two holes because of darkness and resumed
Monday, with Langer immediately missing
another chance to win when his 12-foot putt
wouldn’t drop.
■ SAN FRANCISCO — The U.S. Golf
Association wanted to make a splash in its
selection of sites for the new U.S. Amateur
Four-Ball championship announced earlier
this year. And it believes it has done just that.
Just a year after hosting the U.S. Open, the
Olympic Club in San Francisco was selected
Monday to host the inaugural men’s four-ball
championship in 2015. Bandon Dunes Golf
Resort on the Oregon coast will hold the first
women’s event that spring. Winged Foot Golf
Club just outside New York City will be the
site of the men’s tournament in 2016, when
the women will go to the newly designed
Streamsong Resort near Tampa, Fla. “It was
our goal primarily to create a wow factor
when announcing these sites and conducting
these inaugural championships,” USGA senior
managing director John Bodenhamer said at
a news conference at Olympic Club. “And I
think ... we’ve done that.” Adding these two
tournaments means the end of the U.S. Amateur Public Links, which dates to 1922, and the
U.S. Women’s Amateur Public Links.
SOCCER
■ KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Expansion
is coming to Major League Soccer. The
only questions facing the league’s board
are how many teams, where to locate them
and when to bring them into the fold. Commissioner Don Garber told The Associated Press in a wide-ranging interview
Monday that the league’s owners plan to
discuss expansion “in great detail” during
a meeting Wednesday. The MLS will play
Italian club AS Roma in its annual AllStar game that night. At the moment, the
league is focused on adding a second team
in New York. but with David Beckham
holding an ownership option and several
cities expressing interest in a franchise,
the league could shoot past the 20-team
mark within the next few years. Cities
that have expressed interest in a team, or
have lower-tier franchises who want to
join MLS, include Atlanta, Sacramento,
Orlando and the Twin Cities.
TENNIS
■ WASHINGTON — No. 2 seed Sloane
Stephens, playing her first match since
Wimbledon, fell to unseeded Olga Puchkova
7-5, 6-3 in the first round of the Citi Open tennis tournament Monday. In the men’s event,
Mardy Fish rebounded from an early exit in
Atlanta and losing the first set to defeat qualifier Matthew Ebden 2-6, 6-1, 6-3. Battling
back from a heart condition, Fish played four
matches in 2013 before facing Ebden, including a first-round loss last week. The struggles
started early for the 15th-ranked Stephens,
the highest-ranked American behind Serena
Williams. She fell behind 0-3 and lost her
serve three times in the opening set.
Wire Reports
NASCAR drivers find passing tough at Brickyard
By Dan Gelston
The Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS — Maybe
NASCAR should steal a page from
IndyCar and install a push-to-pass
button.
This past weekend saw the boring Brickyard at its worst.
Juan Pablo Montoya griped over
his radio that trying to pass another
car cost him position on the track.
Jimmie Johnson suggested the track
needed a second lane with more
banking to help the cause. Denny
Hamlin called passing “impossible.”
“If impossible is hard, then it
was impossible,” Hamlin said. “It is
just a product of the speed we run,
the tire we’ve got and the surface.
It all just makes for hard racing. It’s
hard to pass anyone. You’ve just got
to deal with it.”
Even super-snail “Tubo” would
have been stuck in Sunday’s single-file snoozer at the Indianapolis
Motor Speedway.
Never really considered an
exciting 400 miles anyway, Indianapolis may have topped itself in
the 20th Cup race at the famed
track. There were three cautions,
for stalled cars or debris, and no
accidents or spins.
And such little passing. The field
fanned out into single-file racing
for most of the event — a plodding
The Associated Press
In this photo taken with a fisheye lens, Sprint Cup Series driver Ryan
Newman takes the checkered flag to win the Brickyard 400 auto race
at Indianapolis Motor Speedway on Sunday.
style that perhaps is a big reason
why the crowd has dwindled from
200,000-plus in the Brickyard’s
NASCAR heyday to maybe 80,000
fans on Sunday. There were scores
of empty rows along the frontstretch, and fans at home probably
wound up changing the channel at
times. The clean race was responsible for the fastest Brickyard in
history at 2 hours, 36 minutes and
22 seconds.
The race was basically a yawner
until Ryan Newman used a flawless
final pit stop to top Jimmie Johnson
for the win.
All this came only two months
after one of the more thrilling
Indianapolis 500s in history. Tony
Kanaan passed leader Ryan HunterReay to grab the lead in the last of
a record 68 lead changes.
The stock cars? They turned the
1
2 ⁄2-mile Indy track into a leisurely
Sunday drive. Just one pass for the
lead under green that had nothing
to do with pit stops.
“On a flat racetrack, it’s just
tough to pass,” Johnson said. “These
corners, they aren’t really that long.
You have four 90-degree turns. That
puts a lot against this racetrack for
side-by-side racing. But we still love
this place.”
Drivers love the history steeped
in the 108-year-old track. Jeff Gordon, Tony Stewart and Newman
fell in love with the place as kids,
and they all talk of the reverence
they hold for a place where A.J.
Foyt, Mario Andretti and Rick
Mears made Indy and open wheel
king.
Stewart said he was “baffled” at
criticism of the racing and he gave
a blistering defense.
“Look up ‘racing’ in the dictionary and tell me what it says in the
dictionary; then look up ‘passing,”’
Stewart said. “If you want to see
passing, we can go out on I-465
and pass all you want. If you can
tell me that’s more exciting than
what you see at IMS, the great
race car drivers that have competed here. This is about racing.
This is about cars being fast. It
doesn’t have to be two- and threewide racing all day long to be good
racing. Racing is about figuring
out how to take the package you’re
allowed and make it better than
what everybody else has and do a
better job with it.”
As difficult as it was to pass, it’s
just as hard for this style of racing
to hook the next generation of fans
on NASCAR at Indy. The new Gen6 was expected to help, but it was
the same old, same old.
IndyCar has figured out how to
make the 500 more exciting — now
it’s NASCAR’s turn, even if there
might not be much the series leaders can do about it.
“It’s a one-groove track. It’s not
going to change,” Dale Earnhardt Jr.
said. “I don’t care what you do. It’s
not the race car. It’s not the tire or
nothing like that. It’s just the track.
It’s one groove, four 90-degree corners. I mean, there’s not much you
can do about it.”
Single-file racing sure beats the
Goodyear tire debacle of 2008. And
it’s better than not having the race
at all on the circuit.
But the event clearly needs a
boost — whether it’s installing
lights and turning it into a night
race or moving it later on the
schedule to launch the Chase for
the Sprint Cup championship. Plenty of ideas were kicked around this
past weekend in the garage. There
were just no easy answers.
D4 • Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • • •
NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST
Atlanta
Washington
Philadelphia
New York
Miami
CENTRAL
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Chicago
Milwaukee
WEST
Los Angeles
Arizona
Colorado
San Diego
San Francisco
W
61
52
49
47
40
W
62
62
59
48
44
W
56
54
51
48
46
L
45
54
56
56
64
L
41
42
47
56
61
L
48
51
56
58
58
MAJOR LEAGUE
SCOREBOARD
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday Games
Detroit 12, Philadelphia 4
Miami 3, Pittsburgh 2
Washington 14, N.Y. Mets 1
Chicago Cubs 2, San Francisco
1
L.A. Dodgers 1, Cincinnati 0, 11
innings
Colorado 6, Milwaukee 5
San Diego 1, Arizona 0
Atlanta 5, St. Louis 2
Monday Games
Pittsburgh 9, St. Louis 2
Atlanta 9, Colorado 8, 10
innings
N.Y. Mets 6, Miami 5
Milwaukee 5, Chicago Cubs 0
Cincinnati at San Diego, late
Tuesday Games
Milwaukee (Gallardo 8-9) at Chicago Cubs (Villanueva 2-7),
2:20, 1st game
St. Louis (Lyons 2-3) at Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 4-7),
4:05, 1st game
San Francisco (Zito 4-7) at Philadelphia (Lannan 2-4), 7:05
Washington (Strasburg 5-8) at
Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 8-7),
7:08
Arizona (Kennedy 3-7) at Tampa
Bay (Ro.Hernandez 5-11),
7:10
Colorado (Nicasio 6-4) at Atlanta (A.Wood 0-2), 7:10
N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler 4-1) at
Miami (Eovaldi 2-1), 7:10
St. Louis (Lynn 12-5) at Pittsburgh (Undecided), 7:35,
2nd game
Milwaukee (Undecided) at
Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 0-0),
8:05, 2nd game
Cincinnati (Latos 10-3) at San
Diego (Volquez 8-8), 10:10
N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 7-8) at
L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 8-3),
10:10
Wednesday Games
Washington at Detroit, 1:08
Cincinnati at San Diego, 3:40
San Francisco at Philadelphia,
7:05
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 7:05
Arizona at Tampa Bay, 7:10
Colorado at Atlanta, 7:10
N.Y. Mets at Miami, 7:10
Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs,
8:05
N.Y. Yankees at L.A. Dodgers,
10:10
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Sunday Games
N.Y. Yankees 6, Tampa Bay 5
Cleveland 6, Texas 0
Toronto 2, Houston 1
Detroit 12, Philadelphia 4
Boston 5, Baltimore 0
Kansas City 4, Chicago White
Sox 2, 12 innings
Oakland 10, L.A. Angels 6
Seattle 6, Minnesota 4
Monday Games
Tampa Bay 2, Boston 1
Cleveland 3, Chicago White
Sox 2
Texas 4, L.A. Angels 3
Toronto at Oakland, late
Tuesday Games
Chicago White Sox (Peavy 8-4)
at Cleveland (Kazmir 6-4),
7:05
Houston (B.Norris 6-9) at Baltimore (W.Chen 5-3), 7:05
Washington (Strasburg 5-8) at
Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 8-7),
7:08
Arizona (Kennedy 3-7) at Tampa
Bay (Ro.Hernandez 5-11),
7:10
Seattle (J.Saunders 9-9) at Boston (Workman 0-1), 7:10
L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 11-6) at
Texas (D.Holland 8-6), 8:05
Kansas City (E.Santana 6-6) at
Minnesota (Pelfrey 4-8), 8:10
Toronto (Buehrle 6-7) at Oakland (Straily 6-4), 10:05
N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 7-8) at
L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 8-3),
10:10
Wednesday Games
Washington at Detroit, 1:08
Toronto at Oakland, 3:35
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 7:05
Houston at Baltimore, 7:05
Arizona at Tampa Bay, 7:10
Seattle at Boston, 7:10
L.A. Angels at Texas, 8:05
Kansas City at Minnesota, 8:10
N.Y. Yankees at L.A. Dodgers,
10:10
Baseball Calendar
July 31 — Last day to trade a player without securing waivers.
Aug. 14-15 — Owners meeting, Cooperstown, N.Y.
Sept. 1 — Active rosters expand to 40 players.
Oct. 23 — World Series begins, city of American
League champion.
November TBA — Deadline for teams to make
qualifying offers to their eligible former players who
became free agents, fifth day after World Series.
November TBA — Deadline for free agents to accept
qualifying offers, 12th day after World Series.
Nov. 11-13 — General managers meeting, Orlando,
Fla.
Dec. 2 — Last day for teams to offer 2014 contracts
to unsigned players.
Dec. 2-5 — Major League Baseball Players Association executive board meeting, La Jolla, Calif.
Dec. 9-12 — Winter meetings, Lake Buena Vista,
Fla.
Dec. 9 — Hall of Fame expansion era committee (1973 and later) vote announced, Lake Buena
Vista, Fla.
..
timesfreepress.com ..
Breaking News: 423-757-News
Pct
.575
.491
.467
.456
.385
Pct
.602
.596
.557
.462
.419
Pct
.538
.514
.477
.453
.442
GB
—
9
111⁄2
121⁄2
20
GB
—
1
⁄2
41⁄2
141⁄2
19
GB
—
21⁄2
61⁄2
9
10
AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
WCGB
—
7
91⁄2
101⁄2
18
WCGB
—
—
—
10
141⁄2
WCGB
—
41⁄2
81⁄2
11
12
L10
6-4
4-6
2-8
5-5
5-5
L10
5-5
6-4
5-5
5-5
5-5
L10
9-1
4-6
5-5
6-4
3-7
Braves 9, Rockies 8 (10)
Colorado
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Fowler cf
5 2 1 0 1 2 .270
LeMahieu 2b
4 1 2 0 0 0 .274
C.Gonzalez lf
5 1 5 2 0 0 .306
Tulowitzki ss
4 1 0 0 1 1 .330
Cuddyer rf
4 1 1 2 1 1 .329
Helton 1b
4 0 1 1 0 1 .259
W.Rosario c
5 1 3 1 0 2 .277
Arenado 3b
4 1 2 1 0 0 .252
J.De La Rosa p
2 0 0 0 0 2 .056
a-Co.Dickerson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .256
Corpas p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Outman p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
W.Lopez p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
b-Blackmon ph
1 0 0 0 0 1 .233
Belisle p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
c-Culberson ph
1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Escalona p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals
40 8 15 7 3 10
Atlanta
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Heyward cf
5 1 2 1 0 2 .227
J.Upton rf
4 1 1 0 1 3 .249
F.Freeman 1b
5 1 1 0 0 3 .299
Gattis c
5 1 0 1 0 1 .252
C.Johnson 3b
5 2 2 2 0 2 .339
Uggla 2b
4 2 1 2 1 0 .202
Simmons ss
5 0 3 2 0 0 .249
Terdoslavich lf
3 1 2 1 1 0 .290
Avilan p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--Walden p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--S.Downs p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--Beachy p
1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
D.Carpenter p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Ayala p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--Constanza lf
1 0 0 0 0 0 .167
Totals
38 9 12 9 3 11
Colorado
113 200 001 0 — 8 15 1
Atlanta
006 020 000 1 — 9 12 0
No outs when winning run scored. a-grounded out
for J.De La Rosa in the 6th. b-struck out for W.Lopez
in the 9th. c-grounded out for Belisle in the 10th.
E—Arenado (7). LOB—Colorado 8, Atlanta 7. 2B—
Fowler (15), Arenado (17), C.Johnson (23), Uggla
(9), Simmons (13), Terdoslavich (3). 3B—Cuddyer
(2), Simmons (3). HR—W.Rosario (15), off Beachy;
Arenado (8), off Beachy. RBIs—C.Gonzalez 2 (69),
Cuddyer 2 (62), Helton (34), W.Rosario (52), Arenado (33), Heyward (25), Gattis (40), C.Johnson 2
(36), Uggla 2 (51), Simmons 2 (40), Terdoslavich
(2). SB—C.Gonzalez 2 (21). CS—C.Gonzalez (3).
S—LeMahieu, Arenado, Beachy, D.Carpenter. SF—
Helton. Runners left in scoring position—Colorado
6 (Fowler 2, Tulowitzki, Arenado, Helton 2); Atlanta 2
(Beachy, Heyward). RISP—Colorado 3 for 11; Atlanta
5 for 10. Runners moved up—Tulowitzki, Culberson,
Uggla, Simmons. GIDP—Arenado. DP—Atlanta 1
(Simmons, Uggla, F.Freeman).
Colorado
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
J.De La Rosa
5 10 8 5 2 3 84 3.21
Corpas
2 1 0 0 0 4 31 3.76
Outman
.2 0 0 0 0 1 12 4.42
W.Lopez
.1 0 0 0 0 1 7 4.93
Belisle
1 0 0 0 0 2 11 4.47
Escalona L, 1-4 0 1 1 1 1 0 12 4.61
Atlanta
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Beachy
3.2 8 7 7 1 5 84 17.18
D.Carpenter
2.1 1 0 0 0 3 30 1.89
Ayala H, 1
1 1 0 0 0 0 13 3.27
Avilan H, 17
1 2 0 0 0 0 10 1.26
Walden BS, 1-1 .2 2 1 1 2 1 22 2.57
S.Downs W, 1-0 1.1 1 0 0 0 1 13 0.00
Escalona pitched to 2 batters in the 10th. Inherited runners-scored—D.Carpenter 1-1, S.Downs 3-0.
IBB—off J.De La Rosa (Terdoslavich), off Walden
(Cuddyer). WP—Beachy, D.Carpenter. Umpires—
Home, Jordan Baker; First, Tim McClelland; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Marvin Hudson. T—3:46.
A—31,218 (49,586).
Indians 3, White Sox 2
Chicago
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
De Aza cf
4 0 0 0 0 1 .276
Al.Ramirez ss
4 0 1 0 0 0 .281
Rios rf
4 1 1 0 0 1 .272
A.Dunn 1b
4 1 1 1 0 2 .212
Konerko dh
4 0 1 1 0 0 .244
Gillaspie 3b
4 0 0 0 0 0 .249
Viciedo lf
4 0 2 0 0 0 .257
Beckham 2b
3 0 0 0 1 0 .302
Phegley c
3 0 0 0 0 0 .207
Totals
34 2 6 2 1 4
Cleveland
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Bourn cf
2 1 0 0 2 0 .288
Swisher 1b
3 0 0 0 1 0 .244
Kipnis 2b
4 0 2 0 0 2 .297
A.Cabrera ss
4 1 0 1 0 0 .249
Raburn lf-rf
4 0 1 0 0 1 .268
C.Santana c
3 0 0 1 0 0 .271
Mar.Reynolds dh
1 0 0 0 2 0 .214
b-Giambi ph
1 1 1 1 0 0 .194
Aviles 3b
2 0 0 0 0 0 .265
Stubbs rf
2 0 0 0 0 0 .239
a-Brantley ph-lf
1 0 0 0 0 1 .282
Totals
27 3 4 3 5 4
Chicago
000 002 000 — 2 6 1
Cleveland
010 001 001 — 3 4 2
No outs when winning run scored. a-struck out for
Stubbs in the 7th. E—Gillaspie (7), Aviles (6), Allen
(2). LOB—Chicago 6, Cleveland 7. 2B—Rios (22),
A.Dunn (10), Viciedo (15), Raburn (13). 3B—Viciedo
(3). HR—Giambi (7), off Troncoso. RBIs—A.Dunn
(63), Konerko (35), A.Cabrera (40), C.Santana (46),
Giambi (24). SB—Al.Ramirez 2 (23). S—Aviles. SF—
C.Santana. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago
4 (Konerko, Phegley, A.Dunn, Beckham); Cleveland
5 (Stubbs, C.Santana 3, Swisher). RISP—Chicago 2
for 10; Cleveland 1 for 10. Runners moved up—Rios,
Beckham, A.Cabrera 2. GIDP—De Aza. DP—Cleveland 1 (Swisher, A.Cabrera, Swisher).
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Joh.Danks
6 2 2 1 4 3 101 4.57
Lindstrom
.1 0 0 0 0 0 1 3.32
Veal
.2 1 0 0 1 1 19 6.59
Troncoso L, 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 0 17 5.59
Cleveland
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
McAllister
7 5 2 2 1 2 90 3.48
Allen
.2 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.47
R.Hill
.1 0 0 0 0 1 6 6.35
C.Perez W, 3-1
1 1 0 0 0 0 10 2.56
Joh.Danks pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Veal pitched
to 1 batter in the 8th. Troncoso pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Lindstrom
1-0, Veal 1-0, Troncoso 1-0, R.Hill 1-0. WP—Veal.
Umpires—Home, James Hoye; First, Bob Davidson; Second, D.J. Reyburn; Third, John Hirschbeck.
T—2:42. A—14,868 (42,241).
Rays 2, Red Sox 1
Tampa Bay
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
De.Jennings cf
4 0 0 0 1 1 .261
Longoria 3b
5 1 2 0 0 3 .278
Zobrist 2b
4 0 1 0 1 2 .268
W.Myers rf
3 0 1 1 1 0 .328
Scott dh
4 0 0 0 0 2 .259
Y.Escobar ss
3 1 2 0 0 0 .251
Loney 1b
4 0 0 0 0 0 .317
J.Molina c
2 0 1 0 2 1 .239
S.Rodriguez lf
2 0 1 1 0 0 .268
a-Joyce ph-lf
2 0 1 0 0 1 .241
Fuld lf
0 0 0 0 0 0 .200
Totals
33 2 9 2 5 10
Boston
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Ellsbury cf
4 0 1 0 0 0 .302
Victorino rf
4 0 0 0 0 0 .274
Pedroia 2b
4 0 0 0 0 1 .294
D.Ortiz dh
3 0 1 0 1 0 .329
2-Iglesias pr
0 0 0 0 0 0 .330
Napoli 1b
4 0 0 0 0 3 .261
J.Gomes lf
3 0 0 0 0 2 .236
Lavarnway c
3 0 1 0 0 1 .233
1-Nava pr
0 0 0 0 0 0 .284
Saltalamacchia c
0 0 0 0 0 0 .260
Drew ss
3 0 1 0 0 2 .230
B.Snyder 3b
3 1 1 1 0 0 .212
Totals
31 1 5 1 1 9
Tampa Bay
000 110 000 — 2 9 0
Boston
000 001 000 — 1 5 0
a-singled for S.Rodriguez in the 6th. 1-ran for Lavarnway in the 8th. 2-ran for D.Ortiz in the 9th. LOB—Tampa
Bay 10, Boston 4. 2B—Longoria (24), S.Rodriguez (8),
D.Ortiz (25), Lavarnway (5), Drew (15). HR—B.Snyder
(2), off Price. RBIs—W.Myers (27), S.Rodriguez (17),
B.Snyder (7). SB—W.Myers (5), Ellsbury (39). Runners
left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 6 (Scott, W.Myers,
De.Jennings 2, Loney, Zobrist); Boston 3 (Lavarnway,
Napoli 2). RISP—Tampa Bay 2 for 10; Boston 1
for 7. Runners moved up—Scott. GIDP—W.Myers,
Y.Escobar, Loney. DP—Tampa Bay 1 (Fuld, Fuld,
J.Molina); Boston 3 (Drew, Napoli), (B.Snyder, Pedroia,
Napoli), (B.Snyder, Pedroia, Napoli).
Tampa Bay
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Price W, 6-5
7.1 2 1 1 0 8 90 3.57
Jo.Peralta H, 27 .2 2 0 0 0 0 9 2.96
Rodney S, 26-31 1 1 0 0 1 1 23 3.92
Boston
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Doubront L, 7-5 5 8 2 2 3 4 104 3.77
De La Torre
1 1 0 0 2 3 32 6.35
D.Britton
2 0 0 0 0 2 21 0.00
Uehara
1 0 0 0 0 1 7 1.52
De La Torre pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—D.Britton 1-0. IBB—off Rodney
(D.Ortiz). HBP—by Doubront (Y.Escobar). WP—Rodney. Umpires—Home, Jerry Meals; First, Chris Conroy; Second, Gary Darling; Third, David Rackley.
T—3:21 (Rain delay: 0:39). A—37,242 (37,499).
Streak
W-4
W-3
L-8
W-1
L-1
Streak
L-4
W-1
L-3
L-1
W-1
Streak
W-3
L-2
L-1
W-2
L-4
Home
35-15
31-25
26-21
21-30
23-29
Home
32-17
33-18
32-17
22-27
26-29
Home
30-24
30-24
31-26
27-23
28-27
Away
26-30
21-29
23-35
26-26
17-35
Away
30-24
29-24
27-30
26-29
18-32
Away
26-24
24-27
20-30
21-35
18-31
EAST
Tampa Bay
Boston
Baltimore
New York
Toronto
CENTRAL
Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago
WEST
Oakland
Texas
Seattle
Los Angeles
Houston
W
63
63
58
55
48
W
59
57
51
45
40
W
62
57
50
48
35
L
43
44
48
50
56
L
45
48
51
57
63
L
43
49
55
56
69
Pct
.594
.589
.547
.524
.462
Pct
.567
.543
.500
.441
.388
Pct
.590
.538
.476
.462
.337
GB
—
1
⁄2
5
71⁄2
14
GB
—
21⁄2
7
13
181⁄2
GB
—
51⁄2
12
131⁄2
261⁄2
WCGB
—
—
—
21⁄2
9
WCGB
—
1
⁄2
5
11
161⁄2
WCGB
—
1
71⁄2
9
22
L10
8-2
5-5
5-5
4-6
3-7
L10
7-3
6-4
8-2
6-4
3-7
L10
6-4
3-7
7-3
3-7
2-8
Streak
W-1
L-1
L-2
W-1
W-1
Streak
W-3
W-5
W-6
L-1
L-4
Streak
W-3
W-1
W-1
L-4
L-1
Home
34-19
34-20
30-22
29-25
28-28
Home
32-19
34-19
27-24
23-24
22-28
Home
33-16
30-24
29-28
27-28
18-37
Away
29-24
29-24
28-26
26-25
20-28
Away
27-26
23-29
24-27
22-33
18-35
Away
29-27
27-25
21-27
21-28
17-32
Braves win in 10 for new reliever
By George Henry
The Associated Press
ATLANTA — Andrelton Simmons
drove in Dan Uggla from first base
with a triple off Edgmer Escalona in
the 10th inning, and the Atlanta Braves
won their fourth straight game with a
9-8 victory over the Colorado Rockies
on Monday night.
After Uggla led off with a walk, Simmons hit the ball too deep into the gap
in left-center field for Carlos Gonzalez and Dexter Fowler to keep it from
reaching the wall.
Scott Downs (1-0) earned the win
after being acquired in a trade with the
Los Angeles Angels earlier in the day
and arriving at Turner Field not long
before the first pitch. The left-hander
allowed one hit and struck out one in
1
1 ⁄3 innings.
Escalona (1-4) allowed one hit, one
run and one walk in 12 pitches.
Downs escaped a bases-loaded jam
in the ninth by making just one pitch,
a liner he caught on the mound from
Todd Helton.
Gonzalez went 5-for-5 with two RBIs
for the Rockies after missing the last
three games with a sprained middle
right finger. He drove in the tying run
in the ninth off Jordan Walden.
Atlanta’s offense bailed out starting
pitcher Brandon Beachy, who made his
first start in 13 months after undergoing
elbow-ligament replacement surgery.
Chris Johnson, who leads the
National League with a .339 batting
average, and Uggla each had two RBIs
to help the Braves erase a 5-0 hole with
six runs in the third inning, then rally
from a two-run deficit in the fifth to
make it 8-7.
Beachy gave up eight hits, seven
runs and one walk with five strikeouts
2
in 3 ⁄3 innings. He made 84 pitches, 58
for strikes.
The Associated Press
Atlanta pitcher Brandon Beachy faces a Colorado Rockies batter in the
first inning of the Braves’ 9-8 win Monday. Beachy was making his first
start of the season after having elbow surgery.
With Braves closer Craig Kimbrel
unavailable after earning saves in all
three games against St. Louis over the
weekend, Walden gave up two hits,
walked two in two-thirds of an inning
and left with the bases loaded.
Rockies starter Jorge De La Rosa
gave up 10 hits and eight runs — five
earned — with two walks and three
strikeouts in five innings.
The Braves scored six runs in
the bottom of the third to take a 6-5
lead, due in part to a fielding error
by third baseman Nolan Arenado that
ruined a chance for an inning-ending
double play.
After Jason Heyward’s one-out RBI
single made it 5-1, Arenado let Evan Gattis’ bases-loaded grounder bounce off
the heel of his glove, allowing Heyward
to score and keep the bases loaded.
Johnson followed with a tworun double before Uggla had an RBI
groundout and Simmons’ RBI double
gave the Braves a 6-5 lead.
The Rockies scored twice in the
fourth to go ahead 7-6 when Arenado hit
his eighth homer. D.J. LeMahieu’s single
chased Beachy, and Gonzalez scored on
David Carpenter’s wild pitch.
Brewers 5, Cubs 0
Mets 6, Marlins 5
Pirates 9, Cardinals 2
This Date In Baseball
Milwaukee
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Weeks 2b
4 0 1 2 1 0 .214
Aoki rf
5 0 0 0 0 2 .291
Segura ss
3 1 0 0 1 2 .313
Lucroy c
3 1 1 0 0 1 .287
C.Gomez cf
4 1 1 1 0 1 .305
Gindl lf
3 1 2 0 0 0 .313
J.Francisco 1b
3 0 0 0 1 3 .232
Wooten p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Bianchi 3b
4 1 1 2 0 0 .248
Lohse p
2 0 1 0 0 0 .171
Mic.Gonzalez p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--a-L.Schafer ph
0 0 0 0 0 0 .229
b-K.Davis ph
1 0 0 0 0 0 .238
Kintzler p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--c-Y.Betancourt ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .207
Totals
33 5 7 5 3 10
Chicago
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
DeJesus cf
4 0 1 0 0 1 .260
Lake lf
4 0 2 0 0 1 .362
Rizzo 1b
3 0 2 0 1 1 .238
Schierholtz rf
4 0 0 0 0 3 .274
St.Castro ss
4 0 0 0 0 0 .248
Valbuena 3b
4 0 1 0 0 0 .228
Barney 2b
2 0 0 0 2 0 .212
Castillo c
3 0 0 0 1 0 .264
Samardzija p
3 0 0 0 0 2 .105
Russell p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--Guerrier p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Strop p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--B.Parker p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--d-Borbon ph
1 0 0 0 0 0 .206
Totals
32 0 6 0 4 8
Milwaukee
000 000 005 — 5 7 1
Chicago
000 000 000 — 0 6 1
a-was announced for Mic.Gonzalez in the 8th. bflied out for L.Schafer in the 8th. c-struck out for
Kintzler in the 9th. d-lined out for B.Parker in the 9th.
E—J.Francisco (13), Barney (4). LOB—Milwaukee 6,
Chicago 9. 2B—Weeks (17), Gindl (6), Bianchi (5),
DeJesus (17). RBIs—Weeks 2 (24), C.Gomez (52),
Bianchi 2 (11). CS—Lake (3). S—Gindl. Runners left
in scoring position—Milwaukee 4 (Segura 2, Bianchi,
Aoki); Chicago 4 (St.Castro, Schierholtz, Samardzija
2). RISP—Milwaukee 3 for 9; Chicago 1 for 8. Runners moved up—Aoki. GIDP—Segura, C.Gomez,
Castillo. DP—Milwaukee 2 (Lucroy, Lucroy, Segura),
(Weeks, Segura, Y.Betancourt); Chicago 2 (St.Castro,
Barney, Rizzo), (Valbuena, Barney, Rizzo).
Milwaukee
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Lohse
6 5 0 0 3 6 106 3.22
Mic.Gonzalez
1 1 0 0 0 1 9 3.86
Kintzler W, 3-0
1 0 0 0 0 1 14 2.87
Wooten
1 0 0 0 1 0 14 0.00
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Samardzija
7 3 0 0 2 7 109 3.75
Russell
.1 0 0 0 0 0 3 2.65
Guerrier
.2 0 0 0 0 0 9 4.14
Strop L, 1-1
.1 3 5 5 1 1 21 4.09
B.Parker
.2 1 0 0 0 2 15 2.82
Inherited runners-scored—B.Parker 2-2. HBP—by
Samardzija (Lucroy). Umpires—Home, Jeff Nelson;
First, Jim Reynolds; Second, Jim Wolf; Third, Mike
Estabrook. T—3:05. A—32,848 (41,019).
New York
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
E.Young lf
5 1 2 0 0 0 .260
Dan.Murphy 2b
4 2 2 3 1 0 .285
D.Wright 3b
5 0 2 1 0 0 .307
Byrd rf
5 1 1 1 0 0 .280
I.Davis 1b
3 0 1 1 1 0 .178
Lagares cf
4 0 0 0 0 0 .263
Recker c
4 1 1 0 0 2 .172
Quintanilla ss
3 1 1 0 1 0 .231
Hefner p
2 0 0 0 0 2 .000
Aardsma p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--a-Satin ph
1 0 0 0 0 0 .310
Edgin p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--b-A.Brown ph
1 0 0 0 0 1 .226
Hawkins p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--Parnell p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--Totals
37 6 10 6 3 5
Miami
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Hechavarria ss
5 0 0 0 0 1 .240
Yelich lf
4 0 0 0 1 2 .241
Stanton rf
3 1 1 0 2 0 .262
Morrison 1b
4 0 0 0 0 1 .265
Lucas 3b
3 2 1 1 1 1 .265
D.Solano 2b
3 1 0 0 0 0 .263
Marisnick cf
3 1 2 0 1 0 .160
Mathis c
3 0 1 2 1 1 .217
Ja.Turner p
3 0 0 0 0 1 .125
M.Dunn p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--A.Ramos p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--Webb p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--c-Dobbs ph
1 0 1 0 0 0 .227
1-Pierre pr
0 0 0 0 0 0 .242
Totals
32 5 6 3 6 7
New York
003 000 300 — 6 10 1
Miami
000 302 000 — 5 6 0
a-grounded out for Aardsma in the 7th. b-struck
out for Edgin in the 8th. c-singled for Webb in the
9th. 1-ran for Dobbs in the 9th. E—Quintanilla (6).
LOB—New York 7, Miami 7. 2B—E.Young (18),
D.Wright (22), I.Davis (6), Stanton (16). 3B—Lucas
(1). RBIs—Dan.Murphy 3 (52), D.Wright (52),
Byrd (60), I.Davis (24), Lucas (12), Mathis 2 (20).
SB—Dan.Murphy (12), Hechavarria (8), Pierre (19).
CS—Marisnick (1). Runners left in scoring position—New York 4 (Byrd, Hefner, I.Davis, Lagares);
Miami 3 (Yelich, Hechavarria, Stanton). RISP—New
York 3 for 11; Miami 2 for 9. Runners moved
up—E.Young, Ja.Turner.
New York
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Hefner
5.1 4 5 3 5 4 111 4.21
Aardsma W, 2-0 .2 0 0 0 0 0 7 3.18
Edgin H, 3
1 0 0 0 0 1 19 3.77
Hawkins H, 11
1 1 0 0 0 0 13 3.15
Parnell S, 21-25 1 1 0 0 1 2 21 2.20
Miami
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Ja.Turner
6.1 5 3 3 3 4 94 2.65
M.Dunn
0 2 2 2 0 0 11 3.02
A.Ramos L, 3-4 1.2 2 1 1 0 1 27 3.25
Webb
1 1 0 0 0 0 16 3.21
M.Dunn pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Aardsma 1-0, A.Ramos 11. HBP—by Hefner (D.Solano). WP—A.Ramos.
Umpires—Home, Andy Fletcher; First, Joe West;
Second, Adam Hamari; Third, Rob Drake. T—3:26.
A—19,343 (37,442).
St. Louis
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
M.Carpenter 2b
4 0 1 1 0 1 .317
Beltran rf
4 0 1 0 0 1 .297
Jay cf
0 0 0 0 0 0 .250
Holliday lf
4 1 2 0 0 0 .268
Craig 1b
4 0 0 0 0 3 .322
Y.Molina c
3 0 0 0 0 2 .331
Ro.Johnson c
1 0 1 0 0 0 .500
Freese 3b
2 0 0 0 1 0 .267
S.Robinson cf-rf
3 0 1 1 1 0 .263
Kozma ss
3 0 0 0 0 1 .241
Salas p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
c-Ma.Adams ph
1 0 0 0 0 1 .297
Westbrook p
1 0 0 0 0 0 .200
a-T.Cruz ph
1 1 1 0 0 0 .220
Rzepczynski p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Descalso ss
2 0 0 0 0 1 .263
Totals
33 2 7 2 2 10
Pittsburgh
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Tabata rf
3 1 0 0 2 1 .253
Watson p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Black p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--Walker 2b
2 2 1 0 1 0 .245
McCutchen cf
5 2 2 1 0 0 .302
P.Alvarez 3b
4 1 1 3 1 2 .244
R.Martin c
2 1 0 0 1 1 .251
G.Jones 1b
3 0 1 0 0 0 .256
G.Sanchez 1b
0 0 0 1 0 0 .233
Presley lf-rf
4 1 1 1 0 0 .289
Barmes ss
4 1 2 2 0 0 .224
Liriano p
3 0 0 0 0 0 .097
b-S.Marte ph-lf
1 0 1 1 0 0 .277
Totals
31 9 9 9 5 4
St. Louis
000 001 001 — 2 7 0
Pittsburgh
400 000 50x — 9 9 0
a-tripled for Westbrook in the 6th. b-singled for
Liriano in the 7th. c-struck out for Salas in the 9th.
LOB—St. Louis 7, Pittsburgh 7. 2B—G.Jones (22),
Barmes 2 (11). 3B—T.Cruz (1). HR—P.Alvarez
(27), off Westbrook. RBIs—M.Carpenter (51),
S.Robinson (12), McCutchen (56), P.Alvarez 3
(68), G.Sanchez (27), Presley (3), Barmes 2 (13),
S.Marte (30). SF—G.Sanchez. Runners left in
scoring position—St. Louis 4 (Y.Molina, Kozma,
Descalso 2); Pittsburgh 4 (Barmes, R.Martin 2,
Presley). RISP—St. Louis 3 for 8; Pittsburgh 5
for 13. Runners moved up—Craig, P.Alvarez,
G.Jones. GIDP—Holliday. DP—St. Louis 1
(M.Carpenter); Pittsburgh 1 (P.Alvarez, Walker,
G.Jones).
St. Louis
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Westbrook L, 7-5 5 4 4 4 3 2 100 3.18
Rzepczynski
1.1 2 2 2 1 0 20 7.84
Salas
1.2 3 3 3 1 2 35 4.79
Pittsburgh
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Liriano W, 11-4
7 4 1 1 2 8 102 2.16
Watson
1 0 0 0 0 1 13 3.12
Black
1 3 1 1 0 1 29 6.75
Inherited runners-scored—Salas 2-2. IBB—off
Salas (R.Martin). HBP—by Westbrook (Walker,
Walker, R.Martin), by Black (Freese). Umpires—
Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, Eric Cooper; Second,
Paul Schrieber; Third, Chad Fairchild. T—2:51.
A—32,084 (38,362).
July 30
1870 — Monmouth Park, in Long Branch, N.J.,
opened with a five-day race meet.
1917 — Ty Cobb, Bobby Veach and Ossie Vitt each
went 5-for-5 in Detroit’s 16-4 win over Washington.
1933 — Dizzy Dean struck out 17 Cubs as the St.
Louis Cardinals beat Chicago 8-2.
1947 — The New York Giants beat Ewell Blackwell
and the Cincinnati Reds 5-4 in 10 innings, ending
Blackwell’s 16-game winning streak.
1959 — Willie McCovey had four hits in four at-bats
in his major league debut, with the San Francisco
Giants. His hits included two triples in a 7-2 win over
the Philadelphia Phillies.
1968 — Washington shortstop Ron Hansen pulled off
an unassisted triple play, but the Cleveland Indians
still won the game 10-1.
1973 — Jim Bibby of the Texas Rangers pitched a 6-0
no-hitter against the Oakland A’s.
1980 — Houston Astros pitcher J.R. Richard had
a stroke during a workout at the Astrodome and
had surgery to remove a blood clot behind his right
collarbone.
1982 — The Atlanta Braves returned Chief Noc-AHoma and his teepee to left field after losing 19 of 21
games and blowing a 10 1/2-game lead. The teepee
was removed for more seats. The team recovered to
regain first place.
1990 — George Steinbrenner was forced to resign as
general partner of the New York Yankees by baseball
Commissioner Fay Vincent.
2005 — Jonny Gomes had the first three-homer
game in Tampa Bay franchise history in a 7-3 victory
over Kansas City.
2006 — New York Mets center fielder Carlos Beltran
tied a major league record with his third grand slam
this month in a 9-6 victory over Atlanta. Beltran
became the ninth player in major league history to hit
three grand slams in a calendar month.
2008 — Kelly Shoppach of Cleveland tied a major
league record with five extra-base hits, including a
game-tying homer in the ninth, but Detroit beat the
Indians 14-12 in 13 innings. Shoppach had two homers and three doubles.
2010 — Carlos Gonzalez, Ian Stewart and Dexter
Fowler homered and Colorado used a record-setting
12-run eighth inning to a 17-2 rout of the Chicago
Cubs. Gonzalez had four hits, two in the eighth when
the Rockies set a major league record with 11 straight
hits in the inning. The Rockies had 13 hits in the
inning, a franchise record. The Rockies batted around
twice in the inning against relievers Sean Marshall,
Andrew Cashman and Brian Schlitter.
2011 — The New York Yankees broke loose for 12
runs in the first inning of the nightcap of a day-night
doubleheader, setting a franchise record en route to
a 17-3 rout of Baltimore.
2012 — Kendrys Morales homered from both sides
of the plate during a nine-run sixth inning, capping the burst with a grand slam that sent the Los
Angeles Angels romping past the Texas Rangers
15-8. Morales became the third switch-hitter in major
league history to homer as a lefty and righty in the
same inning. Carlos Baerga did it for Cleveland in
1993 and Mark Bellhorn of the Chicago Cubs duplicated the feat in 2002.
Greeson
rules, since baseball did not
completely ban PEDs until
the early 2000s. But baseball as a sport has embraced
cheating from its origins.
Spitballs are cheating. Corking bats and emery boards
and various other facets of
baseball are based in deception. Stealing signs could be
considered immoral.
And sure, PEDs are worse.
But how can anyone look
at the group of players and
— without knowing for sure
unless the player failed a test
or admitted to using banned
substances — use different
scales and criteria in regard
to steroids?
Do we know Jose Canseco
and Mark McGwire used?
Yep, because they admitted
it. We have our suspicions
about the rest, but in truth
they are just suspicions.
Sure, Sammy Sosa and
Barry Bonds and Clemens
posted huge numbers very
late in their careers, raising
the spectrum of PED use.
Know who else was throwing in the mid-90s in his 40s?
Yep, Nolan Ryan, the pitcher
to whom Clemens was most
frequently compared during
his heyday.
Now to fold a guy like Biggio with 3,000 hits or Piazza,
who is the best offensive catcher ever, under that umbrella
just because of the era in which
they played is wrong.
Will they do that next
year when former Braves
pitchers Tom Glavine and
Greg Maddux are on the ballot? If you’re going to judge
universally, do it. To pick and
choose when and on whom
to apply a checkered morality is flawed and wrong.
Just like the steroid era.
Contact Jay Greeson at
[email protected]
com
Rangers 4, Angels 3
Los Angeles
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Aybar ss
4 1 0 0 1 1 .280
Calhoun rf
5 0 1 0 0 2 .286
Trout cf
2 1 2 0 2 0 .324
Hamilton lf
4 0 2 2 0 0 .223
Trumbo 1b
4 0 0 0 0 3 .249
H.Kendrick 2b
4 0 1 0 0 1 .298
Callaspo 3b
3 0 0 0 1 1 .253
Conger c
4 0 0 0 0 2 .234
Shuck dh
4 1 1 1 0 0 .283
Totals
34 3 7 3 4 10
Texas
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
L.Martin cf
4 1 1 0 0 1 .277
Andrus ss
4 1 1 0 0 0 .250
Kinsler 2b
3 0 1 2 0 0 .277
A.Beltre 3b
4 0 2 0 0 0 .309
Pierzynski dh
4 1 1 1 0 1 .275
N.Cruz rf
3 0 1 0 1 2 .268
Dav.Murphy lf
4 0 0 0 0 1 .222
G.Soto c
4 1 2 1 0 1 .210
Moreland 1b
3 0 0 0 0 0 .239
Totals
33 4 9 4 1 6
Los Angeles
000 030 000 — 3 7 1
Texas
000 001 012 — 4 9 0
Two outs when winning run scored. E—Conger
(6). LOB—Los Angeles 8, Texas 5. 2B—Trout (30),
G.Soto (5). HR—Shuck (1), off Garza; Pierzynski
(11), off Frieri; G.Soto (5), off Frieri. RBIs—Hamilton
2 (45), Shuck (21), Kinsler 2 (44), Pierzynski (37),
G.Soto (11). SB—Andrus (23). SF—Kinsler. Runners
left in scoring position—Los Angeles 4 (Conger 3,
Hamilton); Texas 3 (G.Soto, Pierzynski, Moreland).
RISP—Los Angeles 1 for 6; Texas 1 for 5. Runners
moved up—Callaspo, Andrus. GIDP—Dav.Murphy.
DP—Los Angeles 1 (H.Kendrick, Aybar, Trumbo).
Los Angeles
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Weaver
7 5 1 1 1 6 104 2.84
D.De La Rosa H, 10 1 1 1 0 0 0 17 3.44
Frieri L, 0-3
.2 3 2 2 0 0 16 4.06
Texas
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Garza
7 5 3 3 3 6 107 1.88
Cotts
1 2 0 0 1 2 29 0.83
Frasor W, 1-2
1 0 0 0 0 2 14 3.16
WP—Garza. Umpires—Home, Alan Porter; First,
Greg Gibson; Second, Jerry Layne; Third, Hunter
Wendelstedt. T—3:04. A—36,282 (48,114).
• Continued from Page D1
era. Players from other controversial eras of baseball —
the all-white era, the “gambling” era, the spitball era,
dead-ball era, the uppers era
— have been ushered into
the Hall with little fanfare
and a minuscule amount
of the hand-wringing and
“guardian of the game” that
has become the mantra of
arguably half of the Hall of
Fame voters.
Why is this era all that
different? Because the voters are “outraged” that this
has tainted the game and
skewed the numbers? Every
sketchy time in baseball was
the exact same.
Was it cheating? Yes, in
the latter stages of the steroid era it was against the
...
. timesfreepress.com
• • • Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • D5
Breaking News: [email protected]
McQueary: Paterno
said officials failed
By Marc Levy
The Associated Press
The Associated Press
Missouri quarterback James Franklin was hampered by shoulder and knee injuries last season
after totaling 3,846 yards as a sophomore.
Missouri seeks health
By David Paschall
Staff Writer
So just how injury-riddled was
Missouri’s offense during its debut
football season in the Southeastern Conference?
A healthy offensive line in a
12-game season combines for 60
starts, but the Tigers last year had
23 total starts for the guys who
had earned particular line jobs in
the preseason. Only one offensive
lineman started all 12 games, and
that was true freshman guard Evan
Boehm, who was penciled in as a
backup this time last year.
Quarterback James Franklin
was able to start eight of 12 games,
and he was unable to finish two of
those eight.
“I’m not going to use it as an
excuse, but there were definitely
times when it affected us more
mentally than physically,” Franklin
said at SEC media days. “We let
it affect us more mentally, and it
kept us from doing what we wanted to do. I’m not saying we were
going to win a championship or
anything, but we definitely would
have been better than 5-7.”
Missouri entered its new surroundings on a record seven-year
tear in bowl appearances, and
Franklin was a chief reason the
Tigers were considered potential
challengers to Georgia and South
Carolina in the SEC East race.
The 6-foot-2, 230-pounder from
Corinth, Texas, had a dazzling
sophomore season in 2011, throwing for 2,865 yards and rushing for
981 in totaling 36 touchdowns.
Missing time after a shoulder
injury against Georgia and a knee
injury against Vanderbilt last sea-
SEC SERIES
■ Coming Wednesday:
South Carolina
MISSOURI
■ Camp start: Thursday
■ Opener: Murray State in
Columbia (pay-per-view)
■ Fun fact: Missouri went
from 12th nationally in total
offense (475.5) in 2011 to
96th last season (356.4).
son, Franklin compiled just 1,684
yards and did not have a rushing
touchdown. He had 15 as a sophomore.
“My sophomore year I ran the
ball around 200 times,” Franklin
said, “and last year I didn’t get
anywhere close to 100. It was
definitely different, because I had
never gone through something
like that before. I didn’t like it too
much.”
Nor did Tigers coach Gary
Pinkel, who had strung together
six consecutive eight-win seasons
before getting worn down by his
walking wounded.
“Last year was different from
any other time since I’ve been
in coaching,” Pinkel said. “I had
never lost a starting quarterback
for a game or two at all, which was
very unusual for us, and our last
three quarterbacks [Brad Smith,
Chase Daniel and Blaine Gabbert]
are playing in the NFL. James had
more injuries than I think any I’ve
ever had combined.
“He pretty much played about
half the season.”
Missouri has eight offensive
starters back this season, a total
that does not include tailback
Henry Josey, who missed last season after a gruesome knee injury
in November 2011. Josey rushed
for 1,168 yards in 10 games two
years ago.
Also not included is receiver
Dorial Green-Beckham, the top
prospect nationally in the 2012
signing class who came on at the
end of last season. With Franklin,
the tailback tandem of Josey and
Marcus Murphy, and the receiving
trio of Green-Beckham, Marcus
Lucas and L’Damian Washington,
Pinkel believes he may have the
best offensive skill combination
since 2007 or ’08.
“We’re ready to win some
games,” Franklin said. “This has
been the longest offseason that
any of us have had since we’ve
been here, because we didn’t play
in a bowl game.”
Franklin’s teammates are ready
to see the same player who dazzled as a sophomore stay healthy.
“James is a big believer in faith
and that everything happens for a
reason,” Washington said. “I think
he has a big chip on his shoulder
this year — not to go out and
prove other people wrong, but just
to go out and show that, ‘Hey, I’m
the quarterback of this team.’ I’m
looking forward to it.
“I’m a James Franklin fan. I’m
happy that he’s back there under
center again and that he’s 100 percent healthy.”
Contact David Paschall at [email protected] or 423757-6524.
FCS champ big league favorite
By Luke Meredith
The Associated Press
The Missouri Valley Football
conference has long been one of
the deepest and most competitive
leagues in the NCAA championship subdivision.
Rarely has a team been as big
of a preseason favorite as North
Dakota State.
The two-time defending national champion was a unanimous
pick to win the league in a poll
released Monday. North Dakota
State, which returns 18 starters
from a team that went 14-1 and
trounced Sam Houston State in
the title game, got all 39 first-place
votes from a collection of league
coaches and media.
South Dakota State was second,
followed by Northern Iowa and
Illinois State.
“Certainly windows of opportunity [like this] don’t come along
very often,” North Dakota State
coach Craig Bohl said. “Our guys
do recognize the great opportunity that we do have, that’s out
there. But to do that, we can’t get
the cart before the horse.”
The Bison aren’t just an overwhelming bet to win the Valley
again. They appear deep enough
to make a serious run at a third
consecutive national title.
North Dakota State had a
league-high 10 selections on the
preseason All-Valley team, including senior quarterback Brock Jensen. He threw for 17 touchdowns
and ran for 12 last season.
“The really good football teams
that we’ve been associated with
here and that I’ve been personally associated with ... those
seniors had their best year,” Bohl
said. “Certainly our experience
has been helpful. But experience
without productivity won’t get
you very far.”
The Associated Press
North Dakota State defensive
end Coulter Boyer celebrates
with teammates after they beat
Sam Houston State 17-6 in the
2012 FCS championship game.
The two-time defending national champions were a unanimous pick to win their league in
a poll released Monday.
Youngstown State was picked
fifth, 16 points behind the Panthers and 11 behind the Redbirds.
Indiana State, Southern Illinois,
Missouri State, Western Illinois
and South Dakota rounded out the
preseason poll.
With preseason practice beginning soon, South Dakota State
appears to be the program best
poised to make a run at the Bison.
The Jackrabbits finished a
game behind North Dakota State
in the Valley in 2012, losing 20-17
in Fargo last November in perhaps
the best league game of the year.
South Dakota State was trounced
by the Bison 28-3 in a rematch in
the FCS playoffs, but the Jackrabbits have 15 starters back, including star back Zach Zenner, and
they host the Bison in the league
opener on Sept. 28.
“You can’t make your season
one game. Obviously it’s huge for
our goals ... but I’ve been at programs where they focus on one
game and they celebrate when
they win that game,” South Dakota
State coach John Stiegelmeier said.
“You’ve got to able to come back
and come back every week and
every day and every play.
“I’ve got a lot of respect for Craig
Bohl and his team. But we play in a
tough league, and we’re all going to
have to battle. But there’s no doubt
they’re the star right now.”
The preseason poll shows that
the league views Northern Iowa’s
rough 2012 as an aberration.
The Panthers spent a Valleyrecord 99 weeks in the FCS Top
25 before falling out last October
on the way to a 5-6 record, the
program’s first losing season since
2002. But they had six players
named to the All-Valley preseason
team, second only to North Dakota
State, and sophomore quarterback
Sawyer Kollmorgen has the potential to emerge as one of the best
players in the nation.
Kollmorgen threw for 2,460 yards
and 21 touchdowns as a freshman,
and he nearly beat Wisconsin in his
debut with three TD passes.
“We have to really define
ourselves and what’s important
to UNI and get those players on
the football field,” Northern Iowa
coach Mark Farley said. “No matter what, you’re going to have to
win a lot of close football games
if you’re going to end up on top
in the end.”
HARRISBURG, Pa. — Longtime Penn State head coach Joe
Paterno said the university mishandled its response to the Jerry
Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal, former assistant coach Mike
McQueary testified Monday during
a hearing for three top school officials accused of a cover-up.
McQueary appeared in a courtroom for the third
time since Sandusky’s November 2011 arrest and
told the court that
top school officials
knew he had seen
Sandusky molesting
a boy in a lockerroom shower.
B u t t h e f o r - Mike
mer PSU assistant McQueary
coach and quarterback also delivered some unexpected testimony:
that the late Hall of Fame coach had
told him over the years that “Old
Main screwed up” — referring to
university administrators — in the
response to McQueary’s allegation
against Sandusky.
Pressed by defense lawyers
on his discussions of the subject,
McQueary brought up a specific
exchange at football practice in
the hours before Paterno’s firing
on Nov. 9, 2011 — four days after
Sandusky’s arrest.
He recalled the head coach saying the school would come down
hard on McQueary and try to make
him a scapegoat. Paterno also
advised McQueary not to trust the
administration or then-university
counsel Cynthia Baldwin, the former assistant testified.
Fo r m e r P e n n
St a t e p re s i d e n t
Graham Spanier,
retired university
vice president Gary
Schultz and ex-athletic director Tim
Curley are accused
of failing to tell
police about a sexGraham
ual-abuse allegation
Spanier
involving Sandusky
and then trying to cover up what
they knew. The men say they are
innocent.
Paterno died in January 2012. He
never has been charged, though former FBI Director Louis Freeh said in
a university-sanctioned report that
Paterno conspired with the three
school officials to conceal accusations against Sandusky.
Paterno’s family has denied vehemently those allegations. The for-
mer coach was “respectful of the
process ... and wanted to know the
truth from the beginning,” and the
latest testimony raised more questions about the credibility of Freeh’s
report, Paterno family spokesman
Dan McGinn said.
“Joe Paterno believed the issue
would be and should be handled
properly,” McGinn said. “That’s been
true since the beginning here.”
The judge must determine whether there’s enough evidence against
the ex-officials to send the case to
trial. They face charges including
perjury, conspiracy and endangering the welfare of children.
The core of McQueary’s testimony is that he saw Sandusky and
a boy engaged in a sex act in the
locker-room shower in 2001 and
within days reported it to Paterno,
Curley and Schultz.
Curley and Schultz “definitely
knew it was a sexual act, a molestation act between Jerry Sandusky and
a boy in the showers,” McQueary
testified.
Curley and Schultz have said
McQueary never
reported that the
encounter was sexual in nature, while
Spanier has said
Curley and Schultz never told him
about any sort of
sex abuse. They said
they believed that
Sandusky and the Gary
boy were engaged Schultz
in nothing more than horseplay.
Sandusky is serving a 30- to 60year prison sentence after being
convicted last year of sexually
abusing 10 boys. He maintains his
innocence.
The hearing adjourned after
about five hours of testimony and
is scheduled to resume this morning
in a Harrisburg courtroom with testimony from two more witnesses.
Much of the testimony Monday
revolved around prosecutors trying
to show that PSU officials should
have known to report Sandusky
to police in 2001 after complaints
in 1998 that he had been showering with boys in university locker
rooms.
Lawyers for the defendants tried
to show they never tried to hide
evidence, never destroyed evidence
and never asked school employees
to hide evidence.
McQueary last year sued the
university, claiming defamation
and misrepresentation and seeking millions of dollars in damages.
His contract with the school wasn’t
Mocs
• Continued from Page D1
spread experience in Jeff Durden, who
spent the previous nine seasons at James
Madison.
When asked about what grade they
expect the offense to get this season,
Revis and Huesman had the same answer
— an “A.”
“We’re expecting the best out of
everybody on the offense,” Jacob Huesman said.
Fifth-year head coach Russ Huesman
has said often since last season that he
wants the offense to be more than the
Terrell Robinson and Jacob Huesman
show. In 2012, the coach’s son led the
team with 904 rushing yards on 195 carries and threw for 1,712 yards, completing 65.2 percent of his passes. He also
caught eight passes.
Robinson began the season as the
starting quarterback but mostly playedreceiver in the final nine games. He
ended with a team-high 40 catches and
was 30-for-44 passing for 296 yards, and
his 222 rushing yards were third on the
team.
Robinson spent the summer trying to
become a complete receiver.
“I want to be more of an all-around
threat and a deep threat,” he said last
month.
If the UTC defense, with five preseason f irst-team All-SoCon players, plays to its potential, the offense
shouldn’t have to light up the scoreboard
every game. The Mocs were second in
the SoCon in scoring defense (20.4 ppg)
and total defense (308.4 ypg) last season and return everyone but defensive
end Josh Williams and linebacker Shane
Heatherly.
The Mocs were second in the SoCon
last season in time of possession, holding
the ball for 32 minutes, 24 seconds per
game. In the spring the offense worked
on playing much faster. The benefit of
having a good defense, Durden said, is
that you don’t have to play at breakneck
speed if you don’t want to.
Durden was able to install his system
in the spring and said he actually took
a few things out as he tried to fine-tune
the offense to suit the personnel.
“We know where everybody fits in the
puzzle now, I think,” he said. “Now let’s
make sure we’re attacking the defenses
the right way.”
Contact John Frierson at [email protected]
timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6268. Follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/MocsBeat.
ROAD
REPORT
SUNS 12,
LOOKOUTS 4
■ Monday’s recap: Chattanooga starting pitcher Duke
von Schamann gave up 11 hits
and eight runs before failing to
make it through four innings.
Jacksonville took a 3-0 lead
in the second inning on J.T.
Realmuto’s home run to left
field and Isaac Galloway’s tworun homer to left. The Suns
added a run in the third inning
and scored five in the fourth,
when Zack Cox had an RBI
double, Realmuto an RBI single
and Daniel Pertusati a two-run
homer to left. The Lookouts
(14-22) were stuck on one hit,
a Jeremy Moore two-out single
in the first inning, until Miguel
Rojas singled in the eighth following three consecutive walks
to bring in their first run.
■ Next game: Game three of a
five-game series in Jacksonville
is tonight at 7:05.
■ Pitchers: Chris Reed (38, 3.62 ERA) is scheduled to
start for the Lookouts, while the
Suns have not announced their
starter.
Chattanooga
AB R H RBI BB SO AVG
Pederson, CF
3 1 0 0 2 0 .285
Rojas, 2B
5 1 1 1 0 0 .236
Moore, LF
3 0 1 1 1 2 .133
Burroughs, 3B
3 0 0 1 1 0 .231
Martinez, SS
4 0 0 1 0 0 .250
Songco, 1B
3 0 0 0 1 1 .180
Garcia, RF
4 0 0 0 0 1 .200
Wallach, C
3 1 1 0 1 2 .213
von Schamann, P 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Baez, P
1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Nelo, P
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Thomas, P
0 0 0 0 0 0 .200
Wise, PH
0 1 0 0 1 0 .254
Garcia P
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Cavazos-Galvez, PH 1 0 0 0 0 0 .264
Totals
31 4 3 4 7 6 .231
Jacksonville
AB R H RBI BB SO AVG
Galloway, CF
5 2 2 2 0 2 .250
Gutierrez, SS
5 0 1 0 0 1 .204
Dietrich, 2B
4 1 1 0 1 1 .248
Canha, 1B
4 2 2 2 0 1 .270
Cox, 3B
5 2 2 1 0 1 .292
Realmuto, C
5 3 4 2 0 1 .232
Pertusati, LF
5 1 2 4 0 1 .189
Main, RF
4 0 1 0 1 2 .244
Neil, P
3 1 1 0 0 2 .222
Perio, PH
1 0 0 0 0 0 .232
Olmos, P
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Andrelczyk, P
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals
41 12 16 11 2 12 .238
Chattanooga 000 000 040 — 4 3 2
Jacksonville
031 502 10x — 12 16 1
2B: Dietrich (8), Cox (10), Realmuto (18), Canha
(22). HR: Realmuto (4), Galloway (1), Pertusati
(4). RBI: Rojas, M (27), Moore, J (3), Burroughs
(13), Martinez, O (13); Realmuto 2 (26), Galloway
2 (4), Pertusati 4 (23), Canha 2 (40), Cox (20).
LOB: Chattanooga 7; Jacksonville 8. SB: Realmuto (9). E: Martinez, O 2 (8); Gutierrez (9).
Chattanooga IP H R ER BB SO HR ERA
von Schamann 3.2 11 8 8 1 4 2 4.59
Baez
1.2 3 3 1 0 3 1 3.24
Nelo
0.2 1 0 0 0 0 0 2.77
Thomas
1.0 1 1 1 1 2 0 1.95
Garcia
1.0 0 0 0 0 3 0 2.47
Totals
8.0 16 12 10 2 12 3 3.73
Jacksonville
IP H R ER BB SO HR ERA
Neil (W, 2-2)
6.0 1 0 0 2 4 0 3.45
Olmos
1.0 0 3 3 3 1 0 2.48
Andrelczyk
2.0 2 1 1 2 1 0 2.84
Totals
9.0 3 4 4 7 6 0 3.43
HBP: Canha. T: 3:10. A: 3,141.
D6 • Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • • •
..
timesfreepress.com ..
Breaking News: 423-757-News
Ringgold’s Dale set to play baseball for Georgia
Staff Writer
RINGGOLD, Ga. —
Slade Dale admits to growing up a Florida fan, but that
didn’t keep the Ringgold
High School two-sport star
from committing to play for
the University of Georgia.
The senior shortstop
committed to new Bulldogs baseball coach Scott
Stricklin on Sunday night
after taking an unofficial
visit to the Athens, Ga.,
campus. He is set to be
the first Ringgold player
to sign with the Georgia
baseball program since Josh
Gandy in the mid-1990s and
the first northwest Georgia prep player to do since
Calhoun’s Matt Robbins in
2004.
“Georgia is getting a heck
of a baseball player,” Ringgold coach Brent Tucker
said of Dale, who hit .405
with seven homers, 33 RBIs,
18 doubles and 14 stolen
bases as a junior. “There are
times Slade makes the game
look so easy because
tournament in Cinhe’s so athletic and
cinnati and were
he just loves the
interested right
game. He’s played a
away,” Dale said. “I
lot of baseball this
visited this weekend
summer, and they’ve
and just loved it. The
watched him a few
campus is beautiful
times.”
and Coach Stricklin
Dale played for
is going to turn that
Gary Baldwin and Slade
program around. I
the vaunted East Dale
really think that in
Cobb Astros this
my time there we’ll
summer. That’s when he get to Omaha (for the Colfirst made contact with lege World Series).”
UGA coaches.
Dale likely will play
“They saw me play in a second base in Athens, a
position he played almost
exclusively this summer.
The switch will be a good
one for him, he said.
“I like second base — it’s
an easier throw to first,”
Dale said. “They were telling me their second baseman will be a senior in my
freshman year and the position would be mine after
that, so it’s exciting.”
Dale, the starting quarterback for the Tigers, is glad
to be able to commit before
football season starts, and
Prep Tour
• Continued from Page D1
haven’t played football since
eighth grade, according to
Cox. But the first-year team
will play its four home games
at Finley Stadium and another game against Monterey at
Tennessee Tech, giving them
five games in college stadiums.
Adversity strikes early in
this year’s tour as the high
grass, still wet with dew, has
made my socks wet. Is there
anything worse than walking
around in wet socks? Quickly
I realize good buddies such
as Signal Mountain coach
Bill Price and Tyner’s Wayne
Turner would never tolerate
such wimpy excuses to derail
practice, or the tour, and I’m
able to overcome this hurdle
and press on.
■ 8:03, Chattanooga
Christian: The middle
school team is practicing
on an adjoining field and
the future looks good for
the Chargers with around 35
players working out. The varsity is in three groups, with
tackling drills at one area,
blocking drills at another and
receivers and quarterbacks
playing pitch and catch.
Assistants stand at each station, shooting video with
iPads for later review.
As one young defender
tries to wrap up a much larger ball carrier, one assistant
encourages him by saying, “I
know it’s like trying to tackle
a refrigerator, but you have
to wrap him up!”
■ 8:26, Ridgeland:
Teams in Georgia must practice for five days in shorts
and helmets before they can
put on full pads. Varsity players met in the weight room
to lift from 7:30 to 8:15 and
just now are running onto
the field to begin warming
up for the two-hour practice.
The physical running style
of the wing-T, and plenty of
horses to run it right, helped
the Panthers reach the state
championship game last
season. Many of those players are no longer here, but
there is no shortage of athletic looking younger ones
waiting to step up.
“Everything we’ve done
up till now has been centered around passing leagues
and throwing the ball,” Panthers coach Mark Mariakis
says. “Now we can finally
get back to actual football,
or the way we play it, and
get to working on finding
out who wants to be physical and block and carry the
ball for us.”
■ 9:12, Baylor: The Red
Raiders are working on an
inside drill, and the coaches
already aren’t happy with
the way the line is blocking.
Head coach Phil Massey
stands in as a tight end on
one play to show how he
wants that position to block
down on the edge, and two
plays later line coach Tim
Daniels shakes his head in
disgust when the defense
blows up a play as soon as
the runner gets the ball from
the quarterback.
“Why are there two
defensive guys in my backfield?” Daniels barks as he
looks at the linemen walking
back to the huddle. “That’s
our bread-and-butter play.
We have to be able to block
that!”
One noticeable difference
here are the extra thick pads
that fit snugly over players’
helmets, giving them extra
cushion to avoid potential
concussions. The pads are
new and will be worn only
during practices.
■ 9:44, Signal Mountain: Barely more than a
half hour into practice, the
Eagles already are in fullscale scrimmage mode.
Play is stopped momentarily
while the defense does several up-downs for not pur-
Staff Photo by C.B. Schmelter
The Ridgeland High School Panthers stretch during practice at Bowers & Painter Field in Rossville on Monday.
suing to the ball to the liking of assistant Troy Boeck.
As play resumes, one thing
becomes clear: Signal Mountain can match any team in
the area in size.
That includes 275-pound
fullback James McClellan
and 6-foot-6, 365-pound
defensive lineman Marcus
Hardy. Junior lineman Harrison Moon, who at 6-6, 255
will be one of the area’s top
prospects next season, sheds
a block and plants freshman
running back Skye Wilson
on his backside. On the next
snap, with Moon out, Wilson turns the corner, lowers
his head and punishes two
defenders on a nice gain,
redeeming himself.
The scrimmage continues when Coach Price
orders the ball to be placed
at the 10-yard line, giving the
offense four plays to try to
score against the first-team
defense. Price, who calls
the offensive plays, jokingly
taunts the defenders by yelling, “We’re going run it down
your throat right here!”
That incites the defensive
players, who begin hitting
runners with a lot more
force than before and stop
the offense at the 2-yard line
on fourth down to prevent
the score.
■ 10:23, Red Bank: After
a two-hour “midnight madness” practice, followed by
a snack, players and coaches slept for a few hours in
the gym before returning
for their second practice.
Coaches note that players
are noticeably less enthusiastic than they were for the
first session.
“We’re dragging quite a
bit now,” Lions coach E.K.
Slaughter says. “We probably got to bed around 4, so
I know I am.”
Slaughter is known for
his fondness of the passing
game, but this year, personnel dictates the switch to the
triple option. When asked
about it, Slaughter looks as if
he may break out in hives.
“Yeah, now when it’s
third-and-3 we’ll have to
actually run the ball,” he
says. “I hate it, but we just
don’t have what we need
to be able to throw the ball
around a lot right now.”
■ 10:58, Notre Dame:
The first practice of the
day is just wrapping up,
and weary-looking players
are making their way from
the field to the locker room,
where they’ll shower, eat
lunch and rest before team
meetings and repeating the
process.
Second-year head coach
Charles Fant is busier than
a one-legged man in a buttkicking contest. He instructs
two assistants on how to
upload video of practice onto
his computer and is interrupted by another assistant
with a question, followed by
a player with another question and back-to-back calls
to his cell phone, all within
a two-minute span.
The biggest difference
here since last year are the
expectations. Not much was
expected from the Fighting Irish, or their first-year
coach, last fall, but goals are
set much higher after a ninewin 2012 season.
Staff Photo by Tim Barber
Bradley Central defensive tackle Colton Scott (60) runs
a drill under the “big man chute” during practice Monday in Cleveland. Assistant coach Matt Bowman, left,
squats and watches his men work.
“Ninety-four percent of
our offense came from our
freshmen and sophomores
last year, so that means pretty much our entire offense
is back this year,” Fant says.
“There’s just a much different attitude now. The kids
got a taste of what it feels
like to win, and they’re willing to work harder to keep
that.”
■ 11:16, McCallie: The
first of two practices just
ended and coaches are
decompressing in their
meeting room, going over
the highs and lows of what
they just watched.
“We’ve got so many
young guys, and in pretty
much every position we’re
just teaching our base stuff
right now,” Blue Tornado
coach Ralph Potter says.
“We’ll have a lot of sophomore starters this year, so
we’re just getting them the
basic knowledge to build
from.
“But we will have pretty
good team speed.”
Included among the
burners who will be on the
field this fall for McCallie is
senior C.J. Fritz, who won
the Division II state title in
the 100-meter dash in May.
■ 2:56 p.m., Walker Valley: The second practice of
the day, an hour-plus special teams workout, has just
ended and the entire team
is in the weight room. “Alice
in Chains” is blaring at near
rock-concert decibels, making the only other recognizable sound that of metal
weights clanging against
the floor.
The Mustangs, who have
just nine seniors, are basically beginning from scratch
on offense with no starters
returning to the line or the
backfield. Receiver Colton
Morrow is the only starter
back on that side of the
ball, while the defense must
replace the entire secondary, two of three linemen
and two linebackers.
“We’ll probably have four
or five freshmen that will
start this year,” Mustangs
coach Glen Ryan says. “Our
freshman class is as talented
as we’ve ever had here, but
they’re still freshmen and
that’s scary.”
■ 3:35, Cleveland: Coach
Ron Crawford reminds me of
Russell Crowe’s character of
a mad genius in the movie “A
Beautiful Mind” as he stands
at a dry erase board, drawing
various scenarios so quickly
that his three safeties barely
have time to nod they under-
stand before he moves on to
the next.
Un l i ke t h e i r co u n ty
rivals at Walker Valley, the
Blue Raiders return plenty
of experience with eight
starters back on each side of
the ball. Quarterback Austin
Herink is among the returners who will be counted on,
and the 6-foot-2 senior has
lost 12 pounds, down to 208,
which should help his mobility.
“He can make all the
throws,” Crawford said of
Herink, who has received
scholarship offers from
Youngstown State and VMI
and is being recruited also
by Furman, Duke, Memphis,
Western Kentucky, the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and Middle Tennessee State. “I think he’s got
D-I (FBS) talent.”
■ 4:09, Bradley Central: Bears coaches barely
had time to grouse over
the graduation of four-year
starting quarterback Bryce
Copeland before former
Soddy-Daisy starter Brett
Standifer transferred in. The
6-2, 210-pound senior is talented enough that two other
players who were in contention for the quarterback job
have moved to other positions.
“He’s better than I thought
he would be,” head coach
Damon Floyd said. “I haven’t
seen many weaknesses yet.
He was coached well before
he ever got here, because he
already knows how to read
coverages and where to go
with the ball. I’m not sure
what we did right to deserve
getting a player with his talent, but we’re awfully glad
he’s here.”
The Bears do have to
replace three offensive linemen but have at least three
talented receivers for Standifer to throw to, including
a pair of 6-3 targets in Dee
Crisp, a senior who was the
District 5-AAA receiver of
the year in 2012, and junior
Daniel Clark, who had played
quarterback.
■ 5:07, East Hamilton:
The Hurricanes have been
on the field since 2:15 and
the coaching staff’s patience
is officially over with what
they believe is lackluster
effort.
Defensive coordinator
Steve Garland blows one
play dead and lights into the
entire unit.
“Why aren’t you hitting?”
Garland yells. “Nobody blew
a whistle. The play was still
going and all of you guys
just jog over and don’t hit
anybody! You’re all arm
tackling and I’m sick of it!
Are you playing hard every
play?”
Watching from a distance,
head coach Ted Gatewood
smiles and says, “It helps
having guys like Steve coaching. I don’t have to be the one
who’s always yelling when
they need it.”
he said UGA coaches gave
his participation their blessing.
“That meant a lot to me
because some schools don’t
want you to play football,”
he said. “There was no way
I was going somewhere that
wouldn’t allow me to play. I
can now get ready for football. This has been a good
week for me. ... Dreams do
come true.”
Contact Lindsey Young at
[email protected]
or at 423-757-6296.
■ 5:36, Brainerd: The
new staff has the Panthers
divided into three working
groups, and the two noticeable similarities are a quick
pace for each drill and continual positive reinforcement.
Panthers assistant Tyrus
Ward, who looks like he’s
still in playing shape, works
with a group of tacklers and
reminds them after each rep
to continue practicing hard
and not slow down.
■ 5:59, Tyner: In the second least shocking moment
of the day, Rams coach
Wayne Turner is chewing out
a young lineman for missing
a blocking assignment. While
“Coach T” continues whipping the line into shape, former Rams quarterback and
longtime assistant Jackie Buttram walks over to ask how
other area teams are looking
today. Buttram has grown a
beard that would rival anything by the stars of “Duck
Dynasty,” or at the very least
Turner.
“Coach T told me I
couldn’t help out this year
if I didn’t grow a beard like
his,” Buttram jokes. “We’re
a young team this year, but
we’re going to surprise some
folks. We’ve got really good
speed in the backfield; we
just have to get our linemen
where they need to be.”
■ 6:31, Hixson: The
Wildcats left spring practice in need of a kicker, but
Luke White, a home-school
student who hasn’t played
football but has a strong leg,
has joined the team. As Hixson coach Jason Fitzgerald
explains how his new kicker
arrived, White is drilling 30yard field goals with 10-15
yards to spare.
“He could really help us
this year,” Fitzgerald says.
“The biggest difference from
my first year here last season
is attitude. The kids have a
different mentality, and they
better. We’re going into this
season as the hunted, and
those kind of expectations
mean you better have your
mind on your business every
week.”
Contact Stephen Hargis
at [email protected]
com or 423-757-6293.
Cathay
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E
LIFE
• • • Tuesday, July 30, 2013
timesfreepress.com/life
Registration Dates:
August 5th, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
August 10th, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
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SMOOTHIE SAFETY: Smoothies, fruit juice and your health, E6
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Tea Party
is silly
to attack
Alexander
Lighten the
LOAD
6 back-to-school apps to help
students in and out of the classroom
T
By Casey Phillips
In Hamilton County, educators
are seeking to leverage the proliferation of tablets to students’ and
o anyone who
educators’ advantage. Hamilton
remembers the
school officials announced last
strained back musyear a 1-to-1 technology initiative
cles and poor posto equip all 42,000 public school
ture of school days
spent lugging around students with an iPad or other
tablet device. The county also
a stuffed backpack,
is exploring a possible “bring
substituting a 1-pound tablet for
your own device” policy to allow
40 pounds of textbooks should
students to take advantage of
be a no-brainer.
smart devices’ usefulness in the
A study released in March by
classroom.
the Pew Internet and American
Out of the box, tablets are
Life Project reported that 23 percent of American teens ages 12 to natively equipped for functions
such as online browsing and
17 own an iPad or similar tablet
multimedia consumption, but
device. In its second annual survey of students and tablets in 2012, with the right third-party apps,
they can serve a variety of other
the Pearson Foundation found
roles to help students in and
that 69 percent of high school
out of the classroom. That’s an
seniors say they believe tablets
“will effectively replace textbooks appealing target to aim for, but
first, teens and their parents need
within the next five years.”
Staff Writer
to know how to select the right
apps from the hundreds of thousands of titles that are available.
Here are six to consider:
1Evernote
n What it is: A notation app
that allows individuals and
groups of users to create, store
and share their documents,
audio recordings and images.
Content saved to an Evernote
account is accessible on
many devices, via a desktop
application or via a web browser.
n How they’ll use it: Save your
class schedule as an Evernote
document so it’s always with
you or on the nearest Internetconnected computer. Share your
notes and research with other
students during group projects.
Refresh for an upcoming quiz
by reviewing a lecture recording.
Take snapshots of whiteboards
and handwritten notes to
preserve them for later.
n Cost: Free
n Available for: Android, iOS
2 Evernote Peek
n What it is: A study app
that allows users to create
“quizzes” to help them memorize
and review information. The
app is built for — but doesn’t
require — Apple’s magnetic
smart cover, allowing students
to lift a single panel to show the
clue or the whole cover to reveal
the answer. Pictures also can
be attached to aid in associative
learning. The app keeps track
of whether the user gets the
question right or wrong.
n How they’ll use it: Memorize
See APPS, Page E6
I can’t stand a tail that
insists on wagging the dog.
The tea party is such a tail
and it’s trying its best to
wag the Republican Party.
In this case, the tail is
located too far from the
brain, which is composed
of old, hard, grisly material
and contains
no gray matter at all.
The most
recent example of the
tea party’s
dog-wagging desire
Dalton
is its effort
Roberts
to recruit a
Commentary
candidate
against Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, one of
the most sane and balanced
Republicans in America.
From 1979 to 1987, Alexander was governor of
Tennessee, and I had my
problems with him when
I was county executive in
Hamilton County from 1978
to 1994. He kept cramming
state felons into Hamilton’s
little workhouse.
But so did Democratic
Gov. Ned McWherter, who
served from 1987 to 1995.
When he was running,
McWherter promised me
he would stop the practice
of shipping felons our way,
but he didn’t. Finally, I went
to federal court to get relief
and a ruling against the
state.
My past experiences
with Alexander might
incline you to think I would
oppose him, but the greatest danger to America today
is the breakdown in bipartisanship, and Alexander is
one of the few Republicans
who sees this.
It is more patriotic to
support a man who has the
good sense and historic
vision to see the desperate
need for bipartisan cooperation than it is to remove
a senator who is not far
enough to the right. If we
could replace a half dozen
of the tea party favorites,
we might have a functioning American government.
A Times Free Press article
on the tea party’s attempt
to remove Alexander said:
“The conservative-believing
national groups will help
fund a sound challenger.” I
know how big a role money
plays in politics these days,
but believe me, we do not
need the influence of these
groups in Tennessee politics.
While the tea party is
fussy about Alexander’s
credentials, saying he votes
like a right-wing Northern
liberal Republican, they’re
finding it hard to recruit
a candidate sufficiently
See ROBERTS, Page E6
‘Star Trek’ spoof planned at vacation Bible school
By Clint Cooper
Staff Writer
If you’re a fan of “Star Trek,”
it doesn’t get any cooler. If
you’re not, a vacation Bible
school — “God Trek” — involving the U.S.S. Starship Redemption, Capt. Perk, Cmdr. Bock
and Lt. Boohoora still sparks the
imagination.
East Chattanooga Church
of God is hoping young fans of
the television series and movies
will be interested enough to
attend the sessions, which run
Wednesday through Sunday.
The congregation is one of at
least three area churches trying
new formats this week in order
to attract parents and children to
what often in the past has been
a predictable week of Bible lessons, crafts and snacks. All three
will use all or part of Saturday —
for some the last Saturday before
school starts — for their VBS.
Daisy United Methodist
Church, for instance, has compacted its session into a one-day
event with the theme “Jonah: A
Whale of a Tale.”
Christy Jones, children’s coordinator for the congregation, says
a church in which her husband
was youth pastor in Winston-Salem, N.C., used a Super Saturday
format for several years.
“It worked really, really well,”
she says. “It was a way to get a
lot of people involved. And it
was good for people [bringing
children] who commuted a long
way. It saved the gas.”
Rock Spring United Methodist Church in Georgia is switching from the Super Saturday for-
mat it has used the last two years
to a VBS with sessions Thursday,
Friday and Saturday nights, with
full meals for participants, a
theme of “SonWest Roundup”
and the idea that Mom and Dad
can have an evening or two out.
“When parents get off from
work [Thursday and Friday],”
says church spokeswoman Jenni
Neighbors, “they don’t have to
worry about going home and
feeding the kids.”
On Saturday, the final night,
activities conclude with a bonfire, snacks and activities to
which the whole family is invited, she says.
East Chattanooga Church of
God, though, is pulling out the
stops with a nightly, live-action
See SAFE, Page E6
Staff Photo by Maura Friedman
Stage hand Joshua Barrows, left, and Hannah Kimbrough, who plays
Lt. Lulu in the production, work on the set of “God Trek,” a spacethemed vacation bible school at East Chattanooga Church of God.
■ To contact Life phone: 423-757-6327 • Fax: 423-668-5051 • Email: [email protected]
E2 • Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • • •
.
timesfreepress.com ...
Breaking News: 423-757-News
Puzzles&Funnies
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Universal Uclick
In the year ahead, a
great deal of your focus is
likely to be on many other
things than your material
concerns. Regardless, you’re
still apt to show a steady
financial growth.
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): There is good
reason for your ears
to be ringing today, because
others are likely talking
about you. Don’t worry — it
would boost your ego if you
could hear what they’re saying.
VIRGO (Aug.
23-Sept. 22): Even
if to the casual
observer a recent development appears to be rather
insignificant, you’ll know its
true worth. It’ll elevate your
hopes and expectations.
LIBRA (Sept. 23Oct. 23): Look to
turn a small profit
today, either from a situation where you might share
a common interest or from
being in a position to serve
as an intermediary.
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Understand
4 In a chair
10 It may be
crushed at a bar
13 Dinghy gear
15 Water-carved
gulch
16 Traitor
17 What baguettes
may be
served in
19 Toronto’s prov.
20 Cover, in a way,
as a car
21 Baltic Sea
republic
23 “Hannah
Montana”
star Miley
26 Minor argument
27 Mimic
29 Fifth wheel
33 Bird: Prefix
34 Mobster’s code
of honor
36 Dashing style
37 Old sheriff’s
badge
39 Self-respect
41 __-Seltzer
42 Jeans giant of
the ’80s
44 Grant-giving gp.
45 Cozy place to
read a book
47 Identifies in
a Facebook
photo
49 Penultimateround game
50 Egyptian life
symbols
52 Numbers to
crunch
55 Title Gilbert
and Sullivan
emperor
59 Pub offering
60 Emotional
response
(which might
be induced by
17-, 29- and 45Across?)
63 Mud bath site
64 Manuscript
fixer
65 Just
66 __ ejemplo:
Spaniard’s “for
example”
67 Hate
68 Cowboy
singer Ritter
DOWN
1 Mongolian
desert
2 Be worthy of
3 Very, in Vichy
4 Pirate’s weapon
5 Time to
remember
6 Latin art
7 Casino gratuity
8 Cause of blurry
vision, perhaps
9 Nashville’s
West
10 Speck in a
magnetic field
experiment
11 Kid’s plea
12 Jazzy James
14 Alfredo, for one
18 Timber trouble
22 Frequently
24 Logon
requirement
25 Mar.-to-Jun. season
27 Walled city of
Spain
28 Kids’ digital
deal-sealer
30 When the cock
crows
31 Rent-a-car
charges, e.g.
32 One-named
Irish singer
33 Run __: drink on
credit
35 Star brightness
measure
38 Cut, as logs
40 “Wuthering
Heights” genre
43 One __
customer
46 Painted a
picture of, say
48 Invite as one’s
date for
51 Target
competitor
52 Coarse talk
53 Brand for a
pooch
54 Toiling away
56 “__ She Sweet”
57 Mete (out)
58 Jet-black gem
61 GPS
suggestion
62 Camera
named for a
goddess
The Associated Press
Today is Tuesday, July
30, the 211th day of 2013.
There are 154 days left in
the year.
TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT
SCORPIO (Oct.
24-Nov. 22):
You’re presently
in a cycle where you could
be extremely fortunate in
some kind of partnership
arrangement, provided both
you and the other party play
your assigned roles.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 23-Dec. 21):
You stand an excellent chance of earning a bit
more than usual from the
use of your acquired knowledge. Don’t hesitate to ask a
fair price for your services.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22-Jan.
19): You’ll have a
marvelous way of brightening up situations wherever
you go. You have the gift of
being able to offer constructive suggestions to people
who lack the answers.
Today In History
By Steve Blais
c.Tribune Media Services
Stumped? Call
July 30, 2013
1-900-226-4413 99 cents a minute
AQUARIUS (Jan.
20-Feb. 19): Be
imaginative, resourceful and assertive, and
success in your endeavors
will be inevitable. In fact,
there is little doubt that
your brightness will win out
over others’ boldness.
urban Detroit; although
presumed dead, his remains
have never been found.
■ 1980: Israel’s Knesset
passed a law reaffirming all
of Jerusalem as the capital
of the Jewish state.
■ 1863: American autoTODAY’S BIRTHDAYS
maker Henry Ford was born
Actor Richard Johnson
in Dearborn Township,
is 86. Actor Edd “Kookie”
Mich.
Byrnes is 80. Singer Paul
ON THIS DATE
Anka is 72. Jazz musician
David Sanborn is 68. For■ 1918: Poet Joyce
mer California Gov. Arnold
Kilmer, a sergeant in the
Schwarzenegger is 66.
165th U.S. Infantry Regiment, was killed during the Actor William Atherton is
Second Battle of the Marne 66. Actor Jean Reno is 65.
Blues singer-musician Otis
in World War I. (Kilmer is
Taylor is 65. Actor Frank
perhaps best remembered
Stallone is 63. Actor Ken
for his poem “Trees.”)
Olin is 59. Actor Richard
■ 1945: The Portland
Burgi is 55. Movie direcclass heavy cruiser USS
Indianapolis was torpedoed tor Richard Linklater is 53.
Actor Laurence Fishburne
by a Japanese submarine
is 52. Actress Lisa Kudrow
during World War II; only
is 50. Bluegrass musician
316 out of some 1,200 men
Danny Roberts (The Grassurvived.
cals) is 50. Country musi■ 1956: President
cian Dwayne O’Brien is 49.
Dwight D. Eisenhower
Actress Vivica A. Fox is 49.
signed a measure makRock musician Brad Harging “In God We Trust” the
national motto, replacing “E reaves (Third Eye Blind) is
42. Actress Christine Taylor
Pluribus Unum” (“Out of
is 42. Actor-comedian Dean
many, one”).
Edwards is 40. Actress Hil■ 1965: President Lynary Swank is 39. Olympic
don B. Johnson signed
gold medal beach volleyball
into law the Medicare bill,
player Misty May-Treanor
which went into effect the
is 36. Actress Jaime Pressly
following year.
is 36. Actress April Bowlby
■ 1975: Former Teamsters union president Jimmy is 33. Actress Yvonne Strahovski (TV: “Chuck”) is 31.
Hoffa disappeared in sub-
Bridge
By Phillip Alder
Universal Uclick
Hands with 4-4-4-1 distribution can be a nuisance.
But with this one, a general
guideline is to treat kingsingleton as if it were kingdoubleton. So plan on bidding no-trump. It would not
be unreasonable to open
two no-trump if you would
be promising a good 20, 21
or 22 points. But I think you
should upgrade because of
all the aces and kings. Open
two clubs, planning to rebid
two no-trump.
Here, whatever you do,
you should end in three
no-trump.
West leads his fourthhighest diamond five:
seven, three, king. What
happens after that?
You have only six top
tricks: two spades, one
heart, one diamond and two
clubs. It would be nice to
find the spade finesse winning, but you need to get
into the dummy.
Cash the club ace, then
lead a low club toward the
dummy. Here, West has no
defense. At the table, he
won with his club queen
and played three rounds of
diamonds. South discarded
three hearts, cashed the
club jack, and ran the spade
jack to take nine tricks:
three spades, one heart, two
diamonds and three clubs.
Cryptoquote
PISCES (Feb. 20March 20): The
best way to get
the support of others in an
important venture is to give
them some logical reasons
why it can be as meaningful
to them as it is to you.
ARIES (March 21April 19): Do your
best to stay on top
of a situation from which
you could financially benefit, even if the gains seem
small. Don’t let the size of it
dilute your efforts.
Jumble:
Monday’s Answer:
BOSSY
CLOTH
KNIGHT
FINITE
After having the flu for a week, she was — SICK OF IT
Puzzle answers on page E4
Don’t Keep
Your Final
Wishes
a Secret.
For more information about Jumble, visit www.jumble.com on the Web.
TAURUS (April
20-May 20):
Listen to the suggestions of others, but be
sure not to ignore your
own counsel in the process.
Your ideas are likely to be
superior when it comes to
personal matters.
GEMINI (May
21-June 20): Even
though your ambitions are extremely strong,
you’ll keep them a secret
from other people. It looks
like you’ll end up getting exactly what you want.
Sudoku
Complete the grid so every row, column and 3x3 box
contains every digit from 1 to 9.
CANCER (June
21-July 22): It
could prove to
be helpful to discuss with
a friend a matter that has
been giving you trouble. Go
to someone who has proven
to be helpful in the past.
Preplanning takes care of
all the decisions so your
family doesn’t have to.
Call 757-6200
for professional help
or do it Yourself
timesfreepress.com
www.hamiltonfuneraloptions.com
4506 Hixson Pike, Chattanooga, TN 37343
423.531.3975
35869075
... timesfreepress.com
.
Breaking News: [email protected]
• • • Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • E3
ExpertAdvice
LIFE
Dirty toddlers should
not sit on store counters
Boy, 15, grows his hair
to donate to children
The Associated Press
DEAR ABBY: I work in an office supply store.
Often when parents of small children come in,
they’ll sit their babies/toddlers on the counter
while we discuss their needs. Sometimes these children have dirty diapers.
While I am not a parent, I do
understand that small children have
a tendency to run off or otherwise
misbehave if they are left standing.
But sitting children on the counter
strikes me as unsanitary and unsafe.
Dear Abby
Would it be appropriate to ask
Written by
Jeanne Phillips these parents to remove their children from the counter? I worry
about offending a customer and displeasing management. I haven’t said anything so far, but this
is really getting to me. — DISGUSTED IN OHIO
DEAR DISGUSTED:
The idea of a child in a
soiled diaper sitting on a
counter in a place of business is, indeed, disgusting.
You would be doing your
employer a favor to suggest that if a child should
fall off the counter, there
could be liability involved.
Tell the customer that
for the child’s safety to
please remove him/her
from the counter. And if
the child has a dirty diaper, make sure you have
a large supply of sanitary
wipes on hand so staff and
customers will be protected from the bacteria.
HEALTH
Give your feet a break;
buy the correct shoes
DEAR DOCTOR K: You’ve often advised buying supportive shoes that fit properly. Can you be
more specific about what to look for in a shoe?
DEAR READER: Buy- foot. (If you can afford it,
ing the right shoe is an buy two pairs of shoes of
investment in your foot different sizes, and use the
health. But how do you proper size for each foot.)
n Stand in the shoes.
identify the “right” shoe?
The bottom line is how Make sure you have at
you feel when you put least a quarter- to half-inch
of space between your lonthem on.
For women, the best gest toe and the end of the
shoes are shoe. Wiggle your toes to
low-heeled make sure there’s enough
b u t n o t room.
n Walk around in the
flat, with a
wide, pad- shoes. Is there enough
ded heel, room at the balls of the
a wide toe feet? Do the heels fit snugbox and a ly, or do they pinch or slip
sole that off?
Dr. K
n Find shoes that fit
provides
Dr. Anthony
suff icient from the start, not shoes
Komaroff
cushioning. that need to be broken in.
In general, the higher the If a salesperson tells you,
heel, the worse for the foot. “Oh, that little pinch will
Men tend to feel most go away as soon as you
comfortable in athlet- walk in them a day or two,”
ic shoes, sturdy oxfords, thank him or her for the
wingtips, loafers or low- advice … and find a pair
heeled boots. Look for that doesn’t pinch.
n Trust your own comsturdy sole construction
that provides support and fort rather than a shoe’s
size or description.
cushions against shock.
n Pay attention to
Buy shoes made from
breathable materials that width as well as length. If
keep feet dry and less sus- the ball of your foot feels
compressed, ask for a
ceptible to foot fungus.
Here are some useful wider size.
n Make sure the soles
tips:
n Wait until the after- provide enough cushionnoon to shop. Your feet ing. Your feet have to deal
naturally expand during with all the weight of your
body. When that big slice
the day.
n Wear the same type of cheesecake puts a couof socks that you intend to ple of extra pounds on
the wall of your belly, it
wear with the shoes.
n Ask the salesperson also gives your feet more
to measure both of your pounds to carry.
Trust what your feet
feet. Get measured every
time you buy new shoes, tell you about shoes. If
because feet change with your feet don’t like the
age. If one foot is larger or shoes today, it’s likely that
wider than the other, buy they will really not like the
a size that fits the larger shoes a month from now.
FAITH
Mother’s friends know
you’re on wrong path
Q: My mother’s friends go out of their way to
say they’re praying for me. I know they’re trying
to get under my skin because they don’t agree with
the way I’m living. Why can’t religious people
mind their own business? — J.P.
A: Have you ever
asked yourself why your
mother’s friends seem
concerned
about you
and wish
you weren’t
living the
way you
are?
T h e y
Billy Graham
care about
you, and they know something that you don’t know,
which is this: Whether
you realize it or not, you’re
on a wrong road in life. It
will only bring you sorrow
and heartache. It may even
lead to your destruction.
The Bible warns, “There
is a way that seems right
to a man, but in the end it
• • • timesfreepress.com....
Breaking News: 423-757-News
E4 • Tuesday, July 30, 2013
leads to death” (Proverbs
14:12).
Your mother’s friends
know you have an even
deeper problem: You’ve
shut God out of your life.
You think you know better
than God does what’s best
for you. God created us
and put us on this Earth.
He knows far better than
we do what’s best for us.
Don’t let pride, or pleasure or anything else keep
you from God. He loves
you, and he alone can give
you the security and peace
you seek. Turn from your
sins and open your heart
to Jesus Christ. The Bible
says, “In him was life, and
that life was the light of
men” (John 1:4).
The Associated Press
James Dean Johnson II, 15, of Dyersburg, Tenn., has
been growing his hair out and donating it to Locks of
Love since he was 5 years old. Locks of Love specializes in making wigs for children in financial need.
DYERSBURG, Tenn. —
For 15-year-old James Dean
Johnson II, leaving his hair
long is not a sign of rebellion
or laziness, but rather it is a
sign of a kid with a heart bigger than most.
As a small child, James
heard his mother talk about
Locks of Love, a nonprofit
organization that specializes
in creating wigs for financially disadvantaged children under the age of 21.
The organization’s mission
is to provide those children,
who are suffering from longterm medical hair loss, with
high-quality hair prosthetics in order to return their
self-confidence and normalcy.
James decided at a young
age that he wanted to help by
donating his own hair.
“I just thought if I had
cancer how would I feel if I
didn’t get the help I needed,”
he says.
According to the Locks
of Love website, most wigs
sold by retailers are built
to fit adult heads. Locks of
Love provides custom-made
wigs, adapted to fit each child
specifically, through donated
ponytails. The wigs return
freedom to kids who may
feel insecure about losing
their hair. The custom-made
pieces allow them to swim
and do any kind of sport or
activity while wearing it.
James’ family is no stranger to family members losing
hair due to a medical illness.
James’ mother, Suzanne
Johnson, recounted how her
mother battled lymphoma
and her grandmother fought
lung cancer before both eventually succumbed to their illnesses. Suzanne says that she
cannot bear the thought that
children are charged for their
wigs (Locks of Love provides
wigs for free or on a sliding
scale, based on financial
need).
“As long as we’re doing the
right thing, I feel good about
it,” says Suzanne, who hopes
more people will be encouraged by her son’s story and
will choose to donate their
hair as well.
It takes James nearly two
years to grow his hair out
to the required 10 inches in
length needed so that it can
be used for a wig. It makes for
a couple of hot summers with
his long hair. It also subjects
him to some taunting from
other kids who just don’t
understand why he feels so
strongly about growing out
his hair and donating it to
Locks of Love.
Although he is frustrated
by the occasional ridicule and
even gave up once, James has
decided that it is the right
thing to do, and as soon as
he cuts his hair this summer,
he will begin the process of
growing it out again.
“Donating your hair is
not a bad thing,” he says.
“Imagine if you had cancer,
wouldn’t you want someone
to donate hair for you?”
Are gamers athletes? Government says yes
By Brian Gaar
The Associated Press
Are video game players
athletes?
That might be a silly question to people who equate the
pastime with less-than-fit guys
hunched over a computer. If
you can drink Mountain Dew
while playing it, is it a sport?
But recently, officials from
game maker Riot Games say
they successfully requested
that the U.S. Citizenship and
Immigration Services provide
visas for competitive gamers
— the kind usually reserved
for professional athletes. The
gamers in question play the
popular (and competitive)
“League of Legends” game.
In an interview with the
website GameSpot, Nick Allen
of Riot Games explains that
his company lobbied for the
change in federal immigration
procedures.
“So the United States government recognizes League of
Legends pro players as professional athletes and award svisas to essentially work in the
United States under that title,”
he says. “So this is groundbreaking … now we can start
looking at international players when they come over. It’s
a much easier process because
they’re actually recognized by
the government. This is a huge
thing.”
But are they athletes?
The Merriam-Webster
online dictionary defines an
athlete as “a person who is
trained or skilled in exercises, sports, or games requiring
physical strength, agility or
stamina.”
To many minds, that’s a no.
But some folks disagree.
“I know the headline makes
people laugh, but I think this
classification is long overdue
and extremely accurate,” says
Jeremy Strauser, chief operating officer of local developer
Bee Cave Games.
Strauser met a number of
professional gamers when he
worked at Electronic Arts’
“
cal dexterity, so in some ways I
can see this being an accurate
nomenclature,” says Gary Gattis, CEO of Austin developer Spacetime Studios. “That
being said, it is a pretty funny
— Jeremy Strauser, chief operating officer,
juxtaposition to picture a
Bee Cave Games
gamer, with full carpal-tunnel
wrist gear and headphones,
in the same category as a traditional professional athlete.”
The designation didn’t surprise David Kaelin, who owns
the Austin-based retro gaming Game Over Videogames
chain. Any competition where
multiple players compete and
there are winners and losers
is a sport — and the players are athletes, Kaelin says.
While a gamer can’t match the
strength of a football player,
some clearly have superior
skills “like any other sport,”
he says.
“Gamers are no different
than most other athletes —
they must train, sweat, and
practice relentlessly to develop their skills, they must perform and win in front of a
crowd, they have fans around
the world who pay to watch
their matches, and the top performers often land very lucraMcClatchy Newspapers
tive sponsorships with major
sports division, maker of the skill that these competitors corporations,” Kaelin says.
popular “Madden NFL” foot- demonstrate is on par with
(what) a professional athlete
ball franchise.
“I have seen skilled players shows.”
Puzzle answers
In other countries, partictrain for weeks with coaches,
spend hours reviewing film ular South Korea, competitive
Answer to previous Sudoku
of their opponents, devising gaming is big business and is
complex strategies, traveling covered on a par with sports.
all over the country for games And top gamers — many of
attending by screaming fans whom can type at blinding
and they are well paid for speeds — are revered on a
their abilities,” he says. “It level of pro athletes.
And the more I thought
may sound like an NFL player,
but in reality it was a Madden about it, I remember attending
a “StarCraft II” tournament on
video game player.”
The same could be says of the University of Texas cam“League of Legends” gamers, pus in 2011. While I wouldn’t
or poker players, even compet- describe it as an athletic competition, it definitely required
itive hot dog eaters, he says.
“All of these elite compet- a high level of skill and the top
itors have more in common players put years of work into Answer to previous Crossword
with stars from the NBA, NFL mastering the game.
“Athletes are individuals
or MLB than with any hobbyist or casual game player. who participate in sports, and
The level of commitment and sports can be based on physi-
The level of commitment and skill that
these competitors demonstrate is on par with
(what) a professional athlete shows.
”
Hotel guests leaving with more than luggage
By Christopher
Seward
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
With summer travel in full
swing, vacationers are stocking up on souvenirs — not
the ones outside the hotel
but the ones inside their
room.
A while back, Hotels.com,
the online accommodation
booking service, found that
most hotel guests surveyed
(65 percent) said they never
take anything beyond toiletries from their rooms before
checkout.
That varies, however,
among individual nationalities.
For example, the Danish,
Dutch and Norwegians are
the most honest with 88
percent, 85 percent, and 84
percent, respectively, saying
they never remove items
such as plush robes or luxury bedding.
At the other end of the
spectrum, only 43 percent of
Colombians say they don’t
take costly items from hotels.
Sixty percent of Mexicans
and 63 percent of travelers
from India say they leave
hotels’ property behind,
according to Hotels.com.
Sixty-six percent of American travelers surveyed deny
taking items, but when items
are taken linen and towels
are the favorites.
In fact, books and magazines, linen and towels were
the most popular items on
the take-home list, except
among the Chinese, who
Hotels.com said have a penchant for furnishings, such
as lamps, clocks and artwork.
The survey of 8,600
respondents across 28 countries and cities was taken in
January.
Answer to previous Word Sleuth
...timesfreepress.com • • •
.
Breaking News: 423-757-News
Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • E5
Reality parody and real thing — twins? Movie on fantasy novel
Tune In
Tonight
By Kevin McDonough
ABC’s “Shark Tank” and its
imitators, including CNBC’s
recent series “Crowd Rules,”
a business-entertainment-investment reality show that
debuted to a minuscule audience of fewer than 50,000
viewers. It was pulled from
the schedule after two airings.
TONIGHT’S
HIGHLIGHTS
Roy Garber appears on
“Shipping Wars,” which
airs tonight at 10 on A&E.
DALTN
RINGD
CLEVE
LAFAY
BATTL
EPB
ity series ever canceled, so
does “The Profit” (10 p.m.,
CNBC), the latest in the business network’s venture into
look-alike “entertainment”
shows.
“Prof it” host Marcus
Lemonis wants to help small
businesses return to profitability. A turnaround expert
who has assisted more than
100 struggling firms, Lemonis will invest up to $2 million of his own cash to buy
into businesses with a need
for capital infusion and a
potential for growth.
CNBC is hoping that
their two-million-dollar man
will set “Profit” apart from
CHATT
We’re knee-deep in the
summer of the parody reality
show. Both “Whodunnit?” on
ABC and “Siberia” on NBC
send up the genre, creating
over-the-top dramas loosely based on “The Bachelor”
and “SurviTo see it vor,” respectively. NBC’s
“Capture,”
“ C a m p ”
9 p.m., CW,
TV-PG, Com- often plays
cast channel
with reality
6, EPBFI
motifs, offerchannel 6 in
ing a comedy
Chattanooga. v e r s i o n o f
good-looking
young people getting in and
out of bathing suits while
pondering the deeper meanings of capture-the-flag.
The CW’s new series
“Capture” (9 p.m., TV-PG)
isn’t a joke. It only seems
like one. It’s a mash-up of
“Hunger Games” and a backyard, summer-night game of
tag, produced and played in
deadly earnest with grim
paramilitary overtones.
Set in “The Hunting
Grounds,” a fenced-in wilderness playground, “Capture” involves 12 teams of
players tagged with GPS
units that alert their rivals
to their location if they stand
still for three minutes. Two
teams are hunted down
every week, ending with a
vote to see who is voted out
of the nightmare compound.
The last team left standing
(for three minutes or fewer)
will win a big prize. Australian marine biologist and
shark-diving expert Luke
Tipple is your host.
Like I said, this isn’t a parody. It just sounds like one.
— If “Capture” seems
like a pastiche of every real-
13
12
12
12
13
13
12
6
PM
6:30
n A two-hour helping
of “So You Think You Can
Dance” (8 p.m., Fox, TV-14)
features the remaining 14
contestants.
n Hanna’s mother needs
Mona’s testimony on “Pretty Little Liars” (8 p.m., ABC
Family).
n “America’s Got Talent”
(9 p.m., NBC, TV-PG).
n Mutiny on the Wizard on the season finale of
“Deadliest Catch” (9 p.m.,
Discovery).
n A video of Jane goes
viral on “Rizzoli & Isles” (9
p.m., TNT, TV-14).
n Masked bullies taunt
Danny on “Twisted” (9 p.m.,
ABC Family, TV-14).
n Pierce puts a medical
device under his microscope
on “Perception” (10 p.m.,
TNT, TV-14)
short takes
n Abby looks forward to
Thanksgiving on “NCIS” (8
p.m., CBS, repeat, TV-PG).
n Party like it’s 1996 on
“Whose Line is it Anyway?”
(8 p.m., CW, TV-PG).
n Chechen terrorists on
“NCIS: Los Angeles” (9 p.m.,
CBS, repeat TV-14).
n A mob hit man becomes
a “Person of Interest” (10
p.m., CBS, repeat, TV-14).
7
PM
‘Winter’s Tale’ coming
LATE NIGHT
DEAR STACY: I have would get so much grief from
been waiting for the movie my brothers.” It’s certainly a
adaptation of one of my trademark by now.
DEAR STACY: I thought
favorite books, “Winter’s
Tale,” which I thought was Agnes Bruckner did a phegoing to be coming out this nomenal job playing Anna
year. Any word? — Skip O., Nicole Smith in the recent
Lifetime movie, which
Orlando, Fla.
DEAR SKIP: Latest word turned out to be much better than I admit I
has the Warner Bros.
expected. I am curibig-screen fantasy
ous as to whether it
coming out next year
was successful? —
instead of this year.
Barbie N., Austin,
As you may know,
Texas
its production was
DEAR BARBIE:
delayed by Hurricane
Yes. The telepic
Sandy. However, the
became Lifetime’s
pedigree of this picmost-watched origture suggests it will Stacy
be well worth wait- Jenel Smith inal movie of 2013
ing for — with a cast Entertainment with 3.3 million viewincluding Colin Farrell, Rus- ers watching its June debut.
sell Crowe, Will Smith and (Last year’s “Liz & Dick” with
Jennifer Connelly, cinematog- Lindsay Lohan grabbed 3.5
raphy by Caleb Deschanel (he mil.) But just for the sake of
has five Oscar nominations perspective, last season’s “Big
and two famous daughters), Bang Theory” season avermusic by Hans Zimmer and aged 20 million viewers per
a screenplay by producer and episode.
DEAR STACY: I was
Oscar-winning screenwriter
(“A Beautiful Mind”) Akiva sorry to read about Sean
Goldsman. This is Goldsman’s C o n n e r y ’s l a n d d e a l
legal problems in Spain.
first directing project.
DEAR STACY: While What else is he up to?
CULT CHOICE
watching “The Internship,” Any chance of his acting
n Lisbon is the
I couldn’t help wondering again? — Tim K., Hunsetting of the 1944
whether Owen Wilson’s tington, W.Va.
resistance drama “The
DEAR TIM: I think it’s
nose was deformed from
Conspirators” (8 p.m.,
likely
that the former 007
birth
or
did
something
TCM) starring Hedy
happen to it? — Yvonne B., star, now 82 and with a heart
Lamarr, Paul Henreid,
condition, will adhere to his
Riverside, Calif.
Sydney Greenstreet and
DEAR YVONNE. Owen retirement plan of remaining
Peter Lorre. Henreid
first broke his nose during a out of the spotlight. He did
and Lorre also starred in
scuffle in the ninth grade, then make a public appearance
“Casablanca” (10 p.m.)
again playing intramural foot- last year at the U.S. Open
in 1942.
ball at the University of Texas. tennis championship, supHe kept his crooked schnozz porting Scottish player Andy
Contact Kevin McDonough even after he could afford Murray, so you never know
at [email protected]
to have it fixed because, he when he might show up again.
c. United Feature Syndicate
said, “If I were to change it, I
c. Marilyn Beck, Stacy Jenel Smith
n Tim Gunn is
scheduled on “The
Daily Show With Jon
Stewart” (11 p.m.,
Comedy Central).
n Bryan Cranston,
Amanda Seyfried
and Michael Franti &
Spearhead appear on
“Late Show With David
Letterman” (11:35 p.m.,
CBS).
n Jay Leno welcomes
Kristin Chenoweth and
Josh Gad on “The
Tonight Show” (11:35
p.m., NBC).
n Larry David, Naya
Rivera and Backstreet
Boys appear on “Jimmy
Kimmel Live” (11:35
p.m., ABC).
n Dan Aykroyd, Paula
Patton, Brad Paisley
and Booker T. Jones
visit “Late Night With
Jimmy Fallon” (12:35
a.m., NBC).
n Craig Ferguson hosts
Henry Winkler and
Valerie Azlynn on “The
Late Late Show” (12:35
a.m., CBS).
TUESDAY EVENING
7:30
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
9:30
10 PM 10:30 11
PM
11:30
3.1 NBC
Eyewitness
NBC Nightly
Entertainment Inside Edition Hwood Game Night "Saturday America's Got Talent Twelve more acts from the top 60 perform Eyewitness
(:35)Tonight
4
3
3
3
4
4
3
WRCB
News
News
Tonight 'TVPG' 'TVPG'
Night Reunion" 'TV14'
live. 'TVPG' (L)
News
Show (N)
3.2 Antenna 216 148 148 148 216 216 163 Sanford
Sanford
Eyewitness
Maude
The Nanny
The Nanny
WKRP
WKRP
WKRP
WKRP
Married, Child Married, Child
6.1 TNN
165 (5:00)Nash.Now Fitness
Best of Rick & Bubba 'TVPG' Larry's Country Diner 'TVG'
Music City Tonight
Texas Music Country Music Rewind
6.2 RTV
H.Cassidy
Real McCoys Bev. Hillbillies Ozzie/Harriet Highway to Heaven
The Saint
Route 66
Da Vinci's Inquest "Fantasy"
6.3 PBJ
Tom Foolery Mr. Magoo
Sgt. Preston Kangaroo
He-Man
She-Ra: Power BraveStarr
Secrets of Isis Good Dog
GRR TV
Real Life 101 Harveytoons
6.4 FGO
Fishful Think. Ride Guide
Outdoorsman Outdoorsman Natural Angler Fishful Think. Inside Angling Ride Guide
Ride Guide
Comp.Angler Wildfly Fishing Wildfly Fishing
6.5 TUFF
Rev It Up!
3 Wide Life
Bounty Hntrs Cold Squad 'TV14'
Bounty Hunter Lumberjack
High Octane
Car Garage
S. Compact
Fusion TV 'TVG'
6.6 MyFam
Animal Court Talk.Picture
MovieStar
Little Miracles The New Zorro Bev. Hillbillies Crook and Chase 'TVPG'
Cold Squad 'TV14'
Eye for an Eye FamTeam
9.1 ABC
NewsChannel ABC World
Wheel of
Jeopardy!
Extreme Weight Loss A young woman wants to lose weight.
Body of Proof "Eye for An Eye" Newschannel (:35)Jimmy
10 9
9
9 10 10 9
WTVC
9 at 6
News
Fortune 'TVG' 'TVG'
'TVPG' (N)
'TVPG'
9 at 11 p.m.
Kimmel (N)
+++ Wild Bill (1995,Western) A gunslinger faces the
+++ Identity (2003,Thriller) Ten strangers get trapped at a
+ Point Blank (1999,Action) A police officer must save the day.
9.2 ThisTV 208 174 174 174 208 208 169
12.1 CBS
WDEF
12.2 Bounce
WDEF
18.1 PBS
23.1 TBN
23.2 Church
23.3 JCTV
23.4 Enlace
23.5 Smile
39.1 WYHB
45.1 PBS
WTCI
45.2 Create
53.1 CW
WFLI
53.2 MeTV
WFLI
61.1 FOX
WDSI
61.2 MNT
A&E
AMC
ANPL
BET
BRAVO
CMT
CNBC
CNN
COM
CSPAN
CSPAN2
CSSE
DISC
E!
ESPN
ESPN2
FAM
FNC
FOOD
FOXSS
FX
GAME
GOLF
HALL
HGTV
HIST
ION
INSP
LIFE
MTV
NBCSN
NGEO
NICK
OWN
SPEED
SPIKE
SPSO
STYLE
SYFY
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
TOON
TRAV
TRUTV
TVLAND
UCTV
USA
VH1
WGN
208
204
9
162
8
4
8
4
4
204 204 10
9
9 13
156
158
159
18
5
10
10
10
5
201
6
5
164
6
6
6
6
435
225
6
166
11
11
11
11
11
11
7
226
26
19
21
48
17
81
61
14
39
95
104
27
20
35
28
29
31
59
58
33
42
179
36
43
22
126
178
244
37
25
70
109
16
103
74
44
53
118
52
7
69
41
15
124
47
83
40
96
24
30
2
2
49
58
52
69
62
68
39
41
65
14
85
34
47
23
31
32
53
43
50
33
30
144
35
60
51
44
107
120
25
66
311
48
55
127
36
64
37
24
63
27
59
26
28
56
49
45
57
2
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23
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144
35
60
51
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107
101
25
66
311
48
55
127
36
64
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24
63
27
59
26
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5
29 29
67 67
15 15
2
46
58
52
69
62
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39
41
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14
85
34
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23
31
32
53
43
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33
30
144
35
60
51
44
107
101
25
66
311
48
55
127
36
64
37
24
63
27
59
26
28
56
49
45
57
226
26
19
21
48
17
45
61
14
39
95
104
27
20
35
28
29
31
59
58
33
42
179
36
43
22
126
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37
25
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26
19
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24 23
53 78
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40
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29 24
67 30
15 2
CINEMAX 320 515 520 515 320 15 520
DISN
136 43 43 54
64 57
HBO
302 500 500 500 302 302 500
HBO2
HBO FAM
303 501 502 501 303 303 502
305 503 504 503 305 305 503
SHOWTIME 340 400 400 600 340 14 540
TMC
350 408 406 408 350 62 560
showdown of his life. Jeff Bridges 'TV14'
motel with a killer. John Cusack 'TVM'
Kevin Cage 'TVM'
News 12 at
CBS Evening Prime News
Andy Griffith NCIS "Shell Shock" Pt. 2 of 2
NCIS: Los Angeles "The
Person of Interest "Triggerman" News 12
(:35)David
6:00 p.m.
News
Show 'TVPG' from July 23 'TV14'
Chosen One" 'TV14'
'TV14'
Nightside
Letterman (N)
(4:30)++ Shaft in Africa ('73) Catch 21
Catch 21
The Newlywed The Newlywed ++ Bowfinger (1999,Comedy) A director tries to get a star his ++ The Nutty Professor
Richard Roundtree 'TV14'
('96,Com) Eddie Murphy 'TV14'
Game 'TVPG' Game 'TVPG' career back. Steve Martin 'TVPG'
PBS NewsHour
Frontline
The Lincoln Highway 'TVG'
Old Amusement Parks 'TVG'
Frontline (N)
Nazi Mega Weapons
(5:00)Macedonian Call 'TVPG' Way of Master Potter's Touch BehindScenes Enjoying Life Joseph Prince Rod Parsley
Macedonian Call 'TVPG'
From His Heart Signs.
Supernatural Faith Now!
Behind Scenes Food for Soul World Impact Dr. Tony Evans Jewish Jesus Benny Hinn
Jerry Dirmann Dr. Goudeaux
40/40
Music Videos 'TVG'
Top 3
Amplify
Reflections
Music Videos 'TVG'
Music Village Yng Believer
Club 700 Hoy Casa de Dios Dios TV
Tiempo
Reino
Vida de Fe
La Vision
Tiempo
Hacerlo
Casa de Dios Tiempo
B. Adventures Upstairs Bears Charlie Church Colby's Club... iShine KNECT The Pond
Sarah
Hermie
Swiss Family Auto B. Good Gerbert
BB's Bed Time
Ron Hazelton L.M. Traveler INN News
Cold Case Files 'TV14'
The FBI Files 'TV14'
Cold Case Files 'TV14'
Poker Heartland Tour 'TVPG'
Amer. Thinks
BBC World
Nightly
PBS NewsHour
A Ride Along the Lincoln
Great Old Amusement Parks
Frontline "Life and Death in
The A List
BBC World
News
Business 'TVG'
Highway 'TVG'
'TVG'
Assisted Living" 'TVPG' (N)
'TVPG'
News
Hometime
Martha
Caprial
Julia & Jac.
Pepin
Test Kitchen Chef Besh
Martha
Hometime
Steves' Europe Burt Wolf
Pepin
Extra 'TVPG' Access
Seinfeld "The The Simpsons Whose Line Is Whose Line Is Capture "The Hunt Begins" (P) How I Met
The Office
Everybody
Rick Davis
Hollywood
Maestro"
It Anyway? (N) It Anyway? (N) 'TV14' (N)
Your Mother "Two Weeks" Loves Ray
Gold 'TVG'
The Rifleman The Rifleman M*A*S*H "Out M*A*S*H
Bewitched
I Dream of
The Mary Tyler Rhoda
The Dick Van The Odd
Night Gallery Perry Mason
"Miss Bertie"
of Gas" 'TVPG'
Jeannie
Moore Show
Dyke Show
Couple
Rules of
Two and a Half The Big Bang The Big Bang So You Think You Can Dance Fourteen talented dancers try to Fox61 First at Seinfeld "The Two and a Half How I Met
Engagement Men
Theory
Theory
win America's votes. 'TVPG' (N)
Ten
Subway"
Men
Your Mother
We the People We the People The People's Court 'TVPG'
House "Airborne" 'TV14'
House "Act Your Age" 'TV14'
Law & Order: Criminal Intent American Dad Dish Nation
Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage NY (N) Storage NY (N) Ship Wars (N) Shipping Wars Shipping Wars Shipping Wars
(3:00)Lonesome Dove
Lonesome Dove Texas Rangers go on an epic and perilous cattle drive. from July 29
++ The Eiger Sanction 'TVMA'
River Monsters
Swamplands USA
Wild Russia "Kamchatka"
Wild Russia "Arctic" 'TVPG'
Wild Russia "Caucasus" 'TVPG' Wild Russia "Kamchatka"
106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live 'TVPG' (N)
The Game
The Game
The Game
The Game
The Game
The Game (N) The Game
RealHusband RealHusband
Inside the Actors Studio "250th Episode" 'TVPG'
Below Deck
Interior Therapy (N)
The Real Housewives
Watch (N)
Property (N)
Reba 1/2
Reba Pt. 2 of 2 Reba
Reba
+++ Footloose (1984,Drama) Kevin Bacon 'TVPG'
Hillbilies Hire Cops
Cops/Country
Mad Money 'TVPG'
The Kudlow Report
American Greed: Scam
American Greed: Scam
The Profit "Car Crash"
The Profit "Car Crash"
(5:00)The Situation Room 'TVG' OutFront
Anderson Cooper 360
Piers Morgan Live 'TVG'
Anderson Cooper 360
OutFront
(:55)South Park (:25)Tosh.O
(:55)Colbert
Daily Show
Tosh.O
Tosh.O
Tosh.O
Tosh.O
Drunk (N)
JeselnikO (N) Daily Show (N) Colbert (N)
(5:00)U.S. House of Representatives 'TVG'
Key Capitol Hill Hearings
Key Capitol Hill Hearings
(4:00)U.S. Senate 'TVG'
Key Capitol Hill Hearings
(5:30)Talkin' Football
SEC Tonight
In the Huddle Football Classics NCAA Alabama vs. South Carolina September 29, 2001 'TVG'
ACC Preview SEC Tonight
Deadliest Catch
Deadly Catch "Man Overboard" Deadliest Catch: The Bait (N) Deadliest Catch (N)
To Be Announced
Airplane Repo
The Kardashians
E! News 'TVG' (N)
The Kardashians
LA Sugar (N) Ryan Seacrest Total Divas
Chelsea Lately E! News
SportsCenter 'TVG'
Nine for IX "Swoopes" (N)
Poker World Series 'TVPG'
Poker World Series 'TVPG'
SportsCenter 'TVG'
Horn (N)
Interruption
NFL Live 'TVG' (N)
Coaches
Coaches
Coaches
Coaches
Baseball Tonight 'TVG' (L)
Nine for IX "Swoopes"
Twisted
Pretty Little Liars
Pretty Little Liars (N)
Twisted "Docu-Trauma" (N)
The Vineyard (N)
The 700 Club 'TVPG'
Special Report With Bret Baier FOX Report
The O'Reilly Factor 'TVG'
Hannity
On the Record
The O'Reilly Factor 'TVG'
Chopped "Oui, Oui, Comfit"
Chopped "My Way" 'TVG'
Chopped "Chefs on a Mission" Chopped
Chopped (N)
Chopped
The Game 365 Boys/ Hall
Poker WPT Venice Grand Prix Bull Riding Championship
UFC Unleashed 'TV14'
Halls of Fame Insider
Poker WPT Venice Grand Prix
(4:00)+++ Avatar (2009,Fantasy) Zoe Saldana 'TV14'
+++ True Grit (2010,Adventure) Jeff Bridges 'TVPG'
+++ True Grit ('10,Adv) Jeff Bridges 'TVPG'
Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud Minute to Win It 'TVG'
Minute to Win It 'TVG'
Family Feud Family Feud Minute to Win It 'TVG'
Golf Central
PGA Tour (N) Academy (N) P. Lessons (N) Golf's Greatest Rounds "2005 PGA Championship" (N)
In Play (N)
Golf Central
Learn (N)
Little House on the Prairie
Little House on the Prairie
++ Family Plan (2005,Comedy) Tori Spelling 'TVPG'
Frasier
Frasier
Frasier
Frasier
House Hunters Renovation
House Hunters House Hunters Property (N)
Property (N)
Power Brokers (N)
HouseH (N)
House (N)
RenovateRent RenovateRent
Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars CountCars (N) CountCars (N) Restoration
Restoration
Truckers "Art of War" 'TV14'
Criminal Minds
Criminal Mind "Sense Memory" Criminal Minds "Today I Do"
Criminal Minds "Coda" 'TV14' Criminal Mind "Valhalla" 'TV14' Flashpoint "Severed Ties"
Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman
Dr. Quinn M.D.. "The Healing" Little House "Back to School" The Waltons "The Revel" 'TVG' Matlock "The Author" 'TVPG'
Matlock "The Rat Pack" 'TVPG'
Dance Moms
Dance Moms
Dance Moms
Dance Moms (N)
Pretty Wicked Moms (N)
Catering Wars (N)
Hey Girl
Girl Code
Girl Code
Girl Code
Catfish 'TVPG'
Catfish 'TV14'
Catfish 'TV14'
Nikki and Sara Catfish
The Crossover The Crossover PFT Extra
Football CFL British Columbia Lions vs. Toronto Argonauts Site: Rogers Centre 'TVG' (L)
PFT Extra
Motocross Highlights
Alaska Troopers "Vice Squad" Manhattan Mob Ramp. 'TV14' King of Coke 'TV14'
Tijuana Drug Lords 'TV14'
Doomsday Bugged (N)
Tijuana Drug Lords 'TV14'
SpongeBob
SpongeBob
Haunted Hath Victorious
Full House
Full House
Full House
Full House
The Nanny
The Nanny
Friends
(:35)Friends
I (Almost) Got Away With It
Haves/ Have Nots "The Set Up" The Haves and the Have Nots Haves and Have Nots (N)
Haves/ Have Nots "The Set Up" The Haves and the Have Nots
NASCAR Race Hub (N)
Pass Time
Pass Time
GearZ
GearZ
Stuntbusters Stuntbusters Trucker
Trucker
GearZ
GearZ
Tattoo Night. Tattoo Night. Tattoo Night. Tattoo Night. Ink Master "Baby Got Back"
Ink Master "Thrills for Grills"
Ink Master 'TV14'
Tattoo Night. Tattoo Night.
Golf America Pre-game
Baseball MLB Colorado Rockies vs. Atlanta Braves Site: Turner Field Atlanta, Ga. 'TVG' (L)
Post-game
Post-game
Baseball MLB Col/Atl.
(5:30)++ Sleepless in Seattle ('93,Rom) Tom Hanks 'TV14'
Giuliana and Bill (N)
Giuliana and Bill
Tia and Tamera
Giuliana and Bill
Face Off "Burtonesque" 'TVPG' Face Off "Alice in Zombieland" Face Off "Supermobile" 'TV14' Face Off "Monster Twist" 'TV14' Face Off "Make It Reign" 'TV14' Fact or Faked
King of Queens Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Family Guy
Family Guy
The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang Conan 'TV14' (N)
(5:45)++++ Lust for Life ('56,Biography) Kirk Douglas 'TVPG' ++ Conspirators (1944,Adventure) Hedy Lamarr 'TVPG'
++++ Casablanca (1942,Romance) Humphrey Bogart 'TVPG'
Toddlers & Tiaras
Little People, Big World
Think You Are "Kelly Clarkson" Think You Are (N)
Little People, Big World (N)
Who Do You Think You Are?
Castle "Setup" 'TVPG'
Castle "Countdown" 'TVPG'
Rizzoli & Isles
Rizzoli & Isles (N)
Perception "Defective" (N)
Rizzoli & Isles
Regular Show LegendsChima Johnny (N)
TeenTita (N) Looney (N)
AdventureTime King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy
Family Guy
Bizarre Foods "Nambia" 'TVPG' Man v. Food Man v. Food Bizarre Foods America
Airport 24/7
Airport 24/7
Epic Spills (P) 'TVPG' (N)
Bizarre Foods America
Cops
Cops
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn (N)
Chicago (N)
Pawn
Pawn
South Beach South Beach
(:25)M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
Loves Ray
Loves Ray
Loves Ray
Loves Ray
King of Queens (:35)Queens
Deliverance Outreach 'TVG'
Know Your Bible 'TVG'
Our Town 'TVG'
Night Talk 'TVG'
Rick Davis Talking Gold 'TVG'
Law & Order: S.V.U. "Avatar" Law & Order: S.V.U. "Bedtime" Law & Order: S.V.U.
Covert Affairs (N)
Suits "Unfinished Business" (N) Graceland "O-Mouth" 'TV14'
(5:45)TI Tiny
T.I. and Tiny Hit the Floor "Turnover"
La La's Full
La La's Full
Love and Hip-Hop: Atlanta
++ Malibu's Most Wanted ('03,Com) Jamie Kennedy 'TVPG'
Funniest Home Videos 'TVPG' Funniest Home Videos 'TVPG' Met Mother
Met Mother
Met Mother
Met Mother
WGN News at Nine
Funniest Home Videos 'TVPG'
PREMIUM CHANNELS
(5:20) What's Your Number?
(:05)+++ Heat ('95,Cri) A detective wants to nab a professional criminal. Al Pacino 'TV14'
Strike Back
(:50)Strike Back 'TV14'
(:45)Banshee
Good Luck ... Austin and Ally Jessie
Jessie
Good Luck ... Dog Blog
Shake It Up
A.N.T. Farm Dog Blog
Gravity Falls Jessie
A.N.T. Farm
(5:15) Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close A
Real Time With Bill Maher
++ Savages (2012,Crime Story) Two men try to save their
(:45)HBO First The Newsroom "Willie Pete"
boy searches for the lock that matches a key.
'TVM'
abducted girlfriend. Aaron Johnson 'TVMA'
Look
'TVMA'
About Face 'TV14'
(:15) Seeking a Friend for the End of the World 'TV14'
The Newsroom "Willie Pete"
Bill Maher 'TVM'
Boxing 'TVMA'
(5:15) Edward Scissorhands
++ Space Jam ('96) Michael Jordan 'TVPG'
++ The Incredible Shrinking Woman 'TV14'
Love Wrecked ('07,Com) Amanda Bynes 'TVPG' Movie
(5:35) The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1 (:35) Gone A woman is convinced her kidnapper (:15) Save the Date (2012,Comedy) A young woman reWeb Therapy Dexter "This
Bella's unborn child is a risk to the Wolf Pack. has returned. Amanda Seyfried 'TV14'
evaluates her life. Geoffrey Arend 'TVMA'
(N)
Little Piggy"
(5:05) The Burning Plain
++ Beloved (1998,Drama) A woman is haunted by her daughter's spirit. Oprah Winfrey 'TVMA' ++ Beyond Borders (2003,Romance) Angelina Jolie 'TVMA'
Are smoothies, juices
dangerous to health?
By Abby Olena
Chicago Tribune
The marketing for freshly pressed and blended juices promises instant energy,
weight loss, a flood of vitamins and minerals — all in
a single, portable, gulpable
serving.
Health-minded consumers seem to have bought the
claims — and with them,
gallons of juice.
Jamba Juice, which
sells juices and smoothies,
reported $55.1 million in
revenue for the 13 weeks
ending April 2. Beverage
giant Coca-Cola tapped the
juice trend early by acquiring Odwalla in 2001, and in
2007 PepsiCo followed suit
with Naked Juice.
Raw vegetable and fruit
juices make up about 10 percent of sales at The Protein
Bar, a Chicago-based chain
of health food restaurants,
says founder Matt Matros.
His customers ask for
juice, he says, because they
believe it is an important
part of their healthy diets.
Tools for juicing at home
are also a big business;
one of the dozens of juicer choices, a stainless steel
model with more than 100
Amazon.com reviews, sells
for close to $1,200. Meanwhile, more than 40 books
or e-books related to juice
or smoothies have been
released in the last 30 days
alone on Amazon.com, with
the majority mentioning
health, weight loss or both
in their titles.
But according to dietitians and nutrition scientists, juice is far from the
healthiest way to consume
fruit, and one expert went
so far as to call its popularity a dangerous trend.
“The fruit juice industry
has essentially taken the
‘apple-a-day’ mentality and
used it to sell fruit juices as
healthy,” says Barry Popkin,
a professor in the department of nutrition at the
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Gillings
School of Public Health.
Popkin and other experts
would rather see people
eating whole fruit. Because
most juicing methods
remove the produce’s fiber,
drinking juice omits one of
the key benefits of eating
fruit, while delivering huge
amounts of sugar and calories.
“Every one of the longterm studies of the health
effects of fruit juices shows
that you increase your risk
of diabetes and weight gain”
with regular juice consumption, Popkin says.
One 2010 study in the
American Journal of Epidemiology followed more
than 43,000 adults in Singapore for five years and
found that those who consumed two or more servings of fruit juice per week
had a 29 percent higher
risk of developing diabetes than those who didn’t
drink juice regularly — not
far behind the 42 percent
increased risk for weekly
soda drinkers.
Expensive, freshly
pressed fruit juices from the
Roberts
• Continued from Page E1
unknown to sell him in such
a short time. I am amused
that some are pushing for
Kevin Kookogey, a former
Williamson County GOP
activist. The best thing about
having him as a candidate is
that we know what everyone would call him. At last
we’d have a candidate whose
name fits him.
Lt. Gov. and state Sen.
Ron Ramsey, R-Blountville,
recently said, “I get a dozen
emails a week asking me to
run against Alexander.” I
don’t doubt it.
When you realize that
Alexander’s voting record
got him an “A” ranking from
The National Rifle Association, a 100 percent rating
from the National Right
to Life and The National
Federation of Independent
Business, and that he has
voted with the majority of
Republican senators 83 percent of the time, it makes
you realize what a kook the
tea party is hunting to run
against him.
Norm Ornstein, a conservative scholar with the
American Enterprise Institute, said Alexander “has
always been viewed as one
of those guys who is a problem solver looking for ways
to work with others.”
Like I said, the tail is too
far from the brain to let it
wag the dog.
Contact Dalton Roberts
at [email protected]
to the Encyclopaedia
Britannica website is $70
per year.)
n Available for: iOS, but a
• Continued from Page E1
similar app, “Encyclopaedia
Britannica 2013,” is
chemical symbols or
equations. Review important available as a one-time,
$20 purchase for Android
dates in European history.
devices.
Pair authors and painters
with their most famous
works. Study up on German
Quick Graph
phrases before das Quiz.
n What it is: A capable
n Cost: Free
application that can fulfill
n Available for: iOS
most of the functions
of scientific graphing
ABBYY
calculators, which can
as much as $150.
TextGrabber + cost
Features include the ability
Translator
to graph multiple equations
simultaneously (and in
n What it is: Using
color), manipulate and
an optical character
retrieve information from
recognition algorithm,
graphs by touch and to
TextGrabber extracts text
display graphs in 3-D.
in saved images or photos
n How they’ll use it:
taken with the tablet and
Check with the mathematics
turns it into an editable
teacher to find out the
document. As the name
policy about tablet use,
suggests, the app also
but even if students can’t
features a translation
use one during in-class or
function that can convert
standardized testing, this
words into and out of
app’s capabilities mean a
40 different languages.
graphing calculator is one
Converted images can be
less thing your student will
shared via email, social
media update or sent to an need to cart around every
day.
Evernote account.
n Cost: Free, but some
n How they’ll use it:
advanced functions such
Instead of the drudgery of
sitting in the library, pouring as implicit graphs are only
unlocked in a $2 premium
through books and taking
notes by hand, TexGrabber version.
n Available for: iOS, but
lets students take a
similar graphing calculator
snapshot of the page,
apps are available for
select the information they
Android as well.
need and save their hands
a great deal of cramping.
The text won’t be formatted
WolframAlpha
correctly, and it’s not 100
n What it is: A mobile,
percent accurate, but no
dedicated
version of
optical character recognition
technology is, and it’s faster the same computational
knowledge engine that lets
than handwriting.
services like Apple’s Siri,
n Cost: $6
Android’s Iris, Microsoft
n Available for: Android,
Bing and other services
iOS
interpret and answer
questions written in natural
Encyclopaedia language. Can interpret
questions on a variety of
Britannica
topics, from the distance
n What it is: A mobile
between Mars and Pluto
version of the legendary
to notable facts about Bob
250-year-old scholarly
Dylan.
reference series. The
n How they’ll use it: Think
slick app packs more than
about how the actors in
80,000 entries. Users can
“Star Trek” interact with the
save their favorite articles,
ship’s computer. Students
swipe through galleries
frustrated by the halting
of images, and use the
language of effective web
LinkMap function to see a
visual representation of the searches might find it easier
connection between related to formulate questions as if
they were asking a teacher.
articles.
n How they’ll use it: Most Need to know about Marie
of the information is behind Curie’s birthplace or when
carbon becomes a liquid?
a paywall, it covers fewer
Just ask “Where was Marie
topics and is updated less
Curie born?” or “What is the
frequently than Wikipedia,
melting point of carbon?”
but the EB has a weighty
Easy.
academic reputation that
n Cost: $3
makes it more reliable for
research papers, eliminating n Available for: Android,
iOS
much of the hassle of
Apps
Kyra Scott loads kale into a juicer at Protein Bar in Chicago.
local juice bar are no healthier than the kind sold in grocery stores, Popkin added.
Smoothies do provide
fiber, as the entire fruit
often goes into the blender,
skins and all, but they still
contain a lot of calories.
Choosing a vegetable-based
juice or smoothie is one way
to reduce the sugar content,
health advocates say.
However, epidemiological studies on juice
consumption show correlations, not cause and
effect, says Elizabeth Ward,
a registered dietitian on
Jamba Juice’s Healthy Living Council. Ward says she
does not consider juices
miraculous but, because of
the vitamins and minerals,
they are a good alternative
to beverages that contain
only calories.
Ward and Karen May, a
spokeswoman for Naked
Juice and Tropicana, agreed
that most Americans don’t
consume enough produce,
and juice products are a
good way to help fix that.
“Orange juice is a convenient and great-tasting
way to help people meet
nutrient needs, providing
vitamin C, potassium and
calcium … in fortified varieties,” May says.
But according to Lara
Field, a pediatric dietitian
at the University of Chicago
Medical Center and founder of a nutrition counseling
practice called Forming
Early Eating Decisions, or
FEED, the sugar in fruit
juice far outweighs any
possible benefit from the
concentrated vitamins and
minerals.
“Eating too much fruit
can make us gain weight,
just like eating too much
candy,” Field says.
Plus, the fiber in fruit
complements the vitamins
and minerals, so juice drinkers miss out on the optimal health benefits, says
Bethany Doerfler, clinical
research dietitian in the
division of gastroenterology
at Northwestern Medicine.
Americans already are
harming their health by not
consuming enough fiber,
says Joanne Slavin, professor in the Department of
Food Science and Nutrition
“
Eating too much
fruit can make us gain
weight, just like eating
too much candy.
”
— Lara Field,
pediatric dietitian
at the University of Minnesota and a self-described
“fiber person.”
Diets higher in fiber are
associated with lower risk
of cardiovascular disease
and lower body weight,
Slavin says, yet most American adults only achieve half
the recommended daily
fiber intake, which is 25 to
38 grams.
“I want people to eat
more fiber,” Slavin says,
and that includes choosing
whole fruits over juice.
Eating fiber also contributes to a feeling of fullness,
or satiety, that helps prevent
people from overeating. In
one study, published in the
journal Appetite in 2009,
people who ate apple slices before lunch felt more
full and subsequently consumed 15 percent fewer calories than those who drank
apple juice.
But the same study suggests fiber isn’t the only factor affecting satiety. A third
group of participants in the
study consumed applesauce
containing fiber comparable
to that in the apple slices.
That group still consumed
more calories at lunch than
those who ate raw apples —
though not as many as the
juice drinkers.
Field offered one explanation: Juice, smoothies and
applesauce don’t require
chewing, which research
suggests helps signal the
body that it’s eaten enough
calories for the moment.
Field highlighted
research published in the
journal Obesity in 2012 in
which subjects took either
one or eight minutes to
chew as much cake as
they naturally would have
chosen, while spitting out
each bite at the moment
they would typically swallow. At the same time, they
had either a small or large
volume of cake mixed with
• Continued from Page E1
Staff Photo by Maura Friedman
Melissa Barrows, assistant director and set designer,
paints pieces for the set of “God Trek,” a space-themed
production presented by the vacation Bible school at
East Chattanooga Church of God.
(jungle theme), Prism (space
lab theme), Treasure (pirates
theme) or Hershey (candy
theme), which are being
plundered and harassed by
the evil Countess H. Despair.
In the live finale which
substitutes for the church’s
Sunday worship service,
the countess is captured,
redeemed and emerges not
McClatchy Newspapers
water delivered to their
stomachs via feeding tube.
At a subsequent meal,
the subjects who chewed
for eight minutes ate fewer
calories than others, regardless of the volume of food
delivered to their stomachs,
suggesting that chewing is
as important as the amount
of food consumed to subsequent caloric intake.
Some nutrition experts
acknowledge that drinking
produce is better than consuming none at all.
“Considering the fact
that more than 90 percent
of Americans are not meeting their recommendations
of daily fruit, 100 percent
fruit juice is an easy and
convenient way to meet
these goals,” Diane Welland,
a registered dietitian for the
Juice Products Association,
wrote via email.
Federal dietary guidelines state that 4 ounces of
100 percent fruit juice are
equivalent to a half-cup of
whole fresh fruit, Welland
says.
Those guidelines also
recommend that the majority of fruit consumed be
whole fruit, but it can be
challenging for adults to eat
the suggested 1 ½ to 2 cups
of fruit and 2 ½ to 3 cups of
vegetables a day.
“Sitting down to a bowl
of kale is intimidating,” says
Doerfler, and that’s one
possible reason juices and
smoothies are so popular.
“Americans do not eat
enough fruits and vegetables, so any step (toward
eating more produce) is
better than none,” says Cornell University nutritionist
Christina Stark.
But Stark cautioned eaters not to choose the same
fruit in the same form over
and over again, as the goal
should be “variety in all
aspects” of the consumption of vegetables and fruits,
from texture to type.
Doerfler says smoothies and juice could be a
less scary way to shift to a
more plant-based diet. Predominantly vegetable-based
blends are a healthier choice
with “a small amount of
fruit to make a juice or
smoothie more palatable,”
she says.
Safe
drama, a talking mainframe
computer and a closing-day
family festival in which all
young participants leave
with a backpack.
Candy Guyselman, new
to the city and a former
children’s pastor, volunteered to update “God Trek,”
one of seven or eight VBS
concepts she had written
while living in Ohio, for the
church. While participants
are learning biblical concepts
and character traits nightly,
they’re also seeing what its
creator called “a soap opera
for kids” play out with the
six-person crew of the U.S.S.
Starship Redemption.
“It’s like watching a ‘Star
Trek’ episode,” Guyselman
says. “And they’re learning
within the drama how to live
a fuller life in Christ.”
In the playwright’s scenario, participants are assigned
to one of four planets, Eden
• • • timesfreepress.com....
Breaking News: 423-757-News
E6 • Tuesday, July 30, 2013
in her usual black outfit but
in white emblematic of her
washed-clean soul.
While six actors have
“been practicing hard, learning the dialogue” and getting
down their timing to interact with the video computer,
around 80 people have been
involved in pulling together
the program, according to
Guyselman.
“That’s how many it will
take to pull it off,” she says. “I
think it’s going to look pretty
nice. We’ve tried to make it
really fun.”
Guyselman says her team
has even put together an
introductory video and purchased original “Star Trek”
sounds effects for more
authenticity.
“The more you put into it,
the more fun it is,” she says.
And the late July-early
August dates, according to
Guyselman, are intentional.
“We tried to stay away
from everybody else’s timeframe,” she says, “so we tried
to do it at the very end [of
summer]. We’re also doing it
in the evening,” concluding
it with a family festival and
backpack giveaway. “We’ve
tried to hit on every aspect
— give them one last hurrah.”
Contact staff writer Clint
Cooper at [email protected] or 423-7576497. Subscribe to his posts
online at Facebook.com/
ClintCooperCTFP.
5
3
6
4
vetting other web-based
sources.
n Cost: The app is free,
but access to the library is
a $15 annual subscription.
(An annual subscription
IF YOU GO
n What: “God Trek”
vacation Bible school.
n When: 7-9 p.m.
Wednesday-Saturday,
and 10:45 a.m. Sunday
(family festival).
n Where: East
Chattanooga Church of
God, 4872 Jersey Pike.
n Ages: 3-sixth grade.
n Phone: 894-7526.
n Website: www.
godtrekvbs.eventbrite.
com.
n What: “SonWest
Roundup” vacation Bible
school.
n When: 5:15-8 p.m.
Thursday-Friday, and 4-8
p.m. Saturday.
Contact staff writer
Casey Phillips at [email protected]
timesfreepress.com or 423757-6205. Follow him on
Twitter at @PhillipsCTFP
n Where: Rock Spring
United Methodist Church,
3477 Peavine Road, Rock
Spring, Ga.
n Ages: Preschool-fifth
grade.
n Phone: 919-491-6600.
n Email:
[email protected]
com.
n What: “Jonah: A Whale
of a Tale” vacation Bible
school.
n When: 8:30 a.m.-2
p.m. Saturday.
n Where: Daisy United
Methodist Church, 9508
Dayton Pike, SoddyDaisy.
n Ages: 4-fifth grade.
n Phone: 332-3243.
News From Across 12 Counties
Every day, every week in the...
SECTION
F
Tuesday, July 30, 2013
CARS HOMES
JOBS
SERVICES STUFF
cars.timesfreepress.com
homes.timesfreepress.com
jobs.timesfreepress.com
FEATURED VEHICLE
FEATURED HOUSE
FEATURED JOB
FEATURED PROVIDER
HVAC SERVICE TECH
TENNESSEE ROOFING
CHICKAMAUGA AREA
1999 CAMANO 1999
31’ DIESEL Trawler on Tennessee
River-Lake Guntersville, Alabama.
Very fuel efficient. Need to sell
due to health. 256-882-1972.
Yachtsouth.com for details.
$87,900 obo.
2500sq ft. 3/2.5 In grnd pool. Det
w/ shop. A STEAL/ $195K.
423-421-1345
TO ADVERTISE, CALL:
READER’S PHOTO
757-6200
classifieds.timesfreepress.com
yp.timesfreepress.com
Experienced HVA Service Tech
Needed fpr Chatt and metro
area. full time. Must have 5 - 10yr
experience and all tools. Must pass
drug screen background check
423-667-0117
White Leather
Arm Chair
220
$
GAF Master Ellite Applicators
Full Insured/ Warrantied
All types roofs
Metal, Shingle & Flat
Residential & Commercial
FREE Estimates! 842-8826
CLASSIFIED
SUBMITTED BY:
CHUCK AND CINDY TAYLOR, CHATTANOOGA, TN
CAR BUYERS
WANT TO KNOW –
OR PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE AT
timesfreepress.com
GET 3 LINES FOR FREE!
Certain Restrictions Apply
BUSINESS HOURS:
MONDAY–FRIDAY
8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY
235
$
Text “Antiques”
to 423-415-1139 to receive
shipment and sales notifications
FEATURED RETAILER
Make, model, year, color, price,
phone number and options of
the vehicle you are selling.
Include a photo and sell it faster.
ZXij%k`d\j]i\\gi\jj%Zfd
3 LINES, 3 DAYS, NO CHARGE
Ladies Writing
Desk With Claw
And Ball Leg
THE INSYDE
OUTSYDE SHOP
5006 Dayton Blvd. • Red Bank, TN
SPRING/ SUMMER HOURS
Thursday 10-5, Friday & Saturday 10-6
Sun Noon-6
876-1400 or 875-9828
Join us on FACEBOOK
WE GLADLY ACCEPT
UPLOAD: [email protected]
Not all photos will be printed
Local Business
DIRECTORY
yp.timesfreepress.com
Air Conditioning
LOOKOUT AIR SOLUTIONS
$49.99 Seasonal Cleaning
Call for Duct Cleaning Specials.
Free Est. 100% financing avail.
423-710-1328
Baileys Heating & Air Svc
& Sales. All makes/models,
senior discounts 423-413-5312
A1 A/C SERVICE - 30 yrs.
exp. All makes, no OT charges.
Lic. Contractor. 706-375-1140
Appliance Repairs
A-1 SERVICE - Air Cond.,
Refrigerators, Washers, Dryers,
Stoves. 822-6003/322-2790
REPAIR HOME icemakers,
refrigerators, freezers & stoves.
7 days. 596-4083/899-9448
Automotive
Bulldozing
Dozer, Excavator, Bobcat,
Backhoe, Dump Truck, Top Soil,
Fill Dirt & Gravel. Prompt &
Reasonable. 423-504-7857
Affordable Excavation
Dump Truck
Service
GRAVEL, FILL DIRT,
Excavators/Dozers/DumpTrucks
Free Estimates 423-595-9554
Top Soil, Sitework, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 423-280-6347
HANDYMAN CONNECTION
Licensed H Bonded H Insured
All work guaranteed.
Lot Clearing, footings, road
building, septic systems, topsoil,
and fill dirt. 605-5374.
Excavating
RANSOM RENOVATION
Bush Hogging
LOTS CLEARED OR BUSH
HOGGED, Driveways installed,
Gravel Hauled, Fill dirt, Mow
Hay, Topsoil/Sand 423-595-1832
WEEDS, BRUSH & TREES
6’, 8’ & 15’ machines
Jim Swafford 423-593-0907
BUSH HOGGING
Any Size Job!!
Any size Job.
Call 423-595-3485
Cell Phone Repair
CPR Cell Phone Repair
We fix all types of devices!
423-486-1668
CLOCK REPAIR
FAITH-FULL Fences & Decks
All Types. Over 20 Yrs. Exp.
Gary 240-0980, 706-866-0099
FENCE OR DECK by STAN
40 yrs. Exp. Free Est.
423-298-1225
JARNAGIN FENCE CO.
All type fences. Free Est.
423-326-9534. 706-375-4828.
Fish Ponds
All Vehicles Running or Not!
423-635-5646
Trojans, Viruses, Worms
Holding Your PC Hostage???
Can Fix call 423-463-0872
Concrete Work
COMPLETE CONCRETE
423.421.8785 or 423.421.9466
SPECIAL 10X40X4’’ $1299
CASH for Junk Cars,
Trucks, Vans & SUVS.
423-394-7192
Henshall Concrete&Masonry
Driveways, slabs, walls & demo.
Call Joe at: 423-635-5680
Lockhart Concrete Finishing
Demolition, concrete, asphalt, excavate. All types concrete 825-0017
TL Hood Construction - Lic/Ins.
25 yrs exp. Remodeling & new
home. Work guar. 423-619-1339
Hardwood, Tile, Kitchen & Bath
Decks, Ret. Walls, Drainage
Lic & Ins (423) 400-0732
GOT A DIRTY FISH POND?
Clean & Service GoldFish/Koi
Ponds. Alan 423-802-5729
Flooring
WOOD FLOORS -Refinishing
& Repairs. All work guaranteed.
Best Prices. 423-227-9328
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Installation, Finish & Refinish.
423-240-9712
Garage Builders
DRYWALL, CARPENTRY,
Pay Top Dollar - Running or not
423-580-1611 Ken
Decks
DECK BUILDERS pool/spa
decks, Screened porches,
fences, 30 yrs. professional exp.
Lic./ Ins. Free Est. 629-8055
DECK RESTORATION
FAST CASH
Our 5 step restoration process
makes your deck look new again.
Renovation HQ 423-645-5740
Cars Running or Not
423-645-7402
Dentistry
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS
BUSES, MOTOR HOMES
EVENING & FRIDAY DENTAL
(423) 521-4210
www.mishagareydds.com
Will pay cash in 30 minutes.
423-521-7777
Beauty
HAIR BENDERS INT.
Hair Salon & Beauty Spa
(423) 414-2164
Drywall
Bedroom Furniture
BED CITY
Mattresses, Bedroom Suites,
Bed Frames 423-956-2490
COX Excavating - Bobcat,
backhoe, topsoil - All kinds of
excavating. Free est. 322-3010
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates. Lic & Ins.
Call or text 423-314-5386
DRIVEWAYS, DEMOLITION ,
REPAIRS TODAY
Drainage Work, Land Clearing.
Lic./Ins. 25 yrs. 423-421-0664
Electrical. Small Jobs OK. Free
Est. Lic & Ins. 423-667-1999
Painting
Pressure Wash -specialize in
Vinyl siding. Driveways from
$99. Repair, Painting, Deck Stain.
423-505-8071
T. Burney Construction
Consultants - Man Cave, Sun
Rm, Bath, Ktchn, Comm. Build
Outs . Lic. / Ins. 423-228-0971
HANGING, FINISHING
& REPAIRS up to 60 miles.
Free Est. 423-876-4445
CEILINGS REPAIRED
Textured, Finishing, 30 yrs.
Clay Simmons. 842-7786
LAWN IRRIGATION
Sales/Service/Install. Comm/Res
Call Mt. Crest Co. 423-414-5280
Landscaping
AAA STUMP
GRINDING
Best Price - Just Call
423-825-CALL / 825-2255
TENNESSEE VALLEY
ROOFING CO.
WALLACE STUMP GRINDING
Free Estimates.
Senior and Military Discount.
Call 423-255-4279
Abbott Painting & Pres-Wash
Lowest Prices All Work Guaranteed
Int/Ext paint & restorations. Press
wash, low temp. paint/ wash,
carpentry. Ins. 423-314-6970
l Seen on newschannel9.com
l All Shingle Roofs & Repairs
l Senior & Church Discounts
QUALITY $15
WATLINGTON PAINTING
Top Quality/Christian. Int/ext.
706-965-7106, 706-280-8661
FAVORS PAINTING PLUS
Interior & Exterior, Lic./Ins.
Satisfaction Guar. 423-902-6954
RON RABY’S TREE SERVICE
Honest, Quality & Professional
Tree Care for over 30 years.
Free Estimates/Fully Insured
ISA-Certified Arborist SO-6099-A
423/421-0479 - 706/965-9945
TILE
Excellent Painter & Wallpaper
Hanger. Great work & Great
Rates. Call Cathie 423-304-3355
Personal Trainers
FIT U INC. Fitness/Nutrition,
TENNESSEE ROOFING
GAF Master Ellite Applicators
Full Insured/ Warrantied
All types roofs
Metal, Shingle & Flat
Residential & Commercial
FREE Estimates! 842-8826
423-605-5374
Finest of all Topsoil
706-861-6404, 423-593-2191
Travel Agencies
DISCOVERY TRAVEL
CRUISE & TOUR CENTER
(423) 414-2167
AFFORDABLE ROOFING &
LEAK REPAIRS. Over 41 yrs.
Senior, Church & Vet Discounts.
Don Grant Co., Old Graysville
Mill. Free Estimates.
423-894-3781/ 706-937-6187
Tree Service
Removal, Trimming, Stump
Grinding. We specialize in
dangerous trees. Free est.
Lic/Ins. 423-244-3487
Plumbing
100% Finance Approval
Master Plumber. Sewer Jetting.
Great Rates. Bonded,
Lic & Ins. Matthew 423-509-4523
$50 Per Month
Quality home repairs low rates.
Master Plumber. 423-785-7430
16 yrs. complaint free BBB.
Commercial, Residential &
Repairs. All work guaranteed.
Free estimates. 423-867-9294
Ron: 316-7904
AJ’S PLUMBING & SERVICE
All types of Service & Repair.
Lic/Bonded/Ins. 423-510-0676
Masonry
$99 Drain Cleaning
H All Star Plumbing H
423-790-0935
For all your plumbing needs.
All Plumbing & Gas
Pay by the job. Not the hour.
24hr. Call 314-4789
MASTER PLUMBER
Lic. & bonded. $25 service call
applied to repairs. 421-5380
Veterans, Seniors & Fixed
Income Discounts.
No job too small.
423-309-0469, 423-718-2310
TIM-BERS Tree Service
& Stump Grinding. Ins. Free est.
70’ bucket truck. 423-605-4158
A CHRISTIAN CO - Kelley
Tree Service-Ins. Free
Estimates. 423-544-2602
NORRIS TREE SERVICE,
Inc. Tree work, stump removal
Licensed, insured. 892-7950
Northside Tree Service
Top trim removed. Insured.
Since 1978. 877-0717/843-9020
RADER’S TREE SERVICE
Fast, Dependable & Best Price.
Lic & Ins. Free Est 423-457-1310
Used Clothing/
Apparel
PLATO’S CLOSET
1-800-385-0781
Jason Helton Roofing
Marvin Jenkins & Son Plumbing
Patriot Tree & Landscape
WILSON TREE CO. Oolt.,
TN. Quality Work at a Fair Price.
Work Comp./Liab. 423-284-9872
TENN TREE SERVICE
Body Transformation, Athletic
Performance (423) 400-7482
ABSOLUTE PLUMBING
42 yrs in business. Free Est.
Lic/Ins. W-Comp. 423-843-3593
MOUNTAIN CITY TILE
Tile, Stone Slabs, Travertine,
Flooring (423) 414-2200
Painting/Wallpaper
Professional Lawn Care
Mow-Trim-Haul, Commercial/
Residential. Insured. 894-4233
All types brick, block, stone &
stucco. Concrete & remove old
concrete & repair chimney top.
Garner Masonry
698-6080 / 645-1846
423-499-0134
L H Lewis Tree Service
423-355-1909
NETHERY PAINTING
5 Star Lawn Services
Cut, Trim, Edge, Blow
Trimming, Topping & Removal.
Free Estimates. Fully insured.
Senior Citizen & Military Discount
SUPER SCENIC CITY
Short Waits & Low Rates
Metal/Roof Coating/Carpentry
l All Shingle Roofs & Repairs
l Senior & Church Discounts
l Residential & Commercial
Call 886-2569, 320-9491
l
MACHINE CLEANED
TOPSOIL
DELTA CONSTRUCTION
KEITH’S TREE
SERVICE
Stump Removal
423-834-1593
HOUSEKEEPING We clean
offices & houses. Commercial
& Residential. 423-394-2909
Tree Service
Sheetrock
Top Soil
Commercial & Res. Scheduled Service
423-344-7446/423-635-0057
Home/Commercial
Remodeling
423-593-7124
TCB PAINTING - Int ./ Ext.
Pressure wash Decks/driveways
Lic/Ins. Free Est. 423-475-0227
Lawn Care
Est. 1993 Small/large jobs,
Home repairs & Remodeling
PLicensed & Fully InsuredP
Free Est.! 423-624-9800
Mid-South Roofing & Repairs
30 yrs. experience.
Licensed, Bonded, Insured.
Quality Int./Ext. Services
Lic./Ins. 423-702-6032
Weekly Specials. Ins. & Bonded
SANDERS GUTTERING
% ANDY OnCall %
Roofing Repairs
Residential Cleaning
Backyards / Patios / Walls
Burn Pits / Planting Designs
J.A. Brett Landscapes 400-5081
Handyman Services
Roofing
PROFESSIONAL PAINTING
Ext & Int Painting, power wash,
deck stain, repair. Credit cards
accept. David 423-227-0176
AFFORDABLE CLEANING
Fully insured.
GUTTERING Free Estimates
(706) 965-4999
5’’ or 6’’ Seamless Aluminum
423-316-7691, 706-861-3591
Call David 423-227-0176
House Cleaning
Irrigation Systems
Bedwell Handyman Services
All home repair - Painting, Press
Wash, Carpentry. 423-432-2405
Bobcat Service
3Fences 3Decks 423-314-6970
JOLLY PAINTING
Gutter Work
PRECISION SEAMLESS
Abbott Press/Wash/Painting
3Chem Low Press 3Safe Cleaning Agent
HAULING brush, trash, furniture, etc. Cleaning of attics,
garages, etc. 423-899-4850
Int/Ext. Decks, Fences, Comm.
Lic/Ins. Free Est. 423-698-1831
Level floors & foundations
423-994-9830 Licensed/Insured.
CEILINGS SPRAYED -1 Day
Service. Hang/Finish Drywall
30 yrs. Exp. Ins. 423-304-2650
Electrical
Moving & Hauling
Free Estimates, 40 yrs. exp. Call
423-596-1796, 423-903-8215
S&S Building Structures
25 yrs in post frame design
as low as $10 psf 423-653-0590
Gutter Replacement,
Repairs, and Cleaning Services.
Call Rick @ 423-488-5942
Pressure Washing
Masonry Scapes - Ponds, Patios, Landscape & Design.
Brick, Block & Stone 602-0095
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!
Jack up & Replace floor joists
Free Estimates! Ron 304-7765
Licensed and Insured
Quality Seamless Gutters
423-499-9301
Block l Brick l Stone
Repair Work l 423-509-5095
basement & bath remodeling,
34 yrs. Exp. 423-432-8295
House Leveling
STONE SOURCE
H No Job Too Big or Small H
Brogdon Masonry
10% off Labor (thru 8/30)
Call J&R Construction
Buying Junk Cars & Trucks
Roofing & Siding
Roofing & Siding You Can
Afford! Call All Home Improvement 423-595-1798. Lic. & Ins.
Kitchen & Bath
Design & Remodel
Lic. Contractor 320-4897
Remodeling, additions, decks,
plumbing. Free est. 870-2391
Counter Tops
Natural Stone, Countertops,
Tile, Flooring 423-702-4856
Plumbing
DALE’S PLUMBING
BETTER HOMES
J. R.’S HOME REPAIR
All makes & models. House calls.
Call Joe (423) 855-8890
Computer Repair
Residential & Commercial,
Decks, hardwood floors,
interior trim, tile showers,
plumbing, electrical, roofing,
masonry, painting. 595-3595
Masonry
TONEY MASONRY-Chimneys,
Repair, Retainer Walls, Block
Brick & Carpentry. 423-580-3611
Mike Delashmitt Const. We do it
all. Roofing, siding, windows & additions
Lic/Bonded/Ins 423-875-3024
Lawn Master 423-280-0970
BUSH HOGGING
Call: (423) 954-3002
Fencing
Clock Repairs
I PAY MORE
THAN ANYBODY!
Home Improvement
Remodeling
Place your ad today 423.757.6679
Buy & Sell Name-Brand Used
Clothes (423) 414-2166
ABSOLUTELY
AFFORDABLE
Trees Cut & Limbs Trimmed
Cheap! Fully Ins. Stump grinding
root ball removal. 423 320-1513
Affordable Roofing
HRepairs & RoofingH
Video
Games
CHATT. PINBALL & ARCADE
Sales, Restoration, Repair
and Parts 888-867-3001
Vinyl Siding
423-505-8071
MASTERS ROOFING
& HOME IMPROVEMENT
Licensed & Insured.
Free Estimates. 423-240-1166
LEAK REPAIR &
SMALL ROOF JOBS
423-903-4701
DAVID LOWE ROOFING
Free Est. 423-598-0294
www.davidloweroofers.com
Quality work + quality material
= Coffey Construction Co. 20
yrs. experience. 877-7147.
AMERICAN TREE
SERVICE
Free Stump Removal with Tree
Removal. Free Est. Ins.
423-243-4396
Waterproofing
We Fix Water Problems
Wet basements/drainage/crawl
spaces. Lic./Ins. 423-421-0664
F2 • Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • • •
timesfreepress.com
REASON #53
EVERYONE LOOKS
GOOD IN ORANGE.
CEMETERY LOTS
Chattanooga Memorial Park 3
Lots Section C on Hill $7500
Old Section 876-7906
NURSING/
ELDERLY CARE
EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER
Is looking for part time job.
Call Kim 423-892-0610
CDL DRIVERS NEEDED Chattanooga moving
company needs (1) Class A
CDL & (1) Class B CDL
driver. Must have clean MVR.
Call 423-892-2388 for appt.
INDUSTRIAL
EOE M/F/D/V
35977231
s/VERTHE2OAD2EGIONALAND4EAMOPPORTUNITIES
FIND YOUR
REASON TO
Apply: schneiderjobs.com/newjobs
More Info: 800-44-PRIDE
PART TIME
ART TEACHER
Call Jennifer @
423-645-7779
s%XPERIENCEDDRIVERSANDRECENTDRIVINGSCHOOLGRADS
SHOULDAPPLYTUITIONREIMBURSEMENT
s%ARNUPTOYEARAND
YEARASA4EAMDRIVER
BASEDONEXPERIENCE
TRUCKING
OPPORTUNITIES
Step by Step lessons
& training provided.
Must be Creative,
High-Energy, Responsible
& Dependable!
Must love working
with children!
Great Pay & Great Hours.
Schneider National is Hiring
Drivers for Tanker Work
s$!93/&&0%2-/.4(-/34,9&2)$!933!452$!93
GENERAL HELP
WANTED
DRIVE
GENERAL HELP
WANTED
DELIVERY DRIVERS,
CUSTOMER SERVICE REPS &
3RD SHIFT LOADERS NEEDED
- Experienced. Drivers must
show proof of clean driving
record for last 3 yrs. Send
resume to: [email protected] or fax 706-866-9118
or apply at 124 Park Industrial
Blvd. Ringgold, GA 30736
DFWP / EOE
Diesel Truck Mechanic
Needed for local trucking
company. Must also
be able to weld.
Call 423-266-7402 for info.
PLASTIC PROCESS TECH
needed in Chatt TN. Basic
knowledge in injection molding + basic trouble shooting
skills in injection molding
pref. Superb hrly wage, exc.
benefits + profit sharing. Visit
www.ultimatepail.com, Fwd
resume to fax 423-800-0851
or email : [email protected]
mmcontainer.com. A drug
/tobacco free facility. EOE
MEDICAL
A.E.D., C.P.R. & FIRST AID
Classes available NOW!
WERCPR.com
Call: 423-553-0400
CODER/BILLER
needed for downtown cardiology practice. Cardiology &
Peripheral Vascular coding
experience preferred. Very
competitive salary and benefits
package. Fax resume to:
(423) 693-2450 or email:
[email protected]
CardiacAndVascular.com
Heritage Healthcare of
Fort Oglethorpe, GA.
Is currently seeking
RN / LPN
TREATMENT NURSE
MEDICAL ASSISTANT is looking for work. Cert. 15 yrs. exp.
Reas. rates. 423-355-3616.
NURSERY/
CHILD CARE
INFANT CAREGIVER w/CDA &
years of exp. available to
work in Signal Mtn area!
Call 423-762-7012
Jack and Jill Learning Center
Hixson Now Enrolling Children
Ages 2-5 yrs., 423-870-5290
MONEY TO LOAN
FIRST LOAN FREE!
$100 - $800
DIETARY AIDES &
PART-TIME DIETARY
SUPERVISOR
Needed at The Health
Center at Standifer Place.
Apply online at:
www.standiferplace.org
EOE
Driver Position Open
Aaa Taxi Service
Call: 423-593-1255
HUMAN
RESOURCES
MANAGER
Murray Guard, Inc.
seeking an entry level
Human Resources
Manager for the Chatt.,
TN office. Job Criteria:
* 1-3 yrs. in HR
* Must be skilled in MS
Office, Excel, Word,
Outlook.
* Degree Preferred
Email cover letter,
resume & salary history
to: [email protected]
murrayguard.com
EOE
Call for details - 622-3776
HVAC / REFRIGERATION
COOKING EQUIPMENT
TECHNICIAN. Must be experienced. Fax resume to:
706-866-4996
ADMINISTRATION
Administrative Asst.
Great environment, Starts
$8hr. Typing, computer skills &
scheduling. 304-6720
CLERICAL/
SECRETARIAL
PART-TIME
OFFICE POSITION
28 - 30 hrs. per week.
Practical experience and
references required. Skills
to include Microsoft Excel,
Power Point & Word.
Send resume to:
5725 Ringgold Rd. Suite A.
Chattanooga, TN 37412
HVAC SERVICE TECH- Experienced HVA Service Tech
Needed fpr Chatt and metro
area. full time. Must have 5 10yr experience and all tools.
Must pass drug screen background check 423-667-0117
LAUNDRY DRIVERS/
OPERATORS
Positions available at
The Health Center at
Standifer Place
Must be able to do all
aspects of the Laundry dept.
Apply online at
www.standiferplace.org
EOE
MAINTENANCE POSITION
at assisted living.
General maintenance
and lawncare. Full time.
423-490-0119
(Mon. - Fri. 7:30a - 4:30p)
RN - (Sat. & Sun. 7a - 7p)
Apply in person 8am - 3pm
1067 Battlefield Parkway
Fort Oglethorpe, GA. 30742
LPN’s and Direct Care Staff
D&S Community Services is now
hiring LPN’s and Direct Care
Staff in Chattanooga and
Calhoun, TN to provide care in a
residential setting.
423.553.7334
Multi-specialty surgical
practice seeking
EHR Manager.
Minimum of bachelor’s
degree required. Experience
implementing new EHR
preferred. Competitive
salary and benefits offered.
Apply online at
www.universitysurgical.com
Are you
interested
in pursuing a
career in the
medical field?
See the Educational
classification for
more information.
MANAGEMENT
Assistant Manager
Assistant Manager position for
Dayton, Tennessee
grocery store. Experience
preferred. Apply in person at any
Shop-Rite location between
the hours of 8AM and 5PM.
Refer all applications to
Wayne McDonough. An Equal
Opportunity Employer
QUALITY MANAGER
needed for automotive
supplier in Chattanooga.
Strong program launch
experience needed.
TS16949 experience required.
Bachelor’s degree with 5
years related experience
preferred. Reply to:
Chattanooga Publishing,
P.O. Box 1447,
Advertiser 35926930
Chattanooga, TN 37401-1447
Warehouse Associates
Part-Time Receptionist
needed. 4 hrs. per day, four
days per week. $8.50/hr. No
benefits. Email resume
to: [email protected]
CONSTRUCTION
EEO Employer seeking
drug free, experienced
Crane /Equipment Operator
in the Dayton, TN area.
Contact Tim @ 931-881-7217
INSTALLATION CREWS
Local company known
nationally seeking
professional, motivated,
quality workmanship, window,
siding and door installation
crews. Must have workers
comp, general liability and
auto insurance. Apply: 3902
Volunteer Dr., Chatt., TN
37416
PEN GULF INDUSTRIAL
Now Accepting Applications for
All Crafts. Apply: 5105 Hwy.
11 South, Suite 6, Calhoun, TN.
37309 use pick up / drop box.
Capital Toyota is seeking to
employ two highly motivated
professionals that possess
excellent communication skills.
Job details include marketing
via telephone and email,
scheduling appointments and
conducting follow up concerning sales and service. This is a
full time position with benefits
available. Please send resume and/or qualifications to:
[email protected]
along with contact information.
Please no phone calls or
applying in person.
New Home
Sales Professional
Needed
Americas Home Place, one
of the Largest Custom Home
Builders in the South East is
now seeking an
experienced New Home
Sales Assistant/
Administrator to assist our
Building Consultant in all
aspects of new home sales.
We offer a benefits package
that includes medical,
dental and 401K. Candidates
should be familiar with the
sales process includes
prospecting, lead
management, product
presentations, buyer need
discovery, and design
selections. Candidates must
also be comfortable reading
detailed floor plans and
understanding the cause and
effect of changes to those
plans concerning the
construction process and
associated costs. An
understanding of the loan
process and experience
communicating with lenders
a plus.
Please send resume via Fax
to: 423-510-9564 or email
[email protected]
com
EMPLOYMENT INFO
GOVERNMENT
WILDLIFE JOBS!!
HIGH PAYING POSTAL JOBS!
Don’t pay for information about
jobs with the Postal Service or
federal government. Call the
Federal Trade Commission
toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP, or
visit www.ftc.gov to learn
more. A public service announcement from the Chattanooga Times/Free Press and
the FTC.
OWN A COMPUTER?
Put it to work. Up to $1500 $5000 / mo. PT / FT, Free
info! www.ckincome4u.com
PEST CONTROL TECH
Locally owned pest control
company in Chattanooga
area seeking full time technician to work route Mon. - Fri.,
8-5. Experience or certification preferred but not required, will train. Drivers license is required. Apply in
person Mon. - Fri. 8-5 at:
Mayfield Bros. Pest Control,
4315 North Creek Rd.
Chattanooga, TN 37406
The Chattanooga Area Food
Bank is seeking two full time
warehouse associates to be
responsible for providing
excellent customer service to
our agencies and clients. The
ideal candidates should have
at least five years warehouse
experience. Box truck and
forklift operations a plus.
Must possess a passion for
helping others, excellent
computer skills and have
experience with Microsoft
programs. Apply online at
www.chattfoodbank.org
MANUFACTURING
Mueller Co., the industry
leader in the manufacturing
of water flow control
products and repair products
has immediate openings
in Cleveland, TN.
Applications and resumes
are being accepted for
the following positions:
- GENERAL
MAINTENANCE
- EQUIPMENT
MAINTENANCE
- CNC MACHINE
OPERATORS
Candidates must have a
minimum of a high school
diploma and at least two
(2) yrs. of continuous work
experience, preferably in a
manufacturing environment.
Qualified parties seeking
opportunity for challenging
work with excellent pay
and benefits should send
confidential resume to:
[email protected]
GENERAL HELP
WANTED
ANIMAL SERVICES
OFFICER
Apply only at: www.
mckameyanimalcenter.org
BODY TECHNICIAN - $30
per hr. Morgan Motor Co..,
3506 Brainerd Rd,
Chatt., TN. 423-698-6171
RT Technician- Experienced
Tech for growing arcade and
pinball company. Must be able
to work on all arcade related
games and pinballs. Monitor
repair experience a must. Apply in person at Chattanooga
Pinball 5919 Lee hwy.
TEACHERS
ASSISTANT
position available at Red Bank
United Methodist PreSchool.
Call 423-877-2881.
MARION ENVIRONMENTAL in
Chattanooga is looking for
Tanker, Dump Truck & Dump
Trailer Drivers with clean driving record & some driving experience. 40 hrs. guaranteed
& health insurance provided.
Please call 423-499-4919 or
fax resume to: 423-892-5122
ANTIQUES
Antique Oak Washstand
refinished $150
619-3537. 580-8525.
BANK, Antique Mechanical,
(Tammany) vintage 1880’s,
$350 423-240-2068
BANK, Antique Mechanical,
(Trick Dog), $875. Call
423-240-2068.
China Noritaki, Lynnbrook,
79pcs, Ret.1950, $150
(423)715-3375
ICE CREAM Table, antique
with 3 chairs, $175 neg. Call
423-842-0092.
Lead Soldiers & Figurines
Britains, Manoils, & Barclays
$8-$10. 423-650-8264.
MILK GLASS Sugar and
creamer from 1950, Mint Condition $6.00 423-336-1249
ROLLTOP DESK, Ladies Victorian, oak, w/key, beautiful.
$950. 423-842-0092.
Round Piano Stool Glass Ball Ft,
Made by Chase Parker Comp.
$125 423-821-7069
Set of Haviland Cherry Blossom
(Limoges) China-service for
10, $400, 423-510-9687
SILVER PLATE, 36 pcs. + tray,
monogram (C), $100.
Call 423-309-0355.
SPINNING WHEEL, Old
$150. Call 706-375-5250.
423-693-8424.
Traditiona l radiator heaters, (2)
antique, cast iron. $125/both.
Call 423-305-0280.
GM LINE DRIVEABILITY
TECHNICIAN - Great benefits.
Must be GM Certified. Apply at
Walter Jackson Chevrolet
5340 Alabama Hwy, Ringgold,
see Duane H. 706-935-2381
GRANDFATHER CLOCK, Oak,
$400.00 or best offer
423-704-0460
AMMO , 4 50 rnd. boxes, 9mm,
Sellier & Bellot, Hard
ball, $125 315-3665 bef. 4:30p
A N C H O R S ( 2 ) - with chains.
$100 for both will separate.
423-421-7274
Coca Cola Shirts - Size Large
And XL, $10 each,
423-877-6209
Half bed, complete,
$95. Call
423-892-2373
AMMO, remington, 525 rds. of
new 22 long rifle, other ammo
avail. $100 706-375-8513.
AUTHENTIC COACH PURSE
Large, $75 or best offer.
256-687-9353
UNIFORMS, medium and large,
good cond. $30 for all or will
sep. 423-629-0404.
Jenny Lynn Baby Bed Water
proof Mattress $30
423-877-6539
AMMO, Winchester,
9mm, $20 Box of 50.
Call 423-316-5305.
Bathroom rugs, pink
reversible, only 3 for $10.
Call 423-894-2213.
COINS-JEWELRY
Kitchen table & 4 chair orange
color alumian asking $300.00
or m.a.o ph 931-505-1003
AMMO Winchester, 9 mm 100
rds $100 other ammo available. 706-375-8513
Bath Towels Wash Clothes &
Hand Towels-Bundle all for
$12 423-892-4261
Lamps (2), Brass w/ glass,
real nice shade, $25
423-486-7397
Federal -5000 Large Rifle
Primers in Factory case
$200 423-987-7599.
Boat Accessories AC unit, gas
stove, with oven, 75 gal. water
tank, $350/sep. 892-4261.
LAMPS, Pair, blue,
$20 cash only. Call
706-0937-3085.
HANDGUN CARRY PERMITCLASSES $50.
Immediate opening, over 300
guns in stock. Fugate’s
Firearms. 423-336-2675.
B O A T A N C H O R- V- shaped,
weighs 8 pds, free rope,
$15.00 423-364-6495
Engagement Ring, total 1ct.
diamond white gold, $2000.
Call 423-488-1725.
Mont Blanc Bracelet new, cost
$485, selling for $185
423-344-4065
RING- Ladies’, Wedding, sz 6
1/4 Ct Diamond, w/ 6 small
Diamonds $500 423-693-8551
COLLECTIBLES
3 S&H green stamps brass
Kerosene Lamps, 2 Quoizels
3 shades $125 for all 344-4065
6 Penthouse 4 Playboy
Magazines, Early 90s $5
423-486-7397
Ceramics by M. Cain Vase 8’’ to
9’’ tall hand painted 80’s or
90’s $100 neg. 423-315-3665
Chess Set- glass, rare
Pavilion Limited, Never Used
$120. 423-598-3122
ELVIS ITEMS- , leather photo
purses and etc, $300.00
304-8808
Old Jenny Lind Print self portrait, Chicago Galleries. 3 digit
SN $300 neg. 315-3665.
RED BANK Annual,
1959, $100. Call
423-266-0065.
SNOW VILLAGE “Paramount
Theatre” $100. cash only.
706-937-3085
SNOW VILLAGE “Motel”
$139. Cash Only. Call
706-937-3085.
Xavier Roberts Cabbage Patch
Bear signed $15
344-4065
COMPUTERS
DELL P-4 Desk Top. Complete,
XP Pro, Internet Ready. 30 day
Warranty! $100. 423-473-2767
[email protected]<NFF;&=L<C
AIR CONDITIONERS for sale!
Dryer/Washer $199. & up will
separ.Also avail. Stoves & Refrigerators. Guaranteed! 706-866-3347
Living Room Suite-Like new,
light color, 2 oversized chairs &
lrg couch $850obo 423-531-8533
FIREWOOD- Split Hardwood.
WHILE IT LASTS!
$45.00/rick. 423-313-2323
Lounge chair,
$50. Call 423-886-3903.
423-774-7147.
Air Conditioner, 22,000 btu,
cools 4 rooms, 4 years old,
$185. Call 423-521-7278.
CAR DOLLEY-Like New
$700.00
423-718-9040
LOVESEAT , Blue and cream
check, $60 obo. Call
423-344-5268.
Window Air Cond. Good
repaired units. May cost less to
repair yours. Free check.
842-5310
Carving set by Carvel Hall
stainless large knife and fork
$10 629-0149
HOBBIES/TOYS
MATTRESS A1 Queen Pillowtop Set. NEW in plastic. Coil
matt. $149. Can del. 400-6233
MATTRESS A 3-Piece Brand New
KING PILLOWTOP. Sacrifice
$189. 423-400-6233. Can deliver
MATTRESS AAA NEW QUEEN
ORTHOPEDIC Set. $139.
Never opened. 423-400-6233
MATTRESS A + Mattress Sets
all sizes. Can deliver $100 &
Up!!. Nice sets. 304-5807
MATTRESS & BOX SPRINGS
King. Very nice! $150.
Call 423-544-0119
ORIENTAL Dining Room, upper
and lower curio lighted, 2 extra 18” leafs, custom pads for
table, 4 chairs, buffet table,
cost $2800 new, sell $1,100.
706-935-6753. 423-309-1584.
Patio Seating Group. White
wicker w/ blue Sunbrella
cushions. Love seat, 2 chairs,
2 tables. Nice! $100 624-706
Rattan Swivel Rockers (2)Both charis and cushions are in
good condition. Both for $100 or
give offer for one. 423-653-7559
RECLINER- various positions,
cherry wood & green ultra
suède, $160. 423-875-4440.
ROCKER CHAIRS, (2) Wrought
iron, w/matching end table,
exc. cond. $65. 423-842-3432.
ALL APPLIANCES FOR SALE
Washers, dryers, refrigerators.
$75 & up. w/warr. 598-0717.
AREA RUNNER, 8 ft. long,
nice colors, like new, $25.
423-892-4261.
SOFA, Flexsteel, blue & beige
plaid, each end reclines, cost
$1700, take $400. 842-0092.
B R E A D M A K E R - Regal,
Kitchen Pro Model, $15
Call: 423-802-9130
Bar/ Counter Stools (2) For
$100. will sep./ cane bottoms,
exc cond. 423-413-3007.
Frigidaire heavy duty Washer &
electric Dryer, white, good
condition $200 (423)443-0805
Gas Hot Water Heater
50 gallon. $100
423-322-3685
Kenmore u p r i g h t f r o s t f r e e
freezer, good condition,
$125.00 423-314-2859
MICROWAVE OVEN Whirlpool,
digital, 900 watts. $15 Call:
423-802-9130
Refrigerator, 23.5 cubic, side by
side, like new, $100,
423-899-7415
Refrigerator, Basic
$75
423-521-3489
REFRIGERATOR, Black, Maytag, double door, 1 year old,
$400 obo. 423-954-3368.
STOVE, Amana, flat top black,
stainless steel, $250 obo.
Call 423-954-3368
UPRIGHT FREEZER - 21 cu. ft.
Excellent condition. $300
OBO. 423-4881454
WANTED DEAD OR ALIVE
Washer, Dryer, Fridge, Stoves
Cash Reward! 423-580-2031
WASHER AND DRYER,
Maytag, good cond. $200 for
both. Call 423-622-6114.
Bedroom Suite, 5 pc. 1951
Mahogany white fine furniture,
$1200. 423-266-0555
Chair with Ottoman
$200
423-892-8189
Chest, modern, 4 drawers
$35
619-3537. 580-8525.
Chest of Drawers, antique, 4
drawers, 32wx35hx18d, solid
$75. 706-375-6565.
Child’s Bedroom Set-birth thru
12, solid cherry by Babies
Dream $825obo 894-0299
CHINA CABINET $250. Firm.
Call 706-965-6264
Computer Desk
Nice; Dark Oak.
$40 706-406-2049
Contemporary Conference
Table- w/ 5 chairs chrome with
arms $300 obo 423-667-5443
DESK- Solid Mahogany,
8’ long, 28” Wide,
$125. 423-693-8551
W a s h e r & D r y e r , Whirlpool,
works perfect. Guarn. Can deliver. $175 both. 584-0401.
Dinette Set, with chairs,
Paid $400, asking $175.
Call 423-892-2373.
WASHER & DRYER,
$350. Good condition.
423-290-6776.
DINETTE SET- Table, 6 chairs,
wood, golden top, white legs,
$95 .00 423-364-6495
BABY ITEMS
DINING ROOM Table, Broyhill
Pine Yorkshire Mkt. 68x43, + 2
ext. $300. 423-876-7351.
(4) Bicycle, 12’’, 20’’, 26’’ &
Girls 18’’, $300 or will sep
423-322-3685
BOYS BIKE, 20” Nice cond.
$30. Call
423-899-3530.
BOYS STURDY TRICYCLE by
Mountaineer for ages 3 & up,
$35. 423-883-0639
BUILDING
MATERIAL
1 Quart of Kilz Primer Sealer
Stain Blocker Cash Only.
$5. 706-937-3085
POLE BARN - 24x36, 10’ ceiling,
6x6 treated posts,Wood trusses.
Metal roof. Installed. $4000.
Other sizes avail. 423-595-2079
Lawn Mower-New Craftsman
GT3000 23HP, 48” cut $900
423-421-4843
Lopping Shears - 3” & 2” cuts.
New. Several. Half price:
$25 & $20. 423-629-7968
RIDING MOWER, Craftsman,
42” cut, 16.5 hp, $250. Call
423-238-6713.
SNAPPER RIDING MOWER,
28” cut, 9 H.P., like new, must
see. $600. Call 423-877-7539
TILLER- Troy built, Horse, cast
iron motor, great cond. , made
in the 80’s $1,800 618-8053
WACKER PACKER-Honda
engine, 5.5 hp, Like new
$950/offer 423-443-8464
Weed Eater - Gas. Curved shaft.
Convertible. Runs good. $40.
423-653-5097.
W O O D S S R D 6000 Finish
Mower, 5 ft. used very little,
$1100. 423-332-0880 bef. 9p.
MACHINERY &
TOOLS
10 ton Hydraulic /
Manual Log splitter
$125 344-6313
Sofa Table & Coffee Table
By Ashley. $250.
423-892-8189
Solid wood armoire, holds 32-in
TV for bedroom or den,
$425, 423-510-9687
Chain Binders $50
423-326-3173
Student Rolltop Desk-Aspen
Wood almost new, cash only
$250 423-855-0889
Craftsmen 19.2 volt right angle
cordless drill w/case $60
706-375-9777
TABLE , 4 chairs, w/ &
china cabinet, exc. cond.
$425 will sep. 423-605-2918.
Delta Scroll Like New $125
344-6313
TABLE, oval shaped, with
leaf, no chairs, $30.
Call 423-332-9023.
Electric Drill. Craftsmen
1/2 in. W/ Case. $10
706-375-9777
TABLE TOP CHEST,
19” tall, 30”x50” $60.
423-693-8551
Lincoln Electric Mig Welder.
Handy Core. $175 .
423-653-7415
TV, 20" color, cable ready,
with remote, $49. Call
423-892-2373.
Molding Set. Craftsmen,
for woodworking,
$20 423-332-5199.
Wicker Bed new queen sizewhite $75 423-877-4179
Pressure Washer - Commercial
9HP-OHV 3000PSI 3GPM
Used 1x, $695. 423-847-0901
Wingback chair, $75. Call
423-886-3902 or
423-774-7147.
Skil Saw, commercial 7-1/4"
worm drive, 13 amp, $80.
423-892-4261.
WINGBACK CHAIR
$25. Call
423-362-1171
TORQUE WRENCH,
1/2” like new, $50. Call
423-886-4551.
Youth Bed, complete $75, never
used. Excellent condition. Purchased for a grandchild. Ruby
Coffee, cell (423) 364-2411
train hoist, quarter ton,
w/ 6ft. load chain,
$25 423-332-5199.
Propane heater,
$60.
Call 423-954-3368.
WASHER & DRYER, Whirlpool.
moved, must sell.. $350.
Call 423-227-0080.
Lawnmower Murray 38” Cut
12 HP $150 Needs Work
706-375-5250
Battery & Charger- 12 Volt for
Sears 3/8 Nextec Drill. New.
$15.00 cash. 423-877-9788.
COUCH,
like new, $100.
Call 423-544-0119
Desk- Rolltop, Good Shape
$30
423-843-0094.
GARDEN TILLER,
Small, $35. Call
423-266-0065.
Air Compressor - Campbell
Hausfeld, 3 gallon, 110 psi, kit.
New $50. 423-653-7062
FURNACES/
FIREPLACES
COUCH with recliners,
brown leather, $400.
Call 423-260-2440.
Garden Tiller. 5.5 hp.
Briggs & Stratton eng. Like new.
$500obo. 423-443-8464.
SOFA Sectional Brick red
Attached pillows Nice! $400.
Call 423-629-0404
COUCH, 2 Seater/makes bed,
423-886-3903. or
423-774-7147.
WASHER / DRYER - Kenmore, Heavy Duty, like new
with warranty. Will sacrifice
$325. 423-421-1615
Baby Crib EvenfloWood Without Mattress $20
423-847-6774
SOFA
Good condition. Beige.
$25 423-362-1171
SOFA, Loveseat, 2 end tables
and coffee table. Jasper Area,
$225.00 423-942-3213
BEDROOM-A Ralph Lauren-like
6 piece Cherry Sleigh set. Brand
new in box. List $2500. Must sell
$895. 423-400-6233. Can deliver
Electric Push mower w/ bagger
works well , like new 36 volt17 hp
$175 423-443-9815
Murray Riding Mower, 12.5 HP,
40” cut, $650obo
423-443-8464
ALL APPLIANCES Repair and
Service. Svc. call $10. All
Work Guar. 423- 598-0717.
FREEZER-Frigidaire,
heavy duty, $85.00
423-847-0177
EDGER, 2 HP, Briggs,
side shaft, $35. Call
423-266-0065.
MOWER, Snapper Self propelled, 19” cut, with bagger,
new in box, $250. 875-9911.
SETEE, La Z Boy,
exc. cond. $150. Call
423-365-5071.
D O U B L E O V E N , Jenn-Air, in
cabinets, white, like new, $500
obo. electric, 423-667-5443.
LAWN/GARDEN
EQUIPMENT
Craftsman ride mower. auto 21
hp. 46” cut. New, $1300. 1 yr
warranty 423-875-9911.
2 Outdoor Concrete Patio
Benches, $40
Call 423-227-7740.
COOK TOP, 4 burner, Jen-Air
with down draft, white, $200
obo. electric, 423-667-5443.
CHILD’S JUMPING HORSE
Larger Size,
$45. 423-899-3530
Child's train table, large,
white/green $30, call
423-903-6258.
FURNITURE
BEDROOM- A Queen/Full.
Very nice 5 piece set. NEW!
Still in boxes. Sacrifice. $399.
423-400-6233 Can Deliver.
CABINETS- BLUE PRINTS,
10 DRAWER $80.00
423-847-0177
CALCULATOR, Texas Instrument, Business II Plus, $10.
Cash only. 706-937-3085.
Air Conditioner,
for bedroom, $150 obo.
Call 423-486-1682.
CHEST FREEZER, Kenmore
Elite, 24.9 cft, $500. O.B.O.
423-304-0243 /706-567-4477.
BOYS STURDY TRICYCLE by
Mountaineer for ages 3 & up,
$35. 423-883-0639
HEATING/AIR
CONDITIONING
Roll-top Desk, Oak, Early
American,4'8" X 1'8". $50
423-847-7902.
Chest Freezer, Large
$100.00
423- 521-3489
Winchester 9 mm- full metal
jacket 115 grain six 50 rdboxes $300 423-987-7599.
Lots of Lawn Furniture
$50.
Call 706-657-3987
RECORDS, 115 45’s, &
20 LP’s. $25. Call
423- 486-7397.
APPLIANCES
A C Dryers, Washers, Stoves,
Fridges, $75/up. Can deliver.
Guaranteed. Also we buy non
working applcs. 423-760-0123
OR 706-891-5843
Living Rm. 3 pc. Brown/reversable pattern. Best offer. Call or
text @ 423-653-0019.
Lead Soldiers & Figurines
Britains, Manoils, & Barclays
$8-$10. 423-650-8264.
Wireless-G Broadband Router.
Linksys by Cisco. Like new.
$25. 706-891-6046
ELECTRICAL
877-685-8936
COATS, Mens 46 reg. White, tan
& rose, perfect cond. Only 3
for $65. 423-894-2213.
PRINTS, Ben Hampton,
framed, signed & numbered.
Call 423-488-725.
SKILLED TRADES
Immediate Commercial &
Industrial work in greater
Nashville.
Top travel pay & benefits.
Drug screen & valid DL.
MISCELLANEOUS
ART & DECORATIVE
BICYCLES
THERAPIST & BEHAVIORAL
HEALTH WORKER
POSITIONS OPEN FOR
MENTAL HEALTH AGENCY.
Seeking a Therapist w/ a MS
AND Behavioral Health Worker
w/ a BS in Counseling, SW,
Psych, or related field to work w/
adults/children in community based program. Need is PT
possibly to FT in Walker, Dade,
Catoosa & Chattooga counties.
Flexibility & potential benefits as
well as loan repayment options.
Email resumes:
SHOOTING
SUPPLIES
HP Pavilon CT963 w/ user man,
printer, 2 new inks nvr been on
internet, $100 320-2910
Equal Opportunity Employer
PROFESSIONALS
FURNITURE
DRIVERS OTR
w/ min. 2 yrs. exp. Apply in
person: Ash Transport, LLC
86 E. 28th St. Chattanooga,
TN or call: 423-870-9681
Owner Operators Welcome!
Century STROLLER - good
condition. $20 423-344-5268
[email protected]
R&R Mechanic Needed for
Transmission Shop- Need Mechanic to remove & intstall
transmissions and do some
light mechanic work. Weekly
pay. Must have own tools. Call
423-244-0404.
Drivers Needed Class A CDL
3 years exp., clean record
needed, home every night.
Call: 423-266-7402 for info.
CLOTHING
GIVEAWAYS
FREE HORSE MANURE
Free loading. Great for gardens.
E. Brainerd 423-280-3716
Free Scrap metal
423-756-2170.
Radial Arm Saw, 9"
won't run. Free. Call
423-886-4551
WEAD EATER, Gas,
runs perfect, $45 firm.
Call 706-419-8423.
WET TILE SAW - 7” Workforce
w/tile cutter & tile tools. Used
once, $100. 706-375-6565
Wire Rope 100 ft x 7,16th’s
winch cable, $50
423-326-3173
Wooden Step Ladder 8 Ft,
$10
706-375-9777
Wood Working Equipment
$975 423-326-3173
MEDICAL
EQUIPMENT
CHAIN SAW 16” McCulloch,
Like new, with carry case,
$55.00 423-364-6495
Chainsaw bar 14” w/ two
chains, Sears or Pollan chainsaw, $16.50 423-894-0299
CHURCH PEW,
old 11 ft 10in, great canvas for
an artists $120 423-847-6774.
COMFORTER, Nice twin size,
black, with shams, bed skirt,
$25. Call 423-629-0404.
C O N C R E T E Picnic Table, 2
bench seats, large family size,
good cond. $275. 842-5677.
Copy Machine Business High
Speed, SAVIN4018d
$425 423-344-4969.
DINING Room Set, Older, buffet,
hutch, table & 6 chairs, oak,
$2000. 706-866-1291.
Display Case, 4’wx5’tall
wood, & glass, $70. Call
423-847-6774.
DOGHOUSE, Medium New all
wood, shingle roof, gable roof
new, $35. Call 423-653-5097.
Doghouse - Wood. For porch or
inside. Tabletop. Medium size.
$40. 423-653-5097
DOLLS 8inch Jenny dolls from
far away land series, $35ea.
excellent shape-706-861-1945
Dolls- Porcelain, new in box ,
paradise galleries, $18
423-336-1249
Drapes , custom made, 65x48”,
heavy duty lined, $125 panel.
Call 423-304-8808.
ADULT DVD’s XXX- New!
5 for $20 / will separate.
Lg. selection. 423-645-2295
End Table- Dark Finished,
Purchased at Bombay, exc cond
$30, 423-344-8794
Even Flo Baby High Chair
$20
423-800-2030
Extension ladder
$75.00
423-314-2859
Extention Ladder, Alum.
32 ft. heavy duty, $200.
Call 706-375-3711.
FAN - five blade, flush mount,
Hunter. With light kit. $18
423-510-0415
File Cabinet. sits on floor,
(2) drawer, $8
423-899-8342
FILE CABINETS- Metal,
4 drawers, $25.00
423-847-0177
Garage Door Opener, Craftsman 1/2hp model 139-53985D
$85 894-0299
George Foreman Grill, never
used, $10
423-629-0149
Glass Top Oak End Table &
Mahogany end table w/ draw
$20 will sep 423-238-2838
Green Top Spaghetti Straps,
Ladies, Size 8, designer Susan
Lucci, $7.00 423-899-8342
Grill, Stainless Steel, Charbroil,
Open box item, retail $399
sale $75 423-899-7415
Hand-blown glass vases. One
large, one small. $50.
423-486-1682
Ipad case. for 3rd Generation,
slim profile, multiple viewing
angles, $30 423-355-3348
JACUZZI, Like new, Asking
$3,000 or best offer
423-942-5129
Kitchen cabinets, stainless steel
sink and 2 wood entry doors $500.00 423-658-9735
KOBALT Tool Box 13 drawers,
top & bottom storage. $500
firm. Call 423-842-5297.
Lace Tablecloths
Light blue, $75. White w/lace
roses, $125. 423-304-8808.
Ladder/Tool Rack for
utility truck, $100. Call
423-544-4582.
LAKE PUMP
$150
423-344-6385
Military Relics. German, Japanese & American World War
I&II Pay top prices. 842-6020
MIXER, Sunbeam Mixmaster,
2 glass bowls, $15.
Call 423-344-8794.
MOVING. Everything Must
Go! $500 for all.
Call 423-870-0079.
Moving, selling White crib with
mattress $75, white Pottery
Barn changing table $100,
white Pottery Barn quilt display hanger $75, adjustable
basketball goal $60, Specialized mountain bike $75. For
more info call 423-599-5279.
NAILS, Lots of boxes,
differnet sizes, $20. Call
423-602-7900.
Old Antique door knobs and
plates from old house. $40.
Call 423-602-7900.
PAIR OF 1934 TN License
Plates, orig. paint, $250.
Call 423-892-9685.
B a t h transfer bench/chair by
CAREX. Adj. legs, left or right
bathtub entry. $35. 472-0947.
Patio Cushions set of 4, 1 pc.
for back & seat w/ties, like
new, $45. 423-892-4261
GUNS
BEDSIDE COMMODE
Toilet seat chair, $25. Call
423-472-0947.
Perculator stainless steel,
farberware, like new 12 cup
automatic, $15 423-698-3643
DINING ROOM, Broyhill, table, 6
chairs, china cabinet & Server
$900 o.b.o. 423-336-9682
.50 BMG AMMO, 48rds,
linked w/ ammo box $250
423-847-0901
BEDSIDE TOILET -by Carex,
NEW, perfect condition.
$30 cash only 706-937-3085
DINING ROOM Suite, complete,
bookcases, $500. Call
423-227-0080.
AR-15 Rifle SIG SAUER M-400
with MAGPUL. Brand new & unfired $1375 OBO (423) 322-1767
POOL TABLE 4 ft. by 8 ft., Excellent cond., Not slate, rack,
balls, Q-tips, Must take apart,
$75.00 706-935-6753
Dining Set- Metal, 4 chairs with
hutch. $150
423-843-0094.
BERETTA PX4 Storm, 45 cal.
$600. Call 423-593-4162
Ga. Residence.
Dining Table- Formal, dark
wood. 4 chairs, 2 leaves. Exc.
cond. $325obo. 423-240-1927.
Chinese SKS Assault Rifle
Wooden stock, 30 round clip,
Semi-auto $650 423-355-0535
DOOR- 32’ Pre Hung,
hendge left, $75.00
423-942-3213
Double brl 12ga shotgun. 1941
Stevens M 335, exc cond to
shoot/display. $325 490-5693
DRESSER
Dark wood. $20.
423-362-1171
GLOCK 27, GEN 4, 40 cal. NIB,
$600. Call 423-593-4162,
Ga. Residence.
DRESSER FOR SALE.
$40 or make offer. Call
423-752-7363.
DRESSER FOR SALE.
$50 or make offer. Call
423-752-7363.
Hospital Bed- almost new,
never slept in, $300
423-580-8071
Porcelain Doll Molds. around 300
molds over 3000 invested will
take $500 423-315-9350.
Pressure Washer 2700 psi, 2.5
gpm, 7hp, $300 w/ extra hose
Call 423-421-7274
PRINCE ALBERT TINS
(3) $10.00 each,
Call 822-8283
I Buy Diabetic Test Strips!
Fast Local Pickup. Most Brands.
Call Daniel: 423-401-8118.
Jazzy Power Chair
W/ charger, good cond. $450
423-544-5654
PROPANE Gas Tank, 120 gal.
like new, filled & used 1 time.
$500obo. 423-238-9714.
Queen Comforter 2 pillow shams
and dust ruffle, like new $15
423-238-2838
Power Chairalmost new, never outside,
$500 423-580-8071
Dresser, no mirror, 3 drawers
good cond. $50
619-3537. 580-8525.
Gunworks LLC-Assault rifles,
shotguns, pistols, ammo, & clips
in stock. 4691 N. Lee Hwy,
Cleveland,TN, Tues.-Sat.
10am-5:30pm 423-458-1539
Dresser, with mirror &
Chest , good shape $100
Call 423-544-0119.
LEUPOLD, M8-4X Power Duplex, Matte finish, rifle scope,
mint. $150. 256-597-4235.
END TABLE / SECRETARY Antique. 2 ft. x 2 ft. x 28” high.
$50 Call: 423-510-0415
REMINGTON 750 Woodsmaster.
.30-06: 3x9 scope: sling. Like
New. Asking $500. 491-4590.
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER,
Large black & glass, cabinets,
$75 Call 423-280-6287.
Rossi-model #R972 .357SS
Magnum 6” barrel NIB never
fired, bought new, 2 boxes
ammo, $500 cash only
423-718-1606
Entertainment Center
Solid oak, w/ 32’’ Color TV Flat
Screen, $500, 706-891-6046
DIABETIC Sensor and transmitter, new in box, $400 or
best offer 423-336-9682
Walker- 4 wheel with seat and
break $25 Cash. 602-8242
Highland Plaza Area
WHEELCHAIR, Hoveround,
electric, like new, sell $1495.
Delivered. 423-910-0262.
WHEELCHAIR, electric, needs
battery, Jazzy, as is $200.
Call 706-866-1950.
MISCELLANEOUS
Rattan Swivel Rockers (2)Both charis and cushions are in
good condition. Both for $100 or
give offer for one. 423-653-7559
READERS DIGEST Condensed
books, .50 each. Call
423-499-8136.
Records of 45’s and 33’s ,
$2 and up 423-834-0443.
16Ft Extension Ladder Great
Condition $40.00 Call or Text
423-718-4780
Room Size Rug
Burgundy w/ Flower Trim. $75.
706-406-2049
2 HORSE TRAILER,
$400 obo. 706-937-7188
or 423-580-7576.
SKILLET, Black cast iron, 8"
old made in USA. $10.
Call 423-344-8794.
Storm Door - 36 in.
Heavy duty with key/lock. $85.
423-238-9398
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER,
4’x4’x15’ w/25” Sanyo TV,
$100 both. 706-375-6565.
SHOOTING
SUPPLIES
TRAILER, Construction, 16 ft.
Steel frame, dbl axle, wood
sides, $1200. 423-693-4935.
Girls
B e d r o o m
Set(8)pieces,wood, Early
American.$250 423-847-7902
9 mm Defence 115 grain jacket
hollow point Samson $150
423-987-7599.
(2) Marble top end tables- tear
drop $100 or will sep.
423-238-2838
Sleeping with Jane Austen by
David Aitken. A Kindle novel.
$2.99. davidaitken.org
WINDOWS,
Tinted Glass
Thermo Pane, several sizes,
3/4” thick. $750. 423-822-8283
Gorgeous Cedar Stump Wood
Coffee/Accent Table Handmade $350. 432-910-1367
AMMO, 220 rounds of new .223,
$100. Other ammo available.
Call 706-375-8513.
A Dundee Detective by David
Aitken. A Kindle novel. $2.99.
davidaitken.org
Strapless Dress, Red,
Size 10, above knee, New, $10
423-899-8342
• • • Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • F3
timesfreepress.com
MISCELLANEOUS
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
PETS
SUITCASE,
extra large, $85
423-894-2213.
SWING SET, Sears,
1 year old, $100. Call
423-842-6116.
TANNING BED- Montego Bay,
Wolfe 24, like new, $1000.
Call 706-398-2585.
NOW HIRING FOR
ALL HOURLY POSITIONS
Tobacco Pipes- (2 & Pipe caddy)
$18
423-336-1249
TRAILER,
16 foot $1,000.00
423-521-3489
TRAILER, Construction, 16 ft.
Steel frame, dbl axle, wood
sides, $1200. 423-693-4935.
Twin spread, beautiful, with
sham, curtain, cream w/vine
roses, $50. 423-821-7069.
VIEWLEX 35mm PROJECTOR
$50 or best offer.
256-687-9353
V-TECH Alphabet Boards, $10
each. Great cond. Call 423488-4570. Leave msg.
WALL MIRROR, small, with
gold frame, $20. Call
423-892-4261.
WILLYS Overland Speedometer,
complete with key, $35. Call
706-866-4077.
Wolf Tanning Bed- Used
$375 Customer Pickup
423-322-6226
MUSIC LESSONS
PIANO LESSONS For all ages!
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES -Tiny
Applehead, raised in home.
$100-$250. 423-413-2410
CHIHUAHUAS- $200 & up.
chickamaugakennels.com
706-866-7782/423-802-2813
Chihuahua. Tiny Apple headed
adorable puppies. 3 left $175
each. Contact Dustin
706-266-7415 Purebred. 8
weeks 706-266-7415 Males &
females. Ready to go.
Wormed. 1st shots. Shorthaired. $175
CRESTED COTONS- $300 & up.
chickamaugakennels.com
706-866-7782/423-802-2813
Doberman Puppies
AKC male $300
706-508-0408
Free 9 months neutered mix
breed maybe part Lab likes
kids 423-303-6142 Cleveland,
FREE RESCUE CHIHUAHUAS
Please call 309-0965
Leave a message
French Bulldog AKC Reg.
French Bulldogs exc. blood
lines. Jodi @ 423-368-4632
Songwriting too! Special
Rates! 423-504-7548.
at our new store opening at 2020 Gunbarrel Road, Chattanooga, TN
on the front corner of the Dicks Sporting Goods Shopping Center.
COME BY & VISIT OUR
ON-SITE JOB FAIR
Tuesday, July 30th 2013
Wednesday, July 31st 2013
Thursday, August 1st 2013
10am - 3pm
We are looking for highly motivated team members who enjoy a fastpaced, customer friendly atmosphere, and take pride in providing the
highest quality experience to every guest. Anyone interested in this opportunity is welcome to apply on-site during the times listed, or online at:
https://my.peoplematter.at/tazikisofchattanooga/hire
Click on the Gunbarrel Rd. location
Interviews will be set up once applications are completed and submitted
online or in person. It is recommended that you apply online
prior to arriving for the fair, as this will allow our team to have your
application on hand for interviewing when you are able to stop by.
EOE, M/F/D/V, Drug Free Workplace
MUSICAL
MERCHANDISE
German Shepherd- CKC, 8 wks
old. wht m/$400, f/$300 multi clr
vet chk/wormed, 423-821-6819
KEYBOARD - Casio w/
stand. CTK-496 $50
Call: 423-821-7069
PIANO, Baldwin Upright,
$250 obo.
Call 423-870-0068.
Snare Drum, stand & case
first $175, “don't snooze”
772-913-1404 Dunlap
Goldendoodles Puppies CKC,
OFA champ lines, family raised
vet checked s&w berachahfarms.com $800 615-765-7976.
Sousaphone by Stagg brass
color student model $800
call 718-2044
Vintage US-made Krakauer
Baby Grand Piano, Superb
Sound, $2850, 423-510-9687
GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPS,
AKC, $400 M&F, English Cream
$600 Taking Dep. 256-605-0964.
YAMAHA CLARINET, wood
Mint Cond. $450 obo.
Call 423-870-0068.
GOLDEN RETRIEVER Pups.
AKC, OFA Approved Lines. 6
wks. old. $500. 706-506-5526.
PHOTO EQUIPMENT
Green Cheek Parrots, (2) male
& female, w/cage $400 birds
free w/cage. 423-260-2440.
CAMERA LENS, Kodak,
80mm-210mm Zoom, $50.
Call 423-344-4969.
POOLS/SPAS
Hot Tub- 4 person, includes
cover, pump 220 wiring inside,
clean, 1st $700. 423-316-6027
POOL STEPS,
$50. Call
423-260-2440.
SEWING
MACHINES
Brother Embroidery Machine.
PR600 w/ stand & program
like new $2900 423-315-9350.
Industrial U.S. Blindstitch
w/lamp. Excellent cond. $450.
238-9398 / 653-4022
Labrador Retriever Puppies akc
Reg. I have 2 yellow males 2
yellow females 3 black females and one chocolate female. They were born 6-23-13
will be ready 8-5-13. $200 firm
Call or txt 931-235-8416. $50
dep. to hold a puppy.
MALTESE- $350&up.
chickamaugakennels.com
706-866-7782 / 423-802-2813
MINIATURE SCHNAUZER
PUPS - AKC reg. 1st shots,
black. $400. 423-790-8945
PEKINESE- 7 mos. old, white,
some color, non shedding,
loves children. Free to a good
home. 706-861-8933.
Sheltie sable male full blooded
$200 Border Collie male $75
more info online 423-553-1541
SHIH-TZU - 4 yrs. old, female,
neutered. $100. Call
423-332-4506. 322-9633.
Quilting Machine QC1000
like new, $800
423-315-9350
SPORTS
EQUIPMENT
SHIH TZU PUPPIES- AKC,
Shots UTD, Warranty, Beautiful
colors, $500. & up 423-775-4016
(2)ABU GARCIA FISHING
REELS - $75 or best offer.
256-687-9353
Bar Bells and bench used very
little $95 423-488-5565.
706-937-6149
GOLF CLUBS 20 assorted clubs
w/ bag. $25
Call: 423-802-9130
Mike's Golf Shop - We pay
$CASH$ for golf equipment!
Facing 153 near Lee Hwy
423-558-0372
Nordic Track,
good condition $30, Call
423-903-6258.
Siberian Huskies AKC registered. 11 weeks Female/Male.
[email protected]
WESTIES- $250&up.
chickamaugakennels.com
706-866-7782 / 423-802-2813
Publication Dates: July 16, July
23, July 30, 2013
NOTICE OF TRUSTEES
SALE
POOL TABLE, Regulation with
2 pool sticks, $300
423-942-5129
Schwinn Weight Lifting Cage
$100
423-280-1666
YORKIES AKC/CKC Beautiful
Champs 1yr health guar.
$550-$900 Tea Cups avail.
423-949-9715 Can deliver. Ready
now. myyorkiebreeder.com
TV/RADIO/STEREO
EQUIPMENT
DVD Player. Very good cond.
Almost new. $30 cash only.
423-855-0889.
Small Color TV
$100, will negotiate
423-486-1682
TV- 20” Magnavox, w/remote,
very good cond. $60. Cash
only. Call 423-855-0889.
TV, 30 inch Philips, 7 yrs old
works great, only $100.
Call 423- 902-2778.
TV- 56” console RCA Home
Theater, works exc. $300 obo.
Call 706-398-2585.
TVs (2)
$25 each
423-322-3685
TV SOUND BAR , Sony w/ Sub
Woofer New, $149,
423-344-4969/423-284-1406
WANTED TO BUY
Cash for your unwanted
items,furniture,appliances antiques to junk. A few pieces or
a house full. Call Jerry
423-910-1367
PETS
AKC English Labradores
Show Champ. 10 weeks $500
Call/Txt for details 706-857-4950
Australian Shepherd Pups
-AKC, 1st shots, tails & dewclaws done. Blue merles, blue
eyes $350-450. 931-273-0626.
BEAGLE PUPPIES, 7wks old
parents hunt, 1st shots,
wormed $100. 423-605-0432
BLUE PITT Bull Pups.
$300. Call
423-902-5837.
BORDER Collie Pups, ABCA
Excel.stock dogs & pets M $250
F $350 931-939-2426/ 607-2426
BOSTON Terrier Pups, 7 wks
CKC, Shots & Wormed, $350.
256-548-1488 / 256-597-1034.
CHIHUAHUA Pups, CKC reg,
2 shots, litter box trained,
$250, 423-842-4438
Robert J. Solomon
Substitute Trustee
Solomon | Baggett, LLC
40 Technology Parkway South,
Suite 202
Norcross, Georgia 30092
(678) 243-2512
Our File No. FMC.00231
YORKIE-POOS, $300 & up.
chickamaugakennels.com
706-866-7782/423-802-2813
Ping Pong Table w/ paddles,
balls & 2 nets. $45,
423-847-7902.
Vintage Mitchell 302 Fishing
Reel Seen one lately? $75
772-913-1404 Dunlap
g
the Hamilton County
Register’s Office.
Property Address: 406 Laverne Drive, Chattanooga,
Tennessee 37421
Tax ID#158A F 014
Current Owner(s) of Property: David E. Walsh and Karen
P. Walsh.
The street address of the
above described property is
believed to be 406 Laverne
Drive, Chattanooga, Tennessee 37421, but such address is
not part of the legal description
of the property sold herein and
in the event of any discrepancy, the legal description referenced herein shall control.
SALE IS SUBJECT TO
TENANT(S) RIGHTS IN POSSESSION.
If applicable, the notice requirements of T.C.A. 35-5-117
have been met.
All right of equity of redemption, statutory and otherwise, and homestead are expressly waived in said Deed of
Trust, and the title is believed
to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only
as Substitute Trustee.
Other interest parties: Old
Republic Insurance Co.
The right is reserved to adjourn the sale to another day,
time and place certain without
further publication, upon announcement of the time and
place for the sale set forth
above. If the highest bidder
cannot pay the bid within
twenty-four (24) hours of the
sale, the next highest bidder, at
their highest bid, will be
deemed the successful bidder.
This property is being sold with
the express reservation that
the sale is subject to confirmation by the lender or trustee.
This sale may be rescinded by
the Substitute Trustee at any
time.
THIS LAW FIRM IS ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR
AND IS ATTEMPTING TO
COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED
WILL BE USED FOR THAT
PURPOSE.
YORKIE/BICHON, $300 & up.
chickamaugakennels.com
706-866-7782/423-802-2813
Nordictrack Ski Pro Model
Good Cond. $35
423-698-3643
T-shirts , Chatt Mocs Logo (18
Total) Adult & 2 Kids, $75 Will
Sep. 423-877-4179
LEGAL NOTICES
YORKIE/SHIH-TZU Pup
CKC papers. No shed, 2nd shots
$250 Call 706-980-8764.
PET SUPPLIES
Patio doggie door panel. Adjustable. E-glass, Euro-flap.
Used once. $125. 843-4628
PET Safe containment wireless
system fence, like new, $135.
Call 423-332-1652.
FEED/SEED/
PLANTS
Cannas Orange & Yellow. $2
come back each yrs
706-937-6149 / 423-488-5565
Rose Of Sharon, Purple or pink
can become a tree or kept as
a bush. $3-$10, 706-937-6149
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE'S SALE
Default having been made
in the payment of the debts
and obligations described in
and secured by a certain Deed
of Trust executed by DAVID E.
WALSH
and KAREN P.
WALSH to J. Michael Winchester, Trustee, recorded
April 23, 2007 in Hamilton
Coun
ty Register's Office as Instrument #2007042300318, GI
Book 8313, Page 985, and the
beneficial interest of said Deed
of Trust is owned by FIRST
TENNESSEE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION , and
the undersigned having been
appointed Successor Trustee
by instrument recorded in said
Register’s Office, this is notice
that the undersigned will on
August 13, 2013 at 1:00PM
local time, at the front door,
Hamilton County Courthouse,
Chattanooga, Tennessee, will
proceed to sell at public outcry
to the highest and best bidder
for cash the following property
located in Hamilton County,
Tennessee, will be sold to the
highest call bidder subject to all
unpaid taxes, prior liens and
encumbrances of record.
Described property is Lot 2,
Block 14 of the J Webbs Resub, and the same property
described in a deed recorded 2301, Page 901 in
WHEREAS, default has occurred in a performance of the
conveyance, terms and conditions of a deed of trust note
dated January 24, 2003, and
the deed of trust of even date
securing the same recorded in
Book 6528, Page 325, as corrected by Scriveners Affidavit
of Deed of Trust recorded in
Book 9913, Page 70, all in the
Registers Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee executed
by Robert Scott Sergeant and
Leah Melinda Tucker and conveying certain property therein
described to Bruce C. Bailey,
as trustee for Northwest Georgia Bank;
WHEREAS, the property
described below is also subject to the following liens and
encumbrances which will be
extinguished and/or adversely
affected by the Trustee's Sale
referenced herein:
(a)
Deed of Trust dated
October 30, 2003, from Robert
Scott Sergeant and wife, Leah
Melinda Sergeant formerly
Leah Melinda Tucker to Joseph Haskins as Trustee for
Capital Bank recorded in Book
6923, Page 459, in the
Register’s Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee.
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the
entire indebtedness has been
declared due and payable; and
that an agent of C. Chad
Young as successor-trustee,
by virtue of the power, duty,
and authority vested and imposed upon said successor
trustee, pursuant to an instrument recorded in Book 9996,
Page 44, in said Register's office will, on August 8, 2013, at
1 0 : 0 0 a . m. , a t t h e W a l n u t
Street entrance of the Hamilton County Courthouse in
Chattanooga, Tennessee, offer for sale, certain property
hereinafter described to the
highest bidder for cash, free
from the equities of redemption, from the statutory right of
redemption, homestead,
dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly
waived in the deed of trust,
said property being real estate
situated in Hamilton County,
Tennessee and being more
particularly described as follows:
All that tract or parcel of land
lying and being in the City of
Chattanooga, Hamilton
County, Tennessee and being known and designated as
Lot No. 4, Subdivision of
Lots 40 to 47, 78 to 83, inclusive, Ridgeview Place, as
shown by a plat of said subdivision of record in Plat
Book 15, Page 40, in the
Register’s Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee.
For prior title see Book 4924,
Page 572, in the above said
Register’s Office.
Subject to Restrictions as recorded in Book 779, Page
549, in the above said
Register’s Office.
Subject to a Sewer Easement as set out in instrument recorded in Book 924,
Page 427, in the above said
Register’s Office.
Subject to a Power Company Easement as shown on
recorded plat.
Subject to any governmental
zoning and subdivision ordinances or regulations in effect thereon.
LEGAL NOTICES
Said property is more commonly known as 311 N. St.
Marks Avenue, Chattanooga,
Tennessee 37411.
This sale is subject to all
matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or set back
lines that may be applicable;
any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental
agency, state or federal; any
prior liens or encumbrances, as
well as any priority created by
a fixture filing; to any matter
that an accurate survey of the
premises might disclose.
DATED: July 10, 2013.
C. Chad Young
Successor Trustee
NOTICE OF TRUSTEES
SALE
WHEREAS, default has occurred in a performance of the
conveyance, terms and conditions of a deed of trust note
dated December 23, 2008, and
the deed of trust of even date
securing the same recorded in
Book 8824, Page 356, in the
Registers Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee executed
by Neeld J. Messler, Trustee
of the Goodpasture 1020
Maroney Trust dated May 8,
2002, T. Howard, Trustee of
the Ketner Mill Road Trust
dated August 15, 2008, and E.
Dell as Alternate Trustee of the
Ketner Mill Road Trust dated
August 15, 2008, and conveying certain property therein described to Bruce C. Bailey, as
trustee for Northwest Georgia
Bank;
WHEREAS, the property
described below is also subject to the following liens and
encumbrances which will be
extinguished and/or adversely
affected by the Trustee's Sale
referenced herein:
(a) NONE.
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the
entire indebtedness has been
declared due and payable; and
that an agent of C. Chad
Young as successor-trustee,
by virtue of the power, duty,
and authority vested and imposed upon said successor
trustee, pursuant to an instrument recorded in Book 10000,
Page 935, in said Register's
office will, on August 8, 2013,
at 10:00 a.m. Eastern Standard Time, at the Walnut Street
entrance of the Hamilton
County Courthouse in Chattanooga, Tennessee, offer for
sale, certain property hereinafter described to the highest
bidder for cash, free from the
equities of redemption, from
the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all
other exemptions which are
expressly waived in the deed of
trust, said property being real
estate situated in Hamilton
County, Tennessee and being
more particularly described as
follows:
All that tract or parcel of land
lying and being located in the
City of Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tennessee and
being more particularly described as Lot 129, Lupton
City Subdivision, as shown
by plat recorded in Plat Book
18, Page 74, in the
Register’s Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee. (Erroneously referred to as Plat
Book 18, Page 24, in deed of
acquisition.)
For prior title and last instrument of record affecting title
to the above described property see deed recorded in
Book 9086, Page 885, in the
above said Register’s Office.
Subject to any governmental
zoning and subdivision ordinances and regulations in
effect thereon.
Subject to Restrictions as set
out in instrument recorded in
Book 1205, Page 390, in the
above said Register’s Office.
Said property is more commonly known as 3564 Whitney Street, Lupton City, Tennessee 37351.
This sale is subject to all
matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or set back
lines that may be applicable;
any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental
agency, state or federal; any
prior liens or encumbrances, as
well as any priority created by
a fixture filing; to any matter
that an accurate survey of the
premises might disclose.
DATED: July 10, 2013.
C. Chad Young
Successor Trustee
NOTICE
The City of Ducktown, TN is
receiving letters of interest from
qualified firms to undertake
planning and design of the
Ducktown Streetscape Project
Phase I. Interest letters are due
on August 15, 2013. Please
contact Ducktown City Hall to
receive a full copy of this advertisement at 423-496-3546.
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
Hamilton County, Tennessee is
soliciting proposals from qualified companies to provide cremation services for indigent individuals. Specifications are
available by contacting the
Purchasing Department at
423-209-6350. Proposals will
be received in the office of the
Hamilton County Purchasing
Director, at 455 North Highland Park Avenue, Chattanooga, TN 37404, before 2:00
p.m. (Eastern) on August 16,
2013.
Gail B. Roppo
Director of Purchasing
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S
SALE
LEGAL NOTICES
WHEREAS, default having
been made in the payment of
the debts and obligations secured by a Deed of Trust executed on April 16, 2007, by
John W. Barrett and April J.
Barrett to Northgate Title Escrow, Inc., Trustee, for the
benefit of Mortgage Electronic
Registration Systems, Inc.
acting solely as nominee for
M&T Bank and appearing of
record in Register’s Office of
Hamilton County, Tennessee,
in Book GI8309, Page 372; and
WHEREAS, the beneficial
interest of said Deed of Trust
was last transferred and assigned to Fannie Mae ("Federal National Mortgage Association") and
WHEREAS, Fannie Mae
("Federal National Mortgage
Association"), as the holder of
the Note for which debt is
owed, (“Note Holder”), appointed the undersigned, Priority Trustee Services of TN,
LLC, as Substitute Trustee by
instrument filed or to be filed
for record in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee, with all the rights,
powers and privileges of the
original Trustee named in said
Deed of Trust; and
WHEREAS, pursuant to
Tenn. Code Ann. § 35-5-117,
not less than sixty (60) days
prior to the first publication required by § 35-5-101, the notice of the right to foreclose
was properly sent, if so required; and
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the
entire indebtedness has been
declared due and payable as
provided in said Deed of Trust
by the Note Holder, and that
the undersigned, Priority
Trustee Services of TN, LLC,
Substitute Trustee, or its duly
appointed attorneys or agents,
by virtue of the power and authority vested in it, will on
Thursday, August 15, 2013,
commencing at 11:00 a.m. at
the Main Door (Walnut Street
side) of the Hamilton County
Courthouse location in Tennessee, proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest and
best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in Hamilton County, Tennessee, to wit:
The following described real
estate in the Third Civil District of Hamilton County,
Tennessee: Being a part of
the property conveyed to
Frankie Uren and wife Dorothy Uren in deed of record
in Deed Book 1218, Page
255, in the Register's Office
of Hamilton County, Tennessee, and being more partivularly described as follows:
Beginning at a point in the
East line of Old Dayton Pike;
said point being at the
Southwest corner of the
property conveyed to Mard D
Haman in Deed Book 4396,
Page 382, said Register's
Ofice; thence in a Easterly
direction along an old Farm
Fence 136 feet more or less
(according to Deed 150 feet)
to a point ; thence in a
NOrthwesterly direction
alonhg a chain link fence 105
feet more or less (according
to Deed 100 feet) to a point
in the south line of
Twenty (20) foot Joint
Driveway Easement
described in Book 2654,
Page 971 this point being he
Northeast corner of the
Haman Property aforesaid;
thence Eastwardly along
said joint driveway easement
124 feet more or less to a
iron pipe at the NOrthwest
corner of Tract One of
Property of Patrick S. Fuller
and wife Stacey in Deed
Book 5741, Page 804;
thence South 2 degrees 1
minute East 124.80 feet (according to Deed 125) to a
point in the Northwest corner
of the property conveyed to
Fuller in Deed Book 5741,
Page 804, described tract 3
in said deed; thence South
13 degrees 39 minutes West
191.54 feet to a point in the
NOrth line property
conveyed to Oscar A. Legg
in Deed Book 989, Page 131
said Register's Office; thence
Westwardly along a fence
line 111 feet more or less to
a point in the Southeast
corner of Kenneth Burroughs
in Deed Book 2030, Page
77, said Register's Office
thence Northwardly along a
fence line being Burroughs
East line 104 feet more or
less to a point; thence
Westwardly along a fence
line being Burroughs North
line 172 feet more or less to
the East line of Old Dayton
Pike; thence Northwardly
along Old Dayton Pike 70
feet more or less to the point
of beginning, according to
survey by C. Barton Crattle,
Registered Surveyer #1742,
dated August 16, 2000 by
Niles Subeying Company
whose address is 3962
C h u r c h i l l R o a d ,
Chattanooga, Tennessee
37406. Together with Twenty
(20) foot Joint Driveway
Easement for purpose of
ingress and egress of record
in Deed Book 2654, Page
971, said Register's Office.
The Grantors herein
reserved unto themselves,
their heirs and assigns a
Twenty (20) foot waterline
easement along a fence line
along the Burroughs Legg
and Legg Northern lines and
Southern line of Easement
being further described as
follows: Beginning at the
intersection of Old Dayton
Pike and the northern line of
the Kenneth Burroughs
property as shown by Deed
Recorded in Deed Book
2030, Page 77; thence in an
easterly directin along said
ence 172 feet, more or less
thence in a southerly
direction 104 feet, more or
35877274
35877275
Card-Monroe Corp. is currently accepting applications for
the following positions:
Welder: Candidate should be able to set up and operate M.I.G.
welding machines and oxygen-acetylene torches. Must perform
a wide variety of M.I.G welding in flat, horizontal, vertical and
overhead positions and produce a variety of parts from shop
drawings that conform to specifications.
CNC Operator 2nd shift: Experience with set-up and operating a wide variety of metal working equipment including CNC
milling centers or turning centers. Work to be performed per
blueprint specifications.
Excellent benefits including medical, dental, vision, life and disability plus 401(k). Apply in person Mon. – Fri, 8:00 AM – 4:00
PM; or send resume to:
4841 Adams Road, Hixson, TN 37343
FAX : 423 308-2940
Email: [email protected]
Card-Monroe Corp is an Equal Opportunity Employer providing
a drug free workplace through pre-employment screening.
No Phone Calls Please
35981675
Epiphony Electric Guitar ,
roland amp, stand case, new,
$390, 772-913-1404 Dunlap
35985988
LEGAL NOTICES
less to a point; thence in a
easterly direction to a point
in the Southern line of the
property conveyed to Darrly
Lee Burchard and wife,
Becky U. Burchard in Deed
Book 566, Page 209, said
Register's Office; thence
South 67 degrees 22 minutes East, a distance of
31.72 feet to a point; thence
South 60 degrees 33
minutes East, a distance of
52.02 feet to a point; thence
South 64 fegrees 15 minutes
East, a distance of 52.66 feet
to a point; thence South 78
degrees 30 minutes East, a
distance of 49.65 feet to a
point; thence South 57
degrees 55 minutes East, a
distance of 122.06 feet to a
point said point being the
Southwest corner of the
Burchard property described
in Deed 4282, Page 150 in
said Register's Office, as
shown by survey of C.
Barton Crattle, TRLS #1742,
Niles Surveying Compnay
Inc. 3962 Churchill Road,
Chattanooga, Tennessee,
job no. VF32-Burchard-1,
dated August, 2000.
Together with waterline
easement along South line
as reserved in Deed Book
5663, Page 209, said
Register's Office. The legal
description in theis deed is
taken from the last deed of
record. Being the same land
described in a deed ot
Miachael D. Seals and wife,
Annette L. Seals by deed
dated April 27, 2001 and
recorded in Book 5849 Page
921 in the Register's Office
of Hamilton County,
Tennessee. SUBJECT To
any governmental zoning
and subdivision ordinances
or regulations in effect
thereon. SUBJECT To
Twento (20) foot Waterline
Easement as shown by
survey of Niles Surveying
Co., Inc. dated August 16,
2000 as reserved in Book
LEGAL NOTICES
5663, Page 209, said
Register's Office. SUBJECT
To Twenty (20) foot Joint
Driv3eway Easement as set
out in instrument recorded
ink Book 2654, Page 971,
said Register's Office.
PROPERTY ADDRESS:
418 Red Bird Lane, Soddy
Daisy, TN 37379
CURRENT OWNER(S):
John W. Barrett and April J.
Barrett The sale of the abovedescribed property shall be
subject to all matters shown on
any recorded plan; any unpaid
taxes; any restrictive
covenants, easements or
set-back lines that may be
applicable; any prior liens or
encumbrances as well as any
priority created by a fixture
filing; and any matter that an
accurate survey of the
premises might disclose.
Substitute Trustee will only
convey any interest he/she
may have in the property at the
time of sale. Property is sold
“as is, where is.” For every lien
or claim of lien of the state
identified above, please be
advised notice required by §
67-1-1433 (b)(1) was timely
given and that any sale of the
property herein referenced will
be subject to the right of the
state to redeem the land as
p r o v i d e d f o r i n §
67-1-1433(c)(1).
All right and equity of
redemption, statutory or
otherwise, homestead, and
dower are expressly waived in
said Deed of Trust, and the title
is believed to be good, but the
undersigned will sell and
convey only as Substitute
Trustee.
The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to
another day, time, and place
certain without further publication, upon announcement at
the time and place for the sale
set forth above.
PRIORITY TRUSTEE
SERVICES OF TN, LLC 1587
LEGAL NOTICES
Northeast Expressway Atlanta,
Georgia 30329 (770) 234-9181
File No.: 1582213
Web Site: www.JFLegal.com
Publication Dates: July 23, July
30, August 6, 2013
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S
SALE
Sale at public auction will be
o n September 3, 2013 at
1 2 : 0 0 P M local time, at the
west door, Hamilton County
Courthouse, Chattanooga,
Tennessee pursuant to Deed
of Trust executed by Clarence
E . Y o r k a n d Lesa J. York,
husband and wife and Annie
Lee York, an unmarried
woman, as joint tenants with
right of survivorship, to James
L. Grillot, Trustee, as trustee
for American Home Mortgage
Company on October 14, 2005
at Book GI 7727, Page 4, Instrument No. 2005102800165;
conducted by Shapiro & Kirsch,
LLP having been appointed
Substitute or Successor
Trustee, all of record in the
Hamilton County Register's Office. Default has occurred in
the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions
of said Deed of Trust and the
entire indebtedness has been
declared due and payable.
Party Entitled to Enforce the
Debt: Wells Fargo Bank, NA,
its successors and assigns
The following real estate located in Hamilton County,
Tennessee, will be sold to the
highest call bidder:
LOT 4, BLOCK ONE (1),
AMENDED PLAT OF ADDITION NO. ONE (1), MURRAY HILLS, as shown on
plat of record in Plat Book
18, Page 77, in the
Register's Office, Hamilton
County, Tennessee, to which
plat reference is hereby
made for a more particular
description of said property.
Street Address: 4515 Murray Hills Drive, Chattanooga,
F4 • Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • • •
35911309
GARY E LESTER,
Substitute Trustee
Tennessee 37416
Parcel Number: 128D E 003
Current Owner(s) of Property: Clarence E. York and
Lesa J. York
The street address of the
above described property is
believed to be 4515 Murray
Hills Drive, Chattanooga, Tennessee 37416, but such address is not part of the legal
description of the property sold
herein and in the event of any
discrepancy, the legal description herein shall control.
SALE IS SUBJECT TO
TENANT(S) RIGHTS IN POSSESSION.
This sale is subject to all
matters shown on any applicable recorded plat any unpaid
taxes; and any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback
lines that may be applicable;
any statutory right of redemption of any governmental
agency, state or federal; any
prior liens or encumbrances as
well as any priority created by
a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of
the premises might disclose.
All right of equity of redemption, statutory and otherwise, and homestead are expressly waived in said Deed of
Trust, and the title is believed
to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only
as Substitute Trustee.
The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place
certain without further publication, upon announcement at
the time and place for the sale
set forth above. If the highest
bidder cannot pay the bid
within twenty-four (24) hours of
the sale, the next highest bidder, at their highest bid, will be
deemed the successful bidder.
This property is being sold
with the express reservation
that the sale is subject to confirmation by the lender or
trustee. This sale may be rescinded by the Substitute
Trustee at any time.
This office may be a debt
collector. This may be an attempt to collect a debt and any
information obtained may be
used for that purpose.
Fifteen (15) foot utility easement on front lot lines as
noted on plat. Five (5) drainage/utility easement on interior lot lines as noted on plat.
Be the same more or less
but subject to all legal highways.
Notice of the Right to Foreclose has been given in compliance with T.C.A. §
35-5-117.
Tax Parcel ID: 019J-C-012.00
Improved and known as 137
Honor Lane Northwest,
Cleveland, TN. Deed of Trust
recorded in Book 2120, Page
87, in the Register's Office of
Bradley County, Tennessee.
Terms of sale will be public
auction, for cash, free and
clear of the rights of homestead, redemption and dower,
and the rights of Danny Vick
and Reta A Vick, husband and
wife, and those claiming
through them, subject to any
accrued taxes and restrictions
which may be of record in the
said Register's Office.
ARNOLD M. WEISS, Substitute Trustee pursuant to Appointment of Substitute
Trustee of record in the
Register's Office of Bradley
County, Tennessee
ARNOLD M. WEISS,
Substitute Trustee
Weiss Spicer Cash PLLC
208 Adams Avenue
Memphis, Tennessee 38l03
90l-526-8296
File # 1701-0101677-FC
Publication Dates: July 16,
July 23, July 30, 2013
Bank of America/Vinson Smith
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
Sale at public auction will be
on Thursday, August 29,
2013, at 10:00 AM prevailing
time at the East Door of the
Courthouse, Cleveland, Bradley County, Tennessee. Loan
#20-20-6-0587407. The owner
of the debt is Flagstar Bank,
FSB.
Realty to be sold under the
provisions of a Deed of Trust
executed by Danny Vick and
Reta A Vick, husband and
wife, Grantors, is located in
Bradley County, Tennessee
and designated as:
The following described real
estate in Bradley County,
Tennessee: Located in the
Second Civil District of Bradley County, Tennessee: Lot
Twelve (12), Camelot, as
shown on plat of record in
Plat 4, Page 43, in the
Register’s Office of Bradley
County, Tennessee. This
conveyance is made subject
to the following: Any governmental zoning and subdivision ordinances or regulations in effect thereon. All
applicable conditions, restrictions, reservations,
easements, etc., as shown
on a recorded plat. Restrictive covenants as set out in
instrument recorded in Misc.
Book 95, Page 647, in the
said Register's Office.
Thirty-five (35) foot front setback line as shown on plat
E Ridge- Great Investment Duplex, convenient location. Each
side w/ 2 bd, 1 ba, eat in kitchen,
appl& window covers, C/H/A.
remodeled. $76,000 838-8184
HOUSES FOR SALE
Brainerd, East Brainerd
E. Brainerd. 8612 Oak View Dr.
Beautifully classic 2 story
$135,700. 463-0032 Remy.
Publication Dates:July 16, ,
July 23, July 30, 2013
HOUSES FOR SALE
Dtwn, St. Elmo, Highland Park,
Avondale, Missionary Ridge
CHATT. Investment Property
Rented. $700/mo. Mechanic
garage. $39,900 423-304-4041
HOUSES FOR SALE
City of East Ridge
APARTMENTS
FOR SALE
BUSINESS
PROPERTY
Hixson, Chattanooga
City Limits
E.DALE Shallowford Rd. 2 story
brick.5K sq. ft. paved.$39,900
Cash talks.We finance.304-4041
HIXSON 415 Bardwood Ln.
$129,900 Updated! Seller pays
closing. 3 BR, 1.5bath Den, F/P,
2 car garage. Mary Mathews
Realty 423-595-7800
Zoned Comm. - 6514-18
Shallowford Rd. Build ready.High
traffic. 200x300, $199K 304-4041
DUPLEXES
FOR SALE
HIXSON foreclosure - Selling as
is. Brick, pool, 3+2, 2300 sq. ft.
$120K Call: 423-304-4041
Signature Oaks
Subdivision-4BR/3BA, huge
bonus room, office,
community pool, McConnell,
Loftis, Soddy schools, $319,900
423-802-2724 423-847-6525
Signal Mtn.-3Br, 2.5Ba, Carport,
8’X12’ storage room, newly
remolded, private,
$239,500. 423-304-7765
OFFICE FOR SALE
OOLTEWAH. 3BR, 2 bath, den
w/gas FP, hardwood, tile,
granite counter tops, all applcs. New roof, large fenced
yard, workshop/storage bldg.
$144,500. 423-238-6035.
OFFICE FOR LEASE
AREA 18
AREA 16
HOUSES FOR SALE
Shallowford off Hwy I-53- Great
investment property! Don’t
wait! 6000 SF corner lot office
building in prime location! 3
suites fully rented. For Sale$50,000 under bank appraisal.
Call 423-785-6865
Ooltewah
HOUSES FOR SALE
Collegedale, Apison
AREA 19
Collegedale- Brand New
Home, approx 1 mile from
Southern University and Green
Way. Open floor plan, walking
closet, garage, porch. $154,000
(423)320-2354
HOUSES FOR SALE
Walker County
Lookout Valley:
Office Space for lease.
Various sizes. 423-894-0324
APTS-RENTFURNISHED
FT. OGLETHORPE.
Furnished Studio Apt. Water,
Garbage, Electric paid.
No Smoking. Quiet Community and Close to Everything.
6 or 12 month lease.
Ground Level. Lakeshore II
Apartments. 706-861-0455
APTS-RENTUNFURNISHED
BRAINERD 2 Bed. 1 bath
* $495. Mo. $300. Dep.
New appliances, hardwood
floors. Water furnished.
No Pets 423-629-6528
BRAINERD
RUSTIC VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
1, 2, Bedrooms & Efficiencies
AREA 20
Chickamauga Area- 2500sq ft.
3/2.5 In grnd pool. Det w/ shop.
A STEAL/ $195K. 423-421-1345
HOUSES FOR SALE
Dade County
AREA 21
TRENTON- 3/2/2.5 Newer, 2050
sq. ft. Hardwood, tile, blinds,
Pella, Halo, Hansgrohe.
$149,900. 407-335-7973.
HOUSES FOR SALE
All Other Georgia
Counties
2BR/2BA, living room, dining
room, kitchen, utility room, 2
car garage, extra nice,
$89,500 706-462-2635
HOUSES FOR SALE
Sequatchie County
Near Hamilton Place
Eastgate
Newly Redecorated Available
Call
423-894-0324
CHATT/ E. RIDGE. SPECIAL!
$235/1st Mo Rent+ $200 Dep
MOVE IN TODAY! 820 sf.1 BR
Water Incl.,all Balconies view
of City, No Pets 423-875-0445
CITY VIEW APTS- Spacious
& Affordable, 1 & 2 BR
Available, Beautiful View!! $440.
& $495. a Month, 423-622-3230
FLINTSTONE, GA. 2bd/ 1.5bath.
10 mins. to Chatt.New flooring
Paint, Appli. Washer/dryer. No
pets. $650/mo. 423-593-2583
FT. OGLETHORPE
Efficiencies $325/355 Washer/
Dryer Great for Seniors.
706-861-1666 or 706-956-8864
HIXSON
1 Bed.1 bath $595. Mo.,
2 Bed. 2 bath $750.Mo.
Appliances,W/D connections.
Water furnished
Ask about our
$99.00 deposit special.
423-629-6528
WATERFRONT MULLINS
COVE 2 lots 210 river frontage
60'slip boat new 1 bdr 1000sq ft
cabin all furnishings incld concrete 2 space covered parking.
Lot $125,000 cabin $325,000
cabin can be sold separately
(423)321-2346
HOUSES FOR SALE
Meigs County
Georgetown 3 BR home 8.25
acres $90,000 423-322-0950
or 423-472-1440
CONDOS TOWNHOUSES
-HIXSON/ RIDGESIDE APTSLarge 1 & 2 BR Available!
Call today for your custom
quote. 423-842-8280
RINGGOLD - Very Nice. 2
BR, 1 1/2 bath. No pets. $625
mo. $625 dep. Boynton School
District. 865-458-2168 or
706-313-4061.
CONDO-TOWNHOUSE-RENT
E.BRAINERD 2100 sq. ft, 3BR ,
2 bath, attached garage, storage, New carpet and granite
counter tops, on a quiet culde-sac. Minutes to Hamilton
Place and I-75. No pets or
smokers $1500/month
423-715-4059
HIXSON/RIVERVIEW -1365 sq
ft, 2 1/2 baths, 2BR, Beautiful
view, 5 mins. from downtown,
$131,900 Call 280-6177
ROSSVILLE- 2 BR, 1.5 Bath.
$600/mo. $500/Dep.
Call 423-255-5385
LEASE/PURCHASE
Rossville 3br/2ba, Cedar Creek
Condos, fireplace, 1 Car Gar
new carpet. $900mo, 505-5648
Harrison- 3 BR, 3 BA, 2 car garage, W/D hookups,2000 SF +,
$1400 /mo, 1 year lease
plus deposit, good credit.
(423)827-3761
DUPLEXES
FOR RENT
LOTS & ACREAGE
E. Brainerd: 3 bd, 2 1/2 ba,
appl, hkps, ctr h/a, double garage, new carpet! $845/500
624.6746 #739
5.4 level ac, 15 min. from Soddy
Lake. 1033 ft. road frontage.
423-280-1505. 463-2401
Brainerd: 1 bd, 1 ba chalet,
appl, hkps, ctr h/a, fireplace,
deck, fireplace $525/400
624.6746 #711
75 Acres. $1000/acre.
Privately owned. Gruettli-Lager.
Sunshine Rd. 786-317-1666
E. Ridge: 2 bd, 1 ba, appl, hkps,
ctr h/a, deck, new carpet,
separate dining $625/500
624.6746 #723
Alton Park- lot approx. 100’
wide by 150’ deep, 5233 Dorsey
St. $7900 423-240-4029
E. Ridge: 3 bd, 2 ba, on three
levels, appl, hkps, ctr h/a,
dead end street, $695/500
624.6746 #732
E. Brainerd: 2 bd, 1 ba duplex,
appl, hkps, ctr h/a, front door
parking $625/500 624/6746
#721
BIRCHWOOD 1 Acre 200’ road
frontage public water $11,900. or
$200. dn $180.mo.423-344-9615
CATOOSA CO. Beautiful lots,
with paved road and underground utilities. Ready to build
on. In Victoria Estates Across
from the Colonnade. Lots
109x153. $50,000. Call
706-866-3407.
St. Elmo Central Ave. Great
fixer-upper. $8500 Cash talks!
Call: 423-304-4041
I BUY HOMES
*CASH $$$ ANY CONDITION
Call & 423-718-7768
HOUSES FOR SALE
TRUSTEE=S NOTICE OF
SALE
John R. Anderson,
Successor Trustee
Grant, Konvalinka &
Harrison, P.C.
Suite 900, 633 Chestnut Street
Chattanooga, TN 37450-0900
316-3800
HIXSON AREA 16 APTS
FOR SALE For more info call
Ed Stephens @ 423-593-7242
Flagstar Bank/Danny Vick
Sale at public auction will be
on August 6, 2013, at 10:00
A.M ., at the Main Entrance of
the Hamilton County Courthouse, Chattanooga, Tennessee, pursuant to a Deed of
Trust executed by Don Walker
and spouse, Rhonda P.
Walker to Stewart Title of Tennessee d/b/a Legal Title,
Trustee for the beneficial interest of First Volunteer Bank of
Tennessee, at Book 7388,
Page 899, as amended in Book
9033, Page 872, in the
Register’s Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee, and conducted by John R. Anderson,
Successor Trustee or his designated agent, all of record in
the Hamilton County Register’s
Office.
Owner of Debt: First Volunteer Bank of Tennessee
The following real estate located in Hamilton County,
Tennessee will be sold to the
highest cash bidder subject to
all unpaid taxes, prior liens and
encumbrances of record:
All that tract or parcel of land
lying and being in Hamilton
County, Tennessee, being
described as follows:
TRACT SEVEN (7): All that
tract or parcel of land lying
and being in the Second Civil
District of Hamilton County,
Tennessee, being Lot Six (6)
Hawks Cove Subdivision, as
shown by plat recorded in
Plat Book 73, Page 73, in the
Register’s Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee.
For prior title, see Deed recorded in Book 8921, Page
704, in the Register’s Office
of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING:
Restrictions recorded in Book
7220, Page 307, in the
Register’s Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee.
Two Hundred (200) Foot
Wide Easement to TVA for
power line as set forth in instrument recorded in Book
1809, Page 187, in the
Register’s Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee, and as
shown on plat recorded in
Plat Book 73, Page 73, in
said Register’s Office.
Transmission Line easement
to United States of America
recorded in Book P, Volume
29, Page 251, as assigned to
the Electric Power Board of
Chattanooga at Book 1549,
Page 15, in the Register’s
Office of Hamilton County,
Tennessee.
Notice of Solid Waste Disposal recorded in Book
4950, Page 530, in the
Register’s Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee.
Easements and other matters on plat recorded in Plat
Book 73, Page 73, in the
Register’s Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee.
Applicable conditions and
easements, if any, in subdivision regulations recorded
in Book 2116, Page 186, in
the Register’s Office of
Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject to any covenants,
conditions, restrictions, reservations or easements of
record.
Subject to any governmental
zoning and subdivision ordinances in effect thereon.
Owner of Property: Quentin Thomas
Property Address: 2245
Red Tail Lane, Chattanooga,
TN 37421
Other Interested Parties:
Don Walker
All right and equity of redemption, statutory and otherwise, homestead and dower
are expressly waived in said
Deed of Trust and the title is
believed to be good, but the
undersigned, will sell and convey only as Successor Trustee.
The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time and place certain without further publication,
upon announcement at the
time and place for the sale set
forth above.
This is an attempt to collect
a debt and any information
obtained will be used for that
purpose.
REAL ESTATE
WANTED
I Buy
HOUSES
CA$H!
AREA 28
Default having been made
in the payment of the debts
and obligations secured to be
paid by a certain Deed of Trust
executed April 20, 2005 by
Vinson Smith, unmarried to
Title Enterprises, as Trustee,
as same appears of record in
the office of the Register of
Hamilton County, Tennessee,
in Book GI 7518, Page 258,
and the undersigned having
been appointed Substitute
Trustee by instrument recorded in the said Register's
Office, and the owner of the
debt secured, Deutsche Bank
National Trust Company As
Trustee For The Holders Of
New Century Home Equity
Loan Trust, Series 2005-A, Asset Backed Pass-Through Certificates, having requested the
undersigned to advertise and
sell the property described in
and conveyed by said Deed of
Trust, all of said indebtedness
having matured by default in
the payment of a part thereof,
at the option of the owner, this
is to give notice that the undersigned will, on Thursday, August 15, 2013 commencing at
10:00 AM, at the Auction.com
Room at the Sheraton Read
House Hotel Chattanooga, 827
Broad Street, Chattanooga, TN
37402, Hamilton County, Tennessee proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest and
best bidder for cash, the following described property, towit:
Situated in County of Hamilton, State of Tennessee.
A certain tract or parcel of
land located in the Third Civil
District of Hamilton County,
State of Tennessee, described as follows, to-wit: Lot
Seventy-five (75), Durham
Land Company’s Subdivision of Soddy, Tennessee as
shown by plat of record in
Plat Book 12, Page 48, in the
Register’s Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee. This
conveyance is subject to all
matters of record in plat in
Plat Book 12, Page 48,
Register's Office for Hamilton County. This conveyance is made subject to any
and all zoning regulations,
building restrictions and setback lines, if any, and easements and rights for public
utilities applicable to this
property.
Notice of the Right to Foreclose has been given in
compliance with T.C.A. §
35-5-117.
Tax Parcel ID: 048D-C-018
Property Address: 216 Depot Street, Soddy Daisy, TN.
Other Interested Parties:
Gault Financial, LLC assignee
of Chase/Washington Mutual –
WA
All right and equity of redemption, homestead and
dower waived in said Deed of
Trust, and the title is believed
to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only
as Substitute Trustee.
City of East Ridge
Any Condition!
AREA 31
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S
SALE
Publication Dates: July 23,
July 30, August 6, 2013
AREA
1 2
AREA
Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP
Substitute Trustee
www.kirschattorneys.com
Law Office of Shapiro & Kirsch,
LLP
555 Perkins Road Extended,
Second Floor
Memphis, TN 38117
Phone (901)767-5566
Fax (901)761-5690
File No. 13-050172
ARNOLD M. WEISS,
Attorney at Law
Weiss Spicer Cash PLLC
208 Adams Avenue
Memphis, Tennessee 38103
(901) 526-8296
File # 1779-0107559-FC
HOUSES FOR SALE
H. ANY HOUSE! H
AREA
1 4
AREA
LEGAL NOTICES
AREA 8
LEGAL NOTICES
AREA 3
TRUSTEE’S SALE
WHEREAS, a Deed of Trust has been heretofore executed by Evelyn C Hays an undivided one-half (1/2) and Roy A Adams and Evelyn C Hays, Co-Trustees of the Marital
Trust U/A Mark H Hays, Jr, to Pioneer Title Agency, Inc., Trustee, dated October 13, 2010, filed for record October 13, 2010, and recorded in Book 9268, Page 672, in the
Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee, conveying the hereinafter described real estate in trust, to secure payment of a promissory note therein described, payable
to the order of Tennessee Valley Federal Credit Union, and,
WHEREAS, by instrument executed by the present holder and owner of said note, Tennessee Valley Federal Credit Union, dated June 18, 2013, filed for record June 21,
2013, and recorded in Book 9984, Page 566, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee, Gary E Lester has been appointed as Substitute Trustee, with all of the
rights, powers and privileges of the original Trustee named in said Deed of Trust; and,
WHEREAS, default has been made in payment of installments maturing on said promissory note, and in performance of covenants contained in the Deed of Trust, by
reason of which Tennessee Valley Federal Credit Union, the lawful owner and holder of said note, has declared the entire balance owing thereon due and payable, default
has been made in payment thereof, such default continuing;
NOW, THEREFORE, by virtue of the power and authority vested in me as such Substitute Trustee, under the Deed of Trust of record in Book 9268, Page 672, aforesaid,
at the request of the owner of said note, and for the purpose of effecting payment and satisfaction thereof, principal and interest, attorney’s fees, and cost of sale, I, Gary
E Lester, Substitute Trustee, will on August 6, 2013 at 1:30 o’clock P.M., offer for sale at public outcry, to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the West door of the
Hamilton County Courthouse, in the City of Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tennessee, in bar of the equities of redemption, statutory right of redemption, dower, distributive
share, homestead, and all other exemptions, the following described real estate:
Located in the City of Chattanooga of Hamilton County, Tennessee:
Unit 52-J, in Heritage Landing, a Tennessee Horizontal Property Regime created pursuant to the provisions of the Tennessee “Horizontal Property Act” as set forth
in Chapter 27, at Sections 66-27-101, et seq., in the Tennessee Code Annotated, by that certain Master Deed for Heritage Landing of record in Book 3190, Page 32,
as amended by First Supplement to Master Deed for Heritage Landing of record in Book 3243, Page 499, and as amended by Second Supplement to Master Deed
For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3365, Page 774, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee, as amended by Third Supplement To Master Deed for
Heritage Landing of record in Book 3415, Page 193, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee, and as amended by Fourth Supplement to Master Deed of
record in Book 3483, Page 415, re-recorded in Book 3484, Page 179, as amended by Fifth Supplement to Master Deed of record in Book 3512, Page 458, re-recorded
in Book 3513, Page 792, as amended by Sixth Supplement to Master Deed of record in Book 3526, Page 74, as amended by Seventh Supplement to Master Deed of
record in Book 3615, Page 917, as amended by Eighth Supplement to Master Deed of record in Book 3658, Page 720, as amended by Amendment to Master Deed for
Heritage Landing, Chattanooga, Tennessee and By-Laws for Heritage Landing Homeowners’ Association, Inc. of record in Book 3736, Page 948, and as amended by
Ninth Supplement to Master Deed of record in Book 3857, Page 560, and as amended by Tenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3918,
Page 795, and as amended by Second Amendment To Master Deed for Heritage Landing, Chattanooga, Tennessee, And By-Laws For Heritage Landing Condominium
Association, Inc. of record in Book 4125, Page 136, and as amended by Eleventh Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4147, Page 525,
and as amended by Twelfth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4403, Page 443, and as amended by Thirteenth Supplement To Master
Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4450, Page 232, and as amended by Fourteenth Supplement To Master Deed for Heritage Landing recorded in Book 4507,
Page 222, and as amended by Fifteenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4675, Page 679, and as amended by Sixteenth Supplement
To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4977, Page 707, and as amended by Seventeenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record
in Book 5099, Page 497, and as amended by Eighteenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 5214, Page 425, and as amended by
Nineteenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 5272, Page 713, and as amended by Twentieth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage
Landing of record in Book 5319, Page 870, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee, and with said Unit 45-J2, Phase 3 being more particularly located and
described on Plat of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 40, Pages 81-1 thru 81-55, as amended by First Supplement of Final Plan as shown in Plat Book 40, Pages
113-1 thru 113-35, as amended by Second Supplement to Final Plan of record in Plat Book 40, Pages 187-1 thru 187-10, as amended by Third Supplement to Final Plan
of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 23-1 thru 23-37, as amended by Fourth Supplement to Final Plan of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 70-1 thru 70-7, as amended by Fifth
Supplement to Final Plan of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 89-1 thru 89-11, as amended by Sixth Supplement to Final Plan of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 93-1 thru
93-18, as amended by Seventh Supplement to Final Plan of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 138-1 thru 138-22, as amended by Eighth Supplement to Final Plan of Heritage
Landing as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 163-1 thru 163-14, as amended by Ninth Supplement to Final Plan of Heritage Landing as shown by plat of
record in Plat Book 46, Page 93, as amended by Tenth Supplement to Final Plan of Heritage Landing as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 46, Pages 123-1 thru 123-7,
as amended by Eleventh Supplement to Final Plan of Heritage Landing as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 52, Pages 16-1 thru 16-7, as corrected by Corrective Plat,
Revised Plan of Sheet No. 1 of Eleventh Supplement to Final Plan of Heritage Landing as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 52, Page 17, and as amended by Twelfth
Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 52, Pages 141-1 thru 141-7, and as amended by Thirteenth Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage
Landing of record in Plat Book 52, Pages 190-1 thru 190-2, and as amended by Fourteenth Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 54,
Pages 32-1 thru 32-6, and by Fifteenth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 54, Pages 138-1 thru 138-7, and by Sixteenth Supplement
To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 58, Pages 112 thru 114, and as amended by Seventeenth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of
record in Plat Book 58, Pages 171 thru 175, and as amended by Eighteenth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 60, Page 30, and as
amended by Nineteenth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 60, Pages 62 through 68, as revised in Plat Book 60, Pages 70 and 71, and
as amended by Twentieth Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 60, Pages 97 through 103, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County,
Tennessee, and all recorded supplements and plats applicable thereto.
Together with the exclusive use of the Limited Common Elements that are designated as appurtenant to said Unit 52-J, by the terms and provisions of said Master Deed
For Heritage Landing, of record in Book 3190, Page 32, as amended by First Supplement to Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3243, Page 499, and
as amended by Second Supplement to Master Deed for Heritage Landing of record in Book 3365, Page 774, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee, and
as amended by Third Supplement to Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3415, Page 193, and as amended by Fourth Supplement to Master Deed of
record in Book 3483, Page 415, re-recorded in Book 3484, Page 179, as amended by Fifth Supplement to Master Deed of record in Book 3512, Page 458, re-recorded
in Book 3513, Page 792, as amended by Sixth Supplement to Master Deed of record in Book 3526, Page 74, as amended by Seventh Supplement to Master Deed of
record in Book 3615, Page 917, as amended by Eighth Supplement to Master Deed of record in Book 3658, Page 720, as amended by Amendment to Master Deed for
Heritage Landing Chattanooga, Tennessee and By-Laws For Heritage Landing Homeowners’ Association, Inc. of record in Book 3736, Page 948, and as amended by
Ninth Supplement to Master Deed For Heritage Landing Chattanooga, Tennessee and By-Laws for Heritage Landing Homeowners Association, Inc. of record in Book
3857, Page 560, and as amended by Tenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3918, Page 795, and as amended by Second Amendment
To Master Deed For Heritage Landing, Chattanooga, Tennessee, And By-Laws For Heritage Landing Condominium Association, Inc. of record in Book 4125, Page 136, and
as amended by Eleventh Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4147, Page 525, and as amended by Twelfth Supplement To Master Deed
For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4403, Page 443, and as amended by Thirteenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4450, Page
232, and as amended by Fourteenth Supplement To Master Deed for Heritage Landing recorded in Book 4507, Page 222, and as amended by Fifteenth Supplement To
Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4675, Page 679, and as amended by Sixteenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book
4977, Page 707, and as amended by Seventeenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 5099, Page 497, and as amended by Eighteenth
Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 5214, Page 425, and as amended by Nineteenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing
of record in Book 5272, Page 713, and as amended by Twentieth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 5319, Page 870, in the Register’s
Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee , in the percentage now set, or as may hereafter be set in accordance therewith.
Together with the appurtenant undivided interest in the Common Elements that is provided for under the terms and provisions of said Master Deed For Heritage
Landing, of record in Book 3190, Page 32, as amended by First Supplement to Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3243, Page 499, and as amended by
Second Supplement to Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3365, Page 774, and as amended by Third Supplement to Master Deed for Heritage Landing
of record in Book 3415, Page 193, and as amended by Fourth Supplement to Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3483, Page 415, as re-recorded in
Book 3484, Page 179, and as amended by Fifth Supplement to Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3512, Page 458, as re-recorded in Book 3513, Page
792, and as amended by Sixth Supplement to Master Deed for Heritage Landing of record in Book 3526, Page 74, and as amended by Seventh Supplement To Master
Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3615, Page 917, and as amended by Eighth Supplement to Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3658,
Page 720, and as amended by Amendment To Master Deed For Heritage Landing, Chattanooga, Tennessee And By-Laws For Heritage Landing Homeowners Association,
Inc., of record in Book 3736, Page 948, and as amended by Ninth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3857, Page 560, and as amended
by Tenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3918, Page 795, and as amended by Second Amendment To Master Deed For Heritage
Landing, Chattanooga, Tennessee, and By-Laws For Heritage Landing Condominium Association, Inc., of record in Book 4125, Page 136, and as amended by Eleventh
Supplement to Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4147, Page 525, and as amended by Twelfth Supplement to Master Deed for Heritage Landing of
record in Book 4403, Page 443, and as amended by Thirteenth Supplement to Master Deed for Heritage Landing of record in Book 4450, Page 232, and as amended by
Fourteenth Supplement to Master Deed for Heritage Landing of record in Book 4507, Page 222, and as amended by Fifteenth Supplement to Master Deed for Heritage
Landing of record in Book 4675, Page 679, and as amended by Sixteenth Supplement to Master Deed for Heritage Landing of record in Book 4977, Page 707, and as
amended by Seventeenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 5099, Page 497, and as amended by Eighteenth Supplement To Master
Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 5214, Page 425, and as amended by Nineteenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 5272,
Page 713, and as amended by Twentieth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 5319, Page 870, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County,
Tennessee, in the percentage now set, or as may hereafter be set in accordance therewith.
The source of Grantor’s interest is found in deed recorded in Book 5160, Page 915, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject to Restrictive Covenants as are set forth in said Master Deed for Heritage Landing of record in Book 3190, Page 32, as amended by First Supplement to Master
Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3243, Page 499, and as amended by Second Supplement to Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3365,
Page 774, and as amended by Third Supplement to Master Deed for Heritage Landing of record in Book 3415, Page 193, and as amended by Fourth Supplement to
Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3483, Page 415, as re-recorded in Book 3484, Page 179, and as amended by Fifth Supplement to Master Deed For
Heritage Landing of record in Book 3512, Page 458, as re-recorded in Book 3513, Page 792, and as amended by Sixth Supplement to Master Deed for Heritage Landing
of record in Book 3526, Page 74, and as amended by Seventh Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3615, Page 917, and as amended
by Eighth Supplement to Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3658, Page 720, and as amended by Amendment To Master Deed For Heritage Landing,
Chattanooga, Tennessee And By-Laws For Heritage Landing Homeowners Association, Inc., of record in Book 3736, Page 948, and as amended by Ninth Supplement To
Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3857, Page 560, and as amended by Tenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3918,
Page 795, and as amended by Second Amendment To Master Deed For Heritage Landing, Chattanooga, Tennessee, And By-Laws For Heritage Landing Condominium
Association, Inc. of record in Book 4125, Page 136, and as amended by Eleventh Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4147, Page 525,
and as amended by Twelfth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4403, Page 443, and as amended by Thirteenth Supplement To Master
Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4450, Page 232, and as amended by Fourteenth Supplement To Master Deed for Heritage Landing recorded in Book 4507,
Page 222, and as amended by Fifteenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4675, Page 679, and as amended by Sixteenth Supplement
To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4977, Page 707, and as amended by Seventeenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record
in Book 5099, Page 497, and as amended by Eighteenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 5214, Page 425, and as amended by
Nineteenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 5272, Page 713, and as amended by Twentieth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage
Landing of record in Book 5319, Page 870, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee, but omitting any covenant or restriction based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin unless and only to the extent that said covenant (a) is exempt under Chapter 42, Section 3607 of the United States Code
or (b) relates to handicap but does not discriminate against handicapped persons.
Subject to lien of assessments as may be levied against said Unite 52-J, pursuant to the provisions of said Master Deed for Heritage Landing of record in Book 3190,
Page 32, as amended by First Supplement to Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3243, Page 499, and as amended by Second Supplement to Master
Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3365, Page 774, and as amended by Third Supplement to Master Deed for Heritage Landing of record in Book 3415, Page
193, and as amended by Fourth Supplement to Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3483, Page 415, as re-recorded in Book 3484, Page 179, and as
amended by Fifth Supplement to Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3512, Page 458, as re-recorded in Book 3513, Page 792, and as amended by
Sixth Supplement to Master Deed for Heritage Landing of record in Book 3526, Page 74, and as amended by Seventh Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing
of record in Book 3615, Page 917, and as amended by Eighth Supplement to Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3658, Page 720, and as amended
by Amendment To Master Deed For Heritage Landing, Chattanooga, Tennessee And By-Laws For Heritage Landing Homeowners Association, Inc., of record in Book
3736, Page 948, and as amended by Ninth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3857, Page 560, and as amended by Tenth Supplement
To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3918, Page 795, and as amended by Second Amendment To Master Deed For Heritage Landing, Chattanooga,
Tennessee, And By-Laws For Heritage Landing Condominium Association, Inc. of record in Book 4125, Page 136, and as amended by Eleventh Supplement To Master
Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4147, Page 525, and as amended by Twelfth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4403, Page
443, and as amended by Thirteenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4450, Page 232, and as amended by Fourteenth Supplement To
Master Deed for Heritage Landing recorded in Book 4507, Page 222, and as amended by Fifteenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book
4675, Page 679, and as amended by Sixteenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4977, Page 707, and as amended by Seventeenth
Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 5099, Page 497, and as amended by Eighteenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing
of record in Book 5214, Page 425, and as amended by Nineteenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 5272, Page 713, and as amended
by Twentieth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 5319, Page 870, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject to all other terms and provisions of said Master Deed for Heritage Landing of record in Book 3190, Page 32, as amended by First Supplement to Master Deed
For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3243, Page 499, and as amended by Second Supplement to Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3365, Page 774,
and as amended by Third Supplement to Master Deed for Heritage Landing of record in Book 3415, Page 193, and as amended by Fourth Supplement to Master Deed For
Heritage Landing of record in Book 3483, Page 415, as re-recorded in Book 3484, Page 179, and as amended by Fifth Supplement to Master Deed For Heritage Landing
of record in Book 3512, Page 458, as re-recorded in Book 3513, Page 792, and as amended by Sixth Supplement to Master Deed for Heritage Landing of record in Book
3526, Page 74, and as amended by Seventh Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3615, Page 917, and as amended by Eighth Supplement
to Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3658, Page 720, and as amended by Amendment To Master Deed For Heritage Landing, Chattanooga, Tennessee
And By-Laws For Heritage Landing Homeowners Association, Inc., of record in Book 3736 Page 948, and as amended by Ninth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage
Landing of record in Book 3857, Page 560, and as amended by Tenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 3918, Page 795, and as
amended by Second Amendment To Master Deed For Heritage Landing, Chattanooga, Tennessee, And By-Laws For Heritage Landing Condominium Association, Inc. of
record in Book 4125, Page 136, and as amended by Eleventh Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4147, Page 525, and as amended by
Twelfth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4403, Page 443, and as amended by Thirteenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage
Landing of record in Book 4450, Page 232, and as amended by Fourteenth Supplement To Master Deed for Heritage Landing recorded in Book 4507, Page 222, and as
amended by Fifteenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4675, Page 679, and as amended by Sixteenth Supplement To Master Deed
For Heritage Landing of record in Book 4977, Page 707, and as amended by Seventeenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 5099, Page
497, and as amended by Eighteenth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 5214, Page 425, and as amended by Nineteenth Supplement To
Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book 5272, Page 713, and a amended by Twentieth Supplement To Master Deed For Heritage Landing of record in Book
5319, Page 870, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject to all stipulations on said Plat of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 40, at Pages 81-1 thru 81-55, as amended by First Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage
Landing as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 40, Pages 113-1 thru 113-35, and as amended by Second Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing of record
in Plat Book 40, Pages 187-1 thru 187-10, and as amended by Third Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 23-1 thru 23-37,
and as amended by Fourth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing, as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 70-1 thru 70-7, and as amended by Fifth
Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing, as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 89-1 thru 89-11, and as amended by Sixth Supplement To Final Plan
of Heritage Landing as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 43, Page 93-1 thru 93-18, and as amended by Seventh Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing as
shown by plat of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 138-1 thru 138-22, and as amended by Eighth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing as shown by plat of record
in Plat Book 43, Pages 163-1 thru 163-14, and as amended by Ninth Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 46, Page 93, and as amended
by Tenth Supplement to Final Plan of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 46, Pages 123-1 thru 123-7, and as amended by Eleventh Supplement to Final Plan of
Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 52, Pages 16-1 thru 16-7, as corrected by Corrective Plat, Revised Plan of Sheet No. 1 Of Eleventh Supplement To Final Plan
of Heritage Landing, of record in Plat Book 52, Page 17, and as amended by Twelfth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 52, Pages
141-1 thru 141-7, and as amended by Thirteenth Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 52, Pages 190-1 thru 190-2, and as amended by
Fourteenth Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 54, Pages 32-1 thru 32-6, and by Fifteenth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing
of record in Plat Book 54, Pages 138-1 thru 138-7, and by Sixteenth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 58, Pages 112 thru 114, and
as amended by Seventeenth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 58, Pages 171 thru 175, and as amended by Eighteenth Supplement
To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 60, Page 30, and as amended by Nineteenth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat
Book 60, Pages 62 through 68, as revised in Plat Book 60, Pages 70 and 71, and as amended by Twentieth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in
Plat Book 60, Pages 97 through 103, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject to easement granted to the Tennessee Electric Power Company by document of record in Book T, Vol. 19, Page 304, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County,
Tennessee, as affected by Abandonment and Relocation of Easement in Book 3497, Page 631, and by Abandonment of Easement of record in Book 4337, Page 593, in
the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject to easements as shown on plat of record in Plat Book 16, Pages 121 thru 128, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject to the rights, if any, of the United States, other governmental entities, the public and other riparian owners in that part of the land lying below the mean
highwater mark of the Tennessee River.
Subject to Electric Power Board easements shown on Sheet 1 of Plat of record in Plat Book 40, Pages 81-1 thru 81-55, as amended by First Supplement To Final Plan
of Heritage Landing as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 40, Pages 113-1 thru 113-35, and as amended by Second Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing
of record in Plat Book 40, Pages 187-1 thru 187-10, and as amended by Third Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 23-1 thru
23-37, and as amended by Fourth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing, as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 70-1 thru 70-7, and as amended by
Fifth Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing, as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 89-1 thru 89-11, and as amended by Sixth Supplement To Final
Plan of Heritage Landing as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 93-1 thru 93-18, and as amended by Seventh Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing
as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 138-1 thru 138-22, and as amended by Eighth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing as shown by plat of
record in Plat Book 43, Pages 163-1 thru 163-14, and as amended by Ninth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 46, Page 93, and as
amended by Tenth Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 46, Pages 123-1 thru 123-7, and as amended by Eleventh Supplement to Final
Plan of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 52, Pages 16-1 thru 16-7, as corrected by Corrective Plat, Revised Plan of Sheet No. 1 of Eleventh Supplement To Final
Plan of Heritage Landing, of record in Plat Book 52, Page 17, and as amended by Twelfth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 52, Pages
141-1 thru 141-7, and as amended by Thirteenth Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 52, Pages 190-1 thru 190-2, and as amended by
Fourteenth Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 54, Pages 32-1 thru 32-6, and by Fifteenth Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing
of record in Plat Book 54, Pages 138-1 thru 138-7, and by Sixteenth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 58, Pages 112 thru 114, and
as amended by Seventeenth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 58, Pages 171 thru 175, and as amended by Eighteenth Supplement
To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 60, Page 30, and as amended by Nineteenth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat
Book 60, Pages 62 through 68, as revised in Plat Book 60, Pages 70 and 71, and as amended by Twentieth Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing of record in
Plat Book 60, Pages 97 through 103, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject to easement to maintain water, gas, telephone, electric power, cable T.V. and sewer lines in designated roads, as stipulated on Sheet 1 of Plat of record in Plat
Book 40, Pages 81-1 thru 81-55, as amended by First Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 40, Pages 113-1 thru 113-35,
and as amended by Second Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 40, Pages 187-1 thru 187-10, and as amended by Third Supplement To
Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 23-1 thru 23-37, and as amended by Fourth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing, as shown by
plat of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 70-1 thru 70-7, and as amended by Fifth Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing, as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 43,
Pages 89-1 thru 89-11, and as amended by Sixth Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 93-1 thru 93-18, and
as amended by Seventh Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 138-1 thru 138-22, and as amended by Eighth
Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 43, Pages 163-1 thru 163-14, and as amended by Ninth Supplement To Final
Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 46, Page 93, and as amended by Tenth Supplement to Final Plan of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 46, Pages
123-1 thru 123-7, and as amended by Eleventh Supplement to Final Plan of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 52, Pages 16-1 thru 16-7, as corrected by Corrective
Plat, Revised Plan of Sheet No. 1 of Eleventh Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing, of record in Plat Book 52, Page 17, and as amended by Twelfth Supplement
To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 52, Pages 141-1 thru 141-7, and as amended by Thirteenth Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing of
record in Plat Book 52, Pages 190-1 thru 190-2, and as amended by Fourteenth Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 54, Pages 32-1 thru
32-6, and by Fifteenth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 54, Pages 138-1 thru 138-7, and by Sixteenth Supplement To Final Plan Of
Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 58, Pages 112 thru 114, and as amended by Seventeenth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book
58, Pages 171 thru 175, and as amended by Eighteenth Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat book 60, Page 30, and as amended by Nineteenth
Supplement To Final Plan Of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 60, Pages 62 through 68, as revised in Plat Book 60, Pages 70 and 71, and as amended by Twentieth
Supplement To Final Plan of Heritage Landing of record in Plat Book 60, Pages 97 through 103, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject to easement granted to City of Chattanooga, Tennessee, by document of record in Book 3104, Page 599, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County,
Tennessee.
Subject to a 40-foot, unnamed road extending South, East and West of the Southern termination of Russell Street (now Fairhills Drive), as shown on plat of Fairhills, of
record in Plat Book 15, Page 94, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject to easement conveyed to the Tennessee American Water Company by document of record in Book 1574, Page 303, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County,
Tennessee.
Subject to Final Plan of Heritage Landing, a Planned Unit Development, as shown by plat of record in Plat Book 40, Page 80-1 and 80-2, and by plat of record in Plat
Book 43, Pages 93-1, 93-2 and 93-18, and by plat of record in Plat Book 58, Pages 143, and 144, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject to easement granted to City of Chattanooga, Tennessee, by document of record in Book 1245, Page 322, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County,
Tennessee.
Subject to easement granted to City of Chattanooga, Tennessee, by document of record in Book 1245, Page 324, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County,
Tennessee.
Subject to easement granted to Tennessee Electric Power Company by document of record in Book T, Vol. 19, Page 312, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County,
Tennessee.
Subject to easement granted to City of Chattanooga, Tennessee, by document of record in Book 1427, Page 151, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County,
Tennessee.
Subject to easement granted to William H. Ring and wife, Yvonne M. Ring, of record in Book 3103, Page 530, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject to Grant of Easements, Agreement To Share Costs And Declaration Of Covenants And Restrictions Document of record in Book 3859, Page 711, as amended by
First Amendment To Grant of Easements, Agreement To Share Costs And Declaration Of Covenants And Restrictions of record in Book 4561, Page 822, in the Register’s
Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject to Easement of record in Book 4031, Page 121, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject of easement granted to City of Chattanooga, Tennessee, by document of record in Book 1121, Page 433, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County,
Tennessee.
Subject to easement granted to City Water Company of Chattanooga, Tennessee, by document of record in Book 1574, Page 297, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee.
Subject to easements contained in Grant of Easements, Agreement to Share Costs and Declaration of Covenants and Restrictions Document of record in Book 4369,
Page 98, and as amended by First Amendment to Grant of Easements, Agreement to share costs and Declaration of Covenants and Restrictions of record in Book 4561,
Page 833, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject to easement granted to City of Chattanooga, Tennessee, by document of record in Book 2083, Page 626, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County,
Tennessee.
Subject to drainage easement granted to Girls’ Preparatory School recorded in Book 4449, Page 912, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject to easement granted to City of Chattanooga, Tennessee, by document recorded in Book 4473, Page 874, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County,
Tennessee.
Subject to easement granted City of Chattanooga, Tennessee, by document recorded in Book 1135, Page 149, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject to easement granted to Tennessee American Water Company by document recorded in Book 5144, Page 65, as revised in Book 5335, Page 468, in the Register’s
Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject to Deed of Perpetual Channel Improvement Easement of record in Book 5468, Page 11, in the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Description taken from prior deed.
This is improved property at 1087 Constitution Drive, Chattanooga, Tennessee 37405.
The sale will be made as Trustee only, without covenants of seizing or warranties of title, subject to any unpaid taxes or other liens and assessments owing on the
property.
The trustee reserves the right to adjourn the sale date to another day, time and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place
for the sale set forth above.
This August 6, 2013.
AREA 3
timesfreepress.com
SIGNAL MTN. 7.8 acres, Seq.
Co. Cul de sac in Rock Creek
Subd. $40,000. 423-886-1714
MOBILE HOMES
E. RIDGE - 2br. Brand new
flooring & appliances. W/D
hook ups. NO PETS. $375/dep.
$635/mo. 423-892-9738
E. Ridge: LG 2 BR, 1.5 BA, attic,
dining room, garbage pd, no
pets. $750-795 mo. 622-7019
HIXSON: 6242 Teletha Ln.
$750.mo. All new 2BR 2 Bath
Hookups Carpet/ Tile. No pets.
423-877-0068/ 595-7800
HIXSON extra nice, 2 BR, C/H/A,
Carpet, No Pets. $625
lease/dep 667-8921/842-1040.
HWY 58. 4824 Lake Haven Dr.
2BR, 1.5 bath, no pets. $650
mo. $600 dep. 423-593-2387
LOOKOUT VALLEY: 2BR/1BA.
W/D connections. $50 app fee,
$350 deposit, $525/mo Call
423-894-0324.
RINGGOLD, 2BR 1.5 Bath.
Schools Boynton/Hertiage Nice!
$595. +dep. 423-653-8222
E.RIDGE 2 BR, Lg. fenced 200
ft. yard. Shade trees. $29,900
Good area.Call: 423-304-4041
Red Bank -Mobile Home, over
55 Park. $4000 OBO. Must sell
NOW. Call 423-463-9512.
ROSSVILLE, Nice 2 br
Appliances $475.mo./ Deposit
307 Chambers St. 423-667-5752
• • • Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • F5
timesfreepress.com
DUPLEXES
FOR RENT
MOVE IN SPECIALS
EAST RIDGE 1br 1bath townhouse, W/D Hookups $520 mo.
ROSSVILLE- 2BR, 1bath.
$485mo. CHATTANOOGA.
1BR 1 Bath all utilities $560.mo.
or $140 wk. $800 mo. House
in E. Ridge lg. yard. 1BR
1Bath $495.mo.
423-305-8666 or 423-999-2882
DFKFI:P:C<J
J:FFK<IJ
H-D SPORSTER 883, ‘97. Near
mint. $3400 firm. No joy rides.
Call 423-488-8397
CLASSIC
SPECIALTY AUTOS
K5 Blazer Cheyenne, ‘78
V8, 4 spd. orig stock, $5500,
706-398-2893 423-413-9847
MERCEDES E190 ‘85. New engine, Inoperable, $700. Call
423-314-4451.
VANS
SIGNAL MTN- 3br/2ba
$995mo.1 mon security dep,
No Pets. 423-316-9002
Signal Mtn (on top) townhouse,
2 bedroom, appliances, very
nice, $600.00, NO PETS,
423-309-2933.
Honda CBR1000RR ‘12, Red
1132 Miles, Like New, $10,997
423-499-9799 C&C Motors
Mustang Motorcycle
Reproduction ‘12 96 MPG,
$3000obo 706-581-9269
SUZUKI - Yellow & black, 50cc,
gas power, $400.
423-653-7415
HOUSES-RENT
-UNFURNISHED
YAMAHA ‘00 Venture Millennia,
exc. cond. 27K mi. $6200 Call:
423-421-1345
Harrison: 3 bd, 3 ba BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOME! stainless steel appl, ctr h/a, f/p, 3
bay garage, $1495/500
624.6746 #738
RECREATIONAL
VEHICLES
E. Brainerd: 3 bd, 3 ba, home
with bonus room! Must See!
appl, hkps, beautiful subdivision, fenced yard. $1595/500
624.6746 #733
Bonny Oaks Area: 3 bd, 1 ba
ranch home, hardwood floors
throughout! appl, hkps, level
yard, $695/500 624.6746
#732
E. Brainerd: 4 bd, 3 ba home,
totally remodeled!! MUST
SEE, appl, hkps, double garage, Westview/E. Ham.
school district $1195/500
624.6746 #736
E. Brainerd: 3 bd, 2 1/2 ba
custom home, appl, hkps,
open loft area, f/p, double garage
$1495/500. 624.6746 #731
4 X 4 TRUCKS
GMC Canyon SLE ’05, 3.5L, 5
cyl, 4x4, auto, All pwr, $11,995
+TTL Dave’s A.S. 706-657-2990
CHEVY G20 Cargo Van, ‘93. 4.3
V6, auto, 98,000 orig. miles,
$2000. 423-332-4594.
cars.timesfreepress.com
DODGE CARAVAN, 2000.
Great shape. $3000. Call
423-752-1145.
Dodge Van, ‘90, 1 ton,
ext. length, 112K, ladder racks,
$1,000. 423-605-3671
Rick
Davis
Supercars
Tacoma Double Cab 4x4 ‘11,
90k miles, Perfect Condition,
Sale $24,950. Call [email protected]
987-9277
Saturn Relay ‘05, Level 3, TV/
Dvd,70K miles, 3rd seat, rear air,
$10,800 - $240.50 MO. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
auto, V6, loaded, extra nice,
$2500. 423-838-0080
CHEVY BLAZER’04, 40K Original miles, new tires,
$10,000.00 942-3213
CAMPERS WANTED: WE BUY
Travel Trailers, 5th Wheels,
Motor Homes & Pop-up Campers.
Will pay cash!! 423-504-8036
Toyota Sienna ’06, LE,TV/DVD
3rd Seat, Rear Air, Pwr doors,
$11,900 - $264.10 MO. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
Chevy Suburban ‘05, 2wd 1500
LT, TV/Dvd, 3rd Seat, Rear Air,
$13,900 - $307.02 MO.W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
INDOOR RV & Boat Storage
Brainerd- Newer, 4Br,
2Ba Home, C/H/A, Porch.
$995/mo. 423-364-1372
Any Day After 1pm
E. BRAINERD. 6308 Walden
Ave. 2br 1 bath $135 wk. +dep
423-313-1955 or 423-728-4551.
E. BRAINERD. Hickory Valley
Rd. New remod. brick, 3BR, 2
bath, hrdwd floors, fenced
yard, no smokers, no pets.
$950mo. $500dep. 1 yr. lease.
Taking applic. 423-667-8695.
OOLTEWAH- 4 Br, 2 bath,
garage, fireplace, unfinished
basement. $975/mo.
(423) 394-5900
www.choochoohomesInc.com
Trailer-Travel Lite, high-low
style, 5 new tires, sleeps 6, lots
of extras $6000 423-875-5402
E. RIDGE/N.GA - $99 move-in
2 & 3 BR’s for $75.00 per week
& up! 894-0039 or 355-1104
16’’ Spare Tire For ‘06 Ford
Ranger, New. $100 or best
offer. 423-877-6209
ROOMS FOR RENT
SIGNAL MTN. RD. $120 week,
$20 Dep. Free HBO & cable,
267-3783
POWER BOATS
Bass Tracker, 50hp Mercury,
exc cond. $3700 obo
423-834-0334.
BOWRIDER - Merc 70, solid
floor, new tune-up, carpet,
trailer, $1850/trade. 645-9924.
Kelly
Downtown
$10,950
$18,782
17” Chrome Dodge big, truck
factory wheels. Complete set.
New. $200. 423-618-2478.
Bridgestone Duelers
P255/70R18s M&S on Toyota
Tundra rims $400 423-994-9088
Infiniti
FISH & SKI, 115 Johnson, rebuilt, 1224 troll, 2F.F, esc
cond, $2500 423-227-8953
Ford Expedition ‘05, 2wd, XLT,
3rd seat, Rear Air, Leather, V8
$9,800 - $219.03 MO. W.A.C
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
Chevy Impala LT ‘06, All Power, Alloys, Remote Start #P6894A incl. $383 Doc Fee +
TTL 423-490-0181
FISH & SKI, 17 ft. Quantum125
force, loaded, beautiful boat
exc cond. $4000. 227-8953.
Flat Bottom Lowes 14 ft. w/ 25
hp Mercury trolling motor
$2200 423-875-9911.
Mercury Outboard Motor
6hp 2 Stroke, $575
423-280-6287
PONTOON BOAT70 horse motor,
$5,000.00 423-718-9040
STRATUS 201XL 2007,
Loaded, warranty, $24,000.
Call 423-488-6180.
Tires and Wheels 215-65R15
Tires/Mag wheels. $400. Call
or text 423-762-4793
TIRES & Wheels, 4 Goodyear
Wrangler, P265/70 R17, $550
obo. 423-899-2036.
1998 Stratus 18.3 ft. Fish & Ski
Boat, 150 hp Johnson Motor,
$7000, 423-451-7042
Kayak - 13’ Perception Mirage
Used, good cond. $350.
423-899-3530
PERSONAL
WATERCRAFT
HONDA AQUATRAX SEADOO
‘07, 3 seater, w/ trailer, 55 hrs.
$6500. 423-653-7062
Sea Ray 240 Sundancer ‘04,
Cabin cruiser, trailer, perfect
cond., $32,000 423-227-1591
‘02 Chevy 3/4 Ton 4x4 , 112k
mi bedliner, 1 owner used on
farm $4000, 423-298-6620
MARINE PARTS &
ACCESSORIES
Wanted: Boat Trailer.
for 23 Ft. V-Hull, $800
332-4594
9F8KI<EK8CJ
FAST CASH
Isuzu Rodeo ‘99 5 spd, 195k mi,
dependable $2500
Call 423-322-1134.
DFKFI:P:C<J
J:FFK<IJ
$6,995
$5,925
Jeep Cherokee ‘01, V8, auto, 4x4, leather,
AC,Sunroof, heated seats, #1C602533
+TTL, $199 Doc Fee & 3 Mo/4500 Mi Warr.
on Engine, Drive Train 423-790-7100
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
$5,995
Jeep Wrangler
‘88, 4 cyl, hardtop, 5 speed, 4x4, #JB532523
+TTL, $199 Doc Fee & 3 Mo/4500 Mi Warr.
on Engine, Drive Train 423-790-7100
$6,995
Suzuki Forenza ‘06, 94K, 4 Cyl, Auto, All
power, AC, CD, #16K449749 +TTL, $199
Doc Fee & 3 Mo/4500 Mi Warr. on Engine,
Drive Train 423-790-7100
Rick Davis
Supercars
$11,450
Toyota 4 Runner ‘04, V6, Auto, Leather,
AC, Alloys, Sunroof, New Michilins, Includes
3 Mo/4500 Miles Powertrain Warr. #P70101 +
TTL & $49 Doc Fee, 423-490-7654
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
$7,950
Toyota Celica GT ‘00, 5 Spped, Sunroof,
Alloys, #01941 +TTL & $449 Doc Fee
423-648-4314
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
$16,950
$10,995
$5,950
Dodge Grand Caravan ‘07, V6, Auto, AC,
Alloys, DVD, All Power, Local Trade. Includes
3 Mo/4500 Miles Powertrain Warr. #99425
+TTL & $49 Doc Fee 423-490-7654
Keystone Spring Dale ‘07, 31ft central heat
& air, 18ft awning, #6N133612 +TTL, $199
Doc Fee & 3 Mo/4500 Mi Warr. on Engine,
Drive Train 423-790-7100
Toyota Solara SLE ‘06, Convertible, 78K
miles, Leather, Alloys, #098653 +TTL & $449
Doc Fee 423-648-4314
Rick
Davis
Supercars
$5,950
Kia Sorento EX ‘04, 139K, 6 cyl, auto,
leather, alloys, sunroof, keyless, Includes 3
Mo/4500 Miles Powertrain Warr. #P27724
+TTL & $49 Doc Fee 423-490-7654
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
$18,950
$12,950
Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer ‘10, 78K miles,
Leather, fixed Running Boards, #16874 +TTL
& $449 Doc Fee 423-648-4314
Lincoln LS ‘04, Sport pkg, 1 owner, 44K
miles, Sunroof, Leather, #613293 +TTL &
$449 Doc Fee 423-648-4314
Jeep Compass ‘07, 2WD, Sport
71K miles, 4 cyl, Auto
$12,900 - $285.56 MO. W.A.C
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
JEEP WRANGLER CJ7 ‘97,
4.0motor, Excellent cond.
$7500.00 706-657-3987
Dodge Ram1500 ‘04, 4x4 Quad
Cab, Laramine, Hemi, 20"
Chrome Wheels, Leather,
$13,900 - $307.02 mo. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
01 Buick Century Custom 3.1
V6 150mi all new parts exc
shape, $3500 423-883-7336.
Kelly
Downtown
$13,923
Toyota Yaris ‘13, Black, Only 38K miles,
#P6921 incl. $383 Doc Fee + TTL
423-490-0181
Rick
Davis
Supercars
$10,950
Volvo S80 ‘07, V6, Auto, Leather, Power
Seats, Sunroof, All Power, Keyless, Includes
3 Mo/4500 Miles Powertrain Warr. #P63983
+TTL & $49 Doc Fee 423-490-7654
Jaquar XJ8 L '01-exc. cond.
V8, 2 owners, 60k, auto
$8500. 423-619-0284
ACURA 3.2 TL ‘96 V6 auto,
leather, moon roof, wood trim, all
power. 186K, $2400. 280-6287
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE’97
318 auto, New trans, starter,
$1,500 423-667-3234
BMW 128i Coupe, ‘11, white,
27k, prem. pkg. 6 cyl., auto,
lthr, sroof $24,900. 785-6031.
Chevy Tahoe ‘06, 4x4, Z71,TV/
DVD, Rear air, Leather, Sunroof
$15,900 - $349.95 MO. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
F O R D F - 1 5 0 ‘86. 300 auto,
good paint/tires/wheels, new
CD/tune-up, $2250. 645-9924
Lexus IS 250 ‘07, White, V6,
Auto, Leather, AC, $14,995
+TTL Dave’s A.S. 706-657-2990
Lexus LS430 ‘ 01- Ultra PKG,
120k mi, service, new tires,
silver, $13,500, 423-653-7062
Chevy Tahoe LT ‘01, V8, 4x4,
All pwr, sunroof, CD, $8,995
+TTL Dave’s A.S. 706-657-2990
CLASSIC T-BIRD ‘84 74.5K
Actual miles. 2-dr w/ 302”
$1850obo. 706-639-6254
Mercury Sable ‘03, ONE
OWNER, extra clean, 84,451
miles, Special $5950.00, call
Jack @ 987-9277
Ford Expedition ‘99 XLT 4x4
5.4 V8 w/ new tires $3600
423-285-7788
‘89 Suburban 6.2L diesel 208k
mil, exceptional cond, runs grt.
asking $4500. 886-6827
Toyota Sequoia Limited ‘05,
V8,sunroof, leather, CD, $11,995
+TTL Dave’s A.S. 706-657-2990
Mercedes S-500 ‘99- Grand
Edition, Blk, 4 door, 1 of 600
built. $3000 423-304-4041
Jeep Grand Cherokee ‘09, 4x4,
V6, Local Trade, AC, $14,995
+TTL Dave’s A.S. 706-657-2990
FORD Taurus SE, 2005, V6,
auto, AC, loaded, leather, dep.
Hwy miles. 206k, $2600 offer.
Call 423-314-8323.
FORD TAURUS, 2001, leather
seats, sunroof, looks good,
$1600. 706-375-3711.
Mini Cooper ‘07, 73K, 5 spd, all
pwr, sunroof, leather $12,995
+TTL Dave’s A.S. 706-657-2990
MUSTANG ‘96
Restored, red, Sport Coupe, 5
speed, $2900. 423-838-0080
Ford F350 ‘04, 4x4, SuperCab,
XLT, DRW, Diesel, 9ft Flat Bed,
$12,800 -$283.42 MO W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
Yukon Denali ‘04, Leather, 203k
miles, Very Nice. Special $8,950.
Call Jack @ 987-9277
Toyota RAV4 ‘10, 4WD
54K MILES, 4 CYL, AUTO,
$17,900 - $392.87 MO. W.A.C
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
Honda Accord ‘02, 4 door auto,
cold air, loaded, 120K, $2500
OBO, 423-899-7415
Hyundai Elantra ‘08, auto,
garage-kept, 33mpg, very clean,
new tires 80k $9200 240-2778
Toyota Solara SLE ‘02, drop
top, leather & like new, only
$8950 Won’t last, call Jack @
987-9277
Volvo S70 ‘00, Very Nice car for
the money. 151k miles, good
service records, only $4950.
Call Jack @ 987-9277.
TRAILERS
Motorcycle/ Utility Trailergreat shape
$500obo, 423-304-1317
TRAILER- 16 ft. dual wheels,
steel bed, extended side rails,
$1600. 706-375-3711.
GRAND PRIX ‘95
4-dr, V-6.
$1,695 obo 706-639-6254
CHOPPER 250CC
$2700. Call
423-533-2408.
Ford Mustang ‘66, Red w/ a
black vinyl top & beautiful black
interior. $12,500 423-802-2223
Toyota Camry ‘97, Brand new
tires, gold, needs new spark
plugs, approx. 220K $2000
423-593-0575, if no answer,
leave voicemail.
CHEVY MALIBU ’98
Nice and clean, $3,500
423-509-1848
DODGE CHALLENGER ‘09
SRT8, 6.1 HEMI with 6 speed
manual. Only 14,900 miles. Has
everything Dodge makes,
including sunroof. Original
window sticker & build sheets.
$31,500 Call: 423-949-4343
or 423-244-1974 (cell phone)
Ford F250 ‘08, 4x4, Crew Cab
XLT, Diesel, Auto, 89K Miles,
$26,900 C & C Motors
423-499-9799
SUZUKI X90, 1997, Auto, air,
glass T-tops, 2 seater, 138k.
Rare, only made 3 yrs. Good
cond. $3,950. 423-255-0100.
Cadillac DeVille ‘99, Leather
int. Good tires, runs great.
171k mi. $2900. 706-398-0611.
CHEVY IMPALA SS '96,
green/grey 59k adult driven mi.,
Exc. Extras. $16,500. 847-0901
Chevy TrailBlazer ‘08, 4x4, LS,
V6, AUTO, $12,900 - $285.56
MO. W.A.C. C & C
Motors 423-499-9799
Toyota Highlander AWD ‘04,
Very Nice Car, Special
$8,950. Call Jack @ 987-9277
Subaru Legacy, ‘97, 4 cyl,
wagon, 5spd, like new, tires,
runs/drives great $2100
423-432-6585 706-858-8526
LINCOLN TOWNCAR ‘96 V-8,
auto, cold air, new brakes,
$1400.00 /obo 423-326-7403
Camaro ‘96 teal green 200k
miles $1800. leave message
883-7310 or 320-2910
Nissan Xterra ‘06, 2WD, S,
74K miles ,V6, Auto,
$12,900 - $285.56 MO. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
Toyota 4 Runner ‘04 v6, 125k
lady owned 2nd owner exc
cond $10,500 706-539-2595.
Ford F250 ‘07, 4x4, Crew Cab
Lariat w/FX4 Pkg, Diesel, 20"
Wheels, Leather, $21,900
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
SUBARU ‘97 SUV
extra good, $3900.
423-838-0080
Lexus RX 330 ‘06, V6, Auto, All
Power, leather, CD, $15,995
+TTL Dave’s A.S. 706-657-2990
Saturn L300 ‘03, V6, 3.0L, 1
owner, 1143 miles, $3,500 call
706-935-4583
4 cyl., 5 spd, extra nice, $1900.
423-838-0080
BUICK LESABRE ‘04
Buick Park Avenue ‘00, Nice
Car, New Tires, Special $3,500.
Call Jack @ 987-9277
Dodge Ram1500 ‘05,4x4, SLT,
Quad Cab, 20" chrome wheels,
auto,V8, $13,900 - $307.02 mo.
wac C & C Motors 423-499-9799
ISUZU RODEO ‘91 5sp. trans.
4-wheel dr. $3,500 or best offer 394-0946
‘86 BMW 325 ES- $4000 New
transmission, timing belt
& alternator. 423-877-6209
1985 BMW K100 1000CC
$2400 obo 423-364-6742
BUSINESS COUPE, ‘51,
good condition, original. $12,500.
423-332-3108, 423-457-5589
Kile
Motors
Kile
Motors
Dodge Grand Caravan ‘12, Power Doors,
Power Lift Gate, Clean, 1 owner, #P6912 incl.
$383 Doc Fee + TTL 423-490-0181
1979 Mercedes 300 CDvery rare, $ 2900 obo
423-364-6742
Buick Roadmaster ‘92 Staion
Wagan 146k, runs super cold
a/c $1500obo 706-581-9269
$11,950
Subaru Legacy ‘08, 4 cyl, Auto, Sunroof,
Disc Changer, Keyless, Local Trade, Includes 3 Mo/4500 Miles Powertrain Warr.
#P63994 +TTL & $49 Doc Fee 423-490-7654
Kile
Motors
$20,982
Jeep Commander ‘07, 2wd,81K
miles, Hemi, Leather, 3rd Seat,
Leather, Limited, $15,800 $347.80 MO. W.A.C
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
Rick
Davis
Supercars
Kile
Motors
Chevy Suburban LS 4x4 ‘99, V8, Auto, All
Power, #MC5852 incl. $383 Doc Fee + TTL
423-490-0181
1995 HondaAccord EX Wagon
2.2 V-Tech new tires, a/c
$2200 423-285-7788
Harley Davidson, ‘04,
Electra glide classic, 8K,
$3000 in extras, must sell
$11,750 OBO 423-332-7615
or 423-488-0195
Jaguar X Type 3.0 ‘02, 1 owner, 80K miles,
Navigation, Sunroof, Leather, #WC59046
+TTL & $449 Doc Fee 423-648-4314
Kelly
Downtown
Buying Junk Cars & Trucks
Pay Top Dollar - Running or not
423-580-1611 Ken
BOAT RENTALS
Harbor Lights Marina
423-842-5391
www.harborlightsmarina.net
YAMAHA GRIZZLY 660 ‘014 Wheeler, Great Cond.
$2800 423-421-1711
$9,950
$21,253
1985 Toyota 4-Runner Call
Greg $2500, 423-667-3664
CARS RUNNING
OR NOT
423-645-7402
CLASSIC
SPECIALTY AUTOS
$11,950
Nissan Maxima 3.5 SL ‘05, Leather, Sunroof,
Alloys #866634 +TTL & $449 Doc Fee
423-648-4314
4 X 4 SPORT
UTILITY
Chevy Colorado ‘04, 4x4 Crew
Cab,LS, Z71, AUTO, 5 CYL
$12,900 - $285.56 MO W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
I BUY JUNK CARS - running
or not. I pay top dollar.
Start at $300 & up.
Dennis 595-1132/ 843-4972.
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Chrysler 300 Touring ‘09, 69K miles, Navigation, Leather, #583873 +TTL & $449 Doc
Fee 423-648-4314
GMC SIERRA STEPSIDE, ‘94,
call for details. $2500.
423-870-0068
4 X 4 TRUCKS
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Infiniti QX56 ‘11, 8 Cyl, 5.6L, Sunroof,
Leather, Auto, #IP004, +TTL and $396 doc
fee. 423-424-4040
$13,950
AUTOS/TRUCKS
WANTED
AARON’S JUNK CARS,
TRUCKS, BUSES &
MOTOR HOMES. Will pay
cash in 30 min 423-521-7777
$48,991
Kelly
Downtown
HONDA PILOT 2011, EXL,
sunroof, leather, 16K miles,
$22,500. 423-295-5393.
CANOES & KAYAKS
17' Grumman canoe
good cond. $350
423-284-0545
of
Chattanooga
Chevy Silverado ‘11, Reg Cab, 4x4, 1 owner,
Local Trade, #P6905 incl. $383 Doc Fee +
TTL 423-490-0181
Tool Box, UWS Single Lid
Paddle lift lock for Chevy S-10,
like new, $150. 706-820-7985.
SAIL BOATS
Infiniti
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Ford Explorer ‘08, 2WD, XLT
rear air, 69k miles, leather, 3rd
seat,$14,800 - $326.34 mo wac
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
Isuzu Rodeo ‘02, New Tires,
160k miles, Good Clean Car.
$5,450. Call Jack @ 987-9277
GMC Sierra 1500 ‘08, 2WD, V8,
Crew Cab, AUTO, 61K MILES,
ONSTAR, $19,900 C & C
Motors 423-499-9799
$17,922
Nissan Altima ‘12, White, Only 32K, #P6917
incl. $383 Doc Fee + TTL 423-490-0181
Infiniti EX 35 Journey ‘08, 6Cyl, 3.5L,
Sunroof, Leather, Auto, #ID058A, +TTL and
$396 doc fee. 423-424-4040
Rick
Davis
Supercars
JUMP SEATSFor Land Rover, $200.
Call 423-822-8283.
Kelly
Downtown
$14,991
Ford Explorer ‘04, Eddie Bauer,
V8, Auto, Sunroof, CD, $7,995
+TTL Dave’s A.S. 706-657-2990
GMC ‘98 SIERRA, ext. cab, 3rd
door, loaded, 150k, V-8 auto,
$4950 obo. 423-949-4280
SEAT COVERS, for Dodge Crew
Cab, Camo, like new. $200 or
best offer. Call 423-987-2482
of
Chattanooga
Kelly
Downtown
Ford F-150 New Tonneau roll
back bed cover. Cost $300.
Take $150. 423-877-4179.
$12,950
Nissan Altima S ‘10, 88K, 4 cyl, Auto, Alloys, AC, Keyless, Cd, Includes 3 Mo/4500
Miles Powertrain Warr. #P58844 +TTL & $49
Doc Fee 423-490-7654
Infiniti EX 35 ‘10, 6Cyl, 3.5L, Sunroof,
Leather, Auto, CD, AC, #IP001, +TTL and
$396 doc fee. 423-424-4040
$8,599
DODGE RAM 2002, 4dr, small
V8, new motor, $6500 obo.
Call 423-637-2868.
Ford Ranger ‘04, 2wd, Reg Cab
Edge pkg, 5 spd,77k miles, 6 cyl,
$9,800 - $219.03 MO. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
Rick
Davis
Supercars
$23,991
$11,950
Chevy Monte Carlo Z34 ‘95, 1 Owner,
30K miles, #248325+TTL & $449 Doc Fee
423-648-4314
Dunlap Tires 265-65-17, fair
cond. $100
Call 423-618-2478.
RADAR DETECTOR,
talking like new, $30. call
706- 820-7985.
of
Chattanooga
$7,950
DODGE FENDER FLARES
Bush Whackers, fits ‘03-’09,
like new, $400. 423-987-2482.
MERCEDES E190 ‘85. New engine, Inoperable, $700. Call
423-314-4451.
Infiniti
Kelly
Downtown
Dodge Ram ‘06, 1500, ST, 2wd
89K miles, 6 cyl manual, Quad
Cab, $11,900 - $264.10 mo wac
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
$8,356
Mercury Grand Marquis ‘01, Gray, 71,474
miles, #UC3451 incl. $383 Doc Fee + TTL
423-490-0181
$5,991
Infiniti
CHEVY SILVERADO ‘04
V8 auto, air, 133k mi, #$7500
423-290-3408 after 6pm
Kelly
Downtown
Infiniti Q45 Touring ‘99, 8 Cyl, 4.13L, Sunroof, Leather, Auto, #IC003A, +TTL and $396
doc fee. 423-424-4040
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
GM Rally Camaro Wheels,
70’s, with all accessories,
$200 706-866-7876.
Camano 1999, 31’ DIESEL
Trawler on Tennessee RiverLake Guntersville, Alabama.
Very fuel efficient. Need to sell
due to health. 256-882-1972.
Yachtsouth.com for details.
$87,900 obo.
of
Chattanooga
Cadillac DTS ‘06, Navy Blue, V8, Loaded,
Only 56K, Very Clean, #P6928 incl. $383
Doc Fee + TTL 423-490-0181
Chevy Rally Wheels, Older
S-10 14”, have caps & beauty
bands, $100. 423-618-2478.
Draw Bar Hitch- 2’’ w/ ball and
pin, like new, $20obo,
423-396-9151
Hyundai Sonta ‘12, Red, Only 35K miles,
#P6918 incl. $383 Doc Fee + TTL
423-490-0181
Chevy Impala LS ‘05, 1 owner, 44K miles,
Sunroof, Leather, Alloys, #389718 +TTL &
$449 Doc Fee 423-648-4314
Chevy S-10 Pickup ‘00, Very
Nice Truck, 105k miles, Only
$5,450. Call Jack @ 987-9277
REPAIRS/PARTS/
ACCESSORIES
Honda Pilot Touring ‘11, 6Cyl, 3.5L, Sunroof, Leather, Auto, #ID017A, +TTL and $396
doc fee. 423-424-4040
Kelly
Downtown
Dodge Journey SXT ‘09, 56K,
V6, Auto, All Power, $13,995
+TTL Dave’s A.S. 706-657-2990
$8,950
Lexus ES 300 ‘02, V6, Auto, leather, Sunroof,
All Power, Heated seats, Local Trade. Includes 3 Mo/4500 Miles Powertrain Warr.
#99430 +TTL & $49 Doc Fee 423-490-7654
$32,991
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
MOBILE HOMESRENT
SIGNAL MTN. Rd. 1 & 2 bedroom, utilities paid, Call
267-3783, 1-4, Mon.-Fri.
TRUCKS
TRAVEL TRAILER, 23 ft,Clean
ready for camping, $5,900
706-866-9541
Used Construction
Equipment Sales,
Call Jake Lunnen
(423) 402-7527
Infiniti
$17,900
Toyota Sienna XLE ’06, V6,
leather, local trade, AC, $10,995
+TTL Dave’s A.S. 706-657-2990
Rick
Davis
Supercars
of
Chattanooga
Cadillac Deville ‘04, 84K miles, Leather, 6
Passenger, #240512 +TTL & $449 Doc Fee
423-648-4314
Outdoor Coming Soon!
Ringgold, Ga.
Call 706-965-7120.
Keystone Sprinter Copper Canyon ‘07, 30 ft, 5th wheel. RLS,
$16,000 obo. 423-240-7834
Honda CRV LX ‘04, 135K, 4cyl, auto, AC,
CD, 1 owner, Local trade, Includes 3 Mo/4500
Miles Powertrain Warr. #P09693 +TTL & $49
Doc Fee 423-490-7654
Kelly
Downtown
‘05, 3rd seat, cold a/c, CD,
$2900. 423-838-0080
$5,950
Kia Spectra EX ‘09, 146K, 4 cyl, Auto, AC,
All Power, Keyless, Includes 3 Mo/4500 Miles
Powertrain Warr. #P98427 +TTL & $49 Doc
Fee 423-490-7654
$7,995
$10,950
Acura TSX ‘05, Sunroof, Leather, Alloys,
#012286 +TTL & $449 Doc Fee
423-648-4314
Cadillac Deville ‘05, Gold, V8, Autom, All
Power, Alloys, Heated Seats, #F2110B incl.
$383 Doc Fee + TTL 423-490-0181
DODGE CARAVAN
BRAINERD 2BR
+ bonus room, den, $675/mo.
Call: 423-510-9237
Rick
Davis
Supercars
$7,982
Camping Trailer, ‘78 Sunfire
Super nice, $1700 obo
706-581-9269
Go Cart- 50cc 2 seater, needs
battery carb work $ 2500 new,
sell $800, 423-834-0334.
Ford Mustang GT ‘04, 1 Owner, 6K miles,
40th anniversary, #113317 +TTL & $449
Doc Fee 423-648-4314
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
CHEVY BLAZER ‘02,
Rick
Davis
Supercars
$14,950
$13,950
Acura RDX Turbo ‘07, 4 Cyl, Leather, AWD,
Sunroof, All Power, Heated Seats, Nav, Includes 3 Mo/4500 Miles Powertrain Warr.
#P64994 +TTL & $49 Doc Fee 423-490-7654
SPORT UTILITY
CAMPER 2006 , Four Winns Express, Excellent Cond. $8,000
Call 706-657-3987.
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Nissan Altima ‘07, One Owner,
Loaded, NAV, Leather, Sunroof.
Special $9,950. Call Jack @
987-9277
Trailer, factory built, all metal,
5x10, great shape. $650.
Call 423-238-6713
Utility Trailer, new tires, 5X10,
Like new! Tilt dump.
$500. 423-987-2661
F6 • Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • • •
timesfreepress.com
MTN.VIEW @ 153 1.99%60 APR
MOS.
JUST ANNOUNCED
UP TO
INTERNET PRICING...ONE LOW PRICE CARVED IN STONE
WAC
ZERO MONEY DOWN!
`11 TOYOTA RAV4 4X2
`10 SUBARU IMPREZA SE AWD
5 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Rack, Power Windows,
Locks #7829
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Sunroof, Power Windows,
Locks, 42K #2295
12,995
11,995
$
$
58 MO.
`98 HONDA CIVIC DX COUPE
Auto, Air, CD, Alloys and More, Clean! #2833
$2,995
• $61.44 MO.
`96 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X2
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Leather, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #9668
$3,500
• $71.80 MO.
`02 CHEVY CAVALIER LS
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Spoiler #1458
$3,995
• $81.95 MO.
`00 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON AWD
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Rack, Power Seat, Windows, Locks
#4065
$3,995
• $92.51 MO.
`02 MITSUBISHI MONTERO SPORT ES
4X2
246
`10 FORD RANGER XL
Reg Cab, Short Bed, Auto, Air, Stereo, Bed Liner, Split Seat, Sport Wheels
#8445
$10,995
• $225.55 MO.
`11 CHEVY IMPALA LS
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Buckets w/Console, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #3377
$10,995
•
$225.55 MO.
`11 KIA RIO LX
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks, Only 50k miles #3417
$10,995
•
$225.55 MO.
`07 MAZDA 5
5 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, 3rd Seat, Power Windows,
Locks, 68k miles #8954
$10,995
• $225.55 MO.
`04 MERCEDES ML350 4X4
5 Door, V6, Auto, Air, CD, Alloys, Rack, Power Windows, Locks, Super
Clean #1440
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Sunroof, 3rd seat, Heated Seat, Power
Seat, Windows, Locks, Nice One! 99K #0642
`03 CHEVY MALIBU
`10 DODGE AVENGER SXT
$3,995
• $81.95 MO.
$10,995
•
$225.55 MO.
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks, Clean Car #1653
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks, 52K, #8396
`07 CHEVY COBALT LS
`10 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE
$3,995
• $81.95 MO.
4 Door, 5 Speed, CD, Wing & More #1951
$4,500
•
$92.31 MO.
`01 DODGE DAKOTA SLT
V6, Reg Cab, Short Bed, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Bed Liner, Tool Box,
Split Seat, Power Window, Locks, Super Clean #3628
$4,995
• $102.47 MO.
`01 FORD EXPLORER SPORT 4X2
2 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Keyless Entry, Rack, Alloys w/New Tires, Power
Windows, Locks #7114
$4,995
•
$102.47 MO.
`00 ACURA 3.2 TL
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Leather, Sunroof, Heated Seat, Power
Seat, Windows, Locks #7130
$4,995
• $102.47 MO.
`06 FORD 500 SE
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows, Locks #0100
$4,995
• $102.47 MO.
`00 SAAB 9.5
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Leather, Sunroof, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #8604
$4,995
• $102.47 MO.
`01 VW JETTA
$11,500
• $235.91 MO.
5 Door, V6, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Stow & Go, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #0061
$11,500
• $235.91 MO.
`10 SUBARU LEGACY PREMIUM
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #2397
$11,995
• $246.06 MO.
`12 KIA FORTE LX
4 Door, Auto, Air, CD, Wing & More, 16K #0912
$11,995
•
$246.06 MO.
`10 FORD TAURUS SE
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #1924
$11,995
• $246.06 MO.
`12 KIA FORTE LX
4 Door, Auto, Air, CD & more, 30k miles #1161
$11,995
• $246.06 MO.
`10 CHEVY IMPALA LT
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, OnStar, CD, Alloys, Buckets w/ Console, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #3102
$11,995
• $246.06 MO.
`10 FORD RANGER XL
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Sunroof, Power Windows, Locks, #4766
Reg Cab, Short Bed, Auto, Air, Stereo, Split seat, Bed liner, Sport wheels
#8414
`02 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE GT
CONVERTIBLE
`08 FORD MUSTAGE COVERT.
$4,995
• $102.47 MO.
Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys w/ New Tires, Power Seat, Windows, Locks
#4464
$5,500
• $112.83 MO.
`01 CADILLAC DEVILLE
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Leather, Power Seat, Windows, Locks,
Low Miles #7656
$5,995
• $122.98 MO.
`02 FORD EXPLORER EDDIE BAUER 4X2
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Heated Seats, Sunroof, Leather, Alloys, Racks,
V8, Power Seat, Windows, Locks, Sharp One! #5790
$5,995
• $122.98 MO.
`06 CHRYSLER P.T. CRUISER
CONVERTIBLE
5 speed, Air, CD, 18" Chrome Alloys, Power Windows, Locks #1922
$5,995
• $122.98 MO.
`07 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT
5 Door, V6, Auto, Front & Rear Air, Cruise, Tape/CD, Alloys w/Michelins,
Power Hatch, Sliding Door, Seat, Windows, Locks #3991
$6,995
• $143.49 MO.
`04 VOLVO S80
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Leather, Sunroof, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #7259
$6,995
• $143.49 MO.
`03 HONDA ODYSSEY EX-L
5 Door, V6, Auto, Front & Rear Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Rack, Heated Seat,
Leather, Power Sliding Door, Seats, Windows, Locks, Looks the Best! #1991
$7,500
• $153.85 MO.
`06 MITSUBISHI ENDEAVOR
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Rack, Leather, Power Windows,
Locks, #4297
$7,995
• $164.01 MO.
`04 MERCEDES BENZ C-230 SPORT
$11,995
• $246.06 MO.
Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Wing, Power Windows, Locks #1210
$11,995
• $246.06 MO.
`10 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE
5 Door, V6, Auto, Front & Rear Air, Cruise, CD, Stow & Go, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #5411
$11,995
• $246.06 MO.
`11 CHEVY IMPALA LT
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Buckets w/ Console, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #8091
$11,995
• $246.06 MO.
`11 CHEVY AVEO LT
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Leather, Sunroof, Power Windows,
Locks, Only 39k miles #9903
$11,995
• $246.06 MO.
`10 SUBARU IMPREZA SE AWD
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Sunroof, Power Windows, Locks,
42K #2295
$11,995
•
$246.06 MO.
`11 FORD FUSION SE
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Seat, Windows, Locks #9472
$11,995
• $246.06 MO.
`05 ACURA TL 3.2
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Heated Seats, Leather,
Sunroof, Power Seat, Windows, Locks, 96k miles
$11,995
• $246.06 MO.
`11 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT 4X2
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Sport Wheels, Power Windows, Locks #0774
$11,995
• $246.06 MO.
`03 BMW Z4 3.0 CONVERTIBLE
6 Speed, Air, Cruise, CD, Leather, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows, Locks,
101K, # 1407
$11,995
•
$246.06 MO.
`11 DODGE JOURNEY EXPRESS
4 Door, Black on Black, Leather, 6-speed, Air, Cruise, CD, Heated Seats, 19"
Alloys, Power Tilt, Scope, Seats, Windows, Locks #7381
5 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Seat, Windows, Locks #5422
`02 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LTZ 4X4
`11 CHEVY IMPALA LT
$7,995
• $164.01 MO.
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Leather, Sunroof, OnStar, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #4497
$7,995
• $164.01 MO.
`08 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER TOURING
CONVERTIBLE
Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows, Locks #1794
$8,995
• $184.52 MO.
`07 CHEVY COLORADO
$12,500
• $256.42 MO.
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Bluetooth, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks, 45K #4888
$12,500
• $256.42 MO.
`11 FORD TAURUS SEL
4 Door, Black w/ Black Leather, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Heated
Seat, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows, Locks, Looks New! #5794
$12,500
• $256.42 MO.
`10 SUBARU LEGACY AWD
`11 FORD FUSION SE
`11 CHEVY IMPALA LT
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, OnStar, Buckets w/Console, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #9082
$12,995
•
•
• $184.52 MO.
`11 CHEVY AVEO LT
4 Door, Auto, Air, CD & More, 50k miles #7923
$9,500
• $194.88 MO.
`07 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X2
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Rack, Power Seat, Windows, Locks
#5589
$9,500
• $194.88 MO.
`04 NISSAN MURANO SE
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Sunroof, Leather, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #6414
$9,500
• $194.88 MO.
`10 NISSAN VERSA
5 Door, Auto, Air, CD & More #7445
$9,995
• $205.04 MO.
`08 SMART FORTWO PASSION COUPE
Auto, Air, CD, Alloys, Glass Top, Leather, Heated Seats, Power Windows,
Locks, Only 16K #0470
$9,995
•
$205.04 MO.
`10 KIA OPTIMA LX
4 Door, 5 Speed, Air, CD, Wing, Power Windows, Locks, Only 39K #5004
$9,995
• $205.04 MO.
`10 KIA RIO LX
4 Door, Auto, Air, CD & More #2744
$9,995
• $205.04 MO.
`11 HYUNDAI ACCENT SE
Auto, Air, CD & More, 43k miles #8384
$9,995
•
$205.04 MO.
`06 MITSUBISHI RAIDER DURO-CROSS
CREW CAB 4X2
4 Door, V6, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Bed Liner, Split Seat, Power
Windows, Locks, #4589
$9,995
• $205.04 MO.
`04 ACURA TSX
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Leather, Alloys, Sunroof, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #0573
$9,995
• $205.04 MO.
•
$266.58 MO.
•
• $266.58 MO.
`11 CHEVY IMPALA LS
4 door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Buckets w/Console, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #1185
$12,995
• $266.58 MO.
`11 FORD TAURUS SE
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #3187
$12,995
•
$266.58 MO.
`11 TOYOTA CAMRY LE
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Sunroof, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #5512
$12,995
• $266.58 MO.
`11 SUBARU LEGACY
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks #9613
$12,995
• $266.58 MO.
`11 FORD TAURUS SE
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #4236
$12,995
• $266.58 MO.
`11 FORD FUSION SE
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Sunroof, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #1783
$12,995
•
$266.58 MO.
`11 SUBARU LEGACY AWD
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Power, Windows, Locks #8940
$12,995
• $266.58 MO.
`11 FORD FUSION SE
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Seat, Windows, Locks, 59K #6750
$12,995
• $266.58 MO.
$14,500
`10 DODGE JOURNEY SXT
$14,500
`12 FORD FUSION SEL
$14,500
$276.94 MO.
5 Door, V6, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Power Seat, Windows, Locks, Only 38k
miles #2311
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks #3703
• $276.94 MO.
12 MAZDA 2
5 Door, Auto, Air, CD, Power Windows, Locks, 23k miles #9658
$13,500
• $276.94 MO.
$14,500
5 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Leather, Heated Seat, Power
Windows, Locks, Only 24k miles #1714
$14,500
`11 FORD TAURUS SEL
Black, V8, Reg cab, Short bed, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Chrome Wheels,
Fiberglass Bed Cover, Power Seat, Windows, only 45K #4194
• $276.94 MO.
$14,500
`12 NISSAN VERSA SV
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #5759
$14,500
`11 FORD ESCAPE XLT
$13,995
• $287.09 MO.
$13,995
•
$287.09 MO.
5 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Rack, Backup Cam, OnStar,
Power Seat, Windows, Locks #7950
$14,500
• $297.45 MO.
`12 NISSAN VERSA SV
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks, Only 22k miles #8084
$14,500
`12 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT
• $297.45 MO.
`11 SUBARU LEGACY PREMIUM AWD
5 Door, V6, Auto, Front & Rear Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Rack, Stow
& Go, Power Hatch, Sliding Doors, Seat, Windows, Locks #8474
$13,995
• $297.45 MO.
`11 CHEVY EQUINOX LT 4X2
`09 DODGE JOURNEY SXT AWD
5 Door, Auto, Front & Rear Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, 3rd Seat, Power
Seat, Windows, Locks #3949
• $297.45 MO.
`11 SUBARU LEGACY PREMIUM AWD
• $276.94 MO.
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Rack, Alloys, Keyless Entry, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #5208
• $297.45 MO.
`06 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks #2665
$13,500
• $297.45 MO.
`11 FORD FIESTA SES
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys w/Michelins, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #5334
$13,500
• $297.45 MO.
`10 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE
`10 SUBARU FORESTER X AWD
$13,500
• $297.45 MO.
5 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Windows, Locks
#5938
`07 NISSAN XTERRA S 4X4
•
• $297.45 MO.
5 Door, V6, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Rack, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #2896
• $266.66 MO.
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #0325
• $287.09 MO.
$14,995
`11 CHEVY MALIBU LT
• $307.61 MO.
`11 HONDA CIVIC VP
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks, 40K #9626
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Power Windows & More, Only 12K #5839
`11 FORD FUSION SE
`07 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE GT COUPE
$13,995
• $287.09 MO.
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Seat, Windows, Locks,
49K #6764
$13,995
•
$287.09 MO.
`11 DODGE NITRO SXT
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows, Locks #4433
$13,995
• $287.09 MO.
$14,995
$14,995
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Sport Wheels, Power Windows, Locks #0313
$14,995
• $287.09 MO.
`12 FORD FOCUS SEL
4 Door, Auto , Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Windows, Locks
#2972
•
`12 KIA RIO EX
$13,995
$13,995
• $287.09 MO.
`12 CHEVY MALIBU LS
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, scope, Cruise, CD, Sport Wheels, Power Windows,
Locks, 30K #3584
$13,995
• $287.09 MO.
`10 CHRYSLER 300 TOURING SIGNATURE
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Leather, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #2739
$13,995
$13,995
`11 DODGE JOURNEY EXPRESS
$13,995
• $287.09 MO.
$13,995
•
$307.61 MO.
• $307.61 MO.
• $307.61 MO.
5 Door, V6, Auto, Front & Rear Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Rack, Stow
& Go, Power Pedals, Hatch, Sliding Door, Seat, Windows, Locks #2850
$14,995
• $307.61 MO.
`12 CHEVY CRUZE LS
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Window, Locks, 21k
miles #6809
$14,995
• $307.61 MO.
`11 SUBARU LEGACY PREMIUM AWD
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks # 6738
$14,995
• $307.61 MO.
`02 CHRYSLER P.T. CRUISER LIMITED
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Chrome Alloys, Leather, Sunroof, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks # 9611
$14,995
• $307.61 MO.
`11 FORD TAURUS SEL
5 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Leather, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks, Looks New! #1259
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #1678
• $287.09 MO.
$14,995
`11 CHEVY EQUINOX LT 4X2
• $307.61 MO.
`11 HYUNDAI SONOTA GLS
5 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Rack, Backup Cam, Power
Seat, Windows, Locks #7594
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise CD, Power Windows, Locks, 29k
miles #6609
`11 KIA SOUL +
`08 NISSAN 3.5 SE COUPE
$13,995
• $287.09 MO.
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Windows, Locks, Only 22k
miles #2739
$13,995
• $287.09 MO.
`12 CHEVY MALIBU LS
$14,995
• $307.61 MO.
V6, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, 20" Alloys, Heated Seats, Sunroof, Leather, Power
Seat, Windows, Locks #9030
$14,995
• $307.61 MO.
`10 MAZDA 6 TOURING PLUS
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, OnStar, Sport Wheels, Power
Windows, Locks, Only 18k miles #1173
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Leathe, New Tires, Alloys, Sunroof,
Power Seat, Windows, Locks, Only 55k miles #7547
`11 FORD FUSION SE
`11 FORD TAURUS SEL AWD
$13,995
• $287.09 MO.
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Seat, Windows, Locks #1170
$13,995
• $287.09 MO.
`11 FORD TAURUS SEL
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #3201
$13,995
• $287.09 MO.
`08 HYUNDAI SANTA FE LIMITED 4X2
5 Door, V6, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, XM, Rack, Nav, Heated Seats, Sunroof,
Leather, Alloys w/New Tires, Power Seat, Windows, Locks, Only 67K #3438
$13,995
• $287.09 MO.
`11 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT 4X2
2 to Choose From, 5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Sport Wheels, Power
Windows, Locks #1066, #1081
$13,995
• $287.09 MO.
`08 1/2 NISSAN TITAN CREW CAB
4 Door, V8, Auto, Air, CD, Power Windows, Locks, Bed Liner, Sliding Rear
Glass, Split Seat, Sport Wheels w/Michelins #3785
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`12 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4X2
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Rack, Keyless Entry, Sunroof, Power
Seat, Windows, Locks #6422
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`09 GMC ACADIA SLE 4X2
5 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, 3rd Seat, Rack, Alloys, Power
Windows, Locks #4574
$15,995
•
$328.12 MO.
`12 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4X2
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Sunroof, Alloys, Rack, Keyless Entry, Power
Seat, Windows, Locks #8627
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`11 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT
V8, Reg Cab, Long Bed, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Sliding Glass, Bed Liner,
Split Seat, Power Windows, Locks #5716
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`11 FORD FLEX SE
5 Door, Auto, Front & Rear Air, Tilt, Scope, 3rd Seat, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Rack,
Power Seat, Windows, Locks #4489
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`10 FORD EDGE SEL
5 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Keyless Entry, Chrome Alloys, Dual
Sunroof, Leather, Heated Seat, Power Seat, Windows, Locks #8145
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`11 FORD FLEX SE
5 Door, Auto, Front & Rear Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, 3rd Seat, Power
Seat, Windows, Locks #7024
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`11 JEEP COMPASS
5 Door, Auto, Air, CD, Power Windows, Locks #8632
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`11 FORD TAURUS SEL AWD
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #7907
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`10 FORD ESCAPE LIMITED AWD
5 Door, V6, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Heated Seat, Alloys, Rack, Keyless Entry,
Leather, Power Seat, Windows, Locks #4240
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`11 FORD FLEX SE
5 Door, Auto, Front & Rear Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, 3rd Seat, Alloys, Power
Seat, Windows, Locks #6236
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`10 NISSAN ROGUE SL-AWD
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Rack, Sunroof, Power Windows,
Locks #0425
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`11 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT
V8, Reg cab, Long bed, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Bed liner, Split Seat,
Power Windows, Locks, Only 27K #9064
$15,995
•
$328.12 MO.
`11 FORD FLEX SE
$15,995
•
$328.12 MO.
$15,995
•
$328.12 MO.
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD Power Windows, Locks #5633
• $307.61 MO.
`10 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT
`11 VOLVO V50 T-5 SPORT WAGON
•
$328.12 MO.
`11 HONDA CIVIC LX
$14,995
• $287.09 MO.
$15,995
Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows, Locks #5800
`12 MITSUBISHI LANCER ES
• $287.09 MO.
5 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Sunroof, Rack, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #4717
5 Door, Premium, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Sunroof, Rack, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #8144
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Sunroof, MP3, Power Windows, Locks,
Only 9k miles #6798
`11 KIA SOUL +
$13,995
`11 SUBARU FORESTER X PREMIUM AWD
`11 FORD TAURUS SEL AWD
$14,995
• $287.09 MO.
•
$317.97 MO.
`10 SUBARU FORESTER X AWD
• $307.61 MO.
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Sport Wheels, Power Windows, Locks, Only
35k miles #1062
`11 FORD FUSION SE
$15,500
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Sport Wheels, Rack, Power Windows, Locks
#1050
`11 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT 4X2
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Seat, Windows, Locks,
49k miles #5185
`12 CHEVY MALIBU LT
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, OnStar, Sport Wheels, Leather Trim,
Sunroof, Power Seat, Windows, Locks # 5728
5 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Sport Wheels, Rack, Power
Windows, Locks #8884
$14,995
• $287.09 MO.
• $307.61 MO.
`11 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT
• $307.61 MO.
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks #5926
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Bluetooth, Power Windows,
Locks, Only 27k miles #6535
$14,995
`10 TOYOTA RAV4 4X4
$14,995
$287.09 MO.
`11 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4X2
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Keyless Entry, Sunroof, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #9960
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks #3939
$14,995
• $287.09 MO.
32812 MO.
5 Door, Auto, Front & Rear Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, 3rd Seat, CD, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #7149
$14,995
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Rack, Keyless Entry, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #5264
$13,995
• $307.61 MO.
`10 SUBARU FORESTER X AWD
`10 FORD ESCAPE XLT AWD
$13,995
•
$307.61 MO.
`10 DODGE NITRO SE 4X2
Reg Cab, Long Bed, V8, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Split Seat, Bed Liner,
Power Windows, Locks, Only 51K #6091
$13,995
• $307.61 MO.
V6, 6-speed, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Heated Seats, Sunroof, Leather, Power
Seat, Windows, Locks, Only 26k miles #8034
`09 DODGE 1500 SLT
5 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Seat, Windows, Locks #8054
$12,995
`11 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT 4X2
5 Door, V6, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Rack, Alloys, Power Windows, Locks #4781
$13,500
• $287.09 MO.
5 Door, Auto Air, Cruise, CD, Sport Wheels, Rack, Power Windows, Locks
#0621
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, Tilt, Scope, CD, Alloys, Rack, Backup Camera, Power
Seat, Windows, Locks, 12K #6747
`11 CHEVY IMPALA LT
4 Door, Auto, Air Cruise, CD, 17" Alloys, On Star, Buckets w/ Console, power
seats, Windows, Locks #4161
$13,995
$266.58 MO.
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, OnStar, Buckets w/Console, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #3468
• $266.58 MO.
`09 HONDA ACCORD LX
`11 DODGE CALIBUR MAINSTREET
$12,999
• $287.09 MO.
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks, Only 65k
miles #1745
5 Door, 5 speed, Air, Cruise, CD, 18" Alloys, Sunroof, Power Windows, Locks,
Very Custom & Very Sharp, 64k miles #0429
V8, Reg Cab, Short Bed, 6-speed, CD, Cruise, Custom Exhaust, Bed
Liner, Split Seat, 20" Chrome Alloys, Power Windows, Locks, Only 48k
miles #4348
$12,995
$13,995
• $266.58 MO.
`11 CHEVY IMPALA LT
$8,995
$12,995
`12 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS
`09 JEEP COMPASS RALLYE 4X2
$12,995
• $287.09 MO.
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks #9788
`11 CHEVY IMPALA LT
`08 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks, Only 96k miles #4758
$13,995
$266.58 MO.
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Window, Locks #3575
`10 SCION XB
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Keyless Entry, Rack, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #1472
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Buckets, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #2330
$12,995
• $287.09 MO.
`11 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4X2
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Leather, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #2919
5 Door, 5 speed, Air, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks, Only 31k #7924
• $266.58 MO.
$13,995
$266.58 MO.
`06 BUICK RENDEZVOUS 4X2
$12,995
5 Door, V6, Auto, Front & Rear Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Stow & Go, Power
Seat, Window, Locks #0066
`11 VOLVO S40 T5
$12,995
• $287.09 MO.
`11 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE
$266.58 MO.
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks #0752
• $184.52 MO.
$13,995
`10 CHEVY IMPALA LT
•
$
`11 NISSAN ROGUE S
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Buckets w/ Console, OnStar, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #0870
$12,995
$
09 MO.
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks #3608
• $266.58 MO.
Reg Cab, Short Bed, Auto, Air, Cruise, Stereo, Split Seat, Bed Liner, Chrome
Wheels #6874
$8,995
287
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Seat, Windows, Locks, Only
58k miles #9928
$12,995
15,995
12,995
$
$
06 MO.
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat,
windows, Locks, 21K #9183
4 Door, V8, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Bed Liner, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #7817
$14,995
• $307.61 MO.
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Window,
Locks # 6246
$14,995
•
$307.61 MO.
`11 SUBARU LEGACY PREMIUM AWD
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #0888
$14,995
• $307.61 MO.
`11 SUBARU LEGACY PREMIUM AWD
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #7186
$14,995
• $307.61 MO.
`12 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks #0523
$14,995
• $307.61 MO.
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`12 CHEVY CRUZE
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`10 FORD EDGE SE 4X2
5 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Windows, Locks
#2410
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`11 SUBARU LEGACY PREMIUM
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows, Locks,
45k miles #4126
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`11 TOYOTA CAMRY
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks, Only 24k
miles #7523
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`12 MITSUBISHI LANCER ES
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Spoiler, Power Windows, Locks, Only
11k miles #0556
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`12 MAZDA 6
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, windows,
Locks, 21K #9183
$15,995
•
$328.12 MO.
`10 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS 4X2
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Rack, Power Windows, Locks #6426
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`05 FORD F-150 LARIAT CREW CAB 4X4
4 Door, 5.4 V8, Auto, Air, Buckets, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Bed Liner, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #4122
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`12 FORD TAURUS SE
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks #4857
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`12 TOYOTA CAMRY LE
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks #1327
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`10 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS 4X2
5 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Windows, Locks,
Looks New! Only 35k miles #2989
$15,995
• $328.12 MO.
`12 FORD ESCAPE XLT
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Michelins w/ Alloys, Rack, Keyless Entry, Power
Seat, Windows, Locks #6118
$16,500
• $338.48 MO.
`12 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT
5 Door, V6, Auto, Front & Rear Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, Stow & Go, Alloys,
Rack, CD, Power Hatch, Sliding Door, Power Seat, Windows, Locks, 49k
miles #5607
$16,500
• $338.48 MO.
`13 CHRYSLER 200 TOURING
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows, Locks,
Only 10k miles #5115
$16,500
• $338.48 MO.
`10 FORD ESCAPE LIMITED AWD
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Heated Seat, Rack, Keyless Entry,
Leather, Power Seat, Windows, Locks, 45k miles #0899
$16,995
• $348.63 MO.
`09 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
4 Door, Signature Limited, Black w/Tan Leather, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD,
Chrome Alloys, Heated Seat, Power Seat, Windows, Locks, Only 34K #7880
$16,995
• $348.63 MO.
`13 NISSAN ROGUE S 4X2
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD< Power Windows, Locks, 15K #0138
$16,995
• $348.63 MO.
`11 CHEVY TRAVERSE LS
5 Door, Auto, Front & Rear Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, 3rd Seat, OnStar,
Power Seat, Windows, Locks #3876
$16,995
• $348.63 MO.
`13 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GS COUPE
Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Windows, Locks, Only 5k
miles #2403
$16,995
• $348.63 MO.
`12 CHRYSLER 200 TOURING CONV
Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows, Locks,
29K #9794
$17,500
• $358.99 MO.
`11 VOLVO S40 T5
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Leather, Alloys, Power Seat
Windows, Locks #3563
$17,500
• $358.99 MO.
`11 MAZDA CX7
5 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Windows, Locks,
30k miles #5720
$17,500
• $358.99 MO.
`09 MAZDA MIATA CONV
Red, 5 speed, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power windows, Only 21K #1671
$17,990
• $369.05 MO.
`11 FORD TAURUS SE
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows,
Locks, 37K #2253
$17,995
• $369.15 MO.
`07 LEXUS IS 250
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Leather, Sunroof, NAV, Hot &
Cold Seats, Backup Cam, Power Seat, Windows, Locks #7141
$17,995
• $369.15 MO.
`10 HONDA CRV EX 4X4
5 door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Sunroof, Power Windows,
Locks, Looks New!, 52K #6002
$17,995
• $369.15 MO.
`12 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT 4X4
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Rack, Power Windows, Locks, 18K
#7567
$17,995
• $369.15 MO.
`12 FORD ESCAPE XLT
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Rack, Alloys, Keyless Entry, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks , 27K #8621
$17,995
• $369.15 MO.
`07 GMC SIERRA 1500 CREW CAB
4 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Sport Wheels, Bed Liner, Split Seat, Power
Windows, Locks, 68k miles, Very Sharp! #4001
$17,995
• $369.15 MO.
`13 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks, 23K #2219
$17,995
• $369.15 MO.
`12 HONDA ACCORD LX
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Power Windows, Locks, 24K, #0413
$17,995
• $369.15 MO.
`12 FORD MUSTANG COUPE
6 Speed, Air, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Wing, Power Windows, Locks, 15K #8463
$18,500
• $379.51 MO.
`12 SCION TC COUPE
6 Speed, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Dual Sunroof, Power Windows,
Locks, 19k miles #1775
$18,500
• $379.51 MO.
`12 BUICK LACROSSE
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys w/Michelins, Power Seat,
Windows, Locks #2384
$18,995
• $389.66 MO.
`12 CHRYSLER 300
4 Door, Black on Black, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys w/Michelins,
Power Seat, Windows, Locks #7977
$18,995
• $389.66 MO.
`11 KIA OPTIMA EX
4 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Hot & Cold Seats, Sunroof, Leather,
Power Seat, Windows, Locks, 27k miles #0858
$18,995
• $389.66 MO.
`13 HYUNDAI VELOSTER
Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Crusie, CD, 18" Alloys, Sunroof, Power Windows,
Locks, 14K # 7310
$19,500
• $400.02 MO.
`13 NISSAN ROGUE S 4X2
5 Door, Auto, Air, Cruise, Cd, Power Windows, Locks, Only 5k miles #6204
$19,500
• $400.02 MO.
`12 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN CREW
5 Door, V6, Auto Front & Rear Air, Cruise, CD, Tilt, Scope, DVD, Alloys, Rack,
Stow & Go, Heated Seat & Steering Wheel, Power Hatch, Sliding Door, Seat,
Windows, Locks, 29k miles! #0314
$20,995
• $430.69 MO.
`12 FORD EDGE SE 4X2
5 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Windows, Locks,
20k miles #2013
$20,995
• $430.69 MO.
`10 VOLVO XC90 3.2 4X4
5 Door, Auto, Front & Rear Air, Cruise, CD, Park Assist, Alloys, Rack, 3rd Seat,
Sunroof, Heated Seat, Power Seat, Windows, Locks #8489
$22,500
• $461.56 MO.
`13 TOYOTA VENZA LE
Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Power Seat, Windows, Locks, 18k
miles #7153
$22,995
• $471.72 MO.
`10 CADILLAC SRX-4 LUXURY
5 Door, Auto, Air, Tilt, Scope, Cruise, CD, Leather, Sunroof, "OnStar", Alloys
w/New Tires, Heated Seat, Power Hatch, Seat, Window, Locks, 50k miles
$26,995
• $553.77 MO.
`12 TOYOTA TUNDRA CREW MAX
4 Door, V8, Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Sport Wheels, Matching Fiberglass Camper
Top, Power Windows, Locks #7220
$26,995
• $553.77 MO.
*Subject to approved credit. Plus tax, tag, title and $499.00 Doc Fee. $0 Down, 60 Months @ 8.35% APR through TVFCU. Cars over 100K Are 60 Months @ 4.89% APR. Subject to lender approval. See dealer for inventory. Offer expires 12 noon on 7/31/15
423-763-0369
LENDERS AVAILABLE FOR BRUISED CREDIT
CARFAX AVAILABLE ON ALL VEHICLES
AVAILABLE ON ALL VEHICLES
CHAPMAN ROAD @
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`12 MAZDA 6
08 DODGE DAKOTA SLT CREW CAB

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