- Riphah International University

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- Riphah International University
RIPHAH INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY
ISLAMABAD
SELF ASSESSMENT REPORT
M.Phil. (Dental Materials)
Islamic International Dental College (IIDC)
30 June 2016
Prepared by:
Islamic International Dental College
Reviewed and Edited by:
Quality Enhancement Cell
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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Table of Contents
1.0 Executive Summary ................................................................................................. 5
1.1 Objectives ............................................................................................................ 5
1.2 Execution ............................................................................................................. 5
2.0 Introduction .............................................................................................................. 7
2.1 University Mission Statement .............................................................................. 7
2.2 Islamic International Dental College (IIDC) ....................................................... 7
2.3 Program Selected ................................................................................................. 7
2.4 Program Evaluation ............................................................................................. 7
3.0 Criterion 1: Program Mission, Objectives and Outcomes ....................................... 8
3.1 Standard 1-1 ......................................................................................................... 8
3.1.1 Program Mission Statement .......................................................................... 8
3.1.2 Program Objectives ....................................................................................... 8
3.1.3 Alignment of Program Objectives with Program & University Mission
Statements ................................................................................................................... 8
3.1.4 Main Elements of Strategic Plan................................................................... 8
3.2 Standard 1-2 ......................................................................................................... 9
3.2.1 Program Outcomes........................................................................................ 9
3.2.2 Program Objectives and Outcomes Matching ............................................ 10
3.3 Standard 1-3 ....................................................................................................... 10
3.3.1 Course Evaluation ....................................................................................... 10
3.3.2 Teachers Evaluation .................................................................................... 11
3.4 M.Phil Dental Materials Program Strong and Weak Points .............................. 14
3.5 Significant Future Development Plans .............................................................. 15
3.6 Standard 1-4 ....................................................................................................... 15
3.6.1 Graduates/Undergraduates enrolled in last three years ............................... 15
3.6.2 Student Faculty Ratio:................................................................................. 15
3.6.3 Average GPA per semester: ........................................................................ 15
3.6.4 Average Completion time ........................................................................... 15
3.6.5 Students Course Evaluation Average Response Rate ................................. 16
3.6.6 Students Faculty Evaluation ....................................................................... 16
3.6.7 Research ...................................................................................................... 16
3.6.8 Community Service .................................................................................... 16
3.6.9 Students/Teachers Satisfaction ................................................................... 16
4.0 Criterion 2: Curriculum Design and Organization................................................. 16
5.0 Criterion 3: Laboratories and Computing Facilities .............................................. 31
5.1 Standard 3-1 ....................................................................................................... 31
5.2 Standard 3-2 ....................................................................................................... 32
5.3 Standard 3-3 ....................................................................................................... 32
6.0 Criterion 4: Student Support and Advising............................................................ 32
6.1 Standard 4-1 ....................................................................................................... 33
6.2 Standard 4-2 ....................................................................................................... 33
6.3 Standard 4-3 ....................................................................................................... 33
7.0 Criterion 5: Process Control................................................................................... 34
7.1 Standard 5-1 ....................................................................................................... 34
7.2 Standard 5-2 ....................................................................................................... 34
7.3 Standard 5-3 ....................................................................................................... 35
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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7.4 Standard 5-4 ....................................................................................................... 36
7.5 Standard 5-5 ....................................................................................................... 37
8.0 Criterion 6: Faculty ................................................................................................ 38
8.1 Standard 6-1 ....................................................................................................... 38
8.2 Standard 6-2 ....................................................................................................... 38
8.3 Standard 6-3 ....................................................................................................... 39
9.0 Criterion 7: Institutional Facilities ......................................................................... 39
9.1 Standard 7-1 ....................................................................................................... 39
9.2 Standard 7-2 ....................................................................................................... 40
9.3 Standard 7-3 ....................................................................................................... 40
10.0 Criterion 8: Institutional Support ........................................................................... 41
10.1 Standard 8-1 ....................................................................................................... 41
10.2 Standard 8-2 ....................................................................................................... 41
10.3 Standard 8-3 ....................................................................................................... 41
11.0 Conclusion ............................................................................................................. 42
11.1 M.Phil Dental Materials program Strong and Weak Points .............................. 43
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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List of Annexure
Annexure A:
Employer Survey
Annexure B:
Alumni Survey
Annexure C:
Students Course Evaluation
Annexure D:
Students Teacher Evaluation
Annexure E:
Research Papers List
Annexure F:
Graduating Students
Annexure G:
Faculty Survey
Annexure H:
Faculty Resume
Annexure I:
Lab Safety Precautions
Annexure J:
AT Findings
Annexure K:
Implementation Plan
Annexure L:
Faculty Course Review
Annexure M:
Rubric Report
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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1.0
Executive Summary
This report is being prepared almost at the end of the assessment cycle
for selected programs of Riphah International University, as per
requirements
of
Higher
Education
Commission
(HEC).
Quality
Enhancement Cell (QEC) was formed in Riphah International University in
Oct 2009. Program Team Members of all five faculties, notified by
University, worked with Dir QEC to pursue the application of SelfAssessment Manual in their respective departments. From each faculty
one program was selected.
In this report, Islamic International Dental College (IIDC), M.Phil. (Dental
Materials)
was
selected
for
self-assessment,
evaluation
and
improvements. A strong commitment of Respected Vice Chancellor to
support QEC made the difference and resultantly, a cycle of assessment
is about to complete.
1.1
Objectives
Following are the two main objectives of the self-assessment report:a
To implement Self-Assessment Manual in selected program with a
view to improve quality in higher education.
b
To identify the areas requiring improvements in order to achieve
objectives through desired outcomes.
1.2
Execution
A soft copy of self-assessment manual was given to all faculty members.
Quality Awareness Lecture and Workshop on preparation of SelfAssessment Report (SAR) were arranged (30 Sep 2015) for the Deans/Incharge Programs and Program Team (PT) Members of the selected
program. Hard copies of HEC issued 10 proformas, 8 criterion and 31
standards were provided to PT members to evaluate their respected
program against defined standards. The PT members with an intimate
support and follow up of QEC, completed the SAR and forwarded to QEC
in given time frame.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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After reviewing SAR, QEC arranged visit of Assessment Team to the
selected program. Dir QEC accompanied the AT Team and participated in
discussions with In-charge Program / Program Team members and
available faculty members.
The AT during visits, indicated salient points of the SAR, account of its
discussions with the faculty members, improvements required in the
infrastructure, syllabi and training of the faculty and support staff.
The implementation plan (Annex-K) basing on the discussions in exit
meeting have been made by In-charge Programs.
The implementation plan indicates the resources required to improve the
infrastructure, environment in the classes and E-Learning. The tasks have
been completed on fast track by the combined efforts of Head of
Department, QEC and Registrar’s Office.
At the completion of Self-Assessment cycle, QEC is going to submit the
hard and soft copy of SAR to HEC before 30 June 2016.
Director
Quality Enhancement Cell
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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Self Assessment Report
2.0
Introduction
Riphah International University is a private university, chartered by the
Federal Government of Pakistan in 2002. The university was established
with a view to produce professionals with Islamic moral and ethical values.
The Riphah International University is committed to promote and impart
quality education with character building of the new generation in the light of
Islamic principles and values. Riphah International University is committed
to a value based integrated educational philosophy. It is running 10 faculties
in 3 different campuses.
2.1
University Mission Statement
Establishment of state of the art educational institutions with a focus on
inculcation of Islamic ethical values.
2.2
Islamic International Dental College (IIDC)
Islamic International Dental College (IIDC) is running following programs:
a. Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS)
b. Master of Philosophy (M. Phil) Dental Materials
c. Master of Dental Surgery (MDS) Orthodontics
d. Master of Dental Surgery (MDS) Operative Dentistry
2.3
Program Selected
Riphah International University has selected the Master of Philosophy
(M.Phil) Dental Materials as third model program for Self Assessment
Report (SAR) for the year 2013-16 under the directives of HEC.
The selected program is accredited by Medical & Dental Council of the
Pakistan (PM&DC) and Higher Education Commission (HEC) of Pakistan.
The program has got inbuilt mechanism for the revision of syllabi, has
competent faculty and adequate infrastructure. New and modern tools have
been introduced in the program to conduct research and quality teaching.
2.4
Program Evaluation
The program is being evaluated based on 8 criterion and 31 standards as
given in the Self Assessment Manual provided by Higher Education
Commission (HEC).
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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3.0
3.1
Criterion 1: Program Mission, Objectives and Outcomes
Standard 1-1
The program must have documented measurable objectives that
support institution mission statements.
3.1.1
Program Mission Statement
Master of Philosophy Dental Materials program aims to impart theoretical
and practical research skills and ethical values to students.
3.1.2
Program Objectives
The Master of Philosophy Dental Materials aims to accomplish following
objectives on completion of degree:
1. To produce competent personnel for leadership positions in the field of
Dental Materials.
2. To provide better research and developmental opportunities by
involving other public/private sector organizations and industries.
3. To groom students to strengthen their research activities in the field of
Dental Materials and improve team work.
4. To prepare students to work within ethical values and betterment of the
society at large.
5. To enable the students to help in the designing of new Dentistry
technique.
6. To enable the students to carry out the qualitative and quantitative
analysis of Dental Materials.
3.1.3
Alignment of Program Objectives with Program & University
Mission Statements
Master of Philosophy Dental Materials program objectives are defined in
the light of program and university mission statements that require the
output to be inclusive of ethical values and research skills. This is done
by imparting Dentistry related skills and sense of ethics in students
through defined set of courses and research.
3.1.4
Main Elements of Strategic Plan
Strategic plan for Master of Philosophy Dental Materials defines the
overall layout of the areas/elements that are included in the program to
educate students to master’s level. These elements prepare students
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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through theory and research work. These elements are Program
Contents,
Program
Delivery
Methodology
and
Program
Output
Evaluation.
3.1.4.1 Program Contents
M.Phil Dental Materials program is comprised of 32 credit hours. 24
credit hours are for theoretical subjects, whereas, 8 credit hours are for
research work/dissertation.
3.1.4.2 Program Delivery Methodology
Program delivery methodology includes lectures, presentations, tutorials,
assignments, practical and research work.
3.1.4.3 Program Output Evaluation
Program output is measured through regular examinations, assignment’s
results and final thesis results.
3.2
Standard 1-2
The program must have documented outcomes for graduating
students. It must be demonstrated that the outcome support the
program objectives and that graduating students are capable of
performing these outcomes.
3.2.1
Program Outcomes
The MDS Dental Materials program is designed to produce following
Out comes:
1. Students shall be able to go for higher education (Ph.D).
2. Students shall be able to lead, motivate and manage teams.
3. Students shall be able to demonstrate specific knowledge, attitudes,
skills and behavior for the welfare of the society.
4. Students shall be able to display the capability of objective advice on
materials used in dentistry and their use to the public and provide
technical advice to other health professional, health planners and
policy makers.
5. Students will be able to perform jobs in related field.
6. Students shall be able to perform research in related field.
7. Students shall be able to perform tasks individually as well as in
teams.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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8. Students shall be able to execute tasks in positive and constructive
manner.
9. Students shall be able to publish research papers in their area of
research.
3.2.2
Program Objectives and Outcomes Matching
Program
Program Outcomes
Objectives
1
2
1
X
2
X
3
4
6
7
8
9
X
X
3
X
4
X
5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Table 2:
X
X
6
3.3
5
X
Outcomes versus Objectives
Standard 1-3
The results of Program’s assessment and the extent to which they are
used to improve the program must be documented.
The result of the program assessment is shown below in graphical charts for
courses evaluation and teachers’ evaluations.
3.3.1 Course Evaluation
Students have graded the courses against the course structure, teaching
methodology,
learning
objectives
and
outcomes
and
practical
implementation of theory. The total graded marks are 5.
See Annexure C (Course Evaluation Survey) for sample course evaluation
results. The sample shows the results for one course only while same has
been done for all courses listed below. The results of all other courses
have been kept in a separate file for record purposes.
Following is the list courses that have been evaluated by the students along with
their course code and graded scores.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
10
0
6
4.94
5
4.15
3.74
4
3.97
3.73 3.83
4
4.41
4.27
4.26
3.93
3.77
3.98
3.85
3.76
3.11
3.1
3
2
1
INSERT GRAPH HERE
Figure 1:
0
1
2
3
Course Evaluation Bar Chart
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
Sr.
No
Course
Marks
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Community Dentistry
General Pathology
General Pharmacology
Science of Dental Materials
Anatomy
Bio-Chemistry
Islamic Ethical Principle & Contemporary Issue (IEPCI)
Oral Biology
Physiology
Operative Dentistry
Oral Surgery
Orthodontics
Professional Ethics
Prosthodontics
Oral Medicine
Oral Pathology
Periodontology
4.15
4.94
3.74
3.97
3.73
3.83
4
4.26
3.77
3.1
3.93
4.27
3.11
3.85
4.41
3.98
3.76
15
16
17
Responses
/Enrolled
students on
VLE
75/75
75/75
73/74
74/80
75/75
76/78
6/6
70/26
69/69
60/76
57/75
56/76
53/78
55/76
38/75
45/82
44/77
3.3.2 Teachers Evaluation
Teacher’s evaluation is shown in the following graphical chart:
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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5
4.59
4.5
4
4.28
4.08 4.08
3.97 4.03
3.58 3.64
4.12 4.08 4.16
3.72
3.64
3.94
4.1
4.31
4.01
3.81
3.36
3.5
3.04
2.91
3
2.5
2
1.5
1
0.5
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
Students have graded the teachers against their lecture preparation, punctuality,
general behavior, subject knowledge and teaching methodology. The total
graded marks are 5.
See Annexure D (Teachers Evaluation Survey) for sample teacher evaluation
results. The sample shows the results for one teacher only while same has been
done for all teachers listed below. The results of all other teachers have been
kept in a separate file for record purposes.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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21
Following is the list of teachers that are being evaluated by the students along
with the serial number and graded scores.
Sr. No
Teacher Name
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Brig (R) Abdul Basit
Dr Alia Ahmed 2
Dr Amara Butt
Dr Faisal Shafiq
Dr. Amber Kiyani Amber
Dr. Khurram Babar Khurram
Dr. Muhammad Qasim Javed 2
Dr. Saad Haroon Saad
Dr. Sara Ali Sara
Dr. Sundas Atique Minhas
Dr. Syed Ibrar Humayun Syed Ibrar
Dr. Yawar
Dr.Amir Ghafoor Ch Amir
Faiqa Iftikhar
Faisal Moeen Faisal
Fatima Riaz
Hafiz Muhammad Zahid Yasin
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
Dr. Kamran khan
Kiran Munira
Mehreen Riaz
Mohsin Fazal
Muhammad Humza Bin Saeed
Nadia Saadatullah
Nadia Zaib
Nida Moeen
Nida Zehra
Owais Durrani
Rabia Masood
Rabia Sadaf
Romana Asghar
Sadia Khalid
Saleha Nisar
Salman Ahmad 2
Saqlain Bin Syed Gilani
Seem Zahid
Shahina Yasmin 1
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
Course Name
Prosthodontics
Operative Dentistry
Physiology
Community Dentistry
Oral Medicine
Oral Surgery
Operative Dentistry
Periodontology
Periodontology
Operative Dentistry
Periodontology
Science of Dental Materials
Prosthodontics
Oral Biology
Science of Dental Materials
Physiology
Islamic Ethical Principle &
Contemporary Issue (IEPCI)
Oral Surgery
Bio-Chemistry
Oral Surgery
Oral Surgery
Community Dentistry
General Pathology
Oral Pathology
Physiology
Anatomy
Orthodontics
Oral Pathology
General Pathology
General Pharmacology
Periodontology
Science of Dental Materials
Prosthodontics
Oral Biology
Orthodontics
Professional Ethics
Respons
es
/Enrolle
d
students
on VLE
55/76
64/76
69/69
75/75
38/75
57/75
62/76
46/77
49/77
60/76
44/77
74/80
55/76
70/71
74/80
69/69
6/6
Marks
3.58
3.64
4.08
4.08
4.59
3.64
3.97
4.03
3.04
3.72
2.91
4.28
4.12
4.08
4.16
3.94
3.81
58/75
76/78
57/75
57/75
75/75
75/75
46/82
69/69
75/75
56/76
46/82
72/75
73/74
53/77
74/80
55/76
70/71
56/76
53/78
4.1
4.31
3.36
4.01
4.34
4.41
4.24
3.77
4.22
3.86
3.73
4.35
3.76
3.76
4.19
3.99
4.45
4.17
3.25
13
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
Shahina Yasmin 2
Shakeel Kazmi
Sidra Tul Muntaha
Sikander Niazi
Tahira Inam
Ulfat Bashir
Zoofa Manazar
General Pathology
Oral Biology
Oral Surgery
Anatomy
General Pharmacology
Orthodontics
Bio-Chemistry
75/75
70/71
57/75
75/75
73/74
56/76
76/78
4.17
4.41
3.49
4.19
4.16
4.42
3.22
QEC staff carried out course and teacher evaluation survey in order to ensure
the unbiased feedback from students. The gathered data was analyzed by QEC
and results were provided to department officials for further actions.
Principal IIDC reviewed the output and decided to put up the results in Board of
Studies and Board of Faculty for further discussion and actions. Initially the
results will be put up in Board of Studies, who may decide to move results to
further level for discussion and decisions if required. This meeting is planned to
be held during the summer vacations.
3.4
M.Phil Dental Materials Program Strong and Weak Points
M.Phil Dental Materials program is designed to educate students to meet
the challenges of the modern world and present market needs. During the
execution of the program several observations were made that can be
categorized as strong and weak points of the program. These points are
listed below:
M.Phil Dental Materials Program Strong Points:

Pakistan Medical and Dental Council & HEC rules fully followed

Pre-requisites fully observed

Program Design, development and organization are based upon set,
well defined and approved criteria

Examinations on schedule

Academic Schemes fully prepared in advance

The number of courses along with their titles and credit hours for each
semester, course contents for degree program are fully planned

Transparent admission, registration and recruiting policy

Excellent Students-Teacher Ratio
M.Phil Dental Materials program Weak Points:
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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3.5

Inadequate space in the research lab for students.

Inadequate chemicals and equipment in the labs for students.

New & State of the art equipment for Labs.

Need to improve the computer facilities to all the research students.

Refresher Courses for Teachers

Need to improve the research papers published by students/faculty.

Need to improve Canteen facility for faculty and students
Significant Future Development Plans
Significant future development plan for the program includes rectification of
weaknesses and improvement in overall performance of the program. As
per agreed views, lack of learning resources will be rectified by the
induction of more learning material including books, CDs and related
magazines and journals in the library. The research lab will be extended to
accommodate maximum number of students. Sufficient funds will be
allocated to buy chemical/equipments. While, classroom facilities will be
improved over a period of time during the next financial year. On the basis
of self assessment, faculty management has decided to look into the
improvement areas for course syllabi in the light of observations listed in
section 3.1.5, that would help achieve program objectives more efficiently.
3.6
Standard 1-4
The department must assess its overall performance periodically
using quantifiable measures.
3.6.1 Graduates/Undergraduates enrolled in last three years
06 M.Phil Dental Materials students were enrolled during the three
years.
3.6.2 Student Faculty Ratio:
M.Phil Dental Materials Program has 2-1 ratio.
3.6.3 Average GPA per semester:
The average GPA is 3.4.
3.6.4 Average Completion time
The program has average completion time of 2 years.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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3.6.5 Students Course Evaluation Average Response Rate
Student’s course evaluation average response rate for all courses
is 6.43
3.6.6 Students Faculty Evaluation
QEC staff conducted the teachers’ evaluation to ensure unbiased
feedback. The results showed under section 3.3.2.
3.6.7 Research
The program faculty published research papers in different journals.
List attached in Annexure E.
3.6.8 Community Service
Islamic International Dental College launched a campaign to
provide books to needy students in a nearby school. Faculty
members and students were assigned different tasks regarding this
campaign. Students were responsible to advertise and market the
campaign in all campuses while faculty member were responsible
to gather books and donations.
3.6.9 Students/Teachers Satisfaction
As per HEC defined standard, a ratio of 4:1 for the academic and
administrative non-technical staff is maintained by the faculty of
dental college.
Students and teachers satisfaction is judged in different ways. For
students this is done by faculty as well as QEC staff by conducting
in-class discussions to know students views and through feedback
provided by them on HEC Performa number 1 & 10. While,
teachers satisfaction is judged using the HEC defined Performa
number 5 and their views during in-person discussion with QEC
staff.
4.0
Criterion 2: Curriculum Design and Organization
COURSE OUTLINE FOR M.Phil. Dental Materials
Semester 1:
1. Dental Materials (4 credit hours).
2. Research Methodology and Biostatistics (2 credit hours).
3. Biocompatibility of dental materials (2 credit hours).
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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
Dental materials 1 - (4 Credit hours) (Course Code DM 7001)
The objective of this course is to broaden the knowledge of dentists in the field of dental
materials, involving comprehensive detail of material characterization and properties,
composition, clinical handling and all possible variables involving the way they interact with
the environment in which they are placed.
1. Properties used to characterize materials.
2. Gypsum materials and dental casts.
3. Waxes.
4. Investments and refractory dies.
5. Metals and alloys.
6. Gold and alloys of Nobel metals.
7. Base metal casting alloys.
8. Casting.
9. Steel and wrought alloys.
10. Ceramics and Porcelain fused to metal (PFM).
11. Synthetic Polymers.
12. Denture base polymers.
13. Denture lining materials.
14. Artificial teeth.
15. Impression materials.
16. Dental Amalgam.
17. Acrylic.
18. Resin restorative materials.
19. Dental adhesives and adhesive performance.
20. Cements.
21. Endodontic materials.
22. Dental implants.
23. Fibre reinforced composites.
Text Books
 Applied Dental Materials by John F. McCabe & W .J. Walls 8th edition, 1998.
 Dental materials and their selection , by W illiam J.O’ Brien. Third edition. Publisher
Quintessence, 2002.
th
 Restorative Dental Materials, by R.G. Craig, Publisher Mosby 13 edition, 2012.
 Phillip’s Science of Dental Materials. Edited by K.J. Anusavice, Publisher Saunders, 11th
edition, 2003.
Research Methodology and Biostatistics - (2 Credit hours) (Course Code DM 7002)
The aim of this course to develop and refine critical and scholarly skills in the methodological
aspects of research. The graduate students would be introduced to concepts of research
synthesis and designs, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation, communication of
results, selection and development of measurement tools and the translation of the gathered
knowledge.
 Research methodology:
1. Introduction to research methodology in dentistry.
2. Evidence based dentistry.
3. Study designs.
4. Searching literature on online databases (CBW).
5. Critical Appraisal of Scientific Literature.
6. Writing a research proposal.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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7. Referencing ENDNOTE (CBW).
 Biostatistics:
1. Types of Data; Representation of data.
2. Normal Distribution; Confidence Intervals; P values.
3. Data Analysis.
4. SPSS (CBW).
Text Books
 Principles of Research Methodology A Guide for Clinical Investigators Supino, Phyllis G.;
Borer, Jeffrey S. (Eds.) 2012, XVI.
 Handbook of statistical analysis using SPSS by Sabine Lauden Chapman and Hall/CRC
2004.
 Using SPSS for windows by Susan Gerber. Springer, 2005.
Biocompatibility of dental materials - (2 Credit hours) (Course Code DM 7003)
The question of whether and to what extent dental materials may be hazardous to patients, the
environment and dental personnel has become of increasing public concern. This course will
provide a detailed knowledge of the biocompatibility of different materials used in dentistry.
1. Determination of Biocompatibility.
2. Dental Amalgam.
3. Resin-Based Composites.
4. Cements and Ceramics.
5. Dental Alloys.
6. Polymethylmethacrylate Resins.
Text Book

Biocompatibility of Dental Materials by Gottfride Schmalz & Dorthe Arenholt, Springer,
2009.
Semester 2
1. Imaging, Testing and Modelling of Dental Biomaterials (2 credit hours).
2. In Vivo Aging of Dental Materials (2 credit hours).
3. Biomaterials (2 credit hours).
4. Bonding (2credit hours).

Imaging, Testing and Modelling of Dental Biomaterials
Code DM 7003)
(2 Credit hours) (Course
This course explains the techniques for the determination of physical properties, chemical
constituents and structural organization of biomaterials and their biological substrates.
The course also introduces students in the designing of research projects, use of
equipment and analysis of the collected data. After completion of the module the students
will be able to devise research projects, conduct research of their own and achieve
optimal results from the equipment in use. The link between mathematical models,
experimental design, experimental results and validation tests would be emphasized in
detail.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Mechanical testing of dental restorations.
Optical imaging techniques for dental biomaterial interfaces.
Electron microscopy for imaging interfaces in dental restorations.
Dental cements; formulations and handling techniques.
Wear evaluation in dental restoration.
Fracture mechanics.
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7. Finite element analysis.
8. Testing the performance of dental implants.
Text Book

Dental Biomaterials Imaging testing, and modelling by Richard Curtis & Timothy W atson,
Woodhead Publishing Limited, 2008.

In Vivo Aging of Dental Materials:
(2 Credit hours) (Course Code DM 7004)
The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive evidence based understanding,
of the in vivo aging processes of dental biomaterials in the oral environment.
1. Effect of exposure to biological fluids on biomaterials surface.
2. Restorative materials.
a) Dental Amalgam
b) GIC
c) Resin composite
Text Book

Dental Materials in Vivo; aging and related phenomena by George Eliades, Quintessence
Publications 2003.

Biomaterials:
(2 Credit hours) (Course Code DM 7005)
This program is designed to provide a good level of understanding and appreciation of
the principles and applications of biomaterials. Review of physical and chemical structural
and mechanical properties of different materials used in biomaterial industry and their
relation to medical application will be covered in detail.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Polymeric Implant Materials.
Metallic Implant Materials.
Ceramic Implant Materials.
Composite as Biomaterials.
Structure-property relationships of Biological Materials.
Text Books
rd


Biomaterials; An Introduction, by Joon Park & R.S. Lakes, Springer, 3rdEdition, 2007.
th
Materials science and engineering an introduction by W, Callister. W iley 8 edition .

Bonding:
(2 Credit hours) (Course Code DM 7006)
Currently tooth bonding techniques, have various important clinical applications including
operative dentistry and preventive dentistry as well as cosmetic and paediatric dentistry,
prosthodontics, and orthodontics. It is imperative for our graduates to have an in depth
understanding of adhesion or bonding of various adhesive dental materials both to
enamel and dentin.
This module involves studying the nature and strength of the adhesion to dental hard
tissues, properties of adhesive materials, causes and mechanisms of failure of the bonds,
clinical techniques for bonding and newer applications for bonding.
1. Etched enamel structure and topography: Interface with materials.
2. Bonding of resinous material on primary enamel.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Bonding strength to enamel.
Orthodontic bonding.
Bonding to dentine; Smear layer and process of hybridization.
Bonding in Prosthodontics.
Insitu photo polymerization and polymerization shrinkage.
Composition and structure of cementum: Strategies for bonding.
Text Book

Dental hard tissues and bonding by G Eliades and DC Watts. Springer 2005.
Semester 3
1. Advanced Dental Materials (3 Credit hours).
2. Professional Ethics (1 Credit hour).
3. Tissue engineering and regenerative Dentistry (2 Credit hours).
4. Bio-Material Testing (2 Credit hours).
Text Books:
th
 Restorative Dental Materials, by R.G. Craig, Publisher Mosby 13 edition, 2012.
rd
 Biomaterials; An Introduction, by Joon Park & R.S. Lakes, Springer, 3 Edition, 2007.
Semester 4
Semester 4 is dedicated to thesis writing. Students are to submit their dissertations before the
end of semester 4.
The types of questions that can be asked in each written exam are as follows:
Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ):
There will be 25 questions in this section. Each question must be answered by choosing one out
of four options that follows the question.
Problem Based Questions (PBQ):
Problem Based questions comprises of scenarios describing clinical problems. Structured short
answer questions will be asked after describing the problem.
Structured Essay Type Questions (SEQ):
In an SEQ, a specific task or information is asked which is denoted by using certain words in the
question. The statement of question is framed in such a way that the query can be answered only
in an integrated and coherent manner. An SEQ may have two parts.
Free Response Essay Type Questions:
In this type, no restriction or limitation is placed on the type of response, and students are free to
express their thoughts on the subject.
Short Essay/ Short Answer Type Questions:
There will be three questions in the section, each carrying 5 marks. Each question, may, be
divided into several parts. Students are required to write short answer by using a phrase or
writing a short note on the subject.
NOTE:

Students need a pass in each semester to proceed into the program.

A student cannot graduate unless he/she has successfully defended his/her thesis
in the semester 4 VIVA. Successful defense of thesis in front of a panel of 4
judges. Two internal examiners and two external examiners.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
20
Course Description
Semester 1
MODULE : DM 7001 (04 Credit Hours)
SUBJECT: Science of Dental Materials
Lecture
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
Topics
Waxes –Types
Waxes-Properties
Inlay Waxes
Gypsum types
Gypsum Properties
Gypsum Handling
Physical Properties
Viscosity
Creep and flow
Thermophysical properties
Optical properties
Mechanical Properties
Stress and strain
Elastic deformation
Strength properties
Fatigue
Fracture toughness
Stress concentration effects
Corrosion and tarnish
Corrosion types
Properties of investment materials
Gypsum bonded
Silica bonded
Phosphate bonded
Casting
Investing procedure
Casting Techniques
Casting Defects
Dental ceramics
Strengthening ceramics
Types of ceramics
Porcelain fused to metal
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
All ceramic restorations
Aluminous porcelain
Y-TZP
Abrasiveness of Porcelain
Metals and alloys
Eutectic alloys
Gold alloys
Wrought alloys
Base metal alloys
Synthetic polymers
Denture base polymers
Lining materials
Artificial teeth
Finishing and polishing
Impression materials requirements
Hydrocolloids+alginate
Elastic impression materials
Inelastic impression materials
Dental cements
Glass ionomer cements
Amalgam
Properties of amalgam
Bonding mechanisms
Dentin bonding agents
Dental composite
Curing of composites
Microfilled composites
Siloranes
MODULE : DM 7003 (02 Credit Hours)
SUBJECT: Biocompatibility
Lecture
No.
1
2
3
4
Topics
Introduction
Determination of biocompatibility
Adverse effects of dental materials
Local and systematic effects
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Immunotoxicity
Measuring biocompatibility
In vitro tests
In vivo test
Usage and implantation test
Patch test
Quantification of results
Tissue reaction of Ca(OH)2
Pulpal reaction to GIC
Eugenol biocompatibility
Cervical dentin hypersensitivity
Cytotoxicity of composites
Estrogenicity of composites
Biological response to microleakage
Toxicology of dental resin monomers
Ceramics toxicity and allergies
Ceramics mutagenicity
Polymethylmethacrylate resin release
Reduction of residual monomer release
Biocompatibility of amalgam
Mercury toxicity
Corrosion of dental alloys
Tissue compatibility of dental alloys
Nickel allergy
Implanted dental alloys
Biocompatibility of impression materials
MODULE: DM 7004 (02 Credit Hours)
SUBJECT: Research Methodology and Biostatistics
Lecture Topics
No.
1
Introduction to research methodology-1
2
Introduction to research methodology-2
3
What is research?
4
5
Basics of research
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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6
Evidence based dentistry-1
7
8
9
10
Evidence based dentistry-2
Evidence based dentistry-3
Evidence based dentistry-4
Study designs.-1
11
Study designs-2
12
Study designs.-3
13
Searching literature on online databases
(CBW).
14
Searching literature on online databases
(CBW).
15
Critical Appraisal of Scientific Literature.-1
16
Critical Appraisal of Scientific Literature.-2
17
18
19
20
Writing a Research Proposal-1.
Writing a Research Proposal-1.
Writing a Research Proposal-1.
Thesis Writing
21
Scientific Writing
22
Referencing Styles
23
Referencing ENDNOTE (CBW)
24
Types of Data; Representation of data.
25
Normal Distribution; Confidence Intervals;
P values
26
Data Analysis
27
Data Analysis.
28
SPSS (CBW).
29
30
SPSS (CBW).
SPSS (CBW).
SEMESTER 2
Module: DM7004 (02 Credit Hours)
Subject: Imaging Modeling and Testing
Sr
Topics
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
24
No.
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Mechanical testing of dental restorations
Shape Optimization of Dental restoration
Verification of optimized dental restoration
Optical imaging techniques for dental
Biomaterials
Laser Confocal Microscopy
Scanning electron microscope
Environmental scanning electron microscope
Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy
Dental cements
Dental cements , formulation and handling
Water based cements
Oil based cements
Testing of materials
Wear evaluation of dental restorations
In situ methods of wear evaluation
Mixed method approaches towards wear
evaluation
Introduction to Fracture mechanics
Crack initiation and propagation
Theories of fracture mechanics
Resistance to fracture
Fatigue in materials
Fracture toughness
Introduction to finite element analysis
Steps in FEA
Boundary conditions
Testing performance of dental implants
Loading of dental implants
Principles of implant stability
Fatigue characteristics of implant assembly
Photo elastic stress analysis on dental implants
Module: DM7005 (02 Credit Hours)
Subject: In-Vivo Aging of Dental Materials
Lecture
No.
Topics
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
25
01
Effect of exposure to biological fluids on
biomaterial surface
02
Biomaterial surface properties and biological
responses
03
Alterations of dental amalgam
04
Changes in amalgam structure and properties
05
Effect of mechanical forces and their effect on
dental amalgam
06
Aging of dental amalgam restorations
07
Aging of Glass ionomer cement
08
Structural characteristics of GIC
09
Fluoride release, adhesion and biocompatibility
of GIC
10
Degradation of GIC
11
Anticariogenic behavior of GIC
12
Degradation mechanisms of dental resin
composites
13
Wear mechanism of composite restorations
14
Chemical degradation of composite restoration
15
Degradation of filler particles
16
Degradation of matrix
17
Degradation of Filler-Silane Interface
18
In vivo aging of brackets
19
Degradation of orthodontic brackets over time
20
Effect of saliva and oral environment on
orthodontic brackets and wires
21
Degradation of GIC
22
Degradation of luting cements in fixed
prosthodontics
23
Aging of porcelain crowns in oral environment
24
In vivo aging of porcelain fused to metal
25
In vivo aging of luting cements
26
Invivo aging of heat cure resin
27
Invivo aging of self cure resin
28
Invivo aging of cast partial dentures
29
Invivo aging of dental implants
30
Effect of soft tissue on implant assembly
Module: DM7006 (02 Credit Hours)
Subject: Biomaterials
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
26
Sr
No.
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Topics
Introduction to biomaterials
Structure of solids
Dental metals and alloys
Ceramic implant materials
Corrosion of metallic implants
Minimization of corrosion of implants
Structure of hydroxyapatite
Properties of hydroxyapatite
Deterioration of ceramic implants
Polymeric implant materials
Deterioration of polymers
Composites as Biomaterials
Mechanics of composites
Applications of composite biomaterials
Biocompatibility of composite biomaterials
Bone cements
Structure-property relationships of biological
materials
Structure –property relationship of tissues
Modeling mechanical properties of bone
Tissue engineering materials
Tissue engineering and regeneration
Substrate scaffold materials
Electrical stimulation for regeneration
Cellular aspects , viability of stem cells
Cartilage regeneration
Bone regeneration
Applications of Collagen based materials
Prosthetic implants materials
Types of grafts
Regeneration using stem cells
Module: DM7007 (02 Credit Hours)
Subject: Bonding
Sr
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
27
No.
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Topics
Introduction
Structure and topography of enamel
Etched enamel; surface and topography
Material interface on etched enamel
Bonding of resinous material on primary enamel
Bonding of resinous material on secondary
enamel
Bonding to enamel
Structure and topography of enamel
Orthodontic bonding
Bonding of orthodontic bands
Bonding of orthodontic brackets
Bonding of orthodontic bands to porcelain
crowns
Bonding to dentine
Smear layer formation
Smear layer and hybridization
Bonding in prosthodontics
Bonding of full metal crowns
Bonding of porcelain crowns
In situ photo polymerization shrinkage
Effect of polymerization shrinkage
Composition of cementum
Structure of cementum
Strategies for bonding to cementum
Bond strength studies
Clinical applications of bond strength testing
Current concerns in adhesive science
Generstions of bonding agents
Innovations in bonding
Light penetration through oral biomaterials
Future directions in bonding
SEMESTER 3
MODULE : DM 7008 (02 Credit Hours)
SUBJECT: Advance Dental Materials
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
28
Lecture
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Topics
Waxes types and properties
Gypsum
Physical Properties
Thermophysical properties
Optical properties
Mechanical Properties
Stress and strain+ Elastic deformation
Strength properties
Fracture toughness+ fatigue
Corrosion
Investment materials
Casting
Casting Defects
Dental ceramics
Porcelain fused to metal
Types of ceramics
Aluminous porcelain+ Y-TZP
Porcelain fused to metal
Metals and alloys
Eutectic and Gold alloys
Wrought Alloys+ Base metal alloys
Synthetic polymers
Denture base polymers+ Lining materials.
Elastic impression materials
Non elastic impression materials
Dental Cements
Glass Ionomer Cements
Amalgam
Dentin Bonding Agents
Siloranes
MODULE : DM 7009 (02 Credit Hours)
SUBJECT: Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Dentistry
Lecture Topics
No.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
29
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Introduction
Types of grafts
Strategies for tissue engineering
Guided tissue regeneration
Cell induction
Scaffold matrices
Functional 3D cell supports and scaffold
Complex in-vitro models and culture techniques
Cells within scaffold matrices
Stem cells-I
Stem cells-II
Stem cells biology
Biomaterials and scaffolds
Biological materials
Ceramic and glass materials
Polymeric materials
Cell culture techniques
Oral tissue repair and regeneration
Tissue engineered dental tissues-I
Tissue engineered dental tissues-II
Tissue engineered dental tissues-III
Tissue engineering approaches for regenerative
dentistry-I
Tissue engineering for periodontal diseases.
Molecular aspects of tissue engineering-I
Molecular aspects of tissue engineering-II
Tissue engineering of craniofacial tissues
SHED
Dental pulp tissue engineering
Bone and cartilage tissue engineering
Tissue Engineering Impact on dentistry
MODULE : DM 7010 (02 Credit Hours)
SUBJECT: Bio-material Testing
Sr
No.
1
Topics
UV Spectrophotometery-I
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
UV Spectrophotometery-I
High Performance Liquid Chromatography
Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectroscopy-I
Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectroscopy-II
Mechanical Testing-I
Mechanical Testing-II
Universal Testing Machine
Flexural strength measurement-I
Flexural strength measurement-II
Hardness testing
Fatigue strength measurement
Tensile strength testing
Impact strength testing
Optical Microscopy
Scanning electron microscopy-I
Scanning electron microscopy-II
Physical testing-I
Physical testing-II
Thermophysical testing
Thermal testing -DSC, DMTA,TMA
Tests for corrosion
Biological testing
Microbiological tests
Sensitivity tests
Biochemical testing
x-ray diffraction spectroscopy
Peel off strength testing
In-vivo testing-I
In-vivo testing-II
SEMESTER 4
MODULE : (8 Credit Hours)
SUBJECT: Research and Thesis
5.0
5.1
Criterion 3: Laboratories and Computing Facilities
Standard 3-1
Laboratory manuals/documentation/instructions for experiments must
be available and easily accessible to faculty and students.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
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Laboratory In-charge is the custodian of all the manuals and instructions
concerning his laboratory. Its copies are also available with the Program
Coordinator to be used by the faculty and students. These manuals and
instructions are issued to desired entity through a defined process and
proper record is maintained. The laboratory in-charge keeps the manuals
and instructions in laboratory for immediate access to students and faculty
members during the laboratory work.
Laboratory equipment and facilities in IIDC are equally good and
comparable to any high reputed university of the country.
5.2
Standard 3-2
There must be support personal for instruction and maintaining the
laboratories.
Each laboratory is authorized two staff members, and Laboratory Attendant.
Laboratory in-charge is responsible for overall maintenance of laboratory
while laboratory Attendant is responsible to maintain the laboratory
equipment and general duties within the lab.
5.3
Standard 3-3
The University computing infrastructure and facilities must be
adequate to support program’s objectives.
The computing facilities in IIDC are adequate with latest computers &
software that support students to fulfill their education requirements. The
facilities can be compared with any high reputed university of the country.
Riphah is running a comprehensive Campus Management System. It
facilitates the faculty members in maintaining the attendance record,
examination schedules, time tables and student’s data
6.0
Criterion 4: Student Support and Advising
Since the launch of Riphah in year 2002, all its programs have started and
finished on schedule. The culture in Riphah is that teachers and students
have facility of frequent interaction, even after classes, for any professional
and academic advice. This aspect is even highlighted and indicated by the
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
32
students in the feedback on HEC Performa number 10, taken by the Quality
Enhancement Cell (QEC) in the university.
6.1
Standard 4-1
Courses must be offered with sufficient frequency and number for
students to complete the program in a timely manner.
The courses are offered in a logical sequence that grooms the students to
obtain the program’s defined objectives and outcomes.
6.2
Standard 4-2
Courses in the major area of study must be structured to ensure
effective
interaction
between
students,
faculty
and
teaching
assistants.
All courses in the program are taught by the single faculty member. Courses
are structured in the board of studies before commencement of each
semester. Faculty members interact frequently among themselves and with
students. Students are encouraged to participate in providing feedback and
their views about course contents during and after the classes.
6.3
Standard 4-3
Guidance on how to complete the program must be available to all
students and access to qualified advising must be available to make
course decisions and career choices.
Students are informed about the program requirements at the start of the
session during orientation week by in-charge program and QEC staff. InCharge Program acts as advisor to guide students to choose appropriate
courses and also provide guidance on different issues. He also maintains a
list of guidance points provided to students during the semester and
program, which is being evaluated at the end of the program to take
necessary improvement.
In-charge student’s affair provides professional counseling to students
when needed. Students can get in touch directly with him/her for any
advice.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
33
In charge Industrial Liaison arranges industrial tours for students to improve
their subject vision and technical know-how. He/She also invites
professionals from different business entities to conduct interactive
sessions with students for advice on professional matters/future career
planning.
Program coordinator maintains a list of professional societies and technical
bodies, that is provided to students on demand and students can get
membership of such organizations on individual basis.
7.0
7.1
Criterion 5: Process Control
Standard 5-1
The process by which students are admitted to the program must be
based on quantitative and qualitative criteria and clearly documented.
This process must be periodically evaluated to ensure that it is
meeting its objectives.
To be eligible for admission to MDS and M.Phil, a candidate having BDS
degree or its equivalent in the relevant discipline from PMDC & HEC
recognized University and Institution. Anyone who has been rusticated or
expelled by any University or college for misconduct or for use of unfair
means in the examinations or any offence involving moral turpitude shall
not be eligible for admission in the MS/M. Phil program.
7.2
Standard 5-2
The process by which students are registered in the program and
monitoring of students’ progress to ensure timely completion of the
program must be documented. This process must be periodically
evaluated to ensure that it is meeting its objectives.
The student’s name, after completion of the admission process, is
forwarded to the Registrar office for registration in the specific program and
the registration number is issued.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
34
Students are evaluated through assignments, sessionals, mid-term tests,
course presentations and final examinations at the end of each semester.
The Research work is done in 3rd and 4th semester and contributes
significantly towards the student’s evaluation for the program. Only qualified
students in each semester are allowed to join the next semester.
7.3
Standard 5-3
The process of recruiting and retaining highly qualified faculty
members must be in place and clearly documented. Also processes
and procedures for faculty evaluation, promotion must be consistent
with institution mission statement. These processes must be
periodically evaluated to ensure that it is meeting with its objectives.
Vacant and newly created positions are advertised in the national
newspapers, applications are received by the Registrar office, scrutinized
by the respective Deans, and call letters are issued to the short-listed
candidates on the basis of experience, qualification, publications and other
qualities/activities as determined by the University in the light of HEC
guidelines.
The candidates are interviewed by the University Selection Board. Selection
of candidates is approved by the BOG. Induction of new candidates
depends upon the number of approved vacancies. HEC also helps RIPHAH
in enrolling the foreign faculty.
Faculty members are retained by giving them good remuneration, favorable
teaching environment, research facilities and management support.
On yearly basis faculty performance is evaluated basing on HEC Performa
number 10 by the students, Deans recommendations and with the counter
signature of vice chancellor and pro chancellor. The annual increment is
based on the recommendations of the Dean and the vice chancellor.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
35
7.4
Standard 5-4
The process and procedures used to ensure that teaching and
delivery of course material to the students emphasizes active learning
and that course learning outcomes are met. The process must be
periodically evaluated to ensure that it is meeting its objectives.
Students are the recipient of the delivery of course material, through their
teachers. The program is actively evaluated by Dean, In Charge program
and QEC. The feedback of the taught is best instrument to measure that the
course learning outcomes are met. The students give feedback on
Performa number 1 regarding course contents and how it was delivered.
Through Performa number 10, students evaluate and comment on
teacher’s efforts, put in to deliver the course contents, his general conduct
in the class, the environment, he, maintains and extra efforts, he makes to
satisfy students, thirst for knowledge.
Faculty feedback is also taken on HEC Performa number 2 (Faculty Course
Review Report – (Annexure L)) and Performa number 5 (Faculty Survey –
(Annexure-G)) which is a very useful activity to evaluate the course
contents, learning and teaching environments and overall teachers
satisfaction level. Course evaluation by teachers also indicates what
percentage of desired outcome has been achieved by the course contents
and what needs to be improved or changed.
This exercise is done once a year. The feedback is discussed with Dean
and In-charge program, who focus on making improvements in the weak
areas, identified by the students. Teacher’s evaluation performs are fed to
the computer and bar charts are made. Each teacher is graded out of 5
marks. The comparative bar charts indicate level of performance of
teachers, as visualized by the students. QEC formally submits these bar
charts to Dean and Vice Chancellor for their information and taking of
necessary corrective actions.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
36
7.5
Standard 5-5
The process that ensures that graduates have completed the
requirements of the program must be based on standards, effective
and
clearly
documented
procedures.
This
process
must
be
periodically evaluated to ensure that it is meeting its objectives.
The program is run on semester basis and at the end of each semester
examinations are held to evaluate the students progress in that semester.
Qualified students are allowed to join next semester and this cycle
continues till the end of 4th semester which is the final semester. At the end
of 4th semester all students are required to submit their respective Thesis
and clear their viva voce examination. Student’s final results are announced
on the basis of viva voce results and examination results.
Requirements of this standard are met through 3 Performas issued by HEC.
The feedback is documented and its evaluation indicates degree of
satisfaction of the graduates. Three forms (Performa 3, Survey of
Graduating Students (Annexure-F), Performs 7, Alumni Survey (AnnexureA) and Performa 8, Employer Survey (Annexure-B)) are extremely good
instruments to measure the program outcomes.
The feedback is taken on yearly basis. The suggestions given by the
graduating students and graduates working in the industry are given due
weightage. For example a few graduates through Alumni survey indicated
that communication and proposal writing skills, in program, may be
increased. The proposal is being evaluated by Board of FHMS and
recommendations are being made to Academic Council to grant approval
for change in syllabi.
The feedback of employers has been achieved. Generally, they are
satisfied; however, they have recommended that graduates be given more
practice in business communication and proposal writing skills. This is also
being processed to make changes in syllabi.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
37
8.0
8.1
Criterion 6: Faculty
Standard 6-1
There must be enough full time faculties who are committed to the
program to provide adequate coverage of the program areas/courses
with continuity and stability. The interests and qualifications of all
faculty members must be sufficient to teach all courses, plan, modify
and update courses and curricula. All faculty members must have a
level of competence that would normally be obtained through
graduate work in the discipline. The majority of the faculty must hold a
Ph.D. in the discipline.
8.2
Standard 6-2
All faculty members must remain current in the discipline and
sufficient time must be provided for scholarly activities and
professional development. Also, effective programs for faculty
development must be in place. Effective Programs for Faculty
Development
Faculty concurrency in the discipline is determined based on the criterion
set by the University in the light of HEC guidelines. All faculty members
submit their professional resumes on HEC Performa number 9 (Faculty
Resume, Annexure-H) once a year. This information is compared with the
existing criterion set by university for the concurrency of the post.
All full time faculty members are allocated teaching hours as per HEC
defined limit which enables the faculty to have enough spare time to
perform scholarly activities and improve their knowledge and skills.
Faculty members are provided with adequate resources for research and
academic activities. Every faculty members has been provided with
computer system and access to internet. Faculty members have also
access to library materials for academic and research activities.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
38
Professional training is also provided to faculty if required to enhance their
capabilities.
University has defined the development programs for faculty members
under the arrangement of RARE (Riphah Academy of Research and
Education). RARE holds frequent interactive sessions of junior and senior
faculty to discuss teaching methodology with a view to train the young
faculty members. This practice is done on yearly basis during the summer
vacations. After every 2 year the development program is analyzed in
Deans Council for its effectiveness and necessary improvements.
The university encourages the faculty to participate in research activities by
providing them sufficient financial support within or outside university.
8.3
Standard 6-3
All faculty members should be motivated and have job satisfaction to
excel in their profession.
Faculty
members
are
motivated
through
public
appreciation
and
documented appreciation (annual performance evaluation report) by the InCharge Program and Dean on regular basis.
The faculty survey of the program using HEC Performa number 5 indicates
the mix reactions of the faculty, which indicates that teaching load be
distributed evenly and more relaxed environment be generated. Cumulative
results of faculty surveys are attached in Annexure G.
9.0
9.1
Criterion 7: Institutional Facilities
Standard 7-1
The institution must have the infrastructure to support new trends in
learning such as e-learning.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
39
The university has provided e-learning facilities to faculty members and
students. Each faculty member has a computer system with access to
internet and e-learning library section.
Students have been provided a number of computer systems in the library
to access e-learning section. Every student has been provided with user ID
to access the e-learning resources from within the university library. The
university library is linked with foreign universities libraries through internet.
The support staff to look after the e-learning resources is sufficient in
number, trained and responsive. The university has provided enough
funding to support the e-learning.
9.2
Standard 7-2
The library must possess an up-to-date technical collection relevant to
the program and must be adequately staffed with professional
personnel.
The university library has enough program related technical books in hard
copies to support the program learning. The internet access to the external
universities libraries provides opportunities to the students and faculty to
obtain knowledge from their technical resources.
The library is staffed with more than 8 professionals to help students and
faculty members to get access to required book or learning material
efficiently.
9.3
Standard 7-3
Class-rooms must be adequately equipped and offices must be
adequate to enable faculty to carry out their responsibilities.
Enough class rooms are available to run the program as per desired
schedule. In few class rooms, there is a need of up-gradation of multimedia
and other resources. The work orders have been initiated and procurement
process is in progress.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
40
10.0
Criterion 8: Institutional Support
10.1 Standard 8-1
There must be sufficient support and financial resources to attract
and retain high quality faculty and provide the means for them to
maintain competence as teachers and scholars.
University allocates enough financial resources each year to hire competent
faculty as required.
As already listed in standard 5-3, Faculty members are retained by giving
them good remuneration, favorable teaching environment, research facilities
and management support.
As listed in standard 6-2, Faculty members are provided with adequate
resources for research
and academic activities to maintain
their
competence. Every faculty members has been provided with computer
system and access to internet. Faculty members have also access to library
materials for academic and research activities. Professional training is also
provided to faculty if required to enhance their capabilities.
10.2 Standard 8-2
There must be an adequate number of high quality graduate students,
research assistants and Ph.D. students.
The university follows the guidelines of HEC for admission in this program.
The number of graduate students during the last three years is 6 with no
research assistants.
10.3 Standard 8-3
Financial resources must be provided to acquire and maintain Library
holdings, laboratories and computing facilities.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
41
Library at RIPHAH holds more than 60000 books for all programs. Sufficient
number of computers are available to be used by the students. Library is
organized to accommodate 50 students (male, female) in research cubicles
as well as in the common places. Separate common rooms for male and
female students are available with internet facility.
Laboratories at RIPHAH holds adequate equipment to be used by the
students to carry out desired experiments and laboratory work. Each year a
handful of budget is allocated for laboratories to maintain and upgrade the
equipment and other facilities.
Computing facilities at RIPHAH provide excellent platform to students to
enhance their learning capabilities. There are 2 computer laboratories in
Faculty of computing, which are accessible to all students for their use.
11.0
Conclusion
The self assessment report of the Islamic International Dental College
(IIDC), Riphah International University, Islamabad is an important
document, which gives strengths and weaknesses of the program. The
management is striving hard to improve infrastructure for establishment of
conducive environments for studies. The faculty is focused on imparting
quality education, introduction of new and innovative techniques and
conduct of quality research to produce competent dentists. The report has
been prepared after evaluating the program in the light of 8 criterion and
31 standards given in HEC’s Self Assessment Manual. The program
mission objectives and outcomes are assessed and strategic plans are
presented to achieve the goal, which are again measurable through
definite standards. Teachers’ evaluation revealed satisfactory standards.
Alumni surveys revealed variable results with regards to knowledge,
interpersonal skills, management and leadership skill. Weaknesses are
identified which are related to space, laboratories and equipment.
Improvements in curriculum design and infrastructure are suggested
which are based upon set, well defined and approved criteria.
Examinations are held on schedules, academic schemes are prepared
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
42
well in advance, transparent admission, registration and recruiting policy,
excellent student teacher ratio are some of the strong areas of this
program. The numbers of courses along with titles and credit hours for
each semester, course contents for degree program, are thoroughly
planned. Their efficacy was measured through different standards and it
was found to be satisfactory.
The facilities and shortcomings in the laboratory have been discussed. It
was concluded that laboratory facilities and class rooms need further
improvement. The need of refreshal courses for the fresh faculty on
method of teaching cannot be over emphasized.
Proper steps are taken to guide the students for program requirements,
communication,
meetings,
tutorial
system,
tours,
students-teacher
interaction etc. Some improvements have been suggested. As regards the
process control covering admission, registration, recruiting policy, courses
and delivery of material, academic requirements, performance and
grading, university, PM & DC as well as Higher Education Commission
have set forth proper rules, which are properly followed. At present
amongst a total of 21, there are 15 faculty members who are highly
qualified in their fields. However, faculty members need motivation for
advanced knowledge, research and external training.
Institutional facilities were measured through Criterion 3; infrastructure,
library, class room and faculty offices and in each case, short comings and
limitation are highlighted. Institutional facilities need to be strengthened.
Accordingly, institutional support will greatly promote and strengthen
academic, research, management and leadership capabilities.
In conclusion, the strong and weak areas of the program are as under:11.1 M.Phil Dental Materials program Strong and Weak Points
M.Phil Dental Materials program is designed to educate students to meet
the challenges of the modern world and present market needs. During the
execution of the program several observations were made that can be
categorized as strong and weak points of the program. These points are
listed below:
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
43
M.Phil Dental Materials Program Strong Points:

Pakistan Medical and Dental Council & HEC rules fully followed

Pre-requisites fully observed

Program Design, development and organization are based upon set,
well defined and approved criteria

Examinations on schedule

Academic Schemes fully prepared in advance

The number of courses along with their titles and credit hours for each
semester, course contents for degree program are fully planned

Transparent admission, registration and recruiting policy

Excellent Students-Teacher Ratio
M.Phil Dental Materials program Weak Points:

Inadequate space in the research lab for students.

Inadequate chemicals and equipment in the labs for students.

New & State of the art equipment for Labs.

Need to improve the computer facilities to all the research students.

Refresher Courses for Teachers

Need to improve the research papers published by students/faculty.

Need to improve Canteen facility for faculty and students
****************
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
44
Annexure – A:
Employer Survey Results
Not Applicable – No Graduate
Annexure – B:
Alumni Survey Results
Not Applicable – No Graduate
Annexure – C:
Students Course Evaluation
Course:
MDS Dental Materials
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
45
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
46
Annexure – D:
Students Teachers Evaluation
Teachers:
Dr. Alia
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
47
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
48
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
49
Annexure – E:
Research Papers List
PUBLICATIONS BY DEPARTMENT OF ORAL &
MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY, 2011 TILL DATE
PUBLICATIONS BY DEPARTMENT OF ORTHODONTICS
No
.
Ye
ar
1
201
1
2
201
1
3
201
1
4
201
1
5
201
2
6
201
3
7
201
3
Authorship
Dr. M. Azhar Sheikh
Mehreen Riaz
Amber Kiyani
Dr. M. Azhar Sheikh
Dr. Ulfat Bashir
Dr. Owais Khalid
Rafia A. Lahoti
Mohsin Fazal
Dr. M. Azhar Sheikh
Amber Kiyani
Anum Shafiq
Dr. M. Azhar Sheikh
Adnan Mehdi
Seema Shafiq
Zainab Rafiq
Dr. M. Azhar Sheikh
Adnan Mehdi
Seema Shafiq
Mehreen Riaz
M. Azhar Sheikh
Mehreen Riaz
Seema Shafiq
Dr. M. Azhar Sheikh
Asma Parvez 1st Author
Mamoona Malik
Article
Categor
y of
article
Journal
Category by
HEC
Resection , rehabilitative
challenge Restoration of
function and aesthetic
Case
Report
Journal of Dental Research
J Dent Res # 90 (Spec IssB): Abstract
151871, Div/Pakistan/2011
Evaluation of secondary Al.
bone grafting
Original
PODJ
Vol.31; No.2; Dec.2011 (246-248)
Y
Removal of 3rd Molars –
should we have guidelines
for surgery
Original
PODJ
Vol.31; No.2; Dec.2011 (273-274)
Y
Hereditary Gingival
Fibromatosis
Case
Report
Journal of Pakistan dental Association
JPDA Vol.20; No.1; Jan-Mar.2011.
Y
Success & Evaluation of
Dental Implant Patients at
Islamic International Dental
College
Incidence of distal caries in
mandibular second molars
due to impacted third
molars-a clinical &
radiographic study
Incidence of alveoloplasty
and its indications protocol
to reduce the incidence
PODJ Vol.32; No.1 April 2012 (10-15)
Original
W
Y
Original
Pakistan oral & dental journal Vol, 32
No. 3 (364-370)
Y
Original
PODJ Vol:33,No.2
August 2013
Y
Total = 07
No. of publication
No. of categories including W
or ISI or impact factor
06
01
12.0
Local data publications
Other than IIDC
publications
Common
05
01
2011 TILL DATE
Sr.
No
Year
Authorship
1st/2nd/3rd/4th
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
Article
Category of
Article
Journal
Catego
ry by
HEC
50
Impact
Factor
1
2011
Owais Khalid
Ulfat Bashir
Noeen Arshad
Fabrication and Evaluation
of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA
Resin with Various Amounts
of Silane Coated Silica for
Orthodontic Use.”
Original
The European
Journal of
Orthodontics
(EJO:
doi:10.1093/ejo/c
jq159)
W
2
2011
Sohrab Shahid
Ayesha Iftikhar
Ghulam Rasool
Ulfat Bashir
Accuracy Of Linear
Cephalometric
Measurements With Scanned
Lateral Cephalograms
Original
Y
3
2011
Ahsan Mahmood Shah
Ulfat Bashir
Tasleem Ilyas
Original
4
2011
c
Nomaan Nasir
Sarah Ali
Ulfat Bashir
Atta Ullah
The Shape and Size of Sella
Turcica in Skeletal class I, II
and III Patients Presenting at
Islamic International Dental
Hospital, Islamabad
Effect of Orthodontic
Treatment on Periodontal
Health
5
2011
Seem Zahid, Ulfat
Bashir, Noeen Arshad
Assessment of Orthodontic
Treatment Need at Islamic
International Dental Hospital
Islamabad
Original
6
2011
Syeda Rabbab Hasan &
Ulfat Bashir Raja
Correlation Among Different
Profile Planes Used To
Evaluate Lower Lip Position
Original
7
2011
Omer Hafeez Kaleem &
Ulfat Bashir
Frequency of Cleft Lip and
Palate and Associated Dental
Anomalies at Islamic
International Dental
Hospital, Islamabad
Original
Pakistan Oral &
Dental Journal
(PODJ
2011;31(1):6872)
Pakistan Oral &
Dental Journal
(PODJ
2011;31(1):104110)
Pakistan Oral &
Dental Journal
(PODJ
2011;31(1):111114)
Pakistan
Orthodontic
Journal
(POJ
2009;1(2):29-33)
(ISSN: 20740069) (Under
Publication)
Pakistan Oral &
Dental Journal
PODJ:2011; 31,
332 - 35
Pakistan Oral &
Dental Journal
PODJ:2011; 31,
352 - 56
8
2011
Ayesha
Ulfat Bashir
Sohrab Shaheed
Nasal Morphology As An
Indicator Of Vertical
Maxillary Skeletal Pattern In
Pakistani Population
Original
Pakistan Oral &
Dental Journal
(PODJ Under
Publication)
Y
9
2012
c
Nomaan Nasir
Sarah Ali .Yawar Hayat
Khan,Ulfat Bashir
Effect of crown margin
location on Gingival Health
Original
10
2012
c
Prevalence of gingivitis in
patients visiting Islamic
International Dental Hospital
Original
11
2012
c
Sarah Ali
Nomaan Nasir
Ulfat Bashir
Abida Masood
Nomaan Nasir
Sarah Ali Yawar Hayat
Khan Ulfat Bashir
Oral Health Status of
Patients visiting IIDH
Original
The Professional
Medical Journal
Professional Med
J Jan-Feb 2012;
19(1):123-128
Annals of PIMS
Ann. Pak. Inst.
Med. Sci. 2012;
8(2): 150-152
Annals of PIMS
Ann. Pak. Inst.
Med. Sci. 2012;
8(1): 27-30
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
Original
Perio
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Z
Z
51
1.022
12
13
2011
c
Nomaan Nasir,
.Sarah Ali,
Ulfat Bashir,
Atta Ullah
Effect of orthodontic
treatment on periodontal
health
Original
2012
Owais Khalid Durrani,
Ulfat Bashir
Custom made nickel titanium
intrusion arch; fabrication
and evaluation
Original
Pakistan Oral &
Dental Journal
Volume 31.No 1
June 2011:11114
International
Journal
of Orthodontics
Y
W
(Impact
Factor
0.893)
(IJO:2012; 23(4),
51-54)
14
2012
Ibad Ullah, Ulfat Bashir
Applicability Of Tanaka And
Johnston Mixed Dentition
Analysis In Patients
Reporting To Islamic
International Dental College,
Islamabad
Original
Pakistan Oral &
Dental Journal
(PODJ ) Vol 82,
No. 2 (August)
Y
15
2012
Ibad Ullah, Ulfat Bashir
Bolton Tooth Size Analysis
of Pakistanis
Ages 13 to 20 Years in
Islamabad City
Original
Y
16
2012
Ulfat Bashir
Lesson Plan On New
Method Of Teeth
Identification Introduced at
Dental Schools in Malaysia
and Pakistan
Original
Pakistan Oral &
Dental Journal
(PODJ) Vol 82,
No. 8
(December)
December, 2012
Journal Dental
Education, Vol
76, No.12, page
1691-96
17
2013
c
Faisal Shafiq Malik
Ulfat Bashir
Dental anxiety among
children of age between 5 to
10 years visiting a teaching
dental hospital in Islamabad
Pakistan
Original
Y
18
2013
Ulfat Bashir
Seem Zahid
Sohrab Shaheed
Bolton tooth size analysis of
Pakistanis of 13 to 20 years
in Islamabad city
Original
19
2014
Zain ul Abadeen
Perception and attitudes of
dental students towards
obesity
Original
Under
Publication
Journal of Ayub
Medical college
No. JAMC/
Accept/12-263
Published in
2015
Pakistan oral &
dental journal
Vol, 32 No. 3
(421-426)
International
Dental Journal
20
2014
Saba
Ulfat Bashir
COMPARISON OF UPPER
PHARYNGEAL AIRWAY
SPACE IN CLASS II AND
CLASS III
MALOCCLUSION CASES
Original
Under
Publication
Pakistan
Orthodontic
Journal
21
2015
Zain ul Abadeen
Knowledge, perception and
attitudes of dental students
towards obesity
Accepted
The Saudi Dental
Journal.
SDENTJ 203
5th May 2015
22
2016
Zain ul Abadeen
Association of smoking and
periodontics in Pakistan
Review
International
Dental Journal of
hygiene
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
W
(Impact
Factor
0.893)
Y
W
52
0.654
23
2015
Ulfat Bashir
Challenges to ponder upon
Editorial
Pakistan
Orthodontics
Journal
Vol. 7 No.1 June
2015
24
2015
Madiha Mahnoor
Ulfat Bashir
Owais Durrani
Saba Yousaf Sheikh
Effect of two different oral
hygiene motivation methods
on gingival health of patients
with fixed orthodontic
appliances
Original
Pakistan
Orthodontics
Journal
Vol. 7 No.1 June
2015
Palwasha Babar Basharat
Ullah
Anser Maxood
Ulfat Bashir
Regional odontogysplasia :
report of an unusual case
Short
Communication
Pakistan
Orthodontics
Journal
Vol. 7 No.1 June
2015
25
Total = 25
No. of publication
No. of categories
including W or ISI or
impact factor
14
05
13.0
Other than IIDC
publications
Local data
publications
09
Common
06
PUBLICATIONS BY DEPARTMENT OF
COMMUNITY DENTISTRY 2011 TILL DATE
No.
Year
Authorship
Article
Category of
Article
1
2011
Attaullah
PREVALENCE OF DENTAL ANXIETY
AMONG UNIVERSITY
STUDENTS IN ISLAMABAD, PAKISTAN
Original
2
2011
Attaullah
Summan Dost
Ayesha Naseem
Komal Siddiq
Prevalence of Dental Fluorosis in Mianwali and
Mardan Districts
Original
3
2011
Fahd Dogar
Estie Kruger
Marc Tennant
Presence of early childhood caries in Preschool
children in rural western Australia
Original
4
2013
c
Faisal Shafiq Malik
Ulfat Bashir
Dental anxiety among children of age between 5 to
10 years visiting a teaching dental hospital in
Islamabad Pakistan
Original
5
2012
Muhammad Humza
Bin Saeed
Knowledge and practice of behavioral
management principles among dentists treating
adults with learning disabilities
Original
6
2013
c
Muhammad Humza
Bin Saeed
Shakeel Kazmi
Faisal Moeen
The role of state in provision of health care
Original
PREVALENCE OF STRESS AND BURNOUT
7
2013
Dr. Humza Bin Saeed
AMONG DENTISTS OFRAWALPINDI &
ISLAMABAD
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
Original
Journal
Journal of Khyber
college of dentistry
JKCD 2011;1(1):1-7.
Journal of Cosmetics,
Dermatological
Sciences and
Applications,
2011, 1, 106-109
doi:10.4236/jcdsa.20
11.13016 Published
Online August 2011
(http://www.SciRP.or
g/journal/jcdsa)
Australian Journal Of
Rural Health
September 2011
Journal of Ayub
Medical college
No. JAMC/
Accept/12-263
Published in 2015
Special Care in
Dentistry 32(5) 2012
The health
The health 2013; 4
(2):
20-23
Pakistan Oral &
Dental Journal Vol
33, No. 3 (December
2013)
53
Category
by HEC
Z
W
W
Y
W
8
2013
c
10
2014
9
2014
c
11
2014
12
2014
13
2015
Muhammad Humza
Bin Saeed
Shakeel Kazmi
Faisal Moeen
Dr. Robina Tasleem
Dr. Humza Bin Saeed
Dr. Muhammad Umer
Faisal Moeen
Khurram Ataulah
Muhammad Hamza
bin Saeed
Muhammad Saeed
Saleha Nisar
Muhammad Saad
Farzeen Tanwir
Pakiza Haider
Muhammad Humza
Bin Saeed
Muhammad Hamza
bin Saeed
Nida Ovais
Anum Zehrs
Yusuf Bhatti
Farida Pervez
Muhammad Humza
Bin Saeed
Muhammad Humza
Bin Saeed
Anum Zehra Khan ,
Nageen Akhtar ,
Sundas Tanveer,
Summayya Mehbub,
Rabbia Sana, Alina
Qureshi
Ayesha Absar, Rohma,
Saira, Rija ,
Muhammad Humza
Bin Saeed, Anum
Zehra
Clinical audits and its role in the practice of
Dentistry
JIIMC Vol. 8 no. 3
December 2013
Original
J Ayub Med Coll
abbotabad 2013:25(34)
Effect of variations in buccal thickness
Original
Pakistan Oral &
Dental Journal Vol
34, No. 2 (June)
Page-386-396
Host modulation therapeutics in periodontics role
as an adjunctive periodontal therapy
Review
Article
Journal of CPSP
Appropriateness of relying on tooth brushing as a
caries prevention method
Review
Article
JIIMC
Vol:9 N:2 July 2014
Oral Cancer screening and its implementation in
Pakistan
Editorial
JIIMC 2015 vol.10 ,
No.2
An assessment of Dentists’ Oral Health
Original article
JIIMC 2015 vol.10 ,
No.2
An insight into antibiotic prescription practices of
post-graduate dentists, discerned through a clinical
dental audit
Original article
JIIMC 2015 vol.10 ,
No.2
Fareha Liaqat
Muhammad Humza
Bin Saeed, Anum
Zehra
An assessment of dentists knowledge of evidence
based terms
Original article
JIIMC 2015 vol.10 ,
No.2
17
Zainab asif, Syeda
Mehar Raza, Neha
Rana, Tehreem Zafar,
Anum Zehra,
Muhammad Humza
Bin Saeed
An assessment of association between carbonated
drink consumption and dental caries prevalence: a
cross-sectional study
Original article
JIIMC 2015 vol.10 ,
No.2
18
Dr. Bushra Tahir
Dr. Maryam Nazir
Dr. Humza Bin Saeed
Dr. Anum Zehra
2015
14
2015
15
Comparison of complete denture fabricated by two
different border molding materials in terms of
patients satisfaction
Original
2015
16
2015
2015
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
Risk factors assessment for dry sockets a logistics
regression analysis
Original article
Journal of Oral &
Maxillofacial
Surgery, Medicine ,
and Pathology 2015
JOMSMP:384
54
Y
Total= 17
No. of categories including W
or ISI or impact factor
No. of publication
08
14.0
Local data publications
04
Other than IIDC
publications
Common
09
04
PUBLICATIONS BY DEPARTMENT
OF OPERATIVE DENTISTRY, 2011 TILL DATE
S.N
o.
Yea
r
1.
2011
2.
2012
3
2013
4
2014
5
2014
6
2014
7
8
Article
Catego
ry of
article
Journal
Category by
HEC
Pre-clinical operative dentistry- student
viewpoints
Original
Pakistan Oral & Dental Journal
PODJ 2011;31(2):447-52
Y
Accuracy of self Evaluation of Crown
Preparations by 2nd Year Pre-Clinical
Students
Original
Indications for conventional root canal
therapy in patients examined at
Ebadullah Raidullah
Original
Pakistan oral & dental journal
Vol, 32 No. 3
(526-530)
Quality of clinical feedback:
perceptions of final year undergraduate
students versus their supervisors
Original
JIIMC Vol. 9 no. 1 April 2014
Frequency of postoperative sensitivity
in posterior class I composite
restoration
Original
Pakistan oral & dental journal
Vol, 34 No. 3
(September 2014)
Y
Original
Pakistan oral & dental journal
Vol, 34 No. 4
(Dec 2014)
Y
Original
Pakistan oral & dental journal
Vol, 34 No. 4
(Dec 2014)
Y
Original
Pakistan oral & dental journal
Vol, 34 No. 4
(Dec 2014)
Y
Authorship
Alia Ahmed
Maryam Abida
Adil Shahnawaz
Alia Ahmed
Sana Jalil
Marya Sikandar
Osama Khatak
Arvin Sing kohli
Ebadullah
Raidullah
Alia Ahmed
Muhammad
Ahmed
Usman Anwar
Bhatti
Alia Ahmed
Qasim Javed
Maria Sikandar
Alia Ahmed
Sana Jalil
2014
Muhammad
Nabeel
Alia Ahmed
Maria Sikander
2014
Sana Jalil
Alia Ahmed
Muhammad
Nabeel
Accuracy of electronic apex locator in
determining the working length of
primary molars with root resorption
A comparison of the anesthetic
efficiency of lidocine and anticline for
buccal infiltration in patients with acute
irreversible pulpits in max fist
premolars
Comparison of premedication of
lornoxican and Ibuprofen on the
success of inferior alveolar nerve block
in patients with irreversible pulpitis
Pakistan Oral & Dental Journal
Y
Y
Total= 08
No. of publication
No. of categories
including W or ISI or
impact factor
08
15.0
Local data
publications
Other than IIDC publications
Common
08
0
PUBLICATIONS BY DEPARTMENT
OF PERIODONTOLOGY, 2011 TILL DATE
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
55
Sr.No
1
Year
2011
2
2012
3
2012
4
5
2012
2012
Article
Category
of
Article
Journal
Effect of orthodontic treatment on
periodontal health
Original
Pakistan Oral & Dental Journal
Volume 31.No 1 june 2011:11114
Effect of crown margin location on
Gingival Health
Original
The Professional Medical
Journal
Professional Med J Jan-Feb
2012; 19(1):123-128
Oral Health Status of Patients visiting IIDH
Original
Annals of PIMS
Ann. Pak. Inst. Med. Sci. 2012;
8(1): 27-30
Z
Periodontal tissue destruction in patients
Original
The Professional Medical
Journal
Professional Med J July-Aug
2012; 19(4): 522-526
Y
Prevalence of gingivitis in patients visiting
Islamic International Dental Hospital
Original
Annals of PIMS
Ann. Pak. Inst. Med. Sci. 2012;
8(2): 150-152
Z
Authorship
1st/2nd 3rd
Nomaan
Nasir,
.Sarah Ali,
Ulfat Bashir,
Atta Ullah
Nomaan
Nasir
Sarah Ali
.Yawar
Hayat
Khan,Ulfat
Bashir
Nomaan
Nasir
Sarah Ali
Yawar
Hayat
Khan Ulfat
Bashir
Dr. Sarah
Ali
Dr. Noman
Nasir
Brig. Kabir
Ahmed
Sarah Ali
Nomaan
Nasir
Ulfat Bashir
Abida
Masood
Category by
HEC
Y
Y
Total = 05
No. of publication
No. of categories
16.0
including W or ISI or
impact factor
Local data publications
17.0
01
Other than IIDC
publications
Common
01
04
PUBLICATIONS BY DEPARTMENT
OF PROSTHODONTICS, 2011 TILL DATE
No.
Year
Authorship
Article
Category of article
Journal
Category
by HEC
1
2011
Brig Dr.
Kabir Ahmad
Azad Ali
Azad
Qayyum
Akhtar
CIE L* A* B* Values of
Cervical, Middle and Incisal
Segments of Permanent
Maxillary Central Incisors
Original
JPDA 2010; 19(2): 116-120
Y
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
56
2
2012
c
Brig Dr.
Kabir Ahmed
Dr. Sara Ali
Dr. Noman
Nasir
Periodontal tissue destruction
in patients
Original
The Professional Medical Journal
Professional Med J July-Aug 2012;
19(4): 522-526
Y
3
2014
Postpubertal cherubism with
noonan syndrome
Original
Journal of CPSP 2014 May. vol.24
special supplement 1 : S39-S40
W
4
2014
JIMDS
2014
2014
Tooth agenesis in human
population
Part I: clinical & diagnostic
considerations
Tooth agenesis in human
population
Part II: Treatment
considerations in subjects
with tooth agenesis
Influence of literacy level on
pretreatment expectations of
patients seeking removable
dentures
Under process
5
Dr. Bilal
Ahmed
Dr.
Muhammad
Amin
Dr. Bilal
Ahmed
Dr.Mehmood
Dr.Yazdanie
Dr. Bilal
Ahmed
Dr.Mehmood
Dr.Yazdanie
6
7
8
2014
2014
2014
Dr. Salman
Ahmad
Dr. Bilal
Ahmed, Dr.
Ahmad , Dr.
Ishaq, Dr.
Bano , Dr.
Zahra
Dr. Bilal
Ahmed
Dr. Bilal
Ahmed
A new design and techniques
of nasoalveolar molding for
managent of cleft lip and
palate in infants
Prosthodontics rehabilitation
of papillon Lefebvre
syndrome. A case report
JIMDS
2014
Under process
Pak Oral Dental Journal
Vol.32 , No.2 June 2014
Original
PJMR/SC/2014
Under process
Under process
Journal of CPSP
Accepted for publication Feb 2015
Prosthodontics rehabilitation
of acquired mandibular
defects a non surgical
treatment approach
Rehabilitation of respected
soft palate with
valopharyngeal obturator
Under process
PJMR/ CR/56/2013
Under process
PJMR/ CR/2014
JIIMC 2013
9
2014
Dr. Bilal
Ahmed
10
2014
Dr. Bilal
Ahmed
11
2014
Dr. Bilal
Ahmed
Prosthodontic rehabilitation
of hemi maxillectory with
interim obturator prosthesis
Under process
12
2014
Assessment of clinical trends
in patients with missing teeth
and congenital tooth agenesis
Original
Pakistan Oral & Dental Journal Vol
34, No. 2 (June 2014)
13
2015
Dr. Humna
Munir
Dr. Kanwal
Sohail
Dr. Bilal
Ahmed
Dr. Kanwal
Sohail
Dr. Bilal
Ahmed
Dr.Humna
Munir
Evaluation of reasons of
patients visit to non-qualified
dental practitioner and level
of malpractice causing
complications
Original
JIIMC
March 2015: Vol.10, No.1
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
57
Y
14
2015
Original
Dr.
SALMAN
AHMAD
Dr.
MARYAM
AMIN
Dr.RIDA
NASEER
EFFECT OF
SOCIOECONOMIC
STATUS, EDUCATION
LEVEL AND TYPE OF
DENTURE ON DENTURE
HYGIENE KNOWLEDGE
AND PRACTICES OF
DENTURE WEARERS
Pakistan Oral & Dental Journal Vol
35, No. 2 (June 2015)
Total = 14
No. of publication
No. of
categories
including W
or ISI or
impact factor
05
18.0
Local data publications
01
Other than IIDC publications
Common
05
01
PUBLICATIONS BY DEPARTMENT
OF DENTAL MATERIAL, 2011 TILL DATE
No.
1
2
Year
Authorship
Article
2011
Fazal Ghani
Faisal
Moeen
2012
3
2012
c
4
2012
c
5
2013
c
Faisal
Moeen
Yawar
Hayat Khan
Uzma Hasan
Nomaan
Nasir
Sarah Ali
Yawar
Hayat
Ulfat Bashir
Nomaan
Nasir
Sarah Ali
Yawar
Hayat
Ulfat Bashir
Muhammad
Humza Bin
Saeed
Shakeel
Kazmi
Faisal
Moeen
Category of
article
Journal
Category
by HEC
Incorporating implant
dentistry into
Undergraduate dental
curriculum
Original
Jpda: Vol 20, No.4 Dec 2011
Y
A study to evaluate
patient preference in the
decision making of dental
treatment
Original
JIIMC: Vol 7, No.1 Jul 2012
Y
Original
The Professional Medical Journal
Professional Med J Jan-Feb 2012;
19(1):123-128
Original
Annals of PIMS
Ann. Pak. Inst. Med. Sci. 2012; 8(1): 27-30
Z
Original
The health
The health 2013; 4(2):
20-23
Y
Effect of crown margin
location on Gingival
Health
Oral Health Status of
Patients visiting IIDH
The role of state in
provision of health care
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
58
Y
6
7
8
2013
c
2014
Faisal
Moeen
2014
c
Asma
Shakoor
Kiran
Rashid
Yawar
Hayat
9
2014
10
2014
11
2014
c
12
2014
13
Muhammad
Humza Bin
Saeed
Shakeel
Kazmi
Faisal
Moeen
2015
Imran Aziz
Waleed
Khan
Faisal
Moeen
Imran
Akhtar
Waseem
Tarar
Faisal
Moeen
Saleha Nisar
Nimra Dar
Faisal
Moeen
Khurram
Ataulah
Muhammad
Hamza bin
Saeed
Muhammad
Saeed
Saleha Nisar
Faisal
Moeen
Saleha Nisar
Nimra Tahir
Saleha Nisar
Faisal
Moeen
Uzma Hasan
Clinical audits and its role
in the practice of
Dentistry
Stress Distribution around
Immediate loaded dental
implants, non linerar
Finite Element Study
Awareness and
Knowledge about Oral
Cancer in Adult Patients
visiting Islamic
International Dental
Hospital,
Islamabad, Pakistan
Original
JIIMC Vol. 8 no. 3 December 2013
Y
Original
Quintessence International (under
publication)
Impact
Fcactor
1.78
Original
Pakistan Oral & Dental Journal Vol 34, No.
1 (March 2014)
Effect do verifying
diameter of dental
implants during
placements in
compromised bony ridge
at different insertion
insertion torques: A finite
element study
Y
International Mechanical Engineering
Congress and Exposition
A step by step guide to
finite element analysis in
dental implantology
Original
Pakistan Oral & Dental Journal Vol 34, No.
1 (March 2014)
Y
Effect of variations in
buccal bone thickness
Original
Pakistan Oral & Dental Journal Vol 34, No.
2 (June 2014)
Y
Practical utilization of
tooth and implant
supported prosthesis
Original
JIIMC
Vol:9 N:2 July 2014
Original
International journal of dental sciences and
research
Vol:3 no. 3 (2015)
64-71 doi:10.12691/ijdsr-3-3-6
Effect of varying curing
regimes and powder
liquid ratios on the
flexural strength and
surface porosities of heat
cure acrylic. an invitro
experiment
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
59
Total = 12
No. of publication
06
No. of
categories
including
W or ISI
or impact
factor
19.0
Local data
publications
0
Other than IIDC
publications
Common
5
06
PUBLICATIONS BY DEPARTMENT
OF ORAL PATHOLOGY, 2011 TILL DATE
No.
1
2
3
Year
2012
2013
2013
4
2013
5
2014
Authorship
Bushra Ayaz,
Nadia Zaib,
Sajid Mushtaq,
Nadira
Mamon,
Noreen
Akhtar, Tahir
Khadim
Nadia Zaib
Madiha Sajjad
Samina Latif
Sabeen Abbas
Salma
Shaheen
Nighat Ara,
M. Atique,
Suhaib
Ahmed, Mir
Rizwan
Ahmed ,
Gulzar Ali
Bukhari
Mir Rizwan
Ahmed ,
M. Tahir
Khadim,
Nighat Ara,
Mir, Gulzar
Ali Bukhari
Dr. Nadia
Zaib, Dr. Naila
Umer. Dr.
Sidra Aamer,
Dr. Sabeen
Abbas , Dr.
Rabia Masood
Article
Category
of article
Journal
Category
by HEC
Pathological Spectrum of Jaw;
Analysis of 178 Cases
Original
Journal of Pakistan Dental
Association
Vol.21; No.2
Y
Oral biopsies: study of 114
cases
Original
Pakistan oral & dental journal
Vol, 32 No. 3
(416-420)
Y
Alterations of P53(Gene
mutation and protein
expression in oral epithelial
dysplasia)
Original
Pakistan oral & dental journal
Vol, 33 No. 2
(2013)
Y
E-Cadherin expression, a
valuable predictor of
invasiveness in histological
grades of oral squamous cell
carcinoma
Original
Pakistan oral & dental journal
Vol, 33 No. 2
(2013)
Y
Practice and knowledge of
infection control protocol
among dental personnel
Original
Infection Disease Journal of
Pakistan Vol:33 issue :1 JanMar 2014
Y
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
60
6
7
8
9
2014
2015
2015
2015
Dr. Rabia
Masood
Dr. Nadia Zaib
Dr.Rozina
Jaffar
Dr. Khaleel
Dr. Raza
Dr. Ehsan
Dr. Rabia
Masood
Dr. Rabia
Masood
Dr. Rozina
Jaffar
Dr. Nadia
Zaib
Dr. Ali Raza
Dr. Naila
Umer
Dr. Fatima
Suhaib, Dr.
Mir Rizwan
Ahmad
Dr. Khalil ur
Rehman
CYTOMORPHOMETRY of
buccal smears of nicotiana
tabacum (naswar) users: a
pilot story
Original
PODJ Vol:34 No :3
Sep 2014
Clinicopathological spectrum
of oral squamous cell
carcinoma at a public sector
health facility
Original
Biomedica Vol. 31 , issue 1
Jan-Mar 2015
Oral
CYTOMORPHOMETRY of
smokers and non smokers
Original
JIIMC
Vol. 10 , No. 3 , 2015
Review of dental operative
procedures and the causes of
tooth extraction at the Railway
General Hospital Rwp.
Original
JIIMC
Vol. 10 , No. 3 , 2015
Y
Total = 07
No. of publication
No. of categories
including W or
ISI or impact
factor
20.0
9
Local data
publications
Other than IIDC
publications
Common
5
04
PUBLICATIONS BY DEPARTMENT
OF ORAL BOLOGY, 2011 TILL DATE
No. Year
1
2013
1
Authorship
Muhammad
Humza Bin
Saeed
Shakeel Kazmi
Faisal Moeen
Article
The role of state in
provision of health care
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
Category of
article
Original
Journal
Category
by HEC
The health
The health 2013; 4(2):
20-23
61
2
2013
3
2013
c
4
2014
c
Dr. Shakeel
Kazmi
Dr. Adnan
Rasol
Dr. Khadija
Dr. Attaullah
Late
Muhammad
Humza Bin
Saeed
Shakeel Kazmi
Faisal Moeen
Asma Shakoor
Kiran Rashid
Yawar Hayat
Awareness of oral cancer
among dentists and dental
students of Islamic
International Dental
College, Islamabad
Original
Isra Medical Journal vol.5-issue 4
Oct-Dec 2013
Clinical audits and its role
in the practice of Dentistry
Original
JIIMC Vol. 8 no. 3 December
2013
Original
Pakistan Oral & Dental Journal
Vol 34, No. 1 (March 2014)
Awareness and Knowledge
about Oral Cancer in Adult
Patients visiting Islamic
International Dental
Hospital,
Islamabad, Pakistan
Total = 04
No. of publication
No. of
categories
including W
or ISI or
impact factor
21.0
Local data
publications
01
Other than IIDC
publications
Common
01
03
Total IIDC = 68
W or ISI or impact factor
Local data publications
10
64
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
62
Y
Annexure – F:
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
Graduating Students Feedback Sample
63
Annexure – G:
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
Faculty Survey
64
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
65
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
66
Annexure – H:
Faculty Resume
Islamic International Dental College has following staff members:ISLAMIC INTERNATIONAL DENTAL COLLEGE
List of Faculty
Department of Basic Medical Sciences
Sr.
No
1
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
7
8
13
1
2
3
4
5
1
3
4
5
Name
Designation
Department of Pathology (Ext 157)
Dr.Shahina Yasmin
Associate Professor
Dr. Rabia Sadaf
Demonstrator
Khurram Shahzad
Lab Tech
Khurram Abbas
Lab. Assistant
Department of Bio Chemistry (Ext 158)
Dr. Kirn- e-Muneera
Assistant Professor
Dr. Syeda Batool
Demonstrator
Dr. Zoofa Manazar
Demonstrator
Muhammad Shafique
Lab Assistant
Sabir Hayat
Lab Assistant
Department of Pharmacology (Ext 143)
Dr.Tahira Inam
Lecturer
Dr.Romana Asghar
Demonstrator
Muhammad Nouman
Lab Tech
Department of Physiology (Ext 148)
Dr. Fatima Riaz
Assistant Professor / HOD
Dr. Amara Butt
Demonstrator
Dr. Nida Moeen
Demonstrator
Saleh Riaz
Lab Assistant
Muhammad Tahir
Lab Assistant
Department of Anatomy (Ext 151)
Dr.Sikandar Hayat
Associate Professor
Dr. Beeinsh
Demonstrator
Ameer Ahmed
Lab Tech
Inam ul Haq
Lab Assistant
ISLAMIC INTERNATIONAL DENTAL COLLEGE
(LIST OF FACULTY)
Sr.
No
1
Name
Designation
DEPARTMENT OF ORTHODONTICS (Ext 114)
Prof. Dr. Ulfat Bashir
Principal/Professor / HOD
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
67
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Orthodontics
Dr. Owais Khalid
Assistant Professor
Dr. Seem Zahid
Assistant Professor
Dr. Madiha Mahnoor
Post Graduate Trainee
Dr. Zain ul Abadeen
Post Graduate Trainee
Dr. Naeema Iqbal
Post Graduate Trainee
Dr. Hasnain
Post Graduate Trainee
Dr. Hajirah Ali Afridi
Post Graduate Trainee
Dr. Maria Shahwar
Hon. Demonstrator
DEPARTMENT OF PERIODONTOLOGY (Ext 106)
Dr. Noman Nasir
Associate Professor / HOD
Dr. Saad Haroon
Sr. Registrar
Dr. Sarah Ali
Registrar
Dr. Rabeea Zeb
Demonstrator
Dr.Syed Ibrar Hussain
Demonstrator
Dr. Ali Rehman
Hon. Demonstrator
Dr. Nida Farid
Hon. Demonstrator
DEPARTMENT OF PROSTHODONTICS (Ext 107)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
9
Brig Abdul Basit (r )
Associate Professor
Dr. Muhammad Umar Shah
(On long leave)
Assistant Professor
Dr. Salman Ahmad
Assistant Professor
Dr. Aamir Ghafoor
Assistant Professor
Dr. Nayyer Shakoor
Demonstrator
Dr. Fadia Butt
Demonstrator
Dr. Ramsha Mazhar
Demonstrator
Dr. Rida Anjum
Demonstrator
Dr. Ahmad Shoaib
Demonstrator
Shameen Tariq
Demonstrator
Bilal Karim
Hon Demonstrator
DEPARTMENT OF ORAL SURGERY (Ext 125)
Dr.Kamran Khan
Assistant Professor
Dr. Mohsin Fazal
Assistant Professor
Dr. Khurram Baber
Assistant Professor
Dr. Mehreen Riaz
Registrar
Dr. Asma Parvez
Demonstrator
Dr.Sidra Tul Muntaha
Demo/PG
Dr. Bibi Khalida
Post Graduate Trainee
Dr. Wisal Nisar
Post Graduate Trainee
Dr. Hawa Jabbar
Hon Demonstrator
Dr. Romesysa Anwar
Hon Demonstrator
DEPARTMENT OF ORAL MEDICINE
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
68
1
Dr. Amber Kiyani
Assistant Professor
DEPARTMENT OF OPERATIVE DENTISTRY (Ext 115)
1
Dr. Alia Ahmed
Professor / HOD
2
Dr. Osama Khattak (on leave)
Assistant Professor
3
Dr. Muhammad Qasim Javed
Assistant Professor
4
Dr.Sundas Atique
Registrar
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Dr. Numra Khalid
Dr. Muhammad
Dr. Kiran Imtiaz
Dr. Huma Aziz
Dr. Sohaib Siddique
Dr. Huma Zahir
Dr. Shahnawaz
Dr. Mansoor Khan
Dr. Iffat Raza
Dr. Farwa Batool
Dr. Romana Yaqoob
Dr. Ahmed Ali
Dr. Amna Javed
Demo/PG
Demo/PG
Post Graduate Trainee
Post Graduate Trainee
Post Graduate Trainee
Post Graduate Trainee
Post Graduate Trainee
Post Graduate Trainee
Hon. PG
Hon. PG
Hon. PG
Hon. Demonstrator
Hon. Demonstrator
1
2
3
4
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY DENTISTRY (Ext 144)
Muhammad Humza Bin
Saeed
Assistant Professor
Dr. Faisal Shafiq Malik
Demonstrator
Dr.Anum Zehra Khan
Demonstrator
Dr. Namrah Rafiq
Hon. Demonstrator
1
DEPARTMENT OF DENTAL MATERIALS (Ext 144)
Associate Professor / HOD /
Dr. Yawar Hayat Khan
Medical Administrator
2
Dr. Faisal Moeen
Associate Professor
3
Dr.Saleha Nisar
Lecturer
1
2
3
1
2
3
4
DEPARTMENT OF ORAL PATHOLOGY (Ext 142)
Dr. Nadia Zaib
Assistant Professor / HOD
Dr. Rabia Masood
Assistant Professor
Dr. Sidra Sana
Demonstrator
DEPARTMENT OF ORAL BIOLOGY (Ext 144)
Dr. Shakeel Kazmi
Assistant Professor
Dr. Saqlain Bin Syed
Sr.Lecturer
Dr. Mariam Tahir
Demonstrator
Dr. Amina Malik
Hon. Demonstrator
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
69
Annexure – I:
Laboratory Safety Guidelines
The Islamic International Dental College (IIDC) is committed to providing a safe
environment for all. However, laboratory safety is a mutual responsibility and
requires full participation and cooperation of all involved persons - students,
faculty and staff. The following Lab Safety Guidelines have been established for
your/our protection as a student/Researcher in the IIDC laboratories areas.
These rules will be rigidly and impartially enforced.
Personal Protection

Safety glasses can be worn during work in the Lab depending on the
nature of experiment.

Contact lenses are discouraged. However, students who choose to wear
contacts must recognize the inherent increased risks - they are difficult to
remove if chemicals get in the eye, they have a tendency to prevent
natural eye fluids from removing contaminants, and sudden displacement
can cause visual problems that create additional hazards. Soft contact
lenses are especially problematic because they can discolor and also
absorb chemical vapors causing damage before the wearer is alerted to
the problem. If you choose to wear contacts, please tell your lab instructor.

Appropriate gloves will be provided when needed. Use of gloves is
required for handling certain chemicals. Gloves are very expensive. Do
not change gloves needlessly.

Appropriate clothing/White Coat is required. Your clothing is a barrier
between your skin and chemicals. You must be covered- also no bare
midriffs or shoulders. Lab coats are recommended and can be purchased.

Shoes must be worn. No sandals, thongs, open toed or open heeled
shoes.

Roll up sleeves and tie up loose clothing and long hair when working with
equipment, open flame, any chemicals or biological substances.

Do not eat, drink (including sport bottles and water bottles), or store food
in the labs.

Smoking or use of other tobacco products is prohibited.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
70

Wash hands after working with chemicals.

It is the recommendation that during the lab work and handling with
chemicals/biological, chatting, noise and shaking hands is prohibited.
General Lab Rules

Conduct yourself in a responsible manner at all times in the laboratory.

When first entering a lab room, do not touch any equipment, chemicals, or
other materials in the laboratory area until you are instructed to do so.

Read all instructions carefully and plan your work. Understand the
experiment and if in doubt, ask.

Follow the written lab procedure - laboratory activity at this level is not
meant to be creative. Improper combinations or amounts of chemicals can
be very dangerous. No unauthorized experiments are to be performed. If
you are curious about trying a procedure not covered in the experimental
procedure, consult with your laboratory instructor.

Place book bags, pocketbooks, etc. under the lab tables.

Lab activities require your undivided attention. No music allowed in
student labs. Radios (including Walkman type) and other entertainment
devices are not permitted. No cellular phone use.

Treat chemicals with respect and understand the chemicals you are using.

Learn where the safety and first-aid equipment is located. This includes
fire extinguishers, eyewash stations.

Notify the instructor immediately in case of an accident, no matter how
small it seems.

Preserved biological materials are to be treated with respect and disposed
of properly.

Leave the lab area clean. Put equipment and chemicals away and wipe off
the bench top.
Disposal of Wastes

Do not dispose of chemicals in the sink. (Rule of Thumb: If you don’t want
to drink it, don’t dump it in the sink). Follow your instructor’s directions for
disposal. Be sure to dispose of chemicals in the proper waste collector.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
71
Do not mix chemical waste without being instructed to do so.
Any
container that is used to collect chemical waste must be properly labeled
and closed at all times unless actively pouring into it.

Properly dispose of cultures in the plastic bags. Never throw them in lab
garbage cans. Your instructor will provide necessary detail.

Dispose of broken glass in the cardboard/"broken glass box" in your lab.
Do not place general trash in the any of the specialized collection
containers.

“Do not let the potential hazards listed above make you afraid to
participate in the lab. If instructions are followed and care is taken, the
likelihood of an accident is greatly reduced. Labs are usually the most fun
part of any science course”.
Who to Contact
If you have any questions, the following people are your safety resources:

Your instructor /Demonstrator in Labs

Faculty Members

Student Advisor

Administration Office
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
72
Annexure –J
AT Findings
Panel - Assessment Team
Following Assessment Team Members Visited IIDC on 10 March, 2016

Prof. Dr. Abdul Khaliq Naveed
Chairman

Dr. Arif Ullah Khan
Member

Brig (R ) Maqsood Ul Hassan
Member

Engr. Salim Ahmed Khan
Member
Exit Meeting - 11 March, 2016
Following attended the meeting:-

Prof. Dr. Anis Ahmad
Vice Chancellor

Prof. Dr. Abdul Khaliq Naveed
Chairman

Prof. Dr. Ulfat Bashir
Principal IIDC

Dr. Arif Ullah Khan
Member

Brig (R ) Maqsood Ul Hassan
Member

Engr. Salim Ahmed Khan
Member
The Chairman AT presented his final recommendations to carry out the
improvements in this program. The Respected VC approved the
proceedings:




Space in the research lab for students needs enhancement
Need to improve Canteen facility for faculty and students
Need to improve the research papers published by students/
faculty members
Refresher courses for faculty members are required
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Note: After the above exit meeting, the Departmental head of Dental
Materials prepared the implementation plan with target dates and
submitted it to the QEC. The QEC pursued the activities and then
mentioned the final status completed/in progress in Annex-K before
submitting the SAR to HEC.
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Annexure – K
Implementation Plan (Summary) – IIDC (DM) – G-7/4 Campus
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
75
Annexure L:
Faculty Course Review Report
All core courses for MDS (Dental Materials) curriculum are reviewed periodically
by the faculty to assess its effectiveness and contribution in achieving program
objectives. Course review also contributes towards making any changes in the
syllabi and enhancements required in areas identified as a result of Alumni
Survey, Employer Survey and Graduating Students Feedback.
PT members launched HEC Performa 2 (Faculty of Course Review Report) to all
the faculty members, to obtain their feedback about courses.
The summary of the overall feedback of all courses identified the following
improvement areas:
a.
Research Aptitude Building
b.
Communication Skills
c.
Confidence Building Measures
d.
Exposure to Dental Materials Sector
These improvement areas have been presented in Board of Studies to finalize its
recommendations and suggest further actions.
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
76
Annexure – M:
Rubric Report
Self Assessment Report
Criterion 1 – Program Mission, Objectives and Outcomes
Factors
Weight = 0.05
Score
1. Does the program have document measurable objectives that
support faculty/ college and institution mission statements?
2. Does the program have documented outcomes for graduating
students?
3. Do these outcomes support the Program objectives?
4. Are the graduating students capable of performing these
outcomes?
5. Does the department assess its overall performance
periodically using quantifiable measures?
6. Is the result of the Program Assessment documented?
Total Encircled Value (TV)
SCORE 1 (S1) = [TV/ (No. of Question * 5)] * 100 * 0.05
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
1
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
25
4.16
Criterion 2– Curriculum Design and Organization
Weight = 0.20
Factors
Score
1. Is the curriculum consistent?
2. Does the curriculum support the program’s documented
objectives?
3. Are the theoretical background, problem analysis and solution
design stressed within the program’s core material?
4. Does the curriculum satisfy the core requirements laid down
by HEC?
5. Does the curriculum satisfy the major requirements laid down
by HEC?
6. Does the curriculum satisfy the professional requirements as
laid down by HEC?
7. Is the information technology component integrated
throughout the program?
8. Are oral and written skills of the students developed and
applied in the program?
Total Encircled Value (TV)
SCORE 1 (S1) = [TV/ (No. of Question * 5)] * 100 * 0.20
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
1
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
Criterion 3– Laboratories and Computing Facilities
Factors
Weight = 0.10
Score
1. Are the laboratory manuals/ documentation/ instructions etc.
for experiments available and readily accessible to faculty and
students?
2. Are there adequate number of support personnel for
instruction and maintaining the laboratories?
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
32
16
77
3. Are the University’s infrastructure and facilities adequate to
support the program’s objectives?
Total Encircled Value (TV)
SCORE 1 (S1) = [TV/ (No. of Question * 5)] * 100 * 0.10
5
4
3
2
1
Criterion 4– Student Support and Advising
Factors
Weight = 0.10
Score
1. Are the courses being offered in sufficient frequency nd
number for the students to complete the program in a timely
manner?
2. Are the courses in the major area structured to optimize
interaction between the students, faculty and teaching
assistants?
3. Does the university provide academic advising on course
decisions and career choices to all students?
Total Encircled Value (TV)
SCORE 1 (S1) = [TV/ (No. of Question * 5)] * 100 * 0.10
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
11
7.33
10
6.66
Criterion 5– Process Control
Weight = 0.15
Factors
Score
1. Is the process to enroll students to a program based on
quantitative and qualitative criteria?
2. Is the process above clearly documented and periodically
evaluated to ensure that it is meeting its objectives?
3. Is the process to register students in the program and
monitoring their progress documented?
4. Is the process above periodically evaluated to ensure that it is
meeting its objectives?
5. Is the process to recruit and retain faculty in place ad
documented?
6. Are the process for faculty evaluation & promotion consistent
with the institution mission?
7. Are the process in 5 and 6 above periodically evaluated to
ensure that they are meeting their objectives?
8. Do the processes and procedures ensure that teaching and
delivery of course material emphasize active learning and that
course learning outcomes are met?
9. Is the process in 8 above periodically evaluated to ensure that
it is meeting its objectives?
10. Is the process to ensure that graduates have completed the
requirements of the program based on standards and
documented procedures?
11. Is the process in 10 above periodically evaluated to ensure
that it is meeting its objectives?
Total Encircled Value (TV)
SCORE 1 (S1) = [TV/ (No. of Question * 5)] * 100 * 0.15
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
IIDC_SAR_DM_June 2016
48
13.09
78
Criterion 6– Faculty
Weight = 0.15
Factors
Score
1. Are there enough full time faculty members to provide
adequate coverage of the program areas/courses with continuity
and stability?
2. Are the qualifications and interest of faculty members
sufficient to teach all courses, plan, modifies and updates
courses and curricula?
3. Do the faculty members possess a level of competence that
would be obtained through graduate work in the discipline?
4. Do the majority of faculty members hold a Ph.D. degree in
their discipline?
5. Do faculty members dedicate sufficient time to research to
remain current in their disciplines?
6. Are there mechanisms in place for faculty development?
7. Are faculty members motivated and satisfied so as to excel in
their profession?
Total Encircled Value (TV)
SCORE 1 (S1) = [TV/ (No. of Question * 5)] * 100 * 0.15
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
1
1
Criterion 7– Institutional Facilities
Factors
Weight = 0.15
Score
1. Does the institution have the infrastructure to support new
trends such as e-learning?
2. Does the library contain technical collection relevant to the
program and is it adequate staffed?
3. Are the class rooms and offices adequately equipped and
capable of helping faculty carry out their responsibilities?
Total Encircled Value (TV)
SCORE 1 (S1) = [TV/ (No. of Question * 5)] * 100 * 0.15
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
Criterion 8– Institutional Support
Factors
Weight = 0.10
Score
1. Is there sufficient support and finances to attract and retain
high quality faulty?
2. Are there an adequate number of high quality graduate
students, teaching assistants and Ph.D. students?
Total Encircled Value (TV)
SCORE 1 (S1) = [TV/ (No. of Question * 5)] * 100 * 0.10
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
31
13.28
12
12
10
10
Overall Assessment Score = S1+S2+S3+S4+S5+S6+S7+S8
= 4.16+16+7.33+6.66+13.09+13.28+12+10
= 82.52
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