August 2012 - All At Sea

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August 2012 - All At Sea
D O N A L D S T R E E T A N D T H E B AT T L E S H I P M I S S O U R I
B U R I A L S AT S E A
ALL AT SEA
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BAHAMAS COVERAGE AND
CHANGES ON THE HORIZON
PHOTO BY MARIA KARLSSON
Andy at the helm of
the Mason 44 Corrina
Corrina, sailing into
Marsh Harbor, in the
Abacos in 2009.
A
ugust is a transitional month for myself at All At
Sea Southeast. For starters, Terry Boram’s article
on the Seven Seas Cruising Association’s (SSCA)
‘Bahamas Project’ expands our coverage geographically to include our neighbors to the southeast. The
Bahamas are less than 100 miles from the coast of Florida
in places, and yet are worlds away, offering anyone with a
boat and a little guts the chance to truly escape right in our
own back yard. Terry’s article highlights the vast difference
in culture between the islands and the USA, and what many
cruisers are doing to help our third-world neighbors.
I was only nine years old the first time I visited the Bahamas – back in 1993, on my mom and dad’s ketch Sojourner
– and the experience that year of living aboard a sailing
boat and getting my education in the real world has shaped
my entire life since then. We crossed the Gulf Stream from
Key Biscayne to Chub Cay, in the Berry Islands, passing by
Bimini in daylight and anchoring on the banks, out of sight
of land and yet in only 12 feet of water, an experience I can
still recall now that seemed utterly absurd. In Chub, my dad
took my sister and I snorkeling for the first time, and we
swam side-by-side a school of a dozen spotted eagle rays.
We made our way to Nassau, where we spent Christmas. I remember staying up all night on the city streets
with my family watching the Junkanoo parade on Boxing
Day, the loud music and louder costumes sparking my
imagination and keeping us awake. Later it was Staniel
Cay and snorkeling in Thunderball Cave, the spot made
famous by Sean Connery in the Bond movie of the same
8
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
name. Dad and I found a fishing spot nearby where we
speared our first grouper, only to discover a week later
that some locals had caught a 15-foot hammerhead only
100 yards away. I could step through the jaws, which they
had saved as a trophy.
The cruise ultimately took us to Georgetown, in the Exumas, the setting for Boram’s article. Even nearly 20 years
ago, the harbor was filled with like-minded families, and I
met loads of other children my age doing the same sort of
thing. The islands left an impression on me – the memories
of that trip are some of my earliest as a human being, and
I’m absolutely certain that without them I would not be writing this right now. It’s touching to read about the SSCA’s involvement in the Bahamas, and encouraging hearing about
their success. And it makes me want to go back.
Which is why, in a certain way, August will mark the last
month that I’ll be editing All At Sea Southeast. I’ve always
had a passion for the sea, and I feel like that’s where I truly
belong (see my article in the ‘Sailing’ department for some
insights into offshore sailing). In light of my desire to pursue
more adventures on the water, I’m handing over the editorial reigns to Rob Lucey, one of Southeast’s first writers and
a very capable editor. Rob was the founder and publisher
of Carolina Currents, and has since moved to Texas, where
he’s been our main Gulf Coast correspondent. Check the
back page of this issue to hear a bit more of Rob’s history.
I’ve had a good run at the helm here, and I’d like to thank
my publisher Chris Kennan for giving me the opportunity
to get the magazine off the ground and help start something I believe will continue to be successful. I’ll continue
to contribute to the magazine regularly – with more stories
to share from on-the-water-experience – and I wish Rob the
best of luck going forward. Thanks to all of the readers who
continue to make the magazine successful!
If you have story ideas, cover photos or would like to contribute in any way to All At Sea Southeast, please email Rob
Lucey at [email protected] Thanks for reading!
Andy Schell,
Editor
[email protected]
August 2012
THIS ISSUE
T H E S O U T H E A S T S TAT E S’ WAT E R F R O N T M A G A Z I N E
PHOTO BY GLENN HAYES
40
18
FEATURES
42
SEVEN SEAS CRUISING
ASSOCIATIONS’ ‘OPERATION
BAHAMAS’ PROJECT
Sailors Cross the Stream
To Do Some Good
Living Aboard in Georgia
Officiating Offshore
EDITOR’S DESK
12
ONE THOUSAND WORDS
14
SOUTHEAST NEWS
17
EVENT CALENDAR
CO V E R S H OT:
10
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
36
SAILING HUMOR
The Pirate Queen, Part 2
38
MECHANICALLY INCLINED
Marine Electronics Onboard
40
WORK ON THE WATERFRONT
Tournament Director, Host,
TV Commentator
60
COASTAL REAL ESTATE GUIDE
64
BROKERAGE/CLASSIFIEDS
67
MARKETPLACE
70
SPONSOR DIRECTORY
72
ON THE INTRACOASTAL
Back at the Helm
Human Sun Protection
28
FISHING REPORT
August a Searing Month
For Southeast Fishing
30
SAILING
Emotions Across the Atlantic
DEPARTMENTS
8
COASTAL LIFE
Summer on the Chesapeake
32
MOTOR CRUISING
1500 Miles on the Inside
34
PRO TIPS
Beware of Long-Term
Weather Forecasts
35
AMERICAN HISTORY
Mighty, Muddy Mo
Work boats at rest in Tarpon Springs | Photo: Glenn Hayes, www.HayesStudios.com
Watch for our Tarpon Springs sponge fishing feature in the September issue.
ALL AT SEA
COASTAL EVENTS & INTERESTS
SOUTHEAST
12
MAP
54
46
FLORIDA
At Last
BAHAMAS
Award-Winning Shark Documentary
Released on DVD
55
GULF
Cruising the Gulf Coast
56
TEXAS
Galveston Yacht Basin Rises
From Ike’s Ashes
47
NORTH CAROLINA
Oriental Welcomes Boats,
Boaters to Coastal Event
Sailors, Leukemia Society,
Win Big at Oriental Regatta
52
Publisher:
CHRIS KENNAN
[email protected]
Editorial Director:
ANDY SCHELL
[email protected]
Associate Editor:
ROB LUCEY
Open for Business
RESOURCES
SOUTH CAROLINA
Sadie Beth Leads Gov Cup
After Two Events
58
SOUTHEAST MARINAS
59
SOUTHEAST BOATYARDS
Art Director:
AMY KLINEDINST
[email protected]
Advertising:
KAREN TORTORIELLO
[email protected]
KATHY ENZERINK
[email protected]
MIKE SWEENEY
[email protected]
Advertising Inquiries:
[email protected]
Accounting,
Subscriptions:
[email protected]
Owned and Published by
Kennan Holdings, LLC
382 NE 191st Street #32381
Miami, Florida 33179-3899
phone (410) 929-2248
fax (815) 377-3831
PHOTO BY JUDY PRESTIA-NICHOLS
The views and opinions of the contributors to
this publication are not necessarily those
of the publishers or editors. Accordingly, the
publishers and editors disclaim all responsibility
for such views and opinions.
Check us out
online at:
www.allatsea.net
54
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
11
ONE THOUSAND
WORDS
“STORIES” FROM OUR READERS
SOUTHEAST
U.S. EVENTS
& INTERESTS
A L L AT S E A S O U T H E A S T ’ S
S TAT E CO V E R A G E
Texas
Louisiana
This month’s ‘One Thousand Words’ shows an image of
Etienne Giroire aboard his trimaran ATNInc. Etienne was
the only American in the 2010 edition of the Route du Rhum
single-handed trans-Atlantic race, from France to Guadaloupe. He writes:
Hello Andy,
I am coming around answering your email of a couple of
weeks back. Yes, I am receiving All At Sea Southeast magazine and I am enjoying every issue! You cater to ALL boaters
enthusiasts and that’s very refreshing.
Keep up the great work!
-Etienne Giroire, ATN Inc.
atninc.com
Thanks Etienne! Send us a photo of you “telling a story,”
in not-so-many words, and you may be the lucky one. The
title speaks for itself. We will select one a month. Thanks for
reading All At Sea Southeast! Please send images and your
information to [email protected] with photo credits.
12
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
PAGE 30 & 32
Offshore v. Inshore:
Andy
A
Schell and
JJody Reynolds explore
the
th differences of
cruising each.
crui
PAGE 52
Sadie Beth leads after
2 events in SC Gov Cup
Virginia
North
Carolina
South
Carolina
PAGE 46
Award-winning
shark documentary
released on DVD
Mississippi
Alabama
Georgia
Atlantic
Ocean
Florida
Gulf
of
Mexico
Grand
Bahama I.
Bahama
Abaco Island
New
Providence Eleuthera Island
Cat Island
Andros
Island
San Salvador
Rum Cay
Great Exuma
Long Island
PAGE 55
P
Cruising the Gulf Coast
C
Crooked Island
Mayaguana Island
Long Cay
Acklins
Turks & Caicos
Island
Islands
Great Inagua Island
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
13
Southeast News
SOUTHEAST NEWS
WAT E R F R O N T H A P P E N I N G S A R O U N D T H E R E G I O N
THE HOUSTON SUMMER BOAT SHOW
HOUSTON, TX: Organizers forecast increased crowds at
the 25th annual Houston Summer Boat Show June 2024 at Reliant Center. The event featured an impressive
display of fishing boats, kayaks, ski and wakeboarding
boats, RVs and the Bass Tub, where live fishing demonstrations took place. Houston Boat Show President Ken
Lovell anticipated a rise in consumer confidence from
last year when Texas was plagued by a severe drought.
“The boating industry has picked back up with a significant increase in sales compared to this time last year,”
he said. “The vast majority of lakes and other waterways
are back up at their normal levels. It’s really a dramatic
turnaround, and we are seeing so much interest from
both seasoned and first time boaters.”
Lovell noted that the Houston area boaters are fortunate
to be close to bodies of water that were not as affected by
the drought, like the Gulf, Galveston Bay and Clear Lake.
“The Houston area boating industry was hit hard by the
14
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
drought, but not as hard as areas farther away from the
coast,” he said.
REFURBISHED YACHT BASIN
TO HOST NEW BOAT SHOW
GALVESTON, TX: Boaters will have a great opportunity to
explore the refurbished Galveston Yacht Basin (see story
pg. 56) Oct. 12-14 during the inaugural Texas Coast Boat
and Outdoor Show. The event is billed as a festive celebration of the restoration of the island landmark. It will feature more than 100 boats in the water, with many ready to
demo right from the dock, plus a huge onshore exhibition
of some of today’s finest watercraft, motor homes, fishing
tackle, marine accessories, gadgets and water toys alongside all things outdoor.
The event will also include the action packed National
Tri-Hull Powerboat Championship, taking place in the
Galveston ship channel in full view of attendees, plus a
Mardi Gras style street parade on Saturday morning along
the Seawall featuring some of the fastest offshore powerboats in the USA, most of which will be seen later in the
day crossing a poker run finish line at the show. A redfish
tournament weigh-in, live bands on stage, food and beverages will complete this three days of fun in the sun in the
great City of Galveston.
The event organizers are also working with the Galveston
Historical Society to create a black tie fund raising opportunity at the Galveston Yacht Club to assist with the repairs
aboard the 1877 barque Elissa, the official Tall Ship of Texas.
GYB has contracted with Peter Bryant, organizer of the
annual Southwest International In-Water Boat Show on
Houston’s Clear Lake, to produce the event. The parties
have an agreement to produce the new show for five years
if all goes well.
Visit texascoastboatshow.com for details as the event
approaches.
LAKEWOOD’S BAY CUP II SLATED
FOR AUGUST 11
SEABROOK, TX: Lakewood Yacht Club Race Committee
Chairman Gerhard Wittich has announced that the 2012
Bay Cup II will be held on Aug. 11. This is the second in
a series where Bay Cup I was held last March. Wittich explained that there will be overall class winners for the Bay
Cup Series which will be presented at the awards ceremony
the night of the race in Lakewood Yacht Club’s lounge.
The race is open to the public with a $70 registration fee.
Racers can register on line at Lakewood’s website at lakewoodyachtclub.com under the “racing” button.
“Bay Cup II will feature long distance racing in Galveston
and Trinity Bays,” related Wittich, “with multiple legs for a
total of about 5-25 nautical miles, depending upon wind
conditions. This should be a navigational challenge for the
racers as well.”
Classes include PHRF Spinnaker, PHRF Non-Spinnaker,
Cruising Spinnaker, Classic Canvas, Multihull, SOS, and others.
There will be a Saturday night pool party with dinner and
entertainment. The awards that night will be for the winners
of Bay Cup II as well as the 2012 Bay Cup Series.
Wittich wanted to thank the sponsors of Bay Cup II, including Sea Lake Yacht Sales and Bay Access, Inc., which is
a not-for-profit organization fostering amateur sailing.
Racers are encouraged to attend the Bay Cup II skippers
meeting which will be held at Lakewood Yacht Club’s ballroom,
2425 NASA Parkway, Seabrook, TX on Fri., Aug. 10, 7:30 p.m.
For further information, please contact Marcy Fryday at
281-474-2511.
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Southeast News
OYSTER SHELLS PURIFY BOTTOM PAINT RUNOFF
STORY AND PHOTO BY KATHY BOHANAN ENZERINK
PORTSMOUTH, VA: Jonathan Swift, born in 1667, is quoted
as having said, “He was a bold man that first ate an oyster.”
In many states, oyster shells are collected and recycled back into the water as bases for new oyster beds.
At Portsmouth Boating Center, just off the ICW at mile
marker 00 on Scott’s Creek, oyster shells are put into
service to purify the run-off water from pressure washing
bottom paint.
While pressure washing a hull, the contaminated water is
collected in a perimeter drain then sent to a bed of oyster
shells where it cycles continually until it is clean enough to
return to the creek.
According to the Boating Center dock master, it was hit
or miss finding the right material to use as a filter until a
local fisherman suggested using oyster shells. The catch
basin and purification system is in its fourth year of successful operation.
Other bottom paint wash water recycling systems in-
Oyster shells catch
bottom paint solids
and purify the water
at Portsmouth Boating
Center. The innovative
system was designed
by owner Mike Davis.
16
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
clude collecting solids in a filter cloth or hay bales; or
using a ‘closed-loop’ system where the contaminated
water is pumped into a settling tank, chemically treated to coagulate the residual solids, then filtered several
times before being reused to wash more boats. Alternative disposal methods include transporting the waste water to an approved off-site facility and treating the water
before discharging to a municipal sewer.
Eco-friendly bottom paints, now available from several manufacturers, use little or no copper in their formulation unlike the traditional hard and ablative antifouling bottom paints, which release toxic biocides to
keep marine organisms, weeds and slime from attaching to the boat.
A truckload of oyster shells sits off to the side of the property, waiting to make their way to the filtering process.
“I think we have enough oyster shells to last us 10 years,”
the dockmaster at Portsmouth said.
POWERING THE INDUSTRY
FOR OVER 60 YEARS
EVENT CALENDAR
Please send future events to [email protected] This month and
next month’s events are currently published here and at www.
allatsea.net. Your specific area may or may not be shown based
on identified activities for these months.
FAIRHOPE, AL
AUGUST 18
Children’s Cup Regatta
Youth Sailing
www.fairhopeyachtclub.com
[email protected]
boat.com
252-675-9424
AUGUST 31 – SEPTEMBER 3
offi[email protected]
club.com
251-928-3276
Oar Cup-Michelob
Lite Regattas
Sailing Regatta
OrientalDinghyClub.com
GULFPORT, MS
[email protected]
AUGUST 18 – 19
252-249-2827
Charles R. Galloway GYA
Sunfish/Laser Regatta
Sailing Regatta
gulfportyachtclub.webs.com
MOBILE, AL
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PASS CHRISTIAN, MS
AUGUST 11 – 12
Knost Regatta
Sailing Regatta
www.pcyc-gya.org
AUGUST 11 – 12
Round the Pig Regatta
Sailing Regatta
www.mobileyachtclub.org
251-471-3131
How many you bring home is none of our business
SERVICES
Q
Q
Q
PENSACOLA, FL
Q
AUGUST 25
Q
Big Mouth Regatta
Sailing Regatta
Q
Q
New Installations Q Modifications
Custom Computerized & Laser Engraving
Custom Designed Switchboards
In-house & Dockside Service
Repairs Q Engineering
Electrical & Corrosion Surveys
Fire Surveys Q Panel Production
www.pensacolabeach-yc.org
NEW ORLEANS, LA
850-934-8757
AUGUST 18
Round the Lake Regatta
Sailing Regatta
www.corinthians.org
ORIENTAL, NC
AUGUST 17 – 18
20th Annual Fishing
Tournament-Tarpon
& Inshore Slam
Fishing Tournament
www.orientalrotary.org
[email protected]
embarqmail.com
252-249-0400
AUGUST 4 – 5
Dragon’s Breath Regatta
Sailing Regatta
www.OrientalDinghy
Club.com
POMPANO BEACH, FL
AUGUST 2 – 5
AUGUST 10 – 11
Dragon Boat Festival
Dragon Boat Races
www.OrientalDragon
Boat.com
Q
Q
The Mercury/SeaVee
Pompano Beach
Saltwater Showdown
Deep Sea Fishing
Q
RALEIGH, NC
Q
AUGUST 19 – 21
Q
Carolina Fall Boat Show
and Sale
Boat Show
www.ncboatshows.com
336-855-0208
SEABROOK, TX
AUGUST 11
LYC Bay Cup II
Sailing Regatta
www.lakewoodyachtclub.com
[email protected] SNEADS FERRY, NC
252-249-2827
EQUIPMENT SALES
AUGUST 11 – 12
Q
Q
Q
Q
AC Generators Q Transformers
Battery Charging Equipment
Panel Meters & Gauges
Switches Q Wire/Cable/Fuses
Cathodic Protection Systems
Converters/Inverters
Shore Cords & Adapters
Lamps & Lighting
Overcurrent Protection
HEADQUARTERS
RIVIERA BEACH
617 S.W. Third Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33315
Phone: 954.523.2815
Toll Free: 800.545.9273
Toll Free Fax: 800.297.8240
999 West 17th Street, Unit #3
Riviera Beach, FL 33404
Phone: 561.863.7100
Fax: 561.863.7008
/WardsMarine
/WardsMarine
Sneads Ferry Shrimp Fest
Carnival
www.SneadsFerryShrimp
Festival.org
[email protected]
910-327-3335
Se Habla Español
W W W.WARDSMARINE.COM
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
17
Coastal Life
SUMMER ON THE CHESAPEAKE
BY DAVID ANSEL
18
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
19
Coastal Life
LIVING ABOARD IN GEORGIA
S TAT E ’ S N E W R E G U L AT I O N S A L LO W B O AT I N G
CO M M U N I T I E S TO F O R M – A N D T H R I V E – I N T H E S O U T H
PHOTO: MARIA KARLSSON
BY DAVE GIBSON
The view from the dock in Savannah
U
ntil January it was illegal to live aboard your vessel in Georgia, at least for any amount of time.
All that is changed now.
The Georgia Department of Natural Resources worked together with GAMBA, the Georgia Marine Business Association, to change the law. It’s good
for business, and money talks. Reading Internet message
boards over the years, it seems that many boaters simply
bypassed Georgia by traveling on the ‘outside’ between
South Carolina and Florida. And those who used the ICW
didn’t dilly-dally. Georgia’s businesses suffered – and not
just in the marine sector – and cruisers were shut out of
enjoying, for any real amount of time, the coastal treasures the state has to offer.
“If a boater comes to a marina, he’s not only staying with
the marina and paying to stay there, but he’s going to go
to the grocery story, the restaurant, various types of shops
and on and on,” said Charlie Waller, an owner of the Isle
of Hope Marina on the ICW in Savannah. “So, that money
filters into the economy.”
And Georgia’s business owners were missing out on it.
Now marinas must be designated by the state to allow
liveaboards. To qualify, each must have adequate pump out
facilities. Currently, there are five: Isle of Hope Marina and
Bull River Marina in Savannah, and Brunswick Landing Ma-
20
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
rina, Golden Isles Marina, and Jekyll Island Harbor Marina
in the Golden Isles.
Rick Gillis, the Isle of Hope Marina’s other partner, said
the obvious reason why he wanted Isle of Hope to become
a designated liveaboard marina was to increase the number of boats there. But he suggested another. By accepting
liveaboards, the marina is ensuring that no marina patrons
are discharging overboard, emphasizing the marina’s environmental stewardship.
According to the Environmental Protection Agency, “a
single discharge of human waste can be detected in a onesquare-mile area of shallow, enclosed water. Human wastes
can include Streptococci, fecal coliform, and other bacteria
that contribute to incidences of human disease, shellfish bed
closures, fish consumption advisories and algal blooms. Boats
can be a significant source of fecal coliform bacteria in areas
with high boating densities and low hydrologic flushing.” At
Isle of Hope, most boats can be pumped out right at the docks.
Gillis takes environmental issues seriously, and is proud
that Isle of Hope Marina was the first in Georgia to be recognized as a “green” marina for its efforts at protecting
the state’s waterways, many of which are arguably the most
beautiful and diverse in the southeast.
My wife and I had been wandering south on our trawler
since last September, spending time at places we liked and
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AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
21
Coastal Life
Easter Dinner at Isle of
Hope Marina, with some
other liveaboards.
Easter Dinner with the family
(dog included).
enjoying the southeast coast. We left Annapolis in early
January, liking each stop better than the last as we traveled
south, arriving at Isle of Hope early in the year. Our planned
couple-of-day stay turned into a couple-of-weeks and then
a couple-of-more-weeks as we fell in love with the Savannah area. We had planned on returning to the Chesapeake
for the summer, but instead applied for liveaboard status to
the commissioner of the Department of Natural Resources
via a simple one-page application.
What is it like living at Isle of Hope Marina with a handful
of other relatively newly arrived liveaboards? Like our previous liveaboard marina in Connecticut, it is a small close-knit
community, and we were quickly absorbed and became
friends with all the other liveaboards. We visit each other’s
boats, get together for sightseeing excursions, gather for
“docktails,” and have started a weekly pot luck dinner and
movie night at the marina’s pavilion. We welcome and invite any transient boaters as well.
Being a liveaboard in a marina community makes you a
member of the landlubber community too. Dan and Pat
on Ironhore (the ‘h’ is silent) have a dog named Jingles.
She is a certified therapy dog and they visit area nursing
homes with her. Bob and Janet aboard the s/v King of Salem are doing local church missionary work. My wife Pamela
and I have volunteered to help at Savannah’s 2013 Scottish
games, and will soon be joining a local classic car club that
raises money for local charities.
22
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
How does a marina benefit by having liveaboards besides the obvious increase in revenue from us? One way is
increased visitor traffic. In our case, we’ve had people stop
at Isle of Hope Marina because they either follow our blog
(trawlerdriftaway.blogspot.com) or know us from Internet
message boards and wanted to meet us in person.
Several boats have extended their stay in part because of
the camaraderie here, and many of the transients that left
will make it a point to return to see their new friends.
After hours, we welcome transients and catch their dock
lines and act as the neighborhood watch. It is a home to us,
not just a place to dock our boats. When a newly arrived
transient boat developed a serious fuel leak after hours that
spilled into the water, it was a liveaboard who called the
marina staff, and liveaboards helped clean it up.
The liveaboard families here also watch out for and care
for each other. Pamela was recently hired as a veterinarian
technician and our only car here was my 1956 Thunderbird.
Diane graciously gave us use of her car until I brought my
truck down from upstate New York to be our daily driver.
Gene flew to Las Vegas to have an operation. Daughter Megan accompanied him to care for him in his recuperation,
and Frank drove them both to Jacksonville International Airport to catch their flight. When Ben and Joe’s little Yorkie became ill, they came to Pam seeking advice. And, whenever
Pamela makes dinner, she often seems to make too much
and a plate is prepared for the single men living aboard here.
Birthdays are celebrated and important events noted.
Is this sense of community different than living in your
typical neighborhood? Yes, I think so. We obviously all have
two things in common, namely boating and living aboard,
so we always have something to talk about. We liveaboards
tend to sit outside on our decks and cockpits and, as people did when they sat on their home’s front porches years
ago, we chat with our neighbors and passersby.
Pam and I decided to take a field trip to Brunswick Landing Marina, another liveaboard marina about 90 miles south
of Isle of Hope. We met a few of the liveaboards there who
were happy to answer our questions. Their community is
just like ours, only their get-togethers are on Wednesdays.
If you’re considering living aboard your boat, you now
can – and should – add Georgia to your list.
Dave Gibson and his wife, along with their grown daughter, two pitbulls and a cat, have meandered down the
east coast on their old trawler from Stamford CT, up to
Albany NY, and down to Georgia. Dave has had articles
published in Cruising World, Good Old Boat, and Seafaring magazines, and posts daily entries and photographs on their blog at trawlerdriftaway.blogspot.com.
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AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
23
Coastal Life
OFFICIATING OFFSHORE
WEDDINGS AND FUNERALS KEEP
MARITIME CHAPEL BUSY
PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF NEPTUNE SOCIETY
BY ROB LUCEY
R
ichard Leach has two business cards: One asks
“May I marry you;” the other says “Maritime Funeral Provider.” He has helped 69 couples tie the
knot offshore. He’s also accompanied nearly 300
people on their final voyage out to sea.
As the pastor of the Maritime Chapel in Houston, Texas,
nautical weddings and funerals are all in a day’s work for Rev.
Leach. He has been busy officiating offshore since the 1970s
when he served as a chaplain in the U.S. military. He is no
longer on active duty, but many of his funeral services are for
military personnel. While naval and coast guard vessels rou-
24
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
tinely conduct burials at sea, families cannot attend because
the vessels are not inspected and licensed to carry passengers. “They will send the family photos and videos, but most
people would rather attend the service,” says Leach, who is
the only provider of burials at sea in the United States who
does take family members offshore for services.
During his time in the military chaplaincy, Leach attended
four seminaries and was ordained six times, allowing him to
serve almost any faith. He’s even performed a Wiccan burial
– and a Wiccan wedding during which the guests danced
naked on the foredeck after the midnight solstice ceremony.
“The captain almost charged me an extra $1,000 because
they painted a pentacle on the deck,” he recalls. “Fortunately, it washed off.”
Most weddings he’s performed have been aboard the
74-foot charter vessel Akela based in Freeport, Texas. The
boat is best known as a major threat during offshore sportfishing tournaments, but it readily converts to a romantic
setting with a hot tub, five staterooms below, and ample
deck space for up to 50 guests. “We usually have the ceremony on the stern at sunset, then you can party the rest of
the night,” Leach says. “In the morning we’ll drop the bride
and groom off in Galveston to catch a limo to the airport,
then take the wedding party back to the marina.”
The cost for the catered charter boat and ceremony typically runs about $4,000, which is comparable to renting a
chapel and renting a hall for a catered party afterwards.
While officiating his first nautical wedding on July 4, 1983,
some uninvited guests joined the party after fireworks were
launched from the vessel.
“The Coast Guard boarded us,” Leach says. “They had
some wedding cake and told us ‘no more fireworks.’ It’s the
only time I’ve had trouble.”
While weddings can make for memorable parties, the
While weddings can make for memorable
parties, the chaplain says he prefers to perform
maritime funerals. “I want to make sure that
everybody gets the proper respect they
deserve,” he says.
Funeral Sites
chaplain says he prefers to perform maritime funerals. “I
want to make sure that everybody gets the proper respect
they deserve,” he says.
He goes so far as to keep a seat with a red cushion on
deck at each ceremony “so there’s a place to sit in case the
spirit of the deceased wants to attend.”
While anybody can scatter ashes at sea if they are outside
the three-mile boundary and report the location to the EPA,
the government rules for consigning bodies to the deep
are much more strict.
Bodies may be buried wrapped (traditionally sewn into
sailcloth), in a perforated wood or stainless coffin, or in a
sealed torpedo-shaped monument filled with nitrogen.
They cannot be embalmed (the fluids kill fish and plankton),
so Leach has the bodies frozen. They must be weighted
down with at least 550 pounds, and the burial site must be a
minimum of 600 feet deep. A permanent brass plaque must
be attached to the body to provide the death certificate
number, date of birth, date of death, and the number from
a certificate of burial which identifies who was responsible
for placing the body there.
Like scattering ashes at sea, the EPA must be notified,
but locations must also be reported to the World Court in
The Hague where a book lists all burials at sea.
Leach performs most of his burials from the deck of a 100foot crew boat operated by Capt. Roy Ringrose, a retired
Coast Guard chief warrant officer and owner of the School Of
Seamanship in Houston. The boat has carried up to 20 people
for a ceremony, including friends and family, honor guards and
(for admirals and higher ranking officers) a piper and band.
A basic burial at sea runs $7,500, which is below the $8,000
average cost for a burial service on land, not including the
$5,000 cost for a typical plot six feet under in a cemetery.
Leach’s preferred burial site is 1,000 feet down in a trench located 109 miles off the Gulf coast. Leach uses a weighted cable
with a camera attached to select each new gravesite before
sliding the body down to its final resting spot. He has carefully
aligned the bodies in rows, forming what he hopes will one day
be designated as the first offshore national cemetery.
“If we get it designated, it would be marked on all of the
charts and protected as a no-fishing area,” he says.
Currently, a cemetery must have 380 military personnel interred to qualify for the designation, so he still has
ways to go.
Rob Lucey has been a regular contributor to All At Sea
Southeast since it’s inception, and will be taking over editorial duties in our September issue. Rob hails from North Carolina where he founded and edited Carolina Currents. He has
since moved to east Texas. Contact Rob at [email protected]
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
25
Coastal Life
BOATER SUN PROTECTION
E N J OY I N G T H E O U T D O O R S S A F E LY
STORY AND PHOTOS BY CONNIE MCBRIDE
W
e are all aware of the ill-effects of the sun – increased risk of medical problems, the pain of
sunburn, and its propensity to cause wrinkles –
yet many continue to spend time on the water
under-prepared for the conditions. Though we would never
go out in a blizzard without a coat, many of us expose ourselves to the dangers of the sun without adequate protection.
Over the years, boaters have adopted headgear from
other sports. The visors worn by sportfishing captains, Tilly
hats made famous by adventurers and sailors, baseball caps,
and even cowboy hats can be seen out on the waterways. If
your noggin happens to be lacking in hair, a hat is particularly
important. When choosing protection for your head, keep in
mind other body parts, too. A hat with a wide brim protects
not only your head, but also keeps the sun off your ears and
helps remove some of the glare that bounces off the water.
Sunscreen companies have done their job well and have
26
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
made us aware of its benefits and the necessity to reapply.
But the sun is omnipresent and has a way of getting to the
places we forget about. Women tend to be particularly careful
to apply sunscreen to their faces. Even our daily moisturizers
often contain high SPF. What we may forget is what carnies
have known for years. They offer to guess your age, and all
too often they are right. One of their tricks is to look not at
women’s faces, but to consider instead the state of their neck
and the back of their hands. These are the places the sun finds
to damage that we often forget to protect. When applying
sunscreen, we also tend to only remember the places we can
see. If you normally wear your hair down, but put it in a ponytail because of the wind when you are out on the boat, the
back of your neck is getting the direct effect of the blazing sun
and will quickly go from its normal silky white to lobster red.
Sunglasses to protect your eyes from wind- and sunburn,
and lip moisturizer with sunscreen are good habits when
you are on the water. Another form of sun protection that
is increasing in popularity is a buff. Often worn by divers to
keep their hair out of their masks, these circles of cloth are
now showing up at nearly every outdoor event. Worn as a
cap, around the neck, or over the lower part of your face, it
is the ultimate in sun protection, though the fashion statement is still being debated.
Because even sunscreen that claims to be waterproof
washes off after swimming or sweating, and reapplying
isn’t always pleasant or possible, covering your skin with
clothing is always the best protection from the sun. Fishing
guides have known for decades the benefits of wearing a
long-sleeved white shirt, and the idea has spread. Several
companies make fast-drying, light, high SPF shirts that are
comfortable and actually look good. The selection, especially for women, has increased drastically in the past few
years as people start to realize that, not only do these shirts
protect your skin by “shading” you from the sun, they also
keep you much cooler.
Children are especially prone to getting sunburned since
they generally spend so much time in the water and on
the beach. Reapplying sunscreen to a child once his skin
is wet and sandy is nearly impossible. Once again, other
sports have offered us a good solution. Surfers wear rash
guards to prevent their chests from getting abraded during
hours of laying on their boards waiting for the right wave.
These fast-drying form-fitting shirts are perfect for children.
They provide protection from the sun, yet they do not get
weighed down and baggy when they are wet like T-shirts.
Long-sleeved versions are available for all sizes, newborn
to adult, and act as a comfortable sunscreen that doesn’t
need to be reapplied.
There are some body parts that we just don’t think about
getting sunburnt. Standing at the helm for hours with the
sun behind you may not immediately signal to you that you
should apply sunscreen. The next day when you can’t sit
down because the backs of your legs are burnt, it is too
late. The tops of your feet are another potentially painful
spot to get too much sun, making wearing shoes Monday
morning a painful punishment.
We all know we should, but a reminder of the importance
of protecting our skin from sun damage may help prevent
sunburns, wrinkles, or worse. Keep a supply of sunscreen
products in the boat, or better yet, in the cooler for an invigorating treat when you reapply.
Connie McBride has been exploring by boat for over a decade. You can read about her adventures in her latest book:
Eurisko Sails West: A Year in Panama available at Amazon
and her web site simplysailingonline.com.
AMELIA ISLAND
Amelia Island Yacht Basin is a full-service marina in
a first-class resort island setting on one of the East
Coast’s most-refined and relaxing resort islands.
Amelia Island provides access to world-class fishing, golf, a quiet evening on a Victorian veranda, or a
short drive to vibrant downtown Jacksonville.
The marina features 146 wet slips and 224 dry slips in
3 dry storage buildings. On site full-service yard and
parts department with haul out up to 36 tons, fuel
dock, state of the art pump out stations, ship store,
bait, wireless internet, laundry facilities, bathroom/
shower houses, and The Marker 13 Tiki Bar and Grill
featuring a deck and seating for 60 people. Near
Historic Fernandina Beach and the closest marina to
Jacksonville Airport.
AMELIA ISLAND YACHT BASIN
251 Creekside Drive | Amelia Island, Florida 32034
Phone: (904) 277-4615 | Email: [email protected]
[email protected] | www.aiyb.net
A SUNTEX WATERFRONT PROPERTY
w w w. s u n t e x v e n t u r e s . c o m
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
27
Fishing Report
AUGUST A SEARING MONTH
FOR SOUTHEAST FISHING
H OT F I S H A N D H OT T E M P S
STORY AND PHOTOS BY CAPTAIN JUDY HELMEY
A pair of spotted
sea trout
Inshore
A
ugust is considered the fisherman’s hottest
month for fishing, meaning temperatures are
very warm! I’m not saying you won’t catch fish or
that it’s a bad time to fish – you’ll just need to be
proactive in some cases to get the catching job done.
This is the month where it’s hot and it’s been hot. However, in comes the best news. All bait that are going to
be here has already arrived, offering up all fish plenty of
the real-deal stuff to eat. If you are going with artificial
baits such as Strike King ZTOO soft baits, which come
in some really great colors, the secret is to “work them
slow and direct.” Slow means just what it says and direct
means put a signature “twitch” in your retrieve. When
picking out soft baits check to see if they are going
to last for multiple blue fish hit. Most soft baits – also
known as “plastics” – pull apart and separate too easy,
immediately altering the retrieve value.
For those fishermen that like to go with the real deal, I
suggest using live shrimp or mud minnows. All inshore fish
have a serious desire to eat these baits. The reason being
is it’s easy to kill, it’s easy to eat, and there is always some
lurking around the edge or right up in the marsh grass.
Another good live bait to use is finger mullet. This is
great bait, but as usual it can have set backs. Going with
live finger mullet says one thing: “The fisherman holding
the rod is looking for that bigger fish bite!” I always suggest catching your own mullet. While doing so, keep the
small ones and discard all but a few of the larger ones for
cut bait. Don’t put them in the live well. Throw them on
the deck and let them season. For a great August red fish
bite I suggest cutting the fresh dead fish up like a loaf of
bread and putting a slice on the hook, cast into place,
and let it sit. Believe me, if a red fish is in the area bites
are going to happen!
Offshore
Fall is just around the corner – however, summer fish
catching tactics need to remain in play. The 2012 top water season for this coast has already been better than
2011. Spanish and king mackerel are being caught off
28
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
Spanish mackerel
the beach fronts in formed rips, artificial reefs, the Savannah Snapper banks, and the Gulf Stream. The best way
to get a more solid Spanish mackerel bite is to troll 00
and 0 Clark spoons. These spoons all come accompanied with a signature red ball. You can pull these spoons
directly on the surface or mid water column behind troll-
ing sinkers or popping corks, or deep behind planer
set ups. When fish are showing out – meaning feeding
on the surface – it’s best to have some sort of small top
water plug for pitching right into the school. Here are a
few that you can find in my tackle box: Rapala F-5, Rapala HJ-6. and Rapala XR06. Most of these small casting lures have a small scoop, which means your options
once casting into place are reeling, stopping, and reelstop. Spanish mackerel seem to like to watch these style
lures move, but when they stop and jump back the biting
deal is sealed.
Bottom fishing can be slow during this time of the summer. However, if you fish as much as we do, secrets to triggering the bottom fish’s bite are revealed! Perfect size live
baits such as cigar minnows and Spanish sardines once
placed on the bottom can trigger a larger fish bite. To
catch these baits, don’t forget your good old Sabiki’s size
8 hook. When baiting up those bottom hooks, I suggest
using smaller pieces of cut squid or cut fish. The reason
being is when the fish does hit your bait, you want it as
close to the hook’s point as possible. If all you are catching
is small fish in a certain place, this is your sign to move to
the next spot!
Spanish Mackerel Lessons
You might see Spanish mackerel jumping periodically out
of the water before the month of August. However, according to my father, Spanish mackerel never jumped a lot until
after August 6. The reason being is that this is their spawning time and they are either trying to get rid of their eggs
or they are just happy as heck that this birthing process is
coming to an end!
“Always steer away!” is something daddy always told
me about Spanish mackerel during the month of August. Once the schools of mackerel start staying on the
surface, they feed for hours. While all this feeding is
going on, large sharks cruise in and start feeding on
the mackerel.
When we see fish on the surface, it seems we all want
to drive right through the disturbance. Well, if a shark
happens to be feeding right where you plow through
the school, you are going to hit the shark. This is bad
for both the boat and the shark. So, always steer clear
of the surface schools of fish. I speak of this from plenty
of experience!
Captain Judy Helmey operates Miss Judy Charters out of
Savannah Georgia. She puts out a regular fishing report
online, and contributes regularly to All At Sea Southeast.
Capt. Judy has been “kicking fish tail since 1956.”
NEW YORK HARBOR
Liberty Landing is a landmark marina with 520 slips offering year-round dockage and dry storage for boats
up to 200 feet in length. Located in Liberty State Park
along the Morris Canal and provides easy access to
the lower Hudson River.
The marina features a marine store, 60 ton travel lifts,
as well as full marine service including: engine repair/
repower, electronics installations, sailboat rigging
shop, generator repair/installation, diesel fuel polishing, painting bottom/hull/topside, and prop and shaft
services. 24 hour fueling, new restrooms and tenants
lounge, peace-of-mind marina security 24/7, two restaurants on site, 85 transient slips, and minutes away
from NYC by onsite ferry service.
LIBERTY LANDING MARINA
80 Audrey Zapp Drive, Liberty State Park
Jersey City, New Jersey 07305
Phone: (201) 985-8000 | Fax: (201) 985-9866
Email: [email protected]
libertylandingmarina.com
A SUNTEX WATERFRONT PROPERTY
w w w. s u n t e x v e n t u r e s . c o m
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
29
Sailing
EMOTIONS ACROSS
THE ATLANTIC
THE UPS AND DOWNS OF OCEAN SAILING
STORY BY ANDY SCHELL
PHOTO BY MARIA KARLSSON
Arcturus in mid-Atlantic, sailing towards the sunrise.
L
ike Jody Reynolds (see story pg. 32), I’ve experienced the merits of cruising both inshore and off,
but for me, there is nothing quite like ocean sailing. And there is not a better way to convey the
feeling of it – the ups and downs, the emotions – than by
writing about it in real-time. The following was excerpted
from my hand-written journal that I kept aboard Arcturus
last summer when my wife Mia and I crossed the Atlantic
from Annapolis to Ireland. Without further ado…
“It’s August 6, 2011, and day seven at sea. Ugh, awful
night. It’s five in the morning, and I’ve got the morning
watch. I know I will regret saying ‘awful night’ later on when
we really do have one, but it was unpleasant nonetheless.
After the weather report last evening, I turned in for the
night. It was blowing about 25 knots and we were just roiling along in big seas under the small jib and the mizzen.
The boat was really moving, and happy. Every fourth or
fifth wave exploded on the beam, covering the decks with
green water and spray.
30
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
Andy and Clint enjoying
a steaming cup of coffee
on the Grand Banks.
I found it nearly impossible to sleep on the high side.
Until last night we’d either been becalmed or on port tack,
so my starboard bunk was always on the low side, or at least
level. To start the night last night I was about 30º higher on
my side – until the wind died, again. After dark, the rain
came, and the wind went with it. We had too little sail up,
and the boat just started bobbing around uncomfortably.
It’s too warm to crawl into the sleeping bag, but too uncomfortable and itchy to lie on the bare cushion, so I had mighty
trouble getting any good rest.
It is still very muggy, and the cabin is damp from the constant windward sailing and heavy rain. Now that it’s warmer
in the air, nothing dries and all the surfaces are sticky and
unpleasant to the touch. The wind never did come back,
and I lay there half in a daze gritting my teeth.
I’m making coffee now. The brass kettle my parents got us
for the wedding works wonders onboard with its wide base
– it stays put in a pitching galley. It’s Swedish instant coffee,
and it’s actually really good. I’m drinking it black. This particular instant coffee came in a small Ziploc bag, and was present
#8 that we got from Mia’s swim girls (Vinnars, Ida, Sara and
Anna – at the wedding in June, they changed out of their
dresses and into their bathing suits, goggles and swim caps,
and gave the most memorable speech of the evening, to the
delight of many of the American lads in the room). Everyday
we open a new one, and the event marks a highlight to each
day, and something we truly look forward to. The girls gave
us 30 presents – one for each day of the voyage, and a few
extra to be sure we’d have enough.
For days now we’ve had a little black chirping bird fluttering around the boat during the nights. You can just make
out his little silhouette against the night sky when he flutters
near the tricolor. He sounds almost as if he’s chuckling to
himself. I haven’t decided if it’s been the same one night
after night or if he has friends that take up station near the
stern as we continue east. If we were closer to shore, he
could easily be mistaken for a bat (save for the chirping of
course), as his flying motion is almost floppy, like he’s not
sure how it’s done. I think I’ve seen him in daylight – he flaps
his wings only occasionally, and between flaps his body appears to fall right out of the sky, as if he’s struggling just to
stay airborne. He’s by far the smallest of the seabirds we’ve
encountered, but he must be a good flyer, as we’re now
over 300 miles from land.
There are a surprising number of birds about actually – the
other day during one of the calms (which are beginning to be
hard to keep track of) an enormous flock of brown and white
guys seemed to be following the boat. We were motoring
south, trying to get to 43º north, ahead of a coming weather
system, and I think they mistook us for a Grand Banks fishing boat. They’d take off en masse, and land on the water
just ahead of us, floating and looking for food. Humorously,
they’ll dunk their heads right under the water to have a good
look around. I nicknamed them ‘curious birds’ (They were
actually red-footed boobies, I would later learn). Once the
boat passed them by, they’d take to the air again, landing
just ahead of us. This game went on for hours that day.
The sun is coming up now. This is one of the best times of
the day, especially now that it’s clear. The nights are long and
hard when you don’t sleep well, and the dawn is so friendly,
invigorating. I just finished my coffee and with the coming
daylight, I might actually feel reasonably awake. The last few
stars are just now fading, and if I were a little more ambitious
I’d get out my sextant. Maybe in another week or so.
I’m finally getting ‘into’ the voyage. There are times when
my anxiety goes way up – two days ago I was literally on the
verge of tears, wanting to snap my fingers and find myself at
home on the couch with the dogs, or at the breakfast table
at Mia’s family’s house in Sweden (The breakfast table usually
consists of her mom’s home-baked bread, yogurt, muesli,
crispbread and cheese, hard-cooked eggs, fruit, homemade
jams and potfuls of coffee. These breakfasts, especially when
Mia is home, can last for hours). The feeling was utterly irrational – we were sailing beautifully and the boat was performing great. But the sky was gray, and with it my mood.
Last night was another instance, even after I felt I’d turned
the corner. The building wind and seas raised my heart rate
just enough that I found it hard to relax. I noticed my breathing was short again, thanks to stress, which had gone away
since leaving Canada. The feeling faded into a battle with
my consciousness to try and let me sleep, which I failed. Mia
shared this butterflies-in-the-stomach feeling, and we chatted about it before her watch. Clint, our friend who came
along as crew, overheard and jokingly wondered if he should
be concerned as well (Though it was obvious that he was not.
On watch a few minutes earlier, Clint had stood outside in
the drizzle and spray, hooting and hollering every time a big
wave came up astern and sent Arcturus on a wild surfing run,
or when another smashed into the beam, sending spray as
high as the spreaders. He was in his element).
Out here, you’re so exposed. I think that’s the root of my
anxiety. The comfort and security found in your bunk is literally only separated from the sea by – at most – an inch of
plastic. I thought of other land-based adventures yesterday –
mountain climbing, hiking, etc. – but comparatively, from my
perspective on this boat, they seem so secure. Yes, a rockclimber is only one slip away from death, but I feel like he’s
in control. Out here, it’s utter wilderness, and no matter how
prepared you and the boat are, the sea is ultimately in control, and can simply overwhelm you if it really kicks off. It’s this
feeling of exposure that literally has me holding my breath.
On the really bad thoughts, I tell myself that this is the end of
my seafaring career, that from now on I’ll stick to adventures
on solid ground, but I know that’s not true. Those are just the
bad days, and they’re complemented by good ones.”
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
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Motor Cruising
1500 MILES ON THE INSIDE
C R U I S I N G T H E U N I V E R S E T H AT PA R A L L E L S I N T E R S TAT E I -95
STORY AND PHOTOS BY JODY REYNOLDS
H
eading north from Beaufort, S.C., on the morning tide late in April, our 82-year-old motor yacht,
Cygnus II, glides through the beautiful marshes
we’ve called home over the months of what
passed for winter. For me, leaving port there’s always an odd
but comforting mix of exhilaration and regret. We’re heading 1500 miles north to Lake Ontario and our summer charter
grounds in the 1000 Islands along the St. Lawrence River. Our
official spotter, Shelby the Labrador, barks joyfully as a couple of dolphins leap in our bow wave. For the moment she’s
forgotten that she hates leaving any port, and especially her
many friends in Beaufort. Our Dalmatian, Dublin, barks too,
but he’s not sure what all the fuss is about.
The mist lifts off the river, promising a spectacular day.
After stopping to visit a friend in Charleston following an
uphill run fighting tides, our second day out we pull into
the familiar entrance to Georgetown, another lovely South
Carolina community, and the third oldest city in the state.
The well-kept wooden shrimper, Stormy Seas, is returning
home to her dock fully loaded. The shrimper’s family, who
run the fish market by the same name, is waving enthusiastically from the dock. The sight brings tears to our eyes.
Naturally, we pick up some fresh caught American shrimp
before leaving town. We call at Morsel’s, a small but quality market along the waterfront whose owners welcome us
back, remembering us and our dogs from four years ago
when we spent several weeks there undergoing repairs on
our previous boat. Morsels and the new Low Country Market in Beaufort are highly welcome to transients like us.
Passing north, we count the all-too-familiar relics of
wooden hulled shrimpers, and other boats lost or abandoned by their unfortunate owners. Occasionally we see a
boat aground … either one who’s missed a marker, a not
unusual sight, or one who didn’t realize that sand moves,
particularly near an inlet.
We note that the tides are more extreme than usual due
to an anomaly of the moon (extremely large and full). On
this trip north, we’re glad Cygnus draws under four feet.
Wildlife seems more abundant than usual for this time
of year. The osprey seem more prevalent, for many more
miles. They get a bird’s eye view of us and the dogs as we
pass close in hopes of spotting their chicks. Occasionally, in
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Passing through the “Rockpile”
in the canal behind Myrtle
Beach can be exciting…
we are looking for an
oncoming barge in
the fog.
The shrimping fleet in McClellanville, SC
The Stormy Seas family waves to us from the dock
addition to the abundant blue heron, we spot a fox fishing
along the shoreline.
The thousands of people racing along I-95 between the
populous states of the north and their Florida vacations are
mostly oblivious to life in our universe, one that parallels the
highway both physically and metaphorically. Most wouldn’t
believe that the ICW from just south of Myrtle Beach to well
south of St. Augustine is mostly wild and beautiful scenery.
There are some stretches of the inside passages – like the
ditch behind Myrtle Beach and the 20-mile-long Alligator
Pungo canal, straight cuts without much to look at – that
most boaters find yawningly boring. As usual I’m the helmsman for the dug canals, because a) I’m never bored at the
helm and b) with the exception of a few miles of Myrtle
Beach, I find the scenery endlessly fascinating.
When I was primarily a sailor with pretty severe time constraints, I used to scoff at the idea of meandering north and
south along the ICW, especially through these land cuts
and along the S-turns of the rivers in Georgia. Although
we ducked in often to avoid bad weather, overall we considered the intracoastal a less desirable backup route for
offshore passages between Maine or the Great Lakes and
the Florida keys.
Now, after countless trips inside and out, Mike and I relish each passage though these sounds and marshes, along
rivers and the canals our forefathers dug to enable boats
like ours and commercial traffic to make their way north and
south many decades ago. Maybe it’s the fact that we travel
on old wooden yachts, but we always share a sense of stepping back into history when we travel the ICW.
Twenty-six trips across the pond aboard freighters bound
from Jacksonville to the Ukraine, tug and scalloper experiences, and decades of yacht deliveries have left Mike without
a craving for additional offshore cruising. Truth be told, other
than enjoying a brief offshore leg now and then, I now prefer
the intimacy and relative protection of intracoastal waters.
Passing into North Carolina, we squint into the morning sun as the ICW travels mostly east to Morehead City
and Beaufort. North Carolina is a beautiful state, with miles
of stunning shoreline and interior waters, but much of it
constitutes my least favorite part of the trip, thanks to the
endless bridges. Unlike South Carolina, where tenders (in
diminishing numbers due to construction of new high span
bridges) open bridges at their own discretion, many North
Carolina bridges open only on the hour. For a competitive
boater like me, this means the entire passage through this
scenic state is spent in a race to make any bridge under 20
feet in clearance.
With Cygnus II’s mast down, not many bridges pose a
problem, but for sailors, the two on-the-hour bridges at
Wrightsville Beach, separated only by a couple of miles,
can waste a couple of hours. Luckily, we pass under both,
feeling sorry for the waiting yachts.
Although the ICW is “protected,” there is more than
ample open water. In bad weather, the rivers and sounds
– the Neuse, the Cape Fear, and the Albermarle Sound in
particular – can challenge any yachtsman. It’s not uncommon to see countless yachts “double parked” at Coinjock
Marina for a couple of days waiting out the weather.
Experienced boaters know that these waters deserve respect, as they can and often do make passages challenging and, at times, downright hair-raising. The Albermarle
Sound may not look like much on an east coast chart, but
those 20 miles can seem like a lifetime on a boat that travels
at 10 knots or less when the wind’s kicking up from the west.
One of our favorite side trips is east to historic Manteo
on Roanoke Island. Another, when we can afford an extra
day, is to pass up the Pasquatank River, which rivals the
Waccamaw (and may be even a little prettier), stopping in
friendly Elizabeth City and then through the Dismal Swamp,
conceived by George Washington in 1763, and up into the
commercial bridge-infested waters of Norfolk.
On this particular trip, weather was a significant factor,
and delays (which we don’t usually experience) ranged from
fog, wind and storms, to heavy rains that brought large
trees floating down the normally peaceful Hudson River.
The usually relaxing and pretty Erie Canal, reopened after
several days of high water, is a harrowing experience with
buoys way out of position, terrific turbulence from dams
and locks, as well as some pretty impressive tree trunks and
other debris we literally pushed out of our way with the bow
in order to make our way into the locks.
Looking back, by far our easiest day’s run on this passage was in fact the offshore leg before passing New York
City, paralleling the coast of New Jersey. While Mike and I
love the inside passages, they are not always as relaxing as
the scenery would make them appear, and this straight shot
offshore with consistent water depths, no shifting shoals or
traffic competing for narrow channels was an absolute pleasure, a respite.
Dublin and Shelby do not share this opinion. They like
the land up close and personal, and prefer brief intervals
between morning and evening docking or mooring, the
former being far preferred. For the crew of Cygnus II, we’ve
come to learn to like the good with the bad, and even
though it’s sometimes easier offshore, we’ll take the challenges – and the rewards – offered on the inside.
Jody Reynolds contributes regularly to All At Sea Southeast, sharing her experiences cruising the East Coast on the
classic yachts she’s come to adore.
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
33
Pro Tips
BEWARE OF LONG-TERM
WEATHER FORECASTS
S O M E S C I E N C E B E H I N D T H E I R I N ACC U R AC Y
BY DENNIS SCHELL
F
ifty years ago, long-range weather forecasting was
already a scientific impossibility, and Edward Lorenz proved it. In 1962, Lorenz published his definitive work on meteorology in Volume 20 of the
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. No one knew it then,
but the paper was perhaps the first published example of
what would become chaos theory.
“All the money spent on long-range forecasting – about
half a billion dollars in the last few decades – is money wasted,” Jeff Goldblum’s character in the movie Jurassic Park
says. “It’s a fools errand. It’s as pointless as trying to turn
lead into gold.”
Before Lorenz, meteorologists were strangely confident in their ability to one day not only predict but actually control the weather. By the 1980s, meteorologists
were in fact producing fairly accurate short-term forecasting. However, beyond two- and three-day forecasts,
the science became speculation. Beyond five and six
days? The forecasts were worthless.
Sound familiar? Thirty years later, and weather forecasting has not advanced at all. Even today forecasters cannot
predict beyond a couple days with any accuracy. Think of
the last hurricane track forecast you have seen – the coneshaped “possibilities” of the hurricane’s future position
cover hundreds of miles after a day or two.
The logic behind Lorenz’s presumption lays in the “butterfly effect” – scientifically known as ‘sensitive dependence
on initial conditions.’
Using primitive computers, Lorenz discovered something incredible in his numbers, and by accident. By merely
changing the decimal point in certain ‘input parameters’ –
say for example, starting humidity at a given point in the
atmosphere – the resulting graphs that showed the ups and
downs of the resulting ‘weather’ gradually diverged, when
in theory they should have remained the same (the input
parameters were for practical purposes identical).
The implications were immediately obvious. It’s impossible to exactly measure the real atmosphere needed to
make accurate predictions. Even if weather sensors could
theoretically measure every condition of the atmosphere at
points inches apart and to the nth decimal place, the slight
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The graphical representation of Lorenz’ original discovery.
The ‘output’ – in Lorenz example, the weather – traces a line
that never overlaps itself in the same place, indicating infinite
variability and hence unpredictability. This graph became the
visual for chaos theory.
variations between those inches and the sheer number of
variables that create weather – humidity, pressure, temperature, etc. – create the chaos. Those inconsistencies multiply in the dynamic system over time, creating more and
bigger inconsistencies and the model quickly breaks down
after the first few days.
In practice, modern GRIB forecasts paint a wonderful picture of chaos theory in action. When GRIBs are downloaded, they offer a picture of the weather over a large scale in
real-time. A simple test on the accuracy of a forecast – and
a perfect visual analogy to what Lorenz first discovered in
1962 – is to simply ‘animate’ the GRIB file seven days out,
then download the real-time file seven days later. Do they
match? Not likely.
Dennis Schell is a yacht captain and sailor who has spent
most of his life cruising the U.S. East Coast and Bahamas.
Contact him at fathersonsailing.com.
American History
MIGHTY, MUDDY MO
A FAMOUS BAT TLESHIP, AN INFAMOUS GROUNDING
BY DONALD STREET
T
he battleship USS Missouri (BB-63) was one of three
of the last warships to be built in the battleship era.
She was decidedly one of the most powerful – nine
16-inch guns, 12 secondary, 5-inchers, and too
many 40- and 20-millimeter anti-aircraft guns to count. She
was big – nigh on 900-feet long – fast, cruising at around 33
knots, and had an exceptionally long range of 15,000 nautical miles. The German Bismarck, the HMS Vanguard of Great
Britain and the Japanese Yamato were big, powerful ships in
their own right, but did not compare to the Missouri in that
most subjective of categories. She was the most beautiful of
them all, said to be President Harry Truman’s favorite ship.
The Mighty Mo never once fought a major ship-to-ship
battle, but she saw plenty of ship to shore action, bombarding coastlines in WWII, Korea and the first Iraq War.
In early January 1950, she was leaving Norfolk with her
usual complement of crew, en route to the Atlantic. The channel from the Naval base in Hampton Roads out past Thimble
Shoals and on towards the mouth of the Chesapeake is well
buoyed, and was indeed well-known to the crew. They had a
planned run through a new acoustic range off Thimble Shoals
on the way, and she steamed ahead around a consistent
speed of 15 knots approaching the range.
Details of the buoyage for the acoustic range remain murky,
but one way or another, the ship missed it, running aground
on Thimble Shoals with so much momentum that she carved a
2,500-foot long channel in the mud and ended up resting hard
on the bottom, a full seven-feet above her waterline.
The Department of the Navy took a close look at the
situation and was ready to contract a private salvage firm
to free the ship. However, a few of the powers that be, including Admiral Smith, at the time Commander, Cruisers,
Atlantic, and issuer of the Missouri’s orders said that if they
Navy got her there, they could get her off. The Pentagon
relented, but made clear that the Admiral’s career was riding on the operation. He moved aboard the ship during the
process, part of which included responding to the nearly
10,000 letters from people with their own ideas of how to
get her free.
Everything moveable was offloaded onto barges, nearly all
the fuel pumped out. Divers set to work with high-pressure
hoses to dig tunnels under the ship in the mud, quite a task
as her maximum beam exceeded 108-feet (subsequently she
traversed the Panama Canal with only a foot to spare either
side), and barge camels were brought alongside.
After threading chain through the tunnels dug beneath
the ship and securing it to flooded barge camels either side,
they began to set her free. With an exceptionally high tide
in early February, the barge camels were pumped out and
floated. The chain took up tight under the hull, every big tug
on the Chesapeake was pulling hard, and the Missouri’s engines were in full reverse and she slowly floated free.
A board of inquiry was convened to investigate the grounding and discuss the matter of a court marshal, and if one were
needed, whom it would fall on. Needless to say, the navigating officer and the officer on the con were first in line.
They ultimately relieved Captain Brown of his command
and court marshaled four others following the incident.
Captain Brown’s record was docked so many points that
many felt it would be the end of his career. Admiral Smith,
on the other hand, survived the salvage effort and went on
to retire a well-respected officer.
Today, the Mighty Mo is a museum in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and is open to the public for tours. See ussmissouri.
com for more information.
Donald Street is an internationally renowned sailor and
writer, and was once a naval officer himself, serving on submarines. He has spent a lifetime at sea and has been published in nearly every major nautical magazine in the world.
street-iolaire.com.
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
35
Sailing Humor
THE PIRATE QUEEN
A T W O - PA R T FAT T Y E P I C
PA R T T W O
BY CAP’N FATTY GOODLANDER
Part II: The Pirate Queen Goes to War
P
erhaps the oddest Pirate Queen Experience took
place in Grenada in 1983, days after the USA ‘won’
the war and boldly commandeered the Holiday
Inn’s beach bar for its HQ. She insisted we sail in
and “help with the war effort.”
Needless to say, I knew we wouldn’t be doing much helping – but I figured, correctly, that it would be an amazing
adventure regardless.
It was – and one that might have gotten us all locked up
if we haven’t been able to slip away (sans running lights) in
the dead of night … before official-dumb knew what we
were up to.
But, it all started off innocently enough. The Pirate Queen
just luffed up her yacht, Life’s a Beach, in front of the Holiday Inn – which was party central for the victorious invasion
forces – and waved.
Basically the entire war effort and Ronald Reagan’s
“valiant fight against communism on the doorstep of the
Americas” ground to a halt over the next few days while
every American Service Man in Uniform shifted his focus
from finding Bernard Coard (the bad guy) to nailing the
Pirate Queen.
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I still have a tattered, faded photograph from those
days, a classic shot of a bygone era. The Pirate Queen is
naked and running through the rain forest wearing only
two crossed gun-belts of bullets and an M16 in each arm
… trailed by a battalion of panting Army Grunts, attempting to both run and hide their attentions at the same time.
Caribbean wildlife, indeed.
The problem was, the Pirate Queen was insatiable on all
levels. I mean, I thought that an entire invasion force adoring her would be enough –WRONG!
And, she had no sense of proportion. If she wanted
more coconuts for her Pina Colada – she’d just inform a
nearby gunnery sergeant. Within seconds, field-radios
would cackle, U.S. Army tank turrets would menacingly
rotate towards their targets, whole groves of palm trees
would be shot down, and the surviving nuts gathered.
(The invaders hadn’t yet mastered the art of palm tree
climbing – not that it mattered with such massive weaponry at their command).
I tried to head off the inevitable with, “…but it costs the
American taxpayer, say, 50 grand per coconut!”
However, the Pirate Queen seldom listened to logic.
“Zee boys love me, no?” she’d say. “I do not tell zem to
shoot down zese silly Nut-of-the-Coco trees – I just slurp
the cream, yes?”
About 10 days into our visit, just when the Pirate Queen
was really having fun, our spies at HQ informed us the Commander of the U.S. War Effort was going to order the Pirate
Queen and her entourage to leave. She was going to be
deported by military decree.
The Pirate Queen was outraged. “But I have just started
to enjoy myself and sample the delights of zee military. I
have barely scratched my – how-you-say – my itch!”
She immediately came up with a plan and rushed over to
our boat for encouragement. “I’m not sure this is a good
idea,” I said. “I mean, inviting the Top Military Brass aboard
your boat for R&R could be very dangerous if, well, things
got out of hand.”
“Zees es no problem,” said the Pirate Queen. “I will be
there whole time, watching like eagle! They will see what
a nice girl I am, and what fine, sensible American friends
I have in you and Carolyn and your sweet American child
Roma Orion. And they will decide to allow me to stay and
finish working my way through the battalion. I am young
and have energy, no?”
With great misgivings, Carolyn and I took our prop… er,
our child Roma, over to Life’s a Beach and joined the party.
The Commander brought his first officer, a black nurse from
Philly, and a chaplain from rural Montana. The Pirate Queen
was nervous. Alas, when she got nervous, she drank –twice
what she normally drank – which was a lot. Enough to kill a
horse … even a Clydesdale!
The Commander was in a particularly relaxed mood on
his first day off since the war started. “I understand from
military intelligence, you have a no-clothes rule,” he leered,
and within a blink of an eye, the Pirate Queen was biting off
his uniform with her teeth.
“…is there a ‘contraband problem’ in the Caribbean?”
asked the First Officer.
“Zees is not,” said the Pirate Queen hotly, “we have plenty!”
My wife Carolyn decamped with Roma at this point.
The next thing I knew, the Pirate Queen was wantonly sitting astride the dazed and delighted Commander, blowing
huge lungfuls of sweet blue smoke into his gaping, drooling
mouth via a discarded cardboard toilet-paper tube. Steamrolling, it’s called – and not a good idea for the faint-of-heart.
Things started to get really out-of-hand. Once the Commander was naked, his First Officer followed suit (or un-suit,
as the case may be), and even the now-drunk nurse from
Philly belligerently took off her top. The chaplain resisted
the madness for a bit – then started to play patty-cake with
the nurse, who was lying on her back in the middle of the
main cabin sole.
I tried not to watch, but it was just too bizarre how the
chaplain’s tongue sort of lolled out of his mouth obscenely.
He was making little, wet, mewing baby sounds. His eyes
were glowing orange – as if in reflection of the hell-fires
awaiting. Damn, he was around-the-bend.
The Pirate Queen didn’t seem to notice. After all, the
party was going well. People were totally incapacitated on
various substances – just like every night aboard Life’s a
Beach. Why worry?
At this point, it was obvious that the nurse – whose breasts
which were still being “splatted” by the devilish-behaving
chaplain – was a lesbian. She was continuously attempting
to grab the Pirate Queen, with greater and greater determination. The Pirate Queen still wore a smile, but it was an
obvious effort when the nurse was holding her by the ankle,
and reaching upward with frantic desire.
Just when I thought things couldn’t get much worse, the
nurse peed. That’s right, she lost control of her bladder.
Right in the middle of the boat, middle of the party, right in
the middle of the evening, shortly before the main course
was scheduled to arrive.
There was shocked silence until the automatic float
switch in the bilge kicked in. Suddenly, things got very ugly.
“You’re out of uniform!” shouted the Commander to his
First Officer – before looking down at his own nakedness,
and covering his deflating manhood with his hands. He was
having some sort of psychotic break – alas, back to reality!
“Nurse,” he screamed. “Put those mounds away immediately! Chaplain, belay the patty-cake!”
Soon they’d awkwardly gathered up their clothes in their
arms, and left via the official launch. The last thing I heard
was the chaplain reciting some religious tripe – he’d probably have to spend years in a monastery to get suitably pious once again.
“Stupidos,” hissed the Pirate Queen afterwards, “leaving
before the whiskey chicken was even served!”
“I’m going back to Carlotta,” I said, “and hoisting anchor. There’s no telling what those idiots will do when they
awake with a brutal hang-over. Somebody is gonna have to
pay – and I don’t want it to be us. I’m going to be in Trinidad
– getting lost in the carnival crowds.”
“What a shame,” said the Pirate Queen sadly, “dat zee
American Brass can’t hold their liquor.”
Dawn found our vessels far offshore en route to South
America.
“Brazil has no extradition,” I said grimly over the VHF radio.
“But it was funny, no, when she peed!” said the Pirate
Queen.
Cap’n Fatty and Carolyn Goodlander are currently refitting
for their third circumnavigation.
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
37
Mechanically Inclined
MARINE ELECTRONICS ONBOARD
PA R T I : V H F R A D I O S
STORY AND PHOTOS BY GLENN HAYES
Editor’s Note: This is the first in a series of articles that will
cover what electronics should be considered for the boater
looking to equip their vessel with the latest in technology.
T
oday there are myriad ways to communicate. Cell
phones, texting, tweeting, Facebook, e-mails and a
multitude of other ways to reach out to others have
made communication instant and easy. But with all
these choices, which is the best way to communicate when
you are out on the boat and, in particular, in an emergency?
Many may say their cell phone is adequate, but the truth
is that relying on your cell phone while on the water could
prove to be not only ineffective, but dangerous. A handheld or fixed-mount VHF radio is a wise choice onboard. It
may even be the most important piece of electronic equipment you buy for your boat.
There are many areas where a cell phone may have enough
signal strength to get a call out. But there are also many ar-
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eas where there is little or no signal. This can be true even in
high traffic coastal areas. A VHF (Very High Frequency) radio
that operates within the frequencies allotted for marine use
can transmit a signal that can be received anywhere within
its range. The U.S. Coast Guard monitors emergency bands
of VHF radio transmission 24 hours a day, seven days a week
along with other marine vessels, marinas and waterside facilities. The fact is, if you need to communicate on the water
your best option the majority of the time is VHF.
Marine VHF radios are two-way radios that operate within
a set of frequencies that have been allotted by the FCC
and other international regulatory agencies to allow for marine and maritime communication. VHF radios commonly
found on recreational vessels come either as fixed-mount
devices or as hand-held portables. The former is designed
to be installed onboard and wired into the vessel’s electrical system. It is comprised of the radio itself and a separate mounted antenna. It has the ability to transmit up to 25
watts, the maximum allowed by the FCC.
New fixed-mount VHF radios are required to have the
ability to transmit an automatic mayday signal (known as
DSC or Digital Selective Calling) that, when connected to
an active GPS, will also transmit your position at the time
the distress button is pushed. This could prove invaluable in
a distress situation where time is short and information may
not be broadcast verbally. To properly use this function, ra-
Other factors that should be considered when
selecting an antenna are what they are made
of, how and where they will be mounted to the
boat and their gain.
dios must be registered to obtain a unique MMSI (Maritime
Mobile Service Identity) number. It is a simple and free process and can be done at boatus.com/mmsi. Once transmitted, this unique identifier is part of the mayday signal, and
rescue authorities along with any other vessel monitoring
DSC can identify the vessel in distress.
A fixed mount radio requires an external antenna. This
antenna can come in a variety of lengths and is just as
important a component as the radio itself. All VHF radios
operate at line of sight, meaning that wherever the top
of the antenna can “see” is where it can broadcast. One
must also consider that many Coast Guard towers are tall
and can increase the range as they view farther over the
horizon. Sailboats, with mast-mounted antennas, generally
have a longer range as well. A simple way to determine the
effective range of your radio is to use this formula: square
root of the height above the water in feet times 1.42 equals
range in miles. The longer (higher) the antenna, the farther
the range of transmission. Common lengths range from a
3-foot stainless whip antennas to 21 foot two- and threepiece fiberglass models.
Other factors that should be considered when selecting an
antenna are what they are made of, how and where they will
be mounted to the boat and their gain. Some VHF antennas
may look similar but their internal components can make a
huge difference in their performance. Lower priced economy
antennas may be nothing more than a coaxial cable held in
place with foam supports inside a fiberglass shaft. Better performing antennas will have single or multiple copper elements
inside allowing for better transmission and reception of radio
signals. Check the construction prior to purchasing. You could
have the best radio on the market but pair it with a low-end
antenna and performance will be less than expected.
The antenna mounting location and appropriate mount
also need to be considered. Gain should be another deciding factor. The gain of the antenna in marine applications
refers to the radiation pattern of the antenna. A three-foot
stainless antenna has a 3 dB gain, meaning that it transmits a spherical or rounded pattern sending the signal in
all directions. This is particularly good if it is mounted on a
sailboat mast that is healed over, as the radiation is wider
and not just transmitting to space or in the water. A taller,
21-foot antenna may transmit at a 9 dB gain, which is a narrower, more conical pattern that will transmit better over
longer distances in calmer water from a boat that doesn’t
rock or pitch too much. Most smaller vessels will have a 3 or
6 dB antenna for the best compromise.
Handheld VHF radios run on their own battery power
(alkaline, nickel cadmium or lithium ion batteries), they are
not dependant on shipboard power and are completely
portable. They can be taken boat to boat and are often
used as a backup to a fixed-mount VHF. Their effective
range may be less than fixed-mount radios, but range can
be increased slightly if the radio is used in a tower or a
high point onboard. Their transmit power is regulated to
be no higher than 6 watts by the FCC and can be adjusted
in some models to transmit on 1 watt or 3 watts to conserve battery power.
Handhelds are a common option in smaller boats plying
near- and inshore waters. Many new models such as those
from Icom, Uniden, and Vertex Standard float and some
even have emergency LED strobes and built in GPS units.
Effective range for these radios is about five miles. While
limited, that’s still better than a cell phone with no signal.
Whichever VHF you decide to go with, it is important that
you have a radio that will give you the ability to communicate
in an emergency, or even a non-emergency, to the appropriate people who can help while you are aboard your vessel.
It may just be the most important piece of electronics you
purchase. It can save lives and property and, if nothing else,
make your days on the water more pleasurable.
Glenn Hayes is a regular contributor to All At Sea Southeast. Find him online at hayesstudios.com.
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
39
Work on the Waterfront
TOURNAMENT DIRECTOR, HOST,
TV
COMMENTATOR
A JACK-OF-ALL-TRADES IN THIS MONTH’S ‘ WORK ON THE
WAT E R F R O N T ’ F E AT U R E
STORY AND PHOTOS BY GLENN HAYES
Host Joe Mercurio and crew covering the action up close,
during week one of the Women’s Professional Tarpon
Tournament Series in Boca Grande Pass, Florida. Inset: PTTS
and WPPTS host Joe Mercurio aboard one of the competitor’s
boats interviewing the team Captain while battling a fish in
Boca Grande Pass, Florida. This up close interaction in the
heat of battle is one of the features that make the PTTS such
a TV success.
F
lorida native Joe Mercurio is passionate about fishing, competition and sports. He has melded these
passions to create a unique and challenging job on
the waterfront as the host and director of the popular and controversial all-release Professional Tarpon Tournament Series (PTTS) and the Women’s Professional Tarpon
Tournament Series (WPTTS) in Boca Grande, Fla. He has
become a familiar face on television covering the tournaments, referred to as “like NASCAR on the water.”
When Joe realized that pro ball was not going to be his
career path, he dove headlong into tournament fishing to
quench his competitive spirit. Having worked the broadcasting booth in different facets, he naturally combined TV
and competitive fishing.
The idea came to him when was broadcasting live for
Clear Channel Radio while competing in a tarpon tourna-
40
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
ment in Boca Grande. Listeners driving out of the range
of the radio towers were so compelled by what they heard
that they pulled off to the shoulder to listen to the dramatic
ending and who had won. When this was relayed to Joe,
he told his business partners that the tournament needed
to be televised. When the
tournament he had participated in was discontinued,
that opened the door for
Joe and his partners to
launch a made-for-television tournament.
The PTTS has gained
viewers each year of its seven-year span, leading to the
introduction of the WPPTS
this year. With access to over
44 million homes through
the World Fishing Network
and the Sunsports Channel, the PTTS now claims to
be the largest and richest
tarpon tournament in the
world. Prizes for the fiveweek series include boat,
motor and trailer packages to the winning team
of each week’s tournament (estimated at a value
of $35,000 each), among
other cash and prizes for
second through fifth place.
The overall winning team
of the championship at
the end of the tournament
wins a boat package worth
$55,000, while second
place gets $8,000 cash.
The prizes are not the major draw for viewers. Mercurio credits the location for the success of the tournament on
TV. “It’s a stadium on the water,” he says. The tournament is
held May through June in Boca Grande Pass, when the highest concentrations of tarpon occur. The deep, narrow pass
funnels the waters of Charlotte Harbor to the Gulf of Mexico,
attracting tarpon to feed prior to spawning offshore. With
the tournament restricting fishermen to a small area of the
pass, the boats are concentrated so the action can be filmed
easily to allow viewers to gain familiarity with the competitors
and their catches.
With 50 to 60 boats, along with local and recreational
fishermen, all drifting through the pass attempting to hook
a tarpon in a three-hour period, it can best be described as
organized chaos to an outsider.
As Joe says, hooking the tarpon is the easy part. Getting the fish to the boat can be difficult in the confined and
crowded competition field. With his camera crews filming
all the action, Mercurio is able to hop aboard a boat fighting a fish and interview them in the midst of all the action,
making for great television. Spectators can even view the
action live from the beach of Gasparilla Island State Park. At
times binoculars are not needed as the action comes within
a few feet of the beach.
An added twist to the drama is the team deciding if the
fish is large enough to weigh in, as they are only allowed to
weigh one fish per week until the Tarpon Cup Championship. Teams can release fish for points and take non-invasive
DNA samples for further points (the tournament has been
working with the Florida Wildlife Commission since 2005 in
its Tarpon Genetic Recapture Program, obtaining more than
2,500 DNA samples). When a fish is brought to the beach
to be weighed, a crowd gathers to watch the catch through
the clear weighing harness, along with commentary and interviews by shore reporter Sheli Sanders. Later, the beach
crowd can view the awards and prizes. Every aspect of the
tournament is made for compelling television viewing.
It’s not all fun and games for Mercurio, however. He is
not just hosting the show and jumping from boat to boat
on tournament day. Joe heads up a crew of more than 35
people to put the tournament together and produce the
TV series. Sixteen crew film and record the tournament.
Six release crews ensure the fish that are brought to the
scales are revived and released in good health. Five others
man camera boats, in addition to tournament support staff,
weigh masters and score keepers.
The five weeks that the tournament runs is when Joe is
most likely to have a consistent schedule. The rest of the
year sees him away from home (278 days last year) trying to
secure sponsorships, which along with other business aspects of his work, is the toughest part of his job. He does
appearances for sponsors, organizes events for them, attends meetings and is involved in all other business activities related to the PTTS and WPTTS.
“It’s a 24/7 job,” he says.
On tournament day he is up at 4:30 a.m. and meeting
with the director. Filming starts at 6:30 and runs for five
hours. Once the weekly tournament ends and filming finishes, it is then time to verify the results and update the
website and Facebook and create press releases.
When asked why he does what he does Joe answered, “I
enjoy the excitement of watching these guys, telling their
story and showing everybody out there what they do.” His
growing audience seems to agree.
Glenn Hayes is a regular contributor to All At Sea Southeast. Find him online at hayesstudios.com.
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
41
SEVEN SEAS CRUISING
ASSOCIATION’S ‘OPERATION
BAHAMAS’ PROJECT
S A I LO R S C R O S S T H E S T R E A M TO D O S O M E G O O D
PHOTO COURTESY SSCA
BY TERRY BORAM
42
School children from Black Point School,
Exuma Bahamas
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
F
or the past four years, I have volunteered at the
Seven Seas Cruising Association booth during the
U.S. Sailboat Show in Annapolis. My job was simply to talk to people about the benefits of joining the SSCA and help the club meet a membership goal.
Clint and I joined the organization several years ago to
access the many resources SSCA has to help turn our “Still
Dreaming” membership status to “Under Way,” so we
felt well qualified for the task. However, over the past two
years I’ve been asked to do another sort of job, namely to
recruit boats to carry small boxes of school supplies and
text books to the Bahamas.
Since we are not “Under Way” – meaning we don’t yet
have our own boat – I knew very little about SSCA’s Clean
Wake Projects. During this 60th year of the SSCA, I set out
to learn more about the ‘Operations Bahamas’ project and
why so many boats were needed. What I discovered, surprisingly, was that the program is in a state of transition.
In 1952, the founding members of the SSCA had three
goals for the organization: to share information; camaraderie; and to leave a clean wake. Sixty years later, these goals
are still the cornerstone of the organization.
To leave a clean wake simply means to show respect for
others and the environment so that those that follow in your
wake have the same experience. SSCA has both humanitarian and environmental programs for cruisers seeking
volunteer opportunities along their journey. While some
cruisers are monitoring radiation levels in the Pacific Ocean
after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, others are
volunteering at an animal clinic in Manzanillo, Mexico, that
provides free spay/neuter clinics for dogs and cats (still an
unusual concept in Mexico). A program closer to our neck
of the woods is the Operations Bahamas Project, which
provides much needed supplies and textbooks to schools
throughout the Bahamas.
In 2003 Bruce and Marilyn Conklin met fellow SSCA
members Edie and Larry Smith who were nearing the end
of their cruising journey. During the Smiths’ extensive travels they discovered that the Bahamian school children were
being taught from 15-year-old textbooks in such disrepair
that complete sections of content were missing. Edie, a retired schoolteacher – and Florida’s ‘Teacher of the Year’ in
1985 – created ‘Operations Bahamas’ and began delivering donated textbooks and school supplies to schools in
Georgetown, Great Exuma. The Smith’s desperately wanted the program to continue. Bruce and Marilyn saw this opportunity as a way to give back to the community that had
been so giving to them over the years.
As founder of Florida’s West Coast rendezvous in Punta
Gorda, Bruce took this idea before his committee seeking
their input and support. They unanimously voted ‘yes’ and
asked participants to bring composition books, lined paper,
crayons, pens, pencils, colored markers, erasers, scissors,
folders, construction paper, book bags, etc. In just their first
year, three boats delivered 45 boxes of school supplies to
schools in the out islands of the Bahamas.
The program grew in 2006 when the Charlotte County
Public Schools in Port Charlotte, Florida joined Operations
Bahamas as a partner by providing retired textbooks, workbooks and instruction manuals. During the 2007/08 campaign, six boats delivered 70 boxes to schools in Staniel
Cay, Black Point, Little Farmers, Georgetown and Ragged
Islands. The following year, 18 boats had delivered 230 boxes and by last year the campaign exploded. In the 2010/11
winter season, 35 boats delivered 350 boxes, requiring 80
volunteers and 45 dinghies.
In 1952, the founding members of the SSCA
had three goals for the organization: to share
information; camaraderie; and to leave a clean
wake. Sixty years later, these goals are still
the cornerstone of the organization.
Longtime volunteer Ron Knaggs began by delivering
supplies himself while cruising the islands. After he stopped
cruising he became a much-needed central hub on the east
coast of Florida. A member of the Experimental Aircraft Association out of the St. Lucie County International Airport in
Fort Pierce, Ron donates hangar space to store the boxes
that come to him already packed and pre-labeled with the
cruiser’s name and ETA. As cruisers make their way south
and east, they contact Ron to make arrangements for a
rendezvous. Once contacted, Ron loads up his truck and
meets the cruisers at their marinas. Though the busiest between November and December, Ron delivers packages all
winter, from October to March.
Ron spoke fondly about the cruisers he sees every year
saying that he looks forward to their stories and pictures
from the previous years. “The most treasured experiences
for the cruisers are when they can deliver the supplies directly to the school,” Ron explained. “It is rare for some of
these areas to see cruisers, so the schools often welcome
them with songs.”
During the 2011/12 campaign Ron and other volunteers
loaded 748 boxes onto 59 boats, distributing supplies
to 11 schools in the Out Islands of the Bahamas, including Ragged Island and the Acklins. It took well over 100
volunteers, making the 2011/12 campaign the largest in
Operations Bahamas history. While overjoyed with the
success, Bruce and Marilyn realized that the program was
not sustainable in its current form. To reach more schools
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
43
PHOTO COURTESY SSCA
SSCA’s ‘Operation Bahamas’ Project
they needed to provide more textbooks and school supplies, requiring even greater numbers of boats and volunteers. They could easily see the need for 120 boats for the
2012/13 campaign. Downsizing was not an option, so they
began searching for alternatives.
Their research led Bruce and Marilyn to the Khan
Academy, a highly acclaimed, free Internet-based learning content provider. In the summer of 2011, Bruce and
Marilyn flew to California to meet Sal Khan, the founder
and CEO, who was named to Time magazine’s 2012 list
of the 100 most influential people in the world. The Khan
Academy has over 3,200 free education videos available,
including a substantial K-12 math program. The company’s belief that “… a few great people can make a big difference” fits perfectly with SSCA’s Clean Wake program.
A partnership was established and plans began for the
2012 campaign.
Upon their return, Bruce and Marilyn conducted a pilot
program with five schools in the Bahamas using the Khan
Program. After downloading the comprehensive math lesson onto thumb drives, they loaded the programs onto the
school’s computers and provided them with five headsets
for the children. Bruce explained that it is easier for the
children to concentrate using the headset. Immediately
the children became so engaged in the program that they
44
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
wanted the schools to open after dinner so that they could
come back to do more modules.
As Bruce talked about the pilot program and the future
plans for Operations Bahamas, I couldn’t help but notice
the excitement in his voice. “We are now part of the digital age and well positioned to help contribute to improving education in the United States as well as expand our
outreach education in the Bahamas, Caribbean, Central
America and beyond,” he explained.
“Cruisers anywhere in the world can now dig
into the very rich math component of Khan
Academy and take them to places that never
had a math program.”
The first order of business was to change the name
from ‘Operations Bahamas’ to ‘Education Anytime’. This
name better describes its widening role in education.
Next the website educationanytime.org was created as
the tool to download the Khan Academy math and science program. Bruce explained that the full K-12 math
program would only be available on this site. Step-bystep instruction will guide the volunteers through the
transfer of the programs onto USB drives. The volunteers
PHOTO COURTESY SSCA
will then have the ability to load the programs directly onto schools’ computers without the need for highspeed Internet access.
Even before the website is fully up and running, one
boater was so excited he shared with Bruce his plans to
distribute the program. “He was going to load the program
directly on to his laptop and when he met with principals
of schools he would work through one of the modules together.” Once the principal agreed to move forward with
the program, the boater would have the flash drives available to immediately load the programs on their computers
so that they can begin teaching that same day.
For those who want a more hands-on experience with
the schools, the Khan Academy has a coaching element
that will also be available on the Education Anytime website. The tools will help volunteers train the principals,
teachers and others so that they can better serve the children in the schools.
“Cruisers anywhere in the world can now dig into the very
rich math component of Khan Academy and take them to
places that never had a math program,” continued Bruce.
“Our current retired professional volunteers in Punta Gorda
continue to be mostly members of the Seven Seas Cruising
Association who have had the vision to support and scale
this worldwide educational effort.” Instead of reaching 1,000
Bahamian children in 2012, there is a potential to reach several thousand worldwide with just this single initiative.
The second initiative will take place in schools right in
Florida. Beginning in September, professional volunteers
(directors of education, retired school Principals, etc.) will
implement and coach teachers in the Khan Academy content in at least four schools in the Charlotte County School
District. The program will then expand to more than a dozen Florida schools in 2013. From there Bruce sees the program going national.
Although the scope of the program has dramatically
changed, I will still be recruiting volunteers to take school
supplies to the Bahamas. In October, the Punta Gorda
SSCA gathering of members (GAM, in the parlance) will still
collect the much-needed supplies. Instead of recruiting 60
boats I will only need to find 15. The rest of my time can be
spent talking about all the other wonderful benefits SSCA
has to offer their members. Happy 60th Birthday SSCA.
Whether she’s gunkholing with her husband Clint aboard
their Contour trimaran, Tri Dreaming or jumping the mast
on a race boat, Terry loves life on the water. Recently she
began sharing this passion through her writing and photography. Contact Terry at [email protected]
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
45
Bahamas
AWARD-WINNING
SHARK DOCUMENTARY
RELEASED ON DVD
T H E S O U T H E A S T ’ S O W N G U Y H A R V E Y P L AY S
A B I G R O L E I N T H E F E AT U R E F I L M
T
he way you look at sharks is about to change forever. This is Your Ocean: Sharks, the award-winning film festival hit, made its way to home video
for the first time in July.
The documentary follows three of the world’s top marine
life artists—Wyland, Guy Harvey and Jim Abernethy—as
they take audiences on a voyage that shatters people’s perceptions of sharks. Sylvia Earle, legendary ocean explorer,
narrates the adventure, shot in The Bahamas, Asia, Pacific
Ocean and New York.
The 48-miniute film reveals up close the misconceptions
and myths surrounding these misunderstood predators
and promotes a call for global shark conservation. One of
the highlights of the film is the story of the relationship between Abernethy and a larger tiger shark named Emma.
For Abernethy, a shark behavioral expert, Emma’s role in
the film shows an entirely different side to the much maligned and demonized species.
“When I look at Emma, I don’t see a 14-foot tiger shark,
I see a peaceful animal that’s established in a relationship
with me—a bond of trust,” said Abernethy, who in the film
demonstrates just how far he is willing to go with that trust.
This Is Your Ocean: Sharks was part of a campaign led
by the Bahamas National Trust encouraging the Bahamian
government to increase protection of sharks in their federal waters. This campaign resulted in the prohibition of all
commercial shark fishing in its more than 240,000 square
miles of territorial waters.
The film, which premiered last year at the prestigious
Newport Beach Film Festival, has won considerable criti-
46
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
cal acclaim, including a Special Achievement Award in Environmental Filmmaking from MacGillivray Freeman Films.
It has been shown at various film festivals worldwide.
“It was amazing to be involved with something that
had such an emotional impact on the audiences, where
people were actually brought to tears,” said Guy Harvey,
an internationally acclaimed marine wildlife artist and
scientist known for his ardent advocacy for conservation
and ocean research. “The loss of these apex predators
could cause irreversible damage to the ocean’s ecosystem and result in the loss of hundreds of millions of dollars to the tourist trade where shark diving has become
a big business.”
Artist Wyland, who also composed some of the music in
the documentary, added: “I really owe it to the animals I
encounter to try to use my art to protect them.”
Film director George C. Schellenger said much remains
to be accomplished to protect the world of sharks, which
through commercial overfishing and the growing taste and
demand for “shark fin soup” is being decimated by tens of
millions annually. Scientists with the International Union for
Conservation of Nature have estimated that 30 percent of
the shark and ray species around the world are threatened
or near threatened with extinction.
“The artists tell a great story,” Schellenger said. “We are
eager to get this film out to the world. It will continue to
make a big difference for sharks, and there’s more work to
be done.”
For more information and/or to purchase a DVD copy, go
to guyharvey.com.
North Carolina
ORIENTAL WELCOMES BOATS,
BOATERS TO COASTAL EVENTS
E N G I N E , W I N D O R PA D D L E P O W E R E D, C I T Y O F F E R S
S O M E T H I N G F O R E V E R Y B O AT E R
STORY AND PHOTOS BY KATHY BOHANAN ENZERINK
Dragon boats are nose to nose
near the finish line during the
2011 Oriental race.
M
id-way between Virginia and South Carolina,
this small coastal village is a well-known and
frequent stop for cruisers traveling the Intracoastal Waterway and a popular destination
for fisherman. It is the kind of town that gets under your skin
and keeps you coming back for more. It is pet, bicycle and
most of all, boater friendly. It is a year-round hub of activity
for boaters, but especially so this month. Oriental boasts
more boats than residents by a huge margin and the ratio
will swell big time during August for regattas, dragon boat
races and world-class fishing.
“If you own a boat, have a friend with a boat or just enjoy
watching on-the-water events, Oriental is the place to be in
August,” said town Mayor Bill Sage.
Sailing
The annual Invitational Dragon’s Breath Regatta Aug.
4-5, is an Inter-Club Racing Committee, or ICRC race and
is open to all PHRS rated mono-hulls with a minimum of
20-feet in length.
Tom Lathrop, who started the regatta in the early 90s,
chose the name Dragon’s Breath because “most names
were already taken and I just thought it was a good
name,” he said.
Originally, the Dragon’s Breath Regatta was an overnight race.
“We would leave Oriental about 5 p.m. and sail to the
Pamlico River and arrive back somewhere between 3 and 4
a.m.,” said Lathrop. “This was before the days of the GPS
and chart plotters, so it was a challenge, especially with
nighttime navigation.”
The Dragon’s Breath Regatta is the biggest event of the
year for the Oriental Dinghy Club.
“It’s is a great racing event made better with a fabulous
banquet and party with live music Saturday night,” said Ken
Small with the Oriental Dinghy Club. “And the Sunday afternoon awards ceremony is always a hit.”
Visit OrientalDinghyClub.com for complete details and
registration forms.
Dragon Boats
Dragons are synonymous with Oriental. They’re everywhere. Painted on the sides of buildings and fences and
adorning lawns and ponds. Dragon eggs nestle safely under bushes and trees throughout the village. The Running
of the Dragon, a 30-plus year celebration of happy noisemaking, welcomes the New Year each December 31. So it
is no surprise to see dragon boats converge at the town’s
beach for what has become an annual event of racing for
points and coveted prizes.
The Oriental Dragon Boat Festival is Aug. 10-11. Experienced, organized teams from as far away as Miami will vie
against local teams, some of which have raced in prior years
and others competing for the first time.
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
47
North Carolina
Dragon Boats are the world’s largest flat-water racing canoes. The standard crew of a contemporary design is typically 22, which comprises 20 paddlers, one drummer and
one sweep or steerer. Full or partial teams and individuals
may register for this event.
Paddlers sit in pairs facing forward toward the drummer
and use a specific type of paddle, which is not attached
to the watercraft. Synchronicity is more important than
strength as dragon boat paddlers move in unison, putting
teamwork ahead of everything else.
“We have invited members of our armed services to
compete as teams,” said Festival Chair Flora Moorman.
“Last year we had two teams from Cherry Point Marine
Corps Air Station from across the (Neuse) River and it was
a huge success.”
Moorman said the Festival Committee welcomes corporate
and individual sponsor donations to pay for the military teams.
“This is just a small way we can say ‘thank you’ to those
who serve our country and to offer them a great time in
Oriental,” she said.
The official kickoff is Saturday morning when the teams
gather to parade, vying for top honors in several categories, some of which are created on the spot.
“This is one of the cool things about Oriental. The
awards change every year,” said committee member Kath-
Friendly pre-race rivalry
during one of several
Oriental-area regattas.
48
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
ryn Garcia. “Last year we awarded Best Team Spirit, Most
Creative Team Headquarters, Best Team Song and Best
Drummer Hats.
“This year they might include Best Dog Costume,” she
said. “It is all about the spirit and the paddling and everyone has a lot of spirit.”
For more information, visit OrientalDragonBoat.com
Fishing
The Oriental Rotary Club hosts the 20th Annual Tarpon
Tournament and 1st Inshore Slam Aug. 17-18.
Tournament Director Charles Skinner changed the 19year format from an all-release tarpon event to include the
inshore slam as a result of input from local fishermen.
“We want to create an opportunity for fishermen of all
stripes,” he said.
Flounder, slot drum and speckled trout, three of the top
eight sport fish in the world, will be weighed in at the town
dock next to tournament headquarters at the Oriental Marina, to determine the winners of the Slam Tournament.
Tarpon anglers must take a date and time-stamped digital photo of their catch for verification to determine the big
purse money winners. One trophy is given to the fisherman
who catches the most “Pancake Tarpon,” or Skates, which
go after the same bait as real tarpon.
“We would like to build the Expo and Tournament into a
major East Coast inshore fishing event,” said Skinner.
Money raised by Rotary during these tournaments and
other fundraising events provide academic scholarships
to local students in addition to supporting area charities.
A substantial amount was donated to the Disaster Relief
Fund, which assisted folks who were hard hit when Hurricane Irene battered Pamlico County and Oriental Aug. 27,
2011. The recovery effort continues.
For more information about the tournaments, email
Charles Skinner at [email protected]
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…And More Sailing
Labor Day weekend offers sailors three days of racing between New Bern and Oriental. The 29th Annual Oar Cup
Regatta runs from New Bern to Oriental Saturday and the
companion Michelob Ultra Cup Regatta is from Oriental
to New Bern Sunday.
For the first time, a return race to Oriental has been organized by the Oriental Dinghy Club for Monday.
“Adding the third leg makes it easier for local sailors to
participate in a round-trip race,” said Ken Small with ODC.
“This way we can make the trip to New Bern and back once
instead of twice.”
“It is a great chance to try out new crew and equipment,”
said Marsha Paplham of Marsha’s Cottage. “It’s also another one of our fun, social events for which we are known up
and down the waterway.”
Oriental has just about everything anyone needs and
wants for a boat. This eclectic fishing village is home to marine craftsmen with a vast variety of skills who can handle
most repairs for all types of boats, including mechanical,
electrical, carpentry, painting, electronic, stainless steel
welding, rigging, fiberglass, sail making, canvas work...the
list goes on.
“Oriental is the best mid-Atlantic stop for anything
having to do with boats,” said Mark Weinheimer of Inner
Banks Sails.
Power and sailboat handling courses and a Youth Day
Camp teaching sailing techniques on Opti, Sunfish and FJ
boats are offered in August. Day, weekend and extended
cruising charters of power and sail boats are readily available in addition to kayak and canoe rentals. With a halfdozen yacht brokerage firms, Oriental is an ideal place for
selling and buying the perfect power or sail boat.
“There is never a bad month to be in Oriental,” said Mayor Sage. “It’s just that August has a wealth of activities for
boaters and everyone who enjoys the water.”
Kathy Enzerink writes regularly for All At Sea Southeast.
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[email protected]
2012 Oriental, NC
ROTARY FISHING
TOURNAMENT AND EXPO
20th Annual Tarpon Tournament
1st Annual Inshore Slam Tournament
AUGUST 17-18
Oriental Marina
and Inn,
Oriental, NC
ICW M/M 182
TWO EVENTS IN ONE WEEKEND!
Prize money In Both Tournaments Based On Participation
Contact Charles Skinner 252-249-0400
for registration and forms
Visit www.OrientalRotary.org for full details
scholarships to local high school seniors and Community College students.
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
49
North Carolina
SAILORS, LEUKEMIA SOCIETY,
WIN BIG AT ORIENTAL REGATTA
$100,000 R AI SED FOR L EU KEM IA S O C IE T Y
STORY AND PHOTOS BY KATHY BOHANAN ENZERINK
O
riental, N.C., the quaint fishing village with less than
1,000 residents, knows how
to raise money in a big way.
For the Second Annual Leukemia Cup
Regatta at River Dunes on June 9-10,
local and visiting sailors, with a little
help from their personal and corporate
friends, raised more than $107,000 for
the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society,
and the fight to cure cancer.
River Dunes Director of Operations
J.C. Capplemann is more than pleased
with the race, participation at the silent
Charlie Garrett’s Godspeed
in the foreground prior to
auction and dinner-dance celebration,
the first race June 9 on the
and the overall fund-raising results.
Neuse River.
“We ranked 17th last year by raising
$90,000,” said Cappelmann. “We won’t
know until all the Regattas are finished this fall, but I am
of boats “Did Not Finish” as they crossed the finish line
hoping we will place in the top 10.”
from the wrong direction.
Thirty-seven sailboats, ranging in length from 21 to 45
“Racing has its own set of rules,” said Small. “They can
feet, competed in Spinnaker A and B, Jib and Main, Cruisbe like Chinese to someone who is not familiar with them.
ing A and B and Multi-hull classes. The Oriental Dinghy Club
This is really a big charity event with a little sailing thrown
headed by Ken Small, Principal Race Officer, provided race
in it,” he said.
management services. Winds were light on the Neuse River
Kent Fann, captain of Fannasea, who raised $1,125 dolduring the two-day event, maxing out at 10 knots. Captains,
lars from 24 donors said, “We’re out here to have fun.”
over-estimating their ability to beat into the wind, tacked
David White, captain of Tidewater, won top honors by raisseveral times before heading around the first red marker.
ing $9,985 dollars in donations and as a result, will join former
“There was a gentle, yet sufficient wind which enabled
America’s Cup Winner Gary Jobson, a lymphoma survivor,
everyone to get around,” said Small. “This was an improvefor a Fantasy Sail weekend in New Orleans later in the year.
ment compared to last year when there was little to no wind
“A huge thanks to our captains, crew, sponsors and dowhen I was racing instead of officiating.”
nors,” said Cappelmann during the awards ceremony. “You all
No race is without a little excitement, and the Leukemia
made this event, and we couldn’t have done it without you.”
Cup Regatta had just that. A little. There was a short delay
Now an annual event, the June 2013 dates have yet to
at the beginning of the first race as the upwind marker had
be announced. Visit riverdunes.com or call Cappelmann at
to be reset, then Ken Lury on Beshert hit the first marker,
252-249-4908 for more details. Donations may be made onthen two boats in the Cruising A Class wanted to cross the
line at LLS.org.
finish line at the same time, but also at the same place, and
finally, Ron Medlin and BASH sported the only crew wearing bikinis. That’s excitement, Oriental-style.
Kathy Enzerink is a regular contributor to All At Sea SouthNoting some cruisers are not racers, Small said a couple
east. Contact her at [email protected]
50
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
OPEN FOR
BUSINESS
MARINA REOPENS IN
SNEADS FERRY
BY KATHY BOHANAN ENZERINK
Jim and Evelyn Hobbs
outside the the ships store,
now sporting a freshly
painted, bright exterior
and a comfortable area to
enjoy the view.
S
entiment saved the marina at Swan Point in Sneads
Ferry, N.C. The 40-year old building and docks, vacant since last September, were going to fall into disrepair unless someone took quick action. Jim Hobbs,
who has been boating and fishing his whole life, did just that.
When Hobbs and his wife Evelyn were working on their
44-foot trawler at the on-site boatyard this Spring, they
kept saying they wished the ship’s store was open so they
wouldn’t have to leave the premises for supplies, drinks and
snacks. Jim, a retired home-builder, approached the property owner about taking over the marina. After two months
of major renovations to the building and docks, the marina
and ship’s store reopened June 30.
“We’re delighted to have this facility open again,” said
Jim. “We’re looking forward meeting old friends of the marina and welcoming new ones.”
Located near ICW mile marker 250 at the New River Inlet,
transient and local boaters will have access to new bathrooms, showers and laundry facilities. The marina can accommodate boats with a maximum five-foot draft and up
to 65-feet long.
A full line of marine supplies, popular provisions, snacks,
drinks and prepared food are available at the ship’s store,
which is open daily.
“Sentiment brought us to take on this marina project,”
said Evelyn Hobbs. “Jim hates to see anything not being
taken care of. He’d rather fix something old than throw it
away and buy new.”
Contact Swan Point Marina Ships Store at 910-741-0541.
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AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
51
South Carolina
SADIE BETH LEADS GOV CUP
AFTER TWO EVENTS
S U M M E R B I L L F I S H I N G S E R I E S U N D E R WAY I N S C
STORY AND PHOTOS BY JEFF DENNIS
The Governor’s Cup fleet assembled during sunset on
the North Edisto River at Bohicket Marina
T
he 24th South Carolina Governor’s Cup Billfishing
Series began with a blue marlin weighed-in on the
first day of the first tournament. However, releasing
blue marlin earns more points towards the Governor’s Cup Series, and Sadie Beth out of Charleston won the
45th Georgetown Landing tournament. Summer Girl took
the second tourney at Bohicket Marina, but Sadie Beth retains the top overall spot after two of five Series events.
Both the Georgetown Landing tourney fished May 23-26,
and the Bohicket Marina Invitational fished June 6-9, were
shortened to two days of fishing by windy conditions. When
the 35-boat Governor’s Cup fleet went fishing at Georgetown,
the billfish bite was hot, and Wildlife boated a blue marlin to
bring to the scales. This marked the first time in the Governor’s
Cup Series since 2010 when a blue marlin was weighed-in.
The Governor’s Cup is headed by the S.C. Department of
Natural Resources, and the tale of their tape measure back
on the docks was that the blue marlin did not meet minimum length requirements, and was disqualified. The federal
government sets a 99-inch minimum limit to harvest a blue
marlin, but the Governor’s Cup rules stipulate that a blue
marlin must be at least 105-inches. Wildlife’s blue marlin was
52
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
Team Wildlife with their blue
marlin at the Georgetown
Governor’s Cup
104-inches long and weighed 348-pounds, and it cost them
600-points in the Governor’s Cup Series points, which awards
600-points for the catch and release of a blue marlin.
Meanwhile, Sadie Beth, a 53-foot Paul Mann (hull #1) completed the unlikely feat of landing and releasing a quadrupleheader of sailfish on day one at Georgetown. By the end of the
day they released a fifth sailfish, giving them 1,000 points total
(sailfish earn 200-points apiece). Then on day two, Capt. Howard Mosely put Sadie Beth back on the fish for owner Gage
Blue, and they caught and released two white marlin, good for
300-points apiece. Sadie Beth earned a total of 1,600-points.
Finishing second at Georgetown was Benchmark, based
out of Charleston, for their catch and release of two blue marlin and one white marlin, good for 1,500 points. The crew of
Benchmark indicated that they had a few other shots at blue
marlin but were unable to get hooked up. Third place went
to Daymaker, based out of Georgetown, for their catch and
release of one blue marlin and two white marlin. During two
back-to-back days of fishing, the Georgetown fleet released 41
billfish including 15 blue marlin, 16 white marlin and 10 sailfish.
Two weeks later, a fleet of 27 boats gathered on Seabrook
Island to fish out of Bohicket Marina. Miss Magnolia, a 50foot Viking out of Hilton Head, had the hot hand on day
one, releasing two blue marlin and one white marlin.
“This was the best fishing day we have ever experienced
off of South Carolina,” said owner Capt. Tram Colket.
“Crew member Tim Gredick handled the rod for both blue
marlin bites.”
With no billfish releases on day two, Miss Magnolia lost
her momentum and had to settle for second place.
Summer Girl, a 42-foot Post run by Capt. Stevie Leasure, had released two blue marlin on day one, and they
followed that up with another blue marlin release on day
two. Their 1,800-point total was good for first place at Bohicket, earning them a $15,500 payday. Since one of their
blue marlin was released by female angler Kimberly Smith,
Summer Girl was also awarded the Top Lady Angler award.
Owner John Smith Jr. and first mate Mike Jackson reported
another marlin in the baits on day two, but the finicky fish
refused to bite any of their lures.
Finishing in third place at Bohicket was Cotton Picker out
of Savannah for their release of one blue marlin and two
white marlin. Thirty-two billfish were released at Bohicket
over back-to-back fishing days, including 10 blue marlin,
14 white marlin and eight sailfish. Sadie Beth was able to
release one blue marlin and one white marlin, boosting its
Series points total to 2,500, keeping them in first place with
three more events to fish. Summer Girl is currently in second place in overall Governor’s Cup points with 1,800.
One catch of note from the Bohicket tournament came
when 13-year old angler Gray Eubank caught a 53.4-pound
dolphin while fishing with his father and grandfather aboard
Sportin’ Life. Eubank’s mahi was the heaviest, earning the
Outstanding Dolphin award and the Top Youth Angler award.
The S.C. Governor’s Cup Billfishing Series promotes both
conservation of billfish stocks and the involvement of youth
in the tradition of offshore fishing.
Jeff Dennis is a Charleston native. Read his blog at lowcountryoutdoors.com.
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AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
53
Florida
AT LAST
B O B A N D H I S D O G C LY D E A N S W E R T H E C A L L O F T H E S E A
STORY AND PHOTOS BY JUDY PRESTIA-NICHOLS
T
here comes a time in every mariner’s life when the
sea calls – she speaks softly, inviting you to cast off
the lines that tie you to land’s commotion and feel
her majesty in motion – to be, on the ocean. Be it
the great pond, a great lake, a river or bay – when the sea
beckons, you become consumed with the search of finding
the perfect boat to answer her call.
Such was the case for Robert Cross, who began hearing
his call more than two decades ago. Bob’s a kindly man
whose motto is “The adventure lies in the journey, not
the destination.” Originally from Connecticut, Bob retired
and settled in Port Salerno, Fla. True to his motto, he soon
found himself cruising the Bahamas, Florida Keys and Gulf
Coast, through Lake Okeechobee and on up to the Eastern Seaboard into his favorite cruising grounds the Chesapeake Bay, on his own boats and with friends.
As life changed for Bob and his faithful companion, a
sea-seasoned Cocker Spaniel named Clyde, they heard the
call a bit louder. And so, with some coin in his pocket and
an Etta James song in his head, off the duo went in search
of the perfect boat.
Weeks and months went by and boat after boat was
eyed. Then, Bob received a phone call from his best friend
requesting the duo make a fast trip to see a special little
boat he had found for them … and so it was – the perfect
“character boat” for this character crew. Even her bright
red hull fits the dashing personality of her owner to a T. A
handsome Nordic Tug she is, 32 feet in length built in 1987
in Washington State. Sporting a single Yanmar 165 hp turbo
diesel, burning only 1.5 gallons per hour at 6.5 knots, she is
always ready to run her 600-mile range.
Her interior has a most practical layout; functional, comfortable and charming. She has quite an interesting history
too, says Bob, as he turns our attention to the four original
black and white tug boat drawings, explaining that each
one was drawn for the former owner, a captain who ran
tugboats in the Panama Canal. The artwork is further enhanced by the old fashioned wood burning stove, a Tiny
Tot with a Charlie Noble chimney giving the deckhouse
even more character.
The steam-tooting tug’s galley is very well laid out and
offers all the necessary cooking comforts a man and his
dog could want and then some. “The galley amply suits a
54
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
First mate Clyde on the stern of At Last.
woman’s wishes too,” says Sharon Tar, Bob’s newest crew
member and first rate, first mate. A newbie sailor, originally
from upstate New York whose sailing lessons at the US Sailing Center in Jensen Beach landed her in position to meet
Bob, she explains their love story with a big smile as they
scurry about making ready to depart from Sunset Bay Marina. They are perfectly paired to cruise together. Even better, along with Sharon came Maddie, a petite Pomeranian
and a perfectly suited pal for Clyde.
And so, on they go, cruising to the Chesapeake. At Last!
Back in the mid 2000’s, Judy wrote for Boater’s Digest, covering New Jersey and part of New York Harbor and the Hudson River. Judy enjoys writing, and missed doing these articles
enough that she’s back now with All At Sea Southeast! Judy
lives in Stuart, Fla., and currently manages Salty’s Ship Store
at Sunset Bay Marina. Contact her at [email protected]
Gulf
CRUISING THE GULF COAST
AU G U S T I S A S T I C K Y S U B J E C T A R O U N D H E R E
STORY AND PHOTOS BY LISA OVERING
T
he Gulf Coast is hot, sticky, and humid in August. And I miss it. I’m ready to go back to Ocean
Springs, Miss., to our bayou-front home. Located
about one mile north of the Gulf of Mexico, our
little La Cala Canal comes complete with blood-sucking
mosquitos and an alligator hole.
I always sit rather on the beautiful 80-foot dock that my
husband had specially built and dredged. There’s a nice, teak
bench where I swat bugs onto my skin while eyeballing potential predators amidst curious clicking sounds of frogs and
baby gators. It’s an eerie, sensory overload, part of a wondrous
wildlife preserve, and it feels that way in the sultry summer.
The Swamp Palace in Mississippi juxtaposes nicely with
the tranquility of our condo perched on Dumbfoundling
Bay and the Intracoastal Waterway in Aventura, Fla. There’s
a magnificent parade of megayachts on any given Sunday
with a cool ocean breeze, even in the middle of June.
During the daytime, the warm Atlantic sun gently balms
your skin until it’s time for the night, which almost requires a
sweater on the balcony. It’s wonderfully pleasant, listening
to the gentle current with the night wind wafting through
your hair. Some nights you’ll spot a magnificent dolphin
prancing through the canal, coming up for air before another effortless porpoise splashes downward, and up again, a
few yards away. The rhythmic repetition of their swim is entrancing under the moonlight.
My Atlantic and Gulf South homes are each beautiful, in their
own way, with those environmental weather factors shaping
their uniquely different waterfront lifestyles. Before I left Mississippi in May for South Florida’s parade of Botox, plastic surgery
nightmares to interview rich movie stars and celebrities, I sat
down with two very down-to-earth stars of TV’s Swamp People,
RJ and Jay Paul Molinere, in Houma, Louisiana.
The Cajun-Indian alligator hunters are freakishly strong,
world champion arm wrestlers who grab lines barehanded
to wrestle a vicious and very live alligator on the other end.
A future issue of All At Sea Southeast will showcase my
interview on History Channel’s alligator-hunting Molineres,
now TV pop culture icons. While I was impressed to meet
them, the truth is that alligator hunting is so prevalent on
the Gulf Coast that it’s even been perfected by 80-year-old
bayou grannies like Joy Fleming, my hostess during my
spring sojourn to Cajun Country.
Jay Paul (left) and RJ Molinere arm-wrestle over the bill
at Big Al’s Restaurant in Houma, Louisiana.
Joy catches gators at her waterfront home on Bayou
Teche in New Iberia, La., a few miles from where Tabasco
pepper sauce is made on Avery Island. After she catches an
alligator, Joy telephones a private alligator control agent
who promptly handles the physical details of killing and removal, usually for sale to a local restaurant. Bayou Granny
carefully reaches out over the water’s edge with a garden
hoe and hangs a rope with a hook and a dead chicken
over a mossy oak branch. It is self-preservation. Otherwise,
Bayou Granny will see what looks like a log moving in her
backyard toward her cats, Mike and Mr. Ugly. Joy does this
without the TV cameras and crew to back her up.
The ecosystem of the Gulf Coast’s marshes and swamps
creates the best fishing in the world, renowned for recordsetting catches from salt, brackish, and fresh waters all located within minutes of each other.
As we prepare for the month of August and observe the
seventh anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, the perpetual
cycle of the Gulf of Mexico, with its hurricanes that destroy
valuable waterfront property and erode precious wetlands,
will churn and turn the Gulf to filter its waters of any remaining oil from the BP disaster. These are the same waters that
hold offshore rigs that attract baitfish to lure big-game trophy fish. It may not seem like a natural co-existence at first
glance, but actually, it juxtaposes rather nicely, too.
As long as there’s salt, sweat, sea, or swamp involved, freelance marine journalist Lisa Overing feels buoyant. A native
of New Orleans, Louisiana, and coming from a long line of
working sailors, Lisa pens for yachting and luxury lifestyle
magazines and wrote under the byline Lisa Hoogerwerf
Knapp from 1986-2011.
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
55
Texas
GALVESTON YACHT BASIN
RISES FROM IKE’S ASHES
I T A N D OT H E R LO C A L T E X A S M A R I N A S A R E F I N A L LY
R E CO V E R I N G , F O U R Y E A R S L AT E R
BY ROB LUCEY
I
n the wake of Hurricane Ike in September 2008, Galveston Bay’s marine infrastructure suffered enormous damage. Many facilities are only now returning to full operation. One of the hardest hit was the Galveston Yacht
Basin along the harbor side of Galveston Island.
The property includes a 480-slip marina, a small boat yard,
the Galveston Yacht Club facilities and a 30-year-old restaurant. The storm’s flood surge sparked an electrical fire that consumed a 130-boat drystack facility. More than 300 damaged
vessels and tons of debris were removed after the disaster.
A subsidiary of the charitable Sealy and Smith Foundation sold the property in October 2011 to fifth generation
Galvestonian John “Rocky” Sullivan and his Houston partners, Stephen Swan and Greg Pappas. It includes facilities
on 18 acres of land and slips over 55 submerged acres.
“We’re face-lifting and repairing the entire property,” said
David Weiss, GYB chief executive officer under the new owners. “Our goal is to re-establish it as a premier property on the
Gulf Coast and a destination for boaters to keep their boats.”
56
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
Originally opened in 1969, many aspects of the property
were in need of attention before Ike ravaged it. The Galveston Yacht Club, which had been closed since the storm, recently re-opened for special event rentals. The adjoining
pool has been re-finished, including a wading pool and hot
tub that had been out of service for nearly 15 years. The
new owners also added a poolside palapa bar.
The on-site restaurant has been rebuilt and the partners
are seeking an operator for it.
The marina continued operations after Ike, but the new
owners have made many repairs such as replacing power
pedestals and refurbishing the heads and showers along the
docks. The effort has included sprucing up the post-storm
appearances to help set the yacht basin apart from its more
industrial neighbors in the port.
“We’re a work in progress. We’ve spent a ridiculous
amount of money on landscaping,” said Weiss, adding
that all of the new touches are designed to fit in with the
island’s historic character.
Boatyard services are once again available on the premises.
The new owners leased the Galveston Yacht Basin Shipyard
to Gulf Coast Complete Marine, the operator of a 20,000
square-foot facility in nearby Kemah. The company re-opened
the Galveston yard in April and took delivery on a new 75-ton
Marine Travelift in mid-May. Yard owner David Whelan said the
lift was specially designed with a 21-foot beam to handle the
wide variety of boats on the Texas Gulf Coast.
Services available at the Galveston yard include bottom
jobs, shaft and prop work, paint jobs, fiberglass, minor and
major refits, outboard/inboard servicing, and other yacht
and powerboat needs.
The final piece of the yacht basin’s rebirth will be completion of a new drystack facility, expected to open sometime
in the fall. Plans call for dry storage capacity to more than
double, holding up to 300 boats. While the original facility
only held boats under 25 feet, the new dry storage will accommodate boats up to 45 feet.
Along with the dry slips, the current construction project
will add facilities for a ship’s store, a waterside bar and grill,
and retail space.
Once completed, the marina will offer new concierge
services. Dry dock customers will be able to schedule outings and arrive to find their vessel in the water ready to go
– fueled and fully stocked with bait, food and beverages, if
desired. Wet slip customers will also be able to enjoy the
new dockside catering services.
It’s about time!!
Any Boat. Anywhere. Anytime.
#ARIBBEANs.ORTH!MERICAs"AHAMASs3AIPANs%UROPE
Baytown Marina Reborn
Another victim of Hurricane Ike’s destructive forces has risen
from the wreckage. The 100-slip Bayland Marina near the
mouth of the San Jacinto River in Upper Galveston Bay held
a ribbon cutting ceremony April 5 to celebrate its re-opening.
The storm shredded the marina, damaging all of the
docks and displacing 80 percent of the pilings, leaving it
looking like a pile of pixie sticks. A dozen liveaboards were
among those renting slips at the marina before the storm.
After a $5.3 million Federal Emergency Management
Agency (FEMA) grant was awarded in 2009 to cover 90 percent of the repair costs, the marina was rebuilt by the City of
Baytown, which leases it to a private operator.
City officials say the marina is now better than before with
floating concrete docks designed by Bellingham Marine to
withstand 18-foot storm surges. It also features storm surge security platforms, upgraded utilities to the slips, a new fuel dock
and a renovated marina store including a yacht brokerage.
With slips up to 55 feet in length, the marina is now accepting lease applications and transient visitors.
In late April, a dozen boats from the Texas Mariner Cruising Association made the 12-mile run from Kemah to Bayland
Marina for a mini-gam to help inaugurate the new facilities.
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
57
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s
s
30/50 Amp
s s s s s
s s
16
s
s
30/50/100 Amp
s s s s s
s s
16
s
35
s
30/50/100
s
830-935-4333
85’ 449
s
TX Cranes Mill Marina
830-899-7718
45’ 250
s
s s s
TX Hurst Harbor
512-266-1800
100’
s
s s s
s
s
s
16
s
s
s s
16
s
16
s s
16
s
ASK ABOUT ADDING YOUR MARINA TO THE ALL AT SEA MARINA GUIDE CONTACT [email protected]
58
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
SOUTHEAST BOATYARDS
Lift
Typ
e/
Ca
pac
i ty
DIY
Frie
nd
El e
ctro ly
nic
Ca
Sho
rpe
p
ntr
yS
El e
hop
c tri
cal
Sho
Pro
p
pS
hop
Pai
nt S
ho
On
site p
Cre
wF
aci
l i ty
Arr
iva
lH
our
s
Ma
Air ximu
Dra m
ft
Jersey City
NJ Liberty Landing
201-985-8000
9’
75’
19’
no
limit
50 Amp
24x7
60 ton
travelift
Wanchese
NC Blackwell’s Boatyard
252-473-1803
6’
70’
20’
no
limit
30/50 Amp
7-3:30
M-F
7-12 S
Washington
NC
252-975-2174
6’
60’
14’
no
limit
30/50 Amp
8-5:30
x7
Oriental
NC Deaton Yacht Service
252-249-1180
5’
50’
18’
no
limit
30/50 Amp
Charleston
SC Pierside Boatworks
843-554-7775
15’ 60’
22’
no
limit
30/50 Amp
8-4:30
M-F
70 tons
s s s s s s s
Brunswick
GA Two-Way Boat Yard
912-265-6944
7’
16.5’
no
limit
30 Amp
8-4:30
M-F
30 ton
travelift
s
Amelia Island
FL
Amelia Island
Yacht Basin
904-277-4615
11’ 100’ 19’
no
limit
30/50 Amp
8-6
x7
36 tons
Stuart
FL
Apex Marine
772-692-7577
8’
65’
19’
no
limit
30/50 Amp
7-3:30
M-F
65 tons
s s s
Fort
Lauderdale
FL
Apex Marine
954-759-7212
9’
90’
22’
no
limit
30/50/100 Amp
7-4
M-F
92 tons
s s s s
St. Petersburg FL
Sailor’s Wharf Yacht
and Boat Yard
727-823-1155
10’ 85’
20’
no
limit
250 50 Amp/
30 Amp
7:30-5
M-F
85 ton
travelift
s s s
s
Kemah
South Texas
Yacht Services
281-334-7245
7’
16
no
limit
30 Amp
7:30-4
M-F
8-12 S
37.5 ton
travelift
s s s
s s
TX
McCotter’s Marina
& Boatyard
Pow
er
Ma
Be ximu
am m
Ma
Dra ximu
ugh m
t
Ma
Len ximu
gth m
A L L AT S E A ’ S S O U T H E A S T U. S . B O AT YA R D S G U I D E
s
s
s
70 tons
s s s
s
15 tons
s s s s
s
8-5 M-F/ 35 ton
8-12 S travelift
s s s s
s
s
s s
ASK ABOUT ADDING YOUR BOATYARD TO THE ALL AT SEA BOATYARD GUIDE CONTACT [email protected]
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
59
Coastal Real Estate Guide
SOUTHEAST U.S.
Virginia
WAT E R F R O N T P R O P E R T Y
North
Carolina
South
Carolina
Mississippi
Alabama
6
5
4
Georgia
Atlantic
Ocean
Texas
Louisiana
Florida
2
1
Gulf
of
Mexico
3
To display your Real Estate in All At Sea contact [email protected]
1
2
St. Petersburg, FL. Located in exclusive Venetian Isles,
South Padre Island, TX. Extremely well maintained home in a quiet neighborhood with wonderful
views of the Island. 2000 square feet of very comfortable
living space with 3 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, office area and
a two-car garage. Well situated on a deep water channel
for quick and easy access to the Bay or Gulf. Features a
covered boat slip with lift and a slip for friends who arrive
by boat! Interior features granite, tile, storm rated windows, storm shutters, sky lights, water softener, chair lift,
and more. $349,000.
DAVID GOWER, Broker | 956-459-5119
South Padre Coastal Real Estate | 956-761-3633
[email protected] | www.spiproperty.com
60
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
enjoy expansive water views from almost every room in this
3649 sq. foot home as the interior wraps around the pool,
deck and spa. The first floor includes 3 bedrooms, 2 baths,
formal living and dining room, family room with fireplace
and an open kitchen with cooking island, solid surface counters and breakfast area. A spiral staircase leads to the master
suite, large walk-in closet, dressing area, private study and a
covered balcony overlooking the pool. $975,000.
KEVIN CAHILL, Managing Broker
Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate
Cell: 813-830-8008 | Fax: 727-821-4052
Email: [email protected]floridamoves.com
vwww.FloridaMoves.com
3
4
Naples, FL. Gorgeous contemporary bay-front townhome with direct boating access to the Gulf of Mexico.
Located in charming Old Naples where beautiful beaches
and fine restaurants are right at your door step. This residence was built in 2005 and boasts 3 bedrooms, 3 baths,
3500 sq ft. and includes a huge open great room, private
elevator and a rooftop deck complete with hot tub. Huge
gourmet kitchen perfect for entertaining and your pets
are welcome. Fabulous views, incredible location and a
superb lifestyle await. Boat slips are available. $1,100,000.
KRISTA HARRIS, Premier Sotheby’s Intl Realty
239-877-6745 | [email protected]
Conway, SC. Enjoy one of the finest river-front homes
available on the Waccamaw River, just minutes from Myrtle Beach and the Atlantic Ocean. This three bedroom,
four and a half bath custom designed home with yellow
pine flooring throughout, offers openness for beautiful
picturesque views. The home is situated on a deep-water
lot that is well elevated and securely grounded with a wellfortified wall. Two floating docks with a gazebo, equipped
with electricity and water, ensure you will enjoy all water
sports. Or, just sit calmly and enjoy the sounds of fish
jumping and water lapping against the bank. $449,000.
Century 21 Broadhurst at Myrtle Beach
843-448-7169 | www.Century21Broadhurst.com
Waterfront Properties
in the Houston Bay Area
This is a good time to acquire your Waterfront Home.
Sellers are motivated and there is plenty to choose from
on Galveston Bay and the two lakes in the Clear Lake
Area: Taylor Lake and Clear Lake. Park your boat at
home or in one of the many marinas. Live in your home
full time or use it as a vacation home with the possibility
of renting it out at times when you are not on location.
Prices range from the $200,000s to $3 mil +
Close to Houston Yacht Club $270,000
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Prudential Gary Greene, Realtors
281-486-5700
Galveston Bay $749,000
| AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
61
Coastal Real Estate Guide
Waterfront Real Estate
5
FOR SALE
Vandemere, NC. Picturesque, private, gorgeous ram-
Located adjacent to and
directly behind STYC, this
end of "Port Lane" gated
compound boasts two family residences, each 3bdrm/2bath
as well as a small boatyard on .810 acres. Income producer.
Offered by owner/builder: $1.2M
No brokers please.
Email [email protected] for appt.
S T .
T H O M A S ,
U S V I
bling timberframe-design farm house, situated on 11-plus
acres suitable for hunter’s haven, vacation paradise, or personal estate. Boaters rejoice--there are 1500 feet of shoreline on lovely Cedar Creek. Chefs take note-a highly impressive kitchen, from floor to ceiling, facilitates this home’s
natural ability to handle all levels of entertaining, indoor or
out on the covered wraparound waterfront front porch. All
the bells and whistles plus newly painted exterior, newly
refinished floors, new heat pumps, generator and more.
Priced dramatically below replacement cost! $375,000.
Tidewater Real Estate, Oriental, NC
Tel: 252-249-9800 | Toll Free 866-249-9800
www.TidewaterCountry.com
6
Suffolk, VA. One-acre custom home site on deep water Nansemond River, near the confluence with the James
River and Route 17 in Governor’s Pointe, home of The Vintage Tavern Restaurant. A custom-build package is available through Quality Homes Inc. includes 3500 sq. ft. from
your plans or ours. Lot is served by city water, sewer and
natural gas. Build a dock to keep your boat just steps away
from your new dream home. There is a community pier
with six day slips for residents and guests. Call or email
for architectural guidelines, pictures, and plat. $349,900.
CYNDI OSBOROUGH, Rose & Womble Realty Co.
757-692-3203 | [email protected]
62
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
Brokerage
O R I E N TA L , N C
Slip Sales, Rentals & Yacht Brokerage
Marina: 252-249-1750
www.whittakerpointe.com
Brokerage: 252-249-1754
www.orientalyachts.com
DEATON YACHT SALES
ST. BARTS YACHTS
New and Brokerage Boats at Oriental Harbor Marina
Dave Wright & Walter Lanet252-249-7245
We’re #1 in Oriental!
1201 Neuse Dr., Oriental, NC 28571
TOLLFREEsLOCAL
SALES DEATONYACHTSCOMsWWW$EATON9ACHTSCOM
Complete Brokerage Service for Sail and Power Yachts
40’ ISLANDER, Doug Peterson Design
YACHT
ESSENTIALS
Volume 4
Aft cockpit, tri-cabin performance cruiser. Scheel keel, 5' 1" draft.
Full electronics, dinghy/davits, nearly new sails. Custom teak interior with cedar-lined lockers. 44 hp Yanmar, Sea Frost refrigeration,
bimini, dodger, side curtains, water heater. 110G water, 35G fuel.
Full spec sheet available. Docked at Oriental, NC - ICW M/M 182.
Call 252-626-1518 or email [email protected]
64
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
s
A MUST HAVE
port to port guide to
2011
Southeast Alaska
Pacific Northwest
Southwest US
Mexico
Central America
Caribbean
Bahamas
Southeast US
MidAtlantic
New England
Eastern Canada
North America
Central America
The Caribbean
A Must-Have Guide to North America,
Central America & Caribbean Ports
for Yachts 100 Feet & Above
Volume 5 s 2012
A Must-Have Guide to North America,
Central America &Volume
Caribbean
Ports
5 s 2012
for Yachts 100 Feet & Above
W W W . YA C H T E S S E N T I A L S . C O M
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
65
Brokerage/Classifieds
For Sale:
63’ VIKING
MOTOR YACHT 1990
— FOR SALE —
Albin 25 Fisherman 1973
SELL YOUR BOAT
Take Your Pick!
t:BONBS)1t7CFSUI
t-BSHFTFMGESBJOJOHDPDLQJUXJUI
GPVSGPMEBXBZTFBUTt&DPOPNJDBM
EJFTFMDSVJTFSt4UBJOMFTTCPXT
GPSGVMMDPDLQJUBXOJOHJODMVEFE
t7)'(140SJHP4UPWF
BOEEFQUIåOEFS
Asking $15,500
4 Staterooms, 3 Bath,
h
2 Generators 20kw & 15kw,
2 Detroit Diesel Engines
12V71TA 900hp each,
Dinghy Novurania 15’
w/new 40hp 4cycles
Yamaha engine, Stabilizers,
Water Maker 1,200gpd,
Fully Equipped
Boat located in Fajardo,
Puerto Rico
$350,000.00
For more info:
call (787) 727-8997
s
or email [email protected]
FOR SALE: 43’ 1973 SEAWARD
MONK TRAWLER. Twin caterpillars,
excellent condition, genset, 3 cabin
layout, galley up, flybridge. V-berth,
side berth, enclosed head. GPS, VHF,
DF, FF. Fully equipped. Great Value.
$135,000. Contacat us for more info!
[email protected]
CONTACT BILL AT 252-331-1559
OR [email protected]
Sell Your
Boat Here!
Starting at just
$50/month
1
TEXT ONLY
CLASSIFIEDS
$30
(Up to 40 Words)
FOR SALE:
43’ 1973 Seaward
Monk Trawler
[email protected]
allatsea.net
2
1/16th
PHOTO AD
Twin Caterpillars,
Excellent Condition
$135,000
Powerboats
Services
FOR SALE 1988 GRADY WHITE
25 FT. SAILFISH WALK-AROUND.
Twin 150 hp Evinrudes from 2000.
V-berth, side berth, enclosed head.
GPS, VHF, DF, FF. Fully equipped. 2007
aluminum trailer. $19,500. Oriental, NC.
252.249-0983.
COAST GUARD LICENSED, ASA
INSTRUCTOR. 25yrs experience.
Caribbean, East Coast, Gulf of Mexico
or anywhere else! Seasonal relocations our specialty! Safe, reliable service. 787 667 8777 - [email protected]
gmail.com
Sailboats
Wanted
JENNEAU ARCADIA 30” 1985
Very good condition. Yanmar Diesel
2QM, standing rigging all done in 2010,
asymetric spinnaker with sock, roller
furling, lazy jacks, 2 vhf, flat screen
19” tv, GPS, auto pilot, swim plataform
with stairs, new motor mounts, and
much more. US 25.000 OBO Boat is in
Puerto Rico [email protected]
787-4454925
WANTED 42 TO 45 CATAMARAN
WE TRADE FOR HOUSE WORTH
115,000 the remaining balance we
pay, house in island of vieques Puerto
rico beautiful views minutes away to
prestine beaches for info email [email protected]
Excellent Condition
AMAZING VILLA IN THE ISLAND
OF VIEQUES IN EXCHANGE FOR
2 WEEKS IN A 45UP CATAMARAN
see http://tripwow.tripadvisor.com/tripwow/vr-001f-80c0-451a?ln, does not
needs to be reciprocal, experience captains, we want to cruise during the summer you can come anytime please contact [email protected]
$135,000
Services
NORTH CAROLINA CHARTERS
- sail the Inner and Outer Banks
from Historic Washington, NC. 36-42
feet including flagship Saga 409.
Contact Carolina Wind Yachting
Center, 252.946.4653, www.carolinawind.com
66
Powerboats
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
TIME TO GO BACK TO SEA!
Trade 3 Level concrete house in Ponce,
Puerto Rico for sailboat. Value $195k,
rental income $1500 per Month. Clear
title, no debt, owner. 8-B, 5-B, pool,
jacuzzi, workshop, walk to schools,
church and shopping. Mail to PO Box
1901 Ponce, PR 00733
Contact us for more info!
$50
[email protected]
FOR SALE: 43’ 1973 Seaward Monk Trawler
Twin Caterpillars
Genset
3 Cabin Layout
Galley up
Flybridge
Great Value
Contact us for more [email protected]
3
BUSINESS
CARD AD
$100
Contact us! [email protected]
6)2').)!s./24(#!2/,).!s3/54(#!2/,).!s'%/2')!
&,/2)$!s!,!"!-!s-)33)33)00)s,/5)3)!.!s4%8!3
Marketplace
Celebrating 10 years on the Oriental Harbor!
s&REE'IFT7RAPPING
s.EW#LOTHING,INES
s*EWELRYBY,OCAL!RTISTS
s#ARE&REE#ASUALTO%LEGANT
#LOTHINGFOR7OMEN
[email protected]
Stepping off the boat, you’ll look as stylish
as your Captain looks handsome!
Stop in for the ultimate personalized shopping experience...
Tuesday - Sunday: Open at 11 a.m.
Monday: By Appointment
/NTHE(ARBORIN/RIENTAL.#s
www.MarshasCottage.com
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
67
Marketplace
“He makes....wine to gladden the hearts of man.”
Psalm 104:15
SUPER
DECK
TANKS
WHAT IF...
Wauquiez PS 43 with
off-center installation
Open For Wine Tasting & Sales
252-249-1503
www.neuseriverwinery.com
169 Morris Creek Lane
Oriental, NC
© NEW BERN MAGAZINE 2012
Thursday - Saturday
11a.m. - 6p.m.
Major Channel Dredging Completed
Painting, Gelcoat, Rigging, Carpentry, Mechanical & Electrical
s4ON4RAVEL,IFTs9EARS#OMBINED%XPERIENCEs7ET$RY3TORAGETO&T
s,OUNGEWITH#ABLE46&IREPLACEs(EADS3HOWERs7IRELESS)NTERNET
/.4(%.%53%2)6%2s"%..%442$-)..%3/44"%!#(.#
sTWM WAYFARERSCOVECOM
WHERE THE LOCALS HANG OUT!
at low prices
Marine Safety Equipment
Yacht Chandlery and Supplies
Saltwater Fishing Tackle | Life Raft Sales and Service
Inflatable Boat Sales and Service | Marine Paints
Fire and Safety Equipment
2827 River Drive, Thunderbolt, GA 31404
912-354-7777 | toll free: 800-673-9391 | [email protected]
www.riversupply.com
68
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
We can fit any transom!
[email protected]
ON THE WATERFRONT
The Bean\(ODGES3TREET\/RIENTAL.#
Your Local Florist
CROAKERTOWN WINE SHOP
807 Broad Street, Oriental, NC
(Next to Post Office)
252-249-0990
www.SouthernBelleGardens.com
Fish On Charters
Full and Half-Day Trolling
“Lisa Ann”
Captain Bill Hamner
910-320-3044
910-741-0157
!"#$%&
&"
1-604-925-2660
CROAKERTOWN GIFTS:
Unusual Gifts s Best Card Selection
#RABTREE%VELYNs7ILLOW4REE
!RTAND*EWELRYBY,OCAL!RTISANS
Gift Baskets and lots more!
)CE#REAMs"AKED'OODSs"AGELS
#OFFEESs4EASs,ATTES
252-249-4918
your source for
NO WORRIES
WITH HYDROVANE
Totally independent
self-steering system and
emergency rudder....
in place and ready to go.
WWW.HYDROVANE.COM
Autopilot fails
Batteries are dead
Engine won’t start
Steering broken
Rudder damaged
Crew incapacitated
LLC
Visit our website
to find out more
about our locally grown
grapes & vineyard.
marine supplies
Let Hydrovane
sail you home safely
Marketplace
EVERYTHING SEWN FOR BOATS!
Inner Banks Sails and Canvas
HIP
Y’33 3TO
T
L
R%
3
A
112 Straight Rd., Oriental, NC 28571
252-249-3001s&AX
%MAILINNERBANKS EMBARQMAILCOM
s#HARTS
s-ARINE3UPPLIES
s"EVERAGES s"OUTIQUE
&EATURING%XCLUSIVE
,INEOF"OAT3HOES
OPEN DAILY 7am - 6pm
615 SW Anchorage Way
Stuart, Florida
772-872-7300
/NTHE3T,UCIE2IVERs.7
Located at the southwest foot of the
532OOSEVELT"RIDGEOFF*OAN*EFFERSON7AY
S U N S E T B AY M A R I N A A N D A N C H O R A G E . C O M
Marine Consignment of Oriental
quality new and used marine products of more than half the savings
708 Broad Street
PO Box 814
Oriental, NC 28571
Phone: 252-249-3222
Fax: 877-832-6516
Email: [email protected]
Web: OrientalMarineConsignment.com
Marina Group
Global Reach, Local Solutions
BROKERAGE AND APPRAISAL
Jeff Carson, MAI
386-672-3339
[email protected]
www.CBRE.com/Jeff.Carson
CBRE, Inc. | Licensed Real Estate Broker
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
69
Marketplace
ORDER ONLINE or at DEALER
TANK TENDER
THE ORIGINAL PRECISION
TANK MEASURING SYSTEM!
Accurate tank
soundings have
never been easier
when one TANK
TENDER monitors
up to ten fuel and
water tanks. Reliable non-electric
and easy to install.
HART SYSTEMS, INC.
PH 253-858-8481 FAX 253-858-8486
www.tanktender.com
MYSTIC
KNOT
WORK
NATIONAL
SAIL SU PPLY
Best sails for the money
You’ll see the quality.
You’ll feel the performance.
Nautical Gifts
Connect
Generations:
But most of all,
you’ll appreciate the price!
s"2!#%,%43
s!.+,%43
s#/!34%23
s%6%.4&!6/23
Phone: 1-800-611-3823
E-mail: [email protected]
Fax 813-200-1385
www.nationalsail.com
ORDER ON THE INTERNET | NEW & USED IN STOCK
Mystic Knotwork.com
Sailing doesn’t have to be expensive
TURBOCHARGERS!!
and Water Cooled Elbos
Cat, Cummins, Yanmar,
Perkins, Det. Diesel, Volvo,
MTU, ABB, MAN, EMD,
IHI, KKK, MAN, Holset,
Rajay, Toyota, Garrett,
Mitsubishi, Schwitzer
Worldwide Service & Exchange
0ROGRAMsYR7ARRANTY
Ram Turbos Inc.
[email protected]
office: 305-743-2920
cell: 321-536-9154
Adventure High School
Adventure High School
Scholarship Program
Adventure High School delivers high
quality education to students from across
the world. Our programs are delivered
at sea and ashore. Some of our students
study on full or partial scholarships.
YOU CAN HELP: Donate your
boat or boating gear to the Adventure
High School Scholarship Program.
WHAT IS NEEDED? Sailing boats of all
TJ[FTBOEUZQFTt3BDJOHTBJMCPBUTGFFU
and over and multihulls for our Caribbean
3BDJOH1SPHSBNTt#PBUJOHHFBSt5SBJMFST
www.AdventureHighSchool.org
Within the USA (800) 927-9503
From the Caribbean (727) 798-1099
SPONSOR DIRECTORY:
ALL AT SEA would like to thank its sponsors for their patronage and support. We
encourage our readers to help keep us a community-focused, free publication by supporting our sponsors. Tell them you
saw their company information or product in ALL AT SEA.
Adventure High School............................... 70
AERÉ Docking Solutions ............................. 21
Atlantic Sail Traders ...................................... 70
ATN Inc. ............................................................. 53
Beta Marine ..................................................... 21
Carolina Wind Yachting Center................. 70
CBRE Marina Group ...................................... 69
Coppercoat ...................................................... 57
Crew Unlimited .............................................. 53
David Weekley Homes................................. 62
Deaton Yacht Sales ....................................... 64
Deaton Yacht Services, Inc. ........................ 49
Divers Direct .................................................... 51
Eco-Clad .......................................................... 2, 3
Edson International .........................................7
Edward William Marine Services SL. ....... 23
Everglades Boats............................................C4
Fish On Charters ............................................ 68
Fort Yachtie-Da International
Film Festival ................................................. 63
Garland F. Fulcher Seafood Co.................. 67
70
ALLATSEA.NET AUGUST 2012
Gun Ledbetter, Prudential Gary Greene.. 61
Hydrovane........................................................ 68
Inland Waterway ............................................ 69
Inner Banks Sails & Canvas......................... 69
KTI Systems Filter Boss ...................................6
Marine Consignment of Oriental............. 69
Marsha’s Cottage ........................................... 67
McCotters Marina .......................................... 69
Mystic Knotwork ............................................ 70
National Sail Supply ..................................... 70
Nature’s Head.................................................. 68
Nautical Wheelers ......................................... 69
Neuse River Winery....................................... 68
Offshore Risk Management ................ 51, 57
Oriental Rotary ............................................... 49
Oriental Yacht Sales ...................................... 64
Poli Glow........................................................... 71
Ram Turbos ...................................................... 70
River Supply .................................................... 68
Sailrite ...................................................................4
Salty’s Ship Store ........................................... 69
Savon de Mer .................................................. 70
Scandia Marine............................................... 71
Seahawk Paints .............................................. 15
SeaSchool......................................................... 23
Southeast Marine Services, LLC ............... 71
St. Barts Yachts ............................................... 64
Suntex......................................................... 27, 29
Tank Tender ..................................................... 70
The Air Line.........................................................5
The Bean ........................................................... 68
The Moorings .....................................................9
The Multihull Company ..............................C3
The Shops at Croakertown ........................ 68
The Trawl Door Restaurant ........................ 67
Triton Yacht Sales .......................................... 64
TurtlePac ........................................................... 68
Ward’s Marine Electric ................................. 17
Wayfarers Cove Marina & Boatyard ........ 68
Whiteaker Yacht Sales .................................. 65
Yacht Chandlers ........................................ C2, 1
ZRD ..................................................................... 23
Marketplace
D-400
on Sale Now
ULTIMATE MARINE LADDERS
®
By Scandia Marine Products
STOP THE DINGHY FLOP
MAKE A GRACEFUL EXIT
WITH OUR DINGHY LADDERS
t
t
t
t
Solid Electropolished 316 Stainless Bar
Easily Extended and Collapsed
Rigid - Will Not Kick Under
No Hinges To Fill With Water
Maurice Howland says:
“My only complaint with the D-400 is
that it is so quiet, you get to listen
to everyone else’s wind generators in
crowded anchorages.”
D-400 on sale - $2,295.00
USD Free Shipping Special
Free shipping in lower 48 U.S. (an $85.00 value)
Call 800-487-0610
or [email protected]
Hook-On Models Also Available For
Hardside Dinghies & Small Boats
for information on further discounts.
Some restrictions apply.
Subject to change without notice.
Factory Direct
American Quality
SOUTHEAST MARINE SERVICES, LLC
www.up-n-out.com
or call: (651) 464-5058
www.semarine.com - [email protected]
800-487-0610
AUGUST 2012 ALLATSEA.NET
71
On the Intracoastal
BACK AT THE HELM
STORY BY ROB LUCEY
PHOTO BY JOANNE LUCEY
Sea Spell anchored along the ICW
N
ine years ago my wife and I sailed out of Houston
with no plans to return other than to eventually empty out our 10-foot storage unit. We’d sold whatever
didn’t fit in that unit or onboard our 38-foot Morgan
sloop Sea Spell: condo, cars, furniture – everything gone except personal keepsakes.
I’d lived on an Endeavor 32 for a few years, preparing to go
cruising. Then I met Jo and we bought the bigger boat and really prepared to go cruising, together (much better).
Many people dream of cruising. Some talk of it. We made
actual plans to go cruising and stuck to them.
When we cast off our lines and sailed out between the Galveston jetties, we barely looked back. For three years we traveled,
eventually island hopping down the Western Caribbean to Venezuela and back up, but most of those years we passed exploring the Southeastern waters of our own great nation.
I’m originally from Rochester, N.Y., and grew up in landlocked Dallas, Texas, so I came to the water relatively late in
life. Jo had just moved here from the U.K. when we met and
was new to sailing. We both had plenty of new places to visit.
Our time cruising the Gulf of Mexico and western Florida, including a prolonged engine repair stop in Pensacola, put us in
the proper frame of mind for cruising. We tossed out all schedules and treated each fresh port as a discovery.
One of our goals along the way was to choose a new place to
call home once we had satiated our cruising desires. We traversed
the Keys, snorkeling, reeling in our dinners and hiking along Highway 1, feeling the funky vibe of those tempting islands.
We sailed up the East Coast and explored the fabled boating grounds of Chesapeake Bay, even cruising up the Potomac
to our nation’s Capitol.
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Many towns tempted us with their historic charms, picturesque waterfronts and salty spirits as we plied the Intracoastal
Waterway ducking in and out of ports. But we didn’t feel at
home until we dropped anchor in North Carolina, a state neither of us had ever visited before. There we found the perfect blend of many of the traits we’d learned to love along
the way: scenic beauty, cultural opportunities, heritage and
plenty of water.
The biggest attraction was the friendliness we found in one
particular town. The village of Oriental dubbed itself the Sailing Capital of North Carolina, and we believed it as we found
boats tucked into almost every one of the many creeks branching off the Neuse River. Every person we met seemed to be a
boater, and many had far more miles of water under their keels
than we did. All were overwhelmingly welcoming to the steady
stream of mariners passing by along the ICW.
It was decided. When we grew weary of the sea, we tied
our docklines along Whittaker Creek and there we launched a
regional boating magazine called Carolina Currents. That mom
and pop operation kept us busy for three years. We were ready
for a break when Jo received a job offer and we found ourselves back in Houston.
Earlier this year I was offered a chance to get back into the
boat writing business, and now I’ve been invited to take the helm
of this magazine. The greatest thing about All At Sea Southeast
is that, through its pages each month, I get to revisit the many
places we explored aboard Sea Spell. I am ready to go!
Rob Lucey will officially take the helm as the new editor of All
At Sea Southeast for the September 2012 issue.