ULTIMER 7757 Product Information and

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ULTIMER 7757 Product Information and
Appendix I
ULTIMER 7757 Product
Information and Correspondence
Product Bulletin: 7757
Page 1
Product Bulletin
®
ULTIMER 7757
Anionic Dispersion Flocculant
PRODUCT DESCRIPTION AND APPLICATION
ULTIMER 7757 is a medium molecular weight, medium charge anionic, liquid dispersion flocculant that
does not contain oil or surfactants. The product is designed to flocculate suspended solids, and is
recommended for the following applications: non-potable raw water clarification, primary and secondary
effluent clarification, enhanced organics removal and filtration. ULTIMER 7757 should be tested in all
traditional and non-traditional applications for liquid anionic flocculants.
PHYSICAL & CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
Form
Appearance
Odor
Specific Gravity
Density
Solubility in Water
pH (100%)
Viscosity
Liquid
Milky White
None
1.19 - 1.22
9.9 - 10.2 lb/gal
Complete
3.8 - 4.2
300 - 1,200 cps
ACTIVE CONSTITUENTS
Co-polymer of acrylamide
REGULATORY APPROVALS
Please refer to the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for the most recent approval information.
MATERIALS OF COMPATIBILITY
Compatible
PVC
Polyethylene
Polypropylene
Teflon
Viton
Hypalon
Buna-N
Vinyl
Fiberglass
Plasite 4005
Plasite 7122
Neoprene
Not Compatible
Aluminum
Copper
Copper Alloys
Nickel
Brass
304 SS
316 SS
Product Bulletin: 7757
Page 2
NOTE: Feed Systems Acceptable Materials
Utilize plastic piping and fittings where possible on neat polymer feed lines. Where strength is
needed, 316 SS pumps, valves, etc. can be used. However, these components, especially pump
internals, will have a reduced life span. Be sure to routinely inspect all 316 SS components for
signs of corrosion and to utilize check valves with Teflon or epoxy coated springs.
DOSAGE AND FEEDING
The feed point in a typical clarification application should be selected to achieve optimum mixing and
product dispersion. In general, the feed point should be as far upstream as possible and preferably on the
suction side of the low lift pump or some other point of agitation. Centrifugal pumps should be avoided.
ULTIMER 7757 is usually best applied as a solution in water at a concentration in the range of 0.5% to
2%. The solution viscosity of ULTIMER 7757 is low compared to latex products. Thus, solutions can be
prepared and applied directly. The dilute solution should be applied at a point in the system where there is
adequate turbulence to ensure rapid mixing. ULTIMER 7757 is readily soluble in water, and can be
activated by simple dilution, preferably with an in-line static mixer. In addition, minimal aging of the
activated product is required. Thus, the polymer solution can be dosed directly into the application. The
polymer solution gains >90% activity 45 seconds after dilution. The Nalco ULTIMER feeder should be
used to apply the program. The product can be fed neat in some cases, although this must be confirmed
by on-site testing. Do not store product diluted for more than one hour since it hydrolyzes and loses
activity with aging.
ENVIRONMENTAL AND TOXICITY DATA
Refer to the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS), SECTIONS 11 and 12, for the most current data.
SAFETY AND HANDLING
As with any chemical, ULTIMER 7757 should be handled with responsible care. When considering the
use of ULTIMER 7757 in a particular application, the Material Safety Data Sheet must be reviewed to
assure that the intended use can be accomplished safely. All precautions described in the MSDS should
be strictly followed when handling ULTIMER 7757. In case of small liquid spills: Contain with absorbent
material, such as clay, soil or any commercially available absorbent. Smaller spills can be effectively
cleaned up with Nalco POLYCLEAN 7.
Avoid eye and skin contact. Do not take internally. Do not get in eyes, on skin, or on clothing. Have
emergency equipment (for fires, spills, leaks, etc.) readily available. Ensure all containers are labelled.
Keep the containers closed when not in use. Use with adequate ventilation. ULTIMER 7757 becomes
extremely slippery if wetted. Wash surfaces thoroughly with water until all traces have been removed.
Keep containers closed and protect from frost. Freezing will not impair the product if it is properly
reconstituted. Low temperatures should be avoided since viscosity increases and pumping problems can
occur.
Product Bulletin: 7757
Page 3
STORAGE
Keep containers closed and protect from frost and moisture. Low temperatures should be avoided since
viscosity increases and pumping problems can occur. When frozen, warm the product slowly to ambient
temperature and agitate with a low (<200) RPM mixer. After warming up to 46 - 50°F (8 -10°C) and
re-homogenization by gentle agitation for about 2 hrs, the product can be re-used without loss in
efficiency. Nevertheless, freezing should be avoided. When the product has been exposed to heat, the
product should be gently agitated while its temperature is allowed to lower to room temperature. After the
product is back to room temperature, about 2 hrs of gentle agitation should be sufficient to make the
product ready for use. While product performance should not be affected if the product freezes or warms
up, some loss in physical stability should be expected. If the product is to be stored for longer than two
weeks, i.e., bulk tank storage, periodic agitation of the product will help keep the product fully
homogenized and ensure consistent performance.
REMARKS
If you need assistance or more information on this product, please call your nearest Nalco
Representative. For more news about Nalco Company, visit our website at www.nalco.com.
For Medical and Transportation Emergencies involving Nalco products, please see the Material
Safety Data Sheet for the phone number.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
ULTIMER and NALCO are registered trademarks of Nalco Company (9-03)
Nalco Pacific PTE, LTD * 21 Gul Lane * Jurong Town * Singapore 2262
Subsidiaries and Affiliates in Principal Locations Around the World
©2006 Nalco Company All Rights Reserved
SAFETY DATA SHEET
PRODUCT
ULTIMER® 7757
EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBER(S)
1800 205 506
1.
CHEMICAL PRODUCT AND COMPANY IDENTIFICATION
PRODUCT NAME :
ULTIMER® 7757
APPLICATION :
WATER CLARIFICATION AID
COMPANY IDENTIFICATION :
Nalco Australia Pty Ltd
2 Anderson Street
Botany N.S.W. 2019
Australia
A.B.N. 41 000 424 788
TEL: +61 2 9316 3000
FAX: +61 2 9666 5292
EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBER(S) :
1800 205 506
Date issued :
Version Number :
11.06.2009
1.1
2.
HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION
HAZARD CLASSIFICATION :
Not classified as hazardous according to the Australian Safety & Compensation Council (ASCC). This product is
not classified as a dangerous good according to national or international regulations.
SAFETY PHRASES
S24/25 - Avoid contact with skin and eyes.
S37/39 - Wear suitable gloves and eye/face protection.
3.
COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS
CHEMICAL NAME
Ingredients determined not to be hazardous
4.
CAS NO
% (w/w)
100
FIRST AID MEASURES
EYE CONTACT :
Flush affected area with water. Get medical attention.
SKIN CONTACT :
Flush affected area with water. If symptoms develop, seek medical advice.
INGESTION :
Get medical attention. Do not induce vomiting without medical advice. If conscious, washout mouth and give
water to drink. If reflexive vomiting occurs, rinse mouth and repeat administration of water. Contact the Poison's
Information Centre (eg Australia 13 1126; New Zealand 0800 764 766).
Nalco Australia Pty Ltd 2 Anderson Street • Botany N.S.W. 2019, Australia
TEL: +61 2 9316 3000
FAX: +61 2 9666 5292
1/8
SAFETY DATA SHEET
PRODUCT
ULTIMER® 7757
EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBER(S)
1800 205 506
INHALATION :
Remove to fresh air, treat symptomatically. If symptoms develop, seek medical advice.
NOTE TO PHYSICIAN :
Based on the individual reactions of the patient, the physician's judgement should be used to control symptoms
and clinical condition.
5.
FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES
FLASH POINT :
Not flammable
EXTINGUISHING MEDIA :
This product would not be expected to burn unless all the water is boiled away. The remaining organics may be
ignitable. Use extinguishing media appropriate for surrounding fire.
FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD :
May evolve oxides of carbon (COx) under fire conditions. May evolve oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and sulfur (SOx)
under fire conditions.
SPECIAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR FIRE FIGHTING :
In case of fire, wear a full face positive-pressure self contained breathing apparatus and protective suit.
SENSITIVITY TO STATIC DISCHARGE :
Not expected to be sensitive to static discharge.
6.
ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES
PERSONAL PRECAUTIONS :
Restrict access to area as appropriate until clean-up operations are complete. Use personal protective equipment
recommended in Section 8 (Exposure Controls/Personal Protection). Stop or reduce any leaks if it is safe to do so.
Ventilate spill area if possible.
METHODS FOR CLEANING UP :
SMALL SPILLS: Soak up spill with absorbent material. Place residues in a suitable, covered, properly labeled
container. Wash affected area. LARGE SPILLS: Water in contact with the product will create a voluminous,
slippery gel. Soak up as thoroughly as possible with inert absorbent material or sawdust. Do NOT hose down area
until all possible traces of polymer are removed. Contact an approved waste hauler for disposal of contaminated
recovered material. Dispose of material in compliance with regulations indicated in Section 13 (Disposal
Considerations). Use of alkaline absorbent materials will generate ammonia.
ENVIRONMENTAL PRECAUTIONS :
Prevent material from entering sewers or waterways.
7.
HANDLING AND STORAGE
HANDLING :
Do not get in eyes, on skin, on clothing. Do not take internally. Use with adequate ventilation. Do not breathe
vapors/gases/dust. Keep the containers closed when not in use. Have emergency equipment (for fires, spills,
leaks, etc.) readily available. Ensure all containers are labeled.
Nalco Australia Pty Ltd 2 Anderson Street • Botany N.S.W. 2019, Australia
TEL: +61 2 9316 3000
FAX: +61 2 9666 5292
2/8
SAFETY DATA SHEET
PRODUCT
ULTIMER® 7757
EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBER(S)
1800 205 506
STORAGE CONDITIONS :
Protect product from freezing. Store separately from oxidizers. Store the containers tightly closed. Store in
suitable labeled containers.
SUITABLE CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL :
Polypropylene, Polyurethane, Polyethylene, Buna-N, Epoxy phenolic resin
UNSUITABLE CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL :
Stainless Steel 304, Stainless Steel 316L, Brass, EPDM, Viton, Hypalon
8.
EXPOSURE CONTROLS/PERSONAL PROTECTION
OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE LIMITS
None of the components have been assigned an exposure standard by ASCC (Australia) or OSH (New Zealand).
ENGINEERING MEASURES :
General ventilation is recommended.
PERSONAL PROTECTION
GENERAL ADVICE :
The use and choice of personal protection equipment is related to the hazard of the product, the workplace and the
way the product is handled. In general, we recommend as a minimum precaution that safety glasses with
side-shields and workclothes protecting arms, legs and body be used. In addition any person visiting an area
where this product is handled should at least wear safety glasses with side-shields.
RESPIRATORY PROTECTION :
Respiratory protection is not normally needed. An amine vapor cartridge with dust/mist prefilter or supplied air may
be used. An organic vapor cartridge with dust/mist prefilter or supplied air may be used. If respiratory protection is
required, institute a complete respiratory protection program including selection, fit testing, training, maintenance
and inspection.
HAND PROTECTION :
Nitrile gloves PVC gloves
SKIN PROTECTION :
Wear standard protective clothing.
EYE PROTECTION :
Wear chemical splash goggles.
HYGIENE RECOMMENDATIONS :
Use good work and personal hygiene practices to avoid exposure. Consider the provision in the work area of a
safety shower and eyewash. Always wash thoroughly after handling chemicals. When handling this product never
eat, drink or smoke.
Nalco Australia Pty Ltd 2 Anderson Street • Botany N.S.W. 2019, Australia
TEL: +61 2 9316 3000
FAX: +61 2 9666 5292
3/8
SAFETY DATA SHEET
PRODUCT
ULTIMER® 7757
EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBER(S)
1800 205 506
9.
PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
PHYSICAL STATE
Liquid
APPEARANCE
Milky White
ODOR
None
pH (100 %)
3.8 - 4.2
VAPOR PRESSURE
No data available.
VAPOR DENSITY
No data available.
SPECIFIC GRAVITY
1.19 - 1.22 (25 °C)
DENSITY
No data available.
SOLUBILITY IN WATER
Complete
VISCOSITY
300 - 1,200 cps (25 °C)
MELTING POINT
No data available.
BOILING POINT
No data available.
FLASH POINT
Not flammable
LOWER EXPLOSION LIMIT
No data available.
UPPER EXPLOSION LIMIT
No data available.
AUTOIGNITION TEMPERATURE
No data available.
Note: These physical properties are typical values for this product and are subject to change.
10.
STABILITY AND REACTIVITY
STABILITY :
Stable under normal conditions.
CONDITIONS TO AVOID :
Avoid extremes of temperature.
INCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS :
Contact with strong oxidizers (e.g. chlorine, peroxides, chromates, nitric acid, perchlorate, concentrated oxygen,
permanganate) may generate heat, fires, explosions and/or toxic vapors. Contact with strong alkalies (e.g.
ammonia and its solutions, carbonates, sodium hydroxide (caustic), potassium hydroxide, calcium hydroxide
(lime), cyanide, sulfide, hypochlorites, chlorites) may generate heat, splattering or boiling and toxic vapors.
HAZARDOUS DECOMPOSITION PRODUCTS :
Under fire conditions:
Oxides of carbon, Oxides of nitrogen, Oxides of sulfur
HAZARDOUS REACTIONS :
Hazardous polymerization will not occur.
11.
TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
OVERVIEW OF HEALTH HAZARDS
ACUTE HAZARDS - EYE CONTACT
May cause irritation with prolonged contact.
ACUTE HAZARDS - SKIN CONTACT
May cause irritation with prolonged contact.
Nalco Australia Pty Ltd 2 Anderson Street • Botany N.S.W. 2019, Australia
TEL: +61 2 9316 3000
FAX: +61 2 9666 5292
4/8
SAFETY DATA SHEET
PRODUCT
ULTIMER® 7757
EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBER(S)
1800 205 506
ACUTE HAZARDS - INGESTION
Not a likely route of exposure. No adverse effects expected.
ACUTE HAZARDS - INHALATION
Not a likely route of exposure. Repeated or prolonged exposure may irritate the respiratory tract.
CHRONIC HAZARDS :
No adverse effects expected other than those mentioned above.
SUMMARY OF TOXICITY INFORMATION
ACUTE TOXICITY DATA :
No toxicity studies have been conducted on this product.
SENSITIZATION :
This product is not expected to be a sensitizer.
CARCINOGENICITY :
None of the substances in this product are listed as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on
Cancer (IARC), the National Toxicology Program (NTP) or the American Conference of Governmental Industrial
Hygienists (ACGIH).
For additional information on the hazard of the preparation, please consult section 2 and 12.
HUMAN HAZARD CHARACTERIZATION
Based on our hazard characterization, the potential human hazard is: Low
12.
ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
ECOTOXICOLOGICAL EFFECTS :
The following results are for the product.
ACUTE FISH RESULTS :
Species
Bluegill Sunfish
Rainbow Trout
Fathead Minnow
Exposure
96 hrs
96 hrs
96 hrs
ACUTE INVERTEBRATE RESULTS :
Species
Exposure
Ceriodaphnia dubia
48 hrs
Daphnia magna
48 hrs
LC50
470 mg/l
490 mg/l
800 mg/l
LC50
295.5 mg/l
1,470.6 mg/l
Test Descriptor
Product
Product
Product
EC50
Test Descriptor
Product
Product
MOBILITY AND BIOACCUMULATION POTENTIAL :
The environmental fate was estimated using a level III fugacity model embedded in the EPI (estimation program
interface) Suite TM, provided by the US EPA. The model assumes a steady state condition between the total input
and output. The level III model does not require equilibrium between the defined media. The information provided
Nalco Australia Pty Ltd 2 Anderson Street • Botany N.S.W. 2019, Australia
TEL: +61 2 9316 3000
FAX: +61 2 9666 5292
5/8
SAFETY DATA SHEET
PRODUCT
ULTIMER® 7757
EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBER(S)
1800 205 506
is intended to give the user a general estimate of the environmental fate of this product under the defined
conditions of the models.
If released into the environment this material is expected to distribute to the air, water and soil/sediment in the
approximate respective percentages;
Air
<5%
Water
30 - 50%
Soil/Sediment
50 - 70%
The portion in water is expected to be soluble or dispersible.
This preparation or material is not expected to bioaccumulate.
PERSISTENCY AND DEGRADATION :
The organic portion of this preparation is expected to be poorly biodegradable.
ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD AND EXPOSURE CHARACTERIZATION
Based on our hazard characterization, the potential environmental hazard is: Low
13.
DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS
Dispose of wastes in an approved incinerator or waste treatment/disposal site, in accordance with all applicable
regulations. Do not dispose of wastes in local sewer or with normal garbage.
Triple rinse (or equivalent) all containers and offer for recycling or reconditioning, or puncture and dispose of in a
sanitary landfill, or by other procedures approved by state and local authorities.
SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS FOR LANDFILL OR INCINERATION :
No additional special precautions have been identified.
14.
TRANSPORT INFORMATION
The information in this section is for reference only and should not take the place of a shipping paper (bill of lading)
specific to an order. Please note that the proper Shipping Name / Hazard Class may vary by packaging,
properties, and mode of transportation. Typical Proper Shipping Names for this product are as follows.
LAND TRANSPORT
Proper Shipping Name :
AIR TRANSPORT (ICAO/IATA)
Proper Shipping Name :
MARINE TRANSPORT (IMDG/IMO)
Proper Shipping Name :
PRODUCT IS NOT REGULATED DURING
TRANSPORTATION
PRODUCT IS NOT REGULATED DURING
TRANSPORTATION
PRODUCT IS NOT REGULATED DURING
TRANSPORTATION
Nalco Australia Pty Ltd 2 Anderson Street • Botany N.S.W. 2019, Australia
TEL: +61 2 9316 3000
FAX: +61 2 9666 5292
6/8
SAFETY DATA SHEET
PRODUCT
ULTIMER® 7757
EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBER(S)
1800 205 506
15.
REGULATORY INFORMATION
AUSTRALIA :
NICNAS
All substances in this product comply with the National Industrial Chemicals Notification & Assessment Scheme
(NICNAS).
SUSDP SCHEDULE :
Not Listed
INTERNATIONAL REGULATIONS
FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION (FDA) Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act :
When use situations necessitate compliance with FDA regulations, this product is acceptable under : 21 CFR
176.170 Components of paper and paperboard in contact with aqueous and fatty foods and 21 CFR 176.180
Components of paper and paperboard in contact with dry foods.
The following limitations apply:
Maximum dosage
0.1%
Limitation
of dry weight fiber
It is limited to use as a retention aid and flocculant employed prior to the sheet forming operation in the
manufacture of paper and paperboard in amounts no greater than those required to produce its intended technical
effect.
INTERNATIONAL CHEMICAL CONTROL LAWS
UNITED STATES :
The substances in this preparation are included on or exempted from the TSCA 8(b) Inventory (40 CFR 710)
CANADA :
The substances in this preparation are listed on the Domestic Substances List (DSL), are exempt, or have been
reported in accordance with the New Substances Notification Regulations.
EUROPE
The substances in this preparation have been reviewed for compliance with the EINECS or ELINCS inventories.
JAPAN
This product contains substance(s) which are not in compliance with the Law Regulating the Manufacture and
Importation Of Chemical Substances and are not listed on the Existing and New Chemical Substances list (ENCS).
CHINA
This product contains substance(s) which are not in compliance with the Provisions on the Environmental
Administration of New Chemical Substances and may require additional review.
KOREA
This product contains substance(s) which are not in compliance with the Toxic Chemical Control Law (TCCL) and
may require additional review.
Nalco Australia Pty Ltd 2 Anderson Street • Botany N.S.W. 2019, Australia
TEL: +61 2 9316 3000
FAX: +61 2 9666 5292
7/8
SAFETY DATA SHEET
PRODUCT
ULTIMER® 7757
EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBER(S)
1800 205 506
PHILIPPINES
This product contains substance(s) which are not in compliance with the Republic Act 6969 (RA 6969) and may
require additional review.
16.
OTHER INFORMATION
This product material safety data sheet provides health and safety information. The product is to be used in
applications consistent with our product literature. Individuals handling this product should be informed of the
recommended safety precautions and should have access to this information. For any other uses, exposures
should be evaluated so that appropriate handling practices and training programs can be established to insure
safe workplace operations. Please consult your local sales representative for any further information.
REFERENCES
Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices, American
Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, OH., (Ariel Insight CD-ROM Version), Ariel Research Corp.,
Bethesda, MD.
Hazardous Substances Data Bank, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland (TOMES CPS
Version), Micromedex, Inc., Englewood, CO.
CD-ROM
IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of the Carcinogenic Risk of Chemicals to Man, Geneva: World Health
Organization, International Agency for Research on Cancer.
Integrated Risk Information System, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C. (TOMES CPS
CD-ROM Version), Micromedex, Inc., Englewood, CO.
Annual Report on Carcinogens, National Toxicology Program, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,
Public Health Service.
Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1910, Subpart Z, Toxic and Hazardous Substances, Occupational
Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), (Ariel Insight CD-ROM Version), Ariel Research Corp., Bethesda, MD.
Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health,
Cincinnati, OH, (TOMES CPS CD-ROM Version), Micromedex, Inc., Englewood, CO.
Ariel Insight (An integrated guide to industrial chemicals covered under major regulatory and advisory programs),
North American Module, Western European Module, Chemical Inventories Module and the Generics Module (Ariel
Insight CD-ROM Version), Ariel Research Corp., Bethesda, MD.
The Teratogen Information System, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (TOMES CPS
Micromedex, Inc., Englewood, CO.
CD-ROM Version),
REVISED INFORMATION: Significant changes to regulatory or health information for this revision is indicated by a
bar in the left-hand margin of the SDS.
Prepared By: Nalco Asia Pacific, Safety, Health and Environment (SHE) Specialist, (02) 9316 3162
Nalco Australia Pty Ltd 2 Anderson Street • Botany N.S.W. 2019, Australia
TEL: +61 2 9316 3000
FAX: +61 2 9666 5292
8/8
Sarah Fitzsimons (Sydney)
From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Subject:
Craig Menouhos [[email protected]]
Sunday, 24 January 2010 10:16 PM
Sarah Fitzsimons (Sydney)
Kester Boardman (Sydney); Hans Kieft
Re: Polymer ULTIMER 7757 Enquiry
Dear Sarah,
my apologies for the lengthy delay in response. I needed to confirm our response with a range of people at
NALCO.
I have included my responses in bold below:
Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any further questions (I assure you my next response will be more
timely!!)
with regard,
Craig Menouhos
Nalco Australia
Phone: (02) 9316 3000
Fax:
(02) 9316 3013
Mobile: 0402 419 004
Email: [email protected]
"Sarah Fitzsimons (Sydney)"
<[email protected]>
15/12/2009 06:30 PM
To "[email protected]" <[email protected]>
cc "Kester Boardman (Sydney)" <[email protected]>
Subject Polymer ULTIMER 7757 Enquiry
Cardno (NSW) Pty Ltd, ABN 95 001 145 035
Level 3, Cardno Building
910 Pacific Highway Gordon NSW 2072
Tel:+61 2 9496 7700 Fax:+61 2 9499 3902
Dear Craig,
Thank you very much for your time this morning. As discussed in our telephone conversation today, we are trying to
resolve some potential issues with using polymer ULTIMER 7757 in the Manly Lagoon Dredging Project and would be
grateful for your assistance.
Issue 1: Mixing of the Polymer with Agricultural Lime
The key issue is mixing of the polymer with lime, as the MSDS for the product indicates there could be potentially
negative reactions as follows:
Page 4/8: Contact with strong alkalies (e.g. ammonia and its solutions, carbonates, sodium hydroxide (caustic),
potassium hydroxide, calcium hydroxide (lime), cyanide, sulfide, hypochlorites, chlorites) may generate heat,
splattering or boiling and toxic vapours.
•
This is in reference to neat flocculant only.
1
As the Dredging Project will be dealing with acid sulfate soils (ASS), the proposed dredging methodology to address
this ASS risk is as follows:
•
Dredge the sediments from Manly Lagoon using a cutter suction dredge,
•
Dose the sediments (in line dosing) with a lime slurry,
•
Following this, dose the sediments (in line) with a polymer ULTIMER 7757 slurry to accelerate the dewatering
process, and finally
•
Pump the dredged sediment slurry into geotextile bags located on the banks of Manly Lagoon (in a secure,
bunded area) to dewater the lagoon sediments for a period of 4 weeks.
Dosing will be occurring at the following rates:
•
Lime: At a rate of either 37kg/tonne of sediments (low ASS risk soils) or 46kg/tonne (high ASS risk soils), and
•
Polymer ULTIMER 7757: In a range of 25 to 100 ppm.
•
For best results, ensure that the Ultimer polymer is diluted down to <1.0% solution prior to
application. (Please call for dilution options) If neat polymer must be added, add at the discharge side
of a pump for contact. A 0.5% lime slurry will not cause an adverse reaction.
Agricultural lime, at a pH of around 8.2, will be used for the lime slurry. Further to our conservation this morning I
would be grateful if you could confirm my understanding that this is not classified as a strong alkali, but rather a weak
alkali, and in the MSDS a ‘strong’ alkali is referring to alkalies at a higher pH, around 13 or 14. Hence we would
appreciate if you could please confirm that none of the negative reactions indicated in the MSDS, including the
generation of heat, splattering or boiling and toxic vapours, are expected to occur during the works.
•
Here, the MSDS is giving reference to the neat (concentrated) flocculant, not a diluted solution. The
0.5% lime slurry (46kg/T for high ASS risk) will not cause an adverse reaction.
Issue 2: Clean-up of Spills
Page 2/8: Use of alkaline absorbent materials will generate ammonia.
The above fact is noted with regards to the clean-up of spills. By association, does the above statement imply that
contact of the polymer with alkaline materials, i.e. lime in the context of dosing during dredging works, will generate
ammonia? Can you please confirm that this is not the case?
•
The reference is to neat (concentrated) flocculant. eg If lime is added to a neat polymer spill, the
generation of Ammonia is expected. The volume of ammonia generated will be proportionate to the
polymer and lime.
Issue 3: Reaction or Loss of Efficiency Due to Other Constituents Present in Manly Lagoon
Are you able to advise whether any of the reported chemical concentrations in the Manly Lagoon water or sediment
can be expected to inhibit the function of, or react with, the polymer, noting the proposed addition of lime as described
above?
The composition of the lagoon water and expected composition of the sediments to be dredged from Manly Lagoon
are provided respectively in the two tables at the end of this email (from sampling conducted earlier this year).
•
We do not believe that the lagoon contaminants will inhibit the function of the polymer to any
noticeable extent.
NOTE: High TDS water (>40000mg/L), can reduce polymer efficacy (~1% polymer performance loss)
Issue 4: Returning Traces of Polymer to the Lagoon
The MSDS also states on Page 2/8: Prevent material from entering sewers or waterways.
The proposed methodology for the works involves returning the runoff water, collected during the dewatering process
2
in the bunded area, to Manly Lagoon. The return of this water to the lagoon will only be permitted if the water meets
certain criteria including pH between 7 and 8.2 and the reduction of suspended solids in the water to suitable levels.
If, for whatever reason, water quality does not allow the return of runoff water to Manly Lagoon, it will likely be
disposed of to the sewer, pending approval from Sydney Water.
•
The MSDS is referring to neat polymer. Ideally this should not enter the sewer or waterways.
I believe the concern is more that sludge can form and therefore block pipe works etc.
A trial dredge was undertaken in August 2009 using the polymer ULTIMER 7757 at a concentration of 25 ppm,
without lime dosing. Testing of the water draining from the geotextile bags (from the dewatering process), indicated
that ULTIMER 7757 could not be detected in the water draining from the geotextile bags using typical laboratory
methodologies. From this we infer that polymer concentration in runoff water is at least three orders of magnitude less
than toxic dosages determined by toxicity testing for the polymer, as specified in the MSDS, and therefore consider it
extremely unlikely that any traces of the polymer in the runoff water will have any detectable impact on aquatic
organisms in Manly Lagoon.
•
The polymer should be bound to the heavy particles and trapped within the sludge formed.
Do you have any experience or case studies which would further support this conclusion?
•
No, sorry
Provided regulatory approval for the Project can be obtained, we are hopeful that dredging will commence early in
2010. We would be very grateful for any comments and advice that you can offer which will help us achieve this aim.
•
I am happy to work with the contractor and ensure polymer dilution and application is effective.
Thank you again for your time Craig. If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to contact either myself or Kester
Boardman on 9496 7700.
Sincerely
Sarah Fitzsimons
Environmental Engineer
Phone: +61 2 9496 7700
Fax: +61 2 9499 3902
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.cardno.com.au
Attached:
CURRENT MANLY LAGOON WATER QUALITY Min Max
Temp °C
Cond (mS/cm)
11.11 22.66
1.3 53.55
3
Cond (µS/cm)
1659
Sal (ppt)
0.65 35.35
pH
7.02
ORP (mV)
DO (%)
DO (mg/L)
8000
8.11
-80.5 453.5
11.7 116.6
0.9
8.65
Turbidity (ntu)
0.35 34.45
Total Dissolved Solids mg/L
377 34450
Suspended Solids mg/L
1
17
0.6
1.45
Total Metals in Saline Water (ORC-ICPMS method)
Arsenic µg/L
Cadmium µg/L
Chromium µg/L
Copper µg/L
0
0
0.6
0.7
1
2
Lead µg/L
0.8
1.85
Nickel µg/L
0.55
1.35
Zinc µg/L
8
41
Mercury µg/L
0
0
0
0.1
Inorganics
Ammonia as N mg/L
Nitrite as N mg/L
0
0
Nitrate as N mg/L
0.01
0.49
Nitrite + Nitrate as N mg/L
0.01
0.49
0.3
0.6
Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen as N mg/L
Total Nitrogen as N mg/L
Total Phosphorus as P mg/L
Chlorophyll a mg/m³
0.3
0.9
0.02
0.08
2
17
Phenolic Compounds
Undetectable
Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons
Undetectable
BTEX
Undetectable
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons
Undetectable
Organophosphorous Pesticides (Ultra Trace)
Undetectable
Organochlorine Pesticides
Undetectable
Enterococci CFU/100mL
10
2433
Source: Cardno Ecology Lab (2009) Manly Lagoon Dredging Project – Water Quality Monitoring Program – Progress
Report 1 – Before Dredging. September 2009. Report prepared for Manly and Warringah Councils.
CURRENT MANLY LAGOON SEDIMENT QUALITY Untreated Sediments
Moisture Content %
23
Arsenic mg/kg
3.18
Cadmium mg/kg
Undetectable
Chromium mg/kg
2.6
Copper mg/kg
Undetectable
Lead mg/kg
2.8
Nickel mg/kg
Undetectable
Zinc mg/kg
1.9
Mercury mg/kg
Undetectable
Total Cyanide mg/kg
Undetectable
Fluoride mg/kg
80
4
Total Organic Carbon %
0.78
Styrene mg/kg
Undetectable
Naphthalene mg/kg
Undetectable
Phenolic Compounds
Undetectable
BTEX
Undetectable
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons
C6-C9 Fraction mg/kg
Undetectable
C10-C14 Fraction mg/kg
Undetectable
C15-C28 Fraction mg/kg
13
C29-C36 Fraction mg/kg
13
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons mg/kg
52
Organophosphorus Pesticides
Undetectable
Organochlorine Pesticides
Undetectable
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
Undetectable
Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons
Undetectable
Enterococci MPN/g
30
Source: Cardno Ecology Lab (2009) Results of Trial Dredging 2 – Manly Lagoon Dredging Project. September 2009.
Report prepared for Manly Council.
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5
Appendix J
Dredging Plans
Appendix K
Technical Specification
TENDER No: T2009/16
SCHEDULE OF RATES CONTRACT
for the
DREDGING OF MANLY LAGOON
SITES 1 AND 2 ONLY
Volume 2 of 4
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION
PREPARED BY:
October 2009
COPY No:
Revision B
Appendix K - Technical Specification.doc
MANLY AND WARRINGAH COUNCIL’S
i
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
C1.
GENERAL
1-1
C1.1.
SCOPE OF THE WORKS
C1.1.1. Background
C1.1.2. Description of the Works
1-1
1-1
1-2
C1.2.
SITE ACCESS AND CONSTRAINTS
C1.2.1. Boundary of Works
C1.2.2. Site Access
C1.2.3. Control of Public in Reserves and Street Access Points
C1.2.4. Existing Vehicle Barriers or Gates
C1.2.5. Work within a Lagoon and Beach Environment
1-3
1-3
1-3
1-3
1-4
1-4
C1.3.
CONTRACTOR’S WORKING AREA
C1.3.1. General
C1.3.2. Works Compound
C1.3.3. Geotube Stock Pile Areas
C1.3.4. Restrictions
C1.3.5. Site Security and Safety
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-5
1-5
1-5
C1.4.
SERVICES AND FACILITIES
C1.4.1. Contractor's Facilities
C1.4.2. General Services
1-5
1-5
1-5
C1.5.
EXISTING SERVICES
C1.5.1. Due Diligence
C1.5.2. Damage to Services
C1.5.3. Cost of Relocation or Replacement of Existing Services
1-5
1-5
1-6
1-6
C1.6.
REMOVAL OF SURPLUS SPOIL, RUBBISH AND FINAL CLEANING UP
1-6
C1.7.
PRE-COMMENCEMENT PHOTO RECORD
1-6
C1.8.
CONTRACTORS TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT PLAN
1-7
C2.
SITE INFORMATION
2-1
C2.1.
GENERAL
2-1
C2.2.
SURVEY
2-2
C2.3.
QUEENSCLIFF BEACH OUTLET WIDENING DURING HEAVY RAINFALL
2-2
C2.4.
SEAGRASS BEDS
2-3
C2.5.
CONTROL OF WATER FLOWS
2-3
C3.
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
3-1
C3.1.
GENERAL
3-1
C3.2.
EROSION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL
3-1
C3.3.
CONTAMINATION
3-1
C3.4.
DISPOSAL OF EXCESS MATERIAL
3-2
C3.5.
CLEANING OF ROAD PAVEMENTS
3-2
C3.6.
INADEQUATE PROTECTION
3-2
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MANLY AND WARRINGAH COUNCIL’S
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Tender No: T2009/16
C4.
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION
ESTABLISHMENT AND SETTING OUT OF THE WORKS
4-1
C4.1.
ESTABLISHMENT ON SITE
4-1
C4.2.
FENCING OF THE WORKS AREA
C4.2.1. General
C4.2.2. Fencing of Contractor’s Compound
C4.2.3. Fencing of the Works Area
C4.2.4. Maintenance of Fences
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-1
C4.3.
SETTING OUT OF THE WORKS
4-2
C5.
PROTECTION OF EXISTING SEAGRASS AREAS
5-1
C5.1.
GENERAL
5-1
C5.2.
REPAIR OF DAMAGED SEAGRASS AREAS
5-1
C6.
TEMPORARY HAULAGE ROADS FOR EXCAVATION ACTIVITIES
6-1
C6.1.
TEMPORARY HAULAGE ROADS
6-1
C6.2.
EROSION CONTROL AT SITE ACCESS POINTS
6-1
C6.3.
RESTORATION OF HAULAGE ROADS AREAS
6-2
C7.
DREDGING WORKS
7-1
C7.1.
GENERAL
C7.1.1. Standby Due to Lagoon Entrance Works by Council
7-1
7-1
C7.2.
MATERIAL TO BE EXCAVATED
7-1
C7.3.
UNSUITABLE MATERIALS
7-1
C7.4.
EROSION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL
7-2
C7.5.
DEWATERING AND STORAGE OF SEDIMENT
7-2
C7.6.
TREATMENT OF POTENTIAL ACID SULPHATE SOILS
7-3
C7.7.
ODOUR CONTROL
7-3
C7.8.
COMMENTS AND COMPLAINTS REGISTER
7-4
C7.9.
REMOVAL OF DREDGED SEDIMENT FROM THE SITE OF WORKS
7-4
C8.
SURVEY
8-1
C8.1.
GENERAL
8-1
C8.2.
TYPES OF SURVEY AND SURVEY DETAIL.
C8.2.1. Pre-Excavation Survey
C8.2.2. Progress Survey
C8.2.3. Work As Executed Surveys
8-1
8-1
8-1
8-1
C9.
COMPLETION
Appendix K - Technical Specification.doc
9-1
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Tender No: T2009/16
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION
C1. GENERAL
C1.1.
SCOPE OF THE WORKS
C1.1.1.
Background
Manly Lagoon is a small shallow coastal lagoon in Sydney’s Northern Beaches area,
approximately 12km north-east of the Sydney Central Business District. The Lagoon is
located along the boundary between the Manly and Warringah Local Government Areas
(LGAs), as shown in Figure 1. As a result both Manly and Warringah Councils take a
pro-active role in the management and improvement of the Lagoon.
WARRINGAH
MANLY
Figure 1: Site Location
The majority of the Lagoon foreshore is public and private open space and includes
parklands, reserves, and Manly and Warringah Golf Courses. The catchment is drained
by three major freshwater creeks that flow into Manly Lagoon, including Burnt Bridge
Creek, Manly Creek and Brookvale Creek. A large number of stormwater drains in the
catchment also flow into the Lagoon.
The ocean entrance of the Lagoon is situated at the northern end of Queenscliff Beach
and is an intermittently/mechanically opened, untrained entrance (DNR, 2009). A box
culvert located at the entrance conveys low flows to the ocean and allows lagoon and
ocean waters to exchange with each tidal cycle. During times of flooding, Council uses
bulldozers to excavate a flood overflow channel across the beach berm to open the
channel to the ocean and convey flood flows.
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TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION
Manly Lagoon is considered one of the most polluted recreational waterways on the east
coast of Australia, with swimming, boating and fishing activities currently prohibited due
to polluted water and sediment (Manly Council, 2009). Poor water and sediment quality
in the Lagoon is mainly due to local pollution sources including urban stormwater runoff,
sewage overflows, tip site leachate and illegal discharge and dumping of industrial and
trade waste.
C1.1.2.
Description of the Works
Manly and Warringah Councils propose to dredge a portion of Manly Lagoon by
removing accumulated sediment from two locations; within the Lagoon between the
footbridge at Nolan Reserve and Addiscombe Road (Site 1), the in the vicinity of the end
of Riverview Parade and the confluence of Burnt Bridge Creek and the Lagoon (Site 2).
The removed sediment is to be disposed of immediately off-site or dosed with a
flocculant dewatered and stored on the Lagoon bank geotextile bags.
The major items of work include:
(i)
Construction of a temporary access suitable for the contractors plant through
Nolan reserve on an alignment to be nominated by the Superintendent.
(ii)
Removal and disposal off-site of gross pollutants from behind the existing floating
boom litter trap adjacent to Nolan reserve. The boom is to be removed carefully
and stored on the bank. The boom is to be re-installed and secured to its preexisting configuration to the satisfaction of the Superintendent following completion
of the works.
(iii) Installation of new silt curtains approximately 25m upstream and downstream of
the proposed dredging area. A secondary downstream “back-up” silt curtain is to
be placed 15m offset from the primary curtain. The silt curtains are to extend the
full width and depth of the lagoon (at high tide) and are to remain in place at all
times during the contract period.
(iv) Construction of a bunded area to contain first flush filtrate from the dredged
sediment following removal and dosing (see items v to vii). Disposal to sewer of the
first flush filtrate including obtaining any necessary approvals from Sydney Water.
(v)
Removal and disposal off-site of any debris and deleterious material at the Lagoon
bed which may impede dredging operations.
(vi)
Excavation of sediment from the lagoon as indicated on the Drawings;
(vii) Dosing the sediment with the specified flocculant in order to dewater the dredged a
material to the satisfaction of the superintendent.
(viii) Disposing of first flush flows from the dewatering process
(ix) Adding lime to the dredge sediment to manage any detected acid sulphate soils.
(x)
Pumping of the dredged sediment in TenCate Geotube dewatering bags or
approved equivalent product.
(xi) Protection of and environmental management of the geotube sediment stockpiles
during the 30 day dewatering period. Note that the Principal will be responsible for
removal of the sediment at the expiry of the 30 day dewatering period.
(xii) Preparation and implementation of a Traffic Management Plan.
(xiii) Preparation and implementation of a Environmental Management Plan.
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TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION
(xiv) Disestablishment of site including restoration of all surfaces/vegetation to preexisting condition.
C1.2.
SITE ACCESS AND CONSTRAINTS
C1.2.1.
Boundary of Works
The excavation area for the works is as shown on Drawing LJ2818-SK01. The area is
divided into two main sections, being: Site 1 adjacent to Nolan Reserve and Addiscome
Road Reserve and Site 2 adjacent To Riverview Parade and the confluence of Burnt
Bridge Creek and the Lagoon. The works boundaries may be varied at the discretion of
the Superintendent. At least twenty four (24) hours notice will be provided should the
boundary of the works require adjustment.
C1.2.2.
Site Access
General
The Contractor shall maintain the access to the site at all times. The Contractor shall
take all precautions to ensure that roads and thoroughfares used under this Contract are
not damaged as a result of construction related activities. In the event of any damage
which, in the opinion of the Superintendent, has been caused by the Contractor, the
Contractor shall take all necessary and immediate steps to repair the damage at the
Contractor’s expense. Refer also Clause C1.7.
Access to the various areas of the site is described below. All vehicles employed by the
Contractor, or any sub-contractors, shall only enter or exit the site via the nominated
access points.
Main Entry/Egress – Nolan Reserve
Access shall be gained to the site of works from Kentwell Avenue behind the bowling
club (on western side). A temporary access road including continuous bunting,
appropriate safety signage and pavement materials as required to ensure a stable and
trafficable surface are to be installed by the contractor on an alignment to be identified
and marked on-site by the Superintendent.
Secondary Site Access – Riverview Parade.
A secondary access point shall be at the end of Riverview Parade adjacent to Site 2.
Vehicles and plant accessing the site from this location will be limited to standard
vehicles only (passenger and utility vehicles) and no deliveries or plant will be permitted
in this location without approval of the Superintendent to use this access point.
C1.2.3.
Control of Public in Reserves and Street Access Points
The access points described above are used extensively by members of the public. If
the Contractor proposes to undertake works that involve the movement of other than
standard vehicles to these areas, then the Contractor shall provide a suitably qualified
traffic controller, to control the movement of pedestrians and other vehicles during the
passage of each truck/plant movement.
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TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION
The Contractor shall implement and maintain a Contractors Traffic Management Plan.
The plan shall be submitted to the Superintendent not less that two weeks prior to
mobilisation to site.
C1.2.4.
Existing Vehicle Barriers or Gates
Where vehicular barriers or gates currently exist at the access points to the site or in
reserves, these barriers shall be replaced and locked into position at the end of each
working day. Should any barriers or gates be left unlocked by the Contractor, the
Principal may instruct a Council Ranger to attend the site to replace and lock and secure
the site. All costs associated with a Ranger attending the site and replacement of any
locks to the barriers shall be recoverable from the Contractor.
C1.2.5.
Work within a Lagoon and Beach Environment
The site of works under this Contract include public reserves and a downstream
recreational beach environment. The public reserves and downstream ocean beach
areas are used extensively by the general public for recreational pursuits such as
fishing, surfing, swimming and walking. The Contractor shall undertake the works to
minimise disruption to the surrounding area, pollution of the surrounding area and
downstream beach outside the limits of the works.
The Contractor shall be deemed to have visited the site and assessed the location of the
works during the Tender Period and allowed in the Tender for any additional works
required to avoid conflicts with the public and access the site as required to carry out the
works.
Refer also Clause C2 SITE INFORMATION.
C1.3.
CONTRACTOR’S WORKING AREA
C1.3.1.
General
The Contractor’s Working Area shall include the areas referred to below, all excavation
areas within the lagoon between high water mark and property fence lines or between
high water mark referred to in Clause C1.2.1 BOUNDARY OF WORKS.
The Contractor may seek permission from the Superintendent to use parts of the
existing lagoon shoreline in addition to the area indicated on the drawings for purposes
of undertaking the works. Use of that part or whole of these areas shall not commence
until the written permission of the Superintendent is received. The Superintendent shall
not be bound to give approval and any such decision may be based on the community
need for the area.
C1.3.2.
Works Compound
An area shall be set aside for the exclusive use of the Contractor adjacent to the lagoon
bank and Nolan Reserve. The land area will be rectangular in shape and occupy a total
maximum area of approximately 200 square metres. The final location of the compound
will be advised by the Superintendent not less that seven (7) days before the date for
possession of site. The Contractor shall not stockpile or store equipment or materials not
required for immediate use outside of the compound area. The compound shall be
fenced in accordance with Clause C4.2.2.
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C1.3.3.
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION
Geotube Stock Pile Areas
The nominated location for stockpiling of sediment within the Geotubes is at southern
edge of Nolan Reserve as shown on Drawing LJ2818-SK01. The area for the stockpile
is approximately 2,500m (18m wide x 250m long). The stockpile area shall be fenced in
accordance with Clause C4.2.3.
C1.3.4.
Restrictions
The Contractor shall confine its working, storage, accommodation and other facilities to
within the Works Compound and the Contractor's Working Area. The Contractor's plant,
labour and materials shall be allowed on the site only to the extent necessary for the
construction of the Works.
C1.3.5.
Site Security and Safety
The Contractor shall be responsible for the proper and adequate safeguarding of the
works, during both working and non-working hours to meet OHS legislation.
In particular, the Contractor shall take all necessary steps at all times to safeguard and
ensure the safety of any person who may enter or trespass upon any part of the works
area.
C1.4.
SERVICES AND FACILITIES
C1.4.1.
Contractor's Facilities
The Contractor shall be wholly responsible for the provision of offices and sheds at the
Site for their use. Offices and sheds required by the Contractor shall only be erected,
and equipment stored, within the Contractor’s compound area.
The Contractor shall provide temporary sanitary accommodation for the workforce,
arrange and pay for the necessary pan service or temporary sewage connection, clean
and disinfect the area regularly and shall remove same on completion of the work.
The Contractor shall not install or permit employees and sub-contractors to use other
facilities within and adjoining the site without permission from the Superintendent.
C1.4.2.
General Services
The Contractor shall arrange for the connection of temporary service lines for water,
power, telephone and any other service deemed necessary by the Contractor. All such
arrangements shall be in accordance with the requirements of the relevant authority and
with the permission of the Superintendent.
The Contractor shall meet the cost of accessing and providing these services to the work
site as appropriate, their use and their removal at completion.
C1.5.
EXISTING SERVICES
C1.5.1.
Due Diligence
It is the Contractor's responsibility to investigate the nature and location of all services
that might be encountered during the construction of the work and to consult with the
relevant authorities with respect to these matters prior to the commencement of any
works.
Existing services including stormwater, sewer, electricity, gas and
telecommunications shall be located, isolated and protected by the Contractor in
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TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION
accordance with the requirements of the appropriate authority. Amongst other services,
a 500mm diameter sewer main traverses the lagoon in an east-west direction in the
vicinity of Riverview and Campbell Parades. The contractor shall liaise with Sydney
Water and other authorities as appropriate to ensure protection of existing services. The
Contractor shall, at his own expense, dig any trial holes it may consider necessary to
determine the exact positions of services and repair, as necessary at its own cost, any
services it may damage during the course of the Contract.
Failure by the Contractor to inform himself of this and to take due care shall not limit it
liability for the repair of all services damaged by them.
C1.5.2.
Damage to Services
In the event that the Contractor causes damage to sewer lines, water supply, electricity
supply, telecommunication cables or other, and notwithstanding that the damage may
have been repaired as a matter of urgency by the Authority responsible for that service,
whether at the request of the Contractor or otherwise, and the Superintendent is
satisfied that the Contractor has not made payment to the Authority for such repair if it is
liable to do so, then it shall be deemed that the Contractor has failed to comply with the
requirements of Clause 15 of the General Conditions, and the cost of such repair shall
be deducted in accordance with the provisions of that Clause.
C1.5.3.
Cost of Relocation or Replacement of Existing Services
Where an existing pipe or conduit cable (hereafter referred to as service and which is to
remain in service after construction of the works) occupies the same space in which a
structure is required to be positioned, the Superintendent shall be notified immediately
that this conflict is observed. The Contractor shall be responsible for the location of
services, and the Principal shall not be responsible for any damage caused by the
Contractor to these services.
The Contractor shall give notice of its requirements to the Superintendent who shall
arrange for the removal or deviation of the service as soon as practicable. The
Superintendent may direct the Contractor to carry out the removal and replacement or
deviation of the service in which case payment shall be in accordance with Clause 36 of
the General Conditions.
C1.6.
REMOVAL OF SURPLUS SPOIL, RUBBISH AND FINAL CLEANING UP
The Contractor shall be responsible for the removal and disposal off-site of all surplus
materials and rubbish associated with the works and for the final cleaning up of all areas
covered by the Contract which shall be left clean and tidy on completion of the Contract.
C1.7.
PRE-COMMENCEMENT PHOTO RECORD
The Contractor shall provide a report giving a photographic record of the condition of
roads, access locations, lagoon banks, and lagoon frontage dwelling walls/fences
adjacent to the works area prior to mobilising any plant to the site. The record shall
extend along the full extent of all roads proposed to be used by the Contractor.
The photographic record shall be undertaken in the presence of the Superintendent. A
copy of the photographic record shall be submitted to the Superintendent not less than
five (5) days prior to mobilising any plant to site. The photographic record shall be used
as a basis by the Superintendent for determining any damage to roads, thoroughfares,
fencing and dunes caused by the Contractor.
Appendix K - Technical Specification.doc
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C1.8.
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION
CONTRACTORS TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT PLAN
The Contractor shall prepare and implement a Contractors Traffic Management Plan for
the Works.
The plan shall include all approvals as required by the various traffic authorities,
including Council, NSW Roads and Traffic Authority and the NSW Police. Obtaining
these and any other approval required is the responsibility of the Contractor. The
Contractor shall allow for review, revision and reimplementation of the Contractors
Traffic Management Plan should any deficiencies or safety issues arise during the
Works.
The plan and associated approvals shall be submitted to the Superintendent not less
than seven (7) days prior to the date for possession of site.
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TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION
C2. SITE INFORMATION
C2.1.
GENERAL
This Section sets out site information for Manly Lagoon based on a range of
investigations and studies conducted by Warringah and Manly Councils over a number
of years.
Contractors shall note that the lagoon is subject to a range of hydrological, coastal and
estuarine processes including flooding, tidal impacts and sediment movement.
Contractors should inform themselves as to the active coastal and estuarine processes
that influence lagoon behaviour and review of relevant documents located at:
(i) Manly Council - Watercycle Management Technical Library
(ii) Warringah Council - Local Studies Section Dee Why Library.
The Contractor shall be deemed to have taken into account during the tender period all
of the site conditions and to have made allowance for these conditions in the Tender.
Relevant documents include but are not necessarily limited to:
(a) Manly Lagoon Dredging Project Review of Environmental Factors (Draft)
Cardno Lawson and Treloar, October 2009 Report No.LJ2818/Rep2580
(b) Public W Department of Land and Water Conservation (1997) Manly Lagoon
Floodplain Management Plan. Report Prepared for Manly Council and Warringah
Council.
(c) Department of Natural Resources - Estuaries in NSW – Manly Lagoon. Online at:
http://naturalresources.nsw.gov.au/estuaries/inventory/manly.shtml [Accessed 2 July
2009]
(d) Manly Council and Warringah Council - Manly Lagoon Estuary Management Plan.
February 1998.
(e) Manly Lagoon Flood Study. June. NSW Public Works Department. Manly Hydraulics
Laboratory (1992)
(f) Manly Lagoon Proposed Rehabilitation Works Flood Modelling. March. NSW
Department of Public Works and Services. Manly Hydraulics Laboratory (2003)
(g) Manly Lagoon Estuary Management Study. March. Report Prepared for Warringah
and Manly Councils. Patterson Britton & Partners (1995)
(h) Manly Lagoon Rehabilitation Works, Site 1, Site and Site 3 Vibrocoring and Push
Core Sediment Sampling Exercise. September. Report Prepared for Warringah and
Manly Councils. Patterson Britton & Partners (2002)
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(i) Manly Lagoon Rehabilitation Works, Sediment Removal from Sites 1 and 2,
Statement of Environmental Effects. January. Draft Report Prepared for Manly
Council and Warringah Council. Patterson Britton & Partners (2003a)
(j) Manly Lagoon Rehabilitation Works, Sediment Removal from Sites 3 and 5,
Statement of Environmental Effects. August. Report Prepared for Manly Council and
Warringah Council. Patterson Britton & Partners (2003b)
(k) University of Technology, Sydney (2004) UTS Freshwater Ecology Report 2003:
Community Guided Research Focusing on the Manly Lagoon Catchment.
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Technology, Sydney.
February.
(l) Manly Lagoon Benthic Survey, Cardno Ecology Lab, October 2009.
(m) Manly Lagoon Sea Grass Survey and Bank Condition, Carno Ecology Lab, 14
September 2009.
(n) Manly Lagoon Water Quality Monitoring Report, Cardno Ecology Lab 2009.
(o) Manly Lagoon Dredging Project, Results of Trial Dredging 2, Cardno Ecology Lab 21
September 2009.
C2.2.
SURVEY
Hydrographic cross section surveys of the lagoon have been undertaken by Warringah
Council in 1992 and 2009.
Information from this survey has been included in the
Drawings. Due to a lack of a common cross section locations and datum, the
comparison of the 1992 and 2009 surveys and the associated indicative volumes
reported cannot be warranted.
The Contractor shall undertake further surveys of the lagoon at sites 1 and 2 for
purposes of level and construction tolerance control during. The contractor engage a
hydrographic surveyor in accordance with to deomonstrate compliance with the
excavation requirements in accordance with Clause C8 SURVEY.
C2.3.
QUEENSCLIFF BEACH OUTLET WIDENING DURING HEAVY RAINFALL
During periods of very heavy rainfall, the Lagoon entrance to Queenscliff beach may be
widened at Council’s discretion. This activity may have an impact on the behaviour and
processes (flow rates, sediment movement, pollution levels) within the Lagoon within
the site of works.
In addition, release of flows and other management practices at Manly Dam may impact
the works. The contractor shall familiarise themselves with management practices and
operation of Manly Dam prior to commencement of works. Warringah Councils Team
Leader Natural Envirnonment, Todd Disckinson should be contacted for further
information regarding Manly Dam on 9942 2111.
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The contractor is deemed to have allowed for such impacts during/following heavy
rainfall, opening of the Queenscliff beach entrance and Manly Dam management
practices in the contract rates and/or price.
C2.4.
SEAGRASS BEDS
Extensive seagrass beds exist downstream of the propose dredging area. The location
of the seagrass beds has been defined by recent mapping undertaken by The Ecology
Lab (Report Ref LJ2818A -Manly Lagoon Sea Grass and Bank Condition Survey,
14/09/09) . It is the contractors responsibility to ensure that dredging activities have no
impact of the sea grass and to take necessary precautions over and above the the
minimum silt curtain measures detailed on the drawings if necessary. Refer Clause C5
PROTECTION OF EXISTING SEAGRASS AREAS.
C2.5.
CONTROL OF WATER FLOWS
The Contractor shall be responsible for controlling the flow of water within, through or
around the site throughout the duration of the Contract. Water flows into the site may
result from the following sources:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
Flow within the lagoon due to catchment runoff;
Stormwater runoff from the areas adjacent to the site;
Tidal inflow from the ocean on a flood tide;
Tidal outflow from the lagoon on an ebb tide.
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C3. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
C3.1.
GENERAL
During the execution of the works the Contractor shall comply with all requirements of
Section 7 and the Review of Environmental Factors (REF) contained in the Contract
Documents. At least five (5) days prior to commencing clearance works, the Contractor
shall prepare an Environmental Management Plan (EMP) for approval by the
Superintendent.
The Contractor shall ensure that all workers are aware of the environmental
requirements of the Contract. Refer Clause SC4 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION.
C3.2.
EROSION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL
The Contractor shall establish and regularly maintain sediment traps, floating sediment
booms (silt curtains), silt fencing and diversion drains to stockpiles and other means of
sediment control as required by the REF and the Contractors EMP, and Council
specifications for sediment and erosion control.
The Erosion and Sedimentation Control Plan shall consist of diagrams and supporting
documentation indicating the following:
(i)
The site drainage lines and inlets;
(ii)
Construction details of all erosion and sedimentation control structures;
(iii)
All proposed permanent and temporary erosion sedimentation control
measures;
(iv)
Confirmation of proposed location of material stockpiles (Geotubes);
(v)
Details of the type, size and location of bunds to collect first flush runoff from
the Geotubes;
(vi)
Details of the disposal method of first flush filtrate to Sydney Water’s sewer
system or by other means.
The selection of appropriate controls shall be the responsibility of the Contractor.
C3.3.
CONTAMINATION
The contractor shall prevent contamination of Manly Lagoon and Queensliff Beach, the
ocean and other lands. Should contamination by oil or any other contaminant occur as a
result of the Contractor's operations, the contractor shall notify the Superintendent of any
such event and shall immediately remove the contamination, and make good any
damage arising from such contamination or its removal to the complete satisfaction of
the DECCW or appropriate regulatory authority.
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C3.4.
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION
DISPOSAL OF EXCESS MATERIAL
Where the Contractor supplies and places materials, additional to those required for the
construction of the works, for the purposes of construction of the works, all such
materials shall be removed at the completion of construction, and the areas restored in
accordance with the Specification.
C3.5.
CLEANING OF ROAD PAVEMENTS
It shall be the responsibility of the Contractor to ensure that all external roads and, where
utilised, any internal roads are kept clean of materials resulting from the Contractors
activities. Roads must be left clean at the end of every working day. Roads shall, where
necessary, be swept with a vacuum sweeper to keep the roads safe and trafficable.
C3.6.
INADEQUATE PROTECTION
Failure by the Contractor to protect the environment in accordance with this Specification
will be considered a breach of Clause 15 of the General Conditions of Contract and the
Superintendent may:
(i)
suspend part or the whole of the works in accordance with Clause 34.1 of the
General Conditions of Contract - which suspension will be deemed due to an
omission of the Contractor; or
(ii)
arrange for the necessary work by others, and costs to be borne by the
Contractor, which would be deducted from moneys due or becoming due under
this Contract.
No notice is required for the Superintendent to act in accordance with (i) or (ii).
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C4. ESTABLISHMENT AND SETTING OUT OF THE
WORKS
C4.1.
ESTABLISHMENT ON SITE
Establishment shall consist of the Contractor furnishing at the site all plant, equipment
and personnel necessary for completion of the works.
Access to the site is described in Clause C1.2 SITE ACCESS AND CONSTRAINTS.
C4.2.
FENCING OF THE WORKS AREA
C4.2.1.
General
Prior to the commencement of construction activities temporary fencing, gates and signs
shall be established.
Temporary fencing shall be erected around the perimeter of all works. Two types of
temporary fencing shall be erected as part of the Contract as described below.
C4.2.2.
Fencing of Contractor’s Compound
Temporary fencing of the Contractor’s Compound shall comprise a 1.8 metre high
chainwire fence with 40 mm minimum diameter galvanised mild steel posts at a
maximum spacing of 3 metre centres. Lockable gates shall be provided at all entrances
to the Compound.
C4.2.3.
Fencing of the Works Area
Temporary construction barrier fencing shall be erected around the Geotube stockpile
locations on the shoreline and along proposed haulage roads other than public roads
and streets.
Temporary construction barrier fencing shall comprise 1,800 mm long star posts driven
into the ground so that a minimum length of 1,000 mm remains above ground. Locate
the star posts around the perimeter of all areas described above at nominal 3,000 mm
centres. Use 3 six gauge wires fitted through the posts to secure orange polypropylene
woven mesh such as “Budget Barrier” by Tapax Safety Fencing or equivalent to the star
posts and properly tension and maintain tensioning throughout the life of the protective
barriers.
C4.2.4.
Maintenance of Fences
Maintaining a continuous, visual barrier around the works area is an important
component of the works under the Contract, given the high degree of public use of the
area.
The Contractor shall maintain all fencing to ensure that a continuous barrier is presented
to the public at all times at the perimeter of the works area. Maintenance of the fence
shall include, but not be limited to, the replacement of any section of the fencing that has
been damaged due to vandalism or adverse weather conditions and the refixing or
tensioning of sections of the fencing that have come loose.
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Payment due to the Contractor for the fencing may be reduced if the fencing is not
maintained in a condition satisfactory the Superintendent.
C4.3.
SETTING OUT OF THE WORKS
The Contractor shall be responsible for setting out the works. The location of the set out
points shall be confirmed by the Contractor on site.
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C5. PROTECTION OF EXISTING SEAGRASS AREAS
C5.1.
GENERAL
The Contractor shall take every precaution to avoid damage to seagrass areas. The
locations of known seagrass areas is shown on Figure 1 of the Cardno Ecology Lab
Report Ref LJ2818A 14/09/09 and reproduced below.
The Contractor shall inspect and confirm the extent of seagrass in the vicinity of the
Works prior to the clearance operations. Refer also C9 SURVEY.
The Contractor shall familiarise itself with relevant legislation administered by NSW
Department of Primary Industries (NSW DPI) related to the protection of aquatic
vegetation including penalties that breaches may attract.
C5.2.
REPAIR OF DAMAGED SEAGRASS AREAS
Any damage to seagrass beds which, in the opinion of the Superintendent, has been
caused by activities of the Contractor will be repaired by Manly Council at the
Contractor’s cost. The cost shall include the cost of design, labour, plant and
supervision of the repairs. The cost shall be in addition to any penalty imposed under
legislation administered by NSW DPI.
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C6. TEMPORARY HAULAGE ROADS FOR EXCAVATION
ACTIVITIES
C6.1.
TEMPORARY HAULAGE ROADS
Temporary haulage roads may be required to assist in the movement of excavation
material around the various portions of the site. The Contractor shall be responsible for
assessing whether temporary roads are required and their construction if necessary.
The standard of construction shall be at the discretion of the Contractor to suit the plant
and equipment to be used.
No haulage roads shall be constructed outside of the fenced construction area unless
approved by the Superintendent. The Superintendent may include conditions on any
approval to construct haulage roads outside of the fenced area.
C6.2.
EROSION CONTROL AT SITE ACCESS POINTS
Access to the site shall be in accordance with the Clause C1.2 SITE ACCESS AND
CONSTRAINTS. At each exit point from the excavation areas a “Stabilised Site Access”
shall be installed in accordance with the sketch below.
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C6.3.
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION
RESTORATION OF HAULAGE ROADS AREAS
At the completion of construction activities the temporary haulage road will be removed
and the surface re-instated to its pre-existing condition.
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C7. DREDGING WORKS
C7.1.
GENERAL
The dredging activities shall be undertaken at the location and to the levels shown on
the Drawings, except where unsuitable materials are encountered. Refer Clause C7.3
UNSUITABLE MATERIALS. The intent of the project is to excavate accumulated
sediment down to previously surveyed levels using a cutter suction dredging plant or
similar approved method. Excavation by long reach excavator or similar is not
considered appropriate for this site due to access and environmental issues.
The tolerances for dredging shall be as follows:
(i)
+/- 100 mm for dredges level;
No dredging is to be undertaken within a horizontal distance from the existing bank
greater than twice the depth of the lagoon at any given location.
No dredging is to be undertaken within 1 metre of the western bank in the area of the
former landfill site at the end of Addiscombe road. Works shall not proceed in this
location until such time that the Superintendent has highlighted the relevant area on-site.
Determination of any temporary batter slopes required during dredging and the
construction of any structure is the responsibility of the Contractor.
C7.1.1.
Standby Due to Lagoon Entrance Works by Council
Payment will be made for authorised standby time between the time that the various
plant involved in the operations cease work following the Superintendent’s instruction to
cease work and the time that the various plant can reasonably restart, in the event that
works are required within the Lagoon or North Steyne entrance that in the opinion of the
Superintendent, prohibit dredging activities to be undertaken.
The date for practical completion shall be adjusted and shall include only the actual
standby time incurred under this heading and on the Critical Path.
C7.2.
MATERIAL TO BE EXCAVATED
The material to be excavated comprises sediments transported into the lagoon by
coastal processes, and sediment introduced by run off or stormwater process in the
Manly Lagoon catchment area.
C7.3.
UNSUITABLE MATERIALS
Excavation of grey/black estuarine mud’s is to be avoided. Should excavation activity
encounter material of this nature before the design excavation level is reached, the
Superintendent shall be notified immediately and excavation shall proceed in another
area. The location and level of the dark estuarine material shall be noted by the
Contractor and advised to the Superintendent. The Superintendent shall modify the
excavation design accordingly and issue an instruction to the Contractor in this regard.
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Man-made debris and other deleterious material may be present at the Lagoon bed. The
contractor shall remove debris as required to enable dredging to proceed to the levels
shown on the drawings or as directed by the Superintendent. Should debris larger than a
shopping trolley be encountered, the Superintendent is to be contacted immediately.
Following an inspection of the subject item/s, the Superintendent will direct the
contractor to remove or avoid the debris.
C7.4.
EROSION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL
Temporary sediment control structures shall be established in accordance with the EMP
to be submitted by the Contractor (refer TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION). Following installation, these environmental control
measures shall require inspection and approval from the Superintendent prior to the
commencement of excavation.
C7.5.
DEWATERING AND STORAGE OF SEDIMENT
Indicative areas on the lagoon shoreline have been identified on the drawings for
stockpiling of the sediment in Geotubes. The final location of the storage areas will be
advised by the Superintendent prior to the Contractors possession of site.
An impermeable bund surrounding and under the Geotubes is required to prevent the
uncontrolled release of filtrate from the dewatering process re-entering the ground water
system.
Prior to placement of the dredged sediment into the Geotubes, the contractor is required
to ensure addition and adequate mixing of a polymer flocculant conforming to the
specifications outlined in Table C7.5
Product
ULTIMER 7757
Supplier
Nalco Company
Ph: 02 9316 3000
Minimum Dosage
25 ppm dilution of
sediment slurry
Maximum Dosage
100ppm dilution of
sediment slurry
Table C7.5 Flocculant Details
The contractor must be able to demonstrate dosage control to 5 ppm.
The first flush filtrate from the geobag is not permitted to be returned to the lagoon. First
flush water is defined as that part of the filtrate that has greater than 75% of suspended
solids (SS) compared to the filtrate tested at the instant flow is detected from the
geobag. A representative of the Principal will supervise will undertake full time
supervision of the dewatering process and will determine when the first flush has
finished (using a Yeokal 7600 multiprobe or similar to measure SS) and the filtrate can
be returned to the lagoon.
First flush flows are to be disposed of either off-site or to Sydney Water’s Sewer system.
The contractor shall be responsible for obtaining any necessary licences or permits and
paying all fees and costs associated with disposal of the first flush water. Under no
circumstances shall the first flush filtrate be returned directly to the lagoon.
The flow rate to the sewer system is not to exceed the maximum peak and average daill
discharge nominated by Sydney Water should this be the preferred method of disposal.
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Filtrate release back into the lagoon following the first flush shall be carried out in a
controlled manner which minimises the potential for erosion or increased turbidity in the
lagoon.
The volume of water contained within the bund and disposed of to Sydney Water’s
sewer system or offsite can be minimised by increasing the dosage to the maximum
concentration identified in Table C7.5.
Should the maximum dosage be exceeded, the contractor would be deemed to be in
breach of Clause 14,15 and 17 of the General Conditions of Contract and the
Superintendent may:
(i)
suspend part or the whole of the works in accordance with Clause 34.1 of the
General Conditions of Contract - which suspension will be deemed due to an
omission of the Contractor; or
(ii) arrange for the necessary corrective or clean up works to be undertaken by work
by others, with the associated and costs being borne by the Contractor including
any associated statutory authority fines, which would be deducted from moneys
due or becoming due under this Contract.
No notice is required for the Superintendent to act in accordance with (i) or (ii).
The Geotubes, bunds and perimeter site fencing is to remain on the Lagoon shoreline
for a period of 30 days, or similar period of time as determined by the Superintendent.
No dredged materials shall be loaded directly into trucks for transport off-site.
C7.6.
TREATMENT OF POTENTIAL ACID SULPHATE SOILS
The contractor will be responsible for dosing the dredge spoil with lime in order to
mitigate the risk posed by the presence of spoil with a known acid sulfate generation
potential. The contractor must make provision for the addition of Hydrated Lime at a rate
of 0-100 kg per cubic metre of dredged material in order to neutralise potential acid
sulphate soils. It is expected that the required rate of lime addition will vary within the
lagoon sediments, and the contractor shall ensure representative testing such that the
dosage rate continues to be appropriate throughout the treatment process.
In line dosing prior to filling of the Geotube is the preferred means of treatment, however
the contractor may propose alternative or additional treatment methods including mixing
lime with the treated dredge spoil
The contractor shall at all times meet the minimum requirements of the Acid Sulfate
Soils Management Plan.
C7.7.
ODOUR CONTROL
It will be the contractors responsibility to manage odour at the site of works. The
contractor shall outline in the EMP how they plan to minimise or treat odorous emissions,
should they arise during dredging, dewatering and/or storage of the sediment for a
period of 30 days on the shoreline.
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C7.8.
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION
COMMENTS AND COMPLAINTS REGISTER
The contractor shall nominate a contact person for all community enquiries, comments
and complaints. The name and number of the contact person shall be clearly identified
on project signage and on the notice letter to residents (refer Clause SC1.1).
The contractor shall establish a comments and complaints register prior to
commencement of the works and maintain the register until the expiry of the Defects
Liability Period. The register shall contian a log of written and verbal comments or
complaints including time and date of complaint, contact name and telephone number.
The complaints register shall be tabled at each site meeting to be held at least once
every two weeks. The contract shall relay all complaints directly to the Superintended
within a reasonable timeframe of the complaint being made (at least on the same
working day).
C7.9.
REMOVAL OF DREDGED SEDIMENT FROM THE SITE OF WORKS
Following expiry of the 30 day dewatering period the Principal will arrange for removal of
the dredged sediment from site provided no further treatment of the sediment by the
Contractor is required in order to meet the requirements of this specification.
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C8. SURVEY
C8.1.
GENERAL
The Contractor shall engage NSW Department of Commerce to carry out the Work as
Executed Survey following completion of the works. The Contractor shall be responsible
for all survey control required to ensure that dredging quantities and tolerances are met.
C8.2.
TYPES OF SURVEY AND SURVEY DETAIL.
C8.2.1.
Pre-Excavation Survey
A pre-excavation hydro-graphic survey was undertaken by NSW Department of
Commerce in May 2009. This Survey is included in the documents for use by the
Contractor and will be used as the baseline survey to which the WAE survey is
compared for the purposes of assessing
C8.2.2.
Progress Survey
At the discretion of the Superintendent, progress surveys may be arranged for project
assessment and planning purposes. The Contractor will be provided with a minimum
three (3) days notice prior to any field work for the progress survey being commenced.
The contractor shall submit a survey volume assessment by a registered surveyor of the
stockpiled sediment each progress claim.
C8.2.3.
Work As Executed Surveys
The Work as Executed Survey carried out by NSW Department of Commerce is to be
prepared using identical benchmarks, datums and cross section locations to the Predredging survey. The survey will be used to determine conformance of the dredging
activities with the project requirements. The Work- As Executed survey shall be carried
out not less than seven (7) days following completion of dredging activities.
Two (2) hard copies of the Works-As Executed certified by a registered surveyor and an
electronic version including 3D coordinates is to be submitted to the Superintendent not
more than twenty one (21) days following completion of the works.
The Principal will engage a registered surveyor to carry out a volume assessment of the
stockpiled sediment at the expiry of the 30 day dewatering period which will be used for
measurement purposes and processing of the Contractors final progress claim (Refer
Clause C10).
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C9. COMPLETION
Upon completion of the works, the site shall be cleared of all surplus materials, plant,
equipment, signs and notice boards, temporary fences and gates, and the like, to the
satisfaction of the Superintendent.
Any areas and existing structures (eg fencing, kerbs, road pavement) or natural surfaces
(grassed areas, lagoon banks, trees and vegetation) which have been disturbed by the
Contractor during execution of the work under this Contract shall be fully
restored/rehabilitated to the satisfaction of the Superintendent.
The existing permanent floating boom shall be reinstalled to the satisfaction of the
superintendent as soon within five (5) days of completion of dredging activities.
The contractor is responsible for security and safety of the site from the date for
possession of site to the expiry of the 30 day dewatering period unless otherwise
directed by the Superintendent.
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Appendix L
Protected Bird Nesting Sites
From: Scott Butcher
Sent: Friday, 30 October 2009 9:49 AM
To: Todd Dickinson
Cc: Jason Ruszczyk; Jacqueline Grove; Nathan Smith
Subject: Manly Lagoon Little Shag Colonies
Guys
Yesterday Jason and myself to Manly Lagoon and found two colonies of little shag nesting in the
Casuarinas on the edge of Manly Lagoon. 1 of the 2 colonies was at the eastern end of Riverview
parade and consisted of 4 nests in total, 2 of which had breeding activity, (one with young in the nests
and the other with a bird sitting etc) there were at least 6 adult birds present at the colony. There was
also some very young Darters present at this colony which looked like they may have only just
fledged, suggesting that they may have nested at this same location.
The second nesting location was behind 42 and 44 Riverview Parade had a single nest present with
one bird sitting, there were about 8 adults present at this site. The nest was also in a Casuarina.
These are the first colonies of nesting shags/darters that I have seen in Warringah, although I would
think that there are other colonies elsewhere in the LGA.
Cheers, Scott
Scott Butcher | Environmental Projects Officer |
Warringah Council
725 Pittwater Road
DEE WHY NSW 2099
t: 02 9942 2375
f: 02 9971 2691
Page 1 of 2
From: Scott Butcher
Sent: Friday, 30 October 2009 1:56 PM
To: Sue Jacobs
Cc: Todd Dickinson; Jason Ruszczyk
Subject: RE: Manly Lagoon Little Shag Colonies
Hi Sue
Little Pied Cormorant (Microcarbo melanoleucos) is usual name. These birds look as though there
breeding effort is in full swing at the present time, one bird (at least) was sitting on eggs and another
had a nest with young that would have been no older than about 2 weeks. A field guide should give a
more accurate idea of the full incubation and fledging period, off the top of my head I am not sure
exactly what it is but would be at least 4 weeks. For the incubation and until they fledge, these birds
would still be using the nest site. I am unsure of the breeding cycle here is Sydney, in other places
colonies can be active pretty much year round. It would pay to monitor the two sites to see if they
keep breeding through summer.
A map is attached with the location of the two nesting locations; both can be easily accessed from
Riverview parade.
Thanks, Scott
Scott Butcher | Environmental Projects Officer |
Warringah Council
725 Pittwater Road
DEE WHY NSW 2099
t: 02 9942 2375
f: 02 9971 2691
Page 2 of 2
LJ2818
LITTLE PIED CORMORANT NESTING SITES AT MANLY LAGOON
FIELD OBSERVATIONS – Thursday, 12 November 2009
The locations of Nesting Sites 1 and 2 are indicated on MAP 1. These locations were determined
using a GPS device, recorded at the base of the nesting trees on the day of the field observations.
MAP 1: Nesting Sites 1 and 2 of the Little Pied Cormorant at Manly Lagoon.
CARDNO
Page 1
LJ2818
NESTING SITE 1: End of Riverview Parade
This nesting site was inspected between 8:30am and 9:30am. Up to 10 birds were observed at this
site, within the one Casurina tree, including Little Pied Cormorants (Phalacrocorax melanoleucos),
Darters (Anhinga melanogaster) and Little Black Cormorants (Phalacrocorax sulcirostris) (PHOTO 1).
Between four and six adult Little Pied Cormorants were present during the hour this site was
observed.
Three nests were present in the Casurina tree, which extends over Manly Lagoon and has its base
directly on the bank, adjacent to the waterway (PHOTO 2). Two of the nests contained three and
four Little Pied Cormorant chicks, respectively. Neither nest had an adult present full time; however
three feedings were observed at these two nests by adult Little Pied Cormorants (PHOTO 3 and
PHOTO 4). These chicks were relatively small (the nest of four chicks appeared smaller and younger
than the nest of three), not yet the size of the adult bird, black in colour with a red, hairless patch of
skin below their beaks (PHOTO 5).
The third nest contained three large Darter chicks, which still had white down but appeared almost
the size of the adult male Darter feeding them (PHOTO 6). One feeding at this nest was observed.
One Darter fledgling was also noted sitting in the tree, sitting away from any of the nests but
distinctly a Darter fledgling because it still had whiter downy feathers.
Continuous noise was present at this nesting site from excavation/earthworks occurring at the
Manly Golf Course site, directly across the Lagoon (approximately 50m away) (PHOTO 7). Manly Golf
Course earthworks appeared to extend right to the bank of the opposite foreshore and truck
movement / machinery engine noise could be heard quite loudly and continuously during the site
inspection of Nesting Site 1. None of the birds appeared to be disturbed by this consistent
construction noise.
Three vehicles used the end section of Riverview Parade in the one hour this site was observed and
about five residents were noted leaving/entering their houses and in their yards during this time.
The nearest residences along Riverview Parade are approximately 30m to 40m from the nesting site.
The birds were not disturbed by these vehicle/people movements. The birds also did not appear
disturbed or agitated due to my presence during observations, and I was even able to walk right to
the base of the tree during feeding of the chicks with no movement of the adult birds.
CARDNO
Page 2
LJ2818
PHOTO 1: A Little Black Cormorant and two Darters (from left to right) sitting in the
Casurina tree at Nesting Site 1, at the end of Riverview Parade.
PHOTO 2: The Casurina tree (centre of photo) containing the three nests (circled), directly
on the bank of Manly Lagoon.
CARDNO
Page 3
LJ2818
PHOTO 3: A Little Pied Cormorant feeding the nest containing three Little Pied Cormorant
chicks at Nesting Site 1.
PHOTO 4: The Little Pied Cormorant immediately after feeding the nest of three chicks at
Nesting Site 1.
CARDNO
Page 4
LJ2818
PHOTO 5: Two of the three Little Pied Cormorant chicks in their nest at Nesting Site 1, with
black down and the red under their beaks visible.
PHOTO 6: One of the three Darter chicks in the third nest being fed by a male Darter at
Nesting Site 1, with white downy feathers and almost the size of the adult bird.
CARDNO
Page 5
LJ2818
PHOTO 7: Earthworks (arrow) taking place on Manly Golf Course on the opposite bank,
approximately 50m away from Nesting Site 1, creating substantial construction noise during
site observations.
CARDNO
Page 6
LJ2818
NESTING SITE 2: Behind 46 Riverview Parade
This nesting site was inspected between 9:30am and 9:50am. Significantly less activity was present
at Nesting Site 2, behind 46 Riverview Parade, compared with Nesting Site 1, at the end of Riverview
Parade.
One Little Pied Cormorant (Phalacrocorax melanoleucos) was observed at this second nesting site,
sitting on a nest (PHOTO 8) in a Casurina tree. No chicks were observed, so the bird was likely sitting
on eggs.
One female Darter (Anhinga melanogaster) was also observed sitting on her nest in the same
Casurina tree. Chick noises could be heard and two quite small, recently hatched chicks were seen in
the nest, underneath the Darter. More Darter chicks may have been present in this nest. One Little
Black Cormorant (Phalacrocorax sulcirostris) was also observed sitting in the tree nearby to the two
nests.
No other birds were noted at this site over the 20 minute period this site was observed. No feeding
activity was observed and no other nests were noted.
No construction noise from the Manly Golf Course earthworks could be heard at this site and no
residents or vehicles were observed, as the site is located at the back of properties on Riverview
Parade, specifically at the back of 46 Riverview Parade. Only one person passed the site on the
opposite bank of the Lagoon, using the walking track, during site observations.
The Casurina the birds were nesting in extends quite far out over the Lagoon, possibly a third of the
way over the Lagoon, as the Lagoon is quite narrow at this point (approximately 30m to 40m)
(PHOTO 9).
Other Casurina trees behind 40, 42 and 44 Riverview Parade were also inspected for nesting birds,
specifically nesting Little Pied Cormorants. Warringah Council indicated that the Little Pied
Cormorant nest at this site was located behind 42 and 44 Riverview Parade; however it is believed
that the nesting birds noted behind 46 Riverview Parade are the same observed by Warringah
Council.
CARDNO
Page 7
LJ2818
PHOTO 8: A Little Pied Cormorant (circled) and a Darter (from left to right) sitting on their
nests in the Casurina tree at Nesting Site 2.
PHOTO 9: The Casurina tree branches (centre of photo) containing the two nests, directly
on the bank of and extending over Manly Lagoon at Nesting Site 2.
CARDNO
Page 8
LJ2818
REFERENCES
All birds at the nesting sites were identified using the following:
Morcombe, M. (2003) Field Guide to Australian Birds. Revised Edition. Steve Parish
Publishing. Queensland.
CARDNO
Page 9
Appendix M
Compound Location on Nolan
Reserve
Appendix N
Flora and Fauna Assessment –
Seven Part Tests
UPDATED MANLY LAGOON DREDGING FLORA AND FAUNA
ASSESSMENT
Nathan Smith and Joseph Horvath, 8 January 2010
1
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
This Flora and Fauna Assessment was undertaken in order to validate background and desktop
research provided in Cardno (2009) Review of Environmental Factors for the Manly Lagoon Dredging
Project.
Validation was required to determine the presence and/or likelihood of occurrence and impacts
associated with the dredging project on species, populations and ecological communities listed under
the NSW Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (TSC Act) and those listed as matters of
National Environmental Significance (NES) under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and
Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act).
1.1
Impacts of the Proposal
The proposal seeks to dredge the bed of Manly Lagoon for the section extending from the footbridge
at Nolan Reserve to the end of Riverview Parade.
The dredging operation will be conducted from a floating barge within the lagoon itself which will
present minimal direct impact. Associated impacts however include the laying of flexible piping
through areas of native vegetation to extract sediment and the establishment of a shore-based site
compound for the temporary storage and treatment of removed sediment. Although located within the
cleared areas of Nolan Reserve, there is the potential for indirect impacts to occur whist the compound
is in operation due to accidental damage to native vegetation and contamination by removed sediment
and water.
An additional potential impact that may occur is undermining of the lagoon banks during the dredging
process, which has the potential to result in damage to adjacent tree roots and bank subsidence thus
potentially impacting on native vegetation (Cardno 2009).
Access to the lagoon via the barge may also pose a potential impact on native vegetation. The
location of the access point has not yet been established, therefore if the access point requires any
damage or removal of any native vegetation an additional assessment is to be undertaken.
1.2
NSW Assessment
Two threatened fauna species listed under the TSC Act were identified as potentially occurring on the
Study Area;
•
The Black Bittern; and
•
Glossy Black-cockatoo.
Two Endangered Ecological Communities (EECs) as listed under the TSC Act were identified on the
Study Area;
•
Swamp Sclerophyll Forest on Coastal Floodplains; and
•
Swamp Oak Floodplain Forest.
Assessments of Significance (Seven Part Tests) undertaken on these species and ecological
communities under the NSW Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (EP&A Act)
concluded that the proposal is unlikely to result in significant impacts on these species and ecological
communities.
1.3
Commonwealth Assessment
Two species listed as matters of NES under the EPBC Act were identified on the Study Area;
•
Latham’s Snipe; and
•
Egrets.
Significant Impact Criteria applied to these species under the EPBC Act concluded that the proposal is
unlikely to result in significant impacts on these species.
2
FLORA
2.1
Flora Survey Methods
The site was visited on Monday, 4 January 2010 by Nathan Smith and Joseph Horvath, Biodiversity
Officers with Warringah Council. Flora surveys and identification of ecological communities were
undertaken according to the random meander method (Cropper 1993). Specific points along the banks
of the lagoon were also assessed to validate existing vegetation mapping and assess the condition of
the site.
2.2
Flora Results
Plant Species
A total of 94 plant species were identified during the survey. Of these approximately 40% were native
species, with 37 native and 57 introduced species present. No plants listed under either the TSC Act
or EPBC Act were identified within the Study Area. Two plants considered to be threatened in
Northern Sydney were identified with two plants considered to be threatened in Warringah LGA also
identified.
Threatened in Northern Sydney:
Threatened in Warringah:
•
Isolepis fluitans
•
Alternanthera denticulata
•
Eucalyptus robusta
•
Melaleuca nodosa
Plant Communities
The Study Area is located in a region with a range of ecological communities.
Table 1. Ecological Communities identified within region.
Status TSC Act
Status EPBC Act
Not listed
Not listed
Not listed
Not listed
Not listed
Not listed
Occurrence within
Study Area
Nil
Nil
Nil
Not listed
Endangered
Nil
Not listed
Critically
Endangered
Nil
Swamp Oak Floodplain Forest
Endangered
Not listed
Swamp Sclerophyll Forest on Coastal Floodplains
Endangered
Not listed
Not listed
Not listed
Not listed
Not listed
Ecological Community
Coastal Dune Heath
Coastal Sandstone Heath
Coastal Sandstone Heath
Eastern Suburbs Banksia Scrub of the Sydney
Region
Littoral Rainforest and Coastal Vine Thickets of
Eastern Australia
Sydney Sandston Ridgetop Woodland
Sydney Sandstone Gully Forest
Occurs within Study
Area. Subject to 7Part Test
Occurs within Study
Area. Subject to 7Part Test
Nil
Nil
Areas of native vegetation are present along both sides of the Lagoon and generally consist of Swamp
Oak Floodplain Forest and Swamp Sclerophyll Forest on Coastal Floodplains. These ecological
communities are listed under the TSC Act as Endangered Ecological Communities (EEC’s). No other
EEC’s are located within the vicinity of the Study Area. Both remnant and regrowth vegetation is
present along sections of the lagoon. A number of introduced species make up the composition of the
ecological communities. Degrees of infestation vary along the banks with areas of Swamp Oak
Floodplain Forest generally in better condition.
Bush regeneration is currently being undertaken along parts of the northern bank.
The points below represent areas of vegetation located along the length of the Study Area (refer to
Map 1 for location of points):
A. Vegetation community confirmed as Swamp Sclerophyll Forest on Coastal Floodplains
(Estuarine Reedland). Considered to be in poor condition and non-resilient. Common species
include Phragmites australis, Ipomoea cairica and Stenotaphrum secundatum.
B. Vegetation community confirmed as Swamp Sclerophyll Forest on Coastal Floodplains
(Estuarine Reedland). Considered to be in poor condition and non-resilient. Common species
include Phragmites australis, Commelina cyanea, Stenotaphrum secundatum and Acetosa
sagittata.
C. Vegetation community confirmed as Swamp Sclerophyll Forest on Coastal Floodplains
(Estuarine Reedland).
D. Vegetation community confirmed as Swamp Sclerophyll Forest on Coastal Floodplains
(Estuarine Reedland).
E. Identified as containing assemblages of both Swamp Oak Floodplain Forest and Swamp
Sclerophyll Forest on Coastal Floodplains.
F. Identified as containing Swamp Oak Floodplain Forest.
G. Identified as containing Swamp Oak Floodplain Forest.
H. Consists of remnant Swamp Oak Floodplain Forest now partly cleared. Assumed to be part
of adjacent Golf Course redevelopment, presumably subject to a Development Application.
Q and P. Identified as consisting of an unnatural landscape with a Casuarina glauca overstorey
with Phragmites australis also present on the bank.
I, K, L, M, N and O. All considered to contain highly modified assemblages of Swamp Oak
Floodplain Forest.
J. Suspect remnant Melaleuca ericifolia therefore likely to contain remnant Swamp Sclerophyll
Forest on Coastal Floodplain
2.3
Flora Impact Assessment
NSW Assessment
The Assessment of Significance (Seven Part Test) under the EP&A Act was applied to Swamp
Sclerophyll Forest on Coastal Floodplains and Swamp Oak Floodplain Forest as assemblages of
these EEC’s occur within the Study Area.
It was concluded that the proposal is unlikely to result in a significant impact on the local occurrence of
these EEC’s (Appendix 4).
Commonwealth Assessment
No threatened flora or communities as listed on the EPBC Act were detected in the study area.
3
FAUNA
3.1
Fauna Survey Methods
Fauna was surveyed by undertaking habitat searches, noting any opportunistic sightings, scats or
tracks and a specific aquatic bird survey. Condition of fauna habitat was also assessed.
A bird survey of the Study Area was conducted for the Manly Lagoon area by Jason Ruszczyk and
Scott Butcher during December 2009.
3.2
Fauna Results
Animal Species
A total of 28 animal species were identified within the Study Area. Two of these are introduced
species. No fauna species listed as threatened under the TSC Act and/or EPBC Act were identified.
Latham’s Snipe and Egrets were identified within the Study Area. These species are matters of NES
and are listed as Migratory under the EPBC Act.
Fauna Habitats
Fauna habitats identified within the Study Area include woodland, grassland, small areas of shrubland
and also aquatic habitat.
The Study Area is considered to constitute potential habitat for several species listed under both the
TSC Act and EPBC Act.
Potential habitat is present on the site for threatened species including the Swift Parrot, Grey-headed
Flying Fox, Black Bittern and Glossy Black-cockatoo.
3.3
Fauna Impact Assessment
NSW Assessment
Habitat for the Swift Parrot and Grey-headed Flying Fox is limited and unlikely to be significantly
impacted on by the proposal. Habitat for the Black Bittern and Glossy Black-cockatoo is however
somewhat more substantial therefore these species are subject to further assessment.
The Assessment of Significance (Seven Part Test) under the EP&A Act was applied to the Glossy
Black-cockatoo and the Black Bittern.
It was concluded that the proposal is unlikely to result in a significant impact on local populations of
threatened fauna as listed on the TSC Act (Appendix 4).
State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP) 44 Koala Habitat Protection does not apply to Warringah
LGA. Clause 59 Koala Habitat Protection of the Warringah LEP is however applicable to this proposal
as the Study Area is larger that 1 hectare in size. A number of feed trees (Eucalyptus robusta) were
identified as occurring within the Study Area. The total number of feed trees however are not
considered to comprise 15% or more the total number of trees on the subject. Therefore the Study
Area is not considered to contain potential Koala Habitat under this Clause.
Commonwealth Assessment
Significant Impact Criteria for Migratory species under the EPBC Act were applied for Latham’s Snipe
and Egrets as they were identified as being present within the Study Area.
It was concluded that the proposal is unlikely to result in a significant impact on threatened or
migratory fauna as listed on the EPBC Act (Appendix 5).
4
REFERENCES
Butcher S. and Ruszczyk J. (2009). Manly Lagoon Wetland Bird Survey. Warringah Council, Cromer.
Cardno (2009). Manly Lagoon Dredging Project - Review of Environmental Factors – Report to Warringah
Council. Cardno Lawson Treloar Pty Ltd, Gordon.
Cropper S. C (1993). Management of Endangered Plants. CSIRO, East Melbourne.
APPENDICES
Appendix 1. Flora Species Recorded at Manly Lagoon
* = Introduced species, W = Threatened in Warringah, S = Threatened in Northern Sydney
SCIENTIFIC NAME
COMMON NAME
Acacia linifolia
Acacia longifolia var. longifolia
Acacia longifolia var. sophorae
Acacia myrtifolia
Acacia terminalis subsp. angustifolia
Acetosa sagittata
Alternanthera denticulata
Alternanthera pungens
Amaranthus sp.
Anagalis arvensis
Anredera cordifolia
Araujia sericifera
Asparagus aethiopicus
Asparagus officinalis
Banksia integrifolia subsp. integrifolia
Baumea juncea
Brachychiton acerifolius
Brassica sp.
Bromus sp.
Callistemon linearis
Cardiospermum grandiflorum
Casuarina glauca
Cestrum parqui
Chenopodium album
Cinnamomum camphora
Clematis aristate
Commelina cyanea
Coprosma repens
Cynodon dactylon
Dianella caerulea var. producta
Dodonea triquetra
Echinochloa sp.
Ehrharta erecta
Eleusine indica
Erythrina crista-galli
Erythrina x sykesii
Eucalyptus parramattensis subsp.
parramattensis
Eucalyptus robusta
Eucalyptus beyeri
Ficus rubiginosa
Fumaria sp.
Glochidion ferdinandi var. ferdinandi
Grevillea robusta
Hardenbergia violacea
Hydrocotyle bonariensis
Hypochaeris radicata
Imperata cylindrica
Ipomoea cairica
Ipomoea indica
Isolepis fluitans
Jacaranda mimosifolia
Juncus krausii
Lantana camara
Lepedium sp.
Leptosperum laevigatum
Ligustrum lucidum
Lomandra longifolia
Lycopersicon sp.
Flax-leaved Wattle
Sydney Golden Wattle
Golden Wattle
Myrtle Wattle
Sunshine Wattle
Turkey Rhubarb
Lesser Joy Weed
Khaki Weed
Amaranthus
Scarlet Pimpernel
Madeira Vine
Moth Vine
Asparagus Fern
Garden Asparagus
Coastal Banksia
Twig-rush
Flame tree
Brassica
Brome Brass
Narrow-leaved Bottlebrush
Balloon Vine
Swamp She-Oak
Green Cestrum
Fat Hen
Camphor Laurel
Old Man’s Beard
Scurvy Weed
Copromsa
Common Couch
Blue Flax Lily
Common Hop Bush
Barnyard Grass
Ehrharta
Crow’s foot Grass
Cockspur
Coral Tree
Parramatta Red Gum
Swamp Mahogany
Beyer’s Ironbark
Fig
Fumaria
Cheese Tree
Silky Oak
False Sarsaparilla
Pennywort
Catsear
Bladey Grass
Mile a Minute
Blue Morning Glory
Isolepis
Jacaranda
Sea Rush
Lantana
Peppercress
Coastal Tea-tree
Broad-leaf Privet
Mat Rush
Tomato
STATUS
*
W
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
S
*
*
*
*
*
*
S
*
*
*
*
*
SCIENTIFIC NAME
COMMON NAME
Melaleuca armillaris subsp. armillaris
Melaleuca hypericifolia
Melaleuca nodosa
Melaleuca quinquenervia
Melaleuca styphelioides
Modiola caroliniana
Morus alba
Ochna serrulata
Olea europaea subsp. africana
Ulmus parviflora
Opuntia sp.
Parietaria judaica
Pennisetum clandestinum
Persicaria hydropiper
Phoenix canariensis
Phragmites australis
Phyllanthus tenellus
Pittosporum undulatum
Plantago lanceolata
Portulaca oleracea
Ricinus communis
Rumex sp.
Salix matsudana ‘Tortuosa’
Salix sp.
Schinus molle
Senna pendula
Sida rhombifolia
Solanum nigrum
Sonchus oleraceus
Sporobolus africanus
Stenotaphrum secundatum
Tagetes minuta
Tetragonia tetragonoides
Tradescantia fluminensis
Verbena bonariensis
Viminaria juncea
Bracelet Honeymyrtle
Paperbark
Ball Honeymyrtle
Broad-leafed Paperbark
Prickly-leaved Paperbark
Red-flowered Mallow
Mulberry
Mickey Mouse Plant
African Olive
Chinese Elm
Prickly Pear
Asthma Weed
Kikuyu
Knotweed
Phoenix Palm
Native Reed
Phyllanthus
Sweet Pittosporum
Plantain
Pig Weed
Castor Oil Plant
Dock
Tortured Willow
Willow
Peppercorn
Cassia
Paddy’s Lucerne
Blackberry Nightshade
Sow Thistle
Parramatta Grass
Buffalo Grass
Stinking Roger
New Zealand Spinach
Wandering Jew
Purple Top
Golden Spray
STATUS
W
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Appendix 2. Fauna Species Recorded at Manly Lagoon
* Denotes introduced species, P = Protected, M = Migratory (EPBC Act), U = Unprotected
SCIENTIFIC NAME
BIRDS
Gymnorhina tibicen
Threskiornis molucca
Chenonetta jubata
Coracina novaehollandiae
Gallirallus philippensis
Anas castanea
Ocyphaps lophotes
Anhinga melanogaster
Anas sp. *
Gallinula tenebrosa
Ardea sp.
Phalacrocorax carbo
Cracticus torquatus
Anas gracilis
Phalacrocorax sulcirostris
Phalacrocorax melanoleucos
Grallina cyanoleuca
Venellus miles
Manorina melanocephala
Anas superciliosa
Pelecanus conspicillatus
Porphyrio porphyrio
Larus novaehollandiae
Gallinago hardwickii
Hirundo neoxena
Egretta (Ardea) novaehollandiae
Rhipidura leucophrys
MAMMALS
Canus familiaris *
COMMON NAME
STATUS
Australian Magpie
Australian White (Sacred) Ibis
Australian Wood duck
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
Buff banded rail
Chestnut teal
Crested Pigeon
Darter
Domestic duck
Dusky moorhen
Egret
Great cormorant
Grey Butcher Bird
Grey teal
Little black cormorant
Little pied cormorant
Magpie-lark
Masked Lapwing
Noisy Miner
Pacific black duck
Pelican
Purple swamphen
Silver gull
Latham’s Snipe
Welcome Swallow
White-faced Heron
Willy Wag-tail
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
U
P
M
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
M
P
P
P
Domestic Dog
U
Appendix 3A. Flora Likelihood of Occurrence Table
Habitat potential for flora species and/or habitat previously recorded within 5km of the Study Area on DECCW Atlas of NSW Wildlife and EPBC Act Protected Matters Report.
TSC Act; E1 = Endangered, E2 = Endangered Population, E4 = Extinct, E4A = Critically Endangered, V = Vulnerable
EPBC Act; E = Endangered, V = Vulnerable
Species
TSC
Act
EPBC
Act
E1
V
E1
E
E1
E
Acacia bynoeana
Acacia terminalis subsp. terminalis
Allocasuarina portuensis
Apatophyllum constablei
E
Caladenia tessellata
E1
V
Callistemon linearifolius
V
Chamaesyce psammogeton
E1
Cryptostylis hunteriana
V
V
Darwinia biflora
V
Epacris purpurascens var. purpurascens
V
V
Preferred Habitat
Likelihood of
Occurrence
Found in central eastern NSW, from the Hunter District (Morisset) south to the Southern Highlands and west
to the Blue Mountains. Occurs in heath or dry sclerophyll forest on sandy soils. Prefers open, sometimes
slightly disturbed sites such as trail margins, edges of roadside spoil mounds and in recently burnt patches.
Limited distribution between Botany Bay to the northern foreshore of Port Jackson. Coastal scrub and dry
sclerophyll woodland on sandy soils. Habitat is generally sparse and scattered. Most areas of habitat or
potential habitat are small and isolated. Most sites are highly modified or disturbed due to surrounding urban
development.
Only known from one location at Nielsen Park. Coarse, highly siliceous shallow sandy soils.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Previously known from four sites, three of which are within Wollemi National Park near Gospers Mountain and
Coorongooba Creek, the fourth of which is about 2 km from Glen Davis. Occurs in dry sclerophyll forest on
slopes with a north to north-westerly aspect. It typically grows near cliffs (i.e. near the base or just above). The
soils at sites are sandy and skeletal, mostly on Narrabeen sandstone. Found in association with Eucalyptus
piperita, E. punctata, E. sparsifolia, Banksia serrata, Acacia linifolia, Cleistochloa rigida, Lomandra obliqua.
Known from the Sydney area (old records), Wyong, Ulladulla and Braidwood in NSW. Populations in Kiama
and Queanbeyan are presumed extinct. It was also recorded in the Huskisson area in the 1930s. The species
occurs on the coast in Victoria from east of Melbourne to almost the NSW border. Generally found in grassy
sclerophyll woodland on clay loam or sandy soils, though the population near Braidwood is in low woodland
with stony soil.
Recorded from the Georges River to Hawkesbury River in the Sydney area, and north to the Nelson Bay area
of NSW. For the Sydney area, recent records are limited to the Hornsby Plateau area near the Hawkesbury
River. Currently only 5-6 populations in the Sydney area, of the 22 populations recorded in the past. Three of
these are reserved in Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park, Lion Island Nature Reserve, and Spectacle Island
Nature Reserve. Grows in dry sclerophyll forest on the coast and adjacent ranges.
Found sparsely along the coast from south of Jervis Bay (at Currarong, Culburra and Seven Mile Beach
National Park) to Queensland (and Lord Howe Island). Grows on fore-dunes and exposed headlands, often
with Spinifex (Spinifex sericeus).
Recorded from as far north as Gibraltar Range National Park south into Victoria around the coast as far as
Orbost. Also recorded at Nelson Bay, Wyee, Washpool National Park, Nowendoc State Forest, Ku-Ring-Gai
Chase National Park, Ben Boyd National Park. Does not appear to have well defined habitat preferences and
is known from a range of communities, including swamp-heath and woodland. The larger populations typically
occur in woodland dominated by Scribbly Gum (Eucalyptus sclerophylla), Silvertop Ash (E. sieberi), Red
Bloodwood (Corymbia gummifera) and Black Sheoak (Allocasuarina littoralis); appears to prefer open areas in
the understorey of this community and is often found in association with the Large Tongue Orchid and the
Tartan Tongue Orchid.
Occurs at 129 sites in the northern and north-western suburbs of Sydney, in the Ryde, Baulkham Hills,
Hornsby and Ku-Ring-Gai local government areas. Occurs on the edges of weathered shale-capped ridges,
where these intergrade with Hawkesbury Sandstone. Associated overstorey species include Eucalyptus
haemastoma, Corymbia gummifera and/or E. squamosa. The vegetation structure is usually woodland, open
forest or scrub-heath.
Recorded from Gosford in the north, to Narrabeen in the east, Silverdale in the west and Avon Dam vicinity in
the South. Found in a range of habitat types, most of which have a strong shale soil influence.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Species
TSC
Act
EPBC
Act
Eucalyptus camfieldii
V
V
V
V
E1
E
Eucalyptus nicholii
Grevillea caleyi
Hibbertia superans
E1
Melaleuca biconvexa
V
V
V
V
Melaleuca deanei
Microtis angusii
E1
E
E1
E
E4
Extinct
V
V
Persoonia hirsuta
Persoonia laxa
Pimelea curviflora var. curviflora
Prostanthera junonis
E1
E
E4A
Extinct
Prostanthera marifolia
Preferred Habitat
Likelihood of
Occurrence
Restricted distribution in a narrow band with the most northerly records in the Raymond Terrace Area south to
Waterfall. Localised and scattered distribution includes sites at Norah Head (Tuggerah Lakes), Peats Ridge,
Mt Colah, Elvina Bay Trail (West Head), Terrey Hills, Killara, North Head, Menai, Wattamolla and a few other
sites in Royal National Park. Poor coastal country in shallow sandy soils overlying Hawkesbury sandstone.
Occurs mostly in small scattered stands near the boundary of tall coastal heaths and low open woodland of
the slightly more fertile inland areas.
Widely planted as an urban street tree and in gardens but is quite rare in the wild. It is confined to the New
England Tablelands of NSW, where it occurs from Nundle to north of Tenterfield. Grows in dry grassy
woodland, on shallow and infertile soils, mainly on granite.
Restricted to an 8km square area around Terrey Hills, approximately 20km north of Sydney. Occurs in three
major areas of suitable habitat, namely Belrose, Ingleside and Terrey Hills/Duffys Forest within the Ku-ringgai, Pittwater and Warringah Local Government Areas. All natural remnant sites occur within a habitat that is
both characteristic and consistent between sites. All sites occur on the ridgetop between elevations of 170 to
240m asl, in association with laterite soils and a vegetation community of open forest, generally dominated by
Eucalyptus sieberi and E. gummifera.
Occurs from Baulkham Hills to South Maroota in the northern outskirts of Sydney. Occurs on sandstone
ridgetops often near the shale/sandstone boundary. Occurs in both open woodland and heathland, and
appears to prefer open disturbed areas, such as tracksides.
Only found in NSW, with scattered and dispersed populations found in the Jervis Bay area in the south and
the Gosford-Wyong area in the north. Biconvex Paperbark generally grows in damp places, often near
streams or low-lying areas on alluvial soils of low slopes or sheltered aspects.
Occurs in two distinct areas, in the Ku-ring-gai/Berowra and Holsworthy/Wedderburn areas respectively.
There are also more isolated occurrences at Springwood (in the Blue Mountains), Wollemi National Park,
Yalwal (west of Nowra) and Central Coast (Hawkesbury River) areas. The species grows in heath on
sandstone.
Currently only known from one site at Ingleside in the north of Sydney. The Ingleside population occurs on
soils that have been modified but were originally those of the restricted ridgetop lateritic soils in the Duffys
Forest – Terrey Hills – Ingleside and Belrose areas. It is not easy to define the preferred natural habitat of this
orchid as the Ingleside location is highly disturbed.
Not identified on site.
Not likely to occur.
Recorded in the Sydney coastal area (subsp. hirsuta – Gosford to Berowra to Manly to Royal National Park),
the Blue Mountains area (subsp. evoluta – Springwood, Lithgow, Putty) and the Southern Highlands (subsp.
evoluta – Balmoral, Buxton, Yanderra and Hill Top areas). Found in sandy soils in dry sclerophyll open forest,
woodland and heath on sandstone. It is usually present as isolated individuals or very small populations.
Extinct
Confined to the coastal area of Sydney between northern Sydney in the south and Maroota in the north-west.
Former range extended south to the Parramatta River and Port Jackson region including Five Dock, Bellevue
Hill and Manly. Occurs on shale/lateritic soils over sandstone and shale/sandstone transition soils on
ridgetops and upper slopes amongst woodlands. Has an inconspicuous cryptic habit as it is fine and scraggly
and often grows amongst dense grasses and sedges. It may not always be visible at a site as it appears to
survive for some time without any foliage after fire or grazing, relying on energy reserves in its tuberous roots.
Has a north-south range of approximately 19 km on the Somersby Plateau in the Gosford and Wyong local
government areas. It occurs on both the Somersby and Sydney Town soil landscapes on gently undulating
country over weathered Hawkesbury sandstone within open forest/low woodland/open scrub. It occurs in both
disturbed and undisturbed sites.
This species was previously recorded from the Sydney harbour region and was presumed extinct. Woodland
dominated by Eucalyptus sieberi and Corymbia gummifera. In deeply weathered clay soil with ironstone
nodules. Recently discovered at Manly Dam.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Not identified on site.
Not likely to occur.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Not identified on site.
Outside known range. No
suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Not likely to occur.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Species
TSC
Act
EPBC
Act
Senecio spathulatus
E1
Syzygium paniculatum
E1
V
Tetratheca glandulosa
V
V
Preferred Habitat
Likelihood of
Occurrence
Coast Groundsel occurs in Nadgee Nature Reserve (Cape Howe) and between Kurnell in Sydney and Myall
Lakes National Park (with a possible occurrence at Cudmirrah). Coast Groundsel grows on primary dunes.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Found only in NSW, in a narrow, linear coastal strip from Bulahdelah to Conjola State Forest. On the south
coast it occurs on grey soils over sandstone, restricted mainly to remnant stands of littoral (coastal) rainforest.
On the central coast Magenta Lilly Pilly occurs on gravels, sands, silts and clays in riverside gallery rainforests
and remnant littoral rainforest communities.
Associated with shale-sandstone transition habitat where shale-cappings occur over sandstone, with
associated soil landscapes such as Lucas Heights, Gymea, Lambert and Faulconbridge. Soils are generally
shallow, consisting of a yellow, clayey/sandy loam. Stony lateritic fragments are also common in the soil
profile on many of these ridgetops. Vegetation structure varies from heaths and scrub to woodlands/open
woodlands, and open forest.
Not identified on site.
No suitable habitat present.
Not likely to occur.
Appendix 3B. Fauna Likelihood of Occurrence Table
Habitat potential for flora species and/or habitat previously recorded within 5km of the Study Area on DECCW Atlas of NSW Wildlife and EPBC Act Protected Matters Report.
TSC Act; E1 = Endangered, E2 = Endangered Population, E4 = Extinct, E4A = Critically Endangered, V = Vulnerable
EPBC Act; E = Endangered, V = Vulnerable, M = Migratory
Species
TSC
Act
EPBC
Act
Amsterdam Albatross
Diomedea exulans amsterdamensis
E, M
Antipodean Albatross
Diomedea exulans antipodensis
V, M
Australian Painted Snipe
Rostratula australis
V, M
Beach Stone-curlew
Esacus neglectus
E4A
Black Bittern
Ixobrychus flavicollis
V
Black-browed Albatross
Thalassarche melanophris
V
V, M
Broad-headed Snake
Hoplocephauls bungaroides
E1
V
Buller’s Albatross
Thalassarche bulleri
V, M
Preferred Habitat
Likelihood of
Occurrence
The Amsterdam Albatross breeds on Amsterdam Island (territory of France), in the southern Indian Ocean. It
mainly forages in the Southern Hemisphere in the ocean surrounding this island. The Amsterdam Albatross is
a marine, pelagic seabird. It nests in open patchy vegetation (among tussocks, ferns or shrubs) near exposed
ridges or hillocks. It sleeps and rests on ocean waters when not breeding.
The Antipodean Albatross is endemic to New Zealand, however forages widely in open water in the southwest Pacific Ocean, Southern Ocean and the Tasman Sea, notably off the coast of NSW. The Antipodean
Albatross is marine, pelagic and aerial. It sleeps and rests on ocean waters when not breeding. The
Antipodean Albatross nests in open patchy vegetation, such as among tussock grassland or shrubs on ridges,
slopes and plateaus.
The Australian Painted Snipe has been recorded at wetlands in all states of Australia. It is most common in
eastern Australia, where it has been recorded at scattered locations throughout much of Queensland, NSW,
Victoria and south-eastern South Australia. The Australian Painted Snipe generally inhabits shallow terrestrial
freshwater (occasionally brackish) wetlands, including temporary and permanent lakes, swamps and
claypans. They also use inundated or waterlogged grassland or saltmarsh, dams, rice crops, sewage farms
and bore drains.
The Beach Stone-curlew has been recorded around the north coast of Australia, mainly between mid-north
Western Australia and north-east NSW. The species has largely disappeared from the south-east of its former
range and is now rarely recorded on ocean beaches in NSW. Occurs on open, undisturbed beaches, islands,
reefs, and estuarine intertidal sandflats and mudflats; beaches with estuaries or mangroves nearby are
preferred; may also frequent river mouths, offshore sandbars and rock platforms.
The Black Bittern has a wide distribution, from southern NSW north to Cape York and along the north coast to
the Kimberley region. In NSW, records of the species are scattered along the east coast, with individuals
rarely being recorded south of Sydney or inland. Inhabits both terrestrial and estuarine wetlands, generally in
areas of permanent water and dense vegetation. Where permanent water is present, the species may occur in
flooded grassland, forest, woodland, rainforest and mangroves. During the day, roosts in trees or on the
ground amongst dense reeds. Nests, built in spring are located on a branch overhanging water and consist of
a bed of sticks and reeds on a base of larger sticks.
The Black-browed Albatross has a circumpolar range over the southern oceans, and are seen off the southern
Australian coast mainly during winter. This species migrates to waters off the continental shelf from
approximately May to November and is regularly recorded off the NSW coast during this period. The species
has also been recorded in Botany Bay National Park. Inhabits fricana , subantarctic, subtropical marine
and coastal waters over upwellings and boundaries of currents. Can tolerate water temperatures between
0oC and 24oC. Spends most of its time at sea, breeding on small isolated islands.
The Broad-headed Snake is largely confined to Triassic and Permian sandstones, including the Hawkesbury,
Narrabeen and Shoalhaven groups, within the coast and ranges in an area within approximately 250 km of
Sydney. Nocturnal. Shelters in rock crevices and under flat sandstone rocks on exposed cliff edges during
autumn, winter and spring. Moves from the sandstone rocks to shelters in hollows in large trees within 200 m
of escarpments in summer.
Buller’s Albatross breed in New Zealand (Snares, Solander and Chatham Islands), but are regular visitors to
Australian waters. They are frequently seen off the coast from Coffs Harbour, south to Tasmania and west to
Eyre Peninsula. As Buller’s Albatross is a seasonal visitor and does not breed in Australia, it is difficult to
estimate extent of occurrence or area of occupancy. Buller’s Albatross are marine and pelagic, inhabiting
subtropical and subantarctic waters of the southern Pacific Ocean.
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Limited habitat present.
Potential impacts not likely to
be significant.
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Not identified within Study
Area. The site does provide
potential habitat. Subject to 7
– Part Test.
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Species
Bush Stone-curlew
Burhinus grallarius
TSC
Act
EPBC
Act
E1
Campbells Albatross
Thalassarche melanophris impavida
V, M
Eastern Bentwing-bat
Miniopterus schreibersii oceanensis
V
Eastern Freetail-bat
Mormopterus norfolkensis
V
Flesh-footed Shearwater
Puffinus carneipes
V
M
Giant Burrowing Frog
Heleioporus australiacus
V
V
Gibson’s Albatross
Diomedea exulans gibsoni
Glossy Black-Cockatoo
Calyptorhynchus lathami
V, M
V
Preferred Habitat
Likelihood of
Occurrence
The Bush Stone-curlew is found throughout Australia except for the central southern coast and inland, the far
south-east corner, and Tasmania. Only in northern Australia is it still common however and in the south-east it
is either rare or extinct throughout its former range. Inhabits open forests and woodlands with a sparse
grassy groundlayer and fallen timber. Largely nocturnal, being especially active on moonlit nights. Feed on
insects and small vertebrates, such as frogs, lizards and snakes. Nest on the ground in a scrape or small
bare patch.
The Black-browed Albatross is a marine species that inhabits Antarctic, subantarctic and temperate waters
and occasionally enters the tropics. It can tolerate a broad range of sea-surface temperatures from 0–24º C. It
forages around the breaks of continental and island shelves and across nearby underwater banks but also
frequents other marine habitats, such as oceanic waters and the iceberg belt at the limit of the Antarctic pack
ice. In the non-breeding season it follows cold water currents north to the continental shelves of Australia,
South America and Africa where it can occur in coastal and inshore waters and sometimes enter fjords and
channels
Eastern Bent-wing Bats occur along the east and north-west coasts of Australia. Caves are the primary
roosting habitat, but also use derelict mines, storm-water tunnels, buildings and other man-made structures.
Form discrete populations centred on a maternity cave that is used annually in spring and summer for the
birth and rearing of young. Maternity caves have very specific temperature and humidity regimes. Cold caves
are used for hibernation in southern Australia. Hunt in forested areas, catching moths and other flying insects
above the tree tops.
The Eastern Freetail-bat is found along the east coast from south Queensland to southern NSW. Occur in dry
sclerophyll forest and woodland east of the Great Dividing Range. Roost mainly in tree hollows but will also
roost under bark or in man-made structures. Solitary and probably insectivorous.
Ranges throughout the Pacific and Indian Oceans. There are two main breeding areas in the world: one in the
South West Pacific includes Lord Howe Island and New Zealand; the other along the coast of Western
Australia. Marine. Nest on Lord Howe Island in forests on sandy soils from Ned’s Beach to Clear Place, with
smaller colonies below Transit Hill and at Old Settlement Beach. Eggs are laid at the end of a burrow 1 – 2
metres in length.
The Giant Burrowing Frog occurs from the NSW Central Coast to eastern Victoria, but is most common on the
Sydney sandstone. It has been found from the coast to the Great Dividing Range. Found in heath, woodland
and open forest with sandy soils. Generally lives in the heath or forest and will travel several hundred metres
to creeks to breed. Burrows into deep litter or loose soil, emerging to feed or breed after rain. Diet includes
ground-dwelling invertebrates such as ants, beetles and spiders.
In Australian territory, Gibson’s Albatross has been recorded foraging between Coffs Harbour, NSW, and
Wilson’s Promontory, Victoria (Garnett & Crowley 2000). Males and females appear to use different foraging
areas, with females frequenting the Tasman Sea in the vicinity of 40° S, while males either disperse
westwards at lower latitudes or north-east towards the mid-Pacific Ocean. Gibson’s Albatrosses are rarely
observed in the Pacific Ocean or Indian Ocean. The only Australian record of this species is from a recapture
off Wollongong, NSW, in September 1997.
The species is uncommon although widespread throughout suitable forest and woodland habitats, from the
central Queensland coast to East Gippsland in Victoria, and inland to the southern tablelands and central
western plains of NSW, with a small population in the Riverina. An isolated population exists on Kangaroo
Island, South Australia. Inhabits open forest and woodlands of the coast and the Great Dividing Range up to
1000 m. Feeds almost exclusively on the seeds of several species of she-oak (Casuarina and Allocasuarina
species), shredding the cones with the massive bill. Dependent on large hollow-bearing eucalypts for nest
sites. One or two eggs are laid between March and August.
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
No suitable habitat. Not likely
to occur within Study Area
Limited habitat. Not likely to
occur within Study Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Not identified within Study
Area. Areas of forage habitat
present. Subject to 7-Part
Test.
Species
TSC
Act
EPBC
Act
Gould’s Petrel
Pterodroma leucoptera leucoptera
V
E, M
Great Knot
Calidris tenuirostris
V
M
Greater Sand-plover
Charadrius leschenaultia
V
M
Green and Golden Bell Frog
Litoria aurea
E1
V
Green Turtle
Chelonia mydas
V
V, M
Grey-headed Flying-fox
Pteropus poliocephalus
V
V
Kermadec Petrel
Pterodroma neglecta neglecta
V
V
Preferred Habitat
Likelihood of
Occurrence
Breeds on both Cabbage Tree Island, 1.4 km offshore from Port Stephens and on nearby Boondelbah island.
The range and feeding areas of non-breeding Petrels are unknown. The first arrival of Gould’s petrel on
cabbage tree Island occurs from mid to late September. Principal nesting habitat is located within two gullies
which are characterised by steeply, sloping rock scree with a canopy of Cabbage Tree Palms. They nest
predominantly in natural rock crevices among the rock scree and also in hollow fallen palm trunks, under mats
of fallen palm fronds and in cavities among the buttresses of fig trees.
In NSW, the species has been recorded at scattered sites along the coast to about Narooma. It has also been
observed inland at Tullakool, Armidale, Gilgandra and Griffith. Occurs within sheltered, coastal habitats
containing large, intertidal mudflats or sandflats, including inlets, bays, harbours, estuaries and lagoons.
Often recorded on sandy beaches with mudflats nearby, sandy spits and islets and sometimes on exposed
reefs or rock platforms. Migrates to Australia from late August to early September, although juveniles may not
arrive until October-November.
The Greater Sand Plover breeds in central Asia from Armenia to Mongolia, moving further south for winter. In
Australia the species is commonly recorded in parties of 10-20 on the west coast, with the far northwest being
the stronghold of the population. The species is apparently rare on the east coast, being found usually singly.
In NSW, the species has been recorded between the northern rivers and the Illawarra, with most records
coming from the Clarence and Richmond estuaries. Almost entirely restricted to coastal areas in NSW,
occurring mainly on sheltered sandy, shelly or muddy beaches or estuaries with large intertidal mudflats or
sandbanks.
Formerly distributed from the NSW north coast near Brunswick Heads, southwards along the NSW coast to
Victoria where it extends into east Gippsland. Large populations in NSW are located around the metropolitan
areas of Sydney, Shoalhaven and mid north coast (one an island population). Inhabits marshes, dams and
stream-sides, particularly those containing fricana (Typha spp.) or spikerushes (Eleocharis spp.).
Optimum habitat includes water-bodies that are unshaded, free of predatory fish such as Plague Minnow
(Gambusia holbrooki), have a grassy area nearby and diurnal sheltering sites available. Some sites,
particularly in the Greater Sydney region occur in highly disturbed areas.
Green Turtles nest, forage and migrate across tropical northern Australia. They usually occur between the
20°C isotherms (Marquez 1990), although individuals can stray into temperate waters (Cogger et al. 1993).
Green turtles nest on islands and coastal beaches all around the north of Australia, from Ningaloo Reef in
Western Australia to southern Queensland. They can be found foraging right down into the subtropical waters
of southern New South Wales. They are also a truly international species, and can be found in places as
diverse as the Caribbean, the South Pacific, along the coasts of Africa and South America, and even the
Mediterranean.
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Grey-headed Flying-foxes are found within 200 km of the eastern coast of Australia, from Bundaberg in
Queensland to Melbourne in Victoria. Occur in subtropical and temperate rainforests, tall sclerophyll forests
and woodlands, heaths and swamps as well as urban gardens and cultivated fruit crops. Roosting camps are
generally located within 20 km of a regular food source and are commonly found in gullies, close to water, in
vegetation with a dense canopy. Site fidelity to camps is high with some caps being used for over a century.
Travel up to 50 km to forage. Feed on the nectar and pollen of native trees, in particular Eucalyptus,
Melaleuca and Banksia, and fruits of rainforest trees and vines. Also forage in cultivated gardens and fruit
crops and can inflict severe crop damage.
Ranges over subtropical and tropical waters of the South Pacific. Balls Pyramid, near Lord Howe Island, is the
only known breeding site in Australian waters. Marine. Breeds on islands across the South Pacific. In
Australia it breeds on Ball’s Pyramid and Phillip Island (near Norfolk Island). Nests in a crevice amongst
rocks. Diet is squid and crustaceans. Vagrant birds occur in coastal NSW waters, particularly after storm
events.
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
No optimum habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Limited habitat present.
Potential impacts not likely to
be significant.
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Species
TSC
Act
EPBC
Act
Koala
Phascolarctos cinereus
V
Large-eared Pied Bat
Chalinolobus dwyeri
V
V
Leathery Turtle
Dermochelys coriacea
V
E, M
Lesser Sand-plover
Charadrius mongolus
V
M
Little Penguin
Eudyptula minor
E2
Little Shearwater
Puffinus assimilis
V
Little Tern
Sterna albifrons
E1
M
Preferred Habitat
Likelihood of
Occurrence
The Koala has a fragmented distribution throughout eastern Australia from north-east Queensland to the Eyre
Peninsula in South Australia. In NSW it mainly occurs on the central and north coasts with some populations
in the western region. It was historically abundant on the south coast of NSW, but now occurs in sparse and
possibly disjunct populations. Koalas are also known from several sites on the southern tablelands.
Inhabit eucalypt woodlands and forests. Feed on the foliage of more than 70 eucalypt species and 30 noneucalypt species, but in any one area will select preferred browse species. Inactive for most of the day,
feeding and moving mostly at night. Spend most of their time in trees, but will descend and traverse open
ground to move between trees. Home range size varies with quality of habitat, ranging from less than two ha
to several hundred hectares in size.
Found mainly in areas with extensive cliffs and caves, from Rockhampton in Queensland south to Bungonia in
the NSW Southern Highlands. It is generally rare with a very patchy distribution in NSW. There are scattered
records from the New England Tablelands and North West Slopes. Roosts in caves (near their entrances),
crevices in cliffs, old mine workings and in the disused, bottle-shaped mud nests of the Fairy Martin (Hirundo
ariel), frequenting low to mid-elevation dry open forest and woodland close to these features. Found in welltimbered areas containing gullies.
Throughout the world’s tropical and temperate seas and in all coastal waters of Australia. Most sightings are
in temperate waters. Large numbers of Leathery Turtles feed in coastal waters from southern Queensland to
the central coast of NSW. Occurs in inshore and offshore marine waters. Rarely breeds in Australia, with the
nearest regular nesting sites being the Solomon Islands and Malayan Archipelago. Occasional breeding
records from NSW coast, including between Ballina and Lennox Head in northern NSW.
The Lesser Sand Plover breeds in central and north eastern Asia, migrating further south for winter. In
Australia the species is found around the entire coast but is most common in the Gulf of Carpentaria, and
along the east coast of Queensland and northern NSW. Individuals are rarely recorded south of the
Shoalhaven estuary, and there are few inland records. Almost entirely coastal in NSW, favouring the beaches
of sheltered bays, harbours and estuaries with large intertidal sandflats or mudflats; occasionally occurs on
sandy beaches, coral reefs and rock platforms. Highly gregarious, frequently seen in flocks exceeding 100
individuals; also often seen foraging and roosting with other wader species.
Occurs in Australia and NZ. They generally breed from south of Port Stephens in NSW along the coast
through Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania and as far as Fremantle in Western Australia. This endangered
population occurs from just north of Smedley’s Point to Cannae Point, North Sydney Harbour, and Manly.
Only known breeding population on the mainland in NSW. A range of nest sites are utilised by the penguins at
Manly including under rocks on the foreshore, under seaside houses and structures, such as stairs, in wood
piles and under overhanging vegetation including lantana and under coral tree roots.
Limited habitat present. Not
likely to be present in Study
Area.
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
A widespread species in the subtropical Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. Lord Howe Island has one of the
larger breeding colonies in the Australian region. Marine Breeding sites at Lord Howe Island include Roach
Island, Muttonbird Island, Blackburn Island and on the main Island at Muttonbird Point and Transit Hill.
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Migrating from eastern Asia, the Little Tern is found on the north, east and south-east Australian coasts, from
Shark Bay in Western Australia to the Gulf of St Vincent in South Australia. In NSW, it arrives from September
to November, occurring mainly north of Sydney, with smaller numbers found south to Victoria. It breeds in
spring and summer along the entire east coast from Tasmania to northern Queensland, and is seen until May,
with only occasional birds seen in winter months. Almost exclusively coastal, preferring sheltered
environments; however may occur several kilometres from the sea in harbours, inlets and rivers (with
occasional offshore islands or coral cay records). Nests in small, scattered colonies in low dunes or on sandy
beaches just above high tide mark near estuary mouths or adjacent to coastal lakes and islands.
No optimum habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Not likely to occur within
Study Area. However, colony
known to occur within the
region. Impacts associated
with the proposal are not
likely to extend to the known
endangered population.
Species
TSC
Act
EPBC
Act
Long-nosed Bandicoot
Perameles nasuta
E2
Long-nosed Potoroo
Potorus tridactylus tridactylus
V
Masked Owl
Tyto novaehollandiae
V
Northern Giant Petrel
Macronectes halli
V
V, M
Osprey
Pandion haliaetus
V
M
Pied Oystercatcher
Haematopus longirostris
V
Powerful Owl
Ninox strenua
V
V
Preferred Habitat
Likelihood of
Occurrence
Restricted to North Head in the Manly Local Government Area. Essentially a solitary animal that occupies a
variety of habitats on North Head. Forages mainly at or after dusk, digging for invertebrates, fungi and tubers.
The conical holes it leaves in the soil are often seen at the interface of naturally vegetated and areas of open
grass around the Quarantine Station, former Defence Lands and Saint Patrick’s Estate. Shelters during the
day in a well-concealed nest based on a shallow hole lined with leaves and grass, sometimes under debris,
sometimes hidden with soil and with the entrance closed for greater concealment.
Not likely to be present in
Study Area. Habitat located
within the region, however
any potential or indirect
impacts are not likely to
extend to area of known
habitat.
The Long-nosed Potoroo is found on the south-eastern coast of Australia, from Queensland to eastern
Victoria and Tasmania, including some of the Bass Strait islands. There are geographically isolated
populations in western Victoria. In NSW it is generally restricted to coastal heaths and forests east of the
Great Dividing Range, with an annual rainfall exceeding 760 mm. Inhabits coastal heaths and dry and wet
sclerophyll forests. Dense understorey with occasional open areas is an essential part of habitat, and may
consist of grass-trees, sedges, ferns or heath, or of low shrubs of tea-trees or melaleucas. A sandy loam soil
is also a common feature.
Extends from the coast where it is most abundant to the western plains. Overall records for this species fall
within approximately 90% of NSW, excluding the most arid north-western corner. There is no seasonal
variation in its distribution. Lives in dry eucalypt forests and woodlands from sea level to 1100 m. A forest
owl, but often hunts along the edges of forests, including roadsides. The typical diet consists of tree-dwelling
and ground mammals, especially rats. Pairs have a large home-range of 500 to 1000 hectares. Roosts and
breeds in moist eucalypt forested gullies, using large tree hollows or sometimes caves for nesting.
The Northern Giant-petrel has a circumpolar pelagic distribution, usually between 40-64ºS in open oceans.
Their range extends into subtropical waters (to 28ºS) in winter and early spring, and they are a common visitor
in NSW waters, predominantly along the south-east coast during winter and autumn. Breeding in Australian
territory is limited to Macquarie Island and occurs during spring and summer. Females obtain most of their
prey live from the sea, while males also scavenge from the carcases of penguins and seals on land.
Ospreys are found right around the Australian coast line, except for Victoria and Tasmania. They are common
around the northern coast, especially on rocky shorelines, islands and reefs. The species is uncommon to
rare or absent from closely settled parts of south-eastern Australia. There are a handful of records from inland
areas. Favour coastal areas, especially the mouths of large rivers, lagoons and lakes. Feed on fish over
clear, open water. Breed from July to September in NSW. Nests are made high up in dead trees or in dead
crowns of live trees, usually within one kilometre of the sea.
The species is distributed around the entire Australian coastline, although it is most common in coastal
Tasmania and parts of Victoria, such as Corner Inlet. In NSW the species is thinly scattered along the entire
coast. Favours intertidal flats of inlets and bays, open beaches and sandbanks. Forages on exposed sand,
mud and rock at low tide, for molluscs, worms, crabs and small fish. The chisel-like bill is used to pry open or
break into shells of oysters and other shellfish. Nests mostly on coastal or estuarine beaches although
occasionally they use saltmarsh or grassy areas. Nests are shallow scrapes in sand above the high tide mark,
often amongst seaweed, shells and small stones.
The Powerful Owl is endemic to eastern and south-eastern Australia, mainly on the coastal side of the Great
Dividing Range from Mackay to south-western Victoria. In NSW, it is widely distributed throughout the eastern
forests from the coast inland to tablelands, with scattered, mostly historical records on the western slopes and
plains. As most prey species require hollows and a shrub layer, these are important habitat components for
the owl. The Powerful Owl inhabits a range of vegetation types, from woodland and open sclerophyll forest to
tall open wet forest and rainforest. Pairs of Powerful Owls are believed to have high fidelity to a small number
of hollow-bearing nest trees and will defend a large home range of 400-1450 ha. Powerful Owls nest in large
tree hollows (at least 0.5 m deep), in large eucalypts (diameter at breast height of 80-240 cm) that are at least
150 years old.
Limited habitat available. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
No suitable habitat. Not likely
to occur within Study Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
No suitable habitat. Not likely
to occur within Study Area
Species
TSC
Act
Red-crowned Toadlet
Pseudophryne australis
V
Regent Honeyeater
Xanthomyza Phrygia
E1
Rosenberg’s Goanna
Varanus rosenbergi
V
Salvin’s Albatross
Thalassarche cauta salvini
Sanderling
Calidris alba
EPBC
Act
E, M
V, M
V
M
Preferred Habitat
Likelihood of
Occurrence
The Red-crowned Toadlet has a restricted distribution. It is confined to the Sydney Basin, from Pokolbin in the
north, the Nowra area to the south, and west to Mt Victoria in the Blue Mountains. Occurs in open forests,
mostly on Hawkesbury and Narrabeen Sandstones. Inhabits periodically wet drainage lines below sandstone
ridges that often have shale lenses or cappings. Shelters under rocks and amongst masses of dense
vegetation or thick piles of leaf litter. Breeding congregations occur in dense vegetation and debris beside
ephemeral creeks and gutters.
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
The Regent Honeyeater mainly inhabits temperate woodlands and open forests of the inland slopes of southeast Australia. Birds are also found in drier coastal woodlands and forests in some years. The species
inhabits dry open forest and woodland, particularly Box-Ironbark woodland, and riparian forests of River
Sheoak. Regent Honeyeaters inhabit woodlands that support a significantly high abundance and species
richness of bird species. These woodlands have significantly large numbers of mature trees, high canopy
cover and abundance of mistletoes.
Every few years non-breeding flocks are seen foraging in flowering coastal Swamp Mahogany and Spotted
Gum forests, particularly on the central coast and occasionally on the upper north coast. Birds are
occasionally seen on the south coast. The Regent Honeyeater is a generalist forager, which mainly feeds on
the nectar from a wide range of eucalypts and mistletoes.
Rosenberg’s Goanna occurs on the Sydney Sandstone in Wollemi National Park to the north-west of Sydney,
in the Goulburn and ACT regions and near Cooma in the south. There are records from the South West
Slopes near Khancoban and Tooma River. Also occurs in South Australia and Western Australia. Found in
heath, open forest and woodland. Associated with termites, the mounds of which this species nests in;
termite mounds are a critical habitat component. Individuals require large areas of habitat. Feeds on carrion,
birds, eggs, reptiles and small mammals.
Shelters in hollow logs, rock crevices and in burrows, which they may dig for themselves, or they may use
other species’ burrows, such as rabbit warrens. Runs along the ground when pursued (as opposed to the
Lace Monitor, which climbs trees). Lays up to 14 eggs in a termite mound; the hatchlings dig themselves out
of the mounds. Generally slow moving; on the tablelands likely only to be seen on the hottest days.
A marine species occurring in subantarctic and subtropical waters, reaching the tropics in the cool Humboldt
Current off South America. The Shy Albatross preference for sea-surface temperatures is poorly known. In the
southern Indian Ocean the species has been observed over waters of 6.4-13.5°C. Birds have been noted i n
shelf-waters around breeding islands and over adjacent rises. During the non-breeding season, the Shy
Albatross occurs over continental shelves around continents. The Shy Albatross nests on level or gently
sloping ledges, summits, slopes and caves of rocky islets and stacks, usually in broken terrain with little soil
and vegetation.
A regular summer migrant from Siberia and other Arctic breeding grounds to most of the Australian coastline.
It is uncommon to locally common, arriving from September and leaving by May (some may overwinter in
Australia). Sanderlings occur along the NSW coast, with occasional inland sightings. Often found in coastal
areas on low beaches of firm sand, near reefs and inlets, along tidal mudflats and bare open coastal lagoons;
individuals are rarely recorded in near-coastal wetlands. Also feeds on plants, seeds, worms, crustaceans,
spiders, jellyfish and fish, foraging around rotting heaps of kelp, at the edges of shallow pools on sandspits
and on nearby mudflats. Roosts on bare sand, behind clumps of beach-cast kelp or in coastal dunes.
Breeding occurs in the Northern Hemisphere.
Limited habitat present.
Potential impacts not likely to
be significant.
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Species
TSC
Act
EPBC
Act
Shy Albatross
Thalassarche cauta
V
V, M
Shy Albatross
Thalassarche cauta cauta
V
V, M
Sooty Albatross
Phoebetria fusca
V
V, M
Sooty Oystercatcher
Haematopus fuliginosus
V
Sooty Tern
Sterna fuscata
V
Southern Brown Bandicoot
Isoodon obesulus obesulus
E1
E
Preferred Habitat
Likelihood of
Occurrence
This species is circumpolar in distribution, occurring widely in the southern oceans. Islands off Australia and
New Zealand provide breeding habitat. In Australian waters, the Shy Albatross occurs along the east coast
from Stradbroke Island in Queensland along the entire south coast of the continent to Carnarvon in Western
Australia. Although uncommon north of Sydney, the species is commonly recorded off southeast NSW,
particularly between July and November, and has been recorded in Ben Boyd National Park. This pelagic or
ocean-going species inhabits subantarctic and subtropical marine waters, spending the majority of its time at
sea. Located on sheltered sides of islands, on cliffs and ledges, in crevices and slopes, nests are used
annually and consist of a mound of mud, bones, plant matter and rocks.
This species is circumpolar in distribution, occurring widely in the southern oceans. Islands off Australia and
New Zealand provide breeding habitat. In Australian waters, the Shy Albatross occurs along the east coast
from Stradbroke Island in Queensland along the entire south coast of the continent to Carnarvon in Western
Australia. Although uncommon north of Sydney, the species is commonly recorded off southeast NSW,
particularly between July and November, and has been recorded in Ben Boyd National Park. This pelagic or
ocean-going species inhabits subantarctic and subtropical marine waters, spending the majority of its time at
sea.
The Sooty Albatross occurs in the South Atlantic and southern Indian Oceans, and has not been recorded in
the Pacific Ocean between Australia and South America. In Australian waters, this species is generally
recorded in winter off the south coast from Tasmania to Western Australia, while there are occasional
sightings off the NSW coast, north of Grafton. The species has not been recorded in any NSW conservation
reserves. Nests are located amongst vegetation on steep cliffs and consist of a mound of mud and plant
matter, lined with grass. This pelagic or ocean-going species inhabits subantarctic and subtropical marine
waters, spending the majority of its time at sea, and rarely occurs in continental shelf waters. While at sea,
this agile species soars on strong winds and when calm, rests on the ocean.
Sooty Oystercatchers are found around the entire Australian coast, including offshore islands, being most
common in Bass Strait. Small numbers of the species are evenly distributed along the NSW coast. The
availability of suitable nesting sites may limit populations. Favours rocky headlands, rocky shelves, exposed
reefs with rock pools, beaches and muddy estuaries. Forages on exposed rock or coral at low tide for foods
such as limpets and mussels. Breeds in spring and summer, almost exclusively on offshore islands, and
occasionally on isolated promontories. The nest is a shallow scrape on the ground, or small mounds of
pebbles, shells or seaweed when nesting among rocks.
The Sooty Tern is found over tropical and sub-tropical seas and on associated islands and cays around
Northern Australia. Occasionally seen along coastal NSW, especially after cyclones. Large flocks can be
seen soaring, skimming and dipping but seldom plunging in off shore waters. Breeds in large colonies in sand
or coral scrapes on offshore islands and cays including Lord Howe and Norfolk Islands.
The Southern Brown Bandicoot has a patchy distribution. It is found in south-eastern NSW, east of the Great
Dividing Range south from the Hawkesbury River, southern coastal Victoria and the Grampian Ranges, southeastern South Australia, south-west Western Australia and the northern tip of Queensland. Southern Brown
Bandicoots are largely crepuscular (active mainly after dusk and/or before dawn). They are generally only
found in heath or open forest with a healthy understorey on sandy or friable soils. Males have a home range
of approximately 5-20 hectares whilst females forage over smaller areas of about 2-3 hectares. Nest during
the day in a shallow depression in the ground covered by leaf litter, grass or other plant material. Nests may
be located under Grass trees Xanthorrhoea sp., blackberry bushes and other shrubs, or in rabbit burrows.
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Species
TSC
Act
EPBC
Act
Southern Giant Petrel
Macronectes gigantean
E1
Spotted-tail Quoll
Dasyures maculatus maculatus
V
Superb Fruit-Dove
Patriclinous Superbus
V
Swift Parrot
Latham us discolour
E1
Tristan Albatross
Diomedea exulans exulans
Preferred Habitat
Likelihood of
Occurrence
E, M
The Southern Giant Petrel has a circumpolar pelagic range from Antarctica to approximately 20° S and is a
common visitor off the coast of NSW.
Over summer, the species nests in small colonies amongst open vegetation on Antarctic and subantarctic
islands, including Macquarie and Heard Islands and in Australian Antarctic territory. A single chick is raised
and although breeding occurs annually, approximately 30% of the potential breeding population does not nest.
It is an opportunistic scavenger and predator, and scavenges from fishing vessels and animal carcasses on
land. It is also an active predator of cephalopods and euphuists, as well as smaller birds (particularly
penguins) both at land and at sea.
Birds will desert their nests if disturbed at the breeding colony.
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
E
The range of the Spotted-tailed Quoll has contracted considerably since European settlement. It is now found
on the east coast of NSW, Tasmania, eastern Victoria and north-eastern Queensland. Only in Tasmania is it
still considered common. Recorded across a range of habitat types, including rainforest, open forest,
woodland, coastal heath and inland riparian forest, from the sub-alpine zone to the coastline. Individual
animals use hollow-bearing trees, fallen logs, small caves, rock crevices, boulder fields and rocky-cliff faces
as den sites. Mostly nocturnal, although will hunt during the day; spends most of the time on the ground,
although also an excellent climber and may raid possum and glider dens and prey on roosting birds. Use
‘latrine sites’, often on flat rocks among boulder fields and rocky cliff-faces; these may be visited by a number
of individuals; latrine sites can be recognised by the accumulation of the sometimes characteristic ‘twistyshaped’ faeces deposited by animals.
The Superb Fruit-dove occurs principally from north-eastern in Queensland to north-eastern NSW. It is much
less common further south, where it is largely confined to pockets of suitable habitat as far south as Moruya.
There are records of vagrants as far south as eastern Victoria and Tasmania. Inhabits rainforest and similar
closed forests where it forages high in the canopy, eating the fruits of many tree species such as figs and
palms. It may also forage in eucalypt or acacia woodland where there are fruit-bearing trees. Part of the
population is migratory or nomadic.
Breeds in Tasmania during spring and summer, migrating in the autumn and winter months to south-eastern
Australia from Victoria and the eastern parts of South Australia to south-east Queensland. In NSW mostly
occurs on the coast and south west slopes. Migrates to the Australian south-east mainland between March
and October. On the mainland they occur in areas where eucalypts are flowering profusely or where there are
abundant lerp (from sap-sucking bugs) infestations. Favoured feed trees include winter flowering species
such as Swamp Mahogany Eucalyptus robusta, Spotted Gum Corymbia fricana, Red Bloodwood C.
gummifera, Mugga Ironbark E. sideroxylon, and White Box E. albens. Commonly used lerp infested trees
include Grey Box E. fricana , Grey Box E. moluccana and Blackbutt E. pilularis. Return to some foraging
sites on a cyclic basis depending on food availability.
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
The ‘at sea’ distribution of this newly described species is yet to be defined. There is currently only one
definitive record of the Tristan Albatross from Australian waters. A bird banded as a chick on Gough Island
was recaptured four years later off Wollongong (NSW). The Tristan Albatross is a marine, pelagic seabird. It
forages in open water in the Atlantic Ocean near the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa. It sleeps and rests on
ocean waters when not breeding.
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
E
E, M
Limited habitat present.
Potential impacts not likely to
be significant.
Not identified within Study
Area. Limited foraging habitat
present. Impact not
considered to be significant.
Species
TSC
Act
EPBC
Act
Wandering Albatross
Diomedea exulans
E1
V, M
White Tern
Gygis alba
V
White-capped Albatross
Thalassarche cauta steadi
Wompoo Fruit-Dove
Ptilinopus magnificus
V, M
V
Preferred Habitat
Likelihood of
Occurrence
The Wandering Albatross visits Australian waters extending from Fremantle, Western Australia, across the
southern water to the Whitsunday Islands in Queensland between June and September. It has been recorded
along the length of the NSW coast. At other times birds roam the southern oceans and commonly follow
fishing vessels for several days. Wandering albatross spend the majority of their time in flight, soaring over the
southern oceans. They breed on a number of islands just north of the Antarctic Circle: South Georgia Island
(belonging to the UK), Prince Edward and Marion Islands (South Africa), Crozet and Kerguelen Islands
(French Southern Territories) and Macquarie Island (Australia). Breeding takes place on exposed ridges and
hillocks, amongst open and patchy vegetation.
Occurs widely in tropical and subtropical seas and islands. The subspecies on Lord Howe Island is rarely
seen on the mainland but occurs on Norfolk and Kermadec Islands. Most breeding sites on Lord Howe Island
are close to the lagoon in the settlement area. Marine
A recent arrival to Lord Howe Island, only breeding there since the 1960s.
This species nests in the high branches of trees. On Lord Howe Island it nests in the introduced Norfolk Island
Pine as well as native Sallywood, Blackbutt, Greybark, Banyan and Pandanus. White Terns do not build a
nest but select a depression or damaged area on the branch of a tree on which to balance their egg.
The White-capped Albatross is probably common off the coast of south-east Australia throughout the year.
This species is similar to the Shy Albatross and can be difficult to identify, especially at sea and as a juvenile.
Breeding colonies occur on islands south of New Zealand. The extent of occurrence of the White-capped
Albatross in Australian waters is estimated to be 5 000 000 km² with an area of occupancy of 5000 km²
(Garnett & Crowley 2000). These estimates are considered to be of medium reliability. Extent of occurrence
and area of occupancy are thought to be stable.
The White-capped Albatross is a marine species and occurs in subantarctic and subtropical waters.
Occurs along the coast and coastal ranges from the Hunter River in NSW to Cape York Peninsula. It is rare
south of Coffs Harbour. Occurs in, or near rainforest, low elevation moist eucalypt forest and brush box
forests.
Feeds on a diverse range of tree and vine fruits and is locally nomadic – following ripening fruit; some of its
feed trees rely on species such as this to distribute their seeds. Feeds alone, or in loose flocks at any height
in the canopy. Despite its plumage, can be remarkably cryptic as it feeds, with the call and falling fruit being
an indication of its presence. The nest is a typical pigeon nest – a flimsy platform of sticks on a thin branch or
a palm frond, often over water, usually 3 – 10 m above the ground.
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Inappropriate habitat. Not
likely to occur within Study
Area
Limited habitat present.
Potential impacts not likely to
be significant.
Appendix 4. Assessments of Significance
Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979
Swamp Sclerophyll Forest on Coastal Floodplain
(a) in the case of a threatened species, whether the action proposed is likely to have an adverse effect on
the life cycle of the species such that a viable local population of the species is likely to be placed at risk of
extinction
N/A
(b) in the case of an endangered population, whether the action proposed is likely to have an adverse effect
on the life cycle of the species that constitutes the endangered population such that a viable local population
of the species is likely to be placed at risk of extinction
N/A
(c) in the case of an endangered ecological community or critically endangered ecological community,
whether the action proposed:
(i) is likely to have an adverse effect on the extent of the ecological community such that its local occurrence
is likely to be placed at risk of extinction, or
This Endangered Ecological Community (EEC) is present in the Study Area as Estuarine Reedland,
reconstructed Swamp Mahogany Forest and occurs along both sides the Lagoon along the proposed
dredging area.
The proposal will not involve any significant direct impacts on the extent of this EEC as a floating barge will
be used as a work platform for the length of the work zone requiring minimal disturbance to the EEC. The
laying of flexible pipe for the removal of sediment however will be required through areas of this EEC. This is
considered to present a minor impact given that it is of a temporary nature and will follow the contours of the
ground and is not likely to require any clearing or excavation. Thus its extent will not be reduced.
Access for the barge will need to be created however. This is to be undertaken via Nolan Reserve. Some
clearing of vegetation may be required to create an access point. Areas of reconstructed Swamp Sclerophyll
Forest on Coastal Floodplains are present in this area. The point of entry to the Lagoon has not yet been
established. Clearing for access purposes within this area is likely to be present a minimal impact however
any clearing of native vegetation within the EEC will require an additional Assessment of Significance.
(ii) is likely to substantially and adversely modify the composition of the ecological community such that its
local occurrence is likely to be placed at risk of extinction
No significant direct impacts are expected as a result of the proposal. No clearing of species that form part of
this EEC is required.
There is the possibility for undermining of the banks to occur, which may result in root damage to some trees
and subsidence of the lagoon banks. This may result in the loss of some species that form part of Swamp
Sclerophyll Forest on Coastal Floodplains, however given the length of the EEC along the Study Area and its
local occurrence, this is not likely to substantially and adversely modify the composition of this EEC such that
its local occurrence is at risk of extinction.
(d) in relation to the habitat of a threatened species, population or ecological community:
(i) the extent to which habitat is likely to be removed or modified as a result of the action proposed, and
No habitat for Swamp Sclerophyll Forest on Coastal Floodplains is proposed to be removed or significantly
modified. A site compound will however need to be established as will a storage area for removed sediment
for the dewatering process. These areas are to be located within Nolan Reserve which is primarily cleared
consisting of sports fields. There is the potential for indirect impacts to occur however during this process
such as accidental damage to native vegetation around the edges of the compound by vehicle and plant
equipment and impact by spilled/leached sediment and water if not appropriately bunded.
(ii) whether an area of habitat is likely to become fragmented or isolated from other areas of habitat as a
result of the proposed action, and
The proposal is not likely to result in any further fragmentation or isolation from other areas of habitat that
was has already taken place in the Study Area.
(iii) the importance of the habitat to be removed, modified, fragmented or isolated to the long-term survival of
the species, population or ecological community in the locality
No habitat is likely to be removed, significantly modified, fragmented or isolated. The proposed works
present a low impact and are of a temporary nature and will be undertaken from a floating work platform in
the lagoon thus not requiring the use of the vegetated banks. Should tree root damage and bank subsidence
occur as a result of undermining, given the length of the EEC along the lagoon and its local occurrence, this
is not likely to result in significant removal and modification of this EEC.
(e) whether the action proposed is likely to have an adverse effect on critical habitat (either directly or
indirectly)
No critical habitat has been identified within the Study Area.
(f) whether the action proposed is consistent with the objectives or actions of a recovery plan or threat
abatement plan
There is currently no recovery plan available for this EEC.
(g) whether the action proposed constitutes or is part of a key threatening process or is likely to result in the
operation of, or increase the impact of, a key threatening process
The proposal is not likely to result in any key threatening processes
Conclusion
In consideration of the above, the proposal is not likely to result in a significant impact on the local
occurrence of Swamp Sclerophyll Forest on Coastal Floodplain. The preparation of a Species Impact
Statement for this EEC is therefore not required.
Swamp Oak Floodplain Forest
(a) in the case of a threatened species, whether the action proposed is likely to have an adverse effect on
the life cycle of the species such that a viable local population of the species is likely to be placed at risk of
extinction
N/A
(b) in the case of an endangered population, whether the action proposed is likely to have an adverse effect
on the life cycle of the species that constitutes the endangered population such that a viable local population
of the species is likely to be placed at risk of extinction
N/A
(c) in the case of an endangered ecological community or critically endangered ecological community,
whether the action proposed:
(i) is likely to have an adverse effect on the extent of the ecological community such that its local occurrence
is likely to be placed at risk of extinction, or
This Endangered Ecological Community (EEC) is present along sections of the lagoon banks. The proposal
will not involve any significant direct impacts on this EEC as a floating barge will be used as a work platform
for the length of the work zone requiring minimal access to the banks of the lagoon. The laying of flexible
pipe for the removal of sediment may be required through areas of this EEC. This is considered to present a
minor impact given that it is of a temporary nature and is not likely to require any clearing or excavation.
(ii) is likely to substantially and adversely modify the composition of the ecological community such that its
local occurrence is likely to be placed at risk of extinction
There is the possibility for undermining of the banks to occur, which may result in root damage to some trees
and subsidence of the lagoon banks. This may result in the loss of some species that form part of Swamp
Oak Floodplain Forest, however given its occurrence within the Study Area and its local occurrence, this is
not likely to substantially and adversely modify the composition of this EEC such that its local occurrence will
be placed at risk of extinction.
(d) in relation to the habitat of a threatened species, population or ecological community:
(i) the extent to which habitat is likely to be removed or modified as a result of the action proposed, and
No significant removal or modification of habitat for Swamp Oak Floodplain Forest is proposed. Some minor
temporary modification of the EEC’s will occur due to the installation of flexible piping.
(ii) whether an area of habitat is likely to become fragmented or isolated from other areas of habitat as a
result of the proposed action, and
The proposal is not likely to result in any further fragmentation or isolation from other areas of habitat that
was has already taken place in the Study Area.
(iii) the importance of the habitat to be removed, modified, fragmented or isolated to the long-term survival of
the species, population or ecological community in the locality
No habitat is likely to be removed, significantly modified, fragmented or isolated. The proposed works
present a low impact and are of a temporary nature and will be undertaken from a floating work platform in
the lagoon thus not requiring the use of the vegetated banks. Should tree root damage and bank subsidence
occur however as a result of undermining, given its local occurrence, this is not likely to result in a significant
of the long-term survival of this EEC.
(e) whether the action proposed is likely to have an adverse effect on critical habitat (either directly or
indirectly)
No critical habitat has been identified within the Study Area.
(f) whether the action proposed is consistent with the objectives or actions of a recovery plan or threat
abatement plan
There is currently no recovery plan available for this EEC
(g) whether the action proposed constitutes or is part of a key threatening process or is likely to result in the
operation of, or increase the impact of, a key threatening process
The proposal is not likely to result in a key threatened process.
Conclusion
In consideration of the above, the proposal is not likely to result in a significant impact on the local
occurrence of Swamp Oak Floodplain Forest. The preparation of a Species Impact Statement for this EEC is
therefore not required.
Glossy Black-Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus lathami
(a) in the case of a threatened species, whether the action proposed is likely to have an adverse effect on
the life cycle of the species such that a viable local population of the species is likely to be placed at risk of
extinction
No Glossy Black-cockatoos were identified in the Study Area. The site does however present some minor
forage habitat with the presence of Casuarina glauca, which the birds occasionally feed on. No significant
hollows were identified on the site which may provide potential nest sites. Glossy Black- Cockatoos are
known to have a range over a wide area and the specimens of Casuarina glauca in the Study Area are
considered to represent only a small proportion of forage habitat for this species. No significant impacts to
the lifecycle requirements of this species are expected as no clearing of potential forage habitat will be
required as dredging will take place from a floating barge within the lagoon.
(b) in the case of an endangered population, whether the action proposed is likely to have an adverse effect
on the life cycle of the species that constitutes the endangered population such that a viable local population
of the species is likely to be placed at risk of extinction
No endangered populations were identified within the Study Area.
(c) in the case of an endangered ecological community or critically endangered ecological community,
whether the action proposed:
(i) is likely to have an adverse effect on the extent of the ecological community such that its local occurrence
is likely to be placed at risk of extinction, or
N/A
(ii) is likely to substantially and adversely modify the composition of the ecological community such that its
local occurrence is likely to be placed at risk of extinction
N/A
(d) in relation to the habitat of a threatened species, population or ecological community:
(i) the extent to which habitat is likely to be removed or modified as a result of the action proposed, and
No areas of habitat are proposed to be directly removed or modified. However, there is the possibility of
subsidence of the lagoon banks to occur after dredging is complete due to undermining. This would inturn
impact on some vegetation with it collapsing into the lagoon.
(ii) whether an area of habitat is likely to become fragmented or isolated from other areas of habitat as a
result of the proposed action, and
The proposal is not likely to result in any further fragmentation or isolation from other areas of habitat that
was has already taken place in the Study Area.
(iii) the importance of the habitat to be removed, modified, fragmented or isolated to the long-term survival of
the species, population or ecological community in the locality
No areas of habitat are proposed to be directly removed or modified. If however, subsidence of the lagoon
banks occurred post dredging, there would be the potential for feed trees for this species to collapse into the
lagoon resulting in the loss of some potential foraging habitat. However, given the local occurrence of feed
trees and the range of this species, this is not considered to be significant.
(e) whether the action proposed is likely to have an adverse effect on critical habitat (either directly or
indirectly)
No critical habitat has been identified within the Study Area.
(f) whether the action proposed is consistent with the objectives or actions of a recovery plan or threat
abatement plan
No Recovery Plan has been implemented for this species.
(g) whether the action proposed constitutes or is part of a key threatening process or is likely to result in the
operation of, or increase the impact of, a key threatening process
The proposal is not likely to result in any key threatening processes.
Conclusion
In consideration of the above, the proposal is not likely to result in a significant impact on the local
occurrence of the Glossy Black-Cockatoo. The preparation of a Species Impact Statement for this species is
therefore not required.
Black Bittern Ixobrychus flavicollis
(a) in the case of a threatened species, whether the action proposed is likely to have an adverse effect on
the life cycle of the species such that a viable local population of the species is likely to be placed at risk of
extinction
No Black Bitterns were identified within the Study Area and no nests were found however the Study Area
does provide potential habitat for this species. There is no proposal to remove areas of native vegetation as
the proposed works will be undertaken via the use of a floating barge so direct impacts to the shoreline are
not expected. Habitat requirements for this species are not likely to be significantly altered. Some minor
temporary impacts are expected due to machinery noise and the use of flexible piping over the shoreline,
however given the absence of any specimens and nest sites and the low impact nature of the works this is
not likely to present a significant impact on the lifecycle of this species.
(b) in the case of an endangered population, whether the action proposed is likely to have an adverse effect
on the life cycle of the species that constitutes the endangered population such that a viable local population
of the species is likely to be placed at risk of extinction
No endangered populations were identified within the Study Area.
(c) in the case of an endangered ecological community or critically endangered ecological community,
whether the action proposed:
(i) is likely to have an adverse effect on the extent of the ecological community such that its local occurrence
is likely to be placed at risk of extinction, or
N/A
(ii) is likely to substantially and adversely modify the composition of the ecological community such that its
local occurrence is likely to be placed at risk of extinction
N/A
(d) in relation to the habitat of a threatened species, population or ecological community:
(i) the extent to which habitat is likely to be removed or modified as a result of the action proposed, and
Given that there will be limited disturbance to the shoreline, no areas of habitat are proposed to be directly
removed or modified. Some subsidence of the banks may occur post dredging, which may result in the loss
of some potential habitat for this species.
(ii) whether an area of habitat is likely to become fragmented or isolated from other areas of habitat as a
result of the proposed action, and
The proposal is not likely to result in any further fragmentation or isolation from other areas of habitat that
was has already taken place in the Study Area.
(iii) the importance of the habitat to be removed, modified, fragmented or isolated to the long-term survival of
the species, population or ecological community in the locality
Given that there will be limited disturbance to the shoreline, no areas of habitat are proposed to be directly
removed or modified. Some subsidence of the lagoon banks may occur post dredging, however given that
no species or nesting sites were identified and the length of the shorelines of the entire lagoon containing
potential habitat, the proposal is not likely to impact on the long-term survival of the species.
(e) whether the action proposed is likely to have an adverse effect on critical habitat (either directly or
indirectly)
No critical habitat has been identified within the Study Area.
(f) whether the action proposed is consistent with the objectives or actions of a recovery plan or threat
abatement plan
No Recovery Plan has been implemented for this species.
(g) whether the action proposed constitutes or is part of a key threatening process or is likely to result in the
operation of, or increase the impact of, a key threatening process
The proposal is not likely to result in a key threatening process.
Conclusion
In consideration of the above, the proposal is not likely to result in a significant impact on the local
occurrence of the Black Bittern. The preparation of a Species Impact Statement for this species is therefore
not required.
Appendix 5. Significant Impact Criteria
Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
Two species listed as matters of NES were identified on the Study Area. The species addressed below are
listed as Migratory Species under the EPBC Act.
Significant impact criteria for Migratory Species
An action is likely to have a significant impact on a migratory species if there is a real chance or
possibility that it will:
• substantially modify (including by fragmenting, altering fire regimes, altering nutrient cycles or
altering hydrological cycles), destroy or isolate an area of important habitat for a migratory species;
• result in an invasive species that is harmful to the migratory species becoming established in an
area of important habitat for the migratory species; or
• seriously disrupt the lifecycle (breeding, feeding, migration or resting behaviour) of an
ecologically significant proportion of the population of a migratory species.
Latham’s Snipe Gallinago hardwickii
Latham’s Snipe was identified on the Study Area.
The action is not likely to result in the substantial modification of important habitat for this migratory species
as the action will be undertaken from a floating barge confined to the water surface. Some minor impact of
adjacent vegetation will occur due to the placement of temporary flexible piping, however this will be of a
temporary nature as no clearing or excavation is likely to be required and will be removed upon completion.
The proposal will result in noise and machinery activity which may temporarily disrupt the feeding and resting
behaviour of this species if the proposal is undertaken whilst the species is present in eastern Australia,
given the nature of the proposal however this is not considered to be a serious disruption. The proposal is
not likely to disrupt the breeding behaviour of the species as Latham’s Snipe has been identified as a nonbreeding population in Australia.
The proposal is not likely to result in a significant impact on this matter of national environmental
significance. A referral to the Minister for the Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts is
therefore not required.
Egret Ardea sp.
Egrets were identified on the Study Area.
The action is not likely to result in the substantial modification of important habitat for this migratory species
as the action will be undertaken from a floating barge confined to the water surface. Some minor impact of
adjacent vegetation will occur due to the placement of temporary flexible piping, however this will be of a
temporary nature as no clearing or excavation is likely to be required and will be removed upon completion.
The proposal will result in noise and machinery activity which has the potential to disrupt the lifecycle of this
species. Some disruption to feeding and resting behaviour may occur whilst the dredging operation is carried
out along the lagoon surface. Being of a minor and temporary nature the proposal is not likely to seriously
disrupt an ecologically significant proportion of the population of this species.
The proposal is not likely to result in a significant impact on this matter of national environmental
significance. A referral to the Minister for the Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts is
therefore not required.
Appendix 6. Map of Vegetation Points Assessed
B
A
C
D
Q
E
P
F
G
L
O
K
M
N
H
J
I
Appendix O
DECCW Correspondence RE:
Contaminant Mass Removal
Our Ref
LJ2818/L2023V5:IKB
Contact Kester Boardman
22 January 2010
Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water
Environment Protection and Regulation Group
PO Box A290
SYDNEY SOUTH NSW 1232
Attention: Kieran Horkan
Dear Kieran,
RETURN OF WATER TO MANLY LAGOON DURING PROPOSED MANLY
LAGOON DREDGING PROJECT
On behalf of Manly and Warringah Councils I am writing in response to your
letter of 17 November 2009.
Firstly, thank you for the time of yourself and David Gathercole at our meeting
(17 November 2009), and for the prompt follow up letter which you issued to us
on the same day. The input to the Manly Lagoon dredging project from
DECCW is highly valued by all parties.
As you are aware, we discussed at length the legal implications of returning
water removed from the lagoon with the dredge spoil back to the lagoon
following dewatering of the solid material, and you have reminded us of the
requirement to comply with Section 120 of the Protection of Environment
Operations Act 1997 (PoEO Act) when returning water to the lagoon.
At the meeting we undertook to calculate, in numerical terms, the net benefit
that will be derived from dredging the lagoon, and this letter sets out the results
of these calculations. We have also reviewed Section 120 of the PoEO Act and
this letter goes on to describe why, in light of the calculation results, we believe
that return of water to the lagoon can be achieved without any breach of
Section 120 of the PoEO Act.
Methodology for Calculation of the Net Benefit to Manly Lagoon
In order to evaluate the potential water quality benefits of the proposed
dredging, calculations were undertaken to consider the net mass or load of
material and associated constituents removed from the system. This involved
consideration of the mass of material removed from the lagoon in the
sediments as well as the mass of material returned to the lagoon in the
overburden water.
The exact volumes of material which will be retained in the geobags and of
over-burden water which will be generated is dependent on a number of
variables which cannot accurately be predicted. However, a reliable range can
be estimated. For example the % solids in the dredge slurry feed, and the
percentage by which the geobag reduces the volume of the dredge slurry
cannot be accurately predicted, but a reliable range can be quantified.
Cardno (NSW) Pty Ltd
ABN 95 001 145 035
Level 3, 910 Pacific Highway
Gordon New South Wales
2072 Australia
Telephone: 02 9496 7700
Facsimile: 02 9499 3902
International: +61 2 9496 7700
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.cardno.com.au
Cardno Offices
Brisbane
Sydney
Canberra
Melbourne
Perth
Darwin
Cairns
Townsville
Mackay
Rockhampton
Hervey Bay
Sunshine Coast
Toowoomba
Gold Coast
Gosford
Baulkham Hills
Wollongong
Busselton
Papua New Guinea
Indonesia
Vietnam
China
Kenya
United Arab Emirates
United Kingdom
United States
LJ2818/L2023V5
22 January 2010
2
Using a range of 20-30% by weight (w/w) which is considered to be the expected solids density of a
slurry transported by a cutter suction dredge, and assuming that the total volume of sediment removed
from the system will be 6400 m3 (at a specific gravity of 2.65 (Patterson Britton and Partners, 2007)),
we have undertaken calculations to provide a range of outcomes representative of realistic operating
conditions.
On the basis of these calculations two realistic scenarios are considered below:
Scenario 1:
This scenario assumes that
•
•
5,600 m3 of solid material will be retained in the geobag, and
25,700 m3 of overburden water will be generated.
Scenario 2:
This scenario assumes that
• 6,400 m3 of solid material will be retained in the geobag, and
• 27,000 m3 of overburden water will be generated.
The calculation used for both scenarios can be defined as:
Mass removed from lagoon via dredging – Mass returned to the lagoon in the water = Net
permanent removal of mass
Results
The results of the mass calculations for the two scenarios considered are shown in Tables 1 and 2
respectively. The values reported in the tables are dependent on the available data which was sourced
as identified in the tables. In some cases, where data was not available, calculations could not be
completed. In other cases, where data was not available, information has been inferred from equivalent
systems.
A net positive benefit was identified from the mass calculations where the overall mass of constituents
(or count of faecal indicator species) will be reduced in the lagoon system.
Table 1: Mass Calculations for Contaminants in Dredged Material for Scenario 1
Mass of Sediment
Mass
Removed from
Net removal of
returned to
Parameter
Lagoon and
Mass from the
Comment
the Lagoon
captured in the
Lagoon (kg)
in Water (kg)
geobag (kg)
Metals
1,2
Arsenic
Net positive benefit
37.20
0.22
36.97
Chromium
1,2
Lead1,2
Nickel
Zinc
1,2
1,2
1,2
Mercury
32.26
0.08
32.18
Net positive benefit
46.37
0.29
46.08
Net positive benefit
11.09
0.15
10.94
Net positive benefit
55.44
0.85
54.59
Net positive benefit
0.10
0.00
0.10
No data
No data
Net positive benefit
N/A. Assume net positive benefit could
be expected.
5.14
236.78
3.08
218.68
1,3
Fluoride
705.60
Petroleum Hydrocarbons
C15-C28
Fraction1,2
241.92
C29-C36
221.76
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Net positive benefit
Net positive benefit
LJ2818/L2023V5
22 January 2010
3
Mass of Sediment
Removed from
Lagoon and
captured in the
geobag (kg)
Parameter
Mass
returned to
the Lagoon
in Water (kg)
Net removal of
Mass from the
Lagoon (kg)
Comment
1,2
Fraction
Total Petroleum
1,2
Hydrocarbons
524.16
8.22
515.94
Net positive benefit based on
assumption of a sum of the
independent petroleum hydrocarbons
values for the return water.
Faecal Indicators
Enterococci1,2
4.1328E+11
9.00E+11
-4.86E+11
4.1328E+11
9.00E+10
3.23E+11
1,4
Enterococci
(After T90 of 6.6
hours
decay
after Kay et al,
2005)
Assumed CFU and MPN are
equivalent (both are counts)*. Overall
shows that there is a net increase in
counts due to the dredge process but
does not take into account die off due
to sunlight exposure during the
dewatering process. Die-off can be
expected to occur at a rate of T90 of
6.6 hours (Kay et al, 2005) for low
turbidity water. This means that the
concentration will be reduced by 90%
in 6.6 hours of sunlight exposure.
Assumed CFU and MPN are
equivalent (both are counts)*.
Values with die-off assumed.
Net positive benefit
Nutrients
Ammonia as N
3,2
Nitrite +
3,2
Nitrate
TKN
TN
5,2
44.46
No data
No data
10.28
No data
473.76
71.96
401.80
No data
82.24
No data
595.37
2.57
592.80
1.01
0.00
1.01
Net positive benefit
1.01
0.13
0.88
Net positive benefit
3,2
5,2
TP
Other
6,6
Cadmium
Copper
6,6
6,3
Total Cyanide
1.01
No data
No data
6,3
Styrene
5.04
No data
No data
50.40
No data
No data
6,3
Napthelene
3,2
Phenols
No data
0
No data
No data
0
No data
Benzo(a)pyrene
3,2
H:\Doc\2010\Letters.2010\L2023V5.docx
No sediment data, therefore unsuitable
for reporting. Included here for
reference.
No sediment data, therefore unsuitable
for reporting. Included here for
reference.
Net positive benefit. The amount of
TKN load removed has been
conservatively assumed as 5% by the
geobag process in the absence of field
trial data. This compares with a
calculated reduction of 98-100% for
metals for which data is available.
No sediment data, therefore unsuitable
for reporting. Included here for
reference.
Net positive benefit
No data
No water data, therefore unsuitable for
reporting. Included here for reference.
No water data, therefore unsuitable for
reporting. Included here for reference.
No water data, therefore unsuitable for
reporting. Included here for reference.
Zero return load means that a net
positive benefit or neutral effect is
expected.
Zero return load means that a net
positive benefit or neutral effect is
expected.
LJ2818/L2023V5
22 January 2010
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* Maximum Probable Number (MPN) values are estimates (statistical in nature), while plate counts are direct counts of
living organisms expressed in Colony Forming Units (CFU/mL). For actively growing microbacteria i.e. not aged cultures,
the CFU count is comparable to the MPN count (Coates, 2003). However, the calculated value for removal of this
parameter from the lagoon should be considered subject to a relatively high degree of inaccuracy.
1 – Sediment quality data from Cardno Ecology Lab (2009)
2 – Return water quality data from Second Flush Analysis from Cardno Ecology Lab (2009)
3 – This analyte was not tested for during the trial dredge (Cardno Ecology Lab, 2009)
4 – Calculations adjusted to incorporate faecal enterococci die off as per Kay et al (2005)
5 – Sediment nutrient concentrations inferred from average concentrations from data collected (50 samples) in May 2007
from a similar system, Towradgi Lagoon in the Illawarra region. TP = 235 mg/kg. TKN = 935 mg/kg. (Source: Wollongong
City Council, unpublished)
6 – The upper range values have been reported as some values in the data set are below detection limit.
It should also be noted that no account was made for the proposed addition of lime to the sediment, since there is no
appropriate background data (e.g. calcium or alkalinity) from which change can be measured. However, it is noted that
the ASSMP specifies the use of agricultural lime at concentrations which will not lead to negative environmental impact.
Table 2: Mass Calculations for Contaminants in Dredged Material for Scenario 2
Mass of Sediment
Mass
Removed from
Net removal of
returned to
Parameter
Lagoon and
Mass from the
Comment
the Lagoon
captured in the
Lagoon (kg)
in Water (kg)
geobag (kg)
Metals
Arsenic1,2
Net positive benefit
42.51
0.23
42.27
Chromium
1,2
1,2
Lead
Nickel
1,2
Zinc1,2
1,2
Mercury
36.86
0.08
36.78
Net positive benefit
52.99
0.30
52.69
Net positive benefit
12.67
0.16
12.51
Net positive benefit
63.36
0.89
62.47
Net positive benefit
0.12
0.00
0.12
No data
No data
Net positive benefit
N/A. Assume net positive benefit could
be expected.
5.40
271.08
3.24
250.20
1,3
Fluoride
806.40
Petroleum Hydrocarbons
C15-C28
1,2
Fraction
276.48
C29-C36
1,2
Fraction
253.44
Total Petroleum
Hydrocarbons1,2
599.04
8.64
590.40
Net positive benefit
Net positive benefit
Net positive benefit based on
assumption of a sum of the
independent petroleum hydrocarbons
values for the return water.
Faecal Indicators
Enterococci
1,2
4.7232E+11
9.45E+11
-4.73E+11
4.7232E+11
9.45E+10
3.78E+11
1,4
Enterococci
(After T90 of 6.6
hours decay after
Kay et al, 2005)
Assumed CFU and MPN are
equivalent (both are counts)*. Overall
shows that there is a net increase in
counts due to the dredge process but
does not take into account die off due
to sunlight exposure during the
dewatering process. Die-off can be
expected to occur at a rate of T90 of
6.6 hours (Kay et al, 2005) for low
turbidity water. This means that the
concentration will be reduced by 90%
in 6.6 hours of sunlight exposure.
Assumed CFU and MPN are
equivalent (both are counts)*.
Values with die-off assumed.
Net positive benefit
Nutrients
Ammonia as N3,2
No data
H:\Doc\2010\Letters.2010\L2023V5.docx
46.71
No data
No sediment data, therefore unsuitable
for reporting. Included here for
reference.
LJ2818/L2023V5
22 January 2010
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Mass of Sediment
Removed from
Lagoon and
captured in the
geobag (kg)
Parameter
Mass
returned to
the Lagoon
in Water (kg)
Net removal of
Mass from the
Lagoon (kg)
No data
10.8
No data
538.06
75.60
462.46
No data
86.4
No data
135.23
2.7
132.53
No sediment data, therefore unsuitable
for reporting. Included here for
reference.
Net positive benefit. The amount of
TKN load removed has been
conservatively assumed as 5% by the
geobag process in the absence of field
trial data. This compares with a
calculated reduction of 98-100% for
metals for which data is available.
No sediment data, therefore unsuitable
for reporting. Included here for
reference.
Net positive benefit
1.152
0
1.152
Net positive benefit
1.152
0.135
1.017
Net positive benefit
1.152
No data
No data
5.76
No data
No data
3,2
Nitrite + Nitrate
TKN
5,2
TN3,2
5,2
TP
Other
Cadmium6,6
Copper
6,6
Comment
Total Cyanide6,3
6,3
Styrene
6,3
Napthelene
57.6
No data
No data
No water data, therefore unsuitable for
reporting. Included here for reference.
No water data, therefore unsuitable for
reporting. Included here for reference.
No water data, therefore unsuitable for
reporting. Included here for reference.
Zero return load means that a net
positive benefit or neutral effect is
No data
0
No data
expected.
Zero return load means that a net
Benzo(a)pyrene3,2
positive benefit or neutral effect is
No data
0
No data
expected.
* Maximum Probable Number (MPN) values are estimates (statistical in nature), while plate counts are direct counts of
living organisms expressed in Colony Forming Units (CFU/mL). For actively growing microbacteria i.e. not aged cultures,
the CFU count is comparable to the MPN count (Coates, 2003). However, the calculated value for removal of this
parameter from the lagoon should be considered subject to a relatively high degree of inaccuracy.
1 – Sediment quality data from Cardno Ecology Lab (2009)
2 – Return water quality data from Second Flush Analysis from Cardno Ecology Lab (2009)
3 – This analyte was not tested for during the trial dredge (Cardno Ecology Lab, 2009)
4 – Calculations adjusted to incorporate faecal enterococci die off as per Kay et al (2005)
5 – Sediment nutrient concentrations inferred from average concentrations from data collected (50 samples) in May 2007
from a similar system, Towradgi Lagoon in the Illawarra region. TP = 235 mg/kg. TKN = 935 mg/kg. (Source: Wollongong
City Council, unpublished)
6 – The upper range values have been reported as some values in the data set are below detection limit.
It should also be noted that no account was made for the proposed addition of lime to the sediment, since there is no
appropriate background data (e.g. calcium or alkalinity) from which change can be measured. However, it is noted that
the ASSMP specifies the use of agricultural lime at concentrations which will not lead to negative environmental impact.
3,2
Phenols
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LJ2818/L2023V5
22 January 2010
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Discussion of Results
Under both scenarios considered (Tables 1 and 2), there is a demonstrable net benefit to the lagoon
with the mass of all parameters for which data is available being shown to reduce within the lagoon as a
result of the dredging and dewatering proposed. In particular, the removal of metals, hydrocarbons and
nutrients is notable. It is expected that other parameters for which data is not available will behave in a
similar manner.
The calculations quantify the mass of materials which, subject to test results, will be returned to the
Lagoon in the overburden water. At the levels shown, this return of material should not be considered to
constitute ‘water pollution’ under the definition of the PoEO Act. For water pollution to occur, there must
be a material change in the physical, chemical or biological condition of the Lagoon as a result of the
return water release. It is our professional opinion that given the natural temporal and spatial variability
in lagoon water quality, the return of overburden water to the lagoon will not result in any demonstrable
change to water quality within the section of the lagoon bounded by the silt curtains (and therefore to
water throughout the lagoon), nor will the return water change the Lagoon from its current status with
respect to its current values (related to aquatic ecosystem health and recreational health).
Notwithstanding the above, it is important to consider the results in the context of natural aquatic
systems. There is a natural equilibrium in aquatic systems between the concentration of a substance in
the sediment, and the concentration of the same substance in the aqueous phase. Consequently,
although we do not expect any change to be measurable as a result of returning the overburden water
to the lagoon, we can be confident that by permanently removing contaminants from the lagoon through
the overall dredging process the concentration in the water column will also reduce.
It should be noted that there are a number of other variables in the dredging process, including the
efficiency of the geobags in dewatering the dredge slurry. We have used a value of 25% in these
calculations to indicate that for each 100m3 of dredge slurry entering the bag, 75m3 will pass through
the bag, and 25m3 will be retained. However, changing this value is not expected to significantly change
the results as the concentrations in the sediment are several orders of magnitude greater than the
concentrations in the aqueous phase. The value of 25% has been selected on the basis of professional
opinion within Cardno, and is consistent with the range of values quoted by manufacturers of geobag
technology. Dewatering using this technology is largely a physical process, and consequently there is
also a clear link between the % solids in the dredge slurry feed, and the efficiency of the geobag.
Sensitivity analysis of several key variables shows that depending on actual operating conditions,
removal of 6,400 m3 sediment from the lagoon bed can be expected to result in 5,000 – 6,300 m3
dewatered sediment in the bag, and 24,000 – 36,000 m3 of overburden water being generated.
Other Issues Raised
In addition to the return of water to the lagoon, your letter confirmed to us a number of other useful
pieces of information for which we are grateful. In particular, you confirmed that should the dredged
material be disposed of at landfill, an exemption from the waste disposal levy may be applicable, and
you highlighted to us the existence of Endangered Ecological Communities (EECs) along the lagoon
banks. With regard to the latter point, we have reviewed the location of these EECs, and incorporated a
number of additional mitigation measures into the Review of Environmental Factors for the project
which will shortly be submitted to the Land and Property Management Authority (LPMA) for
determination to ensure their protection.
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LJ2818/L2023V5
22 January 2010
7
Should you wish to discuss any of the above, please do not hesitate to contact me on (02) 9496 7700.
Yours faithfully
Kester Boardman
Senior Environmental Scientist
for Cardno (NSW) Pty Ltd
References
Cardno Ecology Lab (2009) Results of Trial Dredging 2 – Manly Lagoon Dredging Project. September.
Report prepared for Manly Council.
Coates, Anthony R.M. (2003) Dormancy and Low-Growth States in Microbial Disease. Cambridge
University Press (page 110).
Holtz, Robert D. and William D. Kovacs (1981) An Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering. PrenticeHall (page 15).
Kay, D., C.M. Stapleton, M.D. Wyer, A.T. McDonald, J. Crowther, N. Paul, K. Jones, C. Francis, J.
Watkins, J. Wilkinson, N. Humphrey, B. Lin, L. Yang, R.A. Falconer and S. Gardner (2005) Decay of
intestinal enterococci concentrations in high-energy estuarine and coastal waters: towards real-time
T90 values for modelling faecal indicators in recreational waters, Water Research, Volume 39, Issue 4,
February, Pages 655-667.
Patterson Britton and Partners (2007) Manly Lagoon rehabilitation works sediment removal from sites 1
and 2 additional sediment sampling and testing.
Wollongong City Council (unpublished data) Towradgi Lagoon Sediment Quality Data – Collected May
2007.
H:\Doc\2010\Letters.2010\L2023V5.docx
Attachment 1
Addendum to Manly Lagoon Dredging Project –
Review of Environmental Factors
(FINAL LJ2818/Rep2580V3 9 Feb 2010)
Additional Planning Detail
CONSIDERATION OF PERMISSIBILITY
State Environmental Planning Policy Infrastructure (2007)
Prevailing Environmental Planning Instrument (EPI)
The proposed works are permissible as development permitted without consent pursuant to the
provisions of State Environmental Planning Policy Infrastructure (2007).
Notwithstanding, the land is still subject to the provisions of Warringah Local Environment Plan
2000 (WLEP 2000) and the subject land lies within the G2 – Riverview Parade Locality.
Notwithstanding the applicability of WLEP 2000 as detailed above, Clause 8(1) of SEPP
Infrastructure (2007) provides that “except as provided by subclause (2), if there is an
inconsistency between this Policy and any other environmental planning instrument, whether made
before or after the commencement of this Policy, this Policy prevails to the extent of the
inconsistency”. In addition, SEPP Infrastructure (2007) defines consent as:
“consent:
(a)
when used in relation to the carrying out of development without consent, means
development consent and any other type of consent, licence, permission, approval or
authorisation that is required by or under an environmental planning instrument, and
(b)
when used in any other context, means development consent.
Note.
As a result of paragraph (a) of the definition of consent, development that this Policy provides may
be carried out without development consent may also be carried out without any other consent,
licence, permission, approval or authorisation that would otherwise be required by another
environmental planning instrument (such as an approval to remove a tree that is subject to a tree
preservation order).
Development that does not require consent under Part 4 of the Act and is not a project to which
Part 3A of the Act applies or exempt development will be subject to the environmental assessment
and approval requirements of Part 5 of the Act.”
From the above, it is important to note that:
An area of inconsistency between WLEP 2000 and SEPP Infrastructure (2007) is that WLEP
2000 requires development consent for the works to be issued and an assessment conducted
under Part 4 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, notwithstanding the
requirements of WLEP 2000, SEPP Infrastructure (2007) allows the development to be
permitted without consent (subject to the environmental assessment and approval
requirements of Part 5 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979) in this regard
as detailed Clause 8(1) of SEPP Infrastructure (2007) the SEPP prevails and development
consent under Part 4 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 is not required.
As the prevailing Environmental Planning Instrument is SEPP Infrastructure and the areas of
inconsistency have been established, development consent and consideration under WLEP
2000 is not required as the SEPP Infrastructure refers the consent authority to a consideration
of the environmental impact under Part 5 (not Part 4) of EPA Act 1979.
Page 1 of 3
Consideration of the proposed works
Dredging
Division 25 Waterway or foreshore management activities of SEPP Infrastructure (2007) provides
that waterway or foreshore management activities includes dredging to rehabilitate aquatic habitat
or to maintain or restore environmental flows or tidal flows for ecological purposes.
In this regard the details within Section 2.1 of Report No LJ2818/Rep2580V3 prepared by Cardno
dated 9 February 2010 provides that the works are for water quality, as such pursuant to Clause
129 (2)(d) the waterway or foreshore management activities falls within the ambit of ‘environmental
management works’ which is defined as
“environmental management works means:
(a)
works for the purpose of avoiding, reducing, minimising or managing the environmental
effects of development (including effects on water, soil, air, biodiversity, traffic or amenity),
and
(b)
environmental protection works.”
Use of Nolan Reserve for the placement of geo-bags to separate the soil and water particles
Division 12 Parks and other public reserves of SEPP Infrastructure (2007) provides that
environmental management works are permitted to be carried out by or on behalf of a council
without consent on a public reserve under the control of or vested in the council. In this regard,
‘environmental management works’ is defined as:
“environmental management works means:
(a)
works for the purpose of avoiding, reducing, minimising or managing the environmental
effects of development (including effects on water, soil, air, biodiversity, traffic or amenity),
and
(b)
environmental protection works.”
As detailed within Section 2.5.3 of Report No LJ2818/Rep2580V3 prepared by Cardno dated 9
February 2010 the use of Nolan Reserve for the placement of geo-bags to separate the soil and
water particles this is considered for fall within the ambit of avoiding, reducing, minimising or
managing the environmental effects of development (the development being the dredging
discussed above).
REQUIREMENTS FOR CONSIDERATION
Both the:
the dredging works; and
the use of Nolan Reserve for the placement of geo-bags to separate the soil and water
particles
Are required to be considered under the provisions of Part 5 of the Environmental Planning and
Assessment Act 1979 as an activity.
An activity is defined under Section 110 of the EPAA as:
(a)
the use of land, and
…
(5) the carrying out of a work, and
…”
All works within the reserve area are required to be carried out by or on behalf of a council on a
public reserve under the control of or vested in the council and all works within the waterway or
foreshore must be carried out by or on behalf of a public authority.
Page 2 of 3
CONCLUDING COMMENTS
The proposed works are permissible as development permitted without consent pursuant to the
prevailing Environmental Planning Instrument (EPI) State Environmental Planning Policy
Infrastructure (2007).
All works are required to be considered under the provisions of Part 5 of the Environmental
Planning and Assessment Act 1979 as an activity by the Natural Environment Unit or other
relevant delegate.
All works are required to be carried out by or on behalf of a council
This referral does not stipulate any other requirement that must be completed to satisfy New
South Wales and Commonwealth legislation you should check, as may be relevant, with other
authorities e.g. NSW Department of Fisheries or NSW Department of Environment, Climate
Change and Water etc.
Page 3 of 3