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link is external - DC Public Charter School
E.L. HAYNES PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL
ANNUAL REPORT
SCHOOL YEAR 2014-2015
Elementary School
4501 Kansas Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20011
(202) 667-4446
Middle School
3600 Georgia Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20010
(202) 667-4446
William Rawson, Chair, Board of Trustees
High School
4501 Kansas Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20011
(202) 667-4446
TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. SCHOOL DESCRIPTION ............................................................................................................................................................... 4
A.
Mission Statement ..................................................................................................................................................................... 4
B.
School Program ......................................................................................................................................................................... 4
1. Curriculum Design and Instructional Approach .............................................................................................................................................................. 4
2. Parent Involvement Efforts .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 12
II. SCHOOL PERFORMANCE ........................................................................................................................................................ 16
A. Performance and Progres ........................................................................................................................................................... 16
CHARTER GOAL ONE: Students will be confident, independent readers. ................................................................................................................. 16
CHARTER GOAL TWO: Students will be strong, independent writers and speakers. ............................................................................................... 16
CHARTER GOAL THREE: (a) Students will be able to think critically and solve problems effectively. (b) Students will master increasingly
sophisticated mathematical concepts and be able to apply those concepts in a variety of settings. ............................................................................. 17
CHARTER GOAL FOUR: Students will master national science standards and become proficient in scientific inquiry, able to design and
execute age-appropriate experiments. .................................................................................................................................................................................. 18
CHARTER GOAL FIVE: Students will become independent learners and will complete independent papers, reports, and performances,
culminating in a high-stakes independent project before they graduate........................................................................................................................... 18
CHARTER GOAL SIX: Students will satisfy EL Haynes PCS’s graduation requirements and gain admission to college, the military, or other
postsecondary option of their choice upon graduation...................................................................................................................................................... 20
CHARTER GOAL SEVEN: Students will have a positive attitude toward school and learning.( b) Students will embrace diversity. (c) The
school will create an environment for student and adult learning with a welcoming culture, high levels of trust, and rigorous standards. ............ 20
CHARTER GOAL EIGHT: (a) Students will treat themselves, other students, staff, and the physical plant with respect. (b) Students will work
collaboratively and resolve conflicts effectively and safely. ............................................................................................................................................... 21
CHARTER GOAL NINE: Students will contribute to their school and community through service projects and see the positive impact they
have on others. ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 22
CHARTER GOAL TEN: Graduating students will have a plan for their future and the confidence and preparation to pursue it. ....................... 22
CHARTER GOAL ELEVEN: Teachers and staff will be highly qualified, demonstrate high expectations for all students, and have a positive
attitude toward the school and their colleagues. ................................................................................................................................................................. 23
CHARTER GOAL TWELVE: Families will see themselves as partners in their child’s education and will be actively involved in the life of the
school. ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 24
CHARTER GOAL THIRTEEN: The school will be led by a strong, active Board of Trustees and a competent, effective leadership team
headed by the principal. ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 24
CHARTER GOAL FOURTEEN: The school will strive to recruit and retain a diverse group of students, teachers, staff, administrators, and
board members. ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 25
CHARTER GOAL FIFTEEN: A School Planning Team will support the principal and leadership team in the effective management of the
school. ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 26
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CHARTER GOAL SIXTEEN: The school will be in sound fiscal health, and the Board of Trustees will ensure the school has the resources it
needs to carry out its program............................................................................................................................................................................................... 26
CHARTER GOAL SEVENTEEN: The school will be a good citizen, contributing to the local community and sharing its math and science
expertise with the larger educational community. ............................................................................................................................................................... 26
B. Lessons Learned and Actions Taken ........................................................................................................................................ 27
C. Unique Accomplishments .......................................................................................................................................................... 30
D. List of Donors of $500+ in FY 14-15 ..................................................................................................................................... 32
Data Collection Template: Elementary School ................................................................................................................................. 37
Data Collection Template: Middle School ......................................................................................................................................... 38
Data Collection Template: High School ............................................................................................................................................ 39
Appendix A: Staff Roster ...................................................................................................................................................................... 40
Appendix B: Board Roster ................................................................................................................................................................... 46
Appendix C: Unaudited Financials ..................................................................................................................................................... 47
Appendix D: Approved 2015-16 Budget ........................................................................................................................................... 51
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I. SCHOOL DESCRIPTION
A. MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of the E.L. Haynes Public Charter School is to ensure that every E.L. Haynes student –
regardless of race, socioeconomic status, or home language - will reach high levels of academic
achievement and be prepared to succeed at the college of his or her choice. Every E.L. Haynes
student will be adept at mathematical reasoning, will use scientific methods effectively to frame and
solve problems, and will develop the lifelong skills needed to be a successful individual, an active
community member, and a responsible citizen.
B. SCHOOL PROGRAM
1. CURRICULUM DESIGN AN D INSTRUCTIONAL APPROACH
The curriculum at E.L. Haynes is founded on the belief that in an environment with excellent
teaching, high expectations and a strong partnership with families, every student can reach high
levels of academic achievement. The school expects students to:
► Meet rigorous expectations;
► Produce authentic, interesting work;
► Actively engage with real-life problems and questions;
► Become passionate and skillful life-long readers and writers;
► Develop mathematical and scientific thinking, problem solving and inquiry skills; and
► Build strong interpersonal, communication and collaborative skills.
Differentiated Instruction: We are committed to intellectually engaging every student, every day
at E.L. Haynes Public Charter School. Our curriculum, our classrooms, and our culture are designed
to challenge each student to deepen his/her understanding of critical concepts and skills.
Differentiation may include the following strategies:
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Small group teaching/individual conferences – After teaching a mini-lesson on a critical
concept or skill, teachers meet with individuals or small groups, customizing instruction to
meet the needs of each student.
Daily Assessment – Teachers use daily assessments to monitor student understanding. This
feedback allows the teachers to make instructional decisions that support each student.
These daily checks for understanding include “do nows” and “exit tickets”.
Probing Questions – During instruction, teachers challenge students to think out loud by
asking questions like: How do you know that’s true?, What’s another way of explaining it?,
How would that work in a different situation? These questions deepen students’
understanding.
Multiple Approaches – Teachers present concepts and skills in multiple ways (visually, orally,
kinesthetically) to meet the needs of students with different learning styles.
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Choice – Teachers regularly provide students with choice so that they can read, write, and
problem solve in ways that appeal to their interests and abilities.
Curriculum Aligned to Common Core: Teachers backwards plan each unit using Understanding
By Design. What should every student know and be able to do when the unit ends and how will
they show it? Evidence of learning might include a presentation, a unit assessment, an essay, an
answer to a challenging math question, a public book talk, or a published piece of work. All
students are expected to meet CCSS grade level standards. For students who already meet the
standards, the final product should extend their learning.
Ongoing Assessment: At E.L. Haynes, students at all grade levels are assessed in a variety of ways
through the year. The goal of assessment is two-fold: To give the teacher(s) information about what
a student does and does not know to inform instruction; and to give the school and our stakeholders
information about the effectiveness of our program.
Assessment is critical to ensuring that every E.L. Haynes student succeeds academically. E.L.
Haynes administers a variety of assessments including systematic observations, student conferences,
unit assessments, quizzes, regular performance assessments, externally developed exams, portfolios,
diagnostic assessments, and the District of Columbia’s standardized assessment, called the
Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC).
Social Development: Responsive Classroom®, a classroom management model and a social
curriculum, is used at our elementary campus. The Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports
(PBIS) model of culture-building is implemented across all three campuses. E.L. Haynes recognizes
that academic achievement goes hand in hand with social growth. Responsive Classroom® is an
approach to teaching and learning that fosters safe, challenging, and joyful classrooms and schools.
This program incorporates social learning into students’ daily program; embraces E.L. Haynes’
remarkable cultural, ethnic, socio-economic, and linguistic diversity; emphasizes the peaceful and fair
resolution of conflicts; and highlights the critical need for parental partnership with the school. To
supplement Responsive Classroom, E. L. Haynes has also adopted the research-based Second Steps
Program, which uses grade-appropriate activities to teach students empathy, problem solving,
conflict resolution and management of impulses and emotions. In the middle school and the high
school, every student is assigned an advisor with whom they meet daily to teach and reinforce
important social skills and study habits. E.L. Haynes also has developed the E.L. Haynes Promise,
similar to a Code of Conduct, which explains in student-friendly language the behaviors that
constitute the school’s motto: Be Kind, Work Hard, Get Smart.
Literacy: Balanced literacy is a framework for instruction built on the premise that all children will
learn to read and write when given a wide variety of real-life experiences appropriate to their current
level. Students are given daily opportunities to practice reading and writing skills with varying levels
of support and scaffolding.
At the heart of E.L. Haynes’ balanced literacy model in grades K-8 is the independent workshop in
both reading and writing. The workshop structure allows students to spend long periods of time
reading at their independent level and writing within a variety of genres; the workshop also provides
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opportunities for small group and individualized instruction. All students are given ongoing reading
assessments that identify their independent reading levels – the levels at which they can read with
deep understanding and independence. Students are expected to increase their reading levels over
the course of the school year. Information about reading levels will be given to families at each
quarterly conference, but caregivers are always welcome to ask their student’s teacher for specifics
about their children’s levels and progress.
In addition to the reading and writing workshops, all students in grades K-4 engage in phonics or
word study lessons and participate in interactive read aloud.
At the high school, students have the following course of study in the 2014-15 school year:
 World Literature
 U.S. Literature
 A.P. Literature and Composition
Mathematics: E.L. Haynes implements curriculum aligned with the Common Core State Standards
(CCSS) for Mathematics. Across all grades, the Standards for Mathematical Practice are emphasized.
These practices rest on important processes and proficiencies with long standing importance in
mathematics education (e.g., problem solving, conceptual understanding, procedural fluency).
In grades Pre-K through 5, the standards by domain include:
 Counting & Cardinality
 Operations and Algebraic Thinking
 Number & Operations in Base Ten
 Number & Operations – Fractions
 Measurement & Data
 Geometry
In grades 6 through 8, the standards by domain include:
 Number & Operations – Fractions
 Geometry
 Ratios & Proportional Relationships
 The Number System
 Expressions of Equations
 Functions
 Statistics & Probability
In grades 9 through 12, students have the following course of study:
 Algebra I
 Geometry
 Algebra II
 PreCalculus
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AP Calculus AB
AP Statistics.
At every level, teachers use small groups and modify assignments to differentiate instruction for
students who are working below or above grade level, using resources such as Marilyn Burns' Do the
Math program, Conceptua, ST Math and First in Math for students with gaps in their foundational
knowledge.
Science: As a Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM)-enhanced school, the
development of scientific thinking is an important goal at E.L. Haynes. Students in all grade levels
study life, earth and physical science throughout the year, developing both scientific content
knowledge and an understanding of scientific processes and communication. The FOSS (Full
Option Science System) science units are the basis for much of our science instruction. FOSS is an
inquiry-based program that provides students with hands-on opportunities to engage in authentic
scientific inquiry that requires increasingly complex cognitive skills. Each grade (PK-8) addresses
science standards through study of the FOSS science units. At the high school, students are offered
a variety of science courses using the “Physics First” approach starting with Physics as the 9 th grade
course. Teaching physics to students early in their high school education is an important and useful
way to bring physics to a significantly larger number of students than has been customary in the
United States and lays the foundation for more advanced coursework in Chemistry, Biology and
Physics. E.L. Haynes offered AP Chemistry and AP Physics in 2014-2015.
Social Studies: Students at E.L. Haynes learn grade level social studies content and concepts by
reading and listening to texts on their level. Students are challenged to discuss, think and write
about important events, people, places and ideas. Teachers give students background knowledge
through direct instruction, using reference texts, primary documents, maps, atlases, etc. Social
studies units are often integrated with literacy units. Students simultaneously gain skills in reading or
writing about a particular genre and knowledge of a particular historical period or social studies
topic.
At the high school, students have the following course of study:
 World History
 U.S. History
 Government/AP Government
 Sociology
 D.C. History
Arts: E.L. Haynes arts programs seek to build creative expression and arts appreciation, and to
accommodate students’ multiple learning styles. The arts emphasis is particularly helpful to students
with special needs and English-language learners. The arts program in 2014-2015 provided students
with regular instruction in the performing and visual arts. At the elementary school, students
enrolled in dance and art. At the middle school, students took drama, art and music. And at the
high school, students could choose Video Game Design or Digital Music. Teachers use the arts as a
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tool for helping children learn in a developmentally appropriate manner about social studies, literacy,
science, and math.
Health and Fitness: Health promotion and wellness at E.L. Haynes is based on DC standards and
in accordance with the Healthy Schools Act. Haynes students are expected to understand, explain,
and apply concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention in order to achieve and
maintain healthy lifestyles. E.L. Haynes students are able to access, interpret, evaluate, and
communicate age-appropriate health information. E.L. Haynes students engage in activities using
interpersonal communication skills that respect differences among people and demonstrate
responsible personal and social behavior. Students are provided with regular opportunities for
exercise and other healthy recreation. At the high school, students are required to take 1.5 credits of
Physical Education/Health. All students took Health in the high school during 2014-15.
World Language Instruction: In elementary school (Pre-K to 4th grade), students at E.L Haynes
receive Spanish instruction twice a week for 45 minutes each time. In middle and high school (5 th to
12th grade), take world language four times per week. Students in 6th grade and above have the
opportunity to take Arabic or Spanish. At the high school, both Arabic and Spanish are offered
levels 1-4. World language instruction focuses on speaking practice, development of vocabulary and
learning reading and writing skills. Teachers follow the Organic World Language approach and
developed a school-wide scope and sequence for Spanish and Arabic during 2014-2015. Students
participate in age-appropriate activities and games in their world language. Introducing students to a
second language also validates the linguistic experience of the school’s students who speak other
languages at home and reinforces Haynes’ commitment to diversity.
Inclusion Program: E.L. Haynes values diversity of all kinds. Our strong belief is that all students,
including those with disabilities, can achieve at high levels. We also believe that all students benefit
from the inclusion of students with disabilities in the general education classroom. Both research
and our own experience demonstrate that students with disabilities perform better with greater
access to the general education curriculum and non-disabled peers. Our special education program is
designed to provide access to our students with disabilities through Individualized Education
Programs (IEPs) and 504 plans.
The E.L. Haynes Inclusion team is comprised of inclusion teachers, social workers, speech-language
pathologists, occupational therapists, reading and math intervention teachers, and a psychologist.
These team members collaborate with general education teachers, English Language Learner (ELL)
teachers, and each other to provide students with disabilities the necessary instructional
environment, tools, and support to access the general education curriculum.
The inclusion program and team has two main priorities to:
► Identify students with disabilities through a rigorous and timely referral, evaluation, and
eligibility process; and to
► Provide excellent services to students with disabilities so that they may meet their IEP goals.
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At E.L. Haynes, students with exceptionalities receive all or the majority of their services within the
general education setting through the collaborative efforts of therapists, inclusion teachers, and
general education teachers. General and special educators share teaching responsibilities in the
general education classroom in a variety of ways: one teaching/one supporting, leading small groups,
parallel teaching, alternative teaching, and team teaching. In addition, both teachers provide
environmental and lesson-specific modifications and accommodations to support students’ success
throughout the day.
When it better meets a student’s instructional needs, therapists and inclusion teachers work with
students individually or in small groups outside of the general education classroom. This instruction
may be alternative instruction in areas that are not addressed in the classroom, such as Wilson
Language System instruction in reading and spelling. This instruction may also be additional practice
in skills that have been taught in class or previews of lessons to come.
To allow special education teachers to focus primarily on instruction, the Senior Director of Student
Support Services manages the evaluation, eligibility and IEP process and meets weekly with special
education teachers, social workers, and related service providers to monitor the success of the
inclusion program, to facilitate cohesion in instruction, and to assess school-wide professional
development needs.
Response to Intervention (RtI): RtI provides a framework to integrate academic and behavior
supports for students who are across all aspects of the spectrum, not only for students who are
behind. RtI provides a common language, performance targets, and structures that provide a
framework of how to organize ourselves to meet our mission. The key to RtI is the ability to
monitor individual student’s progress so we know what the student needs. This requires assessments
that measure growth and proficiency and a data system to use the data easily. RtI’s focus on growth
is important so students can catch up as quickly as possible if the student is behind and keep
students advancing if he or she is ahead. We use the RtI Triangle pictured below as our targets to
work toward. We expect that it will take between two and five years to meet the ideal targets for
each of our campuses (elementary, middle, and high school).
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English Language Learning (ELL) Program: E.L. Haynes has developed its English Language
Learning (ELL) program to support the success of our students who are culturally and linguistically
diverse in the general education curriculum.
The purpose of our ELL program is to:
► Develop the language and literacy skills of non-native English speakers; and to
► Ensure access to the general education curriculum for students who are still developing
cognitive academic language proficiency.
Our ELL team achieves these goals through identification of students, direct instruction,
consultation with general education teachers, professional development for staff, and participation in
Academic and Social Student Support Team (AS3) and Multi-disciplinary team (MDT) meetings.
Our ELL teachers monitor the progress of students’ language and literacy acquisition quarterly by
conducting assessments, making observations, and soliciting input from general education teachers.
They prepare quarterly ELL progress reports for families of students who receive services. In
accordance with guidelines determined by the OSSE, we use annual ACCESS test scores to track the
progress of students’ language and literacy development over time.
Year Round Programs: In order to ensure that every child at E. L. Haynes is academically and
socially successful regardless of socioeconomic status, school readiness, race/ethnicity, home
circumstance, or home language, E.L. Haynes adopted a year-round calendar with 1,000 additional
hours of out-of-school time programming so that all of its students have access to consistent,
comprehensive, high quality educational experiences throughout the year. E.L. Haynes’ out-ofschool time programming takes place both throughout the year (the Extended Day Program) and
during quarterly breaks (Intersession). The Extended Day and Intersession Programs are embedded
in the school’s mission, goals, and design.
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Extended Day Program: The Extended Day Program (EDP), which consisted of a Before School
and After School Program, is for students in grades PK-8 and incorporates the philosophies and
activities of the classroom, carrying them over into the before and after school hours. The Before
School Program begins at 7:30 AM and provided breakfast to students who arrive before 8 AM.
Quiet classical music played while students activated their minds with educational games, read
books, or drew pictures until they began “Morning Math” or “Morning Reading” in their
classrooms. The After School Program begins when the students are dismissed from their classes
and ends at 6:00 PM. The program is offered Mondays through Fridays when school is in session
and during summer Intersession. The program consists of an Afternoon Meeting with a greeting,
initiative, and snack; time to play at a local playground; “Quiet Time” for students to complete their
homework; and, for our younger students, “Choice Time” when they played educational games, read
books, or drew pictures with friends and adults. Students in second grade and above participate in
electives, including sports teams, newspaper, chess, Latin club and step club.
At the high school, students stay after the academic day ends to meet with teachers during their
office hours or participate in a variety of clubs and athletics offerings.
Intersession: In 2014-15, E.L. Haynes offered Intersession programming for two weeks in
October, one week in April, and four weeks across June and July. Taught by E.L. Haynes teachers,
Capital Teaching Residents, EDP leaders, and local experts, twelve to fifteen students embarked on
week-long investigations involving classroom, community, and museum-based work. Students took
advantage of Washington, DC resources such as the Smithsonian Institution, National Geographic
Society, the Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, historic theaters and parks, among many others. Trips
were coupled with learning from local experts brought in to speak with the students on whatever
topic was being studied. All Intersession classes aligned to the school’s academic standards and
involved daily reading, writing, and math; used the framework of active pedagogy and learning
expeditions; and shared their learning through a weekly newsletter and individual student progress
reports written by the teacher.
At the high school, intersession may be used for enrichment e.g., Civil Rights trip, community
service abroad, internships. They are also a time when students who have fallen behind can receive
extra help and complete missing assignments. In the summer, opportunities for credit recovery are
available.
Learning Expeditions: In spring 2015, every science class in grades K-8 at E.L. Haynes embarked
on a multi-week learning expedition in order to tackle a science topic more deeply. Expeditions are
in-depth, long-term investigations of significant real-life problems and questions. These topics are
compelling and relevant to students, but also address issues important to the community or
discipline at large. Classes began preparing for their expeditions early in the second semester.
E.L. Haynes’ learning expeditions last year were typically nine weeks long and contained the
following components:
► In-depth investigations that address guiding questions;
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► A high-quality product that meets an authentic need and has an audience and purpose
beyond families and the classroom teacher;
► Many opportunities for fieldwork that have a clear purpose, often related to collecting data
or research in an authentic way;
► Service learning;
► Visits from outside experts; and
► Student performances and presentations of expertise and high-quality work.
Shared Leadership: Leadership at E.L. Haynes is shared at every level. Students have a voice in
determining classroom rules and choosing their activities through the use of Responsive Classroom
at the elementary campus. Parents and teachers work together to advise the Head of School and
Principals on issues and priorities and have a voice through Principal Chit Chats, evening events,
and meetings before and after school on specific topics, e.g. middle school, year-round programs, or
homework. Lastly, the Board of Trustees works collaboratively with the Head of School, Chief
Academic Officer and Principals to set policy and provide leadership for the school with the help of
three parent board members.
Professional Development: Two of E.L. Haynes’ core beliefs are that learning is a lifelong
endeavor and that students succeed when teachers, administrators, and school staff are constantly
learning themselves. In 2014-2015, E.L. Haynes provided high quality, ongoing, differentiated
professional development to all staff members and developed a professional learning community
and culture of adult learning. In summer 2014, E.L. Haynes provided a week-long orientation for
new staff and a two-week-long Summer Institute, and during the school year, weekly professional
development workshops for 2.5 hours each week for instructional staff, day-long professional
development days, and numerous off-site professional development opportunities to build and hone
skills so that every school professional worked toward mastery of the skills and knowledge he or she
needs to best fulfill the school’s mission.
2. PARENT INVOLVEMENT EFFORTS
Parent engagement at E.L. Haynes centers around four key goals:
► Supporting student academic progress;
► Celebrating student work;
► Strengthening families; and
► Building community.
Supporting Student Academic Progress: To support the academic success of all E.L. Haynes
students, we hold a series of events and workshops each year to provide opportunities for teachers,
parents and caregivers to have meaningful dialogue, learn how to supper their students in school,
gain clarity around student expectations and the school’s curriculum.
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Parent-Teacher Conferences (3 times per year). Parent-Teacher-Student conferences offer a
great chance to meet individually with teachers to learn more about the specifics of the
students’ academic progress.
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Back to School Nights (Annual). Families meet teachers, view classrooms, ask questions,
and learn about the exciting skills students will learn for the new school year.
Home Visits (Annual). PK and K teachers, meet students and families in their homes and
gain rapport with the families prior to the first day of school in order to build relationships
with families and students.
ELL Workshop (Annual). Parents are given tools to support their students at home. Parents
are also given the opportunity to have a dialogue with ELL staff.
Math Nights (Annual). Families learn about how to support their child's learning in math as
well as fun games to play at home!
Parent-Principal Chit Chats (Monthly). Parents and caregivers are invited to meet with the
school’s Principals to discuss whatever topics are important to them.
PreK and K Parent Discussions (Monthly). Parents and caregivers are invited to meet with
grade level team and support staff, for topic driven, discussion and activity in support of
their child’s early development. This is facilitated by the elementary school wellness-team.
HS College Nights (Monthly). High School parents are invited to meetings throughout the
year to share information about the college application process, college financing and the
financial aid process, and the college experience.
PARCC Night (Anually). Third and fourth grade parents learn about the PARCC
assessment, ask questions, and participate in a simulated online PARCC test. Resources and
skills for PARCC preparation are modeled and reviewed. Parents from other grades are
welcome. Childcare provided for families
Celebrating Student Work: E.L. Haynes hosts regular activities to bring families and teachers
together to celebrate student work.
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Culminating Activities for Expeditions (Annual). Each of our grade levels embark on
dynamic learning expeditions culminating in a day when our students teach others about the
real-world problem they've been tackling.
Grandparents/Special Friends Day (Annual). We celebrate guests for their support in their
grandchildren/special friends’ education.
Gallery Walk (Annual). An evening for middle school parents to experience their child’s
showcased art.
Choir and Band Concerts (Bi-Annual). The elementary school choir performs contemporary
songs for families in the winter and spring. While the middle school plays a variety of
musical genres for their special guests and families in the fall and spring.
Theatrical Productions (Annual). Middle School families work together with the middle
school drama teacher to create a beautiful set, costumes, and general family support in debut
of their Peter Pan production in the Spring.
Promotion Ceremonies (Annual). E.L. Haynes celebrates students’ promotion from
Elementary School to Middle School (at the end of 4th grade) and Middle School to High
School (at the end of 8th grade).
Graduation (Annual). On Saturday, June 20, 2015, E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
graduated our very first class of students! The students were inspired by a keynote address
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from our honored guest, BB Otero. We had much to celebrate, with co-valedictorians, a
Gates Millennium Scholar, a National Science Foundation Scholar, a 100% college
acceptance rate, and $3.5 million in merit scholarships!
Athletic Events and Banquet (Ongoing/Annual). Student athletes are celebrated both
throughout the year at games and then at an annual athletics banquet in the spring.
Promise Roll (Bi-annual). The Middle School celebrated nearly 100 scholars who earned a
3.0 or higher for two consecutive quarters.
Strengthening Families: To help parents and caregivers support the social and emotional growth
of their children at home, E.L. Haynes provides a number of opportunities for parents and
caregivers to learn more about child development, violence prevention, stress management,
parenting, and other topics.
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College Savings Workshops (Annually). This workshop provides parents the opportunity to
understand the special benefits for DC residents while educating families about the
substantial cost of higher education.
Bullying Prevention Workshops. (Ongoing) In this workshop parents learn the definition of
bullying, what they can do to support their child, and how to work with the school to
provide a positive environment for all students.
Health and Wellness Workshops (Ongoing). Thanks to a Community Schools partnership
with Mary’s Center, E.L. Haynes offered a variety of health and wellness workshops during
the 2014-2015 school year.
Attendance Awards (Quarterly). Because we emphasize EVERY DAY, ON TIME for every
student, we take the time to celebrate students who have achieved perfect attendance or
experienced strong improvement in attendance across each quarter and the year.
Wellness Day (Annual). Haynes Wellness Team hosted a Wellness Day and Parent Resource
Fair. Families had the opportunity to meet each other and learn more about 25 community
resources. The event included parent-student workshops and demos focused on: Hip-Hop,
Reiki, Yoga, Capoeira, Zumba, Dental Health, Arts, Nutrition, and Meditation.
Building Community: To build family-school relationships, it is essential to create a welcoming
environment that transcends culture and language.



Haynes Family Team (Monthly) E.L. Haynes established to strengthen school and family
connections to help ensure that all E.L. Haynes students reach high levels of academic
achievement, enjoy a rich school experience from PK to 12th grade, and are prepared to
succeed at the colleges of their choice. The Haynes Family Team sponsored a number of
events in the 2014-2015 school year.
Heritage Day Celebrations (Ongoing). To create meaningful educational opportunities about
world cultures through fostering connections to E.L. Haynes students’ lives and studies. The
Extended Day Program staff invites parents and relatives to school to share their knowledge
of cultures being studied through heritage celebrations.
Family Activities (Ongoing). The Elementary School regularly hosts playdates, and game
nights to keep families connected and engaged throughout the year.
14| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School


Movie and Pajama Night (Monthly). The Elementary School wellness team provides
families with an opportunity to connect with each other and watch a movie monthly on
Fridays.
End of Year Celebration (Annual). Roughly six hundred people were in attendance for this
celebration where the Elementary School Choir, Elementary School Dance Team, High
School Latin Dancers, DC Girls Rock and The Lofton's featuring Skipp Pruitt all put on
FANTASTIC shows! Families contributed potluck dishes, monitored kids’ games and
activities and engaged in conversation.
15| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
II. SCHOOL PERFORMANCE
A. PERFORMANCE AND PROGRES
CHARTER GOAL ONE: STUDENTS W ILL BE CONFIDENT, INDEPENDENT READERS.
E.L. Haynes PCS is meeting this charter goal. Reading is a pillar of the school day at E.L. Haynes.
Literacy coursework at each grade level is structured such that students will learn not just how to
comprehend a text, but also how to unpack the text, search for subtext, and develop their ideas
about a text in writing and in class discussions.
PARCC results for 2014-2015 are not yet available.
Elementary Assessments
Elementary reading assessments that we give in pre-kindergarten through 2nd grade show our early
readers are growing, though not always at the pace that we would like. The Fountas & Pinnell
(F&P) assessment tells us whether the grade level equivalent of a student’s reading ability. Each
student has a growth goal so they will move up at least one grade level during the year. If the student
is below grade level, the growth goal is more aggressive. Note that Kindergarten students were not
assessed as frequently and therefore only generated a half-year of data for analysis.
Grade Goal
K
1
2
Goal Met
%
One-half Year of Growth or More in one- 70%
half year
One Year of Growth or More in One Year 58%
One Year of Growth or More in One Year 63%
In pre-kindergarten, we use the Individual Growth and Development Indicators (IGDI) assessment.
IGDI’s are especially designed for use in early childhood to measure general outcomes, such as
communication. The three areas assessed related to this reading charter goal were picture naming,
rhyming, and sound identification.1
CHARTER GOAL TW O: ST UDENTS W ILL BE STRONG, INDEPENDENT W RITERS AND
SPEAKERS.
E.L. Haynes PCS has met this charter goal in the past. PARCC results for 2014-2015 are not yet
available. Across disciplines, students engage in the writing process: prewriting, drafting, revising,
1
As of this writing, validated score data on the IGDIs was not available.
16| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
peer conferencing, teacher conferencing, revising, editing, and publishing. At the elementary
campus, students follow the Lucy Calkins Units of study for Primary Writing curriculum. At the
middle school campus, 8th grade students participated in the One World Writing Program, which is a
Common Core-aligned four-week unit centered on student writing. Through peer-to-peer learning,
students become more informed about cultural and global issues and gain important researching and
writing skills as they produce their own argumentative and persuasive essay. Eighth graders focused
on school issues as their theme in 2014-2015. In 2015-2016, we have expanded our partnership, and
students in grades 5, 6, 7, 8 and 12 will participate in the One World Writing Program. Tenth graders
enhanced reading, writing and speaking skills through their participation in National History Day.
Also at the high school, students regularly engage in Socratic Seminars in English.
CHARTER GOAL THREE: (A) STUDENTS W ILL BE ABLE TO THINK CRITICALLY AND
SOLVE PROBLEMS EFFECTIVELY. (B) STUDENTS W ILL MASTER INCREASI NGLY
SOPHISTICATED MATHEM ATICAL CONCEPTS AND BE ABLE TO APPLY THOSE
CONCEPTS IN A VARIET Y OF SETTINGS.
E.L. Haynes has met both of these goals in the past and continuously seeks to improve the math
program so that students will develop in-depth understanding of essential math concepts in each
grade, as well as problem solving, procedural fluency, and model drawing. As previously noted,
PARCC results for 2014-2015 are not yet available.
Elementary Assessments
Kindergarteners through 2nd graders were assessed using iReady, an adaptive assessment that
leverages advanced technology to provide a deep, customized evaluation of every student and to
track student growth and performance consistently and continuously over a student’s entire K–12
career.
By dynamically adapting based on student response patterns, adaptive assessments are able to derive
large amounts of information from a limited number of test items. This allows the assessments to
more accurately and more efficiently pinpoint students’ needs as compared to traditional fixed-form
tests.
Grade
K
1
2
Goal
Goal Met %
Met or exceeded expected growth based on iReady 20%
scale score
Met or exceeded expected growth based on iReady 23%
scale score
Met or exceeded expected growth based on iReady 79%
scale score
In pre-kindergarten, we use the Individual Growth and Development Indicators (IGDI) assessment.
IGDI’s are especially designed for use in early childhood to measure general outcomes, such as
17| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
problem solving. Pre-kindergarten students were tested in four areas related to this charter goal:
number naming, oral counting, quantity comparison, and one-to-one correspondence counting.2
CHARTER GOAL FOUR: STUDENTS W ILL MASTER NATIONAL SCIENCE STA NDARDS
AND BECOME PROFICIENT IN SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY, ABLE TO DESIGN AND EXECUTE
AGE-APPROPRIATE EXPERIMENTS.
E.L. Haynes PCS has met this charter goal in previous years. Student science proficiency rates have
been above the state average since 2010-11. PARCC results for 2014-2015 are not yet available.
As a Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM)-enhanced school, the development of
scientific thinking is an important goal at E.L. Haynes. Students in all grade levels study life, earth
and physical science throughout the year, developing both scientific content knowledge and an
understanding of scientific processes and communication. The FOSS (Full Option Science System)
science units are the basis for much of our science instruction. FOSS is an inquiry-based program
that provides students with hands-on opportunities to engage in authentic scientific inquiry that
requires increasingly complex cognitive skills. Each grade (PK-8) addresses science standards
through study of the FOSS science units. At the high school, students are offered a variety of
science courses using the “Physics First” approach starting with Physics as the 9th grade course.
Teaching physics to students early in their high school education is an important and useful way to
bring physics to a significantly larger number of students than has been customary in the United
States, and lays the foundation for more advanced coursework in Chemistry, Biology and Physics.
E.L. Haynes offered AP Chemistry and AP Physics in 2014-2015 and will offer AP Chemistry, AP
Physics and AP Biology in 2015-2016.
CHARTER GOAL FIVE: STUDENTS W ILL BECO ME INDEPENDENT LEARN ERS AND
W ILL COMPLETE INDEPE NDENT PAPERS, REPORT S, AND PERFORMANCES,
CULMINATING IN A HIG H-STAKES INDEPENDENT P ROJECT BEFORE THEY
GRADUATE.
E.L. Haynes is fully meeting this goal. At every grade level, we assign projects that lead students to
develop learning independence. We know that our mission of college success for every student turns
on our graduates’ ability to transition to the post-secondary environment of self-guidance and study.
Below are examples of independent learning taking place at E.L. Haynes:
National History Day. To participate in National History Day (NHD), tenth grade students chose a
historical topic related to the annual theme, and then conducted primary and secondary research.
They looked through libraries, archives and museums, conducted oral history interviews, and visited
historic sites. After they analyzed and interpreted their sources, and have drawn a conclusion about
the significance of their topic, they presented their work in one of five ways: as a paper, an exhibit, a
2
As of this writing, validated score data on the IGDIs was not available.
18| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
performance, a documentary, or a website. The project entails a multi-step process that takes place
over several months and teaches time management, research, organization and critical thinking skills.
E.L. Haynes had 122 tenth grade students compete at our school wide NHD competition. Twentytwo of those students moved on to do the citywide competition. Three students moved on to
Nationals. The 8th grade will also participate in National History Day in 2015-2016.
Senior Project. In the twelfth grade, seniors complete a capstone project that involves research,
writing, speaking, collaboration and critical thinking. Students can either work as a team of 2 - 4 to
facilitate a discussion related to the focus themes (identity, power, oppression, rebellion) using
protocols and strategies for effective discussion. The discussion is focused through an appropriate
core text related to the group’s theme. Alternatively, students can develop a creative representation
connecting the key thematic topics examined in AP Literature
with issues studied in Sociology to show their deep understanding of the issue and theme selected.
Student Led Conferences. All students in grades 8 through 12 are required to lead presentations for their
parents and adviser at the end of each quarter. Typical parent/teacher conferences often leave out
the most important voice in determining educational outcomes – that of the student. At E.L.
Haynes, we believe that a person’s most powerful tool is his or her voice, and we encourage our
students to use their voices to take ownership of their own learning. The student led conference is
an important opportunity for students to independently reflect on what the mission of the school
means to them and how their work, behavior and work habits are moving them closer to realizing
their own goals and our collective mission.
Students are responsible for every aspect of organizing the conference and the digital portfolio they
will present. To prepare them for success, they access “how-to” videos on creating a Google site,
attaching appropriate documents, and designing site layout. They are given a checklist itemizing
each conference requirement and the evaluation rubric to assess their delivery. They are permitted
to view sample videos of other student-led conferences at other schools. Lastly, they are given
scripted prompts to aid in inviting their parents and other adults to the scheduled conference.
Students on assessed with grades on the skills that these conferences are meant to demonstrate, such
as “Creative and Critical Thinking – Evidence and Discussion of Habits and Performance.” Each
skill/standard is graded on a 4.0 scale and is a part of the Health & Advisory course that all students
take.
Independent Reading. As soon as the students can read, they are allotted independent reading time
during their literacy block. Teachers model different ways to approach text and support them as they
read by discussing and annotating challenging words. In order to ensure that students choose books
that are sufficiently challenging, they are organized by level. Based on our regular reading
assessment levels, students know from which shelf, basket, or labeled books they should be
choosing. They also carry those chosen books to do independent reading as a part of the entry
routine to other classes.
Writing. Across disciplines, students engage in the writing process: prewriting, drafting, revising, peer
conferencing, teacher conferencing, revising, editing, and publishing. In the middle school, 8th grade
students participated in the One World Writing Program, which is a Common Core-aligned four-
19| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
week unit centered on student writing. Through peer-to-peer learning, students become more
informed about cultural and global issues and gain important researching and writing skills as they
produce their own argumentative and persuasive essay. Eighth graders focused on school issues as
their theme in 2014-2015. In 2015-2016, we have expanded our partnership, and students in grades
5, 6, 7, 8 and 12 will participate in the One World Writing Program.
Science. Project-based learning is implemented at every level in science courses. In grades K-8,
students use FOSS, which allows students to appreciate the scientific enterprise, learn important
scientific concepts, and develop the ability to think critically. Students actively construct ideas
through their own inquiries, investigations, and analyses. The FOSS program was created to engage
students in these processes as they explore the natural world. At the high school, all course
offerings are lab sciences that ask students to conduct their own inquiries, investigations and
analyses. Expedition units are self-created, and students conduct their own research with the
teacher’s guidance. In 2015-2016, all science curriculum will be aligned with the Next Generation
Science Standards.
Drama. Middle school students are given a monologue project where they are asked to choose any
movie with a monologue and forget everything they know about that movie. The goal is to create a
character, develop the thoughts, costume, and props to perform that monologue in a different way
than it is presented in the movie. In 2015-2016, high school students will reenact scenes from
classic American musicals in a new Musical Theater course.
CHARTER GOAL SIX: ST UDENTS W ILL SATISFY E.L. HAYNES PCS’S GRADUAT ION
REQUIREMENTS AND GAI N ADMISSION TO COLLEGE, THE MILITARY, OR OTHER
POSTSECONDARY OPTION OF THEIR CHOICE UPON GRADUATION.
We had our first graduating class in 2015. Each member of the Class of 2015 at E.L. Haynes was
accepted into college – 100%. E.L. Haynes does not yet have an official 2014-15 on track rate yet.
We have completed the data collection part. Our estimate of the rate the DCPCSB will propose is
72.0%. In 2015-2016, we have implemented a credit recovery program, which allows students to
move forward with their original cohort while simultaneously earning credit for courses they failed
in previous years. In addition, we have created a tight team structure and enrichment blocks for 9th
grades to ensure every student stays on track in 2015-2016.
CHARTER GOAL SEVEN: STUDENTS W ILL HAVE A POSITIVE ATTITUDE TOW ARD
SCHOOL AND LEARNING.(B) STUDENTS W ILL EMB RACE DIVERSITY. (C) THE SCHOOL
W ILL CREATE AN ENVIRONMENT FOR STUDENT AND ADULT LEARNI NG W ITH A
W ELCOMING CULTURE, HIGH LEVELS OF TRUST, AND RIGOROUS STANDAR DS.
E.L. Haynes PCS considers student attendance and reenrollment as indicators to assess whether
students have a positive attitude toward school and learning. We have met pre-kindergarten
attendance targets, and the attendance rate for kindergarten through tenth grades is at or above the
sector average. Our strong attendance rates dropped slightly at the elementary and high school, and
stayed the same at the middle school in 2014-15. Our reenrollment rate also continues to be strong.
The school’s reenrollment has been consistently above the sector average.
20| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
2014-15
Attendance Rate
ELHES
ELHMS
ELHHS
94%
94%
91%
2014-15
Reenrollment
Rate
92%
91%
88%
In 2014-2015, we made significant effort to reduce our truancy rates. We have a Student
Engagement and Attendance Support Specialist whose exclusive role is to provide intensive services
to our hardest to reach, truant youth. Services included calling students for daily wake up times;
visiting homes of disengaged students; arranging for basketball tickets and free haircuts; conducting
group meetings with truant students to talk about time management and life goals; and linking
students in need of physical, dental or mental health services with Mary’s Center. Nevertheless, our
truancy rates increased at all three campuses. We are establishing systems and procedures with our
operations team to ensure absences are documented consistently and follow-up procedures are
implemented with fidelity.
CHARTER GOAL EIGHT: (A) STUDENTS W ILL TREAT THEMSELVES, OTHE R
STUDENTS, STAFF, AND THE PHYSICAL PLANT W ITH RESPECT. (B) STUDENTS W ILL
W ORK COLLABORATIVELY AND RESOLVE CONFLICT S EFFECTIVELY AND SA FELY.
E.L. Haynes is meeting this two-part goal, as exhibited by our discipline rates for suspension and
expulsion that are consistently lower than charter sector averages.
ELHES
ELHMS
ELHHS
Suspension Rate
5%
17%
16%
Expulsion Rate
0%
0%
0%
We attribute our generally low suspension and expulsion rates to the use of Responsive Classroom,
Restorative Practices and Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports. In developing classroom
and school-wide behavior management plans, we prevent misbehavior and help students become
increasingly respectful, motivated, and engaged in instruction. We recognize that students are
developing adolescents seeking independence while still in need of adult guidance, and we help them
to negotiate life challenges by providing tools to resolve conflict in a safe and welcoming
environment.
When expectations are not met and harm is done to relationships and/or community, these
situations are an opportunity for learning, growth and community building through restoration. We
practice restorative conferences, proactive community-building circles, and affective statements to
give students a voice, knowing that students are happier and more cooperative when adults do
things with them rather than to them or for them.
21| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
We will continue to set high expectations for our students, teach them, reward those who follow
them, and provide support to those in need. If we are consistent in enforcement and positive
recognition, we expect our suspension and expulsion rates stay low.
In addition, in 2014-2015, we added the role of Behavior Intervention Coordinator at all three
campuses. The Behavior Intervention Coordinator leads and supports members of the school staff
in assuring that effective and efficient, evidence-based behavioral intervention and support systems
are in place to support continuous academic progress of students.
CHARTER GOAL NINE: STUDENTS W ILL CONTRIBUTE TO THEIR SCHOOL AND
COMMUNITY THROUGH SE RVICE PROJECTS AND S EE THE POSITIVE IMPA CT THEY
HAVE ON OTHERS.
Students are required to complete 100 community service hours in order to graduate from E.L.
Haynes PCS. The Chris Kim Day of Service has been set aside for the past several years at Haynes
to honor a staff member who played a large role in the organization’s earliest days. The day serves
as a chance to give back and to show our students that a 'Be Kind' attitude is important. Each grade
level team decides on how to approach the day, whether a simple project or a service to others off
campus. Staff and students start the day with a wonderful All School Meeting and go from there into
different service projects. The entire day is devoted to service and the values that E.L. Haynes
supports.
Examples of Additional Service Projects in 2014-2015:
 4 students travelled to Paraguay with LearnServe to work on projects in the Santa Ana
community related to health, job skills training, environmental education, and art – all led by
youth from the Centro Cultural Comunitario.
 4 students travelled to Jamaica with LearnServe and did these things: Offered literacy
training to children at St. Albans Primary School in Kingston, in partnership with KBC
Learning; received training from KBC Learning to be effective tutors; lived and worked with
families in the Blue Mountains, helping to improve their health center and community
center; and worked with Scott’s Hall Primary School, also adopted by KBC Learning, in
Scott’s Hall, a rural community approximately 1 hour outside Kingston.
 8 students participated in the 14 week "Bringing the Lessons Home" tour guide training
program at the Holocaust Museum (Spring 2015).
 2 students went to join Stephen Tyrone Johns Summer Youth Leadership Program and gave
tours all summer to museum visitors, engaging in over 200 hours of service in the Columbia
Heights Area.
 High school students tutored students at the elementary and middle schools and volunteered
in the Extended Day Program.
CHARTER GOAL TEN: GR ADUATING STUDENTS W ILL HAVE A PLAN FOR T HEIR
FUTURE AND THE CONFIDENCE AND PREPARATIO N TO PURSUE IT.
22| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
Each high school student has an individual learning plan (ILP) and is assigned an advisor. Advisors
review the student’s ILP on a weekly basis and quarterly with the student and family to discuss goals,
grades and their impact on life after high school.
We begin work on life after E.L. Haynes with 11th graders in the spring. We take juniors on a spring
college tour. In junior spring, students begin work on the building blocks of the college application
process. Juniors write brag sheets to assist teachers write recommendations for them. They request
letters of recommendations from teachers of their choice and begin work on personal statements.
Year round, they take College Prep, a class designed to prepare students for the college application
process and life in college. Juniors also take a Career Interest Profiler, which guides their college
selection process. We also work with juniors to build their resumes through college trips, service
learning opportunities, study abroad and internships.
In senior year, there are individual conferences with students. And there are workshops with families
on how to best access Naviance to their advantage, understand the common application, select
colleges for best fit and decipher the processes for financial aid and scholarships. In 2015-2016,
students will receive a SAT prep course during their school day. A college trip for families is also
planned for 2015-2016.
As a result of our partnership with College Directions Inc. (CDI), a group of E.L. Haynes
sophomores are selected as College Directions Scholars. CDI supports its Scholars over a sevenyear span, providing comprehensive counseling and tutoring services from the end of 10th grade
through college graduation. They help their Scholars gain admission to selective four-year colleges as
well as to secure financial aid, obtain scholarships, and manage the transition to campus life.
Unwilling to leave Scholars at the college gate, they then provide ongoing academic and social
support throughout college to ensure that each Scholar thrives and graduates.
CHARTER GOAL ELEVEN: TEACHERS AND STAFF W ILL BE HIGHLY QUALIFIED,
DEMONSTRATE HIGH EXP ECTATIONS FOR ALL ST UDENTS, AND HAVE A POSITIVE
ATTITUDE TOW ARD THE SCHOOL AND THEIR COL LEAGUES.
E.L. Haynes PCS has met this goal and is proud to have an exceptionally qualified team of teachers,
administrators, and staff. The school’s teachers and staff have extensive qualifications, including
being designated as Highly Qualified for purposes of ESEA. From 2009-10 through 2014-15, the
school has employed a high rate of Highly Qualified Teachers (HQT), as defined by the federal
Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Our administrative team holds degrees from some of the
most prestigious colleges and universities in the country and advanced degrees in law and business.
The table below shows the percentage of teachers that have four or more years of teaching
experience:
Highly Qualified
4+ Years Teaching
23| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
2012-13
96%
72%
2013-14
98%
76%
2014-15
96%
75%
CHARTER GOAL TW ELVE: FAMILIES W ILL SEE THEMSELVES AS PARTNERS IN THEIR
CHILD’S EDUCATION AN D W ILL BE ACTIVELY INVOLVED IN THE LIFE OF THE
SCHOOL.
E.L. Haynes PCS is meeting this goal and highly values parental partnership in supporting academic
progress and celebrating students. The school invites parents to many events throughout the school
year, as detailed in the “Parent Involvement Efforts” section of this annual report. In survey
responses, parents have consistently reported satisfaction with the school program, including feeling
included in school activities and their students’ education. With every parent survey given, the
majority of parents who completed the survey consistently responded that they strongly agreed or
agreed with statements supporting this goal, including the following:





I feel welcome at E.L. Haynes (87%).
I feel that my child is safe at E.L. Haynes (84%).
I understand how my child is performing academically in school (81%).
I would recommend E.L. Haynes to other parents (81%).
My child’s principal/assistant principal/teacher are responsive to my needs (69%).
At the elementary campus, parents were more satisfied with consistent communication from school
to home (85%), and as a result, middle school and high school are analyzing the elementary school’s
procedures and replicating them in a developmentally appropriate manner for their campuses.
CHARTER GOAL THIRTEE N: THE SCHOOL W ILL B E LED BY A STRONG, A CTIVE
BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND A COMPETENT, EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP TEAM HEADED
BY THE PRINCIPAL.
E.L. Haynes PCS is fully meeting this goal. The school’s Board and leadership team are closely
monitoring academic performance to ensure E.L. Haynes fulfills its mission. Another point of
support for this goal is the school’s strong financials, which indicate that the Board and leadership
team are making prudent decisions regarding the school’s finances. PCSB conducted a review of the
school’s Board minutes during the ten-year charter review process and concluded that the minutes
reflect an engaged board and school leader.
In 2014-2015, the Board partnered with Charter Board Partners, a nonprofit organization
committed to strengthening the governance and thereby the quality of public charter schools.
Charter Board Partners completed an overall assessment of the Board. They recruited new Board
members and asked their Fellows to support staff members with special projects.
In 2014-15, the organization under Board leadership embarked on a strategic planning process to
look back at its first decade and plan for the next five years. The purpose of the strategic planning
process was to identify and establish a plan to strengthen the academic outcomes of the school and
to explore ways to better fulfill our mission and commitment to families and scholars.
24| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
The Haynes board and senior leadership engaged an external consulting firm, the U.S. Education
Delivery Institute (EDI), to help drive the process of creating a vision for the next five years, and
formed a strategic planning team consisting of EDI, executive staff, and board members to lead the
effort. The strategic planning team started by conducting a range of analyses of academic,
organizational, and operational performance at the organization. Vision 2020 with its four key
interlined academic strategies is being implemented in 2015-16.
CHARTER GOAL FOURTEE N: THE SCHOOL W ILL STRIVE TO RECRUIT AND RETAIN A
DIVERSE GROUP OF STUDENTS, TEACHERS, STAFF, ADMINISTRATORS, AND BOARD
MEMBERS.
The student body at E.L. Haynes is diverse and representative of the District of Columbia. E.L.
Haynes values the diversity of its students and is committed to hearing, sharing, and understanding
aspects of every family’s experience, language, and culture in order to ensure student success. We
have a high percentage of students with special needs and English Language Learners, which
generally exceeds the city-wide average enrollment of these subgroups.
Year
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
E.L. Haynes PCS – Student Demographics
Enrolled
Low
Special
AfricanHispanic
ELL
Students
Income Education American
606
51.8%
27.9%
18.0% 63.1%
11.7%
797
19.1% 58.7%
18.0%
54.0%
31.0%
949
22.5% 70.6%
18.3%
49.7%
34.5%
1073
20.4% 58.7%3 18.0%
48.6%
37.9%
1157
20.0% 70.0%
20.3%
48.0%
41.0%
White Asian Other
18.2% 1.6%
0.0%
11.0%
9.3%
7.9%
6.6%
1.0%
4.9%
4.4%
4.0%
3.0%
1.5%
1.3%
.7%
E.L. Haynes Public Charter School is committed to recruiting and retaining a diverse staff and
Board of Trustees to serve the needs of our students. As hiring season approaches each year, the
human capital team reviews our student demographic data. Throughout our hiring and recruitment
process, our hiring managers are focused on building a staff that reflects our student body. We
recruit from historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) including Howard University and
Morgan State University. We have a referral program and incentives that encourage our staff
members to refer great candidates who meet the needs of our students.
In addition to the recruitment efforts, E.L. Haynes staff has created and participated in Race and
Equity in Education Seminars (REES). Every staff member from the maintenance staff to the
3
This figure reflects a lower percentage of Low Income students than we believe to be true. As our high school
population has grown, we have seen a reduction in the number of families that return their qualification form for meal
subsidies. Thus, the result is a figure that does not necessarily truly represent the poverty levels of our student
population.
25| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
classroom teachers are required to participate. REES training is an integral part of New Staff
Institute each summer, and the seminars take place over three days. By building the skill, will, and
courage in each of us to interrupt the status quo, we are shifting our focus to permeate all aspects of
our interaction with students, families, and each other at E.L. Haynes to confront the effects of
systemic racism – the achievement gap. We have hosted panel discussions on our Race and Equity
seminars and have an open door policy for community members to join any of our REES seminars.
This focus on race and equity has assisted in recruiting a diverse board and staff; candidates are
attracted to working within a school that is focused on such important and ground-breaking work.
CHARTER GOAL FIFTEEN : A SCHOOL PLANNING TEAM W ILL SUPPORT THE
PRINCIPAL AND LEADER SHIP TEAM IN THE EFF ECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF THE
SCHOOL.
E.L. Haynes PCS is meeting this goal and actively supporting the three school principals. The
“School Planning Team” is now referred to as the core leadership team. The leadership team meets
at least monthly and is composed of upper-level staff including the Head of School, Chiefs,
Principals, Senior Directors, and Directors. In 2014-15, our leadership team had nine monthly
meetings and two week-long intensive training and planning sessions. The two-week long intensive
training and planning sessions included other key staff e.g., assistant principals, assistant directors of
special education, deans of culture, behavior intervention coordinators.
CHARTER GOAL SIXTEEN : THE SCHOOL W ILL BE IN SOUND FISCAL HEALTH, AND
THE BOARD OF TRUSTEE S W ILL ENSURE THE SCHOOL HAS THE RESOURC ES IT
NEEDS TO CARRY OUT ITS PROGRAM.
E.L. Haynes PCS is meeting this goal and in good financial standing. The school adheres to
Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and has a positive track record of completing
audits on time and without findings. The school’s financial statements may appear weak in some
areas, such as a high debt burden and negative operating results. This apparent weakness, however,
is the result of numerous tax-advantaged transactions the school has employed in the construction
of their two facilities at Georgia Avenue and Kansas Avenue. The PCSB has studied these
transactions carefully and concluded that the school is financially strong given its current cash flow
position, other financial indicators, and overall understanding of the school’s financing structure and
trajectory. In May 2015, the school successfully refinanced its debt, which resulted in the
simplification of the school’s financial structure and replaced it with traditional long-term
debt. Numerous financial measures should improve as the result of the refinance, which will be
reflected in future financial statements and audits. The Board of Trustees has an active Audit and
Finance Committee that closely monitors the financial health for school by meeting at least quarterly
with school leadership.
CHARTER GOAL SEVENTE EN: THE SCHOOL W ILL BE A GOOD CITIZEN,
CONTRIBUTING TO THE LOCAL COMMUNITY AND SHARING ITS MATH AND SCIENCE
EXPERTISE W ITH THE L ARGER EDUCATIONAL CO MMUNITY.
26| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
E.L. Haynes PCS met this goal. The school continued to contribute significantly to the
improvement of DC public education, particularly in supporting the transition to the Common Core
State Standards. The school shared its expertise with the larger educational community in many
ways, including that the school:

Continued to lead the Capital Teaching Residency (CTR) Program. The program trains
residents who work alongside lead teachers for one year and, through that classroom
experience, extensive professional development, and teacher certification, gain the skills
necessary to become exceptional teachers ready to serve students in schools across DC.
Each year, CTR recruits and trains an impressive cohort of teachers. And recognition of the
CTR model grows. This past school year, 2014-15, CTR had an 11% acceptance rate; 828
applicants applied for 91 positions. Thirteen (13) of these residents completed the program
at E.L. Haynes.

Built on the success of the DC Common Core Collaborative to support DC’s transition to
the Common Core with the Partnership for the Assessment of College and Career Readiness
(PARCC) Readiness Project. As in the Common Core Collaborative, E.L. Haynes convened
teachers citywide to work with Common Core content and become fluent in what students
are now expected to know and be able to do. Teachers in the PARCC Readiness Project
worked in small Professional Learning Communities to practice and refine new instructional
techniques in line with Common Core shifts. More than 100 teachers from 34 DC Public
and Public charter schools participated in this impactful program that benefited more than
11,000 students citywide.
B. LESSONS LEARNED AND ACTIONS TAKEN
E.L. Haynes PCS has grown from 138 students in PK-2nd grade to nearly 1,200 students in PK-12th
grade and the staff has learned many lessons along the way. While we have seen some student
performance growth over time and have outperformed the state consistently, we strive to do better.
Beginning in Spring 2014, the school began a strategic planning process that entailed capacity
review, school review, comparison studies, and input from faculty, students, staff and families. In
March, we shared Vision 2020 with our school community. What follows are our goals, the
strategies to achieve those goals and how to monitor our progress to ensure we achieve them.
GOALS FOR 2020
The barriers to progress are high, but they are not insurmountable. To achieve its mission, E.L.
Haynes is setting out three student outcome goals for 2020:
► Goal 1: All E.L. Haynes students will become successful individuals, active community
members, and responsible citizens.
► Goal 2: All E.L. Haynes students will graduate prepared to succeed in college.
► Goal 3: All E.L. Haynes students will be adept at mathematical reasoning and use scientific
methods effectively to frame and solve problems.
27| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
Each of these goals has a set of primary metrics with targets for 2020, as well as a set of supporting
metrics to monitor progress between now and then.
STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE THE GOALS
The goals provide direction for the organization. The strategic planning team combined this
information with the evidence on current performance and the school’s core values and beliefs to
prioritize eight 5-year strategies for achieving the goals, as well as a series of six key drivers
(systems and structures) that must be developed in order to sustain the work.
Due to the nature of the academic challenges uncovered by analyses of the school’s performance,
the four highest priority strategies are focused on centralizing and strengthening the school’s
academic program to ensure consistent and excellent instruction in every classroom. They will be
implemented together, and aim to change teacher practice through three primary vehicles: a
comprehensive curriculum review, high-quality professional development, and revision of the
school’s Teacher Competency Rubric to reflect new academic expectations for educators. These
four interlinked strategies are:
► Design engaging and rigorous student-centered instruction, with classroom practices and
learning activities that incorporate student voice and choice and incorporate higher order
thinking skills;
► Implement rigorous, research-based, vertically aligned curriculum for all content areas,
phased in over a four-year review cycle that touches every subject area;
► Monitor student performance to ensure high levels of mastery by building core educator
skills in assessment as instruction; and
► Differentiate instruction to meet the needs of all learners by developing stronger systems for
intervention and enrichment.
There are four additional strategies that focus on improving students’ academic success through
extra-curricular and leadership opportunities, comprehensive socio-emotional supports, and
use of extended-day and year-round programs for academic intervention and enrichment. These
strategies support and extend the core academic program into students’ everyday lives and are a
critical part of the school’s mission. In many cases, however, these strategies represent more minor
shifts to existing activities – this in recognition of the fact that most of the energy for new initiatives
must be focused on turning around the academic program.
Finally, there are six key drivers of success – systems and structures that the school must build or
maintain in order to sustain this work. They include recruitment and retention of staff, family
engagement, effective resource allocation, strong governance, systems of performance
management against this plan, and school culture. Some of these drivers imply big changes in the
way that the school operates – particularly in performance management – while others require
smaller shifts.
MONITORING PROGRESS
28| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
All of these elements of the strategic plan – the goals, the strategies, and the key drivers – have
quantitative and qualitative measures identified for tracking progress. The school will regularly
review this information by establishing a system of performance management routines: regularly
scheduled and structured conversations about progress between the Head of School, Chief
Academic Officer, and principals.
During these routines, which will take place on a monthly basis, school leaders will review progress,
discuss and solve major challenges that have arisen, and make decisions that will drive the delivery of
results. These routines will also serve as the basis for the Head of School’s regular reporting to the
board on performance against this plan.
At the school level, school leaders will conduct Weekly Data Analysis meetings with teachers at
every grade level. They will analyze a student exemplar compared to the teacher exemplar and then
sort student work to identify gaps and how to address them to move students to proficiency on a
particular standards. We have hired an Instruction Specialist, Mathematics and and Instructional
Specialist, Literacy to support this work.
SHIFTS IN PLACE FOR THE 2015-16 SCHOOL YEAR
Implement rigorous, research-based, vertically aligned curriculum for all content areas.












Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) aligned FOSS kits implemented for grades K-8.
Earth & Space Science course designed for 9th grade to address NGSS standards.
Mathematics textbooks aligned to Common Core State Standards for Mathematics
implemented grades 6-12.
AP textbooks implemented for Physics, Biology, Chemistry and Calculus.
Engage NY English Language Arts implemented for grades 3-8.
Engage NY Math implemented grades K-2.
Imeplementation of Read 180 and Wilson at the high school.
Implementation of Wilson at the middle school.
Implementation of Fundations at the elementary school.
Implementation of Every Child Ready for PK.
Implementation of Social Studies Alive curriculum implemented in the middle school.
Core content areas (ELA, Science, Mathematics, Social Studies) given equal time in the
schedule grades 6-12.
Monitor student performance to ensure high levels of mastery by building core educator
skills in assessment as instruction.



Hired instructional specialists for Mathematics and Literacy.
All three principals trained at Relay on how to implement weekly instructional cycle.
Review of end of unit assessments underway.
29| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
Design engaging and rigorous student-centered instruction, with classroom practices and
learning activities that incorporate student voice and choice and incorporate higher order
thinking skills.


Appointed teacher leaders to serve as signature learning activity coordinators to establish
hallmark experiences for each grade.
Revised teacher competency rubric to include indicators such as engagement in learning and
heavy lifting.
Differentiate instruction to meet the needs of all learners by developing stronger systems for
intervention and enrichment.



Establishment of enrichment blocks to remediate or extend learning in grades 5-9.
Use of pre-assessmnet in math to determine underlying skills that need to be addressed to
bridge the gap.
Revised teacher competency rubric to include indicators such as differentiation, checks for
understanding and response to student misunderstanding.
C. UNIQUE ACCOMPLISHMENTS
E.L. Haynes served 1,150 students in PK through 12th grade in 2014-15 and continues to receive
local and national recognition for student achievement gains and our model program in fulfillment
of our mission. Our mission-driven accomplishments include various exciting activities that are part
of our work to prepare students for college success. Our broader impact accomplishments include
strategic programs and partnerships that reached hundreds of teachers and thousands of students in
DC and beyond in the 2014-2015 school year.
Mission Driven Accomplishments
E.L. Haynes Celebrates First High School Graduation. In June 2015, E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
celebrated a significant milestone as 53 graduating seniors received their high school diplomas. The
event took place at Catholic University’s Hartke Theatre. Speakers included Beatriz (BB) Otero,
President of Otero Strategy Group, LLC, Former Deputy Mayor for Health and Human Services,
and Founder of CentroNía; Jennifer C. Niles, Deputy Mayor for Education, Founder of E.L.
Haynes, and former Head of School; Darren Woodruff, Chair of DC Public Charter School Board;
student leaders of the Class of 2015; and E.L. Haynes leadership. E.L. Haynes’ Class of 2015 boasts
a 100% college acceptance rate and more than $3.5 million in merit based scholarships.
Senior Wins Gates Millennium Scholarship. In May 2015, the United Negro College Fund selected Kai
Lin Shi, Class of 2015, as one of 1,000 students nationwide – and one of seven from the District –
to receive the prestigious Gates Millennium Scholarship. As a GMS winner, Shi will receive financial
support to pursue a degree in any undergraduate major and selected graduate program at accredited
colleges or universities, as well as leadership development opportunities, mentoring, academic and
30| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
social support. He began his studies at Kalamazoo College (Michigan) this fall to pursue a degree in
economics and political science.
Summer Programs Open Minds. In June/July 2015, E.L. Haynes high school students gained real world
experiences while participating in prestigious summer programs abroad and at home. Eight students
completed service learning projects in Paraguay and Jamaica. Students traveled to China, Japan, and
Guatemala as part of cultural exchange programs. Others took college classes at Stanford, Syracuse,
Howard, Georgetown, and George Washington. A group of 15 sophomores began internships in the
Escalera College Prep Program at Mary's Center, two students led tours at the Holocaust Museum,
and one student participated in NIH's HISTEP Program.
E.L. Haynes’ Fourth Annual Fundraising Event a Success. In May 2015, E.L. Haynes held its fourth
successful Toast to Transformation fundraising event. More than 300 guests celebrated the
accomplishments of our graduating seniors, got a glimpse of our students’ artistic talents, and heard
the profound testimony of co-valedictorian Katy Reyes, Class of 2015. E.L. Haynes honored Kaya
Henderson, Chancellor of DC Public Schools, and DC Mayor for Education, Jennifer Niles. The
event raised more than $150,000 in support of E.L. Haynes’ work, including $25,000 toward the
newly-established E.L. Haynes College Support Fund.
Building New Field of Dreams. In April 2015, E.L. Haynes began construction on our new athletic field
at 4501 Kansas Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20011. This project marks the capstone project of
E.L. Haynes’ work to upgrade and develop the former Clark Elementary School facility, once again
making it a vital space for learning and play. The $1.3 million field project features a soccer field and
site amenities that will provide our students with a safe place to play intramural and interscholastic
sports, both during and outside the school day. Support for the project was provided by the Office
of the State Superintendent of Education, the U.S. Soccer Foundation, and private donors.
Exploring Race, Diversity and Social Justice. In July 2014, every E.L. Haynes teacher and administrator
gathered around a shared goal: Closing the achievement gap between white students and students of
color. Race and Equity in Education Seminars (REES), convened throughout the year, are
mandatory trainings for staff to develop the will, skill, and courage to confront the residual effects of
systemic racism. During spring semester, high school sociology students explored the impact of
gentrification on communities of color in Washington, DC. During the 2014-2015 spring break,
high school students toured southern landmarks of the Civil Rights Movement.
Broader Impact Accomplishments
Celebrating Our Award Winning Faculty. In June, E.L. Haynes High School history teacher Barrie
Moorman became the 2015 Patricia Behring Teacher of the Year at the National History Day
Ceremony; she competed against affiliate winners from across the nation to win the national title
and received $10,000. E.L. Haynes teachers Nio Olutsin, Beth Barnes, Kathryn O'Keefe, Elani
Lawrence, Kris Bengtson, and Rohey Mbenga won acceptance into the Master Teacher Cadre, a
partnership of OSSE and American University to develop Common Core State Standards-based
lessons to support English Language Learners and students with disabilities. Additionally, Connie
31| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
Parham and Beth Barnes won competitive fellowships through Teach for America and Flamboyan
Foundation to create a new family engagement initiative to increase student achievement.
Jennie Niles Becomes DC’s Deputy Mayor for Education. In December 2014, Mayor Elect Muriel Bowser
appointed E.L. Haynes Founder and Former Head of School as DC’s new Deputy Mayor for
Education. Bowser cited Niles’ deep roots in education and her record for bringing together DCPS
and public charter schools in efforts to ensure excellence for students citywide. She praised Niles’
“impressive and innovative background” that has prepared her for her role “increasing collaboration
between all of our public Schools.”
E.L. Haynes Prepares DC Teachers for the PARCC. In March 2015, E.L. Haynes convened more than
100 teachers from district and charter schools across the city to gear up for the first highstakes PARCC that will assess how well DC measures up to the new Common Core State Standards.
In 2014-2015, E.L. Haynes led monthly meetings to collaborate on lesson planning, address
challenges, and learn from expert workshop leaders. The PARCC Readiness Project builds on the
momentum and success of the DC Common Core Collaborative, a three-year project largely funded
by a $1.4 million Race to the Top grant that brought together teachers from 30 DC district and
charter schools to support DC's transition to the Common Core.
E.L. Haynes Featured in New Book on Diverse Charters. According to A Smarter Charter: Finding What
Works for Charter Schools and Public Education (2014), a new book by Richard D. Kahlenberg and
Halley Potter, E.L. Haynes is among the nation’s best charter schools in creating diverse student
communities. The book draws on decades of research into successful models for intentional
diversity. Of the 15 charter schools featured in the book, E.L. Haynes is one of eight nationwide
regarded as an exemplar in cultivating and supporting diversity; E.L. Haynes’ student body is diverse
in race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and home language.
Capital Teaching Residency (CTR) Program Cultivates Excellence. CTR trains residents who work alongside
lead teachers for one year and, through that experience, extensive professional development, and
teacher certification, gain the skills necessary to become exceptional teachers ready to serve students
in schools across DC. Each year, CTR recruits and trains an impressive cohort of teachers. In 20142015, CTR’s sixth year, CTR trained 13 teachers to serve in district and charter schools.
D. LIST OF DONORS OF $500+ IN FY 14-15
E.L. Haynes gratefully acknowledges the support of our dedicated donors, whose generous
contributions ensure high achievement for every E.L. Haynes student. The following individuals,
foundations, corporations, and organizations supported E.L. Haynes with gifts of $500 or more
between July 1, 2014 and June 30, 2015:
Ampersand Education
Annie's Ace Hardware
Anybill
32| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
Mr. Phillip Ash and Ms. Elizabeth Ash
Mr. Andrew Drechsler and Ms. Beth Bangert
Mr. John D. Barrett, II and Mrs. Lucy Barrett
Anonymous
Mr. Andrew Berg
Mr. David Bonelli and Mrs. Anna Bonelli
Mr. Kevin Borgmann and Mrs. Haise Borgmann
Mr. Alan Bubes and Mrs. Nancy Bubes
Mr. and Mrs. C. Austin Buck
Building Hope
Mr. Dixon Butler and Mrs. Susan Butler
The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation
Mr. and Mrs. Tucker Carlson
Mr. Guy Cecil and Mr. Ed McNulty
Mr. Brian Chalmers
Mr. John Chase and Mrs. Courtney Chase
Mrs. Sara Horwitz Cherkis and Mr. Jason A Cherkis
Dr. Purnell Choppin and Mrs. Joan Choppin
Ms. Theresa Cibrano
CityBridge Foundation, Inc.
Community Foundation for the National Capital Region
Mr. Langdon Cook and Mrs. Lyn Cook
Mr. John F Cozzi and Mr. Wendell S Cozzi
Mrs. Susan Crowley
Mr. Charles and Mrs. Sabine Dalluge
Ms. Mindi d'Angelo and Mr. Jeff Blackwell
Ms. Jacquelyn Davis and Mr. Jordan Dey
Mr. Alec Dawson and Mrs. Anne Noel Dawson
DC Children and Youth Investment Trust Corporation
DC Office of the State Superintendent of Education
Diane and Norman Bernstein Foundation
Mr. John Dickerson and Mrs. Anne Dickerson
The Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation
Mrs. Nancy Folger and Dr. Sidney Werkman
Mr. David T. Buente and Ms. Frances A. Dubrowski
Mr. and Mrs. Le Roy Eakin
EdOps
Kristin Ehrgood
Mr. David Kelly and Mrs. Sarah Ely Kelly
33| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
Mr. Adam Fazackerley and Mrs. Amy Fazackerley
Forrester Construction
Mr. Kevin Fox and Mrs. Deanna Fox
Mr. Joseph Gibson and Mrs. Heath Kern Gibson
Graham Holdings Company
Ms. Jackie Gran
Dr. Stephen Green and Ms. Susanne Walker
Ms. Julie Anne Green and Mr. William S. Murray, III
Ms. Caryn B. Gottlieb and Mr. Richard Grinspun
Haldeman Family Foundation
Mr. Michael Hall and Ms. Anne Crowley
Mr. Jamie Hedlund and Dr. Phyllis Hedlund
Mr. James Henderson and Ms. Catherine Henderson
Ms. Traci L. Higgins
Ms. Caroline Hill
Mr. William Holding and Mrs. Judith Holding
Mr. Paul Houghton and Mrs. Dianne Houghton
Mr. Ramon S. Jacobson and Ms. Alwynne Wilbur
Jarman Company
JLAN Solutions
Dr. Roy S. Jones, Jr.
Ms. Carolyn Kari
Mr. Michael Kershow and Ms. Marianne Keler
Mr. Stefan Kershow
Mr. Nicholas Kilavos and Dr. Mary Kilavos
Mr. Andrew and Mrs. Julie Klingenstein
Mr. Hugo Roell and Ms. Lisa Landmeier
Mr. Jon T. Larranaga
Mr. Andrew Lee and Mr. Matt Cunningham
Mr. Terry Falk Lenzner and Mrs. Margaret Rood Lenzner
Mr. Christopher Linen and Mrs. Robin Linen
Ms. Margaret Lopez-Balboa
M&T Bank
Mr. Joshua Mandell and Mrs. Carolyn Reynolds Mandell
Ms. Maura Marino
The J. Willard and Alice S. Marriott Foundation
The Richard E. and Nancy P. Marriott Foundation
Mr. Leonard Marx and Mrs. Sylvia Marx
Mr. Thomas McCormick
34| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
Ms. Danielle McCoy
Mrs. Monique McDonough and Mr. Gregory McDonough
McGladrey & Pullen LLP
MCN Build
Mr. Alan Meltzer
Mr. Glenn Merten and Mrs. Allison Merten
The Honorable Stephen Milliken and Mrs. Rebecca P. C. Milliken
Mr. Stephen Henn and Mrs. Emily Henn
Mr. John Lugar and Mrs. Kelly Lugar
Mr. Joshua Bernstein and Mrs. Lisa Bernstein
Mr. James R. Wilson and Ms. Clarissa C. Potter
Mr. John Gutman and Ms. Elizabeth Duffy
Neustar
Mr. A. David Niles and Mrs. Allison Clark Niles
Mr. Nicholas Niles and Mrs. Margaretta Niles
Ms. Jennifer C. Niles
Mr. Larry Nussdorf and Mrs. Melanie Nussdorf
Mr. Stephen Padre and Mrs. Sarah Padre
Mr. Malcolm Peabody and Mrs. Pamela Peabody
Perkins Malo Hunter Foundation
Mr. Richard Pohlman and Ms. Ingrid Andersson
Public Economics
Mr. William Rawson and Mrs. Mary Rawson
Mr. Victor Reinoso
Mr. Gerald Rigg and Mrs. Dedee Rigg
Mr. Steve Rosenthal and Mrs. Ilene Rosenthal
San Francisco Foundation
Mr. Raj Shah and Mrs. Shivam Mallick Shah
Mr. James Shelton and Mrs. Sonia Shelton
Shinberg Levinas
Shippy Foundation
Mr. Saul Shorr and Mrs. Margaret Shorr
Mr. Douglas D. Smith
Mr. Nelson Smith and Mr. Paul Garrard
Mr. Clyde L. Solomon and Ms. Shirley E. Thompson
Mr. Stephen Springer and Mrs. Caroline Springer
Mr. William Stafford and Mrs. Ingrid Stafford
Mr. Aaron Stallworth and Ms. Danielle Conley
Mr. Michael Steinig and Ms. Lara Flint
35| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
Ms. Margot Stiles
Struble Eichenbaum Communications
Studio 27
Mr. Devin L. Talbott and Mrs. Lauren L. Talbott
The Culinary Trust
Mr. Joseph Gibson
The Meltzer Group
Mr. Walter Tunnessen and Dr. Aviva D. Zyskind
Mr. Theodore Smith and Ms. Gretchen Van Fossan
Mr. Steven VanRoekel and Mrs. Carrie VanRoekel
Mr. Claude Vol and Mrs. Kira Vol
Mr. A. Christopher Wailoo and Ms. Alisa Lasater
Ms. Sarah Wallerstein
Mr. Benjamin Edelman and Ms. Ruth Wielgosz
Mrs. Diane Wilbur
Mrs. Emma Wilkey
Mr. Dudley Williams
The Honorable Edwin Williamson and Mrs. Kathe Williamson
Ms. Tammy Wincup
Mr. and Mrs. Rick Witmer
Mr. Michael S. Zamore and Ms. Abigail Smith
36| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
DATA COLLECTION TEMPLATE: ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
GENERAL INFORMATION
LEA Name/ ID
E.L. Haynes PCS / 116
Campus Name
E.L. Haynes Elementary School
Ages served – adult schools only
NA
Audited Enrollment Total
358
PK3 Audited Enrollment
42
PK4 Audited Enrollment
42
KG Audited Enrollment
49
Grade 1 Audited Enrollment
50
Grade 2 Audited Enrollment
50
Grade 3 Audited Enrollment
50
PCSB
Grade 4 Audited Enrollment
75
PCSB
Grade 5 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Grade 6 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Grade 7 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Grade 8 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Grade 9 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Grade 10 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Grade 11 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Grade 12 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Adult Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
School
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
School
School
School
School
School
Ungraded Audited Enrollment
Total number of instructional days
Suspension Rate
Expulsion Rate
Instructional Time Lost to Suspension
Promotion Rate (All Grades)
Mid-Year Withdrawal Rate
Mid-Year Entry Rate
College Acceptance Rate (SY 13-14)
College Admission Test Scores (SY 13-14)
Graduation Rates (SY 13-14)
Teacher Attrition Rate
Number of Teachers
Average Teacher Salary
Minimum Teacher Salary
Maximum Teacher Salary
0
181
5.3%
0.0%
0.09%
94.6%
Not yet validated – Intentionally blank
Not yet validated – Intentionally blank
NA
NA
NA
28%
40
$58,861
$47,600
$83,059
37| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
DATA COLLECTION TEMPLATE: MIDDLE SCHOOL
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
GENERAL INFORMATION
LEA Name / ID
E.L. Haynes PCS / 116
Campus Name
E.L. Haynes Middle School
Ages served – adult schools only
NA
Audited Enrollment Total
377
PK3 Audited Enrollment
0
PK4 Audited Enrollment
0
KG Audited Enrollment
0
Grade 1 Audited Enrollment
0
Grade 2 Audited Enrollment
0
Grade 3 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Grade 4 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Grade 5 Audited Enrollment
76
PCSB
Grade 6 Audited Enrollment
101
PCSB
Grade 7 Audited Enrollment
99
PCSB
Grade 8 Audited Enrollment
101
PCSB
Grade 9 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Grade 10 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Grade 11 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Grade 12 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Adult Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
School
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
School
School
School
School
School
Ungraded Audited Enrollment
Total number of instructional days
Suspension Rate
Expulsion Rate
Instructional Time Lost to Suspension
Promotion Rate (All Grades)
In-Seat Attendance Rate
Mid-Year Withdrawal Rate
Mid-Year Entry Rate
College Acceptance Rate (SY 13-14)
College Admission Test Scores (SY 13-14)
Graduation Rates (SY 13-14)
Teacher Attrition Rate
Number of Teachers
Average Teacher Salary
Minimum Teacher Salary
Maximum Teacher Salary
0
181
17.2%
0.0%
0.3%
94.6%
94.13%
Not yet validated – Intentionally blank
Not yet validated – Intentionally blank
NA
NA
NA
41%
41
$63,763
$47,600
$90,598
38| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
DATA COLLECTION TEMPLATE: HIGH SCHOOL
GENERAL INFORMATION
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
LEA Name / ID
Campus Name
Ages served – adult schools only
Audited Enrollment Total
PK3 Audited Enrollment
PK4 Audited Enrollment
KG Audited Enrollment
Grade 1 Audited Enrollment
Grade 2 Audited Enrollment
Grade 3 Audited Enrollment
E.L. Haynes PCS / 116
E.L. Haynes High School
NA
422
0
0
0
0
0
0
PCSB
Grade 4 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Grade 5 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Grade 6 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Grade 7 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Grade 8 Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
Grade 9 Audited Enrollment
169
PCSB
Grade 10 Audited Enrollment
104
PCSB
Grade 11 Audited Enrollment
97
PCSB
Grade 12 Audited Enrollment
52
PCSB
Adult Audited Enrollment
0
PCSB
School
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
PCSB
School
School
School
School
School
Ungraded Audited Enrollment
Total number of instructional days
Suspension Rate
Expulsion Rate
Instructional Time Lost to Suspension
Promotion Rate (All Grades)
In-Seat Attendance Rate
Mid-Year Withdrawal Rate
Mid-Year Entry Rate
College Acceptance Rate (SY 13-14)
College Admission Test Scores (SY 13-14)
Graduation Rates (SY 13-14)
Teacher Attrition Rate
Number of Teachers
Average Teacher Salary
Minimum Teacher Salary
Maximum Teacher Salary
0
181
15.6%
0.0%
0.47%
94.6%
91.04%
Not yet validated – Intentionally blank
Not yet validated – Intentionally blank
NA
NA
< 25 students in subgroup
17%
36
$65,236
$47,600
$90,598
39| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
APPENDIX A: STAFF ROSTER
E.L. Haynes is proud to have an exceptionally qualified staff. In 2014-2015, 96% of our teachers
were “Highly Qualified Teachers” (HQT), as defined by the federal Elementary and Secondary
Education Act; seventy-five percent (75%) of teachers had more than four years of teaching
experience. Our administrative team holds degrees from some the most prestigious colleges and
universities in the country and advanced degrees in law and business.
Alexandra Alderman, Institutional Giving Manager (2011)
Noris Alderson, Interpretation and Translation Specialist (2007)
Darnell Almanzar, Teacher, High School Special Education (2011)
Leonard Anderson, Teacher, Grades 7 Science and Math (2014)
Lisa Apple, Teacher, Grades 5-8 Math Intervention (2009)
Kirsten Bakken, Teacher, Pre-Kindergarten (2011)
Amy Balas, Tier 3 Interventionist, Grades PK-4 (2011)
Beth Barnes, Teacher, Grades 6 & 8 Math Inclusion (2012)
Tijuana Barnes, Teacher, Grades 5-8 Resource (2014)
Brent Bass, Director, Athletics, Health and Fitness (2011)
Kristopher Bengtson, Teacher, Grade 8 English Language Learning (2010)
Sharon Blount, Paraprofessional (2014)
Eva Bollag, Paraprofessional (2011)
Jessica Brewster, Assistant Principal, Grades PK-4 (2012)
Bethany Bronson, Teacher, Grade 4 (2013)
Kimberly Brown, Teacher, Kindergarten (2013)
Tia Brumsted, Director of Student wellness (2011)
Sasha Buchanan, Teacher, Grade 7 Math (2014)
John Burns, Teacher, Grade 7 & 8 Math Inclusion (2012)
Benjamin Byrd, School Culture Coordinator & Staff Developer (2012)
Caitlyn Calabrese, Teacher, Grade 6 Math (2014)
Keith Calix, Teacher, High School English (2014)
Mark Calligan, Teacher, Grades 9-12 Special Education (2014)
Caitlin Campbell, Teacher, Grade 5 Writing & Science (2014)
Celeste Capaldi, Teacher, Grade 10 US Literature (2012)
Vanessa Carlo-Miranda, Chief Financial Officer (2012)
Gisella Castillo, Literacy Curriculum & Staff Developer & Teacher, Grade 9 World Literature (2011)
David Chachere, Paraprofessional (2014)
Jeannette Chang, Director of Technology Innovation (2012)
Joanna Charles, YRP Site Manager, Grades PK-4 (2011)
Andrew Christian, Teacher, Grade 10 Chemistry (2013)
Tameka Christmas, Capital Teaching Resident (2014)
40| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
Darren Clark, YRP Site Manager, Grades 5-8 (2013)
Gayle Clark, Literacy Curriculum & Staff Developer (2013)
Cassandra Class, School Psychologist (2012)
Mary Clune, Executive Assistant to the Head of School (2013)
Davon Coachman, Paraprofessional (2011)
Michelle Coachman, Instructional Aide (2011)
Nathaniel Cole, Teacher, Grade 9 AP World History (2012)
Ashton Conklin, Teacher, Grades 5-8 Music (2014)
Maria Conner, Senior Director of Student Support Services (2013)
Michael Conners, Teacher, Grade 5 English Language Learning (2010)
Ebony Crawford, Assistant Principal, Grades 5-8 (2014)
Jamaal Crowder, Teacher, Grade 9 World Literature (2014)
Elsi Cruz, Office Manager, Georgia Ave Campus (2007)
Charles Curtis, Behavior Intervention Coordinator, Grades 9-12 (2014)
Lionel Daniels, Paraprofessional (2014)
Teresa Danskey, Teacher, Grades 9-12 Spanish (2011)
Quivianna Davis, Capital Teaching Resident (2014)
Ebony Dennis, School Psychologist (2014)
Carmel Domond, Capital Teaching Resident (2013)
Claire Donahue, Teacher, High School English Language Learning (2012)
Shane Donovan, Teacher, Grade 9 Physics (2012)
Alison Drury, Teacher, Pre-Kindergarten (2013)
Lindsey Dubose, Instructional Aide (2014)
Melanie ElLaissi, Teacher, Kindergarten (2013)
Hannah Engel-Rebitzer, Teacher, Grade 10 Algebra II (2013)
Margaret Fatovic, Response to Intervention Coordinator, Grades 5-8 (2009)
Elizabeth Fighera, Teacher, Grade 7 Humanities (2013)
Jodi Fiteny, Assistant Director, Grades PK-4 Student Support Services (2009)
Rob Fleisher, Teacher, Grade 7 Inclusion (2012)
Shirley Fletcher, Paraprofessional (2012)
Meredith Flynn, Speech Language Pathologist, Grades PK-4 (2009)
Quintin Floyd, Paraprofessional (2014)
Jennifer Fox-Thomas, Teacher, High School Art/Music (2011)
Cyril Gerald-Quinn, Paraprofessional (2013)
Kennon Goff, Teacher, Grades 5-8 Health and Fitness (2010)
Joe Golub, Teacher, Pre-Kindergarten (2007)
Marissa Gonzalez, Teacher, Grade 9 Geometry (2012)
Paula Gordon, Assistant Principal, Grades 5-8 (2012)
James Grange, Capital Teaching Resident (2013)
41| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
Julie Green, Chief Marketing and Development Officer (2005)
Alvin Greene, Instructional Aide (2009)
Tia Greene, Teacher, Grade 2 (2014)
Carla Grinnell, Teacher, Grades K-1 Inclusion (2009)
Emmalia Sanks, Teacher, Grade 6 Literacy (2014)
Christel Guillen, Assistant Director, Grades 9-12 Student Support Services (2011)
Erica Hamilton, Teacher, High School Special Education (2013)
Randy Harper, Paraprofessional (2014)
William Harris, Teacher, Grades 9 & 10 World & US Literature (2013)
Tarek Hbeichi, Teacher, Grades 3-4 Math Inclusion (2010)
Phyllis Hedlund, Chief Academic Officer (2014)
Rachel Heitin, Teacher, Grade 2 (2014)
Krystina Hermes, Capital Teaching Resident (2014)
Garrett Hess, Capital Teaching Resident (2014)
Caroline Hill, Principal, Grades 9-12 (2010)
Erin Hogan, Development and Communications Associate (2015)
Julie Holt, Associate Director of Student Support Services (2012)
Kate Hubbard, Senior Director of Curriculum and Instruction (2005)
Emily Hueber, Teacher, Grade 10 Algebra II (2012)
Caitlin Hurwit, Capital Teaching Resident (2014)
LaToya Hutchins, Teacher, Grade 5 Math (2012)
Samone Jackson, Child Care Subsidy Manager (2008)
Dion Jackson, School Counselor, Grades 5-8 (2011)
Lakesha Johnson, Food Service Manager, Grades 5-8 (2012)
Travis Johnson, Food Service Manager, Grades 9-12 (2014)
Tanisha Jones, Assistant Principal, Grades PK-4 (2004)
Eric Jones, Teacher, Grade 9 Geometry (2011)
Brittany Kam, Teacher, Grades 6-8 Arabic (2014)
Krystiana Kaminski, Instructional Aide (2009)
Beth Kara, Teacher, Grade 8 Humanities (2013)
Sarah Kennelley, Teacher, Grade 11 Biology (2014)
Kathryn Keyser, Teacher, Grades PK-4 Dance (2014)
Kimberly Kirby, Behavior Intervention Coordinator, Grades 5-8 (2014)
Joseph Kotarski, Teacher, Grade 9 AP World History (2011)
Sofiya Kotarski, Office Manager, High School (2013)
Vicki Koussoglou, Operations Manager, Georgia Avenue Campus (2012)
Allen Kramer, Budget and Finance Manager (2013)
Chanel Laguna, Capital Teaching Resident (2014)
Katharine Landfield, Social Worker, Grades PK-4 (2005)
42| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
Danielle Lassiter, Paraprofessional (2014)
Christine Law, Occupational Therapist, Grades 5-8 (2014)
Marc Lawrence, Teacher, Grade 10 Inclusion (2012)
Elani Lawrence, Teacher, Grades 6 English Language Learning (2012)
Kwame Lawson, Teacher, Grades 9-12 Arabic (2013)
Khanh Le, Teacher, Grades PK-4 Art (2012)
Shaundranetta Lee, Teacher, Grade 11 Pre-Calculus (2012)
Maurice Lee, Instructional Aide, Grade 9 (2014)
Kristy Li Puma, College Office Coordinator (2012)
Myron Long, Principal, Grades 5-8 (2011)
Daniel Malec, Assistant Principal, High School (2012)
Megan Maples, Teacher, Grade 8 Literacy (2014)
Alonzo Marshall, Recovery Room Specialist (2015)
Deena Martins, Teacher, Grade 2-4 English Language Learning (2014)
Diller Matthews, Teacher, Grade 8 Science (2014)
Rohey Mbenga, Teacher, Grade 8 Inclusion (2012)
Kelly McAllester, Teacher, Grade 3 (2013)
Holly McBride, Assistant Director of Student Support Services, Grades PK-4 (2011)
Erin McDonough, Math Curriculum and Staff Developer, Grades 5-8 (2012)
Nicole McElroy, Human Capital and Recruitment Manager (2014)
Jshuane Melton, Operations Manager, Kansas Avenue Campus Grades 9-11 (2012)
Katie Meyer, Teacher, Grades 3 & 4 Literacy Inclusion (2012)
Samuel Miranda, Teacher, Grade 9 World Literature (2013)
April Mitchell, Teacher, Grade 6 Science (2015)
Bethany Molitor, Director of Kansas Ave Operations (2005)
Barrie Moorman, Teacher, Grade 10 AP US History (2011)
Emily Morris, Literacy Curriculum & Staff Developer, Grades PK-4 (2009)
Sandra Mun, Teacher, Grades 5-8 Reading Intervention (2013)
Carmelita Naves, Community Partner - Marys Center - Truancy Intervention (0)
Tiana Nguyen, Occupational Therapist, Grades PK-4 (2013)
Becky Nolin, Teacher, Grade 1 (2007)
Kate Noonan, Literacy Curriculum and Staff Developer, Grades 5-8 (2010)
Thais Nysus, Paraprofessional (2015)
Katherine O'Connor, Teacher, Grade 3 (2013)
Kenli Okada, Director of Student Information (2011)
Kathryn O'Keefe, Teacher, Grade 6 Inclusion (2014)
Iris Olsen, Director of Human Capital (2012)
Nioyonu Olutosin, Teacher, Grade 10 Inclusion (2013)
Élan Ousley, School Counselor, Grades 9-12 (2014)
43| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
Dior Paire, Paraprofessional (2012)
Reynaldo Paniagua, Maintenance, Building, and Grounds (Georgia Ave Campus) (2008)
Silvestre Paniagua, Maintenance, Building, and Grounds (Kansas Ave Campus) (2010)
Aashish Parekh, Teacher, Grades 2-4 ELL (2013)
Constance Parham, Teacher, Grade 8 Math (2012)
Katharine Patton, Teacher, Grade 9 Inclusion/Reading Intervention (2013)
Janelle Peoples-Shaw, Teacher, Grades 5-8 Resource (2014)
Griffin Pepper, Teacher, Grades 9-12 Spanish (2014)
Aide Peralta, Receptionist, Grades 9-12 (2014)
Naomi Perl, Math Curriculum and Staff Developer, Grades PK-4 (2014)
Michelle Petrotta, Teacher, Grades PK-4 Response to Intervention (2011)
Lan-Ahn Pham, Teacher, Grades K-1 ELL (2013)
Caroline Pinto, Capital Teaching Resident (2014)
Richard Pohlman, Chief of Operations (2011)
Claudia Price, Social Work Intern (0)
Colette Price, IT Help Desk Technician (2013)
Benjamin Pruitt, Dean of Culture, Grades 5-8 (2014)
Khristina Pullings, Teacher, Grade 5 Inclusion (2013)
Eliana Ramirez, Receptionist, Grades PK-4 (2011)
Alexia Ramos, Teacher, High School English Language Learning (2011)
Amos Renix, Teacher, Grades PK-4 Health and Fitness (2013)
Rosenda Reyes, Food Manager and Facility Assistant, Grades PK-4 (2008)
Paul Robinson, Instructional Aide (2006)
Maria Roldan-Vasquez, Teacher, Grades 9-12 Health and Fitness (2013)
Jessica Rucker, Capital Teaching Resident (2014)
Michelle Rush, Director of English Language Learning (2008)
Ruth Salamanca, Receptionist, Grades 5-8 (2014)
Adriana Salcedo, Social Worker, Grade 9 (2013)
Jamienne Santos, Capital Teaching Resident (2014)
Robert Sapp, Student Engagement and Attendance Specialist (2005)
Gabriela Schaps, Capital Teaching Resident (2014)
Kara Schoo, Assistant Director, Grades 5-8 Student Support Services (2010)
Carter Semple, Capital Teaching Resident (2014)
Ty'ease Setepenra, Teacher, Grade 1 (2010)
Shivam Shah, Interim Executive Director (2015)
Cindy Sherman, Speech Language Pathologist, Grades 9-12 (2014)
Shalini Shybut, Senior Director of Response to Intervention & Planning (2012)
Omar Sillah, Teacher, Grades 9-12 Math Inclusion (2014)
Elizabeth Simmonds, Teacher, Grade 4 (2013)
44| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
Sharlene Simon, Individual Giving Manager (2014)
William Skaggs, Human Capital & Benefits Manager (2012)
Mignon Smith, Teacher, Grade 9 Physics (2014)
Zuleika Smith, Teacher, Grades 5-8 Art (2012)
Anna Smunt, Teacher, Grade 6 Literacy (2013)
Kiara Social, Teacher, Grade 5 Literacy (2011)
Andrew Somerville, College Counselor (2014)
Samantha Sosey, Teacher, Grade 11 AP Government (2013)
William Stafford, Teacher, Grade 10 Algebra II (2011)
Aaron Stallworth, Director of College Counseling (2011)
Matt Stephens, Teacher, Grade 7 Literacy (2010)
Dana Stiles, Teacher, Grade Pre-K Inclusion & ELL (2013)
Teri Stokes, Social Worker, Grades 5-8 (2007)
Stephanie Storlie, Teacher, Grades PK-4 Resource (2012)
Marie Stott, Teacher, Grade 10 AP & Honors Chemistry (2012)
Romaine Stover, Assistant Principal, High School (2011)
Cherrelle Swain, Family Communications Manager (2014)
Julian Taurozzi, Teacher, Grades 9-12 English Language Learning (2012)
Seshmi Taylor, Teacher, Pre-Kindergarten (2011)
Adrian Taylor, School Counselor, High School (2013)
Florence Thomas, Paraprofessional (2011)
Elizabeth Toth, Teacher, Grades 2 Inclusion (2012)
Tammy Tuck, Director of Student Performance and Assesment (2004)
LaToya Tufts, Teacher, Grades 5-8 Resource (2014)
Iris Ventura, Office Manager, Grades PK-4 (2010)
Keysi Villalobos, Teacher, Grade 7 English Language Learning (2011)
Brittany Wagner-Friel, Principal, Grades PK-4 (2007)
Lindsey Walker, Teacher, Grades 9-12 Special Education (2014)
Fatima Walsh, Teacher, Grades 5-8 Spanish (2014)
ShaNeda Warren, Paraprofessional (2014)
Franklin Wassmer, Education Technology & Systems Specialist (2012)
Jonathan Williams, Teacher, Grade 4 Math (2012)
Sharon Witting, Marketing and Public Relations Manager (2011)
R'Kheim Young, Teacher, Grades 5-8 Drama (2011)
* Parentheses indicate year of hire.
45| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
APPENDIX B: BOARD ROSTER
Guy Cecil (Co, Vice Chair), Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (2015)
Jacquelyn Davis (Trustee), Founder, ED-Volution Education Group (2016)
Michael Hall (Co-Vice Chair and Parent Trustee), Principal Architect, Studio CrowleyHall (2015)
Dr. Roy Jones (Trustee), Physicist, Leidos (2015)
Stefan Kershow (Treasurer), Assistant Director-The Bernstein Companies (2015)
Maura Marino (Trustee), Managing Director, NewSchools Venture Fund (2016)
Danielle McCoy (Trustee), Deputy Counsel and Assistant Corporate Secretary, Fannie May (2017)
Monique McDonough (Trustee), Principal Consultant, Symmetrics Group (2018)
William Rawson (Board Chair), Partner, Latham & Watkins LLP (2015)
Victor Reinoso (Trustee), Co-founder, Decision Science (2016)
Abigail Smith (Parent Trustee), Former DC Deputy Mayor for Education (2016)
Theodore Smith (Parent Trustee), Supervising Producer, Discovery Channel GEP (2016)
Tammy Wincup (Trustee), Chief Operating Officer, Everfi (2016)
* Parentheses indicate end year of term.
46| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
APPENDIX C: UNAUDITED FINANCIALS
Ordinary
Income/Expense
Accrual Basis
Income
Jul '14 - Jun 15
04 · State and Local Revenue
400 · Per-Pupil Operating Revenue
4000 · Per-pupil alloc
12,486,726.03
4010 · Per-pupil SpEd alloc
3,664,399.14
4020 · Per-pupil LEP/NEP alloc
1,060,446.24
4030 · Per-pupil summer alloc
4040 · Per-pupil at risk
4050 · Per-pupil adjustment
Total 400 · Per-Pupil Operating Revenue
22,267.00
837,837.00
6,548.32
18,078,223.73
410 · Per-Pupil Facility Revenue
4100 · Per-pupil facility alloc
Total 410 · Per-Pupil Facility Revenue
3,554,304.00
3,554,304.00
420 · Other Local Revenue
4200 · Local grants
38,475.04
4210 · Local programs
22,396.10
Total 420 · Other Local Revenue
Total 04 · State and Local Revenue
60,871.14
21,693,398.87
05 · Federal Revenue
500 · Federal Grants
5000 · NCLB grants
5001 · IDEA grants
5030 · Competitive federal grants
Total 500 · Federal Grants
731,855.39
231,309.75
1,208,808.79
2,171,973.93
510 · Public Programs
5100 · National school lunch prog
5110 · E-rate program
5130 · Child care subsidy program
Total 510 · Public Programs
Total 05 · Federal Revenue
327,168.96
44,442.65
322,715.20
694,326.81
2,866,300.74
06 · Private Revenue
600 · Private Grants
6010 · Corporate/business grants
6020 · Foundation grants
Total 600 · Private Grants
4,100.00
593,075.00
597,175.00
620 · Private Contributions
6200 · Individual contributions
6210 · Corporate contributions
6220 · Foundation contributions
6230 · Special event contributions
Total 620 · Private Contributions
249,287.21
17,773.40
154,884.84
58,345.00
480,290.45
630 · Activity Fees
6300 · Supplemental BC/AC fees
6320 · Club & other fees
Total 630 · Activity Fees
202,148.46
11,632.00
213,780.46
640 · School Sales
6400 · Paid meals sales
6410 · School store sales
Total 640 · School Sales
8,001.85
40.00
8,041.85
650 · Additional Revenue
6500 · Short-term investments
6520 · Rental revenue
54,081.59
4,560.60
6530 · Realized gains/losses
-5,823.25
6560 · Miscellaneous revenue
54,595.65
6561 · Misc rev - Georgia leasebk gain
27,261.96
6562 · Misc rev - Kansas assign gain
40,941.00
47| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
6563 · Misc rev - Kansas loan gain
Total 650 · Additional Revenue
Total 06 · Private Revenue
Total Income
546,913.64
722,531.19
2,021,818.95
26,581,518.56
Gross Profit
Expens
e
26,581,518.56
07 · Staff-Related Expense
700 · Curricular salaries
7000 · Leadership salaries
765,851.69
7010 · Teacher salaries
4,020,967.70
7011 · SpEd teacher salaries
1,476,726.90
7012 · ELL teacher salaries
7020 · Teacher aides salaries
7080 · Curricular stipends
7090 · Curricular bonuses
Total 700 · Curricular salaries
709,158.59
1,147,251.16
124,669.58
58,248.15
8,302,873.77
710 · Supplemental Service Salaries
7100 · Student support salaries
2,197,044.46
7110 · Instr staff support salaries
804,285.89
7120 · Clerical salaries
492,814.75
7130 · Business, operations salaries
447,280.80
7131 · IT staff salaries
169,957.73
7140 · Maintenance/custodial salaries
70,459.68
7180 · Supplemental service stipends
12,223.32
7190 · Supplemental service bonuses
Total 710 · Supplemental Service Salaries
95,115.66
4,289,182.29
720 · Supplemental Program Salaries
7200 · Program leadership salaries
155,360.31
7210 · Program staff salaries
121,245.04
7280 · Program stipends
7290 · Program bonuses
Total 720 · Supplemental Program Salaries
1,000.00
250.00
277,855.35
730 · Management/Development Salaries
7300 · Executive salaries
555,145.26
7310 · Development salaries
334,321.23
7380 · Executive bonuses
7390 · Development bonuses
Total 730 · Management/Development Salaries
7,700.00
150.00
897,316.49
740 · Employee Benefits
7400 · Retirement plan contrib.
400,290.93
7410 · Health insurance
866,749.34
7420 · Life and disability insurance
197,726.99
7440 · Travel stipends
7460 · Workers' comp insurance
Total 740 · Employee Benefits
70,657.45
35,776.93
1,571,201.64
750 · Payroll Taxes
7500 · Social security & medicare
7510 · State unemployment tax
Total 750 · Payroll Taxes
1,059,367.25
98,560.85
1,157,928.10
760 · Professional Development
7600 · Staff development (non-travel)
7610 · Staff development travel
Total 760 · Professional Development
183,941.72
40,377.62
224,319.34
770 · Contracted Staff
7700 · Substitute teachers
7711 · Curricular contract staff
7712 · Sup service contract staff
7713 · Sup prog contract staff
7714 · Fundraising contract staff
Total 770 · Contracted Staff
48| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
240,518.95
27,982.50
2,802.50
515,472.46
700.00
787,476.41
780 · Other Staff Expense
7800 · Staff recruiting
7810 · Staff background checks
7820 · Staff meals, events, & awards
7830 · Staff travel (non-development)
Total 780 · Other Staff Expense
Total 07 · Staff-Related Expense
115,546.80
12,687.77
134,882.96
4,126.89
267,244.42
17,775,397.81
08 · Occupancy Expense
810 · Occupancy Service Expense
8100 · Utilities & garbage removal
363,514.77
8110 · Contracted building services
513,882.01
8120 · Maintenance and repairs
426,548.66
8130 · Janitorial supplies
8140 · Facility consulting fees
Total 810 · Occupancy Service Expense
Total 08 · Occupancy Expense
35,969.83
1,300.00
1,341,215.27
1,341,215.27
09 · Additional Expense
900 · Direct Student Expense
9000 · Student supplies, snacks
357,550.08
9010 · Student assessment materials
106,502.97
9020 · Student Textbooks
148,397.19
9030 · Student Uniforms
9040 · Library & media materials
3,796.22
5,119.50
9050 · Contracted instruction fees
182,569.01
9060 · Food service fees
588,553.02
9070 · Student travel / field trips
141,201.96
9080 · Student recruiting
9090 · Other student expenses
9091 · Translation services
Total 900 · Direct Student Expense
4,885.30
25,459.19
51,717.44
1,615,751.88
910 · Office Expense
9100 · Office supplies
107,648.44
9110 · Copier rental & services
171,085.59
9120 · Telephone & telecommunications
87,766.88
9130 · Postage, shipping, delivery
27,237.65
9140 · External printing
Total 910 · Office Expense
3,232.01
396,970.57
920 · Business Expense
9200 · Business insurance
68,911.79
9210 · Authorizer fees
267,452.42
9230 · Accounting, auditing, payroll
290,360.18
9240 · Legal fees
40,942.40
9260 · Computer support fees
207,129.98
9270 · Fundraising fees
137,804.69
9280 · Other professional fees
357,125.55
9290 · Other expenses
Total 920 · Business Expense
19,412.69
1,389,139.70
930 · Business Fees
9300 · Dues, fees, and fines
9320 · Bad Debts, Pledges
9341 · Misc exp - Kansas grant release
Total 930 · Business Fees
Total 09 · Additional Expense
61,262.99
10,482.01
155,591.52
227,336.52
3,629,198.67
1X · Interest, Depr, and Amort
11 · Depreciation and Amortization
11000 · Operating asset depreciation
11010 · Facility asset depreciation
11020 · Amortization expense
Total 11 · Depreciation and Amortization
12 · Interest Expense
49| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
326,845.12
1,659,461.00
107,929.92
2,094,236.04
12000 · Interest payments
41,893.61
12002 · Interest pmts - Georgia junior
931,457.13
12003 · Interest pmts - Kansas senior
803,209.24
12004 · Interest pmts - Kansas junior
Total 12 · Interest Expense
Total 1X · Interest, Depr, and Amort
Total Expense
Net Ordinary
Income
Net Income
1
322,273.23
2,098,833.21
4,193,069.25
26,938,881.00
-357,362.44
-357,362.44
Standing alone, the school’s financials may appear weak in some areas, such as a negative operating result. However, this apparent weakness is the
result of numerous tax-advantaged transactions the school has employed in the construction of their two facilities on Georgia Avenue and Kansas
Avenue. The PCSB has studied these transactions carefully and concluded that when the effects of these transactions are accounted for, the school is
economically viable and financially strong. As the school unwinds its tax-advantaged transactions beginning in 2015, numerous financial measures will
strengthen. The Board of Trustees has an active Audit & Finance Committee that closely monitors the financial health for school by meeting at least
quarterly with school leadership.
50| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
APPENDIX D: APPROVED 2015-16 BUDGET
Income Statement
Account
Event
Revenue
01. Per Pupil Charter Payments
02. Per Pupil Facilities Allowance
03. Federal Entitlements
04. Other Government Funding/Grants
05. Private Grants and Donations
06. Activity Fees
07. Other Income (please describe in footnote)
Total Revenue
SY15-16
Future
17,916,150
3,471,360
825,440
1,220,727
1,354,700
199,284
669,969
25,657,630
Operating Expense
Personnel Salaries and Benefits
08. Principal/Executive Salary
09. Teachers Salaries
10. Teacher Aides/Assistance Salaries
11. Other Education Professionals Salaries
12. Business/Operations Salaries
13. Clerical Salaries
14. Custodial Salaries
15. Other Staff Salaries
16. Employee Benefits
17. Contracted Staff
18. Staff Development Expense
Total Personnel Salaries and Benefits
1,428,230
6,683,954
1,066,309
662,989
378,337
102,573
3,360,972
2,770,737
805,816
260,000
17,519,917
Direct Student Expense
19. Textbooks
20. Student Supplies and Materials
21. Library and Media Center Materials
22. Student Assessment Materials
23. Contracted Student Services
24. Miscellaneous Student Expense **
Total Direct Student Expense
100,000
260,426
150,000
200,000
90,600
801,026
Occupancy Expenses
25. Rent
26. Building Maintenance and Repairs
27. Utilities
28. Janitorial Supplies
29. Contracted Building Services
Total Occupancy Expenses
215,062
445,562
41,091
469,562
1,171,278
Office Expenses
30. Office Supplies and Materials
31. Office Equipment Rental and Maintenance
32. Telephone/Telecommunications
33. Legal, Accounting and Payroll Services
34. Printing and Copying
35. Postage and Shipping
36. Other
Total Office Expenses
106,093
200,405
102,106
349,702
3,254
26,339
297,500
1,085,399
General Expenses
37. Insurance
38. Transportation
39. Food Service
40. Administration Fee (to PCSB)
41. Management Fee
42. Other General Expense
43. Unforeseen Expenses
Total General Expenses
Total Ordinary Expenses
Interest, Depreciation
44. Depreciation Expense
45. Interest Payments
Total Interest, Depreciation
Total Expenses
Net Income
Adjustments To Cash Flow
Net Income
Operating Activities
Investing Activities
Financing Activities
Net cash increase for year
51| E.L. Haynes Public Charter School
74,834
174,809
647,122
256,576
398,043
1,551,384
22,129,003
1,372,231
1,774,720
3,146,951
25,275,955
381,676
381,676
754,655
430,168
(577,066)
989,433

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