OFFICIAL PROGRAM NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court

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OFFICIAL PROGRAM NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
June 10-13, 2009
Anaheim, CA
Celebrating Twenty Years of Drug Court
Twenty Years ago, a team of visionaries in
Miami, Florida, opened the doors of the
nation’s first Drug Court. Since then, Drug
Courts have become the fastest growing
and most highly regarded justice system
intervention in history. Now, with over 2,300
Adult, Juvenile, Family, DWI, Tribal, Reentry,
and Veterans Courts in all fifty states, U.S.
territories, and twenty nations, Drug Court
Professionals are leading a wave of change to
make our justice system more compassionate
and effective.
NADCP congratulates all Drug Court Professionals who have worked so hard for the past
two decades as well as the millions of people
whose lives have been touched and transformed through the power of Drug Court.
This conference celebrates you!
13585_NDCI_PCP_Fig2_FNL
5/5/09
8:38 AM
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Happy Birthday Drug Court!
Operational Drug Court Programs in the United States
2,301 drug courts…
a 7.2% increase from 2007!
Judge Goldstein and the First Drug Court Team
Here’s to Twenty More Years of Unprecedented Growth
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CORPORATE MEMBERS
Many thanks to the NADCP Corporate members
The NADCP Corporate Members give generously to support our efforts on behalf of drug courts everywhere.
Pioneer Members
Alcohol Monitoring Systems
Alkermes
Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics
Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Gold Members
OraSure Technologies
ThermoFisher Scientific
Premier Integrity Solutions
Bronze Members
Correctional Counseling, Inc.
Integrated Management Solutions
Lifesafer Interlock, Inc.
NOVX Systems
Smart Start
Varian
N A D C P We lc om e s O pi n i on s
NADCP welcomes the diversity of methods and
opinions shared through the interactive format
of this conference. NADCP does not necessarily
endorse all of the viewpoints expressed.
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NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
This Conference ha s B e e n M ad e P ossi ble Th rou gh th e G e n e r o u s Fi n a n c i a l Su pp o rt o f :
U.S. Department of Justice
And Throug h a Pa rt n e r sh i p Wi t h :
Office of National Drug Control Policy:
Executive Office of the President
of the United States
Drug Enforcement Administration
The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators at HHS-sponsored conferences do not necessarily
reflect the official policy of the Department of Health and Human Services or the Department of Justice; nor does mention of trade names, commercial
practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
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NADCP BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Thomas Alexander
Wanda Moore
San Diego, CA
Trenton, NJ
Hon. Barbara Brugnaux
Connie Payne
Terre Haute, IN
Frankfort, KY
Peter Carlisle
Hon. William Ray Price, Jr.
Honolulu, HI
Jefferson City, MO
Hon. John Creuzot
Hon. Robert Rancourt
Dallas, TX
Center City, MN
Hon. Rogelio Flores
Larry Robinson
Santa Maria, CA
Newport News, VA
Norma Jaeger
Terree Schmidt-Whelan, Ph.D.
Boise, ID
Tacoma, WA
Scott Henggeler, Ph.D.
Hon. Chuck Simmons, Chair
Charleston, SC
Greenville, SC
Earl Hightower
Hon. Keith Starrett
Los Angeles, CA
Hattiesburg, MS
Hon. Jamey Hueston
Lee Webber
Baltimore, MD
Honolulu, HI
Norma Jaeger
Hon. Robert Ziemian
Boise, ID
Boston, MA
EMERITUS MEMBERS
Hon. Melanie May
West Palm Beach, FL
Hon. Louis Presenza
Philadelphia, PA
Hon. Robert Russell
Buffalo, NY
Hon. Jeff Tauber
Berkeley, CA
Hon. Kent Lawrence
Athens, GA
Lars Levy
Morgan City, LA
Mike Loeffler
Bristow, OK
Attorney General
Patrick S. Lynch
Providence, RI
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NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS AND
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS
Room 315 on the 3rd floor of the Marriott is reserved
for AA, CA, or NA meetings throughout the conference.
This room is available to use 24 hours a day at your
choosing Wednesday through Saturday.
NADCP STAFF
Percy Brooks
West Huddleston
Registrar
Chief Executive Officer
Laquetta Butler
Linda Jalbert
Administrative Coordinator
Public Policy Advisor
Oriana Casadei
Clifford Jacobs
Associate Director of Conferences
Training Coordinator
Jennifer Columbel
Dana Jenkins
Director, Public Policy
Statewide Program Director
Kelly Curtis
Stephen Korda
Training Coordinator
Legislative Assistant
Janet Davis
Austine Long
Chief Financial Officer
Technical Assistance Director
Chris Deutsch
Jennifer Lubold
Associate Director of
Communications
Meeting Planner
Natalie Edwards
Training Coordinator
Leonora Fleming
Research Coordinator
Robert Foster
Associate Director of Membership
Carson Fox
NADCP Director of Operations
RESOURCE CONSULTANTS
Hon. Peggy Hora
Senior Judicial Fellow
Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey (ret.)
Senior Policy Analyst
Hon. William G. Meyer
Senior Judicial Fellow
Douglas Marlowe,
Ph.D., J.D.
Chief of Science, Law and Policy
Jannise Randall
Training Specialist
Frank Stewart
Special Assistant to the CEO
David Wallace
Director, National Center for DWI
Courts (NCDC)
Carolyn Hardin
Director, National Drug Court
Institute (NDCI)
Meghan M. Wheeler
DCPI Adult Director
The NADCP and NDCI staff provide technical assistance and training, host this annual training conference, provide advocacy, sponsor
research, disseminate information and provide a number of other services to the field throughout the year. We are indebted to our staff for
all their hard work.
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FEATURED GUESTS
6
Kelleigh Bannen
Louis Gossett, Jr.
Musician and Activist
Actor and Activist
Tommy Davidson
Tobey Maguire
Comedian and Actor
Actor
Dr. Carlo DiClemente
General Barry
McCaffrey (Ret.)
Robby Gordon
Martin Sheen
NASCAR Driver
Actor and Activist
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
California Sessions
The NADCP and CADCP have teamed up to bring
CA Drug Court professionals these CA specific sessions:
Proposition 36: Review of the Basics With Updates
Participants will learn the basics of Proposition 36 from experts at the local level. Topics will include the
fundamentals from treatment, court and supervision experts. The panel will also explore what the future
holds for Proposition 36. What are the challenges and how will they be met?
Proposition 36: Findings and Recommendations
The University of California, Los Angeles has evaluated Proposition 36 since inception almost eight years ago.
Participants will learn some of the key findings and recommendations specific to the fields of courts, treatment,
and supervision. Future areas of research will also be discussed.
What Makes a Difference in Drug Court
Participants will learn what role the court plays in the success of Proposition 36. Courts have implemented
several recommendations proposed by UCLA. Judges will share how these practices work in their court in
addition to their own strategies.
Other Highlights Include:
Community Courts in Action: Recent
Developments in California
Pre-Filing Dependency Family Preservation Court:
An Innovative Approach to Keep Families Together
• Understand how early and consistent collaboration can lead
•
•
•
•
•
to program development and expansion
• Learn how to be politically strategic in a controversial
environment to reach your project goals
DATA = Survival: California Drug Court
Cost Study and the Importance of Collecting
Meaningful Data
• Learn about the Drug Court Cost Self-Evaluation Tool (DC-CSET)
to enable courts to determine their own costs and benefits
• Discuss the collection and distributing of meaningful data
Hot Topics in California Collaborative Justice
Court Programs – Ask the Experts
• Learn the latest research, methods, and legislation affecting
collaborative justice courts in California
• Learn how to identify and work with the partners you need to
make your California collaborative justice court program effective
• Learn where available sources of funding are and how to get
it for your California collaborative justice court program
• Learn what works and what doesn’t in California collaborative
justice courts
*See program for further details
Learn what a Pre-File drug court is
Learn what components are essential for the best outcomes
Learn what cost savings are possible with Pre-Filing
Understand the legal basis for implementing a Pre-Filing drug court
Understand what it takes to implement a Pre-Filing drug court
Elder Abuse:
A New Frontier for Problem Solving Courts
Prop 63 – Mental Health Services Act:
Let’s Get the Funding for Mentally Ill Offenders!
• An overview of Prop-63 Mental Health Services Act’s current
funding initiatives and how these funds are dispersed
• How to be sure your Collaborative Court Programs are
represented at the MHSA table
• Working locally with your collaborative partners to secure Prop
63 funding with examples provided by three successful jurisdictions
• How to write successful proposals that allow for the implementation of Collaborative Court Programs (e.g. Veterans Courts and
Girls Court among others)
NEW SESSIONS
NADCP 15th Annual Training
Conference: On the Cutting Edge!
In NADCP’s ongoing effort to deliver the most
recent, cutting edge information on drug courts,
along with offering new, innovative presentations,
over 90 sessions in this year’s conference agenda
are new! These sessions are highlighted throughout
the program as
To qualify as “new,” sessions have either never
before appeared in an NADCP Training Conference,
or have not appeared in the last several years. Of
course, we’ve also responded to your requests
and brought back those sessions you want to
see year after year, updated with the most recent
information.
Enjoy the conference!
8
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Drug court professionals have a great story to tell!
NADCP helps you tell that story.
WE ARE YOUR VOICE!
Join NADCP and be a part of the largest organization in the nation
representing justice system, drug treatment and social service professionals.
An Individual Membership to NADCP costs only $60, but saves you $100 on registration
to the NADCP 16th Annual Training Conference on June 2nd-June 5th, 2010, in Boston,
Massachusetts! An Organizational Membership costs less than $60 per person (depending
on the type of organizational membership, see rates on back), but saves you $100 each on
registration to the NADCP 16th Annual Training Conference!
For More Information on the NADCP 16th Annual Training Conference:
Visit www.nadcp.org and click on NADCP 16th Annual Training Conference
IS YOUR VOICE!
Become a Member Today!
2009-10 MEMBERSHIP FORM
Membership year runs from July 1 - June 30
o Individual Membership
$60, July 1 through June 30
Print or Attach Business Card(s)
o 5 Member Organization
$275, July 1 through June 30
(up to five team members from
the same drug court)
o 10 Member Organization
$500, July 1 through June 30
(up to ten team members from
the same drug court)
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CONFERENCE AT-A-GLANCE
CONFERENCE AT-A-GLANCE
CONFERENCE AT-A-GLANCE
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CONFERENCE AT-A-GLANCE
(MAR)=Marriott Anaheim (HIL)=Hilton Anaheim
TUESDAY, JUNE 9
2:00 pm-7:00 pm
Registration Open
6:00 pm-6:30 pm
Speaker/Panelist/Moderator Orientation
Marquis Ballroom (MAR)
Elite 1 (MAR)
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10 – SKILLS BUILDING WORKSHOPS
7:30 am-7:00 pm
Registration Open
8:00 am-9:00 am
Continental Breakfast
9:00 am-12:00 pm
Skills Building Workshops
SB-1: Advances in Medication-Assisted Therapies for Opioid Dependence: How
Medication Can Help Drug Courts Reduce Recidivism and Improve Client Outcomes
OC Salon 1 (MAR)
SB-3: S
tarting and Growing a Drug Court Program in Current Economic Conditions
This workshop is broken into three segments:
(Basic) Drug Court 101
(Intermediate) Program Efficiency
(Advanced) Prescription Drugs of Abuse Testing
OC Salon 2 (MAR)
SB-5: Drug Endangered Children: Special Issues to Consider
OC Salon 3 (MAR)
SB-7: Criminal Thinking/Addict Thinking Treatment Matrix
OC Salon 4 (MAR)
SB-9: Case Management: Skills for Better Outcomes
Grand Ballroom A/B (MAR)
SB-11: The Next Generation of Sober Social Networking – An Innovative Collaboration
To Enhance Outcomes for Drug Court Participants and Graduates
Grand Ballroom C/D (MAR)
SB-13: Motivational Interviewing in the Courtroom
SB-15: Rediscovering Alcoholism, Addiction, and Dependence:
Re-energizing Treatment and Prevention
SB-17: Immigration Issues in Drug Court
SB-19: Reentry Courts
SB-21: Tribal Nations Forum
SB-23A: Managing Multiple Problem—Solving Court Dockets:
Spotlight on the Orange County Problem—Solving Courts
SB-25: ASAM PPC – 2R – Making it Real; Making it Work
SB-27: California Proposition 36: Building Bridges
12:00 pm-2:00 pm
Lunch on Your Own
12:00 pm-5:00 pm
State Coordinators’ Meeting
1:00 pm-4:00 pm
SB-23B: S
ee for Yourself: Visit the Orange County Community Court for a Tour
and Court Sessions (must have registered in SB23A to attend)
Marquis Ballroom (MAR)
Ballroom Foyer (MAR)
Grand Ballroom E (MAR)
Laguna A (HIL)
Capistrano A/B (HIL)
El Capitan A/B (HIL)
Huntington B (HIL)
Palos Verdes A/B (HIL)
Malibu (HIL)
Pacific Ballroom D (HIL)
Room 312 (MAR)
Orange County Community Court
Drug courts perform their duties without manifestation, by word or conduct, of bias or prejudice,
including, but not limited to, bias or prejudice based upon race, gender, national origin, disability, age,
sexual orientation, language or socioeconomic status.
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2:00 pm-5:00 pm
Skills Building Workshops
SB-2: SCRAM Program Development and Value Add to Drug Courts
OC Salon 1 (MAR)
SB-4: Show me the Money! A Guide to Federal and Private Funding for Drug Courts
—and How to Improve Your Skills in Writing Grant Applications
OC Salon 2 (MAR)
SB-6: Building Interventions for Marijuana Dependent Young Adults in Drug Court
OC Salon 3 (MAR)
SB-8: Partners in Change: How to Facilitate Change Through Twelve Steps
OC Salon 4 (MAR)
SB-10: Consensus and Evidence-Based Practices For Treatment of Persons
with Co-Occurring Disorders
Grand Ballroom A/B (MAR)
SB-12: Getting the Most out of your Evaluation: How to use Data to Help Your
Drug Court Program
Grand Ballroom C/D (MAR)
SB-14: Are Gang Members Appropriate Candidates For Drug Court?
SB-16: Ethical Issues for Judges and Attorneys in Problem Solving Courts
SB-18: MET/CBT 5
SB-20: Sex Addiction
SB-22: Getting the Most out of Your State Association, 2:00-3:30pm
Congress of State Drug Court Associations, 3:45-5:45pm
SB-24: Drug Testing 101 – The Fundamentals
SB-26: Sustaining the Gain – Real Life after Graduation
SB-28: California Proposition 36 – Building Bridges
2:00 pm-7:00 pm
Exhibit Hall Open
5:30 pm-6:00 pm
Speaker/Panelist/Moderator Orientation
6:00 pm-6:30 pm
Opening Ceremony in Exhibit Hall
Grand Ballroom E (MAR)
Laguna A (HIL)
Capistrano A/B (HIL)
El Capitan A/B (HIL)
Huntington B (HIL)
Palos Verdes A/B (HIL)
Malibu (HIL)
Pacific Ballroom D (HIL)
Marquis Ballroom (MAR)
Elite 1 (MAR)
Marquis Ballroom (MAR)
THURSDAY, JUNE 11 – ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
7:30 am-5:00 pm
Registration
Marquis Ballroom (MAR)
8:00 am-9:00 am
Continental Breakfast in Exhibit Hall
Marquis Ballroom (MAR)
7:30 am-5:00 pm
Exhibit Hall Open
Marquis Ballroom (MAR)
8:00 am-10:00 am
Opening Session
Platinum Ballroom (MAR)
10:00 am-10:30 am Break in Exhibit Hall
Marquis Ballroom (MAR)
10:30 am-11:45 am Concurrent Workshops, Session A
12
A-1: Grant Writing
A-2: Screening, Assessment and Triage: Application of the SAFERR Model in FDTC
Grand Ballroom A/B (MAR)
A-3: Why Use Strength-Based Assessment? Benefits To Youth and Program Staff
Grand Ballroom C/D (MAR)
A-4: Treatment is the Key: Address Drug Abuse in Criminal Justice Settings
Grand Ballroom G/H (MAR)
A-5: Working with the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Drug Court Participant
A-6: Evaluating a Pre-Filing Dependency Family Preservation Court: Results and
Recommendations from an Innovative Program
Laguna A (HIL)
OC Salon 2 (MAR)
Palos Verdes A/B (HIL)
A-7: Marijuana: It’s Impact on the Brain
A-8: Incentives and Sanctions in Juvenile Drug Court
A-9: The Smoking Gun – Ethical Triggers in a Drug Court Setting
A-10: The Academy DWI Courts – How Model DWI Courts Do It
OC Salon 1 (MAR)
A-11: The Role of the Prosecutor in Drug Court
OC Salon 3 (MAR)
A-12: Interpretation of Opiate Results
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Grand Ballroom E (MAR)
Grand Ballroom J/K (MAR)
Santa Monica (HIL)
Avila A/B (HIL)
A-13: Evidence-Based Results of SCRAM Programs
A-14: Domestic Violence Courts: National Models and Promising Practices
A-15: The Role of Expressive Therapies in Problem—Solving Courts
A-16: Development and Operation of a Girls Drug Court A-17: Methamphetamine and Its Power Impact on the Basic Brain
A-18: Immigration Issues
A-19: Judicial Immunity
A-20: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders
San Simeon B (HIL)
A-21: Drug Treatment Courts Finally Get the International Attention they Deserve
San Simeon A (HIL)
A-22: Community Courts in Action: Recent Developments in California
A-23: Using Drug Court to Save Our Young African American Males
12:00 pm-1:45 pm
Lunch on your own
1:45 pm-3:00 pm
Concurrent General Sessions
CG-1: Reentry/Drug Court: The Next Generation of Drug Court
Grand Ballroom E (MAR)
CG-2: Gender Matters: Creating Services for Women
Grand Ballroom F (MAR)
CG-3: From Concept to Real-World Practice: Medicaton-Assisted Recovery
for Alcohol Dependence in the Drug Courts
CG-4: Ensuring Sustainability: Ensuring Funding for your Drug Court
in Tough Economic Times
2:45 pm-3:15 pm
Break in Exhibit Hall
3:15 pm-4:30 pm
Concurrent Workshops, Session B
B-1: Building Teams to Last
B-2: I am Woman, Help Me Soar!!
OC Salon 4 (MAR)
Malibu (HIL)
Pacific Ballroom B (HIL)
El Capitan A/B (HIL)
California Ballroom A (HIL)
Pacific Ballroom A (HIL)
California Ballroom B (HIL)
Grand Ballroom F (MAR)
Elite 1 (MAR)
Platinum Ballroom (MAR)
Pacific Ballroom B (HIL)
Marquis Ballroom (MAR)
Laguna A (HIL)
Grand Ballroom A/B (MAR)
B-3: Creating Support Systems, Eliminating Excuses and Removing Road Block to Recovery Grand Ballroom C/D (MAR)
B-4: MET/CBT 5
B-5: The Impact of the “War on Drugs” and Drug Courts
B-6: A Tale of Two Family Drug Courts: “Show me the Money!”
B-7: Alcohol: Its Impact on the Brain
B-8: Incentives in Adult Drug Court
B-9: Effective Community Supervision in Drug Court
B-10: Developing a DWI Court – Getting the “Buy-in” from Your Community
OC Salon 1 (MAR)
B-11: Being Effective Counsel in Drug Court
OC Salon 3 (MAR)
B-12: Overcoming Budgetary Constraints
B-13: Managing Drug Testing Beyond the Basics and Understanding “What’s New”
B14: Reentry/Drug Court from Different Perspectives
B-15: Co-Occurring Disorders: Science and Treatment Stratetgies
B-16: From Homeless Court Program to a Response for Returning Veterans
B-17: Meth Manufacturing
B-18: Moving the Latina Client Successfully Through the Drug Court
B-19: Sentencing Reform: What the Future Holds
B-20: H
istorical Trauma & the American Indian: Rekindling the Sacred Fires
for Healing, Justice and Peace
San Simeon B (HIL)
B-21: Accepting Higher Risk and Higher Need Offenders in Drug Treatment Courts
San Simeon A (HIL)
www.nadcp.org
Grand Ballroom G/H (MAR)
OC Salon 2 (MAR)
Palos Verdes A/B (HIL)
Grand Ballroom E (MAR)
Grand Ballroom J/K (MAR)
Santa Monica (HIL)
Avila A/B (HIL)
OC Salon 4 (MAR)
Malibu (HIL)
Pacific Ballroom B (HIL)
El Capitan A/B (HIL)
California Ballroom A (HIL)
Pacific Ballroom A (HIL)
California Ballroom B (HIL)
Become a Member Today
13
B-22: DATA – Survival: California Drug Court Cost Study and the Importance of
Collecting Meaningful Data Grand Ballroom F (MAR)
B-23: Spirituality and Recovery for African-Americans
4:45 pm-5:30 pm
Discipline Specific Breakouts
Treatment Providers – Adults
Grand Ballroom A/B (MAR)
Treatment Providers – Juvenile
Grand Ballroom C/D (MAR)
Tribal Judges
Elite 1 (MAR)
Grand Ballroom E (MAR)
Tribal Treatment Providers
Tribal Coordinators
Tribal Defense Attorneys
Prosecutors
OC Salon 1 (MAR)
Defense Attorneys
OC Salon 2 (MAR)
Researchers and Evaluators
OC Salon 3 (MAR)
State Coordinators
Administrators/Coordinators
Pacific Ballroom A (HIL)
Child Protection Services
Pacific Ballroom B (HIL)
Community Supervision/Probation Services Adult Courts
California Ballroom A (HIL)
Community Supervision/Probation Services Juvenile Courts
California Ballroom B (HIL)
Guardian Ad Litem/Court Appointed Advocate
Judges – Adult Courts
Judges – Juvenile Courts
Judges – Family Courts
Law Enforcement
5:45 pm-6:30 pm
Membership Meeting
Grand Ballroom F (MAR)
Grand Ballroom G/H (MAR)
Grand Ballroom J/K (MAR)
OC Salon 4 (MAR)
El Capitan A/B (HIL)
Malibu (HIL)
Palos Verdes A/B (HIL)
Laguna A (HIL)
Santa Monica (HIL)
Grand Ballroom C/D (MAR)
CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT
All attendees of the NADCP 15th Annual Training Conference will receive a certificate of
attendance and schedule of workshops. These certificates may be submitted to the board
or entity through which you normally receive continuing education credit. The amount of
credit you receive is at that board’s discretion and will be based upon your participation
in certain conference offerings. Since not all states pre-approve hours in advance for
attendance at this conference, we cannot assure you of a specific number of credit hours
for your attendance at the conference. NAADAC has certified NADCP as an Approved
Education Provider.
14
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
FRIDAY, JUNE 12
7:00 am -7:45 am
New Members and First Time Attendee’s Breakfast
7:30 am-5:00 pm
Registration Open Marquis Ballroom (MAR)
7:00 am -8:00 am
Continental Breakfast in Exhibit Hall Marquis Ballroom (MAR)
7:00 am-1:00 pm
Exhibit Hall Open Marquis Ballroom (MAR)
8:00 am-10:00 am
Opening Session Platinum Ballroom (MAR)
10:00 am-10:30 am Break in Exhibit Hall Pavia (HIL)
Marquis Ballroom (MAR)
10:30 am-11:45 am Concurrent Workshops, Session C
C-1: Psychopharmacology C-2: Family Treatment Court Research: Developmental Needs and Practice Implications C-3: Critical Elements of a Juvenile Treatment Court Program: What Works
in Counties in Four States Grand Ballroom C/D (MAR)
C-4: Utilizing the Matrix Model in Drug Court – An Evidence Based Approach Grand Ballroom G/H (MAR)
C-5: Engaging Minority Families
C-6: Evidence Based Programming for Your Clients
C-7: Prescription Drug Medications Grand Ballroom E (MAR)
C-8: Sanctions in Adult Drug Court Grand Ballroom J/K (MAR)
C-9: Lessons Learned: EBP in the Real World of Corrections
C-10: Discovering the Real Problem: Effective Assessment in DUI/DWI Courts OC Salon 1 (MAR)
C-11: Ethical Issues in Drug Court for Attorneys
OC Salon 3 (MAR)
C-12: It Takes a Village – the Relationship between Courts and Treatment Providers C-13: Expanding your Courts Drug Testing Toolbox C-14: Developing a Community Court: How to Keep a Project Moving Forward
in a Challenging Environment Laguna A (HIL)
Grand Ballroom A/B (MAR)
OC Salon 2 (MAR)
Palos Verdes A/B (HIL)
Santa Monica (HIL)
Avila A/B (HIL)
OC Salon 4 (MAR)
Malibu (HIL)
C-15: Conquering the Fear of Coloring Outside the Lines C-16: Making Proposition 36 Work in Rural California: El Dorado County’s Solution C-17: Effective Treatment for Methamphetamine Dependence C-18: Cultural Issues and Perceptions with Latinos C-19: Overview of the FBI NICS Section and Ensuring Federal Firearms
Prohibitions for Drug Cases California Ballroom B (HIL)
C-20: Multisystemic Family Therapy and Tribal Wellness (Drug) Court:
Implementing an Evidence Based Practice on the Reservation San Simeon B (HIL)
C-21: Development of Drug Courts in Latin America San Simeon A (HIL)
C-22: Hot Topics in California Collaborative Justice Court Programs – Ask the Experts C-23: African-American Women and Girls in Drug Court 11:45 am-1:30 pm Lunch on your own
1:30 pm-2:45 pm Concurrent General Sessions
CG-5: Federal Confidentiality Laws and Drug Court Grand Ballroom E (MAR)
CG-6: Veterans Treatment Court Grand Ballroom F (MAR)
CG-7: California Mental Health Laws Pacific Ballroom C (HIL)
2:00 pm-5:00 pm Conference Tapes/CDs Available for Sale www.nadcp.org
Pacific Ballroom B (HIL)
El Capitan A/B (HIL)
California Ballroom A (HIL)
Pacific Ballroom A (HIL)
Grand Ballroom F (MAR)
Elite 1 (MAR)
Marquis Ballroom (MAR)
Become a Member Today
15
3:00 pm-4:15 pm Concurrent Workshops, Session D
D-1: Targeting: Who Gets In? D-2: The Unbroken Cycle: A DEC Perspective for Drug Court Practice
Grand Ballroom A/B (MAR)
D-3: Developing Accountability in the Lives of Youth: Staff and Youth Perspectives
on Essential Elements in a Juvenile Treatment Court Grand Ballroom C/D (MAR)
D-4: Cognitive Behavioral Interventions Grand Ballroom G/H (MAR)
D-5: Cultural Proficiency and the Ten Key Components
D-6: Performance Measures/Best Practices D-7: Club Drugs D-8: Incentives and Sanctions in Family Dependency Treatment Court D-9: Treatment 101: What Law Enforcement Officers Need to Know
D-10: DWI Court Building Blocks – The Guiding Principles OC Salon 1 (MAR)
D-11: Ethics for Treatment Providers OC Salon 3 (MAR)
OC Salon 4 (MAR)
Laguna A (HIL)
OC Salon 2 (MAR)
Palos Verdes A/B (HIL)
Grand Ballroom E (MAR)
Grand Ballroom J/K (MAR)
Santa Monica (HIL)
D-13: The Impact of Daily Recovery Text Messages on Drug Court Participants D-14: Federal Reentry Courts in an Evidence Based Practice Context
Malibu (HIL)
D-15: Genetics and Treatment Dispositions in Drug Court for Judges Pacific Ballroom B (HIL)
D-16: Implementing a Psychiatric Clinic in an Adult Drug Court D-17: Meth Recovery: Our Story D-18: Working with Latino Clients D-19: Criminal Defense: Representing the Mentally Ill D-20: Ensuring a Healthy Team San Simeon B (HIL)
D-21: IADTC Annual General Meeting (open to all) San Simeon A (HIL)
D-22: Pre-Filing Dependency Family Preservation Court: An Innovative Approach
to Keeping Families Together D-23: Engaging the African American Family in Drug Court
El Capitan A/B (HIL)
California Ballroom A (HIL)
Pacific Ballroom A (HIL)
California Ballroom B (HIL)
Grand Ballroom F (MAR)
Elite 1 (MAR)
STATE ASSOCIATION MEETINGS
State association meetings have been scheduled throughout this conference. They will
be listed in the day’s ancillary activities. Please check to see if your state’s association
has scheduled a gathering. Do you want to schedule a state association meeting? A limited
number of “Pop-up” rooms and sessions may be available! Just approach any NADCP/NDCI
staff member and ask them to get you in touch with Jennifer Lubold who will assign you
to a room.
16
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
4:30 pm-5:45 pm Concurrent Workshops, Session E
E-1: Developing Procedures and Supporting Documents and Forms
to Help Your Court Conform to the 10 Key Components Laguna A (HIL)
E-2: Psychological and Social Needs of Children Impacted by Addiction Grand Ballroom A/B (MAR)
E-3: Year 7: Sustaining Drug Court after Implementation Grand Ballroom C/D (MAR)
E-4: Adolescent CRA-Learn the Power of this Evidence Based Treatment Grand Ballroom G/H (MAR)
E-5: Working with 18-to 25-Year Olds E-6: Consumers’ Perspectives on Drug Courts
E-7: Opiates and Prescription Drugs E-8: Motivational Incentives in Drug Court E-9: Supervision in the Community E-10: Review of DWI Court Research OC Salon 1 (MAR)
E-11: Ethics in Family Dependency Treatment Court OC Salon 3 (MAR)
E-14: Specific Challenges and Opportunities in Working with Veterans Court Malibu (HIL)
E-15: Love, Lust and Lies: Exposing Sex Addiction in Drug Court Participants Pacific Ballroom B (HIL)
E-16: E
mpowering Young Adults through Positive Socialization Events
in Problem Solving Courts E-17: A Country in Meth Crisis – Could Drug Treatment Courts Make the Difference? E-18: El Impacto de la Funcion Judicial en el Exito de Drug Court (en Espanol) E-19: Criminal Law Update E-20: L earning from Native Traditions: Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts
Journey of One Tribe: Southern Ute E-22: Elder Abuse Cases: A Frontier for Problem—Solving Courts E-23: African-American Focused Reentry 6:30 pm-8:30 pm Celebrating 20 Years of Drug Court – Gala Reception
Evening Ancillary Meetings by Invitation OC Salon 2 (MAR)
Palos Verdes A/B (HIL)
Grand Ballroom E (MAR)
Grand Ballroom J/K (MAR)
Santa Monica (HIL)
El Capitan A/B (HIL)
California Ballroom A (HIL)
Pacific Ballroom A (HIL)
California Ballroom B (HIL)
San Simeon B (HIL)
Grand Ballroom F (MAR)
Elite 1 (MAR)
Lanai Deck East, 2nd Floor (HIL)
Various Locations
TAPE/CD SALES ENSURE THAT YOU DON’T MISS A THING!
With the number of sessions to choose from, it is inevitable you’ll be torn between two
or three that run concurrently. But you don’t have to miss a thing! Video footage of all
plenary sessions and audio cassettes or CDs of workshops will be made available for
purchase beginning Friday, June 12, after 2:00 pm. Detailed order forms are available in
your conference tote bag.
This is a service to conference attendees. NADCP does not make a profit on tape/CD sales.
www.nadcp.org
Become a Member Today
17
SATURDAY, JUNE 13
7:30 am-12:00 pm Registration Open Marquis Ballroom (MAR)
7:30 am-12:00 pm Conference Tapes/CDs Available for Sale Marquis Ballroom (MAR)
7:30 am-8:00 am Continental Breakfast 8:00 am-9:15 am Concurrent General Sessions
CG-8: Doing the Due Grand Ballroom E (MAR)
CG-9: MYTHBUSTERS-Treatment & Drug Testing: Is it Fact or Fiction? Grand Ballroom F (MAR)
CG-10: MAT – Medically Assisted Treatment for Opioid Dependence CG-11: Best Practices in Adult Drug Courts: Reduce Recidivism and Costs! 9:30 am-11:30 am Closing General Session 11:45 am-1:00 pm Concurrent Workshops, Session F
F-1: Building and Maintaining Enduring Alumni Groups F-2: FDTC: An Alternative to Termination of Parental Rights Grand Ballroom A/B (MAR)
F-3: Promoting Best Practices with LGBTQ Youth in Juvenile Drug Courts Grand Ballroom C/D (MAR)
F-4: CRA for Adults – Learn the Power of this Evidence Based Treatment! Grand Ballroom G/H (MAR)
F-5: How Faith Can Support Recovery in Drug Court
F-6: Improving Treatment Effects: The Critical Role of Probation F-7: Cocaine F-8: Theory to Practice F-9: Tackling Supervision Issues in Rural Communities F-10: Supervision: It’s More Than Office Visits and Court Appearances F-11: Ethical Issues for Judges in Drug Court OC Salon 3 (MAR)
F-14: HOPE OC Salon 4 (MAR)
F-15: Understanding and Implementing 12-Step Programs for Drug Courts F-16: Certificates of Assurance: Gateway to New Drug Court Development and Monitoring F-17: Your Personal Tour of the National Meth Center Website
and What It Can Do for You California Ballroom A (HIL)
F-19: Future Legal Challenges and Opportunities California Ballroom B (HIL)
F-20: Incorporating Culture/Spirituality into Your Program: Pros and Cons San Simeon B (HIL)
F-21: Drug Court Opportunities in the Eastern Caribbean Countries
San Simeon A (HIL)
F-22: Prop 63 – Mental Health Services Act: Let’s Get that Funding
for Mentally Ill Offenders! Grand Ballroom F (MAR)
F-23: Working with African-American Populations from the Bench
Elite 1 (MAR)
1:00 pm Conference Adjourns
Ballroom Foyer (MAR)
OC Ballroom (MAR)
Pacific Ballroom B (HIL)
Platinum Ballroom (MAR)
Laguna A (HIL)
OC Salon 2 (MAR)
Palos Verdes A/B (HIL)
Grand Ballroom E (MAR)
Grand Ballroom J/K (MAR)
Santa Monica (HIL)
OC Salon 1 (MAR)
Pacific Ballroom B (HIL)
El Capitan A/B (HIL)
MENTAL HEALTH COURT – CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS FORUM
2:00 pm-6:00 pm
18
Registration Open NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Pacific Ballroom Registration Desk, (HIL)
TRAINING TRACKS
TRACK 1
TRACK 4
Ready, Set, Go!
Implementation of Your Drug Court
The Power of Evidence-Based Treatment
Every day public health and public safety partnerships are
formed to develop drug courts. Many communities already have
one type of drug court and now want to venture into another part
of the drug court arena; others are implementing a drug court for
the first time. If this describes your community, this is the track
for you. It will address the considerations and partnerships that
must be made in the early stages of planning and implementing
a new adult, juvenile, or family dependency treatment drug
court. It will also provide the scientific principles and best
practices to ensure that your new drug court is built on a solid
foundation to ensure success and sustainability.
TRACK 2
Raising the Bar: Taking Family
Dependency Treatment Courts to the
Next Level
Family Dependency Treatment Courts, also called Family Drug
Courts, focus on child welfare cases that involve an allegation of
child abuse or neglect related to substance abuse using the drug
court model. As a result, there is better collaboration between
agencies and better compliance with treatment resulting in
improved outcomes for the children in these cases. Learn from
professionals in this field on what is working for them, as well as
what steps must be taken to get to the next level.
TRACK 3
Raising the Bar: Taking Juvenile Drug
Courts to the Next Level
Juvenile drug courts are a critical part of every juvenile justice
system. They provide a unique partnership that is focused on
the future of our communities. These courts have issues unique
to the population they serve. What is the best way to engage
juveniles and their families? What is considered developmentally
appropriate, gender-specific, culturally relevant, and evidencebased treatment? What roles do schools and the faith community
play? Whether your juvenile drug court has been in operation
for one year or more, this track is for you. Learn from fellow
practitioners as well as subject matter experts about the latest
research and effective approaches to dealing with adolescent
populations.
www.nadcp.org
This track debunks the myths of treatment and provides you
with an insider’s view of what works and what does not work
when treating substance abuse and mental health issues. Do
you ever wonder what the research really means or why certain
approaches do not work? Then this track is for you! This track will
highlight the innovative, evidence-based treatment approaches
that are available to the treatment community.
TRACK 5
Cultural Competency: More Than
Awareness
Culture is everywhere around us. It is how we dress, what we
choose to eat, and what music we enjoy. It shapes our past,
present, and future. It is essential to recognize and understand
the culture of our drug court participants in order to shape
their future. It follows that we will enhance our effectiveness
by becoming culturally competent. It is so simple to see, but so
challenging to implement. This track will not only focus on the
“seeing,” but also provide the latest in practice and research on
the “implementation.”
TRACK 6
The Facts and Nothing but the Facts:
Research to Practice
Do not let your drug court suffer because you do not understand
how to use evaluations to your advantage. Increasingly,
researchers are learning more about what works in a drug
court and why. Fostering partnership with practitioners and
researchers is critical toward improving drug court outcomes.
This expands empirical information about the long-term impact
of drug courts on recidivism, drug use, employment, and other
social factors. Don’t miss the opportunity to learn how to
improve your program measurement and outcomes.
Become a Member Today
19
TRACK 7
TRACK 10
Keeping Ahead of the Curve:
Knowing the Universe of Drugs
DWI Courts
Drug court participants are very sophisticated consumers of
their drug of choice. They select from a myriad of drugs whose
effects are widely varied. Although it is critical for treatment
providers to understand the effects of these drugs, all drug court
professionals need to be trained in their impact on supervision,
case management, drug testing and treatment planning. Learn
the latest in pharmacology, treatment approaches, and research
findings to enhance programming and improve partnerships in
your community.
We are seeing significant increases in the number of jurisdictions
that have implemented a DWI court or added DWI offenders
to their drug court. If your court is considering adding DWI
defendants or starting a DWI court, then this track is for you. The
success of the drug court model in other settings has led many
court systems to consider this often difficult and challenging
population. Participants in this track will gain an increased
understanding of the principles specific to DWI as well as how to
modify their current operations to include this population.
TRACK 11
TRACK 8
The Good, The Bad, and The Effective:
Re-visiting Incentives and Sanctions
Incentives and sanctions are essential to every drug court. When
properly used, they are a powerful tool for improving client
behavior and outcomes. Drug courts achieve better outcomes
when practitioners understand the science behind behavior
management. The research is clear; managing participant behavior
includes the development of graduated and individualized
motivational strategies as well as consequences to hold
participants accountable for failing to meet programmatic goals.
Incentives and sanctions imposed in the courtroom have an impact
not only on the individual appearing before the judge, but also
on the other drug court members present. Participants will leave
these sessions not only with an increased understanding of the
science, but also better equipped to develop an incentives and
sanctions plan that will yield better results.
TRACK 9
Law Enforcement: Striking the Balance
Law enforcement and community supervision partnerships are
critical to any successful drug court. This track focuses on the
importance of strengthening relationships with law enforcement
and community supervision and assists officers in better
understanding their role in the drug court arena. The track will
feature courts with strong linkages to law enforcement and
community supervision personnel.
20
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Legal and Ethical Issues in ProblemSolving Courts
Protecting the due process rights of the participants in drug
court is a foundation of drug courts. Practitioners in problemsolving courts are often faced with situations unique to the
problem-solving court arena. This session is designed to provide
some of the questions practitioners should ask, while also
providing the answers to many of those difficult questions.
Whether you are a new problem-solving court professional, or
you’ve been with drug courts for many years, this track includes
sessions on the cutting edge of what every drug court and other
problem-solving court practitioner should know.
TRACK 12 AND 13
Science and Technology:
Our Partners in the Commercial Sector
Private enterprise offers many necessary tools for drug court
operations. From unique methods assisting with community
supervision to a variety of drug testing options, from researchproven ways to use medically-assisted treatment to successful
treatment techniques, our partners in the private sector are a
critical asset to drug courts’ success. These sessions apprise
practitioners of new developments in science and technology
and provide a perspective on the concerns that every drug court
should have in selecting the right tools of the trade. Although the
information presented represents the viewpoint of presenters
and do not intend to be viewed as NADCP’s endorsement of any
particular product, these tracks will provide the practitioner with
a wealth of information in order to become a wise consumer of
products and services intended for the drug court field.
TRACK 14
TRACK 18
Problem Solving Courts? Not a Problem!
Working with the Latino Community:
Meeting the Challenge
As the number of drug courts increases in the United States and
abroad, practitioners are seeing individuals who are not only
drug addicted, but who also suffer from a host of other problems.
As a result, the drug court model is being adapted to enhance
and address the complex needs of various special populations.
This track offers a look into a variety of innovative problemsolving courts from around the nation.
Drug courts reflect the communities in which they are located.
Addressing the needs of the Latino population goes well beyond
dealing with communication barriers. Culture, residency status,
and employability are among the many factors that present drug
court practitioners an extra challenge when working with these
clients. This track is designed to help practitioners working with
the Latino community meet that challenge.
TRACK 15
Advanced Treatment Issues
One size definitely does not fit all. As in many things, this is so
true in effective drug and alcohol treatment. This track identifies a
variety of treatment methods, along with insight into some specific
and complex issues with which many drug court clients struggle.
TRACK 16
Innovations in Problem-Solving Courts
Since the inception of the drug court program in Miami-Dade
County, Florida, drug courts have spread to every state and
territory in the United States and several countries. Other
successful problem-solving courts have also been implemented,
some using the drug court model. This track offers the problemsolving court practitioner a look into some of the most unique
and watched problem-solving courts throughout the nation.
TRACK 17
Mining the Mysteries of Meth
Whatever you call it—crystal, ice, bikers’ coffee—
methamphetamine is possibly the fastest growing drug of
choice among those entering drug court today. For drug court
professionals, methamphetamine represents a unique and
daunting challenge requiring innovative new approaches and
partnerships. This track will provide strategies for increasing the
effectiveness of law enforcement and community supervision
efforts, information on the pharmacology of methamphetamine
and effective treatment protocols for responding to drug
endangered children, and approaches for community-wide
interventions. Whether you have witnessed a meth explosion in
your community for the last twenty years or just for the first time,
this session will provide you with the latest in practice, policy,
and science to ensure that you have the tools and knowledge
needed to effectively intervene with methamphetamine users.
www.nadcp.org
TRACK 19
Legal Issues in and beyond ProblemSolving Courts
For attorneys practicing in problem-solving courts, the legal
issues are multi-faceted. The sessions in this track focus on
topics of interest within problem-solving courts, but also stretch
far beyond the problem-solving court arena. From judicial
immunity to sentencing reform, from issues involving criminal
defense to firearms possession, these sessions are designed to
answer some of the most complex questions for the attorneys
and judges in problem-solving courts.
TRACK 20
Learning from Native Traditions:
Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts
Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts are profound expressions of
sovereign, self-determining nations. Such courts have become
an important part of a long, often perilous, and amazing Nation
rebuilding process that began for American Indian, Alaska
Native, and Native Hawaiian communities after centuries of
war, oppression, and resistance. Consequently, the impact of a
tribal drug court is complex and multi-faceted affecting multigenerational attitudes and perceptions about alcohol and other
drugs, addressing historical trauma and unresolved grief, acting
as a tool to restore tribal values, expanding tribal justice systems,
improving state-tribal and federal-tribal relationships, and restoring
individuals to their rightful place as contributing members to
the tribal community. Sessions in the tribal track will convey the
complexities and nuances of Tribal Healing/Wellness Courts and
contain useful information for both state and tribal practitioners.
Become a Member Today
21
TRACK 21
FOR ATTORNEYS AND JUDGES!!
The NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training
Conference includes an unprecedented
number of legal sessions. Sessions include
topics on Ethics, Immigration, Due Process,
Judicial Immunity, Representing the Mentally
Ill, Prosecutor’s Role in Drug Court, Defense
Attorney’s Role in Drug Cour t, Federal
Confidentiality Laws, and much more! With two
tracks devoted to legal sessions, along with
several Skills Building Sessions and Concurrent
General Sessions, this year’s conference is
an even greater tool for the lawyer or judge
working in a problem-solving court.
Please check with the Continuing Education
booth in the Registration area to get more
information on possible CLE credit for your
attendance.
Thanks for all your hard work in the drug court field!
International Drug Treatment Court
Movement: Getting a Boost
After years of neglect by international drug control organizations,
the drug treatment court approach has finally been fully
endorsed by the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB),
the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), and
the World Health Organization (WHO). This will make it easier
for countries intending to or in the process of establishing
drug treatment courts to get them acknowledged as part of
the strategic framework for treatment within national drug
control policies. Drug treatment court pioneers from around
the world will share the very latest progress which includes the
International Association of Drug Treatment Courts’ (IADTC)
mission, vision and belief statements as well as its international
agenda for the years to come.
TRACK 22
Problem-Solving Courts in California
As part of the partnership between the California Association of
Drug Court Professionals, the California Administrative Office of the
Courts, and the National Association of Drug Court Professionals,
this track concentrates on issues specific to the drug court and
other problem-solving court practitioner from California. From drug
courts to reentry courts to mental health courts, California has
been a leader in the field of problem-solving justice. Come learn
from experts across the state on best practices!
TRACK 23
African American Clients: Improving
Services and Outcomes
This track is a necessity for problem-solving practitioners looking
to improve outcomes with African American clients. Experts from
around the nation address best practices, cultural competency,
treatment approaches and more.
22
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
WEDNESDAY
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10
Registration Open
7:30 am-7:00 pm
Continental Breakfast
8:00 am-9:00 am
Skills-Building Workshops
9:00 am-12:00 pm
Lunch on your own
12:00 pm-2:00pm
Skills-Building Workshops
2:00 pm-5:00 pm
Exhibit Hall Open
2:00 pm-7:00 pm
Opening Ceremony
6:00 pm-6:30 pm
*HDTV Giveaway*
WEDNESDAY
NOTES
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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10
SKILLS BUILDING WORKSHOPS
MORNING SESSIONS
9:00 am-12:00 noon
SB-1 Orange County Ballroom, Salon 1, Marriott
Advances in Medication-Assisted
Therapies for Opioid Dependence: How
Medication Can Help Drug Courts Reduce
Recidivism and Improve Client Outcomes
In the past 15 years, science has revealed ways addiction
can affect people’s brain functioning and decision-making.
This groundbreaking research has led to unprecedented
developments in the overall treatment of addictions, and the
use of medication as part of the treatment plan.
This session will discuss the benefits and limitations of
medication-assisted treatment, and will focus specifically on
unique medication-assisted treatment models within the criminal
justice system, and how these models can help address criminal
justice concerns such as recidivism, jail overcrowding, and current
fiscal challenges. Growth in prescription drug dependence is
outpacing many other substances throughout the US, in particular
prescription opioids. Come learn and engage with three county
partnerships that have taken unique approaches to addressing
these public safety and public health concerns.
Tamara J. Bartek
Coordinator
Fresh Start Program
Fairfield Co. Municipal Court
Lancaster, Ohio
Kimberly Eaton
Director
Franklin County Day Reporting Center
Chambersburg, Pennsylvania
Sheriff David Phalen
Sheriff
Fairfield County, Ohio
Christopher Pick
Director, Research & Business Development
Health Analytics
Columbia, Maryland
Rhonda Myers
Associate Director
Fairfield County Alcohol, Drug Addiction,
and Mental Health Services Board
Lancaster, Ohio
SB-3 Orange County Ballroom, Salon 2, Marriott
Starting and Growing a Drug Court
Program in Current Economic Conditions
This session is broken into three segments: Basic, Intermediate,
and Advanced
(Basic) Drug Court 101
In the early stages of planning a drug court? Assessing whether a
drug court program will be the right system for your community?
Join Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics in a beginner level workshop
to discuss issues ranging from program assessment, resources,
funding sources, cross-functional coordination, and setting up the
foundation to your new drug court. Speaker and drug court expert
Hon. Karen Freeman-Wilson will discuss the major concerns and
details when first starting up a new drug court program.
Learning Objectives
• Recognize first steps in establishing a drug court program;
• Understand funding, resources, and grant application;
• Explore tools for brand new programs;
• Understand leveraging your community for program support.
Hon. Karen Freeman-Wilson
Judge (ret.)
Freeman-Wilson & Shannon-Lewis, LLC
Gary, Indiana
(Intermediate) Program Efficiency
Are you frustrated with the lack of efficiency in your drug court
program? Do your manual billing system, drug testing records,
and client data bog your work day down? Learn how testing
automation linked with electronic data and case management
can turn your creaky system into a well-oiled engine. From intake
to graduation, Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics in partnership
with Integrated Management Solutions can improve overall
workflow, no matter what stage your program is in. As proven
with hundreds of court facilities across the country, Siemens
Healthcare is taking drug courts to the next level, together.
Learning Objectives
• Understand how to achieve efficiency in your program
with drug testing;
• Utilize the tools of automation and information management
to streamline workloads and reduce paperwork;
• Understand a working sustainability model using a real case study.
www.nadcp.org
Become a Member Today
23
Angela Sparks
Executive Director
Marshall County Court Referral Services
Marshall County, Alabama
Deborah Augustine
Program Manager Victim Witness Program of the Drug
Enforcement Administration (DEA)
Washington, D.C.
(Advanced) Prescription Drugs of Abuse Testing
Holly Hopper
Project Director
Drug Endangered Child Training Network
University of Kentucky
Lexington, Kentucky
Prescription drugs are a sweeping national trend in dangerous
abuse habits, and studies show experimentation and abuse can
occur even in children. For those courts with a good handle on the
technical aspects of drug testing, join us in a workshop focused on
prescription drug abuse and the nuances of testing for prescription
drugs in your facility. Dr. Leo Kadehjian will lecture on the nature
of prescription drugs, basic biochemistry of drug metabolism,
and testing for prescription drug abuse. This course is primarily
for those facilities familiar with quantitative results reporting and
interpreting results in relation to cut-offs.
Learning Objectives
• Learn the driving factors behind opioid and prescription
drug addiction;
• Learn which prescription drugs are being abused and how
to detect abuse;
• Understand basic metabolism of prescription drugs by the
human body in order to test and detect drug misuse and abuse.
Leo Kadehjian
Biomedical Consulting
Toxicologist and Expert on Drugs of Abuse
Palo Alto, California
SB-5 Orange County Ballroom, Salon 3, Marriott
Drug Endangered Children: Special
Issues to Consider
Drug Court Participants and their children come to you during a
time of chaos, stress, and change he or she may not understand,
have difficulty processing, and resent. Healing for the drug
involved family cannot begin until acceptance of what can and
cannot be changed occurs. This session will address the needs
of families through the lens of examining current drug trends
as they relate to individuals striving to break free from the drug
culture, address family victimization issues, and achieving
recovery for themselves and their children.
Learning Objectives
• Participants will be given an overview of drug trends
and related victimization;
• Responses to dual victimization associated with drug
crimes will be discussed;
• Identify common issues facing the recovering parent
and the drug endangered child.
24
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
SB-7 Orange County Ballroom, Salon 4, Marriott
Criminal Thinking/Addict Thinking
Treatment Matrix
The workshop is designed to introduce participants to Criminal
Thinking and Addict Thinking and the interactive effect of these
thought processes on behavior. Employing the CT/AT matrix helps
refine specific treatment objectives for individual participants and
gives direction to decision makers about levels of supervision,
frequency and type of drug screening and treatment sub-goals.
The workshop is designed for treatment professionals, probation
officers, judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys and others
involved in making Drug Court placement decisions.
Learning Objectives
• Define criminal thinking and addictive thinking, give examples
of each, and list the effect of their interaction on drug court
participant’s behavior;
• Describe one application of the CT/AT model to a current Drug
Court problem;
• Describe one area where communication between Drug Court
personnel and external parties could be enhanced by using the
CT/AT model.
Charles A. Starks
Mental Health Counselor
Ft Myers, Florida
SB-9
Grand Ballroom A/B, Marriott
Case Management: Skills for Better
Outcomes
Effective case management is a keystone to the success of your
drug court. While substance abuse treatment is the first priority,
practitioners know their clients present with a variety of challenges
and needs beyond chemical addiction. In order for adult, juvenile,
or family drug court clients to maintain long-term sobriety, every
program must have a clear set of case management policies and
procedures, and all team members must understand their role in
providing case management services. This session will define the
functions of case management, and will provide specific strategies
to enhance current practice. Case managers will learn how to
improve their technique, and other team members will learn how to
support the case management process.
Learning Objectives
• Learn best practices in the field of case management;
•R
ecognize issues in specific populations within your drug court;
Learning Objectives
• Learn about the challenges and successes we encountered
creating our collaboration, how those challenges were
addressed, and the results achieved. Timely data related to ITC
participants who engage in Phoenix Multisport activities will be
provided;
• Discuss future growth strategies and opportunities planned
by the collaboration as well as each program individually;
• Learn how to best serve specific case management needs, e.g.,
those addicted to methamphetamine, 18-24 year-olds, etc.
• Learn how to access Phoenix Multisport activities and
programming, and how to replicate this sort of collaboration
in your own community.
Mack Jenkins
Chief Probation Officer
San Diego County Probation Department
San Diego, California
Marcy Becker
Probation Supervisor
Colorado District Court – 20th Judicial District Probation Department
Boulder, Colorado
Jane Pfeifer
Consultant
Justice Development and Training
Chico, California
Ben Cort
National Director of Operations
Phoenix Multisport
Boulder, Colorado
SB-11 Grand Ballroom C/D, Marriott
The Next Generation of Sober
Social Networking – An Innovative
Collaboration to Enhance Outcomes for
Drug Court Participants and Graduates
The collaboration between the Integrated Treatment Court
and Phoenix Multisport is redefining social networking in the
context of drug courts. Through this collaboration, Drug Court
participants have access to a sober, physically active community
for individuals in recovery. Together we are striving to cultivate
real and lasting opportunities for those in recovery to access
community based networks to support positive and sustainable
life style changes during the drug court experience, through
graduation and beyond. This presentation will be informative,
interactive and include a PowerPoint presentation with handouts.
Individuals can expect to learn about how our collaboration is
designed to further the missions of both programs, to promote
public safety, reduce crime, develop individual’s emotional
strength to stay sober and improve the quality of life for
participants. The session will present an overview of both the
Integrated Treatment Court and Phoenix Multisport. It will also
include a discussion examining this collaborative approach in
comparison to other drug court models and program evaluation
data. Phoenix Multisport will provide more specific information
on their program history, mission, values, activities and efforts
and intentions for replication to ensure all in recovery have
access to a sober active community.
www.nadcp.org
Hon. Carol Glowinsky
Judge
Boulder District Court
Boulder, Colorado
Scott Strode
Team Director and Founder
Phoenix Multisport
Boulder, Colorado
Jacki Subberra
Colorado Chapter Director
Phoenix Multisport
Boulder, Colorado
SB-13
Grand Ballroom E, Marriott
Motivational Interviewing in the
Courtroom
Motivational Interviewing is an evidence-based practice that
has demonstrated success in assisting clients with chronic
substance abuse to alter their behavior and choose sobriety over
dependence. The efficacy of Motivational Interviewing is derived,
in large part, due to the motivation that is elicited from within
the individual and not imposed by outside forces. Given the
courts’ ability to make and enforce decisions on a defendant’s
behalf, resistance is often a byproduct of even the most clientfriendly court mandates. Training in, and use of, Motivational
Interviewing techniques by judges, lawyers, and other
affiliated court personnel can significantly reduce a defendant’s
Become a Member Today
25
ambivalence and increase their willingness to participate and
cooperate in their own best interests. This training is intended
to educate court personnel to understand the stages of change,
begin to develop the tools to reach clients where they are
currently at, reduce the power struggle between the court and
the defendant, and assist the client to overcome their own
defensive posture and develop a partnership with the court to
obtain the best legal and clinical outcomes.
Ray Daugherty
President
Prevention Research Institute
Lexington, Kentucky
Dr. Carlo DiClemente
Department of Psychology
University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Baltimore, Maryland
Learning Objectives
Co-Developer of the Stages of Change Model,
Carlo DiClemente is one of the most respected and
recognized names in AOD treatment in the world.
• Learn the basic philosophy of Motivational Interviewing, and
how this intervention is distinctly different from persuasion
and coercion;
• Learn the stages of change, determine which stage their clients
are in, and begin to understand and use the appropriate stagematching intervention to reduce the defendant’s ambivalence;
• Further abilities to develop successful working relationships
with their clients to obtain the best possible legal and clinical
outcomes.
Hon. William Meyer
Judge (ret.)
Judicial Arbiter Group, Inc
Denver, Colorado
Elke Rechberger
Chief Executive Officer
VDT, Inc.
Pasadena, California
SB-15 Laguna A, Hilton
Rediscovering Alcoholism, Addiction,
and Dependence: Re-energizing
Treatment and Prevention
Does a DSM-IV Dependence diagnosis mean the same thing as
“alcoholism” or “addiction?” Join PRI President Ray Daugherty
and co-developer of the stages of change model Carlo
DiClemente to explore this sometimes perplexing question.
Learning Objectives
• Describe how alcoholism/addiction and dependence represent
different paradigms and are thus not synonymous;
• Identify why it is important to differentiate dependence from
alcoholism/addiction in clinical work;
• Identify the clinical benefits a “staged” approach to substance
abuse treatment that taps the critical processes of change
required to meet “recovery and discovery” tasks.
26
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
SB-17
Capistrano A/B, Hilton
Immigration Issues in Drug Court
Many drug court professionals work with immigrant defendants
(including lawful permanent residents, refugees/asylees,
undocumented immigrants, and others). These immigrants
seek the opportunities for treatment and rehabilitation that
drug courts provide, and their families and communities
benefit from the reduction in recidivism that drug courts help
to produce. However, immigrant defendants may face serious
and unexpected immigration consequences due to some drug
court policies and requirements – consequences that also affect
their families and communities. This session will explain why
immigrant defendants face these consequences and explore
how the key players in the drug court system may implement
alternatives to these policies and requirements, thereby
facilitating the effectiveness of drug courts for immigrants, their
families and communities. This session is designed for drug
court planners, judges, attorneys, treatment providers, and other
drug court professionals who work with immigrant defendants.
Learning Objectives
• Understand the immigration consequences of drug charges,
pleas, and convictions;
• Identify the reasons why some drug court policies and
requirements may result in deportability and other unexpected
consequences for immigrant defendants;
• Discuss how drug court planners, judges, attorneys, treatment
providers, and other drug court professionals may address
immigration issues and ensure greater participation,
compliance, and positive outcomes for immigrant defendants
and immigrant communities.
Alina Das
New York State Defenders Association
New York, New York
SB-19
El Capitan A/B, Hilton
Reentry Courts
The 2nd Chance Women’s Reentry Court provides evidencebased substance abuse and mental health treatment utilizing
the Drug Court model for women who are otherwise facing an
imminent state prison sentence. This court program provides,
for the first time in Los Angeles, treatment for women with
extensive criminal records who are charged with a new felony
offense. This presentation will describe the creation of this court,
the collaboration, the court process, early outcomes, and the
importance of evidence based treatment for women.
Learning Objectives
• Learn about the innovative 2nd Chance Women’s Reentry
Court, collaboration building and the science behind genderresponsive treatment.
SB-23A Palos Verdes A/B, Hilton
Managing Multiple Problem Solving
Court Dockets: Spotlight on the Orange
County Problem Solving Courts
The Orange County Community Court houses the following
Collaborative Courts: Drug Court, Criminal Mental Health
Court, Veterans Court, Homeless Court and DUI Court. Hear
from all the collaborative partners about the development and
implementation of these courts.
Learning Objectives
• Understand the collaborative process utilized in the
development and implementation of the above described
collaborative courts;
• Identify the challenges in creating collaborative courts;
• Understand the unique issues related to the different
types of courts;
Nancy Chand
Attorney
County Public Defender’s Office
Los Angeles, California
• Recognize the beneficial outcomes both fiscal and humane
that result from these collaborative efforts.
Nena P. Messina
Criminologist
UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs
Los Angeles, California
Hon. Wendy Lindley
Judge
Superior Court of California
Orange County, California
Hon. Michael Tynan
Supervising Treatment Judge
Los Angeles, California
Orange County Community Court Teams
SB-21
Isabel Apkarian
Public Defender
Huntington B, Hilton
Tribal Nations Forum
This forum is designed for tribal healing to wellness court
practitioners to establish a working group to address tribal issues
and needs. The NADCP Board of Directors has created a special
committee to meet the needs of tribal drug court professionals.
With these two groups working together; NADCP will be better able
to address the needs of tribes in an effective, timely and culturally
proficient manner.
Learning Objective
• Establish a working group for tribal healing to wellness
court practitioners.
Wendy Brough
District Attorney
Rick Cota
Probation
David Dworakowski
Public Defender
Cyr Oca
Probation
Roni Portillo
Health Care Agency
Andrea Sarafin
Veterans Affairs
Catherine Shreenan
Health Care Agency
April Thorton
Health Care Agency
www.nadcp.org
Become a Member Today
27
Gina Wilkie
Probation
SB-25
ASAM PPC - 2r – Making it Real;
Making it Work!
Jean Wilkinson
Public Defender
Anthony Wade
Probation
SB-23B Orange County Community Court
Shuttle to depart from the Hilton at 1:00 pm (estimated time of visit is two hours)
See for Yourself: Visit the Orange
County Community Court for a Tour
and Court Sessions
Description: Tour the beautiful Community Court where 24
ancillary agencies collaborate to offer “one stop” services. Watch
a brief Drug Court staffing and Court session and a brief Veterans
Court staffing and Court session.
This is limited to 40 participants ~ sign up sheet in SB-23A
classroom beginning at 9:00 am on June 10. Transportation
will be provided.
Learning Objective
•A
s a result of this visit participants will thoroughly understand the
operation of a Community Court, Drug Court and Veterans Court.
Orange County Community Court Team
Isabel Apkarian
Public Defender
Wendy Brough
District Attorney
Rick Cota
Probation
Bianca Jimenez
Public Defender
Hon. Wendy Lindley
Judge
Superior Court of California
Cyr Oca
Probation
Roni Portillo
Health Care Agency
Andrea Sarafin
Veterans Affairs
28
Malibu, Hilton
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
The American Society of Addiction Medicine Patient Placement
Criteria for the Treatment of Substance-Related Disorders (ASAM
PPC-2R) provides a scientific framework through which treatment
practitioners can exercise their art of effectively addressing a
myriad of competing and sometimes contradictory treatment
needs. Since the introduction of this revised second edition
in 2001, the ASAM PPC-2R has gained widespread acceptance
and arguably is the unrivaled industry standard for making
treatment placement, treatment planning, and discharge
planning decisions. Unfortunately many practitioners have been
unable to fully realize its benefits. Its sheer volume and intricate
decision trees can make trying to “make it work” in the “real
world” a daunting task for even the experienced clinician. This
advanced level workshop is designed for practitioners who are
familiar with the ASAM PPC-2R, yet want to become more skilled
in effectively applying its criteria to the kinds of individuals that
drug treatment courts encounter every day.
Learning Objectives
• Understand and practice how to accurately categorize
assessment information into each of the six ASAM PPC-2R
dimensions;
• Understand and practice how to accurately rate severity
in each of those dimensions;
• Understand and practice how to translate the six dimensional
severity ratings into a sound and justifiable treatment
placement decision.
Terrence Walton
Director of Treatment
DC Pre-Trial Services Agency
Washington, DC
SB-27 Pacific Ballroom D, Hilton
California Proposition 36:
Building Bridges
Proposition 36 was approved by California voters November 7,
2000. It sentences nonviolent drug offenders to drug treatment
rather than jail or prison. In Fiscal Year 2008-09, Proposition
36 appropriated $90 million to fund county drug treatment
services and criminal justice supervision. Proposition 36 serves
approximately 50,000 drug offenders annually. How do counties
bridge the gap between all the various entities involved? What
current challenges face Proposition 36 and how are local experts
meeting them? The University of California, Los Angeles has
evaluated Proposition 36 since inception almost eight years ago.
How can recommendations for improvement be applied to the
courts, treatment, and criminal justice fields? How are judges
implementing these practices work in their court? This session
is for current California Proposition 36 stakeholders in addition
to anyone who wants to learn more about how Proposition 36
works and how it can be improved.
Learning Objectives
• Learn the basics of Proposition 36 and what the future holds
from experts in the treatment, court and supervision fields;
• Learn some of the UCLA evaluation key findings and
recommendations specific to the fields of courts, treatment,
and supervision;
• L earn what role the court plays in the success of Proposition 36.
FOR CALIFORNIA PARTICIPANTS
We are pleased to announce that the Administrative
Office of the Courts (AOC) will be providing
educational credit for California judicial officers
and court staff attending the NADCP conference.
The AOC is a State Bar of California approved MCLE
provider and MCLE credits for California attorneys
will be available. Mental Health Systems, Inc.
will also provide BBS, CAADE, CAADCAC, CAARR,
Breining Institute, and APA credit for select courses.
Additional information and forms will be available
at the California table in the registration area during
the conference.
www.nadcp.org
Millicent A. Gomes
Deputy Director
Office of Criminal Justice Collaboration
California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs
Sacramento, California
Nancy Gottlieb
Interim Division Chief for Alcohol and Drug Programs
Santa Barbara, California
Helen Harberts
Assistant District Attorney
Chico, California
Jessica L’Etoile
Deputy Probation Officer
El Dorado County Probation
Placerville, California
Hon. Rogelio Flores
Superior Court Judge
Santa Barbara County Superior Court
Santa Maria, California
Hon. Stephen Manley
Superior Court
County of Santa Clara
San Jose, CA
Hon. Douglas Phimister
Superior Court Judge
El Dorado County Superior Court
Placerville, California
Darren Urada
Principal Investigator, California’s Evaluation of Proposition 36
University of California
Los Angeles, California
Hon. Richard A. Vlavianos
Superior Court Judge
San Joaquin County Superior Court
Stockton, California
Become a Member Today
29
AFTERNOON SESSIONS
2:00 pm-5:00 pm
SB-2 Orange County Ballroom, Salon 1, Marriott
SCRAM Program Development and Value
Add to Drug Courts
This workshop will detail the necessary and sequential steps
to building a world-class SCRAM® (Secure Continuous Remote
Alcohol Monitor) program in your Specialty Court. Featuring
examples of successful Specialty Courts, you will learn how to
develop and execute your own SCRAM program. This session
will also show you how AMS’ national network of SCRAM Service
Providers is poised to work with your court to develop a turnkey
SCRAM program that is uniquely suited to your alcohol offender
management needs.
MODERATOR
Hank Pirowski
Director
Buffalo C.O.U.R.T.S Programs
Buffalo, New York
Tim Jeffries
Policy Advisor
Bureau of Justice Assistance
Washington, DC
Marilyn Roberts
Deputy Administrator of Programs
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
Washington, DC
Ken Robertson
Team Leader, Criminal Justice Programs
Center for Substance Abuse Treatment
Rockville, Maryland
Learning Objective
• Learn in detail about SCRAM “best practice” models, the
sequential steps to building a SCRAM program from the ground
up, and the portfolio of services that SCRAM Service Providers
offers to manage the full workload of your alcohol program.
Don White
Chief Operating Officer
Alcohol Monitoring Systems, Inc.
SB-4 Orange County Ballroom, Salon 2, Marriott
Show Me The Money! A Guide to Federal
and Private Funding for Drug Courts—
And How to Improve Your Skills In
Writing Grant Applications
Are you wondering where your drug court can find resources in
these tough economic times? Well, look no further—this is the
skills building session for you. Come hear from United States
Department of Justice and United States Substance Abuse and
Mental Health Services Administration officials as they join a top
drug court administrator to discuss funding opportunities from
their agencies, along with creative venues for private funding,
and finally, tips on writing successful grant applications to secure
these scarce resources.
Learning Objectives
• Learn federal funding resources for drug courts;
• Learn private funding resources for drug courts;
• Identify key elements of a successful grant application.
30
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
SB-6
Orange County Ballroom, Salon 3, Marriott
Building Interventions for Marijuana
Dependent Young Adults in Drug Court
The first part of this session will discuss environmental impacts
that influence the development of crime, mental health, and
addictive disorders in the young adult population. The presenter
will provide a review of distinct patterns of criminality that can
complicate program eligibility, retention and safety in treatment
settings. A discussion of assessment tools and cognitive
behavior interventions will be emphasized. The second part of
this session will focus on existing young adult tracks in adult
drug court settings. Practitioners will discuss the challenges
of working with this population and some of the promising
practices that are being developed to serve this population.
Learning Objectives
• Assess young people’s needs, interests and strengths
through motivational interviewing;
• Learn how issues of criminality affect drug misuse and the
implications for assessment, treatment and court monitoring;
•R
ecognize strategies for addressing multiple needs including
trauma-oriented treatment, expressive therapies, habilitation,
anger resolution, educational supports, and pro-social activities.
Hon. Giselle Pollack
Judge
Seventeenth Circuit
Ft Lauderdale, Florida
Dennis A. Reilly, Esq.
Deputy Director
Drug Court Programs
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
SB-10 Grand Ballroom A/B, Marriott
Consensus and Evidence-Based Practices
for Treatment of Persons with CoOccurring Disorders
David Deitch
USC San Diego
San Diego, California
This course will help drug court staff identify the challenges and
benefits of Evidence-Based practices in the field of Co-Occurring
Disorders.
Hon. Jo Ann Ferdinand
Judge
Brooklyn Treatment Court
Brooklyn, New York
Learning Objectives
SB-8 • Review definitions of mental disorders, severe mental
illness, substance abuse and substance dependence,
and co-occurring disorders;
Orange County Ballroom, Salon 4, Marriott
Partners in Change: How to Facilitate
Change Through Twelve Steps
You can maximize the effectiveness of your referrals to Twelve
Step support groups by learning about and experiencing a
group meeting. Each of the Twelve Steps is thoroughly explained
and combined with insightful information for practical use.
The session also addresses the role the client’s family plays in
preventing relapse and provides a framework for making family
support group referrals. This is a must-attend session if you refer
to Twelve Step support groups and wish to increase your ability
to assess compliance and progress toward long-term recovery.
• Review the four quadrants of service coordination
for people with COD;
• List consensus and evidence based practices for
persons with COD.
John Challis
COCE Project Director
National Development and Research Institutes, Inc.
New York, New York
Mary McCarty-Arias
Program Manager
National Development and Research Institutes, Inc.
New York, New York
Learning Objectives
SB-12 • Experience a short “fish bowl” Twelve Step meeting and see
how this community resource might help your participants;
Getting the Most out of your
Evaluation: How to Use Data to Help
Your Drug Court Program
• Explore ways to identify recovery resources in your community
using a Drug Court Recovery Check Sheet and a Guide to
Mutual Support Groups.
Hon. Thomas S. Gilbert
Judge (retired)
Faces and Voices of Recovery
Traverse, Michigan
Dan Griffin
State Court Administrator’s Office
Minnesota Judicial Branch
St Paul, Minnesota
www.nadcp.org
Grand Ballroom C/D, Marriott
This presentation illustrates the benefits of conducting evaluations
of your programs, from gaining information that helps you
make program improvements and innovations, to documenting
successes that help you gain additional resources (show me the
money!). Evaluators will share the different types of information
that can be provided to programs through a menu of evaluation
activities, including training and technical support, process
evaluation, outcome studies, and cost analyses. State drug court
coordinators will discuss why they fund evaluation activities in
their states and programs, and how these activities benefit them at
the state level. Program coordinators will discuss their perceptions
of the benefits of both the evaluation process and resulting
evaluation data at the local level, including how to develop a
method to track information. They will also share their experiences
trying to implement recommendations from evaluations (including
the potential impact on team dynamics), challenges and successes
in these efforts, and lessons learned through this process.
Become a Member Today
31
Learning Objectives
SB-14 • Gain knowledge about the different types of evaluation
activities available to programs;
Are Gang Members Appropriate
Candidates for Drug Court?
• L earn about the benefits of evaluation and the different types of
information each type can provide through an understanding of
the successes and challenges in using evaluation data for program
improvement, including lessons learned from program staff.
Gray Barton
Executive Director
Office of Problem Solving Courts
Annapolis, Maryland
Francine Byrne
Supervising Research Analyst
Judicial Council of California
Administrative Office of the Courts
San Francisco, California
Shannon M. Carey
Senior Research Associate
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
Stephanie D’Amato
Program Coordinator
Prince George’s County Circuit Court
Upper Marlboro, Maryland
Karen Gennette
Court Coordinator
Vermont Treatment Court
Montpelier, Vermont
Mary Kay Hudson
Problem-Solving Court Administrator
Indiana Judicial Center
Indianapolis, Indiana
Juliette R. Mackin
Senior Research Associate
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
Grand Ballroom E, Marriott
A common disqualification to acceptance into drug court is gang
membership. This track examines three types and truths of the
gangster subculture. A drug court graduate and inactive gang
member will co-facilitate this informative and thought provoking
discussion. Learn whether defacto disqualification of gang
members is appropriate.
Learning Objectives
• Describe the gang culture;
• Identify strategies for working with gang involved individuals;
• Learn how to keep them motivated in drug court.
Hon. Allison Krehbiel
District Court Judge
Brown-Nicollet-Watonwan Adult Drug Court
St. Peter, Minnesota
Laurie Mayo
Drug Court Coordinator
Brown-Nicollet-Watonwan Adult Drug Court
Mankato, Minnesota
Marshall Spain
2008 Drug Court Graduate
Brown-Nicollet-Watonwan Adult Drug Court
North Mankato, Minnesota
SB-16
Laguna A, Hilton
Ethical Issues for Judges and Attorneys
in Problem Solving Courts
Drug treatment courts, and problem-solving courts in general,
modify the role of judges and attorneys in ways that raise ethical
concerns. Working with a series of hypotheticals, we will discuss
the prosecution’s concern for public safety, defense’s role in
a non-adversarial, collaborative program, and the concerns of
judges about ex parte communications and direct dialogue with
the DTC participant.
Learning Objectives
• Identify the ethical issues in problem-solving courts for judges;
• Identify the ethical issues for attorneys in problem-solving courts;
•R
ecognize ways to ensure ethical practice in problem-solving courts.
Hon. Peggy Hora
Judge (retired)
Castro Valley, California
32
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
SB-18 Capistrano A/B, Hilton
Learning Objectives
MET/CBT 5
• Identify the defining elements of sexual addictions;
The MET/CBT 5 Training is designed to provide interested
juvenile drug courts, with the core knowledge, skills and
information necessary to properly implement a MET/CBT 5. It is
the goal of this training initiative to lead each attendee through
a two and half-day training program resulting in the certification
of clinical supervisors and clinicians in the implementation
of MET/CBT 5. This training program is designed to educate
clinicians in the theory and application of necessary components
to effectively execute MET/CBT 5. NDCI is providing free training
for juvenile courts through a cooperative agreement from the
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Programs (OJJDP). Join
us during this session to learn how to access this resource and
skills you can incorporate in your programs.
• Recognize the recovery process for a sex addict.
• Understand the treatment regimen for a sex addict;
Learning Objectives
• Learn about the new training being offered to Juvenile Drug
Courts on MET/CBT 5 training and certification;
• Review the theory, rationale, MET and CBT strategies;
• Practice specific session procedures.
Wendy Danicourt
WD Consulting
St. Petersburg, Florida
SB-20 El Capitan A/B, Hilton
Sex Addiction
The term “sexual addiction” is used to describe the behavior of
a person who has an unusually intense sex drive or an obsession
with sex. Sex addicts engage in distorted thinking, rationalizing
and justifying their behavior and blaming others for problems.
They generally deny they have a problem and make excuses for
their actions. Treatment must begin by bringing the person to
accept and admit that he or she has a problem. In many cases, it
takes a significant event, such as the loss of a relationship, loss of
a job, or an arrest to force the addict to admit to his or her problem.
Treatment of sexual addiction focuses on controlling the addictive
behavior and helping the person develop a healthy sexuality.
Treatment includes education about healthy sexuality, individual
counseling, and marital and/or family therapy. Support groups
and 12 step recovery programs are also available. In some cases,
medication is used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder to curb
the compulsive nature of the addiction. This presentation outlines
the issues presented by the sex addict, how to identify them, and
how to effectively treat them.
www.nadcp.org
Sean McFarland
Addiction Therapist
Venice, California
SB-22
Huntington B, Hilton
Getting the Most out of Your State
Association – 2:00 pm-3:30 pm
Congress of State Drug Court
Associations – 3:45 pm-5:45 pm
Need funding for your drug court? Are you wondering how your
drug court will make it during these tough economic times?
You may need to look no further than your state drug court
association. Your state drug court association is a tremendous
resource. State drug court associations around the country
provide a variety of services to drug courts within their states,
one of which often includes keeping a finger on the pulse of
what’s happening in state funding issues for drug court. They
may also be able to share information with you about beginning
your own tax exempt organization to help support the drug court.
This session will discuss how you can get the most from your
state association, along with valuable tips from current state
association officials on starting down the path of beginning a
nonprofit to support the drug court’s efforts. This session will
adjourn at 3:30 pm for an official meeting of the Congress of
State Drug Court Associations.
Learning Objectives
• Identify the resources available through your state drug court
association;
• Understand the steps necessary to developing a 501c(3).
Harry D. Cale III
Program Administrator
Charleston, South Carolina
Hon. Irvin G. Condon
Judge
Charleston County Adult Drug Court
Charleston, South Carolina
Hon. Brian McKenzie
District Court Judge
52nd District Court
Novi, Michigan
Become a Member Today
33
SB-24
Palos Verdes A/B, Hilton
Drug Testing 101 – The Fundamentals
Effective drug testing in drug court is essential to the overall
success of the program. This presentation is designed to
provide fundamental information and strategies for building and
maintaining a successful drug testing program. It is designed for
the new drug court member who wants a greater understanding
of drug testing issues. Collection strategies and result
interpretation—two essential components of a credible testing
program, will be discussed. Attendees will learn the reasons
for testing, how to select clients for maximum abstinence
surveillance, and what specimens yield the best results. An
additional focus issue will be controlling sample tampering.
Learning Objectives
Learning Objectives
• Learn methods to help graduates maintain gains achieved
in therapeutic courts;
• Learn methods to engage graduates and keep them
engaged, thus helping them stay clean and sober;
• Learn methods to maintain self-esteem among graduates
and foster it in other addicted offenders;
• Learn the basic principles of drug testing;
• Learn methods to build mutually supportive relationships
with court professionals;
• Gain knowledge of effective drug testing to ensure
the success of abstinence monitoring;
• Learn methods to use graduate experience to improve
effectiveness of therapeutic courts;
• Understand which drug testing myths are true and false.
• Learn methods to harness the breadth of graduate skills.
Paul Cary
Director
Toxicology and Drug Monitoring Lab University of Missouri
Columbia, Missouri
MODERATOR
Claire Waddoup
Executive Director
Partners for Progress, Inc.
Anchorage, Alaska
SB-26 Malibu, Hilton
Sustaining the Gain – Real Life after
Graduation
A DUI/Drug Court Alumni group is a unique peer group that
bridges the gap in support between therapeutic court and life
after graduation. While Drug/DUI courts have had an important
impact on treating substance abuse offenders and reducing
recidivism, relatively little attention has been given to the
aftercare of court graduates. The Anchorage Therapeutic Court
Alumni Group has developed multiple programs to engage
graduates and keep them engaged, and help all members
stay clean and sober. Examples of how alumni create personal
investment in their group and also generate excitement about
the group in the community include raising funds ($60 each)
for a sober table at the Mayor’s Diversity Dinner, organizing two
sober celebrations a year (summer picnic and holiday party), and
attending court to encourage and mentor current participants.
Group meetings twice a month with food provide a sharing
atmosphere. Graduates use the meetings to:
• Support each other when the going gets rough in “real life” –
dealing with difficulties they face;
• Network for job opportunities;
• Discuss parenting issues.
34
Partners for Progress is a non-profit organization supporting
therapeutic courts throughout the state of Alaska. Three years
ago Partners assisted court graduates in forming the Anchorage
Alumni Group and continues to provide the group with
administrative, logistical and financial support. Claire travels
with Alumni Group members on outreach trips, provides advice
and encouragement, and is the group’s Financial Manager.
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Patty Lane
Member, Anchorage Alumni Group
Anchorage, Alaska
Michael Mooradian
Co-Chair, Anchorage Alumni Group
Anchorage, Alaska
Muriel Morse
Member, Anchorage Alumni Group
Anchorage, Alaska
Randy Wilson
Co-Chair, Anchorage Alumni Group
Anchorage, Alaska
SB-28 Pacific Ballroom D, Hilton
California Proposition 36 –
Building Bridges
California counties have shown tremendous innovation in
how they implement Proposition 36. Los Angeles County has
successfully demonstrated notable improvements in Proposition
36 client engagement and retention in treatment services with
little added costs. Los Angeles County will share the results of
two pilot projects using a process improvement model developed
by the nationwide Network for the Improvement of Addiction
Treatment (NIATx). One of the keys to successful Proposition
36 outcomes is the collaboration between the courts, criminal
justice and treatment partners. How do you maintain this
collaboration when funds are decreasing? How do partners make
the tough decisions on where to place the funds? What are some
successful strategies on how to build collaborative partnerships?
San Diego will also share additional innovations which make
them a successful collaborative. This session is for current
California Proposition 36 stakeholders in addition to anyone that
wants to learn more about how Proposition 36 works and how it
can be improved.
Learning Objectives
• Learn how Los Angeles County implemented the Network for
the Improvement of Addiction Treatment (NIATx) model to
improve outcomes for Proposition 36 clients;
• Learn specifics about the state requirements of Proposition 36
including the annual county plan, regulations and audits;
• Learn what it takes to maintain a successful collaboration
with courts, criminal justice and treatment during tough
economic times.
Charlie Aperule
Program Manager
Mental Health Systems, Inc’s
Central East Regional Recovery Center
San Diego, California
Alexandra Bruehl
Research Analyst
Department of Public Health, Alcohol and Drug Program
Administration
Los Angeles, California
Lanis Clark
Branch Manager
Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs’ Audit Services Branch
Sacramento, California
Kelly Cowger
Analyst
Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs’ Office of Criminal
Justice Collaboration
Sacramento, California
Michael Hall
Supervising Probation Officer
South Bay & El Cajon Regions
San Diego, California
Holly McCravey
Executive Director
Antelope Valley Rehabilitation Centers
Los Angeles, California
Richard McCue
Deputy District Attorney
District Attorney’s Office
San Diego, California
John Oldenkamp
Alcohol and Drug Program Manager
Alcohol and Drug Services Division
San Diego, California
Marlies Perez
Staff Services Manager I over Proposition 36
Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs Office of Criminal
Justice Collaboration
Sacramento, California
Jason Rodriguez
Manager, Residential Treatment Program
Alpha Project/Casa Raphael
Los Angeles, California
Wayne Sugita
Chief Deputy Director
Department of Public Health, Alcohol and Drug Program
Administration
Los Angeles, California
Michael Chmielewski
Supervising Governmental Auditor
Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs’ Audit Services Branch
Sacramento, California
www.nadcp.org
Become a Member Today
35
ANCILLARY EVENTS
12:00 pm-5:00 pm
State Coordinators Meeting
312 (MAR)
7:00 am-6:00 pm
SAMHSA CSAT Criminal Justice
Treatment Drug Court Grantee Meeting
Grand Ballroom F-K (MAR)
3:45 pm-5:45 pm
Congress of State Drug Court
Associations
Huntington B (HIL)
6:00 pm-6:30 pm
Opening Ceremony – HDTV GIVEAWAY
Marquis Ballroom (MAR)
36
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Opening Night Reception
and 46" HDTV GIVEAWAY
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10
6:00 pm-6:30 pm
Exhibit Hall
Welcome to the NADCP 15th Annual Training Conference!
You don’t want to miss the Opening Night Ceremony! The
ceremony provides you with the opportunity to network
with your peers and see the most cutting edge technology
and services available to drug courts around the world.
Please thank our exhibitors, and give special thanks to our
corporate members who, by supporting NADCP, have joined
our efforts in securing the largest federal funding mark for
drug court ever!
OraSure Technologies has donated a Sony - BRAVIA / 46"
Class / 1080p / 60Hz / LCD HDTV which will be raffled off
during the ceremony. Make sure you are there!
THURSDAY
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
THURSDAY, JUNE 11
Continental Breakfast in Exhibit Hall
7:00 am-7:45 am
Registration Open
7:30 am-5:00 pm
Exhibit Hall Open
7:30 am-5:00 pm
Opening Session
8:00 am-10:00 am
Break in Exhibit Hall
10:00 am-10:30 am
Concurrent Workshops, Session A
10:30 am-11:45 am
Lunch on your own
12:00 pm-1:45 pm
Concurrent General Sessions
1:45 pm-3:00 pm
Concurrent Workshops, Session B
3:15 pm-4:30 pm
Discipline Specific Breakouts
4:45 pm-5:30 pm
NADCP Membership Meeting
5:45 pm-6:30 pm
THURSDAY
NOTES
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THURSDAY, JUNE 11
8:00 am-10:00 am
OPENING GENERAL SESSION
Platinum Ballroom, Marriott
Twentieth Anniversary Celebration
West Huddleston
NADCP Chief Executive Officer
Jennifer Columbel
NADCP Director of Public Policy
The Anaheim High School Choir
NADCP Impact Award
Welcome
Jeff McFarland
Executive Director
Timmins Foundation
Judge Charles Simmons
NADCP Board Chair
Special Guest
Presentation of Colors
Orange County Sherriff’s Department
National Anthem
The Anaheim High School Choir
“Land of Hopes and Dreams”
Video Presentation
Ron Brooks
President, National Narcotic Officers’ Association Coalition
Director, Office of National Drug Control Policy,
Executive Office of the President of the United States
NADCP Ambassador Award
Robby Gordon
NASCAR and BAHA Champion
Opening Remarks
Robby is often called the modern-day Mario
Andretti or A.J. Foyt. He can and has driven virtually
every type of racing vehicle on four wheels – a
throwback to the days when racing was a passion
rather than a business.
Judge Charles Simmons
NADCP Board Chair
Special Guest
Conference Overview
Carson Fox
Director of Operations
NADCP
A Salute to 20 Years of Drug Courts
Miami: Where it All Began
Carolyn Hardin
Director, National Drug Court Institute
Timothy Murray
Executive Director
Pretrial Justice Center
Special Guest
Miami/Dade County Drug Court Team
Special Guest
“All Rise”
West Huddleston
NADCP Chief Executive Officer
Earl Hightower
NADCP Board Member
Featured Keynote Speaker
Tobey Maguire
Actor
One of the most critically acclaimed actors of his
generation, Tobey Maguire is well-known for his
roles in the Spiderman series, Seabiscuit, and
Cider House Rules.
Video Presentation
www.nadcp.org
Become a Member Today
37
THURSDAY, JUNE 11
10:30 am-11:45 am
Session A-1
Session A-3 Why Use Strength-Based Assessment?
Benefits to Youth and Program Staff
Laguna A, Hilton
Grant Writing
This beginner’s guide to writing grants will help you to develop
and write an effective proposal. It will provide a basic overview
and review of the grant writing process. This course will help you
to start with an idea, plan ahead, and seek appropriate funding
sources to meet your needs.
Learning Objectives
• Describe best business practices for resource development;
• Find opportunities and write a winning grant proposal.
Hank Pirowski
Director
Buffalo C.O.U.R.T.S Programs
Buffalo, New York
Session A-2 Protective factors reduce the risk for juvenile offending and
support positive adolescent development. Juvenile drug courts
aim to help youth reduce delinquency and substance use, yet
staff often lack the training and tools to increase protective
factors and build on existing strengths in the youth and her/
his environment. The goal of this presentation is to introduce
the strengths perspective and how it applies to juvenile justice
settings. The presenter will lead a discussion about the benefits
of a strength-based approach to assessment and service delivery
for youth with juvenile justice involvement and substance use
issues. The presentation will provide an overview of a strengthbased assessment tool, the Youth Competency Assessment, and
discuss the benefits of implementing strength based approaches
into our work.
Learning Objectives
• Gain an understanding of the strength-based perspective
and why it is appropriate for juvenile drug courts;
Grand Ballroom A/B, Marriott
Screening, Assessment and Triage:
Applications of the SAFERR Model in FDTC
Assessment is a process by which the presence and immediacy
of an issue, its nature and extent, as well as appropriate
treatment and case plans are identified. A balanced approach
is required for incorporating family issues and risks for children
when child welfare, the courts, and alcohol and drug treatment
come together to partner in assessing and providing services
for helping families change. Providing a structure to create and
sustain change in substance-abusing families is both possible
and feasible.
Learning Objectives
• Understand that the FDTC Team is the decision-making tool
and that people, not instruments, make decisions;
• Recognize that problems do not appear in separate silos,
but are linked together in overlapping ways;
• Discuss how assessment is not a one-person responsibility,
and how systems need to interact with each other.
Nancy Young
Executive Director
Children and Family Futures, Inc.
Irvine, California
38
Grand Ballroom C/D, Marriott
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
• Discuss the benefits of adopting strength-based practices,
such as strengths assessments;
• Gain a tool for identifying strengths in youth (and families).
Juliette Mackin
Senior Research Associate
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
Session A-4
Grand Ballroom G/H, Marriott
Treatment is the Key: Address Drug
Abuse in Criminal Justice Settings
Individuals with co-occurring disorders are often taking
prescription medication; this medication may make drug testing
these individuals more problematic. This session presents the
issues that must be considered when drug testing participants
who are on a variety of prescription medications, and includes
strategies for making a successful drug testing regimen a part of
any program.
Learning Objectives
• Recognize the issues presented when drug testing participants
who are on prescription medications;
• Understand the steps to ensure your drug testing protocol
works with this population
Redonna Chandler
Branch Chief
Division of Epidemiology, Services, and Prevention Research
Bethesda, Maryland
Timothy P. Condon
Deputy Director
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Bethesda, Maryland
Session A-5 Orange County Ballroom, Salon 2, Marriott
Working with the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual,
and Transgender Drug Court Participant
The odds are good that your drug court has lesbian, gay,
bisexual, or transgender participants whether you know
about them or not. From a cultural perspective effectively
individualizing treatment for an LGBT individual will require
accurate assessment and heightened sensitivity to both their
needs as LGBTs and accessibility issues of the treatment system.
This workshop will cover definitions, values, and drug treatment
issues with the hope of improving practitioner sensitivity and
knowledge base about this important treatment population.
Learning Objectives
• Define key terms needed to understand LGBT participants;
• Identify at least two values they hold strongly that deal with
sexual orientation and gender;
• Recognize at least two things they can do to make their drug
court team more LGBT friendly.
Joe Lunievicz
Deputy Director
National Development and Research Institutes
New York, New York
Session A-6 Palos Verdes A/B, Hilton
Evaluating a Pre-Filing Dependency
Family Preservation Court: Results and
Recommendations from an Innovative
Program
This workshop is designed for any county court and/or social
services agency desiring information on the effectiveness of
an actively operating Pre-Filing Family Preservation Court (AKA
Family Treatment Dependency Drug Court). We will present
information on the current Pre-Filing Family Preservation Court
Program in Riverside including the components of the program
and the evaluation, the barriers and challenges encountered
www.nadcp.org
during the evaluation, and the outcomes from the 3-year
SAMHSA funded evaluation. Family Preservation Court is
accomplished through the implementation of an innovative,
comprehensive, and family-centered approach to keep families
together prior to the removal of children from their home and
filing of the petition with the court. The Family Preservation Court
targets drug-dependent clients who have been reported to the
Department of Public Social Services for reported neglect with a
related substance abuse problem.
Learning Objectives
• Understand the Family Preservation Court Program;
• Understand the importance of the program structure and
benefit to the court;
• Understand the critical data elements that must be maintained
on a weekly basis, given the fluidity of this population;
• Gain valuable tools to conduct an evaluation of this or similar
programs and this target population.
Pamela Miller
Collaborative Justice Coordinator
Superior Court of California, County of Riverside
Murrieta, California
Colleen M. Killian
Evaluator/Research Associate
Superior Court of California, County of Riverside
WestEd
Los Alamitos, California
Session A-7
Grand Ballroom E, Marriott
Marijuana: Its Impact on the Brain
Neuroimaging has yielded new evidence about the effects on the
brain of marijuana use. This presentation will focus on those new
findings as well as describe the psychopharmacology of marijuana
use from both an acute and chronic use perspective. This session
is designed for both the new practitioner as well as the experience
practitioner who might need an update on marijuana.
Learning Objectives
• Identify the neurochemical actions of marijuana in the brain;
• Identify the symptoms of the acute use of marijuana, its chronic
use consequences and withdrawal symptoms.
Ron Jackson
Evergreen Treatment Services
Seattle, Washington
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39
Session A-8
Grand Ballroom J/K, Marriott
Orange County Ballroom, Salon 1, Marriott
Incentives and Sanctions in Juvenile
Drug Court
The Academy DWI Courts – How Model
DWI Courts Do It
Applying incentives and sanctions in juvenile drug courts
present significant challenges and opportunities. Juveniles are
not “little adults,” and thus, may not respond to sanctions or
incentives that may work for an older, more mature population.
Understanding the culture of youth, what your participants
value, and hearing what has worked in other juvenile drug courts
should help shape your court’s attitude and approach towards
applying incentives and sanctions in your juvenile drug court.
The four Academy DWI Court network serves as mentors for other
DWI Courts across the country. These courts work with NHTSA
and NCDC to evaluate and implement ongoing best practices and
other DWI court program reforms. The four courts will discuss
how they handle such issues as implementing a DWI Court,
what is needed in the operation of a DWI Court, developing an
effective drug testing procedure, and how to remain sustainable
during these rough economic times.
Learning Objective
Learning Objectives
• Learn strategies for what works in applying incentives
and sanctions in juvenile drug court.
• Learn how to access the DWI Academy Court network;
Wendy Schiller
Assistant Information Specialist
National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges
Reno, Nevada
• Examine what is needed to ensure sufficient funding
to maintain a viable DWI Court.
Session A-9 Santa Monica, Hilton
The Smoking Gun – Ethical Triggers in a
Drug Court Setting
Police and Probation Officers face unique challenges in drug
court. Some of these challenges are ethical ones. Officers are
often aware of treatment information which they may not be
able to reveal. Sometimes officers are aware of criminal justice
investigations which they cannot reveal. When are you at risk for
an ethical breach? What will you do?
Learning Objective
• Learn how to identify and address ethical problems
in a drug court context.
Helen Harberts
Assistant District Attorney
Chico, California
Vanessa Price
Sergeant—Drug Court Liaison Officer
Oklahoma County Drug Court Program
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
40
Session A-10 NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
• Identify ways to create a successful DWI Court program
and maintain it once it is up and running;
Hon. Carlton Biggs
Judge
Superior Court of the State of California
Newport Beach, California
Hon. Peggy D. Davis
Drug Court Commissioner
31st Judicial Circuit Greene County Missouri
Springfield, Missouri
Hon. Michael Haley
Judge
86th District Court
Traverse City, Michigan
Hon. Kent Lawrence
Judge
State Court of Kent County
Athens, Georgia
Session A-11 Orange County Ballroom, Salon 3, Marriott
The Role of the Prosecutor in Drug Court
The prosecutor must shed his traditional role as advocate
and work as part of a team in drug court. The prosecutor’s
responsibilities include screening candidates for the program
and making sure participants comply with the drug court
requirements. The prosecutor participates in a coordinated
strategy for responding to positive tests and other instances of
noncompliance. A prosecutor has to make decisions whether to
reinstate criminal prosecution if rehabilitation is unsuccessful.
Learning Objectives
Learning Objective
• Discuss the nonadversarial approach to drug court;
•S
ession participants will hear the details about these two new
research studies, and learn how to leverage SCRAM in their own
Specialty Courts to achieve similar recidivism reduction results.
• Discuss a prosecutor’s role in promoting rehabilitation
while protecting public safety;
• Discuss a prosecutor’s part in a team approach to
sanctions and other instances of noncompliance.
Kimberly J. Hassett
Deputy District Attorney
Compton, California
Session A-14
Avila A/B, Hilton
Session A-12 Interpretation of Opiate Results
The presentation is designed to inform the attendee of the
various naturally occurring and synthetic 0piates and their
metabolites. In addition the presentation will explain how these
various opiates cross react with immuno assay screening test
and which test will give a positive result for specific opiates.
Learning Objectives
• Learn the difference in natural and synthetic opiates;
• Learn differences in the metabolism of the natural
and synthetic opiates;
• Recognize what an amphetamine screen or
confirmation detect;
• Identify what’s new on the streets;
• Recognize what information the lab results provide.
Patricia Pizzo
Director of Toxicology, Substance Abuse Testing
Kroll, Inc
Grenta, Louisiana
Session A-13 Orange County Ballroom, Salon 4, Marriott
Evidence-Based Results of SCRAM
Programs
The evidence is in - SCRAM (Secure Continuous Remote Alcohol
Monitor) is working! SCRAM programs across the country are
producing quantifiable benefits, particularly in Specialty Courts.
This session will overview the highlights of a new study that
shows how courts are using SCRAM to reduce recidivism, and
how these results are impacted by a variety of factors including
length of monitoring and repeat DUI offenders.
®
www.nadcp.org
Mike Iiams
Chairman and CEO
Alcohol Monitoring Systems, Inc
Malibu, Hilton
Domestic Violence Courts: National
Models and Promising Practices
Judges, court staff and other drug court professionals frequently ask
whether drug court techniques can be applied to solve other social
problems, including domestic violence. This panel will draw on the
members’ considerable experience with implementing domestic
violence courts. Panelists will discuss the different models of
domestic violence courts and illuminate the overlap and differences
between drug and domestic violence courts. Additionally, the
presenters will update the audience on how many domestic violence
courts currently exist and what the research says about their
effectiveness. The presentation will also cover the role of compliance
reviews in a domestic violence court. This session is geared towards
criminal justice professionals and stakeholders who have an interest
in learning more about domestic violence courts.
Learning Objectives
• Participants will leave this session with a greater
understanding of the dynamics of domestic violence and
how this influences the domestic violence court model;
• Participants will also be introduced to the importance of working
in the context of a coordinated community response to domestic
violence and understand the role of compliance reviews.
Liberty Aldrich
Director, Domestic Violence Programs
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
Hon. Eugene Hyman
Judge
Santa Clara, California
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41
Session A-15 Pacific Ballroom B, Hilton
El Capitan A/B, Hilton
The Role of Expressive Therapies in
Problem-Solving Courts
Development and Operation of a Girls
Drug Court
Expressive Therapy is a well-established method of treating
addiction and mental illness. It utilizes the creative process
to improve and enhance the physical, mental and emotional
well-being of individuals of all ages and levels of functioning.
Problem-solving courts can utilize Expressive Therapy as a
motivational tool, as a creative reward and/or sanction, and as
a means of enhancing and complementing the recovery process.
The purpose of this presentation is to assist participants in
obtaining the knowledge and skills necessary to implement
creative and expressive activities that complement the recovery
process. This presentation is aimed at problem-solving court
personnel (Adult, Family and Juvenile) and treatment providers.
Santa Clara County, California, has had a Juvenile Delinquency
Drug Court for more than ten years. Although a few girls have
historically been included in that program, it was focused on
delinquent male teens. Santa Clara received a SAMHSA grant to
develop a gender specific girls drug court. Judge Johnson and her
panelists will share their experience in working out protocols and
procedures. Partners in the program include the court, juvenile
probation, mental health, and drug and alcohol treatment as
well as an education specialist, and volunteer mentors from
community agencies. Eighteen months later we have graduated
more than a dozen girls from the program, have clearer intake
procedures and a number of “clean” babies born to the girls.
Learning Objectives
Learning Objectives
• Acquire knowledge about the therapeutic value of Expressive
Therapies;
• Receive a brief overview of gender specific needs
of adolescents particularly in drug treatment
(Why girls are different!);
• Learn about various types of Expressive Therapies, including
those currently used at the Brooklyn Treatment Court and other
problem-solving courts;
• Participate in an experimental exercise with therapeutic value;
• Receive “realistic” and cost-effective strategies to implement
Expressive Therapies within your existing problem-solving
courts and/or treatment programs.
Joseph Madonia
Project Director
Brooklyn Treatment Court
Brooklyn, New York
Christina Ruffino
Clinical Director
Brooklyn Treatment Court
Brooklyn, New York
Joan E. Standora
Director, Substance Abuse Counseling Program
Dept. of Behavioral Sciences
Kingsborough Community College
Brooklyn, New York
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Session A-16 NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
• Learn how to develop a successful gender specific
juvenile drug court;
• Learn the importance of involving county agencies and
community partners in the planning and developmental
process and to keep them working as a team;
• Learn what works in drug treatment with adolescent girls;
• Recognize the intended audience would be those working with
juvenile drug offenders.
Hon. Margaret S. Johnson
Santa Clara County Superior Court
San Jose, California
Session A-17
California Ballroom A, Hilton
Methamphetamine and Its Power Impact
on the Basic Brain
This is a Powerpoint presentation designed for professionals
actively requiring a practical understanding of how
Methamphetamine and other “stimulant” drugs impact the
brain and the nervous system. Since chemical dependency
is a neurological-biological disorder, today’s health care
professionals, working in either the field of mental health or
chemical dependency, must understand the basic biology of
the brain and the long term neurological consequences of
Methamphetamine “stimulant” drug use.
Learning Objectives
Session A-19 • Gain practical information and understanding of how your
clients using Methamphetamine “Stimulant” drugs effect
them emotionally and physically;
Judicial Immunity
• Learn what regions of the brain and nervous system are directly
impacted by the use of Methamphetamine “Stimulant” drugs;
• Learn the pathological and physical consequences of using
Methamphetamine “Stimulant” drugs common to most
abusers;
• Understand the common co-existing disorders that result
from Methamphetamine “Stimulant” drugs and secondary
psychiatric interventions needed in effective treatment of
the “Stimulant” abusers co-existing concerns.
What did I just do? Can I do that or do I need to start carrying
Judicial Malpractice insurance (If there even is such an
underwriter)? In this interactive session, we discuss the general
parameters of judicial immunity and also address the unique
issues that potentially can arise from presiding in a problemsolving court.
Learning Objectives
• Understand why there is judicial immunity;
• Identify when a judge is immune;
• Recognize what a judge is immune from;
Carl Dawson
Licensed Professional Counselor
Springfield, Missouri
Session A-18
California Ballroom B, Hilton
• Appreciate how problem-solving courts can
present thorny judicial immunity issues.
Pacific Ballroom A, Hilton
Immigration Issues
Immigration issues ranging from denial of citizenship to possible
deportation for drug convictions in state and federal court can
affect the outcome for those in need of treatment. This session
will explore how successful completion of drug court affects
these outcomes.
Learning Objective
• To understand the effect of drug court on multiple
immigration issues.
Hon. Rogelio Flores
Superior Court Judge
Santa Barbara County Superior Court
Santa Maria, California
Belinda Escobosa Helzer
Staff Attorney
ACLU Foundation of Southern California
Orange County, California
Stacy Tolchin
Immigration Attorney
Van Der Hout, Brigagliano & Nightingale, LLP
Los Angeles, California
Hon. William Meyer
Judge (ret.)
Judicial Arbiter Group, Inc
Denver, Colorado
Session A-20
San Simeon B, Hilton
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders
FASD (Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders): Do You Know It When
You See It? Most of us know the facial anomalies associated with
FAS (Fetal Alcohol Syndrome). We know it when we see it. Yet,
FAS is only the tip of the iceberg. Over 90% of those struggling
with developmental and functional deficits due to prenatal
exposure to alcohol have no outward physical sign. They go
unidentified and undiagnosed. They struggle silently. They end
up in trouble, first in school, then in the community. They do well
when institutionalized, then once released, they re-offend. This
workshop will provide a basic understanding of FASD, what to
look for, and how to meet their needs in your courts.
Valerie Staats
Consultant Trainer
Amherst, New York
Session A-21 San Simeon A, Hilton
Drug Treatment Courts Finally Get the
International Attention They Deserve
The world is waking up to the fact that drug treatment courts
are the most cost-effective way to retain drug-abusing offenders
in treatment and reduce re-offending. This session will give you
the international arguments that you need to convince national
decision-makers to support your drug treatment court program
www.nadcp.org
Become a Member Today
43
and help you identify technical assistance providers through the
International Association of Drug Treatment Courts (IADTC).
Learning Objectives
Hon. Wendy Lindley
Judge
Superior Court of California
Orange County, California
• Learn about the recent international support for drug
treatment courts and how to use it in favor of your program;
• Learn about the international technical assistance
available to you.
MODERATOR
Hon. Paul Bentley
Chairman of the International Association of
Drug Treatment Courts (IADTC)
Toronto, Canada
Kristian Hölge
United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC)
Bogotá, Colombia
Hon. Bernard Leroy
United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC)
Vienna, Austria
Michael Sullivan
Inter-American Drug Control Abuse Commission (CICAD)
Washington, DC
Session A-22 Grand Ballroom F, Marriott
Community Courts in Action: Recent
Developments in California
The challenges of organizing a Community Court will be
presented by the Judicial Officers and leaders of these two court
efforts. Two new programs will be presented: Orange County’s
landmark service center where various collaborative courts and
services are in one location, and the San Francisco Community
Justice Center in the Tenderloin and South of Market area linking
a “community informed” court with services from the target area.
Learning Objectives
• Understand how early and consistent collaboration can
lead to program development and expansion;
• Learn how to be politically strategic in a controversial
environment to reach your project goals.
Ron Albers
Judicial Officer
San Francisco Community Justice Center
San Francisco, California
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NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Session A-23 Elite 1, Marriott
Using Drug Court to Save Our Young
African American Males
Treatment teams should be cognizant of cultural factors that
impact substance abusing young African American males in the
criminal justice system. To be effective, practitioners who work
with this population must be culturally proficient. This workshop
will explore issues of cultural proficiency in treatment settings.
Practitioners will learn about methods and approaches that work
in treatment settings with African American clients. Exercises will
cover topics such as effectively managing trauma and resistance
in a treatment setting.
Learning Objectives
• Enhance knowledge of cultural realities that impact
the lives of young African American males;
• Learn treatment protocols that are effective with
this population;
• Practice culturally proficient approaches and
methods during group exercises.
Darryl Turpin
President
Darryl Turpin Consulting
Louisville, Kentucky
CONCURRENT
GENERAL SESSIONS
1:45 pm-3:00 pm
Session CG-1
Grand Ballroom E, Marriott
Reentry/Drug Court: The Next
Generation of Drug Court
(This session is the first of two dedicated to the Reentry/Drug
Court Concept—see B-14)
Reentry/Drug Courts promise to transform drug courts into
systems focusing on those offenders who need drug court the
most: the non-violent, high-risk substance abusing offender, who
might otherwise be sent to prison. This mini-plenary will provide
the basis for “closing the gap” in the drug court system, and
reach out to those who need drug court the most.
Learning Objective
• Provide a conceptual, structural, and practical
understanding of the Reentry/Drug Court
Douglas Marlowe
NADCP Chief of Science, Law and Policy
Alexandria, Virginia
Grand Ballroom F, Marriott
Gender Matters: Creating Services
for Women
Over the past thirty years our knowledge of women’s lives
has increased dramatically, and we have added significantly
to our understanding of the treatment needs of women with
substance use disorders. Based on Dr. Covington’s model,
Women’s Integrated Treatment (WIT), this presentation offers a
comprehensive model for services. The results from an ongoing
NIDA-funded four site drug court study are also presented.
Learning Objectives
• Describe a comprehensive model for women’s treatment;
• Integrate current theoretical perspectives;
• Discuss findings from drug court study.
www.nadcp.org
Session CG-3 Platinum Ballroom, Marriott
From Concept to Real-World Practice:
Medication-Assisted Recovery for
Alcohol Dependence in the Drug Courts
The National Drug Court Institute states that “Drug Court programs
should adopt the use of medications as part of a comprehensive
treatment program…for individuals with a history of alcohol
dependence” (Quality Improvement for Drug Courts: EvidenceBased Practices, Monograph Series 9, April 2008, National
Drug Court Institute). Select treatment courts in Michigan and
Missouri are among the first in the United States to use VIVITROL®
(naltrexone for extended-release injectable suspension), a
once-a-month treatment for select alcohol dependent clients. An
educational presentation on VIVITROL will be followed by a panel
featuring retired Judge Peggy Hora and treatment systems CEO,
Christopher Wilkins. The panel will discuss use of evidence-based
practices in the Michigan and Missouri treatment courts.
This promotional event is sponsored by Alkermes. Please see our
ad in the program book for a brief summary of the prescribing
information by Vivitrol.
Hon. Jeffery Tauber
Judge
Berkeley, California
Session CG-2 Stephanie Covington
Co-Director
The Institute for Relational Development and
Center for Gender and Justice
La Jolla, California
Hon. Peggy Hora
Judge (retired)
Alameda County
Castro Valley, California
Christopher R. Wilkins, Sr.
President
Loyola Recovery Foundation
Pittsford, New York
Judge Hora and Mr. Wilkins are paid consultants of Alkermes, Inc.
Session CG-4
Pacific Ballroom B, Hilton
Ensuring Sustainability: Ensuring
Funding for your Drug Court in Tough
Economic Times
Are you concerned about how to sustain your drug court
given the tough economic times? Come hear four experts
from around the nation discuss strategies that work. With
local, multi-jurisdictional, and statewide perspectives, these
individuals will answer the difficult questions of how to ensure
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45
institutionalization of your drug court, while also providing you
with helpful hints on unique resources, grant writing, and wading
through the myriad of private and government funding options.
Learning Objectives
• Identify funding opportunities for drug courts;
• Understand the need to develop a comprehensive
sustainability strategy;
• Understand “tricks of the trade” in grant writing and
negotiating the maze of private and government resources.
MODERATOR
Dennis A. Reilly
Deputy Director
Drug Court Programs
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
Jane Pfeifer
Consultant
Justice Development and Training
Chico, California
Grand Ballroom A/B, Marriott
I am Woman, Help Me Soar!!
Beyond reproductive organ and hormonal differences, the brains
of females and males are constructed differently, as are their eyes,
ears, values, beliefs, motivators and approaches to problem solving.
These major gender differences are the heart and soul of the award
winning evidence-based Project SAFE being implemented across
the nation. This interactive workshop will cover stage appropriate
and gender competent interventions that are preserving/reuniting
families by launching mom’s recovery. IF YOU WORK WITH ADDICTED
FAMILIES IN FAMILY DRUG COURT, DON’T MISS THIS WORKSHOP!
• Participants will be presented with key research
on gender differences;
• Participants will be presented the gender competent and stage
appropriate key components that interrupt addictive patterns
and launch recovery.
Maya Hennessey
National Consultant and Trainer on Women and Addictions
Chicago, Illinois
Hank Pirowski
Director
Buffalo C.O.U.R.T.S Programs
Buffalo, New York
Session B-3 Grand Ballroom C/D, Marriott
Creating Support Systems, Eliminating
Excuses and Removing Road Blocks to
Recovery
3:15 pm-4:30 pm
Laguna A, Hilton
Building Teams to Last
Drug courts succeed or fail based on their ability to bring group
members together into a team. This course will define team
building in the context of drug court work, determine the level
of functionality of their team through team mapping, look
at communication patterns, apply Tuckman’s group process
paradigm, provide concrete roles for team members to take
during meetings using the SOFI HAGE model and apply it in a
small group exercise.
Learning Objectives
• Identify the key elements required to build a drug court team;
• Assess the functionality of their team and what can be done
to help improve its functionality.
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Session B-2 Learning Objectives
Ann Wilson
Executive Director
Missouri Association of Drug Court Professionals
Jefferson City, Missouri
Session B-1
Joe Lunievicz
Deputy Director
National Development and Research Institutes
New York, New York
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Do chronic excuses from the adolescents in your Juvenile Drug
Court slow down their progress in recovery as well as negatively
impact on the work done with the other participants? Do these
youthful offenders take advantage of holes in service delivery so
that they avoid working on their programs in a timely way? If you
are sometimes frustrated by the lack of supports in your juvenile
drug court, please come to this session and get refreshed and
back on track.
Learning Objectives
• Learn how to identify subterfuge and excuses that stall
success for the juveniles and the juvenile court in a climate
of accountability;
• Create a supportive network amongst the service providers that
can be flexible and strong enough to thwart attempts to derail
participants and the Court Team.
Hon. Andra Sparks
Attorney/Judge
The Sparks Family Law Firm
Birmingham, Alabama
Ura Jean Oyemade Bailey
Director
Center for Drug Abuse Research
Washington, DC
Grand Ballroom G/H, Marriott
Session B-4 MET/CBT 5
MET/CBT 5 is a manualized brief adolescent substance abuse
treatment program developed by Susan Sampl, Ph.D. & Ronald
Kadden, Ph.D. as a part of the Center for Substance Abuse
Treatment (CSAT) Cannabis Youth Treatment (CYT) Series trials.
The objectives of MET/CBT 5 consist of 2 individual Motivational
Enhancement sessions and 3 Cognitive Behavioral group therapy
sessions. The individual sessions utilize Motivational Interviewing
techniques to focus on building rapport and developing the
client’s motivation for change. The three (3) CBT group sessions
focus on developing skills for refusal, gaining social support, and
maintaining abstinence. This session will cover the research and
how to utilize this evidence-based treatment approach to assist
juveniles through the change process.
Learning Objectives
• Review the theory, rationale, MET and CBT strategies;
• Practice specific session procedures.
Wendy Danicourt
WD Consulting
St. Petersburg, Florida
Session B-5 Orange County Ballroom, Salon 2, Marriott
The Impact of the “War on Drugs”
and Drug Courts
For almost 25 years, drug court judges have adjusted and adapted
to drug policies that disparately impact African Americans with
little involvement or influence over legislative agendae. However,
legislative bills and policies affect the scope, direction, and daily
functioning of drug court judges, specifically those working in the
African American community. Being armed with the knowledge and
tools to influence legislative agendae enhances the quality of drug
court judges’ work by advocating for the unique needs of their court.
Learning Objectives
• Gain knowledge of disparities in health and the criminal justice
system emergent from unjust drug laws and drug policies;
• Identify current legislative bills and policies that have
consequences for drug treatment;
Hon. Arthur L. Burnett
National Executive Director
The National African American Drug Policy Coalition, Inc.
Washington, DC
Marshella Toldson
Attorney Advisor
The National African American Drug Policy Coalition, Inc.
Howard University Law
Washington, DC
Session B-6 Palos Verdes A/B, Hilton
A Tale of Two Family Drug Courts:
“Show me the Money!”
Family Recovery Courts (FRCs, also known as Family Drug Courts)
serve the multiple and complex needs of families involved in
the child welfare system because of parental substance abuse.
While this intervention grows rapidly, few rigorous studies have
examined the effectiveness of these courts and even fewer
studies have explored whether this program results in potential
societal cost savings.
This presentation provides an overview of the context of FRCs
in Maryland and summarizes the results from two outcome, and
cost studies. One of these courts is in an urban area, the other
in a suburban area; one of the programs represents a systemwide reform effort. This presentation includes data derived from
administrative data collection of program participants and a
comparison group, to examine the influence of the program on:
• Amount of time children spend in out-of-home placements
• Permanency outcomes
• Time to permanency
• How quickly parents enter treatment
• Amount of time spent in treatment
• Likelihood of treatment completion
Learning Objectives
• Obtain a working knowledge of the current outcomes
and trends of Family Recovery Courts;
• Obtain an understanding of the potential child welfare
cost savings of implementing Family Recovery Courts;
• Learn about evaluation use for program sustainability.
• Discuss implications for social justice and health promotion
strategies among drug court judges.
www.nadcp.org
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47
Scott W. M. Burrus
Research Associate
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
This portion of the session concentrates on the incentives in
adult drug court. Session (C-8) deals with sanctions.
Santa Monica, Hilton
Session B-9
Gray Barton
Executive Director
Office of Problem-Solving Courts
Annapolis, Maryland
Session B-7
Effective Community Supervision in
Drug Court
Grand Ballroom E, Marriott
Alcohol: Its Impact on the Brain
Neuroimaging has yielded new evidence about the effects on
the brain of alcohol use. This presentation will focus on those
new findings as well as describe the psychopharmacology of
alcohol use from both an acute and chronic use perspective. This
session is designed for both the new practitioner as well as the
experienced practitioner who might need an update on alcohol.
Learning Objectives
Learning Objectives
• Identify the neurochemical actions of alcohol in the brain;
• Identify the symptoms of the acute use of alcohol, its
chronic use consequences and withdrawal symptoms.
• Recognize the importance of field services in
supporting the recovery environment;
• Learn how supervision services enhance both
treatment and public safety outcomes;
• Assess your current supervision needs and
consider local solutions.
Ron Jackson
Evergreen Treatment Services
Seattle, Washington
Session B-8
Community Supervision is a critical component of each Drug Court
program. Whether juvenile, adult or family, there are things that
require attention within the home and community environment.
Identifying and addressing these issues enhances treatment
outcomes and public safety. Fun, fast paced, and full of photos, this
presentation brings home the importance of “getting out there.”
Attending this class will help you assess your current community
supervision needs, and provide suggestions on how to maximize
your resources. Additional critical topics include case management
and office based services as part of the comprehensive community
supervision response in the Drug Court setting.
Grand Ballroom J/K, Marriott
Helen Harberts
Assistant District Attorney
Chico, California
Incentives in Adult Drug Court
We know that the proper use of rewards shapes desired
behavior. However, it is sanctions, sanctions everywhere and
not an incentive in sight. In this interactive session, we discuss
how to effectively use and deliver incentives. Additionally, we
will participate in an exercise that will expand the incentives
available to our team.
Learning Objectives
• Understand why low level incentives do not
motivate behavior change;
• Recognize what incentives work and why;
• Utilize a greater array of incentives to enhance
behavior change.
Hon. William Meyer
Judge (ret.)
Judicial Arbiter Group, Inc
Denver, Colorado
48
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Session B-10 Orange County Ballroom, Salon 1, Marriott
Developing a DWI Court – Getting the
“Buy-in” from your Community
This presentation focuses on how to successfully elicit and
obtain support from within your community to start and
sustain a DWI Court. The presentation will explore how the
unique demographics of a jurisdiction factor into the need
for establishing a DWI Court as well as the efforts required
to sustain the Court once it is implemented. There will be an
examination of the availability of community partners and
resources necessary to form a successful DWI Court. This
presentation will review the local and State wide political climate
for the acceptance of Specialty Courts. The presenters will
assist in identifying any obstacles that may exist in establishing
your DWI Court. Lastly, there will be an examination on how to
conquer these obstacles in establishing your DWI Court.
Learning Objectives
Session B-12 • Understand what needs to be done to obtain the support
of the other criminal justice professionals for a DWI Court;
Overcoming Budgetary Constraints
• Understand and utilize the community to support a DWI Court;
In the current economic state, with budget cuts, funding losses,
and overall difficult financial situations, drug court programs face
potential major detrimental effects. Hear from peer programs
across the country on how they have met the challenge of budget
constraints, achieved sustainability, and ultimately became a
revenue generating program instead of a cost center concern.
The future of your participants is dependent on whether your
program can provide much needed services during an economic
crisis. Sustainability is now more important than ever to the
long-term success of drug courts.
• Learn what the issues are blocking a DWI Court and how to
overcome them.
Hon. Tony Abbatangelo
Judge
Clark County
Las Vegas, Nevada
Ray Figueroa
Clark County
Las Vegas, Nevada
Session B-11 Learning Objectives
Orange County Ballroom, Salon 3, Marriott
Being Effective Counsel in Drug Court
This session will focus on the defense attorney’s practice in
Drug Court. Topics will include working with substance abusers,
best practices for defense attorneys in a drug court setting and
maintaining ethics in a collaborative court.
Learning Objectives
• Learn how to effectively represent Drug Court participants
while maintaining strict adherence to ethical standards;
• Identify unique characteristics of working as a defense
attorney in drug court;
• Understand the role of the defense attorney on the
drug court team.
Nancy Chand
Attorney
County Public Defender’s Office
Los Angeles, California
Mark DeWit
Public Defender’s Office
Los Angeles, California
www.nadcp.org
Avila A/ B, Hilton
• Learn how others have utilized the Siemens and iMs
products and services to create a model of sustainability
in their programs;
• Address issues of budget constraints and learn how to
make shrinking program dollars go further.
Adrienne Bowen
Athens Clark County, Georgia
Darlene Default
Las Vegas, Nevada
Hon. Karen Freeman-Wilson
Judge (ret.)
Freeman-Wilson & Shannon-Lewis, LLC
Gary, Indiana
Hon. Kent Lawrence
Judge
State Court of Kent County
Athens, Georgia
Annie Markichevich
Las Vegas, Nevada
Angela Sparks
Executive Director
Marshall County Court Referral Services
Marshall County, Alabama
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49
Session B-13 Orange County Ballroom, Salon 4, Marriott
Malibu, Hilton
Managing Drug Testing Beyond the
Basics and Understanding “What’s New”
Reentry/ Drug Court From Different
Perspectives
Take a close look at the latest tools of Drug Court programs and
how to effectively use them to change the behavior of participants.
Take an engaging and enlightening look at the effects that drugs
can have on the body from marijuana to methamphetamine. Get
the answer to “what is the benefit of testing for drugs at lower
levels or expanded testing panels”. Look at the new data and
reports made available and how to use them in growing your
program. Hear the tough questions and answers you need to
develop respect and credibility in your Drug Court.
(This session is the second of two dedicated to the Reentry/Drug
Court Concept—see CG-1)
Learning Objectives
• Focusing on RANDOMIZATION, one of the most powerful
deterrents. How to take full advantage of the related tools
you have and, “What’s New;“
• Understanding drugs, past and present, including the truth
about the effects of today’s drugs and the old stand by’s
separating fact and fiction, then learning, “What’s New;”
• Explore drug testing at lower levels and expanded test panels.
Learning the benefits and challenges, then discovering,
“What’s New;”
• Utilizing Data and Reporting to identify trends and target
solutions for the next wave of challenges with Drugs of Abuse,
by examining, “What’s New.”
Jacky D. Burton
Executive Vice President
Premier Integrity Solutions
Jamestown, Kentucky
Donald J. Mac Neil
Director of Criminalistics and Addiction Medicine Services
Medtox Scientific, Inc.
Santa Clarita, California
Brian Walters
President CEO
Premier Integrity Solutions
Russell Springs, Kentucky
50
Session B-14
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Too often a new innovation is viewed through a limited lens. Join
a seasoned group of observers: judges, state legislators, parole
officers, state probation and parole supervisors, and researchers
who come at the reentry/drug court concept from very different
perspectives, yet share a vision of what reentry/Drug court can
become.
Learning Objective
• The objectives of this session will be to examine the many
forms of Reentry/Drug Court being developed nationwide
and how they work within a state drug court system.
MODERATOR
Hon. Jeffery Tauber
Judge
Berkeley, California
Michael Brady
Deputy Commissioner
Sacramento, California
Mary Kay Hudson
Problem-Solving Court Administrator
Indiana Judicial Center
Indianapolis, Indiana
Sheila Leslie
Specialty Courts Coordinator
Reno, Nevada
Session B-15
Pacific Ballroom B, Hilton
Co-Occurring Disorders: Science and
Treatment Strategies
Many individuals with mental illness also are misusing or abusing
substances. Individuals who are addicted to street drugs often
manifest psychiatric symptoms. Hence, diagnosis and treatments
often can be cumbersome and difficult to understand. Despite the
fact that a majority of individuals have both conditions, clinicians
continue to struggle with implementing culturally appropriate
treatments due to stigma and its complexity.
Learning Objectives
• Participants will become familiar with the philosophy and
protocols underlying homeless court programs to include
referral processes, progressive disposition agreements and
alternative sentencing practices;
• Participants will learn how to develop the tools for
replicating a HCP in their community;
• Participants will learn how to begin to build a support network
to address issues related to the treatment of trauma, reduction
of charges, and diversion.
Steve Binder
Deputy Public Defender
San Diego, California
Learning Objectives
• Understand co-occurring disorders;
• Understand behavioral manifestation of common street drugs;
• Understand treatment options.
Session B-17
Clayton Chau
Associate Medical Director
Integrated Services & Recovery
Orange County Health Care Agency, Behavioral Health
Orange County, California
Session B-16 El Capitan A/B, Hilton
From Homeless Court Program to a
Response for Returning Veterans
In 1989, San Diego started the first Homeless Court Program
(HCP) in the nation. To counteract the effect of criminal cases
pushing homeless defendants further outside society, this
unique superior court program combines a progressive plea
bargain system, alternative sentencing structure, assurance of
“no custody,” and proof of program activities to address a full
range of misdemeanor offenses and bring homeless defendants
back into mainstream society. Increasingly, we find veterans
returning from Iraq and Afghanistan in our case files and
courtrooms. Collaborative courts are well positioned to build a
constructive response to evaluate and identify veterans’ ailments
while reaching out to the social service community in developing
an action plan to address the underlying cause of their behavior.
www.nadcp.org
California Ballroom A, Hilton
Meth Manufacturing
Wanna get blown away? What you don’t know about
manufacturing methamphetamine could kill you. This session
takes a look at new trends in manufacturing methamphetamine
and provides general information to raise your awareness when
coming in contact with potentially hazardous situations. The
ability to identify, detect, decontaminate and manage yourself in
this environment is critical.
Learning Objectives
• Understand the risks to manufacturers and first
responders due to meth’s toxic chemicals;
• Learn how to manage a suspected laboratory site to
protect suspects, victims, and colleagues.
Vanessa Price
Sergeant—Drug Court Liaison Officer
Oklahoma County Drug Court Program
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
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Session B-18
Pacific Ballroom A, Hilton
Moving the Latina Client Successfully
through the Drug Court
When working with Latinas in the drug court program, drug
court professionals often encounter challenges from both a
gender and a cultural nature. It is through identifying cultural
and gender issues for this population that will help practitioners
in developing effective approaches of engagement which are
essential to promoting behavior change and successful program
completion for Latina clients. This presentation will discuss
values specific to Latinas and how adherence to these values
can impact on client’s behavior throughout the drug court
experience.
Learning Objectives
• List issues of societal, familial and environmental
factors for Latina clients;
• Recognize how cultural and gender issues affect
the Latina client’s perception and behavior;
• Identify effective approaches that will help motivate
Latinas to successfully complete the Drug Court program.
Diana Padilla
Cultural Proficiency Program Manager
National Development & Research Institutes, Inc.
New York, New York
Session B-19 California Ballroom B, Hilton
Sentencing Reform: What the
Future Holds
Around the nation, many jurisdictions are looking at reforms in
sentencing laws, especially those that impact drug possession.
What are the forces working behind the scenes on sentencing
reform, and what does the future hold? This session will explore
what we should expect to see from legislators across the country
in regard to sentencing reform of drug laws in the next few years.
Learning Objectives
• Recognize the move to modify sentencing and drug crime;
• Identify the trends in sentencing reform and how legislators,
specifically those in California and Washington, DC,
are dealing with this issue;
• Understand the history of sentencing reform in
American justice.
Hon. Stephen Manley
Superior Court Judge
County of Santa Clara
San Jose, CA
52
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Session B-20
San Simeon B, Hilton
Historical Trauma & the American
Indian: Rekindling the Sacred Fires for
Healing, Justice and Peace
For generations, American Indians suffered massive loss of life,
land, culture, kinship, and identity as the result of destructive
government policies. Their spiritual beliefs were outlawed, so
they were unable to heal. Furthermore, since these losses were
not acknowledged (until recently), the grieving process that
facilitates healing has been slow. Unresolved trauma is passed
on from generation to generation. Today, we are learning about
post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and complex trauma within
context of the unresolved historical trauma suffered by the
American Indian. This workshop will provide a basic understanding
of the American Indian and unresolved historical trauma and its
implications for drug courts/Healing to Wellness Courts in terms
of blending the linear and holistic world views, trust-building,
assessment, family and community engagement, and treatment/
healing options, including the utilization of traditional indigenous
ceremonies and other activities of learning and healing.
Valerie Staats
Consultant Trainer
Amherst, New York
Session B-21 San Simeon A, Hilton
Accepting Higher Risk and Higher Need
Offenders in Drug Treatment Courts (DTC)
This presentation will discuss the management and treatment
of violent and co-disordered offenders, ultimately showing
that those with a violent history can participate in a DTC. The
Downtown East Side of Vancouver, British Columbia (the DES)
has a reputation for having one of the poorest and most densely
populated addict communities in North America. Many addicts
of the DES have severe and long standing addictions to hard
drugs, while also suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder,
undiagnosed mental illness, HIV, AIDS and Hepatitis C. Violence
“on the street” is endemic. All DES addicts live with a certain
degree of violence everyday. The Drug Treatment Court of
Vancouver has relaxed its admission criteria, to accept some
addicted offenders who previously were convicted of violent
offenses ranging from simple assaults to robberies. Their greater
safety risk and higher needs challenge the DTC team’s capacity
to provide much needed treatment services while also protecting
public safety at all times.
Learning Objectives
Session B-22 • Identify challenges for integrating therapeutic services at a DTC
treatment centre for non-violent participants and participants
who pose a higher risk of exhibiting aggressive or violent
behaviour;
DATA - Survival: California Drug Court
Cost Study and the Importance of
Collecting Meaningful Data
• Learn how to work effectively with DTC participants who live
with a higher level of violence than is reflected in their criminal
record;
• Investigate tolerance levels within the DTC for managing
participants’ aggressive and violent behaviour in the DTC
treatment centre as well as in the community.
Jeremy Guild
Defense Counsel for the Drug Treatment Court of Vancouver
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Deborah Hines
Manager of the Drug Court Treatment and Resource Centre
British Columbia Corrections
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Pat Hoogeveen
Clinical Supervisor of the Drug Court Treatment
and Resource Centre
Vancouver Coastal Health Authority
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Hon. Jocelyn Palmer
Judge for the Drug Treatment Court of Vancouver
Provincial Court of British Columbia
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Gerri-Lyn Nelson
Barrister & Solicitor
Provincial Crown for the Drug Treatment Court of Vancouver
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Garth Smith
Federal Crown for the Drug Treatment Court of Vancouver
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Grand Ballroom F, Marriott
Research throughout the nation has consistently proven that
drug courts save taxpayer money. Although information on
the costs and benefits associated with drug courts has been
invaluable for policy makers and practitioners, few drug courts
have the resources to conduct cost-benefit studies at the local
level. The Judicial Council of California and NPC Research have
developed the Drug Court Cost Self-Evaluation Tool (DC-CSET)
to enable courts to determine their own costs and benefits.
Numerous courts throughout the state have used the tool and
results from the study have been used by policy makers and
practitioners alike, underscoring the need to collect meaningful
data. Results from the cost study courts will be presented. A
discussion of the importance of collecting meaningful data and
efforts to improve data collection will follow.
Learning Objectives
• Learn the importance of data collection as it applies to
program funding priorities;
• Learn what data elements need collecting along with an
overall description of how each element impacts the results;
• Receive an introduction to DC-CSET. See an overview of the
web based tool allowing you to better understand the impact
and benefits of implementation at the local level;
• Learn what is on the horizon; Near term and long term changes
that are coming; Auto calculation; California Case Management
System (CCMS).
Moderator
Kevin Wortell
Branch Chief
Office of Criminal Justice Collaboration
Sacramento, California
Shannon Carey
Senior Research Associate
NPC Research, Inc.
Portland, Oregon
Deborah Cima
Treatment Court Coordinator
Superior Court
San Bernardino, California
Pamela Miller
Collaborative Justice Coordinator
Superior Court of Riverside County
Riverside, California
www.nadcp.org
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53
Session B-23 Elite 1, Marriott
Spirituality and Recovery for African
Americans
Using William Miller’s book “Integrating Spirituality into
Treatment” for practitioners, Guy Wheeler discusses how
spirituality is vital to many clients, especially African American
clients. Many providers are reluctant to use this powerful tool,
but research and studies have documented that spirituality aids
in recovery.
4:45 pm-5:30 pm
Discipline Specific Breakouts
Treatment Providers – Adults
Grand Ballroom A/B (MAR)
Treatment Providers – Juvenile
Grand Ballroom C/D (MAR)
Tribal Judges
Grand Ballroom E (MAR)
Tribal Treatment Providers
Learning Objectives
Grand Ballroom F (MAR)
• Define and explain spirituality;
Tribal Coordinators
• Understand the difference between spirituality and religion;
Grand Ballroom G/H (MAR)
• Show how African Americans are impacted by spirituality
in treatment;
Tribal Defense Attorneys
• Convey how spirituality can be integrated into treatment
and utilized as a powerful support system.
Prosecutors
Guy Wheeler
President
Guy Wheeler & Guy A. Wheeler Group
Plantation, Florida
Grand Ballroom J/K (MAR)
OC Salon 1 (MAR)
Defense Attorneys
OC Salon 2 (MAR)
Researchers and Evaluators
OC Salon 3 (MAR)
State Coordinators
OC Salon 4 (MAR)
ANCILLARY EVENTS
Administrators/Coordinators
5:30 pm-7:00 pm
Child Protection Services
Thurgood Marshall Action Committee
Pacific Ballroom B (HIL)
Elite 1 (MAR)
5:45 pm-6:30 pm
Pacific Ballroom A (HIL)
Community Supervision/Probation Services
Adult Courts
NADCP Membership Meeting
California Ballroom A (HIL)
Grand Ballroom C/D (MAR)
Community Supervision/Probation Services
Juvenile Courts
6:30 pm-7:00 pm
Florida Association of Drug Court
Professionals
San Simeon A (HIL)
California Ballroom B (HIL)
Guardian Ad Litem/Court Appointed Advocate
El Capitan A/B (HIL)
Judges – Adult Courts
Malibu (HIL)
Judges – Juvenile Courts
Palos Verdes A/B (HIL)
Judges – Family Courts
Laguna A (HIL)
Law Enforcement
Santa Monica (HIL)
54
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
FRIDAY, JUNE 12
Registration Open
7:30 am-5:00 pm
Continental Breakfast in Exhibit Hall
7:00 am-8:00 am
Exhibit Hall Open
7:00 am-1:00 pm
Opening Session
8:00 am-10:00 am
Break in Exhibit Hall
10:00 am-10:30 am
Concurrent Workshops, Session C
10:30 am-11:45 am
Lunch on your own
11:45 am-1:30 pm
Concurrent General Sessions
1:30 pm-2:45 pm
Concurrent Workshops, Session D
3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Concurrent Workshops, Session E
4:30 pm-5:45 pm
Celebrating 20 Years of Drug Court Gala
6:30 pm-8:30 pm
FRIDAY
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
FRIDAY
NOTES
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FRIDAY, JUNE 12
8:00 am–10:00 am
ANCHOR
Dr. Doug Marlowe
NADCP Chief of Science, Law, and Policy
GENERAL SESSION
PANELISTS
Edward H. Jurith (invited)
Acting-Director
Office of National Drug Control Policy
Executive Office of the President
Washington, DC
Platinum Ballroom, Marriott
Welcome
West Huddleston
NADCP Chief Executive Officer
Special Guests
Rethinking Business as Usual
General Barry R. McCaffrey (ret.)
BR McCaffrey Associates
Alexandria, Virginia
The youngest four star general in United States
history and the first US Drug Czar, General Barry
McCaffrey has been at the forefront of championing
treatment alternatives for addicted persons in the
justice system.
Plenary
Twenty Years of Getting it Right
Over the last twenty years, Drug Courts have spread from Miami,
Florida to every U.S. state and territory as well as to nearly
twenty other countries throughout the world. The research about
Drug Court is clear…it works. But what about it works and just
how important is fidelity to the original Drug Court model, the
Ten Key Components? Does an adult Drug Court need to maintain
strict adherence to the Ten Key Components to have good
outcomes? Are the Ten Key Components necessary for other
populations and problem solving courts?
Session anchor Dr. Doug Marlowe will announce new findings
that answer these questions and an impressive panel of Federal
leaders, notable pioneers and researchers will discuss the
impact of the Drug Court model on the community and the
overall justice and treatment system.
Honorable Laurie Robinson (invited)
Acting-Assistant Attorney General
Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
Washington, DC
Rich Kopanda
Deputy Director
Center for Substance Abuse Treatment
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Rockville, Maryland
Dr. Timothy Condon
Deputy Director
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, Maryland
Dr. Jeff Michael
Associate Administrator for Research and Program Development
National Highway Transportation Safety Administration
Washington, DC
Michele M. Leonhart (invited)
Acting-Administrator
Drug Enforcement Administration
Washington, DC
Dr. Shannon M. Carey
Senior Research Associate
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
Hon. William Dressel
President
National Judicial College
Reno, Nevada
Hon. Leonia Lloyd
Judge
36th District Court, Drug Treatment Court
Detroit, Michigan
Hon. Jeff Tauber (ret.)
NADCP President Emeritus for Life
Berkley, California
www.nadcp.org
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55
FRIDAY, JUNE 12
10:30 am-11:45 am
Learning Objectives
The audience will:
• Learn the factors that predict enrollment and completion
in FTCs;
Laguna A, Hilton
Session C-1
Psychopharmacology
Alcohol and other drugs modify the body’s entire neurochemistry
once they enter the body’s system. Alcohol and other drugs
trigger a massive release of neurotransmitters within the brain’s
pleasure centers, inhibiting its ability to replenish its chemical
reservoirs. This session will provide practitioners with insight
into why an individual continually uses drugs to replenish
chemical reservoirs to feel “good” again.
Learning Objectives
• Understand the effect of drug use on mind and body;
• Learn to distinguish behaviors associated with use
and withdrawal of various drugs.
Steve Hanson
Director
Bureau of Addiction Treatment Centers
New York OASAS
Albany, New York
Session C-2
Grand Ballroom A/B, Marriott
Family Treatment Court Research:
Developmental Needs and Practice
Implications
This presentation will discuss the study and findings from an
evaluation of a Family Treatment Court (FTC) in a northeastern,
mid-sized metropolitan city. This study involved access to the FTC
database enabling extensive record review of parents who were
ever referred to the FTC program (in the years 2003-2005). The
study examined certain demographic characteristics, severity
of substance use problems, parent-child factors, and severity
of mental health as possible influences upon the outcomes of
enrollment and completion of an FTC. Of particular interest is the
fact that there was virtually no drug court literature to suggest
predictors of enrollment in an FTC. There will be an emphasis on
the developmental needs of children and families involved with
FTCs, as well as implications for practice for professionals and
the child and family population served by FTCs.
56
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
• Learn of the developmental needs and practice implications
for the population of children and families served by FTCs.
Joanne Cannavo
Assistant Professor; Director
Field Education Department of Social Work and Sociology
Daemen College
Amherst, New York
Session C-3 Grand Ballroom C/D, Marriott
Critical Elements of a Juvenile
Treatment Court Program: What Works
in Counties in Four States
This session will present a synthesis of findings across 8 juvenile
treatment court programs highlighting the critical elements
that have lead to their success over time. The programs are
being implemented in New Mexico (3), Florida (2), Colorado
and Maryland (2). The information presented is compiled from
numerous reports on the eight programs over time, and focuses
on key elements and practices developed and implemented
by the programs. Finally, lessons learned and best practices
identified are presented, along with their impact on the local
communities involved.
Learning Objectives
• Need to identify practical, effective components for juvenile
treatment court programs that produce desired results for
clients. Explain how specific critical elements impact program
retention and outcomes;
• Learn about the critical elements that juvenile drug courts have
used to enhance the program design to produce permanent
change in their clients;
• Provide input on how to further compile and disseminate
critical elements of juvenile drug courts nationwide.
Robert A. Kirchner
Director of Research
Glacier Consulting, Inc.
Annapolis, Maryland
Grand Ballroom G/H, Marriott
Session C-4 Session C-6
Palos Verdes A/B, Hilton
Utilizing the Matrix Model in Drug
Court – An Evidence Based Approach
Evidence Based Programming
for Your Clients
The Matrix approach emphasizes the use of outpatient techniques
that focus on lifestyle changes, relapse prevention and changed brain
chemistry to educate participants on finding the Road to Recovery.
The model has proven effective to treat thousands of clients. Dr.
Nora Volkow stated “studies have shown the Matrix Model can be
used successfully in the treatment of addiction and is recognized as
a NIDA/SAMSHA list of approved evidenced-based programs.” This
course will provide information on how the model can be utilized
with drug courts, the phases of drug courts and provide information
for courts to achieve the highest possible treatment outcomes. A
must see for complex drug court participants.
To be effective and cost-efficient, services in drug courts must
be modified based upon the risk-and-needs profiles of clients,
and adapted over time in response to clients’ performance in
treatment. This presentation will review an evidence-based
approach to matching clients in drug courts to the most effective
and cost-efficient interventions.
Learning Objectives
• Understand the Matrix Model can be utilized in a
drug court setting;
• Describe the elements of the model and how it
differs from other treatment models;
• Describe the usefulness of the model and how it
can be utilized with the most difficult and complex
populations such as drug courts.
Donna Johnson
Matrix Institute on Addictions
Los Angeles, California
Session C-5
Orange County Ballroom, Salon 2, Marriott
Engaging Minority Families
It is important to recognize the difference between being culturally
aware and culturally competent. Without truly understanding
the differences in the culture of minority families or why these
families might be suspicious of outside interventions, erroneous
assumptions may be made and opportunities to assist the family
may be missed, potentially heightening the distrust of helping
agencies. It is vital to understand how to approach different
cultures as people from all over the world immigrate to the US,
easily becoming overwhelmed with the challenges facing them.
Learning Objective
• Understand how to approach and engage minority
families in an authentic way, recognizing personal
biases and assumptions.
Darryl Turpin
President
Darryl Turpin Consulting
Louisville, Kentucky
www.nadcp.org
Learning Objectives
• Learn how to match clients to supervision and
treatment services based on their risks and needs;
• Learn how to adapt interventions over time in
response to clients’ performance in the program.
Doug Marlowe
Chief of Science, Law, and Policy
National Association of Drug Court Professionals
Alexandria, Virginia
Session C-7
Grand Ballroom E, Marriott
Prescription Drug Medications
Lessons Learned: Unique problems and suggested solutions
associated with drug courts in which participants have
prescription medication abuse issues. This workshop will
explore the unique problems associated with drug courts in
which participants have prescription medication abuse issues.
The attendee will learn the complexity of the problem, the
effectiveness of the drug court model, and some practical
suggestions to address specific problems in these courts.
Learning Objectives
• Educating attendees on the complexity of the prescription
medication abuse problem in drug court;
• Educating attendees on the effectiveness of the drug court
model in drug courts where participants have prescription
medication abuse problems;
• Offering practical suggestions that will improve the
performance of the drug court dealing with prescription
medication abuse issues.
Hon. Lewis D. Nicholls
Senior Judge
Commonwealth of Kentucky
Greenup, Kentucky
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57
Session C-8 Grand Ballroom J/K, Marriott
Sanctions in Adult Drug Court
How do we properly use sanctions to motivate behavior change?
Sometimes, I feel like I am being punitive and other times I
feel like I am coddling drug court participants. What is worse is
that our team is not getting the expected result from the use of
sanctions. In this interactive session we discuss who needs what
and when to effectively motivate behavior change with sanctions.
Learning objectives
• Understand how sanctions work;
• Recognize what sanctions work, for whom and when;
• Appreciate what sanctions don’t work.
Hon. William Meyer
Judge (ret.)
Judicial Arbiter Group, Inc
Denver, Colorado
As the last session looked exclusively at incentives, this session
looks at sanctions.
Session C-9 Santa Monica, Hilton
Lessons Learned: EBP in the Real World
of Corrections
This workshop will explore the operational rewards and
challenges of initiating an evidence-based correctional model,
from the perspective of a recently-retired probation chief who
survived his own EBP implementation process. Real-life lessons,
learned the hard way, about the successes and pitfalls of
implementing EBP at the field level will be discussed from a drug
court perspective. Emphasis will be on the practical applications
of the “What Works” correctional literature and the trials and
tribulations of implementing (in real time and with limited
resources) the complex, interrelated practices that research
suggests may improve offender outcomes and enhance longterm public safety, if done with fidelity and sustainability.
Learning Objectives
• Educating participants on the latest in evidence-based
correctional concepts, while providing participants with
practical applications of the What Works research in a
“real world” drug court environment;
• Preparing participants for the operational challenges inherent
in an EBP implementation process, in terms of planning,
organizational development, culture change, operational
capacity, skill acquisition, collaboration, quality assurance
and leadership.
58
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Neal Goodloe
Consultant and Trainer
Northpointe Institute for Public Management
Traverse City, Michigan
Session C-10 Orange County Ballroom, Salon 1, Marriott
Discovering the Real Problem: Effective
Assessment in DUI/DWI Courts
Communities across the globe are grappling with how best
to deal with men, women, and youth who are charged with
or convicted of alcohol-related offenses—with DUI and DWI
offenses being of greatest concern. This workshop will outline
the steps for accurately assessing the true extent of the
alcohol or other drug problem that may have contributed to
the alcohol-related driving offense. Special emphasis will be
given to exploring the convincing evidence that suggests that
therapeutic rapport is essential to conducting an accurate
alcohol assessment. We will explore how to assess public safety
risk and clinical need to determine the proper balance between
supervision and treatment responses for the DUI/DWI offender.
Learning Objectives
• Explore how we have often “missed the boat” when
trying to assess DUI/DWI offenders;
• Discover three secrets to establishing instant rapport
during assessment, treatment, or supervision sessions;
• Examine the critical components of accurately assessing
both clinical need and public safety risk.
Terrence Walton
Director of Treatment
DC Pretrial Services Agency (PSA)
Washington, DC
Session C-11
Orange County Ballroom, Salon 3, Marriott
Ethical Issues in Drug Court
for Attorneys
This session will provide an overview of the issues that are
unique to the defense counsel practice in drug court. Drug court
encourages teamwork in conjunction with therapeutic models
of justice. For the defense attorney, this shift can result in some
ethical, legal and practical dilemmas. No member of the drug
court team has experienced more conflict or struggled with their
role or identity as the defense attorney.
Learning Objectives
• Participants will better understand the role of
defense counsel in drug courts;
• Participants will learn about common ethical
dilemmas faced by defense counsel in drug courts;
• Participants will learn how defense counsel balance ethical
responsibilities with the goals of the drug court.
Session C-13 Orange County Ballroom, Salon 4, Marriott
Expanding your Court’s Drug Testing
Tool Box
Do you want to improve your court’s drug testing toolbox, and
the reliability of the test results you’re getting? Do you want
to maximizing on the resources available in your court for
sample acquisition and testing? This track will offer attendees
an opportunity to explore how expanding the courts tool box
of drug testing tools to include oral fluid testing can help drug
courts address a number of the issues that routinely arise in the
drug testing process.
Austine Long
Technical Assistance Project Director
National Drug Court Institute
Alexandria, Virginia
Jim Egar
Monterey Public Defender
Pacific Grove, California
Learning Objectives
Session C-12 Avila A/B, Hilton
It Takes a Village: The Relationship
between Courts and Treatment
Providers
“Drug courts should ensure that the judge, case managers,
the participant, and the entire drug court team continually
monitor the effectiveness of the RPP (Relapse Prevention
Plan) that is currently in place” (Quality Improvement for Drug
Courts: Evidence-Based Practices, Monograph Series 9, April
2008, National Drug Court Institute). Select treatment courts
in Michigan and Missouri are among the first in the United
States to use VIVITROL® (naltrexone for extended-release
injectable suspension) a once-a-month treatment for select
alcohol dependent clients. This event will feature an educational
presentation discussing VIVITROL and the critical relationships
between the key stakeholders in the treatment courts: judges,
probation and parole officers, case managers, and treatment
providers. Following this presentation, Attorney Michael Loeffler
and a court administrator from Missouri will discuss the impact
of these important stakeholders.
Learning Objectives
• The most common issues arising from urine drug testing and/
or point of care testing including recent use concerns, false
negatives, sample integrity and adulteration, juvenile testing,
same gender collection and costs associated with these and
other issues;
• How oral fluid drug testing has helped them overcome
these issues and consequently improved the quality and
efficiency of testing;
• Learn ways oral fluid can help drug court programs maximize
on their budget dollars by streamlining processes.
Ed Cone
ConeChem Research, LLC
Severna Park, Maryland
Brian Feeley
National Account Manager
Substance Abuse Testing
Orasure
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
Janet Ward
Radford, Virginia
• Learn best practices employed when
supervising the DWI offender;
• Understand what skills are needed to
supervise the DWI offender.
Mr. Loeffler is a paid consultant of Alkermes, Inc.
Mike Loeffler
Deputy District Attorney
Bristow, Oklahoma
www.nadcp.org
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Session C-14
Malibu, Hilton
Developing a Community Court: How
to Keep a Project Moving Forward in a
Challenging Environment
In 2006, the San Francisco Superior Court, in partnership with
the Mayor’s Office and the Center for Court Innovation in New
York, undertook a needs assessment in the city’s high-crime
Tenderloin and SOMA neighborhood with the goal of opening a
community court there (the “Community Justice Center”). The
complexity of the neighborhood and the political environment
matched the complexity of developing this highly visible
program. Participants will learn about the trajectory of program
planning, including stories of success and ‘what we wish we
knew.’ Even before opening its doors, the Community Justice
Center obtained over $1.3 million in grants, and received strong
support from the San Francisco’s business community, residents;
at the same time, though, it generated significant opposition
from political activists. Throughout this tumultuous environment,
planners persevered and the project opened in March 2009.
Learning Objectives
• Learn the importance of thorough community engagement
and planning in the implementation of a community court;
• Understand how early and consistent collaboration can lead
to program development and expansion;
• Learn how to be politically strategic in a controversial
environment to reach your project goals.
MODERATOR
Julius Lang
Director, Technical Assistance
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
Hon. Ron Albers
Judicial Officer
San Francisco Community Justice Center
San Francisco, California
Lisa Lightman
Director for Collaborative Justice Courts
San Francisco Superior Courts
San Francisco, California
Tomiquia Moss
Community Justice Center Coordinator
San Francisco, California
60
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Session C-15 Pacific Ballroom B, Hilton
Conquering the Fear of Coloring Outside
the Lines
The client population of New Orleans’ Drug Court Program is
especially vulnerable to particular challenges post-Katrina.
Staff collaboration to implement alternative modalities led to
creative, motivational strategies to meet individual needs, as
well as continuity of care. This session will showcase treatment
successes in client engagement, retention, and satisfaction.
Learning Objectives
• Explore non-traditional, alternative therapies;
• Understand how creative interventions can engage,
motivate and empower clients;
• Recognize how such strategies can increase client
retention and satisfaction.
Michelle Cassisa
Metropolitan Human Services District
New Orleans, Louisiana
Rena Smith
Metropolitan Human Services District
New Orleans, Louisiana
Session C-16 El Capitan A/B, Hilton
Making Proposition 36 Work in Rural
California: El Dorado County’s Solution
Because we recognize that families who struggle with substance
abuse and addiction come into contact with the Judicial system in
a variety of ways, El Dorado County’s Proposition 36 Drug Court
calls upon a variety of traditional and non-traditional partners to
participate in a practice of collaborative case management that
is creative and pro-active. Key partners such as Public Health
Nursing, Department of Human Services Cal-Works, Children’s
Protective Services, and Mental Health provide enhanced
services to clients such as home visits, well child checks, child
care, job training and other supportive services maximize client’s
ability to fully avail themselves of treatment and maximize the
prudent use of a variety of funding streams.
Learning Objectives
• Witness an actual case management process in which
team members engage discussion and problem solving
related to client recent actual client scenarios;
• Learn methods that will build on the strength of
their Drug Court Teams;
• Engage in a question and answer process with
El Dorado County’s Drug Court Team.
Larry Cantwell
Senior Deputy Probation Officer
El Dorado County Probation Department
Placerville, California
Jessica L’Etoile
Deputy Probation Officer
El Dorado County Probation Department
Placerville, California
Phyllis Goldie
Placerville, California
Salina Villa
Registered Addiction Specialist
Placerville, California
Session C-17
California Ballroom A, Hilton
Effective Treatment for
Methamphetamine Dependence
This is a presentation designed for professionals actively
seeking to understand the 13 necessary components of effective
“Stimulant” drug treatment. This presentation will quickly review
current research with respect to gender differences and the
use of stimulant drugs and then focus on recent concepts and
therapeutic philosophies being utilized in the treatment of all
drugs of dependency today.
Learning Objectives
•G
ain practical information and understanding of how their clients
using “Stimulant” and other drugs benefit from following 13
primary components of a successful treatment program;
• Gain a current understanding of what regions of the brain
and nervous system are directly impacted by the use of
“Stimulant” drugs;
• Understand the common co-existing disorders that result from
“Stimulant” drugs and secondary psychiatric interventions
needed in effective treatment of the “Stimulant” abusers coexisting concerns;
• Review the current research regarding the use of “Stimulant”
drugs and their distinctive impact on various gender
differences and multi-cultural populations;
• Learn practical treatment recommendations found to
be currently most effective with the Methamphetamine
“Stimulant” abusing client.
Carl Dawson
Licensed Professional Counselor
Springfield, Missouri
Hon. Douglas Phimister
Judge
El Dorado County Public Health
Placerville, California
Laurie Prince
Placerville, California
Ralph Thomure
Placerville, California
Rachel Wilson
Attorney
El Dorado County Public Health
Placerville, California
www.nadcp.org
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Session C-18
Pacific Ballroom A, Hilton
Cultural Issues and Perceptions
with Latinos
Drug court professionals find that Latino clients share common
issues as well as a great diversity at the same time. Identifying
cultural differences within this community is essential to
individualized treatment. This presentation will look at Latino
cultural issues and how perception, from both the client and
the practitioner can impact on perceived client behavior and
motivation. Incorporating the client’s cultural perspective will help
practitioners develop effective strategies, including culturally
appropriate sanctions and incentives that can help provide an
atmosphere that will enhance successful program completion.
Learning Objectives
• Identify two attitudes commonly associated with Latinos
in a Drug Court program.
• List at least two client behaviors practitioners see as counter
productive on the client’s part to succeed in the program;
• State at least one other interpretation for each client behavior
when the behavior is looked at from a cultural perspective;
• List at least two culturally appropriate incentives and sanctions
for Latinos in Drug Court program.
Diana Padilla
Cultural Proficiency Program Manager
National Development & Research Institutes, Inc.
New York, New York
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NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Session C-19 California Ballroom B, Hilton
Overview of the FBI NICS Section and
Ensuring Federal Firearms Prohibitions
for Drug Cases
This presentation will focused on United States Code, Title
18, Section 922(g)(3) which is a federal firearms prohibition
for individuals who abuse drugs. The speakers will focus on
the importance of documenting drug arrest, conviction, and
all test information in court and arrest records. We will show
how documenting this information will help the NICS prevent
prohibited individuals from possessing firearms. We will also
give an overview of the NICS and impacts court documentation
has on our process of enforcing firearm prohibitions.
Learning Objectives
• Understand the requirements of the federal law
prohibiting firearms for persons who abuse drugs;
• Learn what is needed to properly document the
case from the arrest to conviction and after;
• Understand what is required by the NICS and
how the courts impact the process.
Roberta A. Hatcher
Legal Administrative Specialist
FBI CJIS Division
NICS Section
Clarksburg, West Virginia
Session C-20 San Simeon B, Hilton
Multisystemic Family Therapy and Tribal
Wellness (Drug) Court: Implementing
an Evidence Based Practice on the
Reservation
Multisystemic Family Therapy is an evidence based intervention
delivered in the home that has been effectively reducing youth
incarceration and out of home placement for the past 20 years.
The Southern Ute Community Action Program’s (SUCAP) Peaceful
Spirit MST program has been successfully delivering MST to
tribal families since 2000 and for 6 years has been the only
MST program implemented on a Native American reservation.
MST works by helping families change systems in their natural
environment and cannot be successful without full collaboration
of community partners. The Peaceful spirit program has proven
to be a valuable component of tribal wellness court and the
surrounding communities in Southwestern Colorado, achieving
significant reduction in out of home placement and arrest rates
for youth. This workshop will provide an overview of MST as
implemented in a culturally diverse rural setting, review program
outcomes over the last 6 years, and discuss the strengths,
struggles and lessons learned in successfully implementing
MST within a tribal wellness (drug) court system and reservation
community. Participants will interact in activities exploring
case examples and will develop community collaboration skills
relevant to working within any juvenile justice and drug court
treatment system.
Learning Objectives
• Describe the core treatment and community components
of Multisystemic Therapy;
• Understand the strengths and challenges of implementing a
rigorous evidence based practice in a tribal community and
wellness/drug court setting;
• Learn and practice effective cross systems collaboration skills
on behalf of youth and families with attention to successful
partnerships with wellness/drug courts;
• Report on clinical outcomes achieved by the Peaceful Spirit
MST team.
Della Romero
Program Manager
Peaceful Spirit Multisystemic Therapy Program
Southern Ute Community Action
Ignacio, Colorado
Erica Viggiano
Director
Center for High Risk Youth Studies
Metropolitan State College
Denver, Colorado
www.nadcp.org
Session C-21
San Simeon A, Hilton
Development of Drug Courts in
Latin America
Drug treatment courts are expanding all over the world. Chile is
not an exception. At this time, there are 18 programs functioning
in the country. This session will look at the development of these
programs in Latin-America. It will review the implementation
process and all the obstacles that have to be tackled in order to
comply with quality standards and with the key components. The
session will also look at the role of the judge and the satisfaction
level of the participants within the program.
Learning Objectives
• To analyze the implementation process of a drug treatment
court in a Latin-American country;
• To learn about the role of the judge in Latin-American countries.
Catalina Droppelmann
Director of Justice Systems and Rehabilitation
Fundación Paz Ciudadana
Santiago de Chile, Chile
Session C-22 Grand Ballroom F, Marriott
Hot Topics in California Collaborative
Justice Court Programs – Ask the
Experts
A panel of statewide experts presents an overview of HOT
TOPICS in the Collaborative Justice Courts of California including
“survival” of your court when overall court funding is cut, finding
creative ways to be part of the “solution” such as reentry courts,
making Proposition 36 and Drug Courts work more effectively in
challenging economic times, the latest legislation, as well as an
open forum for questions from the audience – ask the experts!
Learning Objectives
• To learn the latest research, methods, and legislation affecting
many different collaborative justice courts in California;
• To learn how to identify and work with the partners you
need to make your court effective;
• To learn where available sources of funding are
and how to get it for your court;
• To learn what works and what doesn’t in operating
a collaborative justice;
• To be aware of the latest issues affecting collaborative
justice courts in California.
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CONCURRENT
GENERAL SESSIONS
Hon. Michael Tynan
Supervising Treatment Judge
Los Angeles, California
1:30 pm-2:45 pm
Hon. Stephen Manley
Superior Court
County of Santa Clara
San Jose, CA
Session CG-5
Federal Confidentiality Laws
and Drug Court
Deborah Cima
Treatment Court Coordinator
Superior Court
San Bernardino, California
Session C-23 Elite 1, Marriott
African American Women and Girls
in Drug Court
Drug courts throughout the nation struggle with providing the
most effective services for African American women and girls.
This session highlights successful strategies for intervening with
this population and includes concrete examples from a variety of
drug court programs.
Learning Objectives
• Identify critical issues to address with African
American women and girls;
• Identify successful strategies for dealing with
these critical issues;
• Identify drug court programs which have had
increased success in this area.
Aminta Mickles
Independent Consultant
San Francisco, California
Federal laws include a variety of restrictions on whether, how,
and when information can be shared with those outside and
within a drug treatment agency. This session outlines the
basics of federal confidentiality law as it pertains to drug
treatment, including the names and citations of the statutes
and regulations, along with an explanation of steps every
drug court should consider in handling information received
from treatment providers. The session is designed for both
the experienced practitioner who may need a brush-up on the
federal confidentiality laws, and the new practitioner who needs
to learn the fundamentals.
Learning Objectives
• Identify the primary federal laws impacting confidentiality
of drug treatment records;
• Begin to identify the fundamental steps each drug court should
take to ensure compliance with relevant confidentiality laws.
MODERATOR
Carson Fox, Jr.
Director of Operations
NADCP
Alexandria, Virginia
Steve Hanson
Director
Bureau of Addiction Treatment Centers
New York OASAS
Albany, New York
Valerie Raine
Director, Drug Court Programs
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
Helen Harberts
Assistant District Attorney
Chico, California
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NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Grand Ballroom E, Marriott
Session CG-6
Grand Ballroom F, Marriott
Veterans Treatment Court
There are currently 1.7 million veterans of the wars in Iraq and
Afghanistan. As more and more of our soldiers return home,
many succumb to substance abuse and crime as a result of their
experience in combat. Drug Courts around the country have
seen rising numbers of veterans in their programs and sought
to offer specialized services to address their unique needs. The
model uses veterans as mentors to help defendants engage
in treatment and counseling as well as partnerships with local
Veterans Affairs offices to ensure that participants receive
proper benefits. Veterans Courts have garnered national media
attention and widespread interest in the Drug Court field. There
are currently over thirty states looking to implement a Veterans
Treatment Court with many more sure to follow.
Learning Objectives
• Better understand the struggle veterans experience
upon return to civilian life after combat;
• Learn how to establish partnerships with Veterans Affairs
Offices and provide effective services such as veterans
mentor programs;
• Learn how to address the needs of veterans who do
not qualify for VA benefits;
• Learn about proposed legislation that would provide
funding to Veterans Courts.
Session CG-7 Pacific Ballroom C, Hilton
The California Mental Health Task Force:
An Innovative Approach to Addressing
Mentally Ill Offenders in the Criminal
Justice System
The U.S. Department of Justice reports that half of all prisoners
in the United States have mental illness. Our prison system is
overwhelmed, recidivism rates run high, and the fiscal impact of
incarcerating this population is staggering.
Ronald M. George, Chief Justice of California, recently appointed
the Task Force for Criminal Justice Collaboration on Mental Health
Issues, whose charge is to focus on improving the response of the
criminal justice system by promoting interbranch collaboration
at the state level and interagency collaboration at the local level.
This task force was originally funded by the Council of State
Governments. During this session, leaders representing the three
branches of government and criminal justice and mental health
partners will discuss various case vignettes, innovative ideas, and
specific plans formulated by the task force.
Learning Objectives
• Describe the importance of forming a court
initiated Mental Health Task Force;
• Identify specific challenges in creating a
representative task force;
MODERATOR
General Barry McCaffrey (ret.)
BR McCaffrey Associates
Arlington, Virginia
• Identify the barriers and challenges of accessing
court services for mentally ill offenders;
Rose Ewing
Program Director
COURTS Programs
Tulsa, Oklahoma
• Identify the role of drug courts and other problem
solving courts, including mental health courts, homeless
courts, and community courts in addressing the issues
of mentally ill offenders.
• Recognize and discuss the human, fiscal, and
outcome benefits of the task force;
Hon. Wendy Lindley
Judge
Superior Court of California
Orange County, California
Hon. Robert Russell, Jr.
Judge
Buffalo City Drug Court
Buffalo, New York
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Hon. Brad Hill
Associate Justice of the California Court of Appeal
Fifth Appellate District
Fresno, California
Susan L. Adams
Marin County Board of Supervisors
District 1
San Rafael, California
Matthew Cate
Secretary
California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation
Sacramento, California
Elizabeth Dodd
Research Assistant
Council of State Governments Justice Center
New York, New York
Mark Gale
National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)
Los Angeles, California
Millicent A. Gomes
Deputy Director
Office of Criminal Justice Collaboration
Sacramento, California
Swapna Jain
National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)
Sacramento, California
Hon. Suzanne N. Kingsbury
Presiding Judge, Superior Court of El Dorado County
Chair: Early Intervention Issues and Strategies Subcommittee
South Lake Tahoe, California
Hon. Stephen Manley
Superior Court
County of Santa Clara
San Jose, California
3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Laguna A, Hilton
Session D-1
Targeting: Who Gets In?
Research reveals that drug courts tend to be most effective
and cost-efficient for individuals with more severe substance
abuse problems and other risk factors for failure in traditional
substance abuse treatment programs. This presentation will
review a typology of risk-and-needs profiles for drug offenders
and discuss the types of clinical and supervisory adaptations
that are required for various offender subtypes.
Learning Objectives
• Identify the specific risk-and-needs profiles of drug offenders
that predict better success in drug courts as opposed to
alternative correctional programs;
• Identify the practice implications and policy implications
of doing risk-and-needs assessments and targeting drug
offenders to specific programs and services.
Doug Marlowe
Chief of Science, Law, and Policy
National Association of Drug Court Professionals
Alexandria, Virginia
Session D-2
Grand Ballroom A/B, Marriott
The Unbroken Cycle: A DEC Perspective
for Drug Court Practice
When working with clients, we find ourselves among men and
women who know very well the life of the drug endangered
child because they have lived these experiences in their own
childhoods. Finding ways to encourage the practice of parenting
while coping with behavioral concerns associated with their own
child’s trauma response can be challenging. This session will link
the drug endangered child experience from the perspective of
the adult survivor and the child whose parent can be empowered
to change the trajectory of their life experience.
Learning Objectives
• Provide an overview of the specific challenges of parenting
the drug endangered child;
• Describe the link between childhood experience and parenting
perspective in a way that can help participants deal with issues
of victimization and parenting-related resentments;
• Discuss the risk of relapse associated with reunification when a
parent may feel unprepared to handle parenting and recovery.
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NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Holly Hopper
University of Kentucky
College of Public Health
Lexington, Kentucky
Session D-3
Session D-4
Grand Ballroom G/H, Marriott
Cognitive Behavioral Interventions
Grand Ballroom C/D, Marriott
Developing Accountability in the Lives
of Youth: Staff and Youth Perspectives
on Essential Elements in a Juvenile
Treatment Court
Operating a successful Juvenile Treatment Court takes strong
leadership, hard work, a caring and dedicated staff, strong
community collaboration, and a commitment to continuous
modification in response to the changing needs of the youth and
families that are being served. This presentation summarizes
lessons learned from individual interviews with staff and youth
from four operational Juvenile Treatment Courts in New York
State on how to overcome the natural obstacles in the planning
and implementation of Juvenile Treatment Courts. The focus
will be on the process and structural factors within Juvenile
Treatment Court programs that led to positive changes in youth
attitudes and behaviors.
Learning Objectives
• Participants will understand the multidimensional needs of
youth who are typically involved in the Juvenile Justice System;
• Participants will appreciate the importance of taking a holistic,
strengths based approach that holds all partners accountable;
• Participants will learn concrete strategies for engaging youth
in making the necessary changes to lead productive lives,
based on the perspectives of the youth themselves and staff
recommendations from New York State Juvenile Treatment
Courts.
The purpose of this workshop is to provide participants with
an overview of cognitive-behavioral approaches and their use
with criminal justice clients. A lecture presenting and exploring
the dynamics and basic personality traits of clients who are
antisocial or who have other personality disorders will be
followed by discussion with session participants. Basic outcome
research on the effectiveness of treating antisocial clients will
be presented. The link between substance abuse and antisocial
personality disorder will be discussed. In addition, the primary
characteristics, evolution, and application of cognitive-behavioral
techniques will be explained and demonstrated. Also, the
cognitive-behavioral method Moral Reconation Therapy will be
reviewed and attendees will be presented with the most recent
ten-year outcome data, as a primary treatment modality as well
as information on MRT® being included in SAMHSA’s National
Registry of Evidenced-Based Programs and Practices.
Learning Objectives
• Understand current research and findings on the relationship
of substance abuse and personality disorders;
• Understand how cognitive-behavioral interventions differ
from traditional treatment methods;
• Understand how cognitive-behavioral interventions gain
their treatment effectiveness.
Kenneth Robinson
President
Correctional Counseling, Inc.
Memphis, Tennessee
Shelly Cohen
Senior Research Support Specialist
School of Social Welfare at Stony Brook University
Stony Brook, New York
Pamela Linden
Research and Training Consultant
Suffolk County, NY Department of Probation and
Stony Brook Research & Evaluation Consulting, LLC.
Stony Brook, New York
Michael Magnani
Director of the Division of Grants and Program Development
New York State Unified Court System
www.nadcp.org
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Session D-5
Orange County Ballroom, Salon 2, Marriott
Cultural Proficiency and the
Ten Key Components
Through the work of the National Development and Research
Institutes, Inc. and the Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S.
Department of Justice, cultural proficiency training in the drug
court field has advanced significantly. Cultural proficiency
training has been enhanced and piloted at several sites
throughout the United States. The new model gives practitioners
basic knowledge of cultural issues and builds on this knowledge
by giving them the tools to make their programs culturally
proficient. This session will teach practitioners how to combine
cultural proficiency with the Ten Key Components.
Learning Objectives
• Learn how to incorporate cultural proficiency with the
Ten Key Components;
• Understanding these cultural differences and using this
knowledge to respond effectively to the participants will
increase the chance for success.
Andrew Osborne
Director of Training
National Development Research Institute
New York, New York
Session D-6
Robert A. Kirchner
Director of Research
Glacier Consulting, Inc.
Annapolis, Maryland
Session D-7
Grand Ballroom E, Marriott
Club Drugs
Often times, when new designer drugs surface in the United
States, the first audience exposed is young adults. Often referred
to as “club drugs,” many of these drugs circulate through clubs
in large metropolitan areas, and in “raves” throughout the
nation. This session explores the recent history of club drugs
and explores what we might need to expect seeing in many of
our communities based on urban adolescent/young adult use
throughout the nation.
Learning Objectives
• Understand the prevalence of a club drug culture;
• Understand the history of club drugs and how its
effected national drug use trends;
• Identify recent changes in club drugs and know what
may be on the horizon.
Palos Verdes A/B, Hilton
Terrence Walton
Director of Treatment
DC Pre-trial Services Agency
Washington, DC
Performance Measures/Best Practices
Performance measurement is critical to assessing program
activities using research-based indicators. NDCI has initiated
numerous projects to develop performance measures for
drug courts to effectively document the effects of drug
courts on clients. In the interest of conformity, with a realistic
understanding of research capacity of local programs,
this session focuses on the primary measures of program
performance and strategies for collecting and analyzing the data.
Finally, examples are given on how performance measurement
leads to the identification and replication of best practices.
Learning Objectives
• Explain the development of, and define primary performance
measures for drug court programs;
• Identify options for types of data used to provide accurate
performance measurement, as well as alternatives for the
collection of data. Methods to calculate primary performance
measures to effectively measure drug court performance;
• Explain how performance measurement leads to identifying
best practices of drug court programs.
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NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Session D-8
Grand Ballroom J/K, Marriott
Incentives and Sanctions in Family
Dependency Treatment Court
An essential element of the family dependency treatment court
is the management of participant behavior in order to ensure
the safety and well being of children as well as participant
accountability. Managing participant behavior consists of the
development of a graduated and creative list of motivational
strategies as well as court responses that encourage adherence
to program requirements.
Learning Objectives
• Identify science based principles of changing behavior through
the use of positive and negative reinforcement and the pitfalls
of punishment;
•D
evelopment and delivery of therapeutic responses to participant
behavior in the specialized context of child protection cases, the
importance of using the court room effectively, and the potential
impact of sanctions on the family system.
Hon. Molly Merrigan
Commissioner
Jackson County Family Drug Court
Kansas City, Missouri
Session D-10
DWI Court Building Blocks –
The Guiding Principles
Hon. Donna Mitchell
Chief Magistrate
Lucas County Juvenile Court
Toledo, Ohio
Session D-9
Santa Monica, Hilton
Treatment 101: What Law Enforcement
Officers Need to Know
So they wanna go to rehab? No I don’t think so! This session
will allow you to have open conversations about the treatment
process and how law enforcement can enhance outcomes in
specialty court settings. By the end of this session you will
have a working knowledge of how information sharing and
collaborations between treatment and law enforcement can
generate successful outcomes for participants and professionals
working in specialty courts.
Learning Objectives
• Demonstrate working knowledge of how collaborative
efforts between treatment and law enforcement generates
success for participants;
• Learn the role of law enforcement in determining outcome
in the specialty court setting.
Vanessa Price
Sergeant—Drug Court Liaison Officer
Oklahoma County Drug Court Program
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Guy Wheeler
President
Guy Wheeler & Guy A Wheeler Group
Plantation, Florida
Orange County Ballroom, Salon 1, Marriott
Much of what has been learned from drug court predecessors can
be summarized in Defining Drug Courts: The Key Components. To
be as successful, the development of DWI Courts must thoroughly
follow the path set forth by these components. However, there are
additional factors to consider and issues to address in operating a
successful court that targets impaired drivers. In this session, learn
about the Guiding Principles that address the creation, operation,
and evaluation of effective DWI Courts.
Learning Objectives
• Recognize the factors germane to creating a court
targeting impaired drivers;
• Understand the role each guiding principle plays in
ensuring a successful DWI Court program;
• Build a platform for successful drug/DWI courts based on
proven strategies developed in drug court predesessors.
Hon. Micheal Barrasse
Judge
Lackawanna County Court
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Hon. Michael Kavanaugh
Judge
Albuquerque, New Mexico
Session D-11 Orange County Ballroom, Salon 3, Marriott
Ethics for Treatment Providers
Drug court is a paradigm shift for all members of the drug court
team. As members of the drug court, treatment providers may
attend staffing, where they share information about their clients
with prosecutors, judges, defense attorneys, probation, law
enforcement, CPS professionals, and others. This sharing of
information, along with many other issues in drug courts, creates
ethical issues for treatment providers. This session explores
these issues and offers some guidance on what ethical hurdles
to spot and how to overcome them.
Learning Objectives
• Identify ethical issues for treatment providers in drug court;
• Identify potential ethical pitfalls for treatment providers
in drug court;
• Recognize ways to ensure ethical practice in the
drug court setting.
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Steve Hanson
Director
Bureau of Addiction Treatment Centers
New York OASAS
Albany, New York
Session D-13 Orange County Ballroom, Salon 4, Marriott
The Impact of Daily Recovery Text
Messages on Drug Court Participants
This presentation will describe an innovative incentive that is
currently being pilot tested in the Brooklyn Treatment Court,
in Brooklyn, NY. In this program, 32 offenders graduating
from either Phase I or Phase II of the program were given a
subscription to a daily recovery text messaging service. Messages
were specifically chosen for their relevance to the drug court
population, and the messages have been configured so that they
appear to be sent directly by the judge, at a time of day selected
for maximum potential effect. The impact of this pilot program
is being assessed using information obtained by the court as
well as by administering a brief questionnaire at program entry,
at the end of the program and three months following program
completion. Court-based data include participant demographics,
program attendance, progress through each phase of the program
and drug testing results. Questionnaire data include commitment
to recovery, participation in recovery-oriented activities (e.g.,
12-step meetings), and program engagement. Focus groups with
participants will be conducted upon completion of the program,
in order to obtain more detailed information about individual
program impacts.
Learning Objectives
• Participants will be aware of the potential to incorporate new
technologies into their drug court activities;
• Participants will understand the novel ways that cell phone text
messaging can be used to enhance drug court outcomes;
• Participants will understand the impact that a brief cell phone
text messaging intervention had on young offenders at the
Brooklyn Treatment Court.
Chris Deutsch
I Live Inspired
Alexandria, Virginia
Hon. Jo Ann Ferdinand
Judge
Brooklyn Treatment Court
Brooklyn, New York
Rob Foster
I Live Inspired
Alexandria, Virginia
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NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Joseph Madonia
Projector Director
Brooklyn Treatment Courts
Brooklyn, New York
Lloyd A. Goldsamt
National Development & Research Institute
New York, New York
Session D-14 Malibu, Hilton
Federal Reentry Courts in an EvidenceBased Practice Context
In this session, staff members of the Administrative Office of
the U.S. Courts and the Federal Judicial Center will describe
the evolution of federal reentry courts and efforts to educate
federal judges and probation officers about reentry courts in
an evidence-based practice context. Presenters will describe
similarities and differences among federal districts’ approaches
to design and delivery of reentry courts and the reasons behind
the differences. Discussion will include exploration of “what’s
next” with federal reentry courts.
This session is designed for federal judges and probation officers
from courts that are either planning or have already launched
reentry courts; state and county judges and probation officers
interested in finding out more about what is occurring in the
federal system; treatment providers; researchers.
**Immediately following this session, a federal reentry court
discussion group will convene in Avila A/B of the Hilton.
Learning Objectives
• Understand the evolution of federal reentry courts;
• Know how federal judges and probation officers are being
educated about reentry courts;
• Appreciate the variations among federal reentry courts
and the challenges they confront;
• Understand the role risk, needs and responsivity play in
reentry court service delivery;
• Articulate the next steps for federal reentry courts.
Charles Robinson
Probation Administrator
Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts
Washington, DC
Mark A. Sherman
Senior Education Attorney
Federal Judicial Center
Washington, DC
Session D-15 Pacific Ballroom B, Hilton
Learning Objectives
Genetics and Treatment Dispositions in
Drug Court for Judges
• Learn the fundamental steps in beginning a court clinic;
Judges, unless you were a trained scientist before attending law
school, possibly the most you know about human genetics came
from your sophomore’s biology review test. Drug court clients
are very sophisticated consumers of their drug of choice. They
select from often new designer drugs whose effects are widely
varied. Although it is critical for judges to understand the effects
of these drugs, all drug court professionals need to be trained
in their impact on supervision and treatment planning. Have
you tried everything available with that one client and nothing
seems to work? Maybe it’s a key molecular mechanism and not
your program. This session addresses the basics of genetics,
the mechanisms and means by which genes can help predict
behavior associated with addictive disorders.
• Achieve an understanding of which types of mental illness
are most effectively treated with medication management
and education.
Learning Objectives
• Genetics – Basic definitions and applications;
Genetics for Judges;
• Changing thoughts and biologics to prevent, treat
and assist other treatment of addictive disorders.
Hon. Joanne Smith
Judge
Ramsey County Substance Abuse Court
Second Judicial District of Minnesota
St. Paul, Minnesota
Session D-17 California Ballroom A, Hilton
Meth Recovery: Our Story
Learning Objective
• Attendees will increase their understanding of the
struggle to overcome addiction to meth.
Hon. Timothy W. Perigo
Judge
40th Circuit Court
Neosho, Missouri
El Capitan A/B, Hilton
Implementing a Psychiatric Clinic in
an Adult Drug Court
After operating for two years and struggling with the lack of mental
health services in the community, Ramsey County Adult Substance
Abuse Court integrated a psychiatric clinic as a component of their
drug court. The need for the clinic emerged from participants’
inability to access needed psychiatric medications. This session
outlines the rational for the clinic, the obstacles the team members
faced, and the lessons they learned during the clinic’s first years of
operation. This session is designed for both experienced and new
drug court team members who want to learn about how to deal
with drug court participants with co-occurring disorders.
www.nadcp.org
Heidi Heinzel
Coordinator
Ramsey County Substance Abuse Court
Second Judicial District of Minnesota
St. Paul, Minnesota
Program graduates tell the story of the battle against meth
addiction.
Hon. David A. Dolan
Judge
33rd Judicial Circuit
Benton, Missouri
Session D-16
• Achieve a greater understanding of the relationship between
addiction and mental illness;
Hon. Wendy Lindley
Judge
Superior Court of California
Orange County, California
Graduate Panel, Orange County Drug Court
Tracie Davis
Chris Jones
Steven Russell
Oliver Maxwell
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Pacific Ballroom A, Hilton
Session D-18
Session D-20
Working with Latino Clients
Ensuring a Healthy Team
Latino clients represented in drug courts have their own cultural
issues that drug court professionals should recognize and respect.
This session will outline the cultural issues Latino clients may
present in court and the best way to understand, appreciate, and
deal with these cultural issues in a therapeutic court setting.
This session will assist attendees in developing a healthy team.
Drug Court team members are faced with many challenges;
therefore, a team must identify ways to assist team members
with remaining healthy. Participants will learn how to engage
team members in the process of team growth and development.
Learning Objectives
Learning Objective
• Enhance one’s understanding of the issues facing
Latinos in substance abuse treatment;
• Discuss ways to keep team members engaged;
• Understand the importance of developing cultural
competence and skills in working with Latinos.
Hon. Rogelio Flores
Superior Court Judge
Santa Barbara County Superior Court
Santa Maria, California
• Understand the various challenges that teams face.
Julie Wilkens
Tribal Prosecutor
Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation
Fort McDowell, Arizona
Session D-21
Antonio Ocegueda
Consultant
San Diego, California
Session D-19 San Simeon A, Hilton
International Association of Drug
Treatment Courts - Annual General
Meeting (Open to all)
California Ballroom B, Hilton
Criminal Defense: Representing
the Mentally Ill
Clients who do not behave rationally are often perceived to be
manipulative or to be deliberately non-compliant with court
orders. Often this behavior is a symptom of mental illness or
a co-occurring disorder. This session will contain information
about how to recognize symptoms of mental illness, techniques
for engaging the client, and best practices for representing the
mentally ill.
Learning Objectives
• Recognize symptoms of mental illness;
• Learn to utilize techniques to engage mentally ill clients;
• Learn to effectively represent mentally ill clients.
Nancy Chand
Attorney
County Public Defender’s Office
Los Angeles, California
Rossana Hernandez
Psychiatric Social Worker
County Public Defender’s Office
Los Angeles, California
72
San Simeon B, Hilton
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
The Annual General Meeting of the International Association of
Drug Treatment Courts is open to all conference participants who
have an interest in learning about the successes and challenges
faced by countries that are working on establishing drug
treatment courts. International and US attendees are welcome to
attend and share their knowledge.
Session D-22 Grand Ballroom F, Marriott
Pre-Filing Dependency Family
Preservation Court: An Innovative
Approach to Keeping Families Together
Pre-Filing Family Preservation Court (AKA Dependency Drug
Court) workshop is designed for any county court and/or social
services agency wishing to reduce the number of cases coming
into the court and the number of children and parents entering
the dependency/foster system. By providing substance abusing
families with intensive services prior to removing children you
can do just that. Pre-Filing Family Preservation Court addresses
areas of improvement from the county System Improvement Plan
(SIP) and provides the county, court, and state with immediate
cost savings. This program also enables families to maintain
assistance from Medi-Cal, AFDC, HUD, and other resources that
would be lost once the children are removed from the home.
Learning Objectives
• Learn what a Pre-File drug court is;
• Learn what components are essential for the best outcomes;
• Learn what cost savings are possible with Pre-Filing;
• Understand the legal basis for implementing a Pre-Filing
drug court;
• Learn how to implement a Pre-Filing drug court.
Pamela Miller
Collaborative Justice Coordinator
Superior Court of California
Riverside, California
Elite 1, Marriott
Session D-23 Engaging the African American Family
in Drug Court
The role of the family has been extensively examined by
criminologist, with findings often showing a direct link between
inconsistent parenting and lack of family support. The family
does play a significant role in the offender’s life both before
and after participating in a Drug Court or other problem solving
courts. As it relates to the African American family, it is vital
to recognize differences between being culturally aware and
culturally competent. Therefore, additional efforts must be made
to engage families in the offender’s treatment court experience
to improve program compliance.
Learning Objectives
• Educate the family to understand, support and
participate in the recovery process;
• Understand how to approach and engage minority
families in an authentic way, recognizing personal
biases and assumptions.
Keta Dickerson
Program Manager
Dallas Initiative for Diversion and Expedited Rehabilitation
and Treatment (DIVERT) Court
Dallas, Texas
Hon. Lela D. Mays
Judge
Dallas County Criminal District Court Magistrate
Dallas, Texas
Phil Breitenbucher
Program Development Manager
Department of Public Social Services
Riverside, California
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4:30 pm-5:45 pm
Session E-1 Laguna A, Hilton
Developing Procedures, Supporting
Documents and Forms to Help
Your Court Conform to the 10 Key
Components
Judge Carpenter and Drug Court Administrator Michael Princivalli
will present the Ten Key Components as the traditional structure
for establishing a drug court. To support the integration of the
Components into the court structure and to help courts conform
to best practices, examples of forms and documents utilized by
the drug court will be provided and discussed.
Learning Objectives
• Gain awareness of the Ten Key Components, how they provide
the structure for a court and what documents and forms
are necessary for drug courts to achieve the performance
benchmarks connected to the Components.
Hon. Christine Carpenter
Associate Circuit Judge
13th Judicial Circuit
Columbia, Missouri
Year 7: Sustaining Drug Court after
Implementation
“Secrets to Success”: A panel presentation highlighting how the
Muscogee County Juvenile Drug Court successfully transitioned
from implementation to self-sustainability. The panel will share
with other Drug Court professionals strategies and obstacles
encountered by the Muscogee County Juvenile Drug Court as it
transitioned from implementation to successful sustainability.
Learning Objectives
• Brief history of Muscogee County Juvenile Drug Court;
• Drug Court Team strengths in addressing funding;
• How to utilize outcome measures and cost benefit analysis
to secure funds;
• Strategies to enhance local and state government support.
Mary Bode
Director
Muscogee County Juvenile Drug Court
Columbus, Georgia
Grand Ballroom A/B, Marriott
Psychological and Social Needs of
Children Impacted by Addiction
The FDTC Team should be familiar with the critical aspects of
child development in order to create child-sensitive, strengthbased case plans. The effects of maltreatment on children’s early
brain development can be extensive; it is rarely the case that a
maltreated infant has no symptoms. Early language delays can
affect both a child’s ability to learn in school and his/her behavior.
It is imperative that a child’s capabilities and adult expectations of
that child coincide. The FDTC Team must know how to advocate for
the child with the parent and to assist the parent in advocating for
psychological and social needs of children.
Learning Objectives
•U
nderstand the challenge meeting time frames for permanency;
• Explore innovative strategies to satisfy mandated time frames.
74
Grand Ballroom C/D, Marriott
Session E-3 • Effective use of advisory board in addressing funding issues;
Michael Princivalli
Drug Court Administrator
13th Judicial Circuit
Columbia, Missouri
Session E-2 Brenda Roche
Arrowhead Psychological & Behavioral Sciences LLC
Program Evaluator, Licensed Clinical Psychologist,
Neuropsychologist
Billings, Montana
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Robert Carlson
Troy University Department of Counseling/
Psychology
Phoenix City, Alabama
Steven Granich
Social Sciences Coordinator
Lock Haven University
Lock Haven, Pennsylvania
Session E-4 Grand Ballroom G/H, Marriott
Adolescent CRA—Learn the Power of
this Evidence Based Treatment!
After more than 20 years of successful clinical trials with
adults the Adolescent version of the Community Reinforcement
Approach was developed and tested from 1997-2001 in the
largest clinical trial ever conducted with adolescents, The
Cannabis Youth Treatment study funded by the Center for
Substance Abuse Treatment. Since then additional successful
clinical trials have been published and A-CRA is recognized
on the National Registry of Effective Programs and Practices
(NREPP). Participants attending this session will learn about
this important treatment program from one of the premier
A-CRA trainers. A-CRA is especially well-suited to youth with low
motivation to participate in treatment, accepts them where they
are, and works with the parents or other caregivers at a point in
treatment where all can benefit from improved communication,
problem solving and other recovery-enhancing activities.
Learning Objectives
• The underlying theory and research support for A-CRA;
• How therapy is conducted, including the flexible use of
several behavioral procedures, with special emphasis on their
application to resistant youth;
• Training and certification for clinicians and clinical supervisors.
Brian Serna
Adapt Adult Outpatient Program Director
Roseburg, Oregon
Session E-5
Orange County Ballroom, Salon 2, Marriott
Working with 18-25 Year Olds
Do you find that the 18-25 year olds in your program are the most
difficult to reach? You are not alone. This session will explore the
cultural issues unique to young adults, and how understanding
and appreciating the culture can lead to greater success in your
drug court program, including treatment, case management,
supervision, and incentives and sanctions.
Session E-6 Palos Verdes A/B, Hilton
Consumers’ Perspectives on
Drug Courts
This presentation focuses on a study, funded, in part by a grant
from the University of California Policy Research Council of
consumer perspectives on factors associated with success or
failure from Drug Court programs. This study involved interviews
with over 90 successful and 90 unsuccessful adult offenders
who had participated in one of two Drug Courts: the Substance
Abuse Treatment Court (SATC) of Santa Barbara, one of the first
200 Drug Courts to be implemented in the United States, and a
Proposition 36 Court which has been operating in accordance
with Drug Court guidelines since 2001. Interviews incorporated
open-ended questions, and two structured questionnaires, the
Treatment Motivation Questionnaire, and the Mental Health
Statistics Improvement Program (MHSIP) Adult Consumer
Survey. Findings will address differences between successful and
unsuccessful participants as well as within group variation with
regard to personal, familial, social and programmatic strengths,
needs and concerns.
Learning Objectives
• Learn about differences between successful and unsuccessful
Drug Court clients with regard to self-reported (a) motivation
for treatment, (b) utilization of services, and (c) social supports
and stressors;
• Learn what Drug Court participants perceive as the most and
least helpful aspects of treatment;
Learning Objectives
• Learn to what the successful program participants attribute
their success and to what the unsuccessful program
participants attribute their failures;
• Understand how the youth lifestyle manipulates the
youth culture to a life of crime;
• Learn how the perspectives of Drug Court participants can be
used to help inform treatment decisions.
• Understand the thinking, attitudes, and behaviors
of young adults in the criminal justice system;
• Understand how acute stress and adjustment disorders
affect this population;
• Understand the psychology of emerging adulthood;
what is known, and what remains to be known;
• Learn new techniques of how to educate 18-25 year old
marijuana users about the drug.
Guy Wheeler
President
Guy Wheeler & Guy A. Wheeler Group
Plantation, Florida
www.nadcp.org
Hon. Rogelio Flores
Superior Court Judge
Santa Barbara County Superior Court
Santa Maria, California
Ricardo Lopez
Manager for Santa Maria Mental Health Systems
Santa Barbara County
Santa Barbara, California
Amber Baker
Doctoral candidate in clinical specialization
Department of Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology
University of California
Santa Barbara, California
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75
Merith Cosden
Professor
Department of Counseling, Clinical and School Psychology
University of California
Santa Barbara, California
Grand Ballroom E, Marriott
Session E-7
Opiates and Prescription Drugs
Patterns of drug use with illicit and pharmaceutical opioids are
ever-changing. The National Institute on Drug Abuse’s (NIDA)
2006 Monitoring the Future Survey showed continued high rates
of non-medical use of prescription medications, especially opioid
painkillers. For example, while past year OxyContin abuse was
down among twelfth grade students-from 5.5 percent in 2005 to
4.3 percent in 2006-the rate nearly doubled among eighth graders
between 2002 and 2006, from 1.3 percent to 2.6 percent, and
Vicodin continues to be abused at a 9.7 percent rate for twelfth
graders, seven percent for tenth graders and three percent for
eighth graders. Use of pharmaceutical opiates among adults,
as described by NIDA’s Community Epidemiology Workgroup, is
showing increases in a number of major cities across the U.S. This
presentation will discuss the impact of illicit and pharmaceutical
opioids on the addict and ways to treat this population.
• Learn the impact of illicit and pharmaceutical opiates.
Steve Hanson
Director
Bureau of Addiction Treatment Centers
New York OASAS
Albany, New York
Grand Ballroom J/K, Marriott
Motivational Incentives in Drug Court
This workshop will review the principles of reward and
punishment and discuss specific considerations in applying
these principles to the drug court system. Emphasis will be on
using a balance of rewards for good behavior and sanctions for
behavioral infractions. The use of positive incentives throughout
the system (e.g. by parole officers, case managers and judges)
will be emphasized. The content, magnitude and timing of these
interventions will be discussed as will practical considerations
about how the interventions might best be applied and
coordinated within a drug court program. Overall, the workshop
will seek to provide a perspective on the balanced use of rewards
and sanctions as well as practical considerations about how this
could be accomplished in individual drug courts.
76
• Identify the principles of effective behavioral
interventions using contingency management;
• Describe reward and graduated sanction procedures
suitable for use in a drug court;
• Design a contingency management system for your
own drug court.
Maxine Stitzer
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore, Maryland
Session E-9
Santa Monica, Hilton
Supervision in the Community
This session will address the fundamentals of law enforcement
and probation/parole involvement in Drug Courts. It will include
what a home visit should encompass, who should conduct
the visits, how to benefit the client and the community, and
suggested documentation.
Learning Objectives
• Identify strategies for building relationships with
Drug Courts and other community partners;
Learning Objective
Session E-8
Learning Objectives
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
• Identify basic legal rulings related to consensual visits
to the client’s home;
• Understand structure for graduated supervision
consistent with the drug court model;
• Understand “What to look for” ideas based on training
and experience.
Richard Cota
Deputy Probation Officer II
Probation Department
Orange County, California
Mack Jenkins
Chief Probation Officer
San Diego County Probation Department
San Diego, California
Mara Steinberg
Supervising Probation Officer
Probation Department
San Diego, California
Session E-10
Orange County Ballroom, Salon 1, Marriott
Review of DWI Court Research
This presentation will review the most current research on the
effectiveness of DWI Courts and offer recommendations for
conducting valid and useful evaluations of DWI Court programs.
Learning Objectives
• Understand the current state of research on DWI Courts;
• Understand how to conduct valid and useful evaluations
of DWI Courts.
Doug Marlowe
Chief of Science, Law, and Policy
National Association of Drug Court Professionals
Alexandria, Virginia
Session E-11
Orange County Ballroom, Salon 3, Marriott
Ethics in Family Dependency
Treatment Court
With the combination of so many disciplines, including but
not limited to judges, defense attorneys, CPS professionals,
prosecutors, and treatment providers, Family Dependency
Treatment Courts present a variety of potential ethical dilemmas.
This session highlights the most common ethical issues raised
in FDTCs and how the team members should prepare for and
handle these issues when they arise.
Learning Objectives
• Identify the ethical issues in FDTCs;
• Understand the ethical rules that apply to each
member of your FDTC team;
• Identify strategies to deal with the most common
ethical issues in FDTCs.
Malibu, Hilton
Session E-14
Specific Challenges and Opportunities
Working with Veterans Court
Attend this session to learn about planning and implementing a
Veteran’s Treatment Court (VTC). This session will provide detailed
information on “how to” plan and implement a specialized docket
for veterans. Discussion will focus specifically on engaging criminal
justice partners, community treatment and resource agencies,
the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), the Veterans Benefits
Administration (VBA), local military service organizations such as
the Disabled American Veterans (DAV), Veterans of Foreign Wars
(VFW), National Association for Black Veterans, state Department
of Veterans Affairs, and the American Legion, and recruiting active
and retired military personnel as mentors. Additional focus will
be on tailoring existing drug courts to manage the complex and
varied treatment, medical and mental health needs of the veteran
involved in the criminal justice system. Detailed information,
including sample materials, will be provided as examples for
“Memorandum of Understanding (MOUs)”, confidentiality
agreements, informed consent releases, service officer component
manual, and volunteer mentor program materials. Discussion will
highlight some of the specific challenges and opportunities for
drug courts working with veterans.
Learning Objectives
• Receive Information and Materials on Planning and
Implementing a Veteran’s Treatment Court;
• Learn How to Develop a Specialized Veterans Docket
within an Existing Drug Court;
• Gain Knowledge on Identifying Community Partners
and Resources, including Veteran’s Health and Benefits
Administrations and Local Military Service Organizations;
• Gain Knowledge on How to Recruit and Incorporate Military
Service Organizations into Your Veteran’s Treatment Court to
Assist Participating Veterans with Benefit, Healthcare, and
Other Issues;
• Learn How to Develop a Mentor Program to Support the
Participants in Veteran’s Treatment Court Using Active and
Retired Military Personnel.
Rose Ewing
Program Director, Community Service Council of Greater Tulsa
Tulsa County Drug/DUI/Veteran’s Treatment Court
Tulsa, Oklahoma
Matt Stiner
Assistant to the Mayor, Liaison for Veteran’s Affairs,
Legislative Affairs
Tulsa, Oklahoma
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Session E-15 Pacific Ballroom B, Hilton
Love, Lust, and Lies: Exposing Sex
Addiction in Drug Court Participants
This workshop explores the often over-looked co-occurring
disorder known as sex addiction. This fascinating presentation
will confront common myths and expose sexual compulsive
disorder as the disabling, livelihood and life-threatening
condition that it is. Using both research and cases ripped from
the headlines, participants will understand the most common
causes; recognize the clearest indicators, and survey the most
effective treatments. As a bonus for the NADCP Conference, we
will investigate whether most sex offenders are sex addicts;
whether most sex addicts are sex offenders; and how you can tell
the difference. This one is not to be missed.
Learning Objectives
• Examine the phenomenon known as sexual compulsive
disorder, sex, pornography, love addiction, and/or
relationship addiction;
• Explore the origins of this disorder and the prevalent signs
that a disorder exists;
• Understand how this disorder often overlaps with substance
addiction and how treatment for one does not necessarily
address the other.
Terrence Walton
Director of Treatment
DC Pre-Trial Services Agency
Washington, DC
Session E-16 El Capitan A/B, Hilton
Empowering Young Adults through
Positive Socialization Events in
Problem Solving Courts
Demonstrating how young people can benefit from socialization
events that encourage positive change in their behavior,
attitudes, and lifestyle choices is critical. This session covers how
to incorporate those events into life lessons for young people to
take with them after the socialization event.
Learning Objectives
• Highlight the importance of having socialization events
and how they can impact a young person;
• Identify ideas for creative socialization events;
• Identify the long term goal socialization events should have.
Randy Kearse
Author, Motivational Speaker and Entrepreneur
New York, New York
Session E-17 California Ballroom A, Hilton
A Country in Meth Crisis – Could Drug
Treatment Courts Make the Difference?
Over the past 10 years New Zealand has risen to have one of the
highest recorded prevalence rates of methamphetamine use
in the world and along with it has experienced unprecedented
growth in violent crime, social dysfunction and prison
populations. This track explores the potential role and benefits
of Drug Treatment Courts against the backdrop of the limited
efficacy of traditional adversarial courts in meeting the
challenges of a burgeoning methamphetamine crisis.
Learning Objectives
• Understand the dynamics of methamphetamine use
and addiction as a social contagion;
• The efficacy of Drug Treatment Courts to address this
challenging drug problem;
• The role and relevance of Drug Treatments Courts alongside
law enforcement demand reduction initiatives as part of a
comprehensive, balanced response to methamphetamine.
Michael Sabin
Managing Director
Methcon Group Ltd
Northland, New Zealand
78
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Pacific Ballroom A, Hilton
Session E-18
El Impacto de la Funcion Judicial en el
Exito de Drug Court (en Espanol)
Una descripcion del impacto y exito que tiene Drug Court en la
Comunidad Latina.
Hon. Maria del Carme Berrios-Flores
Drug Court Judge
Ponce Judicial Region
Ponce, Puerto Rico
Antonio Ocegueda
Consultant
San Diego, California
Session E-20 San Simeon B, Hilton
Learning from Native Traditions:
Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts
Journey of One Tribe: Southern Ute
The Southern Ute TuuCai (Ute word meaning “To be Well”)
Wellness Court (WC) opened in 2004. Its design encourages
participants and their families to change their lives by improving
mental, physical and spiritual health via counseling, education,
exercise and exploration of the Southern Ute culture and
spirituality. All participants complete a twelve-month program
divided into four phases or seasons with the following themes:
Spring, stabilization and detoxification; Summer, motivation;
Autumn, stability; and Winter, aftercare.
Learning Objectives
Session E-19 California Ballroom B, Hilton
Criminal Law Update
This presentation focuses on recent cases and statutes which
effect the operation of therapeutic courts in general and drug
courts in particular. Specific emphasis on adaptations necessary
to embrace these legal changes will be in the areas of due
process, waivers, and confidentiality, drug testing and equal
access. Discussion will include local, statewide and national
updates in these areas as well as other issues.
Learning Objectives
• To familiarize drug court practitioners with recent case law
and legislative changes that affect drug courts;
• To learn ways for your drug court practice to reflect and
accommodate changes in the law as well as continue to
conform to long-standing relevant case law and statutory law;
• Better understanding of the unique workings of a tribal
court system;
• Incorporation of culture and traditions into a Wellness Court;
• The importance of community and extended family roles
in Wellness Court;
• Data collection needs to validate and guide the program.
Eric Hayes
Wellness Court Case Manager
Southern Ute Indian Tribe
Ignacio, Colorado
Barb Scott Rarick
Councilwoman
Southern Ute Indian Tribe
Ignacio, Colorado
• To discuss with other practitioners difficulties in conforming
to legal issues, as well as from jurisdictions that have
met challenges and found that their program has been
strengthened from meeting legal requirements.
Jim Egar
Monterey Public Defender
Pacific Grove, California
Anthony Mesa
Assistant District Attorney
Orange County, California
Jeffrey Thoma
Public Defender
Solano County
Fairfield, California
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Session E-22 Grand Ballroom F, Marriott
Elder Abuse Cases: A Frontier for
Problem Solving Courts
This course explores the dynamics of elder abuse and its impact
in a variety of case types. Faculty will focus on the definitions of
elder abuse, characteristics of victims and perpetrators, common
dynamics in elder abuse cases, and issues of undue influence.
Included in the session, faculty will also discuss benefits of
special calendars, alternative ways of bringing elders into court,
assessing and identifying high risk situations, and an exploration
of issues in judicial decision-making in both criminal and
conservatorship matters. This course will also address impact of
mental illness (i.e. dementia) and substance abuse (i.e. drug and
alcohol) as unintended consequences in elder abuse cases.
This course will also discuss collaboration with system partners
to provide social and legal services.
Learning Objectives
• Identify recommended guidelines and practices for
improving the administration of justice in elder abuse cases;
• Identify elder abuse laws and current legislative
changes (California specific);
• Discuss ethical issues for judicial officers in cases
involving elders;
• Recognize signs of elder abuse.
Hon. Joyce Cram
Judge
Superior Court
Contra Costa County
Martinez, California
Candace J. Heisler
Assistant Adjunct Professor
University of California’s
Hastings College of the Law
San Francisco, California
80
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Session E-23 Elite 1, Marriott
African American Focused Reentry
Re-entry courts are rapidly gaining momentum throughout the
United States. With many people being released from prison
and returning to their communities, coupled with the success
of the reentry court model, applying the drug court model to
facilitate success in reintegrating these persons into society
is a cost-effective and proven strategy. In many communities,
a disproportionate number of people imprisoned and leaving
prison for reentry courts are African American. Therefore,
many communities have a need to concentrate resources on
reintegrating these men and women back into their communities
successfully. This session will focus on reentry courts that have
shown innovation and improved outcomes by doing just that.
Learning Objectives
• Recognize the need for reentry court initiatives targeting
African American participants;
• Learn the elements necessary for tailoring a reentry program
to meet the needs of the African American participant;
• Identify ways to organize available resources in the community
to improve services for African American participants in
reentry courts.
ANCILLARY EVENTS
7:00 am-7:45 am
First Time Conference Attendees and
New NADCP Members Breakfast
Pavia Restaurant (HIL)
7:00 am-8:00 am
Stanley M. Goldstein
Drug Court Hall Of Fame
Tomorrow morning we will induct a new individual or
individuals into the Stanley M. Goldstein Drug Court Hall
of Fame. Be on hand for the Closing Session and Featured
Keynote Speaker at 9:30 a.m.
Michigan Association of Drug Court
Professionals (MADCP)
Elite 1 (MAR)
6:30 pm-8:30 pm
Celebrating 20 years of Drug Court –
Gala Reception
Lanai Deck East, 2nd Floor (HIL)
THIRD ANNUAL BREAKFAST FOR NEW NADCP MEMBERS
AND FIRST TIME CONFERENCE ATTENDEES!!
FRIDAY, JUNE 12 • 7:00 am-7:45 am • Pavia Restaurant, Hilton
Back by popular demand, all new NADCP members and first time conference attendees
are invited to join West Huddleston, NADCP CEO, and the rest of the executive staff of
NADCP for a breakfast on Friday. If you are a first time attendee, but not yet a member, we
encourage you to join the NADCP. Visit us at the Membership Booth for more information.
www.nadcp.org
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Join us Friday night on the Lanai Deck East
of the Hilton from 6:30 pm-8:30 pm
Comedian Tommy Davidson will perform
as we Celebrate Twenty Years of Drug Court
and look towards the future
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
SATURDAY, JUNE 13
Registration Open
7:30 am-12:00 pm
Continental Breakfast
7:30 am-8:00 am
Concurrent General Sessions
8:00 am-9:15 am
Closing General Session
9:30 am-11:30 am
Concurrent Workshops, Session F
11:45 am-1:00 pm
SATURDAY
SATURDAY
NOTES
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SATURDAY, JUNE 13
CONCURRENT
GENERAL SESSIONS
8:00 am-9:15 am
Session CG-8
Grand Ballroom E, Marriott
Doing the Due
In this participatory presentation, issues involving the 1st, 4th,
5th and 6th amendment are discussed as they particularly
relate to problem solving courts. Around the country courts are
wrestling with the thorny issues that arise because of the nontraditional procedures in problem solving courts.
Learning Objectives
• Recognize the constitutional issues that frequently
arise in a problem solving court;
• Become familiar with the relevant case law relating
to problem solving courts;
• Adopt constitutional compliant procedures in problem
solving court operations.
Hon. William Meyer
Judge (ret.)
Judicial Arbiter Group, Inc
Denver, Colorado
Paul Cary
Director
Toxicology and Drug Monitoring Lab
(University of Missouri)
Columbia, Missouri
Steve Hanson
Director
Bureau of Addiction Treatment Centers
New York OASAS
Albany, New York
Session CG-10
Orange County Ballroom, Marriott
MAT- Medically Assisted Treatment
for Opioid Dependence
Medically assisted treatment (MAT) has long been recognized as
an evidence-based practice. Individuals struggling with opioid
dependence have extremely high relapse rates, and often drug
courts lack the expertise to provide effective MAT. If participants
in your drug court are dependent on opiates, this session is
not to be missed. It outlines fundamental information on MAT,
along with discussions of conquering hurdles and applying best
practices to the critical component of MAT in your drug court.
Learning Objectives
• Understand the research behind MAT;
•U
nderstand how to integrate MAT into your drug court program;
• Identify resources for further information on MAT.
Mark Parrino
Session CG-9 Grand Ballroom F, Marriott
MYTHBUSTERS - Treatment & Drug
Testing: Is it Fact or Fiction?
Christopher Wilkins
President and CEO
Loyola Recovery Foundation
Using the popular Discovery Channel’s show “MythBusters” as a
launching point, co-hosts Steve Hanson (playing the role of Jamie
Hyneman) and Paul Cary (as Adam Savage) with investigate the
“myths” associated with treatment and drug testing. It’s a tough
job separating truth from legend, but Steve and Paul are here to
serve. Treatment and drug testing are two essential components
of a successful drug court program and they will explain how
something may or may not be scientifically valid.
Learning Objectives
• Identify the myths associated with drug testing and treatment;
• Understand the facts that dispel the myths of drug testing
and treatment.
www.nadcp.org
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Session CG-11
Pacific Ballroom B, Hilton
Best Practices in Adult Drug Courts:
Reduce Recidivism and Costs!
What practices are being implemented in drug courts across
the nation? What practices are related to reduced recidivism
and costs? This panel describes results from the latest research
and evaluations performed by NPC Research including 24 drug
courts in Maryland, 40 drug courts in Missouri, 29 drug courts in
California, and over 30 drug courts in Oregon as well drug courts
in Indiana, Michigan, Vermont and Guam. These studies examine
the relationship between drug court practices and graduation
rate, recidivism and costs including: 1) the impact of 10 years
of operation in a mature drug court (over 6,000 participants),
2) variations in practices among drug courts in multiple states
with focus on which practices result in better outcomes, and 3) a
comparison between drug court programs with and without the
use of jail as a sanction. Highlights include the findings that drug
court participants had significantly lower recidivism up to 14
years after drug court entry than similar eligible offenders who
did not participate, that investment in drug court programs can
cost less than traditional court processing, and that the longer
judges preside over drug court, the better their participant
recidivism rates. In addition, drug courts that provide training on
the drug court model for all team members had 10 times the cost
savings (due to lower recidivism) than drug courts that did not
provide training for the whole team. The information presented in
this session is of interest to drug court practitioners in all roles.
Learning Objectives
• Gain knowledge about current research related to
adult and juvenile drug courts;
• Obtain information about the current best and
promising practices in adult and juvenile drug courts;
• Learn which drug court practices are associated with
lower recidivism and lower recidivism costs.
Shannon M. Carey
Senior Research Associate
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
Michael W. Finigan
President and Founder
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
Juliette R. Mackin
Senior Research Associate
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
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NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
SATURDAY, JUNE 13
9:30 am-11:30am
Judge Ellen DeShazer
Compton Drug Court
Compton, California
CLOSING GENERAL SESSION
NADCP Ambassador Awards
Platinum Ballroom, Marriott
Martin Sheen
Actor and Activist
Putting Drug Court Within Reach of
Every American in Need
With one of the most recognizable faces and voices in
the world, actor Martin Sheen has won the devotion
of movie fans, television fans and critics alike for
his performances in classics of the large and small
screen such as Apocalypse Now and The West Wing.
Honorable William Ray Price
Justice, Missouri Supreme Court
Jefferson City, Missouri
Special Guest
Louis Gossett, Jr.
Actor and Activist
The Future of Drug Courts and
Other Problem Solving Courts
Louis Gossett, Jr., is known the world over for
his inimitable style on stage and screen. He has
captured the imagination and hearts of generations
with dozens of roles, including Gunnery Sergeant
Emmil Foley in An Officer and a Gentleman, for
which he won an Academy Award.
William Vickrey
Administrative Director
Judicial Council of California’s Administrative Office of the Courts
Honorable Paul J. De Muniz
Chief Justice, Oregon Supreme Court
Salem, Oregon
Preparing for the Road Ahead
Yvonne Smith Segars
New Jersey Public Defender
Trenton, New Jersey
International Drug Treatment Courts
West Huddleston
NADCP Chief Executive Officer
Veterans Treatment Court
Judge Robert Russell
Buffalo City Drug Court
Buffalo, New York
Special Guest
Presentation of the National
DWI Court Leadership Award
David Wallace
NCDC Director
Judge Kent Lawrence
Athens/Clark County DWI Court
Athens, Georgia
Presentation of NADCP
Ambassador Awards
Earl Hightower
NADCP Board Member
www.nadcp.org
Presentation of National Drug Court
Month Awards
Jennifer Columbel
NADCP Director of Public Policy
West Huddleston
NADCP Chief Executive Officer
Judge Charles Simmons
NADCP Board Chair
Announcing the Stanley M. Goldstein
Drug Court Hall of Fame Inductees
Carson Fox
NADCP Chief Operating Officer
West Huddleston
Chief Executive Officer
Judge Charles Simmons
Circuit Court Judge and NADCP Board Chair
Special Guest
Featured Keynote Speaker and
Musical Performance
Kelliegh Bannen
Musician and Activist
“It’s refreshing to hear some real music on Kelleigh
Bannen’s new disc, Radio Skies...her voice howls
and breaks like Sheryl Crow in her raw, Leaving Las
Vegas, days.” –American Songwriter Magazine
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SATURDAY, JUNE 13
11:45 am-1:00 pm
Session F-1
Session F-2 Grand Ballroom A/B, Marriott
FDTC: An Alternative to Termination of
Parental Rights
Laguna A, Hilton
Building and Maintaining Enduring
Alumni Groups
Drug Court Works! Now what? Consider an alumni group. This
resource is for graduates and participants, who are trying to
bridge the gap between active addiction and reentering the
mainstream of life in recovery. Active alumni groups can also be
a resource to create positive community based connectivity and
instill a sense of being a part of the bigger picture for individual
members. This is accomplished by the alumni group sponsoring
and organizing drug free events such as social activities,
supporting charities, and facilitating a mentor program.
Let’s keep the momentum and enthusiasm going!
Challenges exist when trying to meet time frames for
permanency due to substance abuse issues. Substance abuse
recovery and the time-lines for achieving permanency are
often in opposition to one another, and non-compliance due to
substance abuse relapse can further push the parent toward
permanently losing their child through a Termination of Parental
Rights proceeding. This presentation, based on an actual Lee
County child welfare case, will examine the role of the family
when termination of parental rights (TPR) is imminent.
Learning Objectives
•U
nderstand the challenge meeting time frames for permanency;
• Explore innovative strategies to satisfy mandated time frames.
• Show drug court practitioners how to structure, implement
and, more importantly, how to motivate an Alumni Group;
Dena Geraghty
Coordinator/Consultant
Court Administration, 20th Judicial Circuit
Ft. Myers, Florida
• Demonstrate how to get observers involved in the program
and will show how drug court practitioners should assume a
posture of being an advisor and cheerleader, not an authority
figure.
Sheree Beau Wells
Project Director
Southwest Florida Addiction Services, Inc.
Ft. Myers, Florida
Learning Objectives
Christine Braun
Program Supervisor
Boone/Gallatin County Drug Court
Burlington, Kentucky
Susan C Wilson
Regional Supervisor
Northern Kentucky Drug Court
Covington, Kentucky
Ricardo Harris
Kenton County Adult Drug Court Graduate, 2004
Covington, Kentucky
Session F-3 Grand Ballroom C/D, Marriott
Promoting Best Practices with LGBTQ
Youth in Juvenile Drug Courts
This workshop is intended to provide juvenile drug court staff
with tools and resources to effectively work with and advocate
for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning (LGBTQ)
youth served by juvenile drug courts. According to Estrada
& Marksamer (2006), LGBTQ youth are disproportionately
represented in the Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare systems,
and are routinely subjected to differential treatment because of
their sexual orientation. Research has shown that LGBTQ youth
are more likely to face abuse and neglect at home, to be harassed
and victimized as school, and subsequently leave their home to
live on the streets to engage in illegal activities for survival. It is
when many of the youth are caught engaging in substance use,
shoplifting, and sex work that they enter our Juvenile Justice
Systems, and specifically our Juvenile Drug Courts.
In this presentation, the various levels of homophobia, including
internalized, institutional, and cultural, will be explored, as
will the resultant higher risk for substance abuse, unsafe
sex, homeless and suicide. The presentation will focus upon
86
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
evidenced-based practice and offer empirical data from the
presenters’ years of experience as Judge and Social Worker
serving LGBTQ youth in the Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare
Systems. Specifically, the presenters will provide strategies
used to combat the notion that there are no LGBTQ youth in our
Juvenile Drug Courts, that it is somehow the youth’s fault that s/
he is enduring harassment, and how best to avoid revictimizing
the victim of harassment and violence.
Learning Objectives
Learning Objectives
Brian Serna
Adapt Adult Outpatient Program Director
Roseburg, Oregon
• Review vocabulary and definitions relevant to Lesbian, Gay,
Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning (LGBTQ) youth;
• E xplore the stereotypes, myths and prejudices that influence
attitudes towards LGBTQ youth in the care of juvenile drug courts;
•D
efine homophobia and heterosexism and explore ways in which
they impact the service to LGBTQ youth in juvenile drug courts;
• Review the coming-out process and how juvenile drug courts
can support youth who are coming out;
• Learn ways in which juvenile drug court personnel can promote
positive development of LGBTQ youth;
• Review national resources and internet sites that provide
information about LGBTQ resources.
Hon. Lisa C. Schultz
District Court Judge, Third Judicial District
Las Cruces, New Mexico
Sarah M. Boone
Therapist
Family Pride Foundation
Las Cruces, New Mexico
Session F-4 • Recognize what procedures go into CRA and the
flexibility of their use in practice;
• Identify training and certification opportunities in CRA;
• Get answers to the questions from participants.
Session F-5 Orange County Ballroom, Salon 2, Marriott
How Faith Can Support Recovery
in Drug Court
During this session, participants will determine how faith-based
programs can enhance the effectiveness of drug court programs
without infringing on the constitutional rights of participants.
Distinctions will be made regarding Spirituality v. Religiosity
and the development of alliances that enhance recovery without
creating religious mandates.
Hon. Karen Freeman-Wilson (ret.)
Freeman-Wilson, Shannon-Lewis, LLC
Gary, Indiana
Session F-6 Grand Ballroom G/H, Marriott
CRA for Adults—Learn the Power of
this Evidence Based Treatment!
First established in 1973, the Community Reinforcement
Approach (CRA) is a comprehensive behavioral program for
treating substance-abuse problems. It is based on the belief
that environmental contingencies can play a powerful role in
encouraging or discouraging drinking or drug use. Consequently,
it utilizes social, recreational, familial, and vocational reinforcers
to assist clients in the recovery process. Its goal is to make a
sober lifestyle more rewarding than the use of substances. Oddly
enough, however, while virtually every review of alcohol and
drug treatment outcome research lists CRA among approaches
with the strongest scientific evidence of efficacy, very few
clinicians are familiar with it. This session is presented by one of
the premier CRA clinician-trainers. We hope you will attend and
learn how CRA can benefit your Drug Court clients. Come see why
O, The Oprah Magazine featured CRA in 2007.
www.nadcp.org
• Understand the underlying theory and research
support for CRA;
Palos Verdes A/B, Hilton
Improving Treatment Effects:
The Critical Role of Probation
Focusing on efforts in Arizona, Florida, New Mexico, Oregon
and Georgia, this session will present and overview the role and
responsibilities of probation as a critical component of maintaining
and sustaining treatment progress and success. The level of
intensive probation participation on the drug court team, as well
as delivery of services to clients, is defined and documented in
programs. The results of evaluations have identified potential best
practices to enhance the performance of drug courts.
Learning Objectives
• Identify the emerging role of probation to enhance the
performance of drug court programs by supporting treatment
through supervision, collaboration, and service delivery;
• Present best practices in the probation activities from the
results of evaluations;
• Discuss the prospects and obstacles faced by probation
participation in drug court programs: expanding roles and
sustaining involvement.
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Robert A. Kirchner
Director of Research
Glacier Consulting, Inc.
Annapolis, Maryland
Helen Harberts
Assistant District Attorney
Chico, California
Grand Ballroom E, Marriott
Session F-7
Cocaine
Cocaine, used for centuries to alter consciousness and since the
1980s popular in its rock or “crack” form, has been a plague on
its users, criminal justice systems and the treatment community
for years. However, in many jurisdictions, crack has been falling
in popularity compared to meth and newer “club drugs.” Over
the last century, cocaine has seen surges and ebbs in popularity.
Come learn about the current trends in powder and crack cocaine
use in the United States.
Learning Objectives
• Understand patterns of change in cocaine usage over time;
• Learn about current trends in cocaine use in the U.S., including
the falling popularity of cocaine in some areas compared to
newer, trendier drugs.
Steve Hanson
Director
Bureau of Addiction Treatment Centers
New York OASAS
Albany, New York
Session F-8
Grand Ballroom J/K, Marriott
Theory to Practice
Delivering incentives and sanctions can be a challenge—
even when you are familiar with the research on behavior
modification. In this session, a panel of practitioners offers their
insight into the effective delivery of incentives and sanctions,
while offering creative ways to obtain incentives at little or no
cost to the drug court program.
Learning Objectives
• Recognize methods of delivering effective incentives
and sanctions from the bench;
• Identify sanction alternatives to jail;
• Identify cost-effective ways to provide incentives
in the drug court setting.
Larry Robinson
Director, Department of Juvenile Services
Newport News, Virginia
88
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Hon. Scott Drazewski
Circuit Judge
Eleventh Judicial Circuit
McLean County
Bloomington, Illinois
Santa Monica, Hilton
Session F-9 Tackling Supervision Issues in
Rural Communities
Rural drug courts face specific challenges with limited resources,
including but not limited to, transportation and employment.
Special conditions must be imposed in order to effectively
supervise a caseload. Learn how the 86th District Court has
adapted their program to try to address some of the challenges
faced in a rural area.
Learning Objectives
• Learn how to coordinate transportation for your
drug court participants in a rural community;
• Learn how to help drug court participants with
employment in a rural community;
• Learn how to manage day to day drug court
operations in a rural community.
Pam Blue
Chief Probation Officer
86th District Court
Traverse City, Michigan
Session F-10 Orange County Ballroom, Salon 1, Marriott
Supervision: It’s More Than Office Visits
and Court Appearances
Supervision is a critical component of every DWI Court, and it is
more than just having the participant show up at the office or in
court. Effective supervision strategies for supervising DWI Court
clients, including the resistant participant, will be discussed during
this session. Attending this class will help you assess your needs
and provide suggestions on topics ranging from responses to
behaviors–negative and positive, creative supervision strategies,
the importance of honesty, and effective drug and alcohol
monitoring. Additional critical topics include building a rapport,
and the balance between accountability and social support. A
graduate from the program is included on the panel and he will
share what worked and didn’t work from his perspective.
Learning Objectives
Session F-14 • Identify the importance of holding each client
accountable for his/her behavior;
HOPE
• Understand specific and creative supervision
strategies in field work/home visits;
Drug courts have proven to be an effective tool for assisting
drug addicted probationers. Come and learn about a new
approach, Hawaii’s Opportunity Probation with Enforcement,
or HOPE Probation, that allows a judge or judges to effectively
supervise many probationers and yet, at the same time, carry a
trial caseload. HOPE provides for swift and certain sanctions for
non-compliance with the terms of probation, and as shown by
a randomized controlled trial evaluation, to greatly reduce drug
use, missed appointments, probation revocations and arrests for
new crimes. Drug Courts and HOPE – what a combo!
• Learn techniques to providing social support
without enabling.
Michelle Hodsden
Probation Officer
Coconino County, Arizona
Adam McLean
May 2007 Graduate
DWI/Drug Court Program
Coconino County, Arizona
Learning Objective
• Conference participants will learn how their jurisdictions can
greatly reduce drug use, missed probation appointments,
probation revocations, and arrests for new crimes while
keeping judges in their existing trial court assignments.
Rex Stermer
Surveillance Officer
DWI/Drug Court
Coconino County, Arizona
Session F-11
Orange County Ballroom, Salon 4, Marriott
Orange County Ballroom, Salon 3, Marriott
Ethical Issues for Judges in Drug Court
There have been few decisions from bodies that enforce ethical
rules for judges concerning their role in problem-solving courts.
This session will discuss possible stumbling blocks for judges
and, working with a series of hypotheticals, attempt to develop
best practices on judicial ethics issues.
Learning Objectives
• Recognize ethical issues for judges in problem-solving courts;
• Identify the recent case law in this area of problem-solving
court practice;
• Identify best practices to ensure ethical practice
in the problem-solving court setting.
Hon. Peggy Hora (ret.)
Judge
Alameda County California
Castro Valley, California
Hon. Steven S. Alm
Circuit Court Judge
First Circuit Court
Honolulu, Hawaii
Session F-15
Pacific Ballroom B, Hilton
Understanding and Implementing 12 Step
Programs for Drug Courts
Topics such as spirituality, belief systems, and self esteem issues
are discussed during this session. Relevant materials along with
the professional and personal experiences of the presenters
make this a helpful and interesting presentation for those in the
treatment court arena.
Learning Objectives
• Inform the audience on the 12 steps of recovery, the principles
behind each step, and how this differs from treatment;
• Learn how to blend this material into a treatment curriculum,
the benefits of blending the two approaches, and how to
overcome resistance to meetings and material.
Michael Devine
Consultant
The Devine Group
Suwannee, Georgia
Robert King
Coordinator
Dawson County Treatment Center
Dawsonville, Georgia
www.nadcp.org
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El Capitan A/B, Hilton
Session F-16 Certificates of Assurance: Gateway
to New Drug Court Development and
Monitoring
A Juvenile Drug Court Certificate of Assurance acts as a tool to
develop new juvenile drug courts and as a foundation to monitor
any juvenile drug court. Certificates of Assurance can act as
a stand-alone standard, in place of state certification or as a
step toward certification if desired. Participants will review the
current Arizona Certificate of Assurance, discuss the elements
included, prepare their own Certificate of Assurance and view an
associated monitoring report.
Learning Objectives
• Understand the multiple roles of a Certificate of Assurance;
• Understand the core elements of a Certificate of Assurance;
• Understand the variable elements of a Certificate of Assurance;
• Develop individualized, court-specific Certificates of Assurance;
News stories are posted daily. Every state is represented with
its own section and links to critical information. The site is
constantly adding new materials and will flash breakthroughs to
readers quickly.
Learning Objectives
• Get a personal tour of the site from the people who built it;
• Understand how its contents can help everyone owning
a stake in the meth epidemic;
• Become invested by offering your ideas for what could
enhance the site.
Chris Fruitrich
Website Consultant
National Methamphetamine Training and Technical Assistant Center
Tacoma, Washington
Terree Schmidt-Whelan
Executive Director
Pierce County Alliance
Tacoma, Washington
• Practice the use of the certificate as a monitoring tool.
Steve Tyrrell
Program Manager Juvenile Justice Services
Arizona Administrative Office of the Courts
Juvenile Justice Services Division
Phoenix, Arizona
Session F-17 California Ballroom A, Hilton
Your Personal Tour of The National
Meth Center Website and What It Can
Do For You
The National Methamphetamine Training and Technical
Assistance Center was created in 2007 with a grant from
Community Oriented Policing Services Office. The National Meth
Center mission is to offer support to all stakeholders in the fight
against methamphetamine abuse – from law enforcement and
treatment professionals to soccer moms and school teachers.
What The Math Center’s organizers realized early is that while
a great deal of meth information exists on the Internet, finding
specific topics or geographic resources can be difficult. When
one asks Google to search for “meth” he or she is rewarded
with more than 16 million references. The National Meth Center
website was crafted, in part, to guide those seeking information.
In some cases the information was researched and written by
our staff. In other cases users will be pointed to a link that takes
them to what they are looking for. Every meth topic is covered
from meth’s physical toll to treatment options and from how to
spot a meth lab to signs your son or daughter may be using.
90
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Session F-19 California Ballroom B, Hilton
Future Legal Challenges and
Opportunities
Problem-solving courts face a variety of legal challenges
throughout the nation; they also have many opportunities to use
these challenges to strengthen the model. This session reviews
some of the current legal challenges to the drug court model,
including appellate cases addressing the state constitutionality
of drug court (and other problem-solving court) practices in
Maryland, California, Idaho, and other jurisdictions.
Learning Objectives
• Identify legal challenges to drug court practices
throughout the nation;
• Learn the arguments and outcomes of these legal challenges;
• Discuss the opportunities these challenges present
for drug court practitioners.
Hon. William Meyer (ret.)
Judicial Arbitration Group
Denver, Colorado
Douglas Marlowe
Chief of Science, Law, and Policy, NADCP
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Carson Fox
Director of Operations, NADCP
Alexandria, Virginia
Session F-20
San Simeon B, Hilton
Incorporating Culture/Spirituality into
Your Program: Pros and Cons
This training explores the meaning of culture and spirituality
and the positive and negative benefits of incorporating these
practices into your Healing to Wellness Program. This workshop
will explore concepts of culture and spirituality as well as key
strategies for integrating such principles into program design
and implementation.
Learning Objectives
• Understand and describe the foundations of values
and culture;
• Gain an overall understanding of the interplay of culture
and spirituality in the recovery process of participants.
Prop 63 – Mental Health Services Act:
Let’s Get that Funding for Mentally Ill
Offenders!
The panel will discuss an overview of Prop-63 Mental Health
Services Act’s current funding initiatives and how these funds
are dispersed, how to be sure your Collaborative Court Programs
are represented at the MHSA table, and working locally with
your collaborative partners to secure Prop 63 funding with
examples provided by three successful jurisdictions. They’ll also
discuss how to write successful proposals that allow for the
implementation of Collaborative Court Programs (e.g. Veterans
Courts and Girls Court among others).
Learning Objectives
• Learn how to be strategically effective in a controversial
environment to reach your project goals.
San Simeon A, Hilton
Drug Court Opportunities in The Eastern
Caribbean Countries
This session will cover the drug problem, the nature and extent
of drug use, and the impact of drug use on crime in the Eastern
Caribbean Countries. The session will also showcase the role of
existing courts as well as the professionals who are introducing
drug treatment courts in the area.
Learning Objectives
• Learn about the court and treatment systems in
Barbados and St. Lucia;
• The session will encourage attendees to offer their
skills to the region.
Victor Roach
The Barbados National Committee
for the Prevention of Alcoholism,
Brigade House Medical Center,
St Michael, Barbados
Grand Ballroom F, Marriott
• To equip Collaborative Court Practitioners with strategies for
securing Prop 63 monies on behalf of the mentally ill offenders
served by their collaborative justice court programs;
Misti Porter
Coordinator
Fort McDowell, Arizona
Session F-21
Session F-22 Hon. Tom Anderson
Judge
Superior Court of California
Nevada City, California
Kathleen Connolly Lacey
Program Director
Citywide Case Management Forensics
San Francisco, California
Lynn Fenton
Collaborative Courts Analyst
Superior Court of California
Santa Ana, California
Michael Heggarty
Behavioral Health Director (Nevada County)
Grass Valley, California
Mark Refowitz
Deputy Director
Orange County Behavioral Health Care Agency
Santa Ana, California
Paul Shapiro
Collaborative Courts Officer
Superior Court of California
County of Orange
Santa Ana, California
www.nadcp.org
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Session F-23 Elite 1, Marriott
Working with African American
Populations from the Bench
Many drug courts across the country have proven success with
African American participants. As in any drug court, a critical
component of this success relies on the leadership of the drug
court judge. In this session, drug court judges from different
areas of the country discuss their perspectives and approaches
to dealing with the African American participants in their drug
courts, and offer insight into their programs’ success.
Learning Objectives
• Learn judicial strategies in more effectively handling
drug court cases involving African American participants;
• Identify jurisdictions that have improved outcomes based
on effective strategies in dealing with African American
participants.
Hon. Ellen DeShazer
Judge
Los Angeles County Superior Court
Compton, California
Hon. Joel Bennett
Judge
Travis County Criminal Court
Austin, Texas
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NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
EXHIBITORS & MAPS
EXHIBIT HALL HOURS
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10
Exhibit Hall Open
2:00 pm-7:00 pm
Opening Ceremony
6:00 pm-6:30 pm
THURSDAY, JUNE 11
Exhibit Hall Open
7:30 am-5:00 pm
Break in Exhibit Hall
10:00 am-10:30 am
Exhibit Hall Open
7:30 am-1:00 pm
Break in Exhibit Hall
10:00 am-10:30 am
EXHIBITORS & MAPS
FRIDAY, JUNE 12
EXHIBITORS & MAPS
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REGISTRATION
NORTH
REGISTRATION
COUNTER
CENTER
REGISTRATION
COUNTER
BALLROOM
FOYER
SOUTH
REGISTRATION
COUNTER
IS LOCATED ON LOWER LEVEL OF OASIS TOWER
OASIS
TOWER
ENTRANCE
STARBUCKS
PATIO
GOLD KEY
GRAND
BALLROOM
ORANGE COUNTY
BALLROOM
10
9
8
7
SELF PARKING
P
GARDEN ROOM
ELEVATOR
LA
TIN
UM
PA
TIO
ATM
ANAHEIM
CONVENTION
CENTER
GARAGE
ENTRANCE
BALLROOM LEVEL (2nd Floor)
CONCOURSE LEVEL (4th Floor)
94
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
EXHIBIT HALL FLOOR PLAN
FOOD
Marquis Ballroom, Marriott
319
418
419
116
114
117
216
217
316
317
416
112
115
214
215
314
315
414
110
113
212
213
312
313
412
108
111
210
211
310
311
410
109
208
309
408
107
206
307
406
105
204
205
304
305
404
102
103
202
203
302
303
402
100
101
200
201
300
301
400
FOOD
417
415
413
411
409
REGISTRATION
407
405
403
401
Exhibitor by Booth Number
100 Varian, Inc.
116Global Drug Testing Laboratories, Inc.
307 Alcohol Monitoring Systems
101 NOVX Systems
200 BI, Incorporated
310 Premier Integrity Solutions
102Substance Abuse and Mental Health
Services Administration (SAMHSA)
201 Norchem Drug Testing
312 The SASSI Institute
202 Ammon Analytical Laboratory, LLC.
313 Narcotics Anonymous
203 Orasure Technologies, Inc.
314 Integrated Management Solutions, Inc.
103 NPC Research
105Judicial Council of California Administrative Office of the Courts
206 Thermo Fisher Scientific
208 StreeTime Technologies
315Northpointe Institute for Public
Management, Inc.
108 American Bio Medica Corporation
210 Antek Healthware, LLC
400 Kroll Laboratory Specialists
109 Treatment Research Institute
211 Alkermes, Inc.
401 Intoximeters, Inc.
110Department of Alcohol and Drug
Abuse Programs Resource Center (RC)
212National Institute on Drug Abuse
(NIDA)
111 Oxford House, Inc.
214Commission on Accreditation of
Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF)
107 Lifesafer Interlock, Inc.
112International Certification &
Reciprocity Consortium (IC & RC)
402National Council of Juvenile and
Family Court Judges
403 Correctional Counseling, Inc.
215 Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics
412 Office of Justice Programs (OJP)
113 Elmo Tech, Inc.
300 CSS Test, Inc.
413 Scotia Consulting, Inc.
114 Alcoholics Anonymous
302 Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals
414 Cocaine Anonymous
115 Smart Start, Inc.
305 House Arrest Services, Inc.
415 Prevention Research Institute
www.nadcp.org
Become a Member Today
95
EXHIBITORS
Alcoholics Anonymous
Mary Dargan, CPC Coordinator
475 Riverside Drive, 11th Floor
New York, NY 10115
Phone: 212-870-3400 Fax: 212-870-3003
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.aa.org
Booth Number: 114
Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of sober alcoholics
who help other alcoholics to recover; unaffiliated with other
organizations or cause; supported by member contributions,
Alcohol Monitoring Systems
Jennifer Mill, Marketing Manager
1241 W. Mineral Ave, Suite 200
Littleton, CO 80120
Phone: 303-785-7828 Fax: 303-791-4262
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.alcoholmonitoring.com
Booth Number: 307-309
SCRAM (Secure Continuous Remote Alcohol Monitor), the world’s
only continuous alcohol monitoring system, uses non-invasive
transdermal analysis to monitor alcohol consumption.
Alkermes, Inc.
Joy Thompson-Ball, Senior Manager – Vivitrol™ Marketing
88 Sidney Street
Cambridge, MA 02139
Phone: 617-283-6966 Fax: 617-252-0915
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.vivitrol.com
Booth Number: 211-213
Alkermes, Inc. will showcase alcohol dependence as a disease
state, and Vivitrol™ as a potential treatment for alcohol
dependence.
Ammon Analytical Laboratory, LLC
Nelson Reyes, Marketing Director
1622 S. Wood Avenue
Linden, NJ 07036
Phone: 908-862-4404 Fax: 908-862-0605
E-Mail: [email protected]
Web: www.ammontox.com
Booth Number: 202
Ammon is one of the largest specialty toxicology laboratories,
providing urine drug testing, oral testing, ETG testing, and
instant on-site devices.
Antek Healthware, LLC
Kristin Brillantes, Marketing Communications Manager
228 Business Center Drive
Reisterstown, MD 21136
Phone: 410-517-0330 Fax: 410-517-0331
E-Mail: [email protected]
Web: antekhealthware.com
Booth Number: 210
LabDAQ Toxicology Information system that can be found in
Drug Courts, Parole and Probation Programs and Drug Testing
Reference Laboratories all across the United States.
BI, Inc.
Laura N. Dickinson, Marketing Coordinator
6400 Lookout Road
Boulder, CO 80301
Phone: 303-218-1000 Fax: 303-218-1413
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.bi.com
Booth Number: 200
BI, Incorporated is a national leader for supervision services,
community-based treatment services, reentry programs and
offender monitoring technology. BI works closely with local
corrections officials to reduce recidivism, enhance public safety
and strengthen the communities it serves.
The Change Companies
American Bio Medica Corporation
Jim Fitzsimons, Director of Government Sales
122 Smith Road
Kinderhook, NY 12106
Phone: 800-227-1243 Fax: 518-758-8172
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.abmc.com
Booth Number: 108
American Bio Medica Corporation is a prominent U.S. manufacturer
of highly accurate drug tests. ABMC has the largest portfolio of
urine test and most sensitive oral fluid test on the market.
96
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Mike Judnick, Vice President of Justice Systems
5221 Sigstrom Drive
Carson City, NV 89706
Phone: 888-889-8866 Fax: 775-885-0643
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.changecompanies.net
Booth Number: 204
The Change Companies produces curriculum, assessment tools, and
resources for addiction treatment and criminal offender programs.
Cocaine Anonymous World Services
Patty Flanagan, Director of Operations
3740 Overland Avenue, Suite C
Los Angeles, CA 90034
Phone: 310-59-58334 Fax: 310-339-2554
E-Mail: [email protected]
Web: www.ca.org
Booth Number: 414
Cocaine Anonymous provides an opportunity for newly identified
addicts to find a solution, freedom from all mind-altering
substances, through relating to their substance of choice.
Department of Alcohol and Drug Abuse
Programs Resource Center (RC)
Kathryn Ring, Associate Governmental Program Analyst
1700 K Street, First Floor
Sacramento, CA 95811
Phone: 916-327-8974 Fax: 916-323-1270
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.adp.ca.gov
Booth Number: 110
The RC at the Department of Alcohol and Drub Abuse Programs
disseminates prevention and treatment information, at no cost,
to all residents of California.
Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation
Facilities (CARF)
Elmo Tech, Inc.
Carol Smith, CARF Surveyor
4891 E. Grant Road
Tucson, AZ 85712
Phone: 520-325-1044 Fax: 520-318-1129
E-Mail: [email protected]
Web: www.carf.org
Booth Number: 214
Rebecca Walker, Office Administrator
1665 Quincy Avenue, Suite 147
Naperville, IL 60540
Phone: 630-420-0901 Fax: 630-420-1475
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.elmotech.com
Booth Number: 113
CARF, International is a private, non-profit accrediting body
established in 1966. Almost 5,000 organizations in the United
States, Canada, Europe, and South America have earned CARF
accreditation for 38,500 programs.
Elmo Tech is a global provider of leading presence and location
verification technologies, designed for monitoring individuals in
the law enforcement, corrections and security markets.
Correctional Counseling, Inc.
Sharron Johnson, Office Manager
2028 Exeter Road
Germantown, TN 38138
Phone: 901-360-1564 Fax: 901-757-1995
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.ccimrt.com
Booth Number: 403
Correctional Counseling, Inc. specializes in providing cognitivebehavioral staff training, treatment workbooks and materials, as
well as adult and juvenile outpatient, offender-specific substance
abuse and accountability services.
CSS Test, Inc.
Gary E. Finger, Vice President of Operations
400 Laurel Oak Road, Suite 102
Voorhees, NJ 08043
Phone: 866-427-7873 Fax: 856-627-5696
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.csstest.com
Booth Number: 300
CSS Test is a national provider of all drug screening solutions,
from on-site to laboratory results. CSS is the largest provider of
the Sweat Patch technology in the country.
www.nadcp.org
Global Drug Testing Laboratories, Inc.
Joel Laker, Vice President of Business Development
2201 N. Government Way, Suite C
Coeur D’Alene, ID 83814
Phone: 208-664-6299 Fax: 208-664-6045
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.gdtlabs.com
Booth Number: 116
Global Drug Testing Labs provides a complete, accessible and
practical drugs-of-abuse collections and testing solutions to the
criminal justice, drug treatment and workplace partners with
absolute speed, precision, accuracy and certainty.
House Arrest Services, Inc.
Jonathan Ugval, Director
16039 E. Nine Mile Road
Eastpointe, MI 48021
Phone: 586-773-0700 Fax: 586-773-9898
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.housearrest.com
Booth Number: 305
House Arrest Services, Inc. has over 22 years of service in the
electronic monitoring industry. We are a full service provider,
which affords us the ability to offer a variety of equipment and
services tailored to your court or agency. Our current inventory
consists of GPS active monitoring, traditional “House Arrest,”
continuous alcohol monitoring, visual alcohol monitoring and
voice verification technology
Become a Member Today
97
International Certification & Reciprocity
Consortium (IC & RC)
Alissa Bradley, Association Coordinator
298 South Progress Avenue
Harrisburg, PA 17109
Phone: 717-540-4457 Fax: 717-540-4458
E-Mail: [email protected]
Web: www.icrcaoda.org
Booth Number: 112
IC & RC is a non-profit voluntary membership organization
composed of certifying agencies involved in credentialing or
licensing alcohol and other drug abuse counselors, clinical
supervisors, prevention specialists, co-occurring professionals
and criminal justice professioanls
Kroll Laboratory Specialists
Ms. Pat Sledge, Sales Representative
450 Southlake Boulevard
Richmond, VA 23236
Phone: 800-977-9130 Fax: 804-379-5919
E-Mail: [email protected]
Web: www.kroll.com
Booth Number: 400
Kroll is a national leader specializing in forensic quality substance
abuse analysis since 1978. Kroll is certified by SAMHSA, CAPFUD, CLIA, and is audited by the NRC. Kroll offers comprehensive
traditional laboratory, POCT devices, and employee background
screening programs.
LifeSafer Interlock. Inc.
Integrated Management Solutions, Inc.
Jim Northway, Sales & Installations Manager
4900 Bradford Drive, NW
Huntsville, AL 35805
Phone: 256-713-5232 Fax: 256-864-9994
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.ims-dynetics.com
Booth Number: 314-316
Integrated Management Solutions (iMS) has provided unique
data management solutions through its information system
products for WinTOX 6 and COTTS 6 for over 10 years. iMS
developed these products with an emphasis on streamlining the
exchange, rapid retrieval, and timely delivery of decision-making
information.
Intoximeters, Inc.
Mark Gilmer, North American Sales Manager
8110 Lackland Road
St. Louis, MO 63114
Phone: 314-429-4000 Fax: 314-429-4170
E-Mail: [email protected]
Web: www.intox.com
Booth Number: 401
Intoximeters Inc. develops, manufactures and markets a full line
of breath alcohol testing instruments and has been the industry
leader since 1945.
Judicial Council of California Administrative Office of the Courts
Francine Byrne, Supervising Research Analyst
455 Golden Gate Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94102
Phone: 415-865-8890 Fax: 415-865-7417
E-Mail: [email protected]
Booth Number: 105
JCC will show displays and reports from drug court evaluators,
judicial education projects, including the collaborative justice
curriculum funded by the State Justice Institute, DUI prevention
programs.
98
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Richard Freund, President
1908 Hudson AVe
Cincinnati, OH 45212
Phone: 513-651-9560 Fax: 513-651-9563
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.lifesafer.com
Booth Number: 107
LifeSafer Interlock, Inc. provides advanced technology to deter
drinking and driving.
Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc.
Colin Sevareid, Public Relations Representative
19737 Nordhoff Place
Chatsworth, CA 91311
Phone: 818-773-9999 ext. 126 Fax: 818-700-0700
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.na.org
Booth Number: 313
Narcotics Anonymous World Services is a global, multilingual,
multicultural mutual-support fellowship which has over 53,000
meetings in 130 countries. NA literature is translated into 36
languages.
National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges
Wendy Schiller, Information Specialist
1041 North Virginia Street, Third Floor
Reno, NV 89503
Phone: 775-784-1748 Fax: 775-784-6628
E-Mail: [email protected]
Web: www.ncjfcj.org
Booth Number: 402
NCJFCJ will disseminate resources specifically designed to help
juvenile drug courts. These resources, including a new technical
assistance brief, are invaluable tools for juvenile drug courts.
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
NPC Research
Joan Nolan, Manager of Publications and Exhibits
6001 Executive Boulevard, Suite 5213
Bethesda, MD 20892
Phone: 301-594-6142 Fax: 301-443-7397
E-Mail: [email protected]
Web: www.drugabuse.gov
Booth Number: 212
Shannon Carey, Vice President of Development, Senior Research
Associate
4380 SW Macadam, Suite 530
Portland, OR 97239
Phone: 503-957-9363 Fax: 503-243-2454
E-Mail: [email protected]
Web: www.npcresearch.com
Booth Number: 103
NIDA is a Federal agency charged with supporting research on
the causes, prevention, and treatment of all aspects of drug
abuse including AIDS.
Norchem Drug Testing
Richard Danisch, Director of Business Development
1760 E. Route 66, Suite 1
Flagstaff, AZ 86004
Phone: 928-526-1011 Fax: 928-526-1777
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.norchemlab.com
Booth Number: 201
Norchem provides leading advances in court-ordered substance
abuse monitoring with the combination of evidence-based
program management and certified forensic laboratory for better
outcomes at lower cost.
Northpointe Institute for Public Management, Inc.
Dave Wells, President/Chief Executive Officer
5148 US 31 North
Williamsburg, MI 49690
Phone: 231-938-53.66 Fax: 231-938-5995
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.northpointein.com
Booth Number: 315
Northpointe Institute for Public Management, Inc. is a nationally
recognized research and consulting firm, offering software
products, training and implementation services to local, sate,
federal criminal justice systems and policy makers.
NOVX Systems, Inc.
Serena Wong, Marketing Manager
185 Renfrew Drive
Markham, ON L3R 6G3, Canada
Phone: 905-474-5051
E-Mail: [email protected]
Web: www.novxsystems.com
Booth Number: 101
Program evaluation services, cost-benefit analysis, research
based training and technical assistance; web-based case
management system and web-based self-evaluation tools, risks,
needs, and strengths assessment tools.
Office of Justice Programs (OJP)
Michael Lambert Conference Coordinator
2277 Research Boulevard
Rockville, MD 20850
Phone: 301-519-6208 Fax: 301-519-5711
E-Mail: [email protected]
Web: www.ojp.usdoj.gov
Booth Number: 412
Orasure Technologies, Inc.
Liana Romero, Marketing Director SAT
220 East First Street
Bethlehem, PA 18015
Phone: 610-882-1820
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.orasure.com
Booth Number: 203-205
Orasure Technologies, Inc. is the pioneer of oral fluid drug
testing, manufactures and markets the Intercept® Oral Fluid Drug
Test System collection device and diagnostic immunoassays.
Oxford House, Inc.
Leann Watkins, Director of Finance
1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 300
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Phone: 301-587-2916 Fax: 301-589-0302
E-Mail: [email protected]
Web: www.oxfordhouse.org
Booth Number: 111
Oxford House is a cost-effective, proven concept that enables
groups of recovering individuals to rent a house, live together,
and help each other stay clean and sober.
NOVX provides powerful on-site drug screening for drug court. The
FDA cleared iMDX Analyzer provides semi-quantitative results that
automatically flow into NOVX’s ClientVu Drug Court Software.
www.nadcp.org
Become a Member Today
99
Premier Integrity Solutions
Scotia Consulting, Inc.
Jacky D. Burton, Director of Program Development
7 Jamestown Street
Russell Springs, KY 42642
Phone: 800-256-7141 Fax: 270-866-8515
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.premierintegrity.com
Booth Number: 310
Thomas R. Hendry, Principal
335 N. Brand Blvd. #200
Glendale, CA 91203
Phone: 818-956-8490 Fax: 800-309-3674
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.scotiaconsulting.com
Booth Number: 413
Premier Integrity Solutions provides on-site rapid drug screens,
laboratory test panels, expanded test panels which test for
hundreds of drugs as well as an automated call-in system and
JUDICATOR, a software specific to criminal justice drug testing
programs.
Scotia Consulting specializes in the design, development,
and delivery of criminal justice case management systems.
Prevention Research Institute
Jo Marie Lammy, Operations Coordinator
841 Corporate Drive, Suite 300
Lexington, KY 40503
Phone: 859-223-3392 Fax: 859-223-5320
E-Mail: [email protected]
Web: www.primeforlife.org
Booth Number: 415
The PRIME programs are develops by Prevention Research
Institute, Inc, a private, non-profit organization. PRIME For Life
is an indicated prevention program whidh has demonstrated the
ability to increase abstinence and reduce high-risk drinking.
Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals
Tara Cooper, Convention Coordinator
1710 Highway 34
Farmingdale, NJ 07727
Phone: 732-919-1234 Fax: 732-280-1350
E-Mail: [email protected]
Booth Number: 302-304
Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals is at the forefront providing
educational resources and treatment options to physicians and
patients dealing with the chronic relapsing disease of opioid
dependence.
The SASSI Institute
Melissa Renn, Conference Coordinator
201 Camelot Lane
Springville, IN 47462
Phone: 800-726-0526 Fax: 800-546-7995
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.sassi.com
Booth Number: 312
The Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory (SASSI) is a
brief, self-report psychological screening measure which helps
to identify adults and adolescents likely to have a substance use
disorder.
100
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics
Kaiyane Bynoe, Convention Planner
1717 Deerfield Road
Deerfield, IL 60015
Phone: 914-524-5168 Fax: 914-524-3817
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.siemens.com/diagnostics
Booth Number: 215-217
When the stakes are too high to be wrong; turn to the experts
in drug testing at Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics. Syva EMIT®
is the world’s leading drug monitoring methodology. Siemens
offers a comprehensive portfolio of products for drugs of abuse,
specimen validity, point of care testing, and data management.
Smart Start, Inc.
Meghan Shepherd, Executive Marketing Assistant
4850 Plaza Drive
Irving, TX 75063
Phone: 972-621-0252 Fax: 972-915-0562
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.smartstartinc.com
Booth Number: 115-117
Smart Start is the nation’s premier provider of ignition interlock
services and technology. The ignition interlock device prevents
intoxicated drivers from endangering themselves, their families
and their fellow citizens by separating drinking from driving.
Smart Start is the smart choice for both monitored drivers and
court/public safety authorities.
StreeTime Technologies
John Diamond, Director of Sales
1127 Sport Hill Road
Easton, CT 06612
Phone: 866-357-1601 Fax: 615-261-9332
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.streetimetechnologies.com
Booth Number: 208
StreeTime Technologies provides unique and cost effective
alcohol and other drug abuse monitoring technologies used
by drug courts which uncover hidden substance use and deter
clients’ abuse.
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services
Administration (SAMHSA)
Paula Ferebee, Senior Exhibit Outreach Specialist
11300 Rockville Pike
Rockville, MD 20852
Phone: 240-747-4058 Fax: 301-945-4296
E-Mail: [email protected]
Web: www.samhsa.gov
Booth Number: 102
SAMHSA is a public health agency within the Department of
Health and Human Services. The agency is responsible for
improving the accountability, capacity and effectiveness of the
nation’s substance abuse prevention, addictions treatment, and
mental health services delivery system.
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Kathy Ruzich, Director Marketing Communications
46360 Fremont Blvd.
Fremont, CA 94538
Phone: 510-979-5157 Fax: 510-979-5357
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.thermo.com/microgenics
Booth Number: 206
Thermo Fisher Scientific supplies innovative quality products for
drugs of abuse screening and offers system solutions with our
MGC240® bench top analyzer to meet your testing challenges.
These assays can be used on a variety of clinical chemistry
analyzers.
Treatment Research Institute
Olivia Stroia, Senior Program Assistant
150 South Independence Mall West
Philadelphia, PA 19106
Phone: 215-399-0980 Fax: 215-399-0987
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.tresearch.org
Booth Number: 109
TRI, a non profit research and development organization, offers
its web-based RANT™ and TRI-CEP™, court tools to improve
monitoring, evaluation, and outcomes for substance involved
offenders.
Varian, Inc.
Bonnie Clarke, Sales and Marketing Coordinator
13000 Weston Parkway
Cary, NC 27513
Phone: 919-677-6832 Fax: 919-677-1311
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.varian-onsite.com
Booth Number:
Varian, Inc. is a leading manufacturer of on-site urine and oral
fluid drug testing kits with over 20 years experience in providing
cost conscious products and services to drug court across the
country.
www.nadcp.org
Become a Member Today
101
Some Uplifting Numbers
About Your SCRAM Programs...
®
% of hardcore offenders compliant
while on SCRAM (other 25% received
swift and certain action)
Evidentiary hearings
where SCRAM
results were backed
by direct testimony
Courts using
SCRAM nationwide
Offenders who
have completed
SCRAM monitoring
Alcohol tests performed
around the clock
$ that SCRAM has
saved the corrections
industry on incarceration
The evidence is in – SCRAM is working!
The only proven continuous alcohol monitoring solution.
See how SCRAM can help your Specialty Court.
Visit AMS in Booth #309 at the NADCP Conference for more details. www.alcoholmonitoring.com
For the treatment of alcohol dependence
VIVITROL...
there when they need it.
Enhance psychosocial therapy with VIVITROL
No need for daily adherence decisions1,2
Easy, once-monthly dosing1
Generally well tolerated
1.
VIVITROL [full prescribing information]. Cambridge, MA: Alkermes, Inc; 2007.
2.
US Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for
Substance Abuse Treatment. Substance Abuse Treatment Advisory. 2007;6(1).
Visit us at Booth 211/213
Important Information
Indication1
VIVITROL is indicated for the treatment of alcohol dependence in patients who are able to abstain from
alcohol in an outpatient setting prior to initiation of treatment with VIVITROL.
Patients should not be actively drinking at the time of initial VIVITROL administration.
Treatment with VIVITROL should be part of a comprehensive management program that includes
psychosocial support.
Important safety information1
Naltrexone has the capacity to cause hepatocellular injury when given in excessive doses.
Naltrexone is contraindicated in acute hepatitis or liver failure, and its use in patients with active
liver disease must be carefully considered in light of its hepatotoxic effects.
The margin of separation between the apparently safe dose of naltrexone and the dose causing
hepatic injury appears to be only five-fold or less.VIVITROL does not appear to be a hepatotoxin
at the recommended doses.
Patients should be warned of the risk of hepatic injury and advised to seek medical attention if they
experience symptoms of acute hepatitis. Use of VIVITROL should be discontinued in the event of
symptoms and/or signs of acute hepatitis.
VIVITROL is contraindicated in patients receiving or dependent on opioids, in acute opioid withdrawal,
and in those who have failed the naloxone challenge test or have a positive urine screen for opioids;
and in those with previous hypersensitivity to naltrexone, PLG, carboxymethylcellulose, or any other
components of the diluent.
Patients must be opioid free for a minimum of 7-10 days before treatment.Attempts to overcome
opioid blockade due toVIVITROL may result in fatal overdose.In prior opioid users,use of opioids after
discontinuingVIVITROL may result in fatal overdose because patients may be more sensitive to lower
doses of opioids.Patients requiring reversal of theVIVITROL blockade for pain management should be
monitored by appropriately trained personnel in a setting equipped for cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
Consider the diagnosis of eosinophilic pneumonia if patients develop progressive dyspnea and
hypoxemia. Injection site reactions not improving may require prompt medical attention.Alcohol
dependent patients, including those taking VIVITROL, should be monitored for the development of
depression or suicidal thinking. Caution is recommended in administering VIVITROL to patients with
moderate to severe renal impairment.
The most common adverse events associated with VIVITROL in clinical trials were nausea, vomiting,
headache, dizziness, asthenic conditions, and injection site reactions.
PLEASE SEE BRIEF SUMMARY OF PRESCRIBING INFORMATION
INCLUDING BOXED WARNING ON THE NEXT PAGE.
©2009 Alkermes, Inc.
All rights reserved VIV 793 March 2009 Printed in U.S.A.
www.vivitrol.com
Once-monthly dosing. Day by day control.
BRIEF SUMMARY See package insert for full Prescribing Information.
INDICATIONS AND USAGE: VIVITROL is indicated for the treatment of alcohol dependence
in patients who are able to abstain from alcohol in an outpatient setting prior to initiation
of treatment with VIVITROL. Patients should not be actively drinking at the time of initial
VIVITROL administration. Treatment with VIVITROL should be part of a comprehensive
management program that includes psychosocial support. CONTRAINDICATIONS: VIVITROL is
contraindicated in: • Patients receiving opioid analgesics (see PRECAUTIONS). • Patients with
current physiologic opioid dependence (see WARNINGS). • Patients in acute opiate withdrawal
(see WARNINGS). • Any individual who has failed the naloxone challenge test or has a positive
urine screen for opioids. • Patients who have previously exhibited hypersensitivity to naltrexone,
PLG, carboxymethylcellulose, or any other components of the diluent.
WARNINGS: Hepatotoxicity
Naltrexone has the capacity to cause hepatocellular injury when given in excessive doses.
Naltrexone is contraindicated in acute hepatitis or liver failure, and its use in patients with active
liver disease must be carefully considered in light of its hepatotoxic effects.
The margin of separation between the apparently safe dose of naltrexone and the dose causing
hepatic injury appears to be only five-fold or less. VIVITROL does not appear to be a hepatotoxin at
the recommended doses.
Patients should be warned of the risk of hepatic injury and advised to seek medical attention if they
experience symptoms of acute hepatitis. Use of VIVITROL should be discontinued in the event of
symptoms and/or signs of acute hepatitis.
Eosinophilic pneumonia In clinical trials with VIVITROL, there was one diagnosed case and one
suspected case of eosinophilic pneumonia. Both cases required hospitalization, and resolved after
treatment with antibiotics and corticosteroids. Should a person receiving VIVITROL develop
progressive dyspnea and hypoxemia, the diagnosis of eosinophilic pneumonia should be
considered (see ADVERSE REACTIONS). Patients should be warned of the risk of eosinophilic
pneumonia, and advised to seek medical attention should they develop symptoms of pneumonia.
Clinicians should consider the possibility of eosinophilic pneumonia in patients who do not respond
to antibiotics. Unintended Precipitation of Opioid Withdrawal—To prevent occurrence of an
acute abstinence syndrome (withdrawal) in patients dependent on opioids, or exacerbation
of a pre-existing subclinical abstinence syndrome, patients must be opioid-free for a
minimum of 7-10 days before starting VIVITROL treatment. Since the absence of an opioid
drug in the urine is often not sufficient proof that a patient is opioid-free, a naloxone
challenge test should be employed if the prescribing physician feels there is a risk of
precipitating a withdrawal reaction following administration of VIVITROL. Opioid Overdose
Following an Attempt to Overcome Opiate Blockade VIVITROL is not indicated for the purpose
of opioid blockade or the treatment of opiate dependence. Although VIVITROL is a potent antagonist
with a prolonged pharmacological effect, the blockade produced by VIVITROL is surmountable. This
poses a potential risk to individuals who attempt, on their own, to overcome the blockade by
administering large amounts of exogenous opioids. Indeed, any attempt by a patient to overcome
the antagonism by taking opioids is very dangerous and may lead to fatal overdose. Injury may
arise because the plasma concentration of exogenous opioids attained immediately following their
acute administration may be sufficient to overcome the competitive receptor blockade. As a
consequence, the patient may be in immediate danger of suffering life-endangering opioid
intoxication (e.g., respiratory arrest, circulatory collapse). Patients should be told of the serious
consequences of trying to overcome the opioid blockade (see INFORMATION FOR PATIENTS).There
is also the possibility that a patient who had been treated with VIVITROL will respond to lower doses
of opioids than previously used. This could result in potentially life-threatening opioid intoxication
(respiratory compromise or arrest, circulatory collapse, etc.). Patients should be aware that they
may be more sensitive to lower doses of opioids after VIVITROL treatment is discontinued (see
INFORMATION FOR PATIENTS). PRECAUTIONS: General—When Reversal of VIVITROL Blockade
is Required for Pain Management In an emergency situation in patients receiving VIVITROL, a
suggested plan for pain management is regional analgesia, conscious sedation with a
benzodiazepine, and use of non-opioid analgesics or general anesthesia. In a situation requiring
opioid analgesia, the amount of opioid required may be greater than usual, and the resulting
respiratory depression may be deeper and more prolonged. A rapidly acting opioid analgesic which
minimizes the duration of respiratory depression is preferred. The amount of analgesic
administered should be titrated to the needs of the patient. Non-receptor mediated actions may
occur and should be expected (e.g., facial swelling, itching, generalized erythema, or
bronchoconstriction), presumably due to histamine release. Irrespective of the drug chosen to
reverse VIVITROL blockade, the patient should be monitored closely by appropriately trained
personnel in a setting equipped and staffed for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Depression and
Suicidality In controlled clinical trials of VIVITROL, adverse events of a suicidal nature (suicidal
ideation, suicide attempts, completed suicides) were infrequent overall, but were more common in
patients treated with VIVITROL than in patients treated with placebo (1% vs. 0). In some cases, the
suicidal thoughts or behavior occurred after study discontinuation, but were in the context of an
episode of depression which began while the patient was on study drug. Two completed suicides
occurred, both involving patients treated with VIVITROL. Depression-related events associated with
premature discontinuation of study drug were also more common in patients treated with VIVITROL
(~1%) than in placebo-treated patients (0). In the 24-week, placebo-controlled pivotal trial,
adverse events involving depressed mood were reported by 10% of patients treated with VIVITROL
380 mg, as compared to 5% of patients treated with placebo injections. Alcohol dependent
patients, including those taking VIVITROL, should be monitored for the development of depression
or suicidal thinking. Families and caregivers of patients being treated with VIVITROL should be
alerted to the need to monitor patients for the emergence of symptoms of depression or suicidality,
and to report such symptoms to the patient’s healthcare provider. Injection Site Reactions
VIVITROL injections may be followed by pain, tenderness, induration, or pruritus. In the clinical
trials, one patient developed an area of induration that continued to enlarge after 4 weeks, with
subsequent development of necrotic tissue that required surgical excision. Patients should be
informed that any concerning injection site reactions should be brought to the attention of the
physician (see INFORMATION FOR PATIENTS). Renal Impairment VIVITROL pharmacokinetics
have not been evaluated in subjects with moderate and severe renal insufficiency. Because
naltrexone and its primary metabolite are excreted primarily in the urine, caution is recommended
in administering VIVITROL to patients with moderate to severe renal impairment. Alcohol
Withdrawal Use of VIVITROL does not eliminate nor diminish alcohol withdrawal symptoms.
Intramuscular injections As with any intramuscular injection, VIVITROL should be administered
with caution to patients with thrombocytopenia or any coagulation disorder (e.g., hemophilia and
severe hepatic failure). Information for Patients Physicians are advised to consult Full Prescribing
Information for information to be discussed with patients for whom they have prescribed VIVITROL.
Drug Interactions Patients taking VIVITROL may not benefit from opioid-containing medicines
(see PRECAUTIONS, Pain Management). Because naltrexone is not a substrate for CYP drug
metabolizing enzymes, inducers or inhibitors of these enzymes are unlikely to change the
clearance of VIVITROL. No clinical drug interaction studies have been performed with VIVITROL to
evaluate drug interactions, therefore prescribers should weigh the risks and benefits of concomitant
drug use. The safety profile of patients treated with VIVITROL concomitantly with antidepressants
was similar to that of patients taking VIVITROL without antidepressants. Carcinogenesis,
Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility Carcinogenicity studies have not been conducted with
VIVITROL. Carcinogenicity studies of oral naltrexone hydrochloride (administered via the diet) have
been conducted in rats and mice. In rats, there were small increases in the numbers of testicular
mesotheliomas in males and tumors of vascular origin in males and females. The clinical
significance of these findings is not known. Naltrexone was negative in the following in vitro
genotoxicity studies: bacterial reverse mutation assay (Ames test), the heritable translocation
assay, CHO cell sister chromatid exchange assay, and the mouse lymphoma gene mutation assay.
Naltrexone was also negative in an in vivo mouse micronucleus assay. In contrast, naltrexone
tested positive in the following assays: Drosophila recessive lethal frequency assay, non-specific
DNA damage in repair tests with E. coli and WI-38 cells, and urinalysis for methylated histidine
residues. Naltrexone given orally caused a significant increase in pseudopregnancy and a decrease
in pregnancy rates in rats at 100 mg/kg/day (600 mg/m2/day). There was no effect on male fertility
at this dose level. The relevance of these observations to human fertility is not known. Pregnancy
Category C Reproduction and developmental studies have not been conducted for VIVITROL.
Studies with naltrexone administered via the oral route have been conducted in pregnant rats and
rabbits. Teratogenic Effects Oral naltrexone has been shown to increase the incidence of early
fetal loss in rats administered ≥30 mg/kg/day (180 mg/m2/day) and rabbits administered ≥60 mg/
kg/day (720 mg/m2/day). There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of either naltrexone or
VIVITROL in pregnant women. VIVITROL should be used during pregnancy only if the potential
benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Labor and Delivery The potential effect of VIVITROL
on duration of labor and delivery in humans is unknown. Nursing Mothers Transfer of naltrexone
and 6β-naltrexol into human milk has been reported with oral naltrexone. Because of the potential
for tumorigenicity shown for naltrexone in animal studies, and because of the potential for serious
adverse reactions in nursing infants from VIVITROL, a decision should be made whether to
discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to
the mother. Pediatric Use The safety and efficacy of VIVITROL have not been established in the
pediatric population. Geriatric Use In trials of alcohol dependent subjects, 2.6% (n=26) of subjects
were >65 years of age, and one patient was >75 years of age. Clinical studies of VIVITROL did not
include sufficient numbers of subjects age 65 and over to determine whether they respond
differently from younger subjects. ADVERSE REACTIONS: In all controlled and uncontrolled trials
during the premarketing development of VIVITROL, more than 900 patients with alcohol and/or
opioid dependence have been treated with VIVITROL. Approximately 400 patients have been
treated for 6 months or more, and 230 for 1 year or longer. Adverse Events Leading to
Discontinuation of Treatment In controlled trials of 6 months or less, 9% of patients treated with
VIVITROL discontinued treatment due to an adverse event, as compared to 7% of the patients
treated with placebo. Adverse events in the VIVITROL 380-mg group that led to more dropouts were
injection site reactions (3%), nausea (2%), pregnancy (1%), headache (1%), and suicide-related
events (0.3%). In the placebo group, 1% of patients withdrew due to injection site reactions, and
0% of patients withdrew due to the other adverse events. Common Adverse Events The most
common adverse events associated with VIVITROL in clinical trials were nausea, vomiting, headache,
dizziness, fatigue, and injection site reactions. For a complete list of adverse events, please refer to
the VIVITROL package insert for full Prescribing Information. A majority of patients treated with
VIVITROL in clinical studies had adverse events with a maximum intensity of “mild” or “moderate.”
Post-marketing Reports—Reports From Other Intramuscular Drug Products Containing
Polylactide-co-glycolide (PLG) Microspheres – Not With VIVITROL. Retinal Artery
Occlusion Retinal artery occlusion after injection with another drug product containing
polylactide-co-glycolide (PLG) microspheres has been reported very rarely during postmarketing surveillance. This event has been reported in the presence of abnormal
arteriovenous anastomosis. No cases of retinal artery occlusion have been reported during
VIVITROL clinical trials or post-marketing surveillance. VIVITROL should be administered
by intramuscular (IM) injection into the gluteal muscle, and care must be taken to avoid
inadvertent injection into a blood vessel (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).
OVERDOSAGE: There is limited experience with overdose of VIVITROL. Single doses up to 784 mg
were administered to 5 healthy subjects. There were no serious or severe adverse events. The most
common effects were injection site reactions, nausea, abdominal pain, somnolence, and dizziness.
There were no significant increases in hepatic enzymes. In the event of an overdose, appropriate
supportive treatment should be initiated. This brief summary is based on VIVITROL Prescribing
Information (VIV 566 Oct 07).
VIVITROL is a registered trademark of Cephalon, Inc.
Manufactured by: Alkermes, Inc., Cambridge, MA 02139
Marketed by: Cephalon, Inc., Frazer, PA 19355
©2009 Alkermes, Inc./Cephalon, Inc. VIV 107A March 2009 Printed in U.S.A. All rights reserved.
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STANLEY M. GOLDSTEIN
DRUG COURT HALL OF FAME INDUCTION
The following list of drug court practitioners have distinguished themselves over the years through their innovation
and leadership and have been formally inducted into the Stanley M. Goldstein Drug Court Hall of Fame.
2002 Judge Judy Lambert; Frankfort, KY
2005 Caroline Cooper; Washington, DC
Henry Pirowski; Buffalo, NY
Marilyn Roberts; Washington, DC
2003 Judge Melanie G. May; West Palm Beach, FL
Judge Stephen Manley; Santa Clara, CA
Judge Robert P. Ziemian; South Boston, MA
2004 Judge Mary Noble; Lexington, KY
Judge Robert T. Russell; Buffalo, NY
Judge Lou Presenza; Philadelphia, PA
2006 Judge Karen Freeman-Wilson (ret.); Gary, IN
Tim Smith; San Diego, CA
2007 Judge William G. Schma; Kalamazoo, MI
Judge John Schwartz; Rochester, NY
2008 Judge Darrell W. Stevens (posthumous); Chico, CA
Ann Wilson; Jefferson City, MO
Previous recipients of distinguished leadership awards from 1995–2001 were grandfathered into the
Drug Court Hall of Fame in 2002:
Joe Brann; Washington, DC
Barry Mahoney, Ph.D.; Denver, CO
Bennett H. Brummer; Miami, FL
General Barry McCaffrey; Washington, DC
Judge John Creuzot; Dallas, TX
Claire McCaskill; Kansas City, MO
Lolita Curtis; Alexandria, VA
Israel Milton; Miami, FL
Michael Smith, M.D.; Bronx, NY
Katherine Fernandez-Rundle; Miami, FL
Judge Robert Fogan; Fort Lauderdale, FL
Luceille Fleming; Columbus, OH
Edward T. Foote; Miami, FL
Ron George; Sacramento, CA
Judge Michael Getty; Chicago, IL
Judge Stanley Goldstein; Miami, FL
Judge Harl Haas; Portland, OR
Chief Justice Major B. Harding; Tallahassee, FL
Judge Peggy Fulton Hora (ret.); Castro Valley, CA
Judge William Hunter; Franklin, LA
110
Judge James Milliken; San Diego, CA
Judge Patrick Morris; San Bernardino, CA
Timothy Murray; Washington, DC
Bill Ritter; Denver, CO
Attorney General Janet Reno; Washington, DC
Assistant Attorney General Laurie Robinson;
Washington, DC
Deputy Associate Attorney General Reggie Robinson;
Washington, DC
Frank Tapia; Oakland, CA
Judge Jeffrey Tauber; Berkeley, CA
Michael Judge; Los Angeles, CA
Bill Vickery; San Francisco, CA
Fran Jursco; San Francisco, CA
Janna Walker; Broken Arrow, OK
Judge Herbert M. Klein; Miami, FL
Andrew Wells; Vienna, Austria
Judge Jack Lehman; Las Vegas, NV
Judge Gerald Wetherington; Miami FL
NADCP 15th Annual Drug Court Training Conference
SB-10 Grand Ballroom A/B (MAR)
SB-12 Grand Ballroom C/D (MAR) Getting the Most out of your Evaluation
SB-14
SB-16
SB-18
SB-20
SB-22
SB-24
Case Management: Skills for Better Outcomes
The Next Generation of Sober Social Networking – An Innovative
Collaboration to Enhance Outcomes for Drug Court Participants
and Graduates
Motivational Interviewing in the Courtroom
Rediscovering Alcoholism, Addiction, and Dependence: Reenergizing Treatment and Prevention
Immigration Issues in Drug Court
Reentry Courts
Tribal Nations Forum
Managing Multiple Problem Solving Court Dockets: Spotlight on
the Orange County Problem Solving Courts
SB-11 Grand Ballroom C/D (MAR)
Grand Ballroom E (MAR)
Laguna A (HIL)
Capistrano A/B (HIL)
El Capitan A/B (HIL)
Huntington B (HIL)
SB-13
SB-15
SB-17
SB-19
SB-21
SB-26
SB-28
See for Yourself: Visit the Orange County Community court for a
Tour and Court Sessions (attendance limited to 40 people - sign
up in SB-23A)
ASAM PPC – 2R – Making it Real; Making it Work
California Proposition 36: Building Bridges
Malibu (HIL)
Pacific Ballroom D (HIL)
SB-25
SB-27
Palos Verdes A/B (HIL)
SB-23B
SB-23A
Grand Ballroom A/B (MAR)
SB-9
SB-8
Criminal Thinking/Addict Thinking Treatment Matrix
OC Salon 4 (MAR)
SB-7
SB-6
Drug Endangered Children: Special Issues to Consider
OC Salon 3 (MAR)
SB-5
Pacific Ballroom D (HIL) California Proposition 36: Building Bridges
Malibu (HIL) Sustaining the Gain – Real Life after Graduation
Palos Verdes A/B (HIL) Drug Testing 101– The Fundamentals
Huntington B (HIL) 2-3:30pm: Getting the Most out of Your State Association
3:45-5:45pm: Congress of State Drug Court Associations
El Capitan A/B (HIL) Sex Addiction
Capistrano A/B (HIL) MET/CBT 5
Laguna A (HIL) Ethical Issues for Judges and Attorneys in Problem Solving
Courts
Grand Ballroom E (MAR) Are Gang Members Appropriate Candidates for Drug Court?
Consensus and Evidence-Based Practices for Treatment of
Persons with Co-Occurring Disorders
OC Salon 4 (MAR) Partners in Change: How to Facilitate Change through Twelve
Steps
OC Salon 3 (MAR) Building Interventions for Marijuana Dependent Young Adults in
Drug Court
OC Salon 2 (MAR) Show me the Money! A Guide to Federal and Private Funding for
Drug Courts—And How to Improve Your Skills in Writing Grant
Applications
SCRAM Program Development and Value Add to Drug Courts
SB-4
OC Salon 2 (MAR)
SB-3
OC Salon 1 (MAR)
Starting and Growing a Drug Court Program in Current Economic
Conditions
(Basic) Drug Court 101
(Intermediate) Program Efficiency
(Advanced) Prescription Drugs of Abuse Testing
OC Salon 1 (MAR)
SB-1
SB-2
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10 – AFTERNOON SESSIONS
2:00 pm-5:00 pm
Advances in Medication-Assisted Therapies for Opioid
Dependence: How Medication can Help Drug Courts Reduce
Recidivism and Improve Client Outcomes
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10 – MORNING SESSIONS
9:00 am-12:00 pm
SKILLS BUILDING WORKSHOPS
OC Salon 2 (MAR)
Keeping Ahead of the
Curve: Knowing the
Universe of Drugs
Grand Ballroom E (MAR)
Track 7
Palos Verdes A/B (HIL)
The Facts and Nothing
But the Facts: Research
to Practice
Track 6
Cultural Competency:
More Than Awareness
Track 5
The Power of EvidenceBased Treatment
Grand Ballroom G/H (MAR)
Track 4
Grand Ballroom C/D (MAR)
Raising the Bar: Taking
Juvenile Drug Court to the
Next Level
Track 3
Raising the Bar:
Taking Family Dependency
Treatment Courts to the
Next Level!
Grand Ballroom A/B (MAR)
Track 2
Laguna A (HIL)
Ready, Set, Go!
Implementation of Your
Drug Court
Track 1
B-5
B-4
B-6
The Impact of the “War on
Drugs” and Drug Courts
MET/CBT 5
Creating Support Systems,
Eliminating Excuses and
Removing Road Block to
Recovery
B-3
I am Woman, Help Me Soar!!
B-2
Building Teams to Last
B-1
Marijuana: Its Impact on
the Brain
A-7
Alcohol: Its Impact on
the Brain
B-7
Evaluating a Pre-Filing
A Tale of Two Family
Dependency Family
Drug Courts: “Show Me the
Preservation Court: Results Money!”
and Recommendations
from an Innovative Program
A-6
Working with the Lesbian,
Gay, Bisexual, and
Transgender Drug Court
Participant
A-5
Treatment is the Key:
Address Drug Abuse in
Criminal Justice Settings
A-4
Why Use Strength-Based
Assessment? Benefits to
Youth and Program Staff
A-3
Screening, Assessment
and Triage: Application of
the SAFERR Model in FDTC
A-2
Grant Writing
A-1
Session B
THURSDAY, JUNE 11
3:15 pm-4:30 pm
Session A
THURSDAY, JUNE 11
10:30 am-11:45 am
Prescription Drug
Medications
C-7
Evidence Based
Programming for
Your Clients
C-6
Engaging Minority Families
C-5
Utilizing the Matrix
Model in Drug Court – An
Evidence Based Approach
C-4
Critical Elements of a
Juvenile Treatment Court
Program: What Works in
Counties in Four States
C-3
Family Treatment Court
Research: Developmental
Needs and Practice
Implications
C-2
Psychopharmacology
C-1
FRIDAY, JUNE 12
10:30 am-11:45 am
TRAINING TRACKS
Session C
Session D
Club Drugs
D-7
Performance Measures/
Best Practices
D-6
Cultural Proficiency and
the Ten Key Components
D-5
Cognitive Behavioral
Interventions
D-4
Developing Accountability
in the Lives of Youth: Staff
and Youth Perspectives
on Essential Elements in a
Juvenile Treatment Court
D-3
The Unbroken Cycle:
A DEC Perspective for Drug
Court Practice
D-2
Targeting: Who Gets In
D-1
FRIDAY, JUNE 12
3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Session E
Opiates and Prescription
Drugs
E-7
Consumers’ Perspectives
on Drug Courts
E-6
Working with 18 to 25
Year Olds
E-5
Adolescent CRA – Learn
the Power of this Evidence
Based Treatment!
E-4
Year 7: Sustaining Drug
Court after Implementation
E-3
Psychological and
Social Needs of Children
Impacted by Addiction
E-2
Developing Procedures and
Supporting Documents
and Forms to Help Your
Court Conform to the 10
Key Components
E-1
FRIDAY, JUNE 12
4:30 pm- 5:45 pm
Session F
Cocaine
F-7
Improving Treatment
Effects: The Critical Role
of Probation
F-6
How Faith Can Support
Recovery in Drug Court
F-5
CRA for Adults – Learn
the Power of this Evidence
Based Treatment!
F-4
Promoting Best Practices
with LGBTQ Youth in
Juvenile Drug Courts
F-3
FDTC: An Alternative to
Termination of Parental
Rights
F-2
Building and Maintaining
Enduring Alumni Groups
F-1
SATURDAY, JUNE 13
11:45 am-1:00 pm
Cutting Edge Treatment
Issues
Pacific Ballroom B (HIL)
Track 15
Problem Solving Courts?
Not a Problem!
Malibu (HIL) - Thur-Fri
OC Salon 4 (MAR) - Sat
Track 14
Science and Technology—
Our Partners in the
Commercial Sector
OC Salon 4 (MAR)
Track 13
Science and Technology—
Our Partners in the
Commercial Sector
Avila A/B (HIL)
Track 12
Legal and Ethical Issues in
Problem-Solving Courts
OC Salon 3 (MAR)
Track 11
OC Salon 1 (MAR)
The Role of Expressive
Therapies in Problem
Solving Courts
A-15
Domestic Violence Courts:
National Models and
Promising Practices
A-14
Evidence-Based Results
of SCRAM Programs
A-13
Interpretation of Opiate
Results
A-12
The Role of the Prosecutor
in Drug Court
A-11
A-10
The Academy DWI Courts
– How Model DWI Courts
Do It
DWI Courts
The Smoking Gun –
Ethical Triggers in a
Drug Court Setting
A-9
Incentives and Sanctions
in Juvenile Drug Court
A-8
Track 10
Law Enforcement: Striking
the Balance
Santa Monica (HIL)
Track 9
The Good, the Bad and
the Effective: Re-Visiting
Incentives and Sanctions
Grand Ballroom J/K (MAR)
Track 8
Co-Occurring Disorders:
Science and Treatment
Strategies
B-15
Reentry/Drug Court from
Different Perspectives
B-14
Managing Drug Testing
Beyond the Basics and
Understanding “What’s
New”
B-13
Overcoming Budgetary
Constraints
B-12
Being Effective Counsel in
Drug Court
B-11
Developing a DWI Court –
Getting the “Buy-in” from
your Community
B-10
Effective Community
Supervision in Drug Court
B-9
Incentives in Adult
Drug Court
B-8
Session B
THURSDAY, JUNE 11
3:15 pm-4:30 pm
Session A
THURSDAY, JUNE 11
10:30 am-11:45 am
Conquering the Fear of
Coloring Outside the Lines
C-15
Developing a Community
Court: How to Keep a
Project Moving Forward in
a Challenging Environment
C-14
Expanding your Courts
Drug Testing Toolbox
C-13
It Takes a Village – The
Relationship between
Courts and Treatment
Providers
C-12
Ethical Issues in Drug
Court for Attorneys
C-11
Discovering the Real
Problem: Effective
Assessment in DUI/DWI
Courts
C-10
Lessons Learned:
EBP in the Real World
of Corrections
C-9
Sanctions in Adult
Drug Court
C-8
FRIDAY, JUNE 12
10:30 am-11:45 am
TRAINING TRACKS
Session C
Session D
Genetics and Treatment
Dispositions in Drug Court
for Judges
D-15
Federal Reentry Courts in
an Evidence Based Practice
Context
D-14
The Impact of Daily
Recovery Text Messages
on Drug Court Participants
D-13
Ethics for Treatment
Providers
D-11
DWI Court Building Blocks
– The Guiding Principles
D-10
Treatment 101: What Law
Enforcement Officers Need
to Know
D-9
Incentives and Sanctions
in Family Dependency
Treatment Court
D-8
FRIDAY, JUNE 12
3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Session E
Love, Lust and Lies:
Exposing Sex Addiction in
Drug Court Participants
E-15
Specific Challenges and
Opportunities Working
with Veterans Court
E-14
Ethics in Family
Dependency Treatment
Court
E-11
Review of DWI Court
Research
E-10
Supervision in the
Community
E-9
Motivational Incentives
in Drug Court
E-8
FRIDAY, JUNE 12
4:30 pm- 5:45 pm
Session F
F-15
F-14
Understanding and
Implementing 12 Step
Programs for Drug Courts
HOPE
Ethical Issues for Judges
in Drug Court
F-11
Supervision: It’s More
Than Office Visits and
Court Appearances
F-10
Tackling Supervision
Issues in Rural
Communities
F-9
Theory to Practice
F-8
SATURDAY, JUNE 13
11:45 am-1:00 pm
African American Clients:
Improving Services and
Outcomes
Elite 1 (MAR)
Track 23
Grand Ballroom F (MAR)
Problem-Solving Courts in
California
Track 22
International Drug
Treatment Court
Movement: Getting a Boost
San Simeon A (HIL)
Track 21
San Simeon B (HIL)
Learning from Native
Traditions: Tribal Healing
to Wellness Courts
Track 20
California Ballroom B (HIL)
Legal Issues in and Beyond
Problem-Solving Courts
Track 19
Working with the Latino
Community: Meeting the
Challenge
Pacific Ballroom A (HIL)
Track 18
California Ballroom A (HIL)
Mining the Mysteries
of Meth
Track 17
El Capitan A/B (HIL)
Innovations in ProblemSolving Courts
Track 16
Using Drug Court to
Save Our Young African
American Males
A-23
Community Courts
in Action: Recent
Developments in California
A-22
Drug Treatment
Courts Finally Get the
International Attention
They Deserve
A-21
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum
Disorders
A-20
Judicial Immunity
A-19
Immigration Issues
A-18
Methamphetamine and
Its Power Impact on the
Basic Brain
A-17
Development and
Operation of a Girls
Drug Court
A-16
Spirituality and Recovery
for African Americans
B-23
DATA – Survival: California
Drug Court Cost Study
and the Importance of
Collecting Meaningful Data
B-22
Accepting Higher Risk and
Higher Need Offenders in
Drug Treatment Courts
B-21
Historical Trauma & the
American Indian: Rekindling
the Sacred Fires for Healing,
Justice and Peace
B-20
Sentencing Reform: What
the Future Holds
B-19
Moving the Latina Client
Successfully Through the
Drug Court
B-18
Meth Manufacturing
B-17
From Homeless Court
Program to a Response
for Returning Veterans
B-16
Session B
THURSDAY, JUNE 11
3:15 pm-4:30 pm
Session A
THURSDAY, JUNE 11
10:30 am-11:45 am
African American Women
and Girls in Drug Court
C-23
Hot Topics in California
Collaborative Justice Court
Programs – Ask the Experts
C-22
Development of Drug
Courts in Latin America
C-21
Multisystemic Family
Therapy and Tribal Wellness
(Drug) Court: Implementing
an Evidence Based Practice
on the Reservation
C-20
Overview of the FBI NICS
Section and Ensuring
Federal Firearms
Prohibitions for Drug Cases
C-19
Cultural Issues and
Perceptions with Latinos
C-18
Effective Treatment
for Methamphetamine
Dependence
C-17
Making Proposition 36
Work in Rural California: El
Dorado County’s Solution
C-16
FRIDAY, JUNE 12
10:30 am-11:45 am
TRAINING TRACKS
Session C
Session D
Engaging the African
American Family in
Drug Court
D-23
Pre-Filing Dependency
Family Preservation Court:
An Innovative Approach to
Keeping Families Together
D-22
IADTC Annual General
Meeting
(Open to all)
D-21
Ensuring a Healthy Team
D-20
Criminal Defense:
Representing the
Mentally Ill
D-19
Working with Latino Clients
D-18
Meth Recovery: Our Story
D-17
Implementing a Psychiatric
Clinic in an Adult Drug
Court
D-16
FRIDAY, JUNE 12
3:00 pm-4:15 pm
Session E
African American Focused
Reentry
E-23
Elder Abuse Cases:
A Frontier for ProblemSolving Courts
E-22
Learning from Native
Traditions: Tribal Healing
to Wellness Courts Journey
of One Tribe: Southern Ute
E-20
Criminal Law Update
E-19
El Impacto de la Funcion
Judicial en el Exito de Drug
Court (en Espanol)
E-18
A Country in Meth Crisis
– Could Drug Treatment
Courts Make the Difference?
E-17
Empowering Young
Adults through Positive
Socialization Events in
Problem Solving Courts
E-16
FRIDAY, JUNE 12
4:30 pm- 5:45 pm
Session F
Working with African
American Populations
from the Bench
F-23
Prop 63 – Mental Health
Services Act: Let’s Get that
Funding for Mentally Ill
Offenders!
F-22
Drug Court Opportunities
in The Eastern Caribbean
Countries
F-21
Incorporating Culture/
Spirituality into Your
Program: Pros and Cons
F-20
Future Legal Challenges
and Opportunities
F-19
Your Personal Tour of The
National Meth Center
Website and What It Can
Do For You
F-17
Certificates of Assurance:
Gateway to New Drug
Court Development and
Monitoring
F-16
SATURDAY, JUNE 13
11:45 am-1:00 pm
Veterans Treatment Court
Grand Ballroom F (MAR)
Concurrent General Session 7
California Mental Health Laws
Pacific Ballroom C (HIL)
Gender Matters: Creating Services for Women
Grand Ballroom F (MAR)
Concurrent General Session 3
From Concept to Real- World Practice: Medication-Assisted
Recovery for Alcohol Dependence in the Drug Courts’
Platinum Ballroom (MAR)
MAT – Medically Assisted Treatment
Orange County Ballroom (MAR)
Concurrent General Session 10
MYTHBUSTERS – Treatment & Drug Testing: Is it Fact or Fiction?
Grand Ballroom F (MAR)
Concurrent General Session 9
Best Practices in Adult Drug Courts: Reduce Recidivism and Costs!
Pacific Ballroom B (HIL)
Concurrent General Session 6
Concurrent General Session 2
Doing the Due
Grand Ballroom E (MAR)
Ensuring Sustainability: Ensuring Funding for Your
Drug Court in Tough Economic Times
Pacific Ballroom B (HIL)
Federal Confidentiality Laws and Drug Court
Grand Ballroom E (MAR)
Reentry/Drug Court: The Next Generation of Drug Court
Grand Ballroom E (MAR)
Concurrent General Session 8
Concurrent General Session 11
Concurrent General Session 5
Concurrent General Session 1
SATURDAY, JUNE 13
8:00 am-9:15 am
Concurrent General Session 4
FRIDAY, JUNE 12
1:30 pm-2:45 pm
THURSDAY, JUNE 11
1:45 pm-3:00 pm
CONCURRENT GENERAL SESSIONS
NOTES
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Don’t Miss Our First Ever
MENTAL HEALTH
COURT / CO-OCCURRING
DISORDERS FORUM
Sunday, June 14, 2009
Hilton Anaheim
Opening Session: 8:00 – 9:15 a.m.
Pacific Ballroom C
16th An n ua l
Dru g Court Tra in in g
Con feren ce
June 2-5, 2010 | Boston, Massachusetts

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