2 granville today - Granville County Chamber of Commerce

Transcription

2 granville today - Granville County Chamber of Commerce
Granville
Today
2011
A PRINTER WITH A PURPOSE!!
You’ll appreciate our prices. You’ll love our service.
Corporate and Personal Print Solutions
EXPERT GRAPHIC DESIGN
CARBONLESS and CONTINUOUS FORMS
POLITICAL POSTERS & BROCHURES
ENVELOPES • LETTERHEAD
WEB and OFFSET PRINTING
BOOK PUBLISHING
HIGH-SPEED COLOR and B&W IMAGERS
COMPLETE MAILING SERVICES
SCHOOL OF GRAPHIC ARTS
PRINT AND DESIGN CENTER
at THE MASONIC HOME FOR CHILDREN AT OXFORD
600 College Street • Oxford, NC 27565
919-603-3910 • Fax 919-693-5505
www.schoolofgraphicarts.com • [email protected]
Granville Today 1
My
Hospital
Stephanie Strother
FOR wOMEN’S HEALTH
“As a woman and a MRI technologist,
I’m proud to be a part of
Granville Health System,
where delivering quality care
and excellent customer service
are always our top priority.”
• Digital Mammography
• Gynecology Services
• Obstetrical Care
GRANVILLE HEALTH SYSTEM
919.690.3000
1 0 1 0 C o l l e g e S t r e e t, o x f o r d , N C
GRANVILLE MEDICAL CENTER
GRANVILLE INTERNAL MEDICINE & GERIATRICS
SOUTH GRANVILLE MEDICAL CENTER
GRANVILLE UROLOGY ASSOCIATES
GRANVILLE SURGICAL ASSOCIATES
GRANVILLE SPECIALTY CLINICS
STOVALL MEDICAL CENTER
HAROLD SHERMAN ADULT DAY CENTER
BRANTwOOD NURSING & REHAB CENTER
GRANVILLE HEART & VASCULAR
SOUTH GRANVILLE PRIMARY CARE
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES (EMS)
2 Granville Today
5
What’s Inside
‘One size doesn’t fit all’
Serving Granville County
Insurance & Real Estate
for Over 50 years
nan Howells
Dudley Barnes
Joe Bryan
Allan Baker
Variety is the key to the progressive
approach Dr. Tim Farley, Granville
County’s superintendent of schools,
takes to help young people learn.
9
Celebrate Granville!
691-4273
693-2681
693-5434
690-4022
Residents and visitors alike appreciate
the many festivals and celebrations
that enhance the quality of life in
Granville County.
11
www.joebryanrealestate.com
139 College St. Oxford, NC 27565
Growing goodness
Multiple listing service
REALTOR
MLS
Agribusiness has expanded into big
business in Granville County, from
tobacco to chile peppers, from cattle to
grapes, and more.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
15
HOLDEN • MOSS
Holden Moss Knott Clark & Copley, P.A.
Always on ready
Certified Public Accountants and Consultants
Accessibility, affordability and
availability are major factors in
economic development. Granville
specializes in all three.
17
A rich history preserved
Granville’s incredible impact on
culture, educational and farming
is being preserved through three
historical museums.
ACCOUNTING PROFESSIONALS
offering technical knowledge and
personalized services to:
- Individuals
- Businesses
- Estates & Trusts
in taxation and auditing
118 Main Street • Oxford, NC 27565
919-693-5960 Phone
919-690-1990 Fax
www.holdenmoss.com
19
Keeping fit in Granville
Greenways, ball parks, horses and
lacrosse are the many recreational
offerings of a county concerned about
the health of its citizens.
On the cover
This 2011 edition of Granville Today highlights
the diversity of living in the vibrant County of
Granville.
Chamber membership directory
The center section has a handy guide with
the complete listing of the membership of the
Granville County Chamber of Commerce.
Granville Today 3
Jim Crawford
Listens
Jim Crawford
Represents You in the
North Carolina General Assembly
Jim Crawford
is in Office to Serve You!
252-492-0185
4 Granville Today
Vance-Granville Community College Culinary Technology students, in the
photograph above, prepare garlic shrimp and soba noodle salads in the
kitchen at the Masonic Home in Oxford. At right, VGCC Reba Bullock, college
liaison shown on the far right side of the photo, talks with Granville Early
College High School students on the grounds at the college’s South Campus
between Butner and Creedmoor during a student orientation session.
Positioning students for success
In recent years, Vance-Granville Community College has reflected on its proud past
as it celebrated a 40th anniversary and faced
the challenges of the present as enrollment
hit new record highs in a time of economic
uncertainty. At the same time, the college
has been looking to the future.
A recent planning process, which included
gathering input from concerned citizens and
business leaders, resulted in a new VGCC
Strategic Plan. Granville County leaders
played a key role in that process by participating in a forum at the college’s South Campus, located between Creedmoor and Butner. The participants discussed issues such
as preparing students to compete in a global
marketplace and what the college should do
to support workforce and economic development for the area. “The goal of the planning
process is to identify local economic, social,
cultural and educational needs, and then to
College’s campuses
play pivotal roles
school systems, GECHS gives students a
chance to earn both a high school diploma
and a two-year college degree (or up to two
years of college-transferable credit) over five
years, tuition-free.
That is just one of the many opportunities
develop educational solutions to meet those available to Granville County. South Campus
needs,” said VGCC President Randy Parker. is the home of VGCC’s Radiography and
“Through this process, we have formulated
Human Services Technology programs, and
new vision and mission statements and six
the campus offers a variety of courses from
new goals that will help lead the college in its Cosmetology to College Transfer (in which
programming.”
students earn the first two years of a fourAmong the needs of all the communities
year degree). Either at South Campus, at othin VGCC’s four-county service area, the
er locations such as Main Campus (between
process of making sure that young people
Henderson and Oxford) or online, Granville
are ready, willing and able to go to college
County residents can access VGCC’s numercertainly ranks high. One way to address that ous curriculum programs, in which students
need is Granville Early College High School, work toward certificates, diplomas and
a partnership between Granville County
degrees. They can also take advantage of a
Schools and VGCC. One of four such high
Continued on page 14
schools operated by the college and local
Granville Today 5
‘One size doesn’t fit all’
in Granville schools
Variety of
programs critical
to learning
Dr. Tim Farley, Superintendent of Granville County Schools, has a teenage son to
whom he refers often when discussing schools
and education with his School Board or with
the public.
Whether the son likes being held up as an
example or not, the fact that Dr. Farley has a
child in the school system he runs has a bearing on his approach to the job.
“I don’t want my own son to fail,” he says.
“So why would I want yours to?”
Perhaps this approach, and the fact that
he himself likes to play video games, has
prompted Dr. Farley to suggest to the school
board that “classroom learning should be like a
video game.” He continues by describing some
of the game attributes he would desire, such as
well organized material, immediate feedback,
full engagement and a chance to try again.
To those ends, Dr. Farley and his administrative team, with the backing of the Board
of Education, have concentrated on providing
a variety of programs. He frequently uses the
motto, “One size doesn’t fill all.”
Before Dr. Farley arrived on the scene
about four years ago, Granville County Schools
had already earned a reputation of being
progressive, willing to try new ideas, leading
the way in attempting to improve education
opportunities in the county.
For example, the county had been a
recipient of grants that let it develop the “small
schools” concept.
The result is that today, there are two
schools on each of the J.F. Webb and South
Continued on page 22
Students at South Granville High School have been provided with laptop computers.
6 Granville Today
Downtown
nan’s
young fashions
“A Children’s Shoppe”
Traditional Styles to Trendy Looks
112 College St. • Oxford, NC 27565
919-693-6813
www.nansyoungfashions.com
Granville Residential, Inc.
Sunrise Biscuits of Oxford
Custom Home Plans
Additions • Plan Modifications
Lee Hight
Connie P. Bowen
128 Williamsboro Street, NC 27565
919-693-6178
Fax: 919-693-5367
Hours: Mon-Sat: 5:30am – 1:30pm
Sun: 6:00am – 1:00pm
Serving Breakfast & Lunch
202 Hillsboro St.
Oxford, NC 27565
(919) 690-1051
Oxford
Granville Today 7
LeVon Nails Salon Matisse Polka Dot
express
133 Main Street
An Upscale Salon in Downtown Oxford
Oxford, NC 27565
Mon-Fri 9am - 7:30pm
Sat 9am - 6:30pm
Walk-Ins Welcome
919-339-4588
Specializing in Colour/Colour Correction,
Precision Cutting (Trained Vidal Sassoon in
London), Waxing, Gift Certificates Available
100 Broad St. • Oxford, NC 27565
919-939-6560
Cy n t h i A n A e f
Owner/Colour Specialist
Granville
Furniture Co.
117 Main Street
Oxford, NC 27565
919-693-7616
We Finance Our Own Accounts
Free Delivery
123 Old Warehouse Square
Oxford, NC 27565
919-603-0276
Everything from the Waist Up!
Clothing, Accessories,
& Much More!
130 Hillsboro Street
Oxford, NC 27565
919.693.8962
Percy Powell, Owner
Mon-Fri 9:30am - 5:30pm
Sat 9am - 2pm
Everything from Batteries to TVs!
Hall’s Floor Fashions, Inc.
919-693-8216
142 Hillsboro Street • Oxford, NC 27565
Carpet, Vinyl, Hardwood, Laminate,
Ceramic, VCT, Remnants and Blinds
Celebrating 45 Years
201 Hillsboro Street
Oxford, NC 27565
919-603-1469
8 Granville Today
Downtown Oxford
Nell’s Flowers
& Gifts
• Plants • Balloons
• Stuffed Animals
• Fresh Flowers
• Gifts • Fragrances
115 W. McClanahan Street
Oxford, NC 693-4034
OxfOrd
Credit
UniOn
128 College St. • Oxford, NC 27565
ph: 919-693-7151
fax: 919-693-5557
[email protected]
“Not for Profit, Not for Charity,
But for Service”
Coffee Cafe & Custom Framing
116 Hillsboro St.
Oxford, NC 27565
919-693-8880
Mon-Fri 7:00am - 5:00pm
Sat 7:00am - 2:00pm
Mark H. Hicks
Builder, Inc
103 New College Street
Oxford, NC 27565
106 Broad St.
Oxford, NC 27565
919-693-3333
www.floydrealtync.com
Fax: 919-693-3400
Ph: 919-693-1866
Email: [email protected]
embarqmail.com
markhicksbuilder.com
Bella Windows
and Blinds for Less
Downtown Oxford
919-693-2279
[email protected]
Blinds, Shades, Shutters, &
Custom Window Treatments
& Bedding
Cynthia K. Currin
Owner/Broker
Oxford Farmers Market
Located at the Corner of Lanier and McClanahan
Streets across from the Oxford Police Dept.
Open from May-October
Saturdays 7am - 12 noon
Wednesdays: Beginning around mid-June
through mid-October from 8am - 1pm
Serving Oxford and surrounding communities with the
best fresh produce, baked goods, jams, jellies, plants,
honey, pecans, and crafts, since 1936.
Everything is homegrown or homemade by our vendors.
For More Information
Call Janis Stalls at 919-693-1000.
Stovall’s
Gifts
100 Main St., Oxford
919-693-1217
Gifts • Wines • Gourmet Baskets
Rainbows • Allegria • Chamillia • Vera
Year ‘Round Christmas Shop
!
Granville Today 9
C •E •L •E •B •R •A •T •E
G •R •A •N •V •I •L •L •E
Granville County’s 58,000 residents are linked by
a network of communities that spread across this
531-square mile region from tiny unincorporated
Grassy Creek in the north to bustling Butner and
Creedmoor in the south.
The county boasts five incorporated communities
where residents enjoy the quiet of Granville’s rolling
countryside on the cusp of the state’s most vibrant
technological, medical and industrial center — the
Triangle region of North Carolina.
Granville County, scarcely a half-hour away from
the urban areas of Durham and Raleigh, has its own
forward-looking industries, of course — from the
state’s innovative Biofuels Center of North Carolina
to the Revlon plant, but its small communities and
rolling farmland give the county its distinctive flavor.
Economic advances in Granville have only
enhanced the small-town atmosphere enjoyed by
residents and visitors alike.
And nowhere is that more evident than in the
many festivals and celebrations that take place
throughout the county.
Here’s a snapshot of some of Granville’s popular
festivals:
• Butner Chicken Pickin’, held on the first Saturday in June on Central Avenue at Gazebo Park,
features a Chicken Pickin’ cooking contest, a street
dance, and an antique car show that attracts as many
as 200 antique and vintage automobiles. Scores of
vendors line the street for the event.
• Butner also joins the city of Creedmoor in sponsoring the Butner-Creedmoor Fireworks Display held
on the July 4 weekend each year at Lake Holt on Old
Highway 75.
• The Creedmoor Music Festival is held on the
third Saturday in September on Main Street. The
event features vendors that offer a variety of arts,
crafts and foods in a carnival-like atmosphere. Door
prizes are given away from the main stage about every
two hours.
• The Grassy Creek Christmas Parade has mushroomed into a huge regional event in its 27 year
history, says co-founder Pratt Winston. The parade
takes place in the tiny Grassy Creek community on
the second Saturday in December and stretches for
more than a mile, with participants and floats from
numerous nearby and distant communities, including
some in Virginia, Winston said. The parade can take
Continued on page 10
10 Granville Today
Vacuum Cleaner Solutions
“SaleS & Service”
Fred & diane HeatH, OwnerS
Store 919-693-0101 • Cell 919-482-0618
Authorized Service Center
Granville County
Historical Society Museums
Two adjacent locations in downtown Oxford:
Granville History Museum • 110 Court Street
A permanent exhibit of the county’s history!
Harris Exhibit Hall: 1 Museum Lane
Rotating exhibits every three months on science, history, art, or culture.
for
Miele • Royal • Hoover • Dirt Devil
Nutone & Many More
Wed. – Fri. 10-4
Sat. 11-3
We Service Kirby, Electrolux, & Bissell
No Admission Charge
Donations Welcomed
We also carry Bags, Belts, Filters, Parts & Fragrances for all models
Residential-Commercial-Central
911 Williamsboro St. • Oxford, NC 27565
919-693-9706
www.granvillemusumnc.org
GRANVILLE INSURANCE
AGENCY INC.
135 Main St. Oxford NC
(919) 693-8196 phone
[email protected]
Sandra
Dean Pruitt
HOME - MOBILE HOME
BUSINESS - AUTO
MOTORCYCLE - LIFE
Charles W.
Dean
Serving all of Granville County With Competitive Rates Since 1908
Serving Granville County and
Surrounding Areas For Over 30 Years!
Contact Our Award Winning GOld TeAm To
Put The local experts To Work For You.
126 Main Street, Oxford 91
9-693-2257
316B Central Avenue, Butner 919-575-0249
www.c21hancockproperties.com
Southern Office
Dancers enjoy Alive After Five.
CELEBRATE,
from page nine
from one to four hours to make its way
past spectators along Grassy Creek Road
north of Stovall.
• In Oxford, the North Carolina Hot
Sauce Contest has caught fire. Held on
the second Saturday in September, visitors sample hot sauces, beer and wine and
music at the festival. And, yes, there’s a
pepper-eating contest, presumably with
local volunteer fire departments on standby. Visitors can watch North Carolina
artist Dan Nelson as he creates a Festival
on Canvas. The Granville County Museum
is open with its “September Sensations
Bazaar” as the Harris Exhibit Hall for the
contest. The gardeners sale is a popular
draw, and the festival offers scores of
activities for children.
• Stem, which is celebrating its centennial in 2011, is staging an event that features
local roots music, food vendors, games and
a variety of activities and events for people
of all ages, according to Mayor Nancy
Alford.
• Stovall, in the northern reaches of
Granville County, celebrates each year with
a Stovall Day festival held in May. Mayor
Janet Parrott said Stovall Day captures the
essence of small-town America with a pieeating contest, music, food and displays of
arts and crafts.
• The Granville County Chamber of
Commerce adds to the entertainment
across the county with three Alive After
Five concerts each year. Two are staged in
Oxford and a third in either Creedmoor
or Butner. The events, which run from
5:30 until 8:30 p.m., feature beach music
by bands such as the Embers, Chairmen of
the Board, the Legends of Beach and the
Castaways.
Granville Today 11
‘New’ agribusiness cropping up
With some help from a grant, Doreathy Booth went into the seedless grape business in Granville County, harvesting as many as 2, 100 pounds in one summer.
From tobacco to tomatillos, Granville is growing goodness
Agriculture is still very much a part of
the landscape of Granville County, as local
farmers continue to grow traditional crops
like tobacco, soybeans, corn and wheat.
But local farmers are also embracing a
diverse variety of new crops and marketing
strategies as well.
Tobacco is still the largest agricultural
cash crop in the county, said Paul Westfall,
director of the N.C. Cooperative Extension Service, Granville County Center. Between 3,300 to 3,500 acres of tobacco were
grown in the county in 2009, even though
the way in which tobacco is marketed has
changed dramatically, he said. “Farmers
now contract directly with the buyer, but
it’s become harder and harder for farmers
to get those contracts to grow tobacco,”
he said.
In addition to tobacco, Granville County farmers also produced approximately
3,400 acres of corn in 2009, along with
Bailey Farms specializes in fresh chile peppers.
3,600 acres of soybeans and 4,500 acres of
wheat. Hay was produced on 12,000 acres
in the county.
Livestock operations are also still a part
of the agricultural profile for the county.
Five dairies operate in the county, Westfall
said, in addition to farms raising 4,500
head of cattle for beef production. Bailey
Newton of Triple B Farms and Doan and
Bette Laursen from Goose River Farm are
two local producers of pasture-raised meats
who are selling directly to consumers as
well, Westfall said.
The Granville County Cattleman’s Association promotes its role in the county’s
agricultural community each year with
its annual beef roast, held annually at the
Granville County Livestock Arena on Cannady’s Mill Road. Held the third Friday of
June each year, the association’s members
roast 2,000 pounds of round roasts in an
earthen pit at the arena, and serve it up
with a baked potato and salad to more
then 2,000 participants. Proceeds from
the event help fund scholarships that the
association has endowed at Vance-Granville Community College and N.C. State
University to assist students from Vance
and Granville counties who want to pursue
a degree related to agriculture.
Continued on page 12
2.25”, full
graphic of
on. Inforead as
ners
reet
press!
12 Granville Today
CROPS, from page eleven
Oxford Dry
Cleaners
1007 College Street
Oxford, NC
919-693-1816
1528 Oak Hill Road
Oxford, NC 27565
(919) 782-2888
www.campoakhill.org
We Press To Impress!
BURGLAR & FIRE ALARMS
CENTRAL VAC
VIDEO SURVEILLANCE
ALARM MONITORING FOR $16/mo.
Call Dave Arner
at 252-438-7181
Danny Loyd
Manager
In Business since 1988
Hwy. 15 South | P.O. Box 869
Oxford, NC 27565
(919) 693-2128 • Fax (919) 603-1953
AHNER
SECURITY
INCORPORATED
www.ahnersecurity.com
Duke Primary Care
Butner-Creedmoor
part of the Duke University Health System
Tamra h. sTall, m.D.
Craig a. hoffmeier, m.D.
CaTherina m. BosTelman, m.D.
allen T. smiTh, m.D.
Kenyon m. railey, m.D.
yvonne e. BersTler, m.D.
Tara neal, fnP
monday - friday
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
saturday
8:30 am - 12:00 pm
maKe your
ToTal family
Care
aPPoinTmenT
WiTh us
2503 e. lyon station rd.
Creedmoor, nC 27522
Phone 919 528-1535 • Fax 919 528-8307
at Duke Primary Care Butner-Creedmoor, your health and the
health of your family are our primary concerns. every member
of our staff is committed to providing you with the highest level
of medical care in a comfortable, friendly, environment. our
doctors are board-certified in family medicine and bring a broad
perspective and deep caring to the practice of medicine.
We offer a wide range of medical services, so that the majority
of your health care needs can be met right in our office. some
services include:
• Family medical care
• X-rays
• Laboratory evaluations
• Geriatric care
• Adult care
•Pediatric care
• Development screening
• Physical exams
• Cancer screening
• Preventive medicine
• Gynecological care
• Pap Smears
• Immunizations
• Allergy injections
• Minor surgery
•Family planning
* occupational health
We participate in most insurance plans.
should you require additional treatment, we will coordinate your
care with other specialists or medical facilities to ensure that you
receive the quality care you need.
While many farmers continue to pursue
traditional agricultural paths, other Granville County growers are striking out in
new directions. With the rise in demand
for locally and organically grown produce
and meats, some farms are pursuing new
products and marketing them directly to
the consumer through farmers’ markets
and other outlets, Westfall said.
Farmer Doreathy Booth contacted
Granville County horticulture agent Carl
Cantaluppi in 2005 looking for a new crop
that she could grow for her farmer’s market
stand. Cantaluppi suggested seedless table
grapes and went to work helping Booth
find funding and assistance to get her new
venture off the ground.
Cantaluppi applied for and received
a $15,000 grant from N.C. A&T State
University to help Booth pay for start-up
expenses. He suggested 14 varieties of
grapes for her to try. Her first harvest in
2007 yielded 900 pounds of grapes which
she sold for $3.50 a pound at the Durham
Farmer’s Market, Canteluppi said. A hailstorm damaged the crop severely in 2008,
but in 2009, she harvested 2,100 pounds of
fruit. The new offering was a hit.
“These are thin-skinned, seedless grapes
that you can pop in your mouth like
candy,” said Canteluppi.
Canteluppi is also conducting similar
trials with asparagus in hopes of attracting
farmers to that high-value crop.
The extension service’s 4-H program,
which traditionally focused on agriculturerelated activities, is also changing with
the times and branching out to embrace
new areas of interest. Granville County
4-H conducts both summer programs and
year-round programs, including four afterschool programs in Granville County that
focus on agriculture, science and nature,w
said Jamie Haddix, 4-H youth development
extension agent.
Keeping agriculture alive in the county
will be dependent on attracting a new
generation interested in returning to the
farm, said Westfall. “There are very few
young farmers coming into the county,” he
said, “and a lot of our current farmers are
aging out.”
Many farming endeavors are expensive
to finance up front, he added, which creates an additional hurdle for young farmers.
“We need to find a way to get the next
generation to come back to the farm.”
Why join
the chamber?
Why should your business join the
Granville County Chamber of Commerce?
Your Chamber offers a number of valuable “members only” benefits and services:
• Free listing in Membership Directory
• Free listing on the Chamber’s web
page, free link to your website plus have
the opportunity to advertise using banner
ads, business card ads, web page sponsor
• Free display of business materials
• Annual Business Expo (partnered with
other area Chambers)
• Monthly Chamber newsletter ads
inserts (first-come first serve)
• Sponsor Business Before or After
Hours and Alive after Five concert series
• Business Referrals
• Newcomer/Visitor Information: The
Chamber promotes its members to residents, tourists, and newcomers who visit or
call our office each day
• Membership Recognition
• Newsletter articles
• Annual Membership Banquet with
Business Awards
• Membership plaque
• Ribbon Cutting ceremonies for new,
relocated, or renovated businesses
• Women in Business and the new Men
in Business programs for growth and networking opportunities.
• Business Before or After Hours make
contacts and seek prospects
• Opportunities created by serving on
Chamber committees
• Attending Chamber events
• Government Affairs Forum guest
speakers on current issues
• South Council “lunch and learn”
• Community Involvement: Leadership
Granville, New Teacher Breakfast
• Collective representation of business
interests in public matters at all levels of
government. What individual businesses
cannot do alone, they accomplish by working together through their local Chamber
of Commerce. That is why we need YOU
as much as you need the Chamber!
• And a number of other great benefits!
Contact us today at the Granville
County Chamber of Commerce and let
us help you grow your business! Get more
details at www.granville-chamber.org.
Granville Today 13
Garden Park Villas
When it comes to getting better,
there’s no place like home!
Providing compassionate in-home care
for pediatrics and adults in Granville
and Vance Counties.
Senior Apartment
Community
55+ or 40+ Disabled
/ Handicapped
100 Garden Park Drive
Oxford, NC 27565 • 690-0200
[email protected]
5R5,-)(&5,5,0#5R5,#0.5/.35/,-#(!
5R576565I
5R5&&(--5,0#-
Contact us today to learn more.
(252) 492-6028
www.maximhomecare.com
Granville
Recycling Center
1111 Goshen Street
Oxford, NC 27565
“We Pay Cash
For Your Metal Trash”
919-693-7723
From
To Falls Lake II in the South
And many excellent sites and buildings in between.
Make your next business location
Granville County
Granville County Economic Development
www.granvillecounty.com
919-693-5911
[email protected]
14 Granville Today
COLLEGE, from page four
Gentry & Newell
Funeral Home & Chapel
Welcome to quiet
country living at
Highland Vista Condominiums
Email: [email protected]
Website: trademarkresidential.com
RIVES HICKS
JOHN E. NEWELL
Off-Street Parking • Chapel Seating 300 • Burial Insurance
“ALWAYS ON DUTY”
320 Hidden Valley Drive
Creedmoor, NC 27522
Phone: 919-528-7231
Fax: 919-528-0221
503 College Street, Oxford, N.C.
Phone 919-693-5191
Lim Gummel, Poperty Manager
Licensed Embalmer & Funeral Director
!!!'AS!PPLIANCE#O
!!!
'AS!PPLIANCE#O
Creedmoor
• 919-528-1100
!!!
(ENDERSON
7ARRENTON
,ITTLETON
!!!
'AS!PPLIANCE#O
'AS!PPLIANCE#O
(ENDERSON 7ARRENTON
,ITTLETON
Henderson
• 252-492-1138
(ENDERSON
7ARRENTON
,ITTLETON
(ENDERSON
7ARRENTON
,ITTLETON
Warrenton
• 252-257-3010
9/52,/#!,&!-),9/7.%$02/0!.%3500,)%2
Littleton • 252-586-2025
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variety of Community & Economic Development opportunities, including the GED and
Adult High School Diploma programs.
South Campus Dean Cecilia Wheeler
has been pleased to see her facility expand
over the years into not only a place where
students succeed, but also a vital resource.
“The seminar room created during our last
renovation has become a central hub for
southern Granville County, being used by
businesses and other community groups,”
Wheeler said.
VGCC’s scientific and technical programs
seek to develop a workforce that is attractive
to new and expanding industries. One such
program is Bioprocess Technology, which
prepares individuals to work as process technicians in biological products manufacturing
facilities. Students train in the state-of-theart Biotechnology lab on the college’s main
campus and get real-world experience at
local companies or organizations such as
the Oxford-based Biofuels Center of North
Carolina. Programs such as this work handin-hand with Triangle North — the network
of four business parks created by Granville,
Franklin, Vance and Warren counties — to
attract 21st-century jobs and investment to
the region.
One of VGCC’s newest programs, Global
Logistics Technology, attempts to leverage
the area’s geographic advantages and the
presence of several distribution facilities in
Granville. VGCC logistics graduates will be
prepared for a multitude of career opportunities in distribution, transportation and manufacturing organizations that move products
and materials through a global supply chain.
In an average year, the college holds
classes at 55 locations in Granville, serving
over 4,500 students. One of those locations
is the dining facility of the Masonic Home
for Children in Oxford, where the two-year
Culinary Technology program is located. As
part of their education, Culinary students
operate The Vanguard Café at the home.
Students prepare and serve lunch for the
public several times each fall and spring semester, which not only gives them a realistic
way to practice their kitchen and hospitality skills, but also serves up American and
international cuisine that local diners won’t
find anywhere else.
Area residents can call Chef Ross Ragonese at (919) 690-0312 for more information
and to make reservations for lunch at the
café.
Granville Today 15
Accessible • Affordable • Available
Granville
is home to
the Biofuels
Center of
North Carolina, above,
developing
biofuels
to reduce
the state’s
dependence
on imported
liquid fuels.
At right,
Granville
announces
Triangle
North, a complex of four
industrial
parks.
Granville County always on ready
for economic development
Accessibility, affordability and availability are major factors businesses
consider when deciding where to locate,
according to Jay Tilley, economic development director for Granville County.
And those three factors are what Granville offers.
The county’s location astride Interstate 85 makes many of the area’s potential industrial/business sites extremely
accessible. With U.S. I intersecting with
I-85 in neighboring Vance County to the
north and U.S. Highway 70 doing the
same in Durham County to the south,
truckers can easily reach almost any part
of Granville County.
“I-85 puts us in the game more than
any single factor,” Tilley says.
Air travel and shipping are available at
the recently expanded Raleigh-Durham
International Airport, while the OxfordHenderson Airport can accommodate
corporate aircraft.
Affordability starts with land prices,
which Tilley estimates to be less than
half those in the Research Triangle area.
And space, which is becoming more
and more limited in the state’s metropolitan areas, is available in Granville County.
To capitalize on these and other assets, Granville County formed a partnership with three other counties to form
Continued on page 16
16 Granville Today
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DEVELOPMENT,
from page fifteen
Triangle North, a complex of four industrial parks, each with its own attributes to attract companies looking for new locations.
The four counties are working closely with
the Research Triangle Regional Partnership to market Triangle North.
Tilley points to Dill Air Controls Products as one of the recent Granville County
success stories. The company purchased
the former Lenox plant, which it had been
leasing. As a result, the company’s 84 jobs
will remain in Granville County. Dill serves
many markets, including aircraft, trucks,
passenger cars, bicycles, air conditioning,
industrial fuel and construction equipment.
Tilley reports that Granville County is
home to another cutting-edge industry, the
Biofuels Center of North Carolina, which
he describes ironically as “a well-kept
secret.” Located at 901 Hillsboro Street in
Oxford, the Biofuels Center is developing
biofuels to reduce the North Carolina’s dependence on imported liquid fuels, which
contribute nothing to the state’s agriculture, forestry or manufacturing economy.
The southern end of Granville County
offers its own advantages.
Scottie Wilkins, who manages business
development and transportation projects
for Creedmoor, says the town is balancing
the competing demands of infrastructure,
transportation, preservation and quality of
life as it pursues economic development.
“We are developing as smart as we can, not
just as much as we can,” she says.
Adjacent to the city, the Creedmoor
Business Park contains 76+ acres with
easy access to Interstate 85 via Highway
56, which runs alongside the park. The
site, owned by The Rogers Group, has a
156,000-square-foot building available,
with the potential of fitting several different combinations of manufacturing, shipping and office space.
The addition of 300+ acres of shovelready land and a pre-built 150,800-squarefoot building makes Butner ready for
business as Falls Lake Commerce Center
is conveniently located just off Exit 189 of
Interstate 85.
This and many of the excellent sites and
buildings are available, and the people of
Granville County and surrounding areas are
anxious to go to work.
Granville Today 17
A rich history
Museums capture Granville’s impact
Persaline Satterwhite of the Granville County
Museum, in photo at top, explains how education has
evolved from one-room schoolhouses in Granville to
today’s modern facilities. Above, Pam Thornton of the
museum reads from the kiosks about the county’s
heroes.
Boasting over 250 years of history,
Granville County’s impact on culture,
education and farming has been farreaching.
Fortunately for its current citizens,
that history is being preserved through
establishments like the Granville
County Historical Society Museums,
Oak Ridge Heritage House and George
Shaw Museum.
The historical society museums,
open Wednesday through Saturday,
experienced substantial growth in the
previous decade and director Pam
Thornton is hoping for further advancement in the near future.
Thornton hopes fundraising for
expansion of the Harris Exhibit Hall
property on Museum Lane, located in
downtown Oxford, will begin by early
2011.
Thornton, director since 1997, esti-
mates the cost of the potential project
to be around $250,000 to $285,000.
Expansion to the 64-year-old building
would increase storage, workshop and
exhibit space.
The building opened in 2000 and
houses exhibits in art, science, history,
and music that change every three
months.
Thornton says the society’s exhibits
are geared toward both kids and adults.
John Penn, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, was born in
Granville County. “It’s a big draw, just
the fact that we have so much history
here,” said Thornton.
The historical society and museum
buildings are steeped in county lore
themselves.
Harris Hall was constructed in 1946,
Continued on page 18
18 Granville Today
MUSEUMS,
from page seventeen
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Serving our Community SinCe 1980
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Perspective
Two Locations:
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305 Virginia Ave., 2nd Floor,
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BetterPerspective.net
www.hendersonymca.org
919.693.0885
Each Office Independently Owned and Operated
functioning as a freezer locker for storing
the town’s perishable items.
The museum building next door housed
prisoners of Granville County for over
100 years. Now, it contains two stories of
county education, military and farming
history.
“We needed to have something on
Granville County that people coming
through wanting to know something about
the county can always see,” Thornton said.
Just around the corner from these
museums lies a shrine to another influential
local. The George C. Shaw Museum, on
East McClanahan Street, was originally
the home of its namesake, one of Granville
County’s leading educators.
Dr. Shaw, the son of two slaves, founded
Mary Potter Academy and Timothy
Darling Presbyterian Church in the late
19th century. The Shaw house was built in
1921 by shop students at Mary Potter and
opened as a museum in 2000 after school
alumni restored the dwelling.
Museum Executive Director Alva
Pettway and Assistant Director Rita Tyler
both began working for the museum two
years ago.
“If you can imagine, take yourself back
to the era that he fought all the obstacles
he had to in order to establish the school,”
said Pettway. “Look how hard it would be
today in the era we’re in to start a school.
And that’s without the added burden of
discrimination in the South. And yet he did
that, and was able to establish this school
that had a great reputation.”
Visitors can access the Shaw home
Wednesday through Saturday.
About 12 miles north of Oxford in the
small community of Oak Hill, Alma PeaceBullock and her husband, Mack, are doing
their part to preserve African-American
history. The Bullocks founded the Oak Hill
Heritage House Museum and Research
Library in 2006.
While the museum emphasizes AfricanAmerican culture, Alma says there’s a little
something for everyone in Oak Hill.
History buffs can schedule an appointment to tour the museum or visit open
house every fifth Sunday.
For more information on these Granville
County monuments, visit granvillemuseum.
nc.org, shawmuseum.com and wiica.org.
Granville Today 19
Ballfields, greenways and lots of fun await
Granville County residents and visitors.
Keeping fit in Granville
From baseball to lake-side activities,
recreation is one of Granville County’s largest attractions.
Looking for a splash pool for the kids
to cool off in the summertime? Granville’s
huge athletic park has one.
Searching for an interesting trail to
walk for exercise? Granville has greenways.
Horses your thing? Granville County has
horses. And there’s something new on the
high school athletic scene — a lacrosse
team.
One of the best known facilities in the
area is the Granville Athletic Park (GAP).
Located at the Jonesland Environmental
Preserve, the 70-acre athletic park hosts
many local sporting events and tourna-
ments. Upgraded at the end of 2008,
several facilities were added to park, nearly
doubling its original size. The athletic
park currently has two baseball fields,
five multipurpose fields, a practice field,
asphalt walking trails, an outdoor amphitheater with a covered stage, a playground,
concession stand, a sports pavilion with a
basketball court and a conference room.
All facilities are rented out, with the exception of the walking trails, which are free to
the public. The park also added a splash
pool/spray park for young children during
the upgrade. Larry Salisbury, GAP park
superintendent, said the splash pool is one
of park’s most popular facilities.
The walking trails at the athletic park
are a part of the greenways in Granville
County. This, along with the ButnerStem School Trail, which is one-third of
a mile, make up the formal greenways in
the county. There are several upcoming
greenway projects in Oxford, Butner and
Creedmoor.
Oxford Parks and Recreation has several
recreational areas, including Lake Devin
Park. Open from March 1 to Dec. 31, Lake
Devin has several fishing piers and a boat
ramp for non-gas motorized boats. The
park also has 2.5 miles of nature trails and
picnic areas. A shelter and an outdoor volleyball facility are available. The Red Barn,
Continued on page 20
20 Granville Today
REALTY
www.stonyhillrealty.com
[email protected]
BRINDELL B.
WILKINS
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SHERIFF
Phone: 919.229.4221
Mobile: 919.637.6883
[email protected]
1012 Traders Trail
Wake Forest, NC 27587
Becky Martin
Broker/owner
SRES
GRANVILLE COUNTY
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FITNESS,
from page nineteen
an actual barn overlooking the Devin Lake,
brings in many visitors to the park, according to Mary Caudle, director for Oxford
Parks and Recreation.
The Oxford Recreation Center, known
as Hix, is another popular facility operated
by the Oxford recreational department.
Located on Spring Street in Oxford, the
center has a gym with one basketball/volleyball court along with a fitness room, a
dance/aerobics room and locker rooms.
Seating 300 people, the gym is reserved
for recreation department programs and
events. Hix also has several multi-use fields
and tennis courts.
For those interested in horses, Bayfield
Farms provides several horse-related activities. Bayfield offers beginning to advanced
riding lessons held on a weekly basis with
private lessons offered on Saturdays. These
lessons are taught by co-founder Kevin Gilliam. Children beginners, who must be at
least 6 years old, start with private lessons
and then join a group lesson that is held on
Fridays. Intermediate and advanced lessons
are offered for all ages. An adult lesson,
that includes beginner to advance riders,
is held on Wednesdays. Lessons can be
taken on a provided horse or an individual’s
horse. Bayfield also has training and boarding for all breeds of horses. Gilliam also
offers a summer camp that lasts for about
one week. Bayfield also hosts the Granville
County 4-H Horseflies, which is a horse
club lead by Gilliam. The club focuses on
horse education where members, ages 7 to
18, participate in community service projects, take photographs, make crafts related
to horses, and assist with a horse show.
In addition to area recreation, one local
high school recently expanded its athletic
department. J.F. Webb High’s School of
Health and Life Sciences introduced a
lacrosse team for the spring 2010 sports
season. The varsity team’s first season had
27 players. “We played against tough and
experienced teams,” coach David Farabee
said. Farabee, also a science teacher at
the school, described the season as “very
exciting.” Farabee set up a summer lacrosse
team, Oxford Crossfire, that competed in
three tournaments throughout the summer, and eventually he hopes to help start
a youth lacrosse league. “This is an exciting
time for lacrosse,” Farabee noted.
Granville Today 21
This artist rendering illustrates a 32,000-square-foot construction project that will be the largest in Granville Health System’s history.
Granville Health System
Dedicated to Quality
For more than 90 years, Granville Health System
(GHS) has been delivering quality health care, close
to home. To meet the community’s growing needs,
GHS has expanded its services throughout
Granville County, offering convenient access
to medical care where you work and live.
Granville Health System has recently
received a number of national awards,
including the Hospital of Choice Award which
names GHS as one of the top 100 hospitals in
the country.
In 2010, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North
Carolina designated the health system’s Granville
Medical Center as a Blue Distinction Center for
Knee and Hip Replacement. This recognition sets
Granville Health System as a top provider for
these orthopaedic services in the Triangle area,
including Oxford, Henderson, Raleigh, Durham,
Chapel Hill, Cary and the surrounding areas.
GHS was given this designation because it has
demonstrated a commitment to quality care,
resulting in excellent overall outcomes for
patients who undergo knee and hip replacement
procedures at Granville Medical Center. Granville Health System also received the
Community Value Index five-star hospital award,
placing GHS in the top 20% of hospitals in the country
in offering financial value to the communities they
serve, while reinvesting back into their facilities in
order to provide for current and emerging health
needs.
In January 2011, GHS will continue to
position itself to accommodate the future
medical needs of the community through the
GHS Expansion Plan. This ambitious 32,000
-square-foot construction project is the largest
in the organization’s history. It includes a new
Emergency Department that will grow from
3,135- to 18,000-square feet; expanded Surgical Services;
a larger Laboratory Department; a new, larger lobby and
admissions area; and additional patient and visitor
parking.
As Granville Health System moves forward,
implementing a long-term approach of strategic
growth, the GHS Expansion Plan ensures the
hospital will continue to deliver new health care
technology and expand services throughout
the area.
Granville Health System is dedicated to
quality…quality physicians and staff, providing
the personal attention you and your family deserve.
Visit them online at www.granvillemedical.com.
22 Granville Today
New program with
Boys & Girls Clubs
For many years, some in Granville
County have seen a need for a youth
services program such as that provided
by the Boys and Girls Clubs. In 2010,
some leaders saw that need and started
an effort to meet it; by year’s end, they
expected to have a program in place.
To operate such a club, the Granville
leaders turned to the North Central
North Carolina Boys and Girls Clubs,
which already had programs going in
Vance and Franklin counties.
Before the year ended, leaders had
chosen a site, an old gym across the
street from the historic old Mary Potter
School in the heart of Oxford.
Their fund-raising effort was well
on its way to success, led by a steering
committee headed by Xavier Wortham
and Cynthia Yancey.
The group headed by those two
will continue as a steering committee
to advise and oversee the work of the
administrative organization.
SCHOOLS, from page five
lina, allows students to go to
class as if going to a corporate
office. They learn the operaGranville high school campuses.
tion of a business, developing
In the past few years, the system has develthe leadership skills necessary
oped a variety of new programs.
for that world.
For a part of the population, there is the
These programs bear out
Early College established in southern Granville the “one size does not fit all”
Dr. Farley
that allows students to not only earn a high
approach, but there is other
school diploma in five years but also earn an
progress as well. Thanks to
associate’s degree or two years toward college. It foundation and corporate grants, the system has
started with 50 students and continues to grow. been able to provide all students and teachers at
For others who want something extra, there South Granville with laptop computers, and the
is the evening program or “virtual school.” Any
School Board has guaranteed that this offer will
course offered across the state or nation can be be extended to other high schools as well.
available to Granville students online. Students
There is more to this effort than the macan use the system to take a special course or
chines, said Dr. Farley. Funds have been availachieve the few units they may need to catch
able to train teachers in the use of computers to
up. Dr. Farley’s son is an example; he has taken improve student performance.
two years of Spanish and is studying German
All the programs and approaches to operatonline.
ing a school system require a system of goals and
Then there is the Center for Innovative
strategies. When he was interviewing for the
Learning, using a completely updated facility in Granville job a few years ago, Dr. Farley gave
Creedmoor. Its program is aimed at those who the School Board a presentation on just these
have struggled with behavior problems or need matters, and in 2010 he was asked to provide an
to catch up or accelerate.
update.
Newest on the scene is a project of Dr.
As part of that effort, he listed some of the
Farley’s associate, Dr. Allan Jordan. The “virtual,
enterprise” program, already proven successful
Continued on page 23
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Granville Today 23
SCHOOLS,
from previous page
system’s goals, which include such tasks as
narrowing the achievement gap among races,
reducing the drop out rate and increasing the
graduation rate, increasing SAT scores and participation, and in general improving academic
progress.
Performance by Granville students in such
measurements as end-of-course and endof-grade testing, for both state and federal
programs, have shown progress, says Stan Winborne, the director of testing.
Dr. Farley’s presentation also listed some
aspects of his vision. Students and teachers
should want to go to school, he said, and they
should expect to achieve. The schools should
provide maximum engagement, make students
feel valued and prepare them for the world after
school.
Part of the system’s strategy is to provide
quality facilities, and to that end in 2010 planning was underway for a new elementary school
in the southeastern part of the county, where
population growth has continued. That will
make nine such schools, which feed four middle
schools and the five high schools on three high
school campuses.
As is the case in most school systems, there
is a funding need, and Granville sees an urgent
need to expand the newest high school, Granville Central, probably the next building project.
There are more than 9,000 students in
Granville County, served by more than a thousand full-time employees using a budget of more
than $72 million.
But while Dr. Farley and his administration
see the funding problems that school systems
have faced, he often stresses that money is not
his main concern.
Improvement in education is the main goal,
he said, with solving the money problem just a
means to that end. And as he told his School
Board before he came to Granville, and afterward, he intends to keep the end in mind.
That may be one reason his colleagues
across the region named him the 2010 Regional
Superintendent of the Year. It was an honor
given by educators from several counties, but
which had been initiated by the School Board
and backed by the Granville County Board of
Commissioners.
Support by such leadership has helped Dr.
Farley and his team in developing a school system that Granville citizens point to with pride.
Granville-Vance
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Oxford, NC 27565
919-693-2141
115 Charles Rollins Road
Henderson, NC 27536
252-492-7915
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3220 Knott’s Grove Rd.
Oxford, NC 27565
919-690-0880
24 Granville Today
Index of Advertisers
14
AAA Gas
22
Adcock Realty
12
Ahner Security
Butner-Creedmoor Family
12
Medicine
12
Camp Oak Hill
Inside Front
Capital Bank
10
Century 21 Hancock Properties
Downtown Oxford Economic
6-8
Development Corp.
Express Employment
23
Professionals
22
For Your Occasion
13
Garden Park Villas
14
Gentry & Newell Funeral Home
10
Granville County Museum
16
Granville County Schools
Granville County Sheriff Brin
20
Wilkins
Granville Economic Development
13
Commission
24
Granville Farms
1
Granville Health System
10
Granville Insurance Agency, Inc.
13
Granville Recycling Center
23
Granville-Vance District Health
13
Harris Inc.
18
Henderson Family YMCA
14
Highland Vista
Holden, Moss, Knott, Clark & Copley,
2
PA
2
Joe Bryan and Associates
20
Kerr-Vance Academy
22
KFC
13
Maxim
20
NeighborCare At Home
12
Oxford Dry Cleaners
12
Perry Brothers Tire Service
24
Piedmont Electric
16
Piedmont Park & Gardens
14
Plastic Ingenuity
Premier Women's Health
Back Cover
Professionals, P.A.
Inside Back
Progress Energy
18
ReMax Perspective
Representative James W. Crawford,
3
Jr.
23
Santa Fe Natural Tobacco
Inside Front
School of Graphic Arts
22
Senator Doug Berger
20
Stony Hill Realty
16
Tatum & Edwards, PA
24
The Daily Dispatch
18
Vacuum Cleaner Solutions
Vance-Granville Community College 10
16
Winston International
GraNville Farms, iNC
Piedmont EMC
Consumers
Have ‘Smart’ Meters
‘Smart’ meters allow Piedmont
Electric consumers to manage
their electricity use better by
giving them access to their actual
use on a daily basis.
It’s just one more way the
Cooperative is empowering its
members to make informed
energy decisions.
Piedmont Electric
Membership Corporation
www.pemc.org
919.732.2123 ï 800.222.3107
Hillsborough ï Roxboro ï Caswell County
A Touchstone Energy® Cooperative
Granville Today
2011 Edition
Granville Today is an annual Publication of
the Granville County Chamber of Commerce
and The Daily Dispatch. The publication is
distributed throughout Granville County and to
interested parties outside the area.
Linda Gupton, Kellen Holtzmann,
Megan Reavis, Charlie Richards,
Tony Tharp
Writers
Ashley Steven Ayscue, Andrew Beal,
Al Crews, James Edwards, Earl King
Photographers
Granville County Chamber of Commerce
Volunteers and Staff
Contributors
Dylan Shawn Wilson & James Edwards
[email protected]
[email protected]
Section Designers
Wanda Garrett
[email protected]
Membership Directory
Desireé Brooks, Gina Eaves,
Denise Edwards, Brenda Faucette &
Deborah Tuck
[email protected]
Advertising sales and design
School of Graphic Arts,
The Masonic Home for Children
[email protected]
Printer
8220 NC Hwy 96 N.
P.O. BOX 1396
Oxford, NC 27565
919-690-8000
growing for TOmOrrOw
www.granville-chamber.org
124 Hillsboro Street — P.O. Box 820
Oxford NC 27565
Phone: (919) 693-6125 • Fax: (919) 693-6126
1598 NC Highway 56
Creedmoor NC 27522
Phone: (919) 528-4994 • Fax: (919) 528-4994
E-Mail: [email protected]
Chamber Staff: Ginnie Lee D. Currin,
Wanda Garrett & Theresa Haithcock
Subscribe to our e-Edition at
www.hendersondispatch.com
For home delivery,
call (252) 436-2700
www.hendersondispatch.com
©2010 The Daily Dispatch, 304 S. Chestnut
Street, Henderson, NC 27536. (252) 436-2700.
All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced
in whole or in part without written consent.
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252-492-8576
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