Super majority for GOP could fuel infighting

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Super majority for GOP could fuel infighting
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DOOLEY UNCERTAIN ABOUT HIS FUTURE AT TENNESSEE BUT SAYS NO DECISION HAS BEEN MADE. — D1
TO GIVE THE NEWS IMPARTIALLY, WITHOUT FEAR OR FAVOR
Tuesday, November 13, 2012
Sold for $4 million
Highest residential resale ever in area is 1 of 3
multimillion-dollar sales in the past six months
Vol. 143, No. 335 • • •
Super majority
for GOP could
fuel infighting
By Andy Sher
Staff Writer
NASHVILLE — Jubilant Tennessee Republicans
are celebrating the “super majorities” they won in
last week’s legislative elections, but history shows
that may not always guarantee smooth sledding for
the GOP, leaders and observers say.
Narrow majorities tend to generate a “lot of pressure for you to
unite against a common foe,” said
I
University of Georgia political science professor Charles Bullock. think we’ll
But “when you’ve got an excess of
votes, there may be personal ambi- be as unified
tions, ideological [differences] and as possible,
whatever else that may come to the but with that
fore, and cracks may then begin to
many memappear.”
A super majority in each cham- bers there’ll
ber — a two-thirds majority of 22 be diverse
senators and 66 representatives
— would allow Republicans to views.
cut off debate at will and suspend
rules, among other advantages.
— Gerald
Republicans already dominated
McCormick,
the state House and Senate entering
House
the election, with House Republimajority
cans holding a 64-34 majority over
leader
Democrats with one independent,
who usually sides with the GOP.
In the Senate, they ruled with a 20-13 majority over
Democrats. Last week, Senate Republicans picked
up six more seats, boosting their majority to 26-7
over Democrats.
In percentages, though, it was the second largest gain for Republicans in a state Senate across
the entire U.S., according to figures posted on the
“
$4.15 MILLION 1609 EDGEWOOD CIRCLE
This Riverview home with 11,000 square feet sold
in November from Gordon Smith III to Billy Oehmig.
Staff Photos by Patrick Smith
By Joan Garrett
Staff Writer
While the economy sputters along, a growing number
of million-dollar homes are
selling in Chattanooga.
Last week, a North Chattanooga home in the Riverview
neighborhood sold for more
than $4 million. Realtor Jay
Robinson, who was involved
in the sale, said it is the most
expensive residential resale
transaction in Hamilton
County history.
The sale is one of three
multimillion-dollar sales in
the past six months, according to Hamilton County
property records.
And Realtors say the last
12 months have been good for
luxury real estate, following
several sluggish years.
“I think it’s an encouraging sign for the overall local
real estate market,” said Jack
Webb, a Realtor with CryeLeike who was part of a $3.2
million home sale in Riverview earlier this year. “I don’t
think this would have happened three or four years ago.
But I don’t think everything
is back to normal.”
Many people are selling
and downsizing, but as more
first-time buyers enter the
market with $150,000 and
$200,000 homes because of
”
See GOP, Page A4
Fired officer had
earlier complaints
of excessive force
$2.8 MILLION 6200 CLARK ROAD
This lakefront home in Harrison with 7,710 square feet was bought by Luap
Property Holdings LLC in April.
By Beth Burger
Staff Writer
$3.2 MILLION 1513 RIVER VIEW OAKS DRIVE
This Riverview home with 9,085 square feet on four acres near the Chattanooga
Golf and Country Club was bought in June by John and Georgia O’Brien.
See HOMES, Page A4
Personnel records show one of
the Chattanooga police officers
fired after a man he arrested suffered severe injuries to his legs
already had been flagged by a couple complaints of excessive force.
Officer Sean Emmer is one of
two officers who was fired last
week after a disciplinary hearing.
Having worked for the department since 2008, Emmer had prior
complaints — none of which was
upheld by internal investigations
at the police department.
Officers are automatically
flagged in the department’s system
if they get two or more administrative complaints, two or more
citizen complaints or have five or
See OFFICERS, Page A4
Sean
Emmer
Adam
Cooley
Petraeus case shows FBI’s authority to read your email
By Richard Lardner
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Your emails
are not nearly as private as you
think.
The downfall of CIA Director
David Petraeus demonstrates how
easy it is for federal law enforcement agents to examine emails and
computer records if they believe a
crime was committed. With subpoenas and warrants, the FBI and other
investigating agencies routinely gain
access to electronic inboxes and
information about email accounts
offered by Google, Yahoo and other
Internet providers.
“The government can’t just
wander through your emails just
See PETRAEUS, Page A4
Today’s poll
VOTE ONLINE
■ Former CIA Director David
Petraeus told the woman
with whom he was having
an extramarital affair to stop
sending threatening emails to
a family friend after a federal
investigation determined who
was behind the harassment. A4
The Associated Press
FBI agents discovered an email account belonging to David Petraeus and exchanges that suggested he was having an affair.
Yesterday’s results
as of 9 p.m. Monday
Have you or a member of your
family served in the military?
Q
Will Derek
Dooley be back
next year?
© 2012 Chattanooga Publishing Co.
INSIDE
because they’d like to know what
you’re thinking or doing,” said
Stewart Baker, a former assistant
secretary at the Department of
Homeland Security and now in private law practice. “But if the government is investigating a crime,
it has a lot of authority to review
people’s emails.”
Under the 1986 Electronic Communications Privacy Act, federal
authorities need only a subpoena
approved by a federal prosecutor
— not a judge — to obtain electronic messages that are six months
old or older. To get more recent
communications, a warrant from
Q
timesfreepress.com
Yes: 93 percent No: 6 percent
INDEX
Business . . . . . . C1
Classified . . . . . . F1
Comics . . . . . .E2-3
Editorials . . . . .B6-7
■ Powerful men can bounce
back from even the most lurid
affairs, but the other woman
rarely survives the firestorm
intact. Call it sexism, bad luck or
lousy public relations — these
modern Hester Prynnes live on
in Google forever. E6
Life . . . . . . . . . . . E1
Metro . . . . . . . . . B1
National . . . . . . . A3
Obituaries . . . .B2-3
Politics . . . . . . . . A6
Puzzles . . . . E2, F3
Sports . . . . . . . . D1
Television. . . . . . E5
Weather . . . . . . . C6
World . . . . . . . . . A5
A2 • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • • •
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METRO/
REGION
■ POLICE DRIVING State
troopers and other law
enforcement officers in
Georgia are being assigned
to brush up on their driving
skills after a spate of crashes. The Brunswick News
reports that state officials
have grown so concerned
about the number of accidents caused by emergency
vehicles they are instating
a mandatory training program. Georgia State Patrol
troopers will start receiving
annual, four-hour driving
courses this month. According to the Governor’s Office
of Highway Safety, there
were 2,475 crashes involving
on-duty officers statewide
in 2011, resulting in three
deaths and 386 people being
injured.
■ VOTER ID Only a fraction of voters complained
they were restricted from
casting ballots on Election
Day because of Tennessee’s
controversial and highly
publicized new voter photo
ID law, but opponents of the
law insist that even “low”
numbers are unacceptable.
EARLY EMAIL
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latest news. Sign up for
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■ BABY DEATH There still
are no charges filed in the
June death of a 3-monthold who suffered “major
trauma” to his brain under
circumstances investigators
and medical officials called
“suspicious.” That could
change with the release
of Colin Eugene Russell’s
autopsy, Marion County,
Tenn., detective Beth Schindel said Monday. The results
will be turned over to the
district attorney’s office
to determine if there was
criminal wrongdoing in the
infant’s death, but Schindel
could not say when those
results could come.
■ HASLAM POLL A recent
poll shows Republican
Gov. Bill Haslam has strong
bipartisan support among
Tennessee voters. The Middle Tennessee State Univer-
sity poll shows Haslam has
a 76 percent approval rating
among independents heading into the third year of his
term, 75 percent of Republicans like what he’s doing,
and 54 percent of Democrats
approve. More than two in
three voters, or 68 percent,
say they approve of the
way Haslam is handling his
job as governor. Fourteen
percent disapprove, and
16 percent say they don’t
know. Jason Reineke, the
poll’s associate director,
said Haslam’s numbers are
impressive “considering the
partisan climate regarding
national politics.”
IN BUSINESS
.31
.61
Dow
12,815.08
Nasdaq
2,904.26
■ ZONING CHANGE A
Chattanooga developer said
Monday he’s looking at putting up a 15,000-square-foot
office building next to his
large Waterside mixed-use
project in East Brainerd.
Developer Ken DeFoor said
he has “no big tenant” yet for
the 2-acre tract at McCutcheon and Gunbarrel roads. But
he secured a zoning change
from the Chattanooga-Hamilton Regional Planning
Commission to allow for the
commercial development.
IN LIFE
■ TALENT SHOW Garrison
Clower, 12, has been one of
the lead actors in puppet theater productions at the Mountain Arts Community Center
in Signal Mountain this year.
He portrayed the lead role in
the debut performance of an
original play, “Beastie’s Birthday Party” this spring, and
soon will take on several roles
in a reprisal of local theater
guru Fred Arnold’s adaptation
of “The Blue Bird.”
IN SPORTS
■ COACH RESIGNS After
one of the most successful
stretches in program history,
Chad Barger has stepped
down as Sequatchie County’s football coach. Barger
resigned Monday, following
the first losing season (2-8)
in his five-year tenure with
the program.
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CIRCULATION / DELIVERY
Judge halves slander verdict
won by casino mogul Wynn
The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES — A judge
slashed a damage verdict favoring casino mogul Steve Wynn in
a slander case against “Girls Gone
Wild” founder Joe Francis.
Superior Court Judge Joanne
O’Donnell issued the ruling
Friday invalidating certain
claims and trimming the damage amount from $40 million
to $19 million. The move comes
after lawyers for Francis argued
that O’Donnell erred when she
allowed jurors to consider allegations that Francis slandered
Wynn in comments made to
TV’s “Good Morning America”
on the eve of trial.
The Associated Press
“Sesame Street” muppet Elmo and puppeteer Kevin Clash.
The Associated Press
Elmo puppeteer accused
of underage relationship
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — The puppeteer who performs as Elmo on
“Sesame Street” is taking a leave
of absence from the popular kids’
show following allegations that
he had a relationship with a 16year-old boy.
Sesame Workshop says puppeteer Kevin Clash denies the
charges, which were first made
in June by the alleged partner,
who by then was 23.
In a statement issued Monday,
Sesame Workshop said its investigation found the allegation of
underage conduct to be unsubstantiated. But it said Clash exer-
cised “poor judgment” and was
disciplined for violating company policy regarding Internet
usage. It offered no details.
“I had a relationship with (the
accuser),” Clash told TMZ. “It
was between two consenting
adults, and I am deeply saddened
that he is trying to make it into
something it was not.”
The 52-year-old Clash has
been a “Sesame Street” puppeteer since 1984. At his request,
Clash has been granted a leave of
absence in order to “protect his
reputation,” Sesame Workshop
said. No duration for the leave
was specified.
RATES
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■ CARRIER DELIVERY
Steve Wynn
Joe Francis
The judge also says Wynn
isn’t entitled to punitive damages
on the claims, which accounted
for $20 million of the verdict.
A call to Wynn’s attorney
Barry Langberg was not immediately returned.
War widow sues over film
featuring her husband
NASHVILLE — A widow
of a U.S. Army soldier killed in
a blast in Afghanistan has sued
Fox Cable Networks and the
National Geographic Society
over a documentary that showed
her husband and family.
The documentary about a
combat hospital called “Inside
Afghan ER” featured Staff Sgt.
Kevin Casey Roberts, who was
serving with the 4th Brigade
Combat Team, 101st Airborne
Division when an improvised
explosive device struck his
vehicle in Khost province in
Afghanistan in 2008.
A year after his death, his
wife, Donnice Roberts, got a
call from a service member in
Germany who saw her husband
in the documentary. According
to the lawsuit filed in Texas on
Nov. 1, she never knew there was
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video footage related to her husband’s death and that the documentary existed. She is seeking
at least $750,000 in damages and
wants a judge to prevent the film
from airing again. She also wants
the cable network to stop using
images of military families without their permission.
The documentary was produced and distributed by the
National Geographic Society
and was promoted and distributed by Fox Networks Inc. and
Fox Entertainment Group Inc.,
which owns part of the NatGeo
network.
Scott Grogin, a spokesman
for Fox Networks, said the film
did not air in the United States.
“The filmmakers got permission from the military to shoot
the documentary and ... were
granted permission to shoot the
memorial service,” he said.
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■ NEWSSTAND
NBC’s ‘Revolution’ drama
snares Led Zeppelin songs
The Associated Press
The Associated Press
Led Zeppelin band members Jason Bonham, Robert Plant,
John Paul Jones and Jimmy Page, from left.
LOS ANGELES — What tunes
fit a post-apocalyptic society? For
NBC’s freshman drama “Revolution,” the answer is Led Zeppelin’s
“Kashmir” and “Since I’ve Been
Loving You.” The songs will be
featured in next week’s episode
of “Revolution.” On the same day,
Led Zeppelin’s “Celebration Day”
album and a companion documentary on DVD will be released.
Corporate synergy led to the
deal for the band that rarely allows
use of its music in Hollywood
projects. “Revolution” is produced
in association with Warner Bros.
Television, and Led Zeppelin has
a deal with Warner Music Group’s
publishing arm.
The Led Zeppelin-accented
episode of “Revolution” will air
10:01 p.m. EST Monday, Nov. 19. A
“Revolution” promo spot featuring
“Kashmir” will air throughout this
week on NBC, with an extended
version available on the network’s
website.
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• • • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • A3
National
Alzheimer’s precursors found at earlier age
called beta amyloid or a-beta,
a hallmark of Alzheimer’s.
Researchers detected higherthan-normal levels of amyloid
in the spinal fluid of these
young adults. They found
suggestions that memoryencoding parts of the brain
were already working harder
than in normal brains. And
they identified indications
that brain areas known to be
affected by Alzheimer’s may
be smaller than in those who
do not have the Alzheimer’s
gene.
The studies in Lancet
Neurology used several tests,
Cox Newspapers
The Associated Press
The Associated Press
Citizens Energy workers continue their investigation
Monday afternoon by digging into the front sidewalk
looking for a possible explanation into the explosion of
a house in Indianapolis.
The owner of one of the
homes that was destroyed said
there was a problem with the
furnace in the last few weeks.
John Shirley, 50, of Noblesville, told The Associated
Press that he received a text
message within the last week
and a half from his daughter,
who complained that the furnace in the home where she
lived with her mother and
her mother’s boyfriend had
broken. The malfunction had
forced them to stay in a hotel,
the girl said.
When Shirley asked if the
furnace had been fixed, his
daughter said yes. He said he
wasn’t aware of any additional
problems until he heard from
his daughter again Sunday
morning.
“I get a text from my
daughter saying ‘Dad, our
home is gone.’ Then I called
my ex-wife and she said what
happened,” he said.
More women drivers on road than men
The Associated Press
WA S H I N G T O N —
Women have passed men
on the nation’s roads. More
women than men now have
driver’s licenses, a reversal of
a longtime gender gap behind
the wheel that transportation researchers say is likely
to have safety and economic
implications.
If current trends continue,
the gap will only widen. The
share of teens and young
adults of both sexes with
driver’s licenses is declining, but the decline is greater
for young men, according
to a study by the University
of Michigan’s Transportation Research Institute. The
study looked at gender trends
in driver’s licenses between
1995 and 2010.
“The changing gender
demographics will have major
implications on the extent and
nature of vehicle demand,
energy consumption, and road
safety,” predicted Michael
Sivak, co-author of the study.
Women are more likely than
men to purchase smaller, safer
and more fuel-efficient cars; to
drive less, and to have a lower
fatality rate per distance driven, he said.
Over the 15 years the study
covered, the share of men
ages 25 to 29 years old with
driver’s licenses dropped 10.6
percent. The share of women
of the same age with driver’s
licenses declined by about half
that amount, 4.7 percent.
Male drivers outnumbered
women drivers from the
moment the first Ford Model
T rolled off the assembly line
in 1908, the year the automobile became popular, and
through most of the last century. In the 1950s, when only
about half of adult women
had driver’s licenses, jokes
about women drivers were a
staple of comedians.
But the gap gradually
closed. By 1995, men with
driver’s licenses slightly out-
numbered women, 89.2 million to 87.4 million. By 2010,
105.7 million women had
licenses, compared with 104.3
million men.
Likewise, in 1995 men with
driver’s licenses outnumbered
women in every age group
except those over 70. By
2010, women outnumbered
men among drivers ages 45
and older and between ages
25 and 29 years old. The share
of older women who are also
hanging onto their driver’s
licenses has also increased.
“I want to be in my own
car for as long as possible. I
want to be independent for
as long as I can,” said Diane
Spitaliere, 58, a retired government worker in Alexandria, Va.
Male drivers under age 44
are still slightly more numerous than women of the same
age, but that’s only because
young men outnumber young
women in the general population, the study said.
ATLANTA — What have
you done for someone else
lately?
If you answered not
much, there’s still a chance
to redeem yourself.
Today is World Kindness
Day, which kicks off a week
of opportunities for wouldbe do-gooders.
Indeed, coming off a contentious presidential campaign that seemed to drag on
forever and dealing with the
everyday stress of work and
traffic, we can all use a little
more tenderness.
“We hope that people are
kind every day of the year,
but this is the one day of the
year when we can celebrate
and give people an excuse to
do something a little extra,”
said Brooke Jones, manager
of Colorado-based The Random Acts of Kindness Foundation.
Even when there is a
major disaster such as Hurricane Sandy, for example, stories emerge about heroes and
acts of kindness. “Those stories fall a little bit down the
list,” she said, “but they’re the
ones that inspire people.”
If you’re looking for ways
to practice charitable behavior, there’s no shortage of
sources and opportunities.
There are books and websites about kindness. There’s
Random Acts of Kindness
Day, World Kindness Day
and Pay It Forward Day.
Kindness proponents say
The Associated Press
sheriff’s department in this
lakeside community between
Cleveland, Ohio, and Toledo.
“He’s stiff as a board.”
No charges were immediately filed in the case, but the
six children, most with physical or mental disabilities or
both, were removed from the
home, and four were sent to
the hospital.
Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital in Cleveland
said the four were still at the
hospital Monday. A spokesman said the hospital could not
release information because of
patient privacy rules.
A 6-year-old weighed 23
The Associated Press
murder, and might have been
started by a malfunctioning
refrigerator.
Prosecutors called the
claim about the refrigerator
“crazy.” They alleged Tata had
left hot oil on a stove when
she left the children alone to
shop at a nearby Target store
in February 2011. The resulting fire also injured three children.
Tata, 24, is charged with
four counts of felony murder
but is being tried on only one
of the counts: for the death of
16-month-old Elias Castillo.
She faces up to life in prison
if convicted of felony murder, though jurors can find
her guilty on several lesser
counts.
Jurors deliberated for
1
about 4 ⁄2 hours before ending their work. They were set
to resume deliberating today.
The jury is being sequestered
during deliberations.
it doesn’t cost anything to be
nice.
“Kindness begets kindness,” Australia’s Michael
Lloyd-White, general secretary of the World Kindness
Movement, said in an email.
“We hope it highlights the
good will in all communities, giving them a focal point
to celebrate, recognize and
promote kindness — a gentle
nudge and reminder that we
are and can be better.”
You can help someone
load his or her groceries in
the car, allow an impatient
driver to merge into your
lane or write a note to someone who’s had a big influence
on your life.
There’s a certain feelgood moment that touches
the giver and the receiver.
“When you do something
really good, you know it,”
said Hanoch McCarty, coauthor of “Acts of Kindness:
How to Make a Gentle Difference.”
“Even if nothing comes
back to you,” McCarty said,
“you’ve already got the
reward just knowing you’ve
done something for someone
else.”
for
Christmas!
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pounds, about half the average
40- to 50-pound weight for the
age. The oldest child was 11.
In the call to 911, the mother
begged for a quick response
from an emergency medical
crew.
“Yes, please, please,” she
said repeating the address
located along a country road
with a mix of small farms and
suburban-style homes with
deep front yards.
“He’s got medical issues,
he’s disabled, he’s a disabled
baby and I don’t know what
happened,” the mother. “Oh,
please, God help us. We have
disabled children.”
Jury deliberating in Houston day care fatal fire trial
HOUSTON — Deliberations began Monday afternoon
in the felony murder trial of a
Houston woman who was out
shopping while a fire broke
out at her home day care, a
blaze that killed four of seven
unsupervised children.
The jury got the case after
the morning’s closing arguments. The attorney for Jessica Tata said the deadly blaze
was a “tragic accident,” not a
ence may be that early-onset
Alzheimer’s involves an overproduction of amyloid, while
late onset involves a problem
clearing amyloid from the
brain.
The study also found that
amyloid plaques increased
steadily until about age 37,
after which the brain did
not seem to gain many more
plaques. Blennow said that
while researchers know that
amyloid plaques plateau when
people already have dementia, they did not know that the
plateau appears to occur years
before.
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911 caller: Malnourished boy ‘stiff as a board’
VERMILION, Ohio — A
mother’s frantic plea for help
for her disabled 18-month-old
son — “He’s stiff as a board”
— sent an ambulance crew to a
reclusive family’s home where
they found the undersized boy
and six other children, most
malnourished, according to a
911 tape released Monday.
“He’s got medical issues,”
the mother told a 911 operator Nov. 6 when she and her
husband awoke and found the
toddler’s lifeless body.
“My husband just went
inside,” she said on the tape
released by the Erie County
young developing brain.
“It is a genetic disease, and
it’s not hard to imagine that
your gene results in some
differences in the way your
brain is formed,” said Dr.
Adam Fleisher, director of
brain imaging at the Banner
Institute and an author of the
studies.
The high level of amyloid
fluid in the Colombian family
supports a hypothesis about
a difference between the
beginning phases of genetic
early-onset Alzheimer’s and
the more common late-onset
Alzheimer’s. The differ-
Be nice: Today is World Kindness Day
Blast probe
focuses on
natural gas
INDIANAPOLIS — The
search for what caused a massive, deadly explosion that
rocked an Indianapolis neighborhood turned to natural gas
Monday, with officials checking gas lines and a homeowner saying a problem furnace
could be to blame.
The National Transportation Safety Board sent investigators to check gas main and
other lines serving the neighborhood where two people
were killed and seven injured
in the weekend blast. Local gas
supplier Citizens Energy said
it also was checking gas lines
and a meter at the home that
exploded.
But officials cautioned that
it was too soon to rule out
other causes, saying only that
they do not believe a meth lab
was to blame for the explosion
that obliterated two homes
and severely damaged dozens
of others.
“It’s too early to speculate
that this might have been
caused by a gas leak,” Citizens
Energy spokeswoman Sarah
Holsapple said at an afternoon
news briefing.
including spinal taps, brain
imaging and functional MRI.
“The prevailing theory
has been that development
of Alzheimer’s disease begins
with the progressive accumulation of amyloid in the brain,”
said Dr. Eric Reiman of the
Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
in Phoenix. “This study suggests there are changes that
are occurring before amyloid
deposition.”
One possibility is that brain
areas are already impaired.
Another possibility, experts
said, is that these brain differences may go back to the
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Scientists studying
Alzheimer’s disease are
increasingly finding clues that
the brain begins to deteriorate
years before a person shows
symptoms of dementia.
Now, research on a large
extended family of 5,000
people in Colombia with a
genetically driven form of
Alzheimer’s has found evidence that the precursors of
the disease begin even earlier
than previously thought and
that this early brain deterioration occurs in more ways than
has been documented before.
The studies, published this
month in the journal Lancet
Neurology, found that the
brains of people destined to
develop Alzheimer’s clearly
show changes at least 20 years
before they have any cognitive
impairment. In the Colombian
family, researchers saw these
changes in people ages 18 to
26; on average, members of
this family develop symptoms
of mild cognitive impairment
at 45 and of dementia at 53.
These brain changes occur
earlier than the first signs of
plaques made from a protein
35116052
By Pam Belluck
New York Times News Service
..
timesfreepress.com ..
Breaking News: 423-757-News
Petraeus told biographer to stop harassing friend GOP
Monday.
Attempts to reach
Broadwell since Petraeus
resigned Friday have been
unsuccessful.
Federal investigators have
said Broadwell sent a series
of emails to Kelley from an
anonymous account telling
her to stop behavior she saw
as overly friendly toward
Petraeus, or she would be
exposed. The law enforcement officials, who spoke
on condition of anonymity, said the emails indicate
Broadwell felt jealous of the
other woman.
The emails did not specifically cite Kelley’s friendship
with Petraeus, according to a
person close to Kelley, who
also spoke on condition of
anonymity. She did not know
who was sending them and
why.
Kelley contacted her
friend in the FBI, who took
her concerns to the bureau.
Investigators were later
able to trace the emails to
Broadwell.
In Broadwell’s account,
investigators found emails
from Petraeus, and given the
personal nature of some of
them, believed at first that
they were being sent by someone who had hacked into the
CIA director’s account.
Kelley was informed that
Broadwell was the sender,
although she told investigators that she did not know
the woman, according to the
person close to Kelley.
At some point, Kelley told
Petraeus about the emails and
named Broadwell as the person who had sent them. That
may have prompted the CIA
director to send his own emails
to Broadwell, telling her to
stop the harassment, the law
enforcement officials said.
People close to Petraeus
say his affair with Broadwell
ended four months ago,
around the time he emailed
her about the harassment.
When confronted by FBI
agents about the emails,
Broadwell acknowledged
the affair with Petraeus and
turned over her computer to
investigators. Petraeus, who
has been married to Holly
Petraeus for 38 years, also
acknowledged the extramarital relationship in his interview with the FBI.
By late summer, the FBI
informed the Justice Department about the case. Federal
prosecutors decided there
was not enough evidence to
file charges against Petraeus, who was interviewed by
investigators during the week
of Oct. 21. Broadwell was
interviewed by agents for the
last time the week before.
FBI Director Robert
Mueller’s top aide was told
Petraeus was having an extramarital affair that might have
compromised national security a week before the Nov.
6 elections, a congressional
official said Monday.
The disclosure raises
fresh questions about why
the FBI leadership withheld the information from
the nation’s top intelligence
official and the congressional
committees that oversee the
U.S. intelligence community
until after President Barack
Obama won re-election.
McClatchy News Service
contributed to this story.
The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee,
Patrick Leahy, has proposed
changing the law to require
a warrant for all Internet
communications regardless
of their age. But law enforcement officials have resisted
because they said it would
undercut their ability to
catch criminals.
A subpoena is usually sufficient to require Internet
companies to reveal names
and any other information
that they have that would
identify the owner of a particular email account. Google,
which operates the widely
used Gmail service, complied
with more than 90 percent of
the nearly 12,300 requests it
received in 2011 from the U.S.
government for data about
its users, according to figures
from the company.
Even if a Gmail account
is created with a fictitious
name, there are other ways
to track down the user. Logs
of when messages are sent
reveal the Internet address
the user used to log onto
the account. Matching times
and dates with locations
allow investigators to piece
together the chain.
A Gmail account figured
prominently in the FBI inves-
tigation that led to Petraeus’
stunning resignation last
week as the nation’s spy chief.
Petraeus, a retired Army general, stepped down after he
confessed to an extramarital
affair with Paula Broadwell,
an Army Reserve officer and
his biographer.
The inquiry began earlier this year after Jill Kelley,
a Florida woman who was
friends with Petraeus and his
wife, Holly, began receiving
harassing emails. Kelley is
a Tampa socialite. That is
where the military’s Central Command and Special
Operations Command are
located.
Petraeus served as commander at Central Command
from 2008 to 2010.
FBI agents eventually
determined that the email trail
led to Broadwell, according
to two federal law enforcement officials, who spoke
on condition of anonymity
because the sources were not
authorized to speak about the
matter on the record. As they
looked further, the FBI agents
came across a private Gmail
account that used an alias
name. On further investigation, the account turned out
to be Petraeus’.
The contents of several
of the exchanges between
Petraeus and Broadwell
suggested they were having an affair, according to
the officials. Investigators
determined that no security
breach had occurred, but
continued their investigation into whether Petraeus
had any role in the harassing
emails that Broadwell had
sent to Kelley, which was a
criminal investigation.
Petraeus and Broadwell
apparently used a trick,
known to terrorists and teenagers alike, to conceal their
email traffic.
One of the law enforcement officials said they did
not transmit all of their
communications as emails
from one’s inbox to the
other’s inbox. Rather, they
composed some emails in a
Gmail account and instead of
transmitting them, left them
in a draft folder or in an electronic “dropbox.” Then the
other person could log onto
the same account and read
the draft emails there. This
avoids creating an email trail
which is easier to trace. It’s a
technique that al-Qaida terrorists began using several
years ago and teenagers in
many countries have since
adopted.
dated April 2011.
Emmer could not be
reached for comment Monday.
He worked in the downtown area during the midnight shift, where he routinely answered calls at bars
where people sometimes
resisted arrest. Officers who
work in areas that average
higher numbers of arrests
and response calls often
have more incidents on their
records, said police Chief
Bobby Dodd.
In July, Emmer responded to the Salvation Army
on McCallie Avenue after a
federal inmate, Adam Tatum,
was kicking the door of an
office at the facility. Federal inmates are sometimes
housed at Salvation Army.
Tatum was armed with a
knife, and Officers Emmer and
Adam Cooley were among
the officers who responded.
An arrest report states the
officers were “in fear for their
lives after Mr. Tatum was not
feeling any pain.”
By the time Tatum was
taken into custody, he had
suffered severe injuries to his
legs, including a compound
fracture, said his defense
attorney, Robin Flores.
Cooley, who is described
as a model officer in reviews,
was also let go last week after
administrators reviewed the
video of the arrest.
“This decision I made
wasn’t to demonize the officers,” said Dodd. “I don’t
know them personally. I’m
told they’re good people by all
accounts. It’s not about them
personally. It’s about what
they did that day in that one
incident. Sometimes there are
things so bad you can’t continue to be a police officer.”
Tatum was charged with
disorderly conduct, resisting
arrest, five counts of assault
and possession of marijuana.
He is serving a consecutive
11-month 29-day sentence for
the assault charges in Silverdale Detention Facility, said
Flores, who said he plans to
appeal the case.
“When [the department]
does take proactive action, it’s
when the evidence is overwhelming,” said Flores, who
said the department does not
routinely take enough action
against officers.
Since November 2010,
there have been 45 incidents
of excessive force investigated by the Chattanooga Police
Department. Of those, three
cases remain open, including Tatum’s. Two complaints
were found to be sustained,
but a vast majority of officers
are exonerated, which means
the department found their
actions were justified.
“The facts of the case are
the facts of the case,” Dodd
said in response to Flores’
accusation. “I’m not going
to make up details to defend
them or make up details to
punish them.”
After the incident at the
Salvation Army, Blaine called
a meeting in late August with
the department’s use-of-force
expert and district supervisors to evaluate the pattern
of complaints and review the
video.
After Dodd observed the
video, Emmer and Cooley
were put on light duty and
taken off patrol. Cooley had
one prior complaint which
was unfounded.
Cooley was credited with
helping to close 807 Fire and
Ice, a nightclub on Market
Street that had numerous
complaints of assaults last
year. In his review of Cooley,
a supervisor said he “is an
outstanding officer who has
a bright future at our department.”
Cooley declined to comment Monday.
Dodd said neither officer
had a bad record with the
department but added that
it was a unanimous decision
to let the officers go.
“I can’t release them back
to the public and explain it,”
he said. “In my mind, it can’t
be justified.”
The department has
not released the video that
captured Tatum’s arrest or
any reports because a third
officer is being investigated
and the FBI is reviewing
the case for any potential
criminal charges. When the
investigation is wrapped up,
the information will be made
available, Dodd said.
Contact staff writer Beth
Burger at [email protected]
freepress.com or 423-7576406. Follow her on Twitter
at twitter.com/abburger.
The Washington Post
WASHINGTON — Former CIA director David
Petraeus told the woman
with whom he was having
an extramarital affair to stop
sending threatening emails
to a family friend, Jill Kelley,
after a federal investigation
determined who was behind
the harassment.
The move by Petraeus
came in midsummer after
Kelley contacted a friend
who worked as an FBI agent
in Tampa, Fla., where she
lived, beginning a process
that would eventually force
the former four-star former
general to resign last week.
The new information,
provided by two law enforcement officials, helps fill in
a summer timeline when
Petraeus’ email account
became the subject of a federal investigation into whether national security had been
compromised during his
affair with his biographer,
Paula Broadwell.
Broadwell, a former Harvard University researcher
who focused her dissertation
on Petraeus’ military career,
hired longtime Washington
criminal defense attorney
Robert Muse, the lawyer said
Petraeus
• Continued from Page A1
a judge is required. This is a
higher standard that requires
proof of probable cause that
a crime is being committed.
Public interest groups are
pressing Congress for the
law to be updated because
it was written a quarter-century ago when most emails
were deleted after a few
months because the cost of
storing them indefinitely
was prohibitive. Now, “cloud
computing” services provide
huge amounts of inexpensive
storage capacity. Other technological advances, such as
mobile phones, have dramatically increased the amount
of communications that are
kept in electronic warehouses and can be reviewed by
law enforcement authorities
carrying a subpoena.
“Technology has evolved
in a way that makes the content of more communications
available to law enforcement
without judicial authorization, and at a very low level
of suspicion,” said Greg
Nojeim, a senior counsel at
the Center for Democracy &
Technology.
Officers
• Continued from Page A1
more use-of-force incidents.
Supervisors review the complaints to determine if there
is an issue.
Emmer has been flagged
several times, said Capt.
Susan Blaine, who oversees
internal affairs.
In a June case, Emmer
reportedly punched a drunken man, Richard McPeek,
twice while arresting him for
disorderly conduct.
“It is difficult to understand why it was necessary
to hit Mr. McPeek twice in
the face when the only charges on Mr. McPeek are public
intoxication,” writes Blaine.
“I also find it questionable
as to why Officer Emmer felt
he had to immediately punch
Mr. McPeek twice in the face
when there were three other
officers right there with him.
It seems four officers should
have been able to arrest one
extremely intoxicated individual.”
The complaint was ultimately ruled unfounded
because there wasn’t enough
evidence to rule either way,
according to the report, but
Emmer’s arrest report and
use of force report showed
inconsistencies.
“I am concerned about
the number of use of force
reports but only monitoring
it at this time,” one supervisor writes in an evaluation
Paula
Broadwell
Jill
Kelley
nonpartisan Governing magazine’s website.
In the House, Republicans
grew their majority by six
seats as well, giving them 70
votes, the fourth highest percentage gain in the country. In
the Senate, the state tied for
second place with Alaska in
percentage growth.
Republican strengths over
the past two years gave them
advantages in votes to eliminate collective bargaining
for teachers and eliminate
the estate tax. But it also
generated divisions among
GOP members in areas such
as school vouchers and a
National Rifle Association
bill that would have allowed
employees to store firearms
in their locked vehicles on
company property.
“I think we’ll be as unified as possible, but with
that many members there’ll
be diverse views,” House
Majority Leader Gerald
McCormick, R-Chattanooga,
said. “We won’t march in
lock step. ... I just think the
sheer numbers of it make it
inevitable we’re not going to
agree on everything every
time.”
Republican Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey, of Blountville, who also is lieutenant
governor, has acknowledged
there could be a downside at
times to a super majority.
“It’s a natural tendency in
any organization ... that when
one party gets dominant, then
the fighting becomes within
and not with the opposing
party,” Ramsey said.
Sy m b o l i c a l ly s p e a king, having a super majority and absolute power is a
pretty heady experience for
the GOP. Republicans last
enjoyed one during postCivil War Reconstruction
days in the 1860s.
Until the mid-2000s,
however, Democrats ruled
the roost and held super
majorities on any number of
occasions, the most recently
being in the 1960s.
But that sometimes led to
factional infighting.
The best-known instance
occurred in 1987 when thenDemocratic Speaker John
Wilder lost the speakership
race in the Democratic Caucus but won on the Senate
floor with a coalition of
conservative white and liberal black Democrats and
all the Republicans. Wilder
held power until 2007 when
Republicans under Ramsey,
along with a single Democrat, ousted him.
While Republicans see
the benefits of total control,
House Minority Leader Craig
Fitzhugh, D-Ripley, warned
they will face their own
problems.
“There are essentially three
parties out there now: the
Republicans, the Democrats
and the tea party,” Fitzhugh
said last week. “We know
who’s driving the car, and it’s
the Republicans, and we clearly understand that, but they’re
the ones that have it on their
shoulders right now.”
Contact staff writer Andy
Sher at [email protected]
press.com or 615-255-0550.
Homes
PREVIOUS
PURCHASES
• Continued from Page A1
■ Dunlap farm, 450 acres
with 6,000-square-foot
favorable interest rates, more home at 2859 Henson Gap
homes in the upper echelon Road, sold for $3.6 million
have been purchased, as well, at the end of 2008.
said Robinson. In the last year, ■ Ooltewah home with
he sold more than $55 million 10,949 square feet and 199
worth of property, market acres at 7230 Sylar Road,
sold for $3.25 million in
penetration data show.
Some sellers of the $150,000 February 2006.
homes purchase homes for ■ Riverfront home at 641
$300,000, and those sellers Battery Place with 6,400
then get dream homes on the square feet bought by
lake, said Robinson.
Henry Luken for $3 million
“Everyone stair-steps up,” in May 2002.
he said. “It creates a ripple.” ■ Riverview mansion at
Chattanooga Realtors are 1649 Minnekahda Road
listing 87 homes with sales with 17,591 square feet
prices of at least $1 million, of residential and utility
including four homes with buildings bought by U.S.
a bigger price tag than the Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn.,
house that sold last week.
in 2000 for $2.4 million
The home at 1609 Edge- from former Wheland
wood Circle in Riverview, Foundry President Gordon
which sold for $4.15 mil- P. Street Jr.
lion, was purchased by Billy
Sources: Hamilton County Register
Oehmig, who is returning to of Deeds and Assessor’s Office,
Chattanooga where he grew Chattanooga Multiple Listing Service
up, according to records with
the Hamilton County regisand Sue Markley, both with
ter of deeds.
Attempts to reach him Crye-Leike, were involved in
were unsuccessful. Robinson the sale to John and Georgia
O’Brien. John O’Brien is a
said he is very private.
Oehmig is the son of one partner in a health care finanof three Oehmig brothers cial company called Contemwho came to the Scenic City porary Healthcare Fund I.
Neighborhoods on Signal
from Cincinnati in 1914. His
father, “Von” Oehmig, found- Mountain, Lookout Mouned Southern Distributors and tain and Riverview have hiswas the founding member torically begged the highest
and first chief executive of price tag, said Webb. The
sales in Riverview just hapCommerce Union Bank.
Billy Oehmig, who still has pen to be some of the highest
family in Chattanooga, went in county history.
But the properties were
to Baylor School and has
been on its board of trust- special, too, he said.
For example, the home at
ees. His business profile with
Forbes magazine says he is 1513 River View Oaks Drive,
an advising partner with pri- bought by the O’Briens, has
vate equity firm The Sterling family crests on the fireplaces and a mural in the dinGroup, based in Texas.
The home had been owned ing room, handpainted by a
by Gordon Smith III and was man who also painted in the
not listed for sale when it was White House.
“Sometimes things happurchased. Robinson said he
scouted the house for Oehm- pen in real estate that are not
ig, and the owner agreed to always indicative of the oversell. The home sits on 1,000 all market,” Webb said. “That
feet of the Tennessee River doesn’t mean that all the
and is 11,000 square feet with homes in Riverview are nicer
16 rooms. It also includes a and better than the homes on
Lookout and Signal.”
guest home.
Contact staff writer Joan
Another home, built by
Jack Lupton in Riverview Garrett at [email protected]
and formerly part of the freepress.com or 423-757Lupton estate, sold this sum- 6601. Follow her on Twitter
mer for $3.2 million. Webb at @JoanGarrettCTFP.
• Continued from Page A1
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A4 • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • • •
...
. timesfreepress.com
• • • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • A5
International
Witnesses differ with U.S. over when attack began
McClatchy Newspapers
BENGHAZI, Libya — Witnesses in Benghazi, Libya, provide a
chronology for the Sept. 11 attack on
the U.S. consulate here that differs
in significant ways from timelines
released by U.S. officials in Washington, raising more questions about
how the assault unfolded and the
speed with which Americans at a
nearby CIA annex responded to calls
for help from the consulate.
The versions of the attack told here
indicate that the last visitor who met
with Ambassador Chris Stevens, who
died in the assault on the consulate,
departed at least 45 minutes earlier
than U.S. officials in Washington have
said. Witnesses here also suggest that
the attack may have begun as many
as 15 minutes earlier than officials in
Washington have said.
Witnesses also said there was no
indication that anyone in the U.S. diplomatic compound was aware before
the assault that protests had broken
out in neighboring Egypt over an
inflammatory film about the Prophet
Muhammad that was produced in the
United States.
The differences in the timelines
could mean that CIA officers stationed in a compound just 1.2 miles
away may have waited as long as 40
minutes before setting out to assist
the besieged consulate and might not
have arrived there until more than an
hour after the attack began. A timeline
released by the CIA says help was
dispatched after just 25 minutes and
that it took the rescue squad 25 minutes to arrive.
At a minimum, the witness
accounts suggest that after two
months, the U.S. government still
may not know the basic sequence of
events and when key moments in the
The Associated Press
Libyan military guards check one of the burnt out buildings at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya,
on Sept. 14, three days after an attack on the consulate.
assault occurred.
But the timelines that have been
offered by the State Department, the
CIA and the Defense Department
offer inconsistent versions of what
took place during the deadliest assault
on a U.S. diplomatic compound in
more than three decades. And any
account of what meetings or discussions, if any, took place at CIA headquarters in Langley, Va., as the events
in Benghazi unfolded is still missing.
According to witnesses, Stevens
had arrived in Benghazi on Sept. 10
for a four-day visit, his first extensive
stay in this city since he assumed the
ambassador’s post in May.
On the evening of Sept. 11, Stevens
met with the Turkish consul here, Ali
Sait Akin, in what everyone agrees
was his last official act. While State
Department officials said Stevens
HEARINGS ON ATTACK
What took place in Benghazi
on the night of Sept. 11 and
the early morning of Sept. 12
is the subject of at least three
congressional hearings this week,
beginning with a closed session
of the Senate Foreign Affairs
committee today and ending
with separate sessions of the
Senate and House intelligence
committees Thursday.
escorted the Turkish consul out of
the compound at 8:30 p.m., a guard at
the compound and an official familiar with the meeting said Akin left at
7:45 p.m.
A 31-year-old security guard
employed by a British contracting
company, the Blue Mountain Group,
said he distinctly remembered the
time of the meeting because about
a half-hour before Akin was scheduled to meet with Stevens, the
ambassador approached the guard,
introduced himself and asked what
security measures were needed to
allow the Turkish consul to enter,
including what kind of badge the
Turkish delegation needed to enter
the compound. Stevens addressed
the guard in Arabic and told him
Akin would arrive at 6:30 p.m. for
an hourlong meeting.
As the guard and Stevens spoke,
the protests in Cairo had been going
on for nearly two hours. Stevens
didn’t mention the film to the guard,
and no one from the compound
warned the guard about possible
protests throughout the night, the
guard said.
Akin arrived on time and the men
met for an hour, the guard said. While
they discussed security broadly, they
didn’t talk about the film, the protests
or the Sept. 11 anniversary, an official
familiar with the meeting, who spoke
only on the condition of the anonymity because of the sensitivity of the
subject, told McClatchy Newspapers.
After the meeting, Stevens and Akin
chatted for about 15 minutes as they
strolled around the compound, and
Akin left at 7:45 p.m.
The guard made a note of the
time of Akin’s arrival and departure
in a book in which the guards tracked
all movements, from official visits to
when the cook arrived, he said.
As of four days ago, no U.S. or
Libyan official had questioned Akin
about his meeting with Stevens,
according to the official familiar with
the meeting.
State Department officials have
said the attack started at 9:40 p.m., a
time that the CIA timeline also sets
as the approximate beginning. A Pentagon account of its response said the
assault started at 9:42 p.m.
But two guards at the compound
told McClatchy that the attack began
earlier; one said at 9:25 p.m. and the
other at 9:35.
One guard, who was at the main
gate and placed the assault’s beginning at 9:25 p.m., said a colleague
stationed at a side gate about 25 yards
away had alerted him by radio that
attackers were approaching. The
guard said he stuck his head out a
window in the compound’s wall and
saw the attackers on one side of the
road, near where his colleague was
stationed, and Libyan police on the
other side of the road fleeing. He said
he hit the alarm button to alert the
compound that it was under attack.
CIA’s station in Benghazi well-kept secret and quickly cleaned, repaired
McClatchy Newspapers
BENGHAZI, Libya — Just
more than a mile from the
group of villas that served as
the U.S. consulate in Benghazi
was another set of U.S.-leased
villas — an annex where the
CIA had set up shop, and from
where would-be rescuers set
out on the night of Sept. 11 in
response to the attack at the
consulate.
Despite speculation to the
contrary, no Libyan or nonAmerican diplomats stationed
in Benghazi say they knew of
the existence or purpose of
the CIA annex.
Top Libyan security officials
in Benghazi and Tripoli, as
well as diplomatic representa-
tives who worked closely with
Americans here, said they had
no idea about the compound,
which unlike the consulate had
no signs of American life outside its tall gates. There were
no concrete barriers in front
or barbed wire on the top of
its concrete wall.
Libya’s deputy interior minister, Omar al-Khadrawy, and
the deputy interior minister
for Benghazi, Saleh Daghman,
told McClatchy Newspapers
they didn’t know that the CIA
had kept a base there. Neither
did the second in command of
Benghazi’s largest revolutionary brigade, the Libyan Shield.
Two consuls from allied
nations who met frequently
with Americans said they
didn’t know the CIA annex
existed until after the deadly
Sept. 11 attack.
During an Oct. 26 question-and-answer session at
the University of Denver,
Paula Broadwell, who’s been
named as the woman whose
affair with CIA Director David
Petraeus led to his resignation
Friday, told the audience that
two Libyan militiamen were
being held at the CIA annex
and suggested that the attackers were targeting the annex,
rather than the consulate.
“Now, I don’t know if a lot
of you heard this, but the CIA
annex had actually taken a
couple of Libyan militia mem-
bers prisoner, and they think
that the attack on the consulate was an effort to try to get
these prisoners back. So that’s
still being vetted,” she said.
But most here don’t believe
that. A guard, who stayed
around the consulate for the
duration of the assault, said he
thought that the subsequent
attack on the CIA compound
happened because the attackers had followed the Americans who were fleeing the
consulate to the CIA annex.
“They came to kill Americans,” he said.
The assault at the consulate
began somewhere between
9:25 and 9:40 p.m. The CIA
annex came under fire twice
in subsequent hours, according to a timeline released
by the CIA. The first attack
consisted of what the agency
called “sporadic small arms
fire and RPG rounds,” a reference to rocket-propelled
grenades. That assault lasted
about 90 minutes, from 11:30
p.m. to 1 a.m.
The second, more serious
attack took place at 5:15 the
next morning, according to the
CIA, when assailants lobbed
mortar rounds into the compound for 11 minutes. It was
during this assault that CIA
contractors Glen Doherty and
Tyrone Woods, both former
Navy SEALs, were killed.
Since the attacks, events
have unfolded very differently
for the two compounds.
At the consulate, gawkers
and looters still could enter
the property, and no repairs
had been made to the burnedout buildings.
But at the CIA safe house,
American officials cleared
their property within days of
the attack. By Sept. 14, three
new families had moved into
the four houses that make up
the compound, according to a
gatekeeper at the door. Nearby residents said the landlord
wanted Libyans living there as
soon as possible, so his property wouldn’t be destroyed by
extremists angry that the CIA
had been stationed there.
Powerful Afghan rallies followers, stoking concern in Kabul
HERAT, Afghanistan —
One of the most powerful former mujahedeen commanders
in Afghanistan, Ismail Khan,
is calling on his followers to
reorganize and defend the
country as Western militaries
withdraw, in a public demonstration of faltering confidence
in the national government
and the Western-built Afghan
National Army.
Khan is one of the strongest
of a group of warlords who
defined the country’s recent
history in battling the Soviets,
the Taliban and one another,
and who then were brought
into President Hamid Karzai’s
Cabinet as a symbol of unity.
Now, in announcing that he is
remobilizing his forces, Khan
has rankled Afghan officials
and stoked fears that other
regional and factional leaders
will follow suit and
them to coordinate
re-arm, weakening
and reactivate their
support for the govnetworks. And he has
ernment and increasbegun enlisting new
ing the likelihood of
recruits and organizcivil war.
ing district command
This month, Khan
structures.
rallied thousands of
“We are responhis supporters in the
sible for maintaindesert outside Herat,
ing security in our
Ismail Khan
the cultured western
country and not letprovincial capital and the cen- ting Afghanistan be destroyed
ter of his power base, urging again,” Khan, the minister of
TEL HAZEKA, Golan
Heights — Israeli tanks
struck a Syrian artillery
launcher Monday after a
stray mortar shell flew into
Israel-held territory, the first
direct clash between the
neighbors since the Syrian
uprising began nearly two
years ago.
The confrontation fueled
new fears that the Syrian
civil war could drag Israel
into the violence, a scenario
with grave consequences for
the region. The fighting has
already spilled into Lebanon,
Jordan and Turkey.
“We are closely monitoring what is happening and
will respond appropriately.
We will not allow our borders to be violated or our citizens to be fired upon,” Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
said Monday in a speech to
foreign ambassadors.
While officials believe
President Bashar Assad has no
interest in picking a fight with
Israel, they fear the embattled
Spinal
Decompression
ever, were not greeting it as an
altruistic gesture, and Karzai’s
spokesman, Aimal Faizi, tersely
criticized Khan.
“The remarks by Ismail
Khan do not reflect the policies
of the Afghan government,”
Faizi said. “The government
of Afghanistan and the Afghan
people do not want any irresponsible armed grouping
outside the legitimate security
forces structures.”
Pakistan says Afghan
forces killing civilians
Israel reports tanks
hit Syrian target
The Associated Press
energy and water, said at a
news conference over the
weekend at his offices in
Kabul. But after facing weeks
of criticism, he took care not to
frame his action as defying the
government: “There are parts
of the country where the government forces cannot operate, and in such areas the locals
should step forward, take arms
and defend the country.”
Karzai and his aides, how-
The Associated Press
The Associated Press
Israeli tanks get into a firing position Monday in the
Israeli-controlled Golan Heights overlooking the Syrian
village of Bariqa.
Syrian leader may try to draw
Israel into the fighting in a
bout of desperation.
Potential Israeli involvement in Syria could be far
more explosive. The bitter
enemies both possess air
forces, tanks and significant
arsenals of missiles and other
weapons.
THE FURNITURE SHOPPE
ISLAMABAD — Pakistan on Monday accused
Afghan forces of killing
at least four civilians in a
cross-border shelling attack,
increasing tension just as a
senior Afghan official visited
Islamabad to discuss peace
talks with the Taliban.
Pakistan is seen as critical to reaching a peace deal
with the Taliban because
of its historical ties to the
group. The process has been
complicated by significant
levels of distrust among the
major players — Afghani-
stan, Pakistan, the United
States and the Taliban.
Pakistani Foreign Secretary Jalil Abbas Jilani
condemned Sunday evening’s cross-border attack
in a conversation with the
Afghan ambassador to Pakistan, Mohammad Umar
Daudzai.
35138662
New York Times News Service
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A6 • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • • •
..
timesfreepress.com ..
Politics
Congress faces agenda of unfinished business
gets and aiding farmers still
reeling from the summer’s
drought.
The first days back will
be a mix of old and new —
choosing down-ballot leaders
in the Senate while the 12 new
members, three Republicans,
eight Democrats and one
independent, are introduced
to their colleagues. The
House will welcome some 70
new members who will get
a crash course on how Congress operates with a class on
ethics Wednesday.
While the nation’s voters endorsed the status quo
of divided government — a
Democratic president and
Senate, a Republican House
— Obama cruised to re-election and his emboldened
programs totaling $110 billion
next year.
Obama meets with congressional leaders at the
White House on Friday.
Democrats and Republicans
recognize the urgency, but the
demands remain unchanged.
Crucial in the House this
week is passage of legislation that would end Cold War
trade restrictions so that U.S.
exporters can take advantage
of the lowered tariffs and
greater market access that
accompany Russia’s entry
into the World Trade Organization.
The measure has been a
top priority of U.S. business
groups seeking to expand
business in the growing Russian economy.
The Senate holds a procedural vote today on a sportsmen’s bill that Republicans
weren’t keen on voting on
before the election and handing a headline-grabbing win
to Sen. Jon Tester of Montana,
then considered one of the
most vulnerable Democrats.
Tester won anyway.
His bill combines 19 measures favorable to outdoorsmen.
A five-year farm bill passed
by the Senate and by House
committee last summer will
either have to be extended
into next year or passed in
the remaining weeks of the
session. The 2008 farm bill
expired Sept. 30.
The bill’s only real chance
for passage is if lawmakers
decide to use its savings as
part of negotiations on the
“fiscal cliff.” The Senate bill
would save $23 billion over
10 years and the House Agriculture Committee bill would
save $35 billion over 10 years.
Legislation setting defense
policy remains undone, and
the House and Senate Armed
Services committees were
working informally in recent
weeks on a bipartisan bill that
both chambers could pass.
The House approved legislation months ago, but the
Senate hasn’t acted. The
freestanding Senate bill has
attracted more than 70 amendments, and Majority Leader
Harry Reid, D-Nev., is pressing for a time agreement that
would limit amendments.
Deficit talks to test GOP focus on tax rates
The Associated Press
New York Times News Service
The Associated Press
Secretary of Defense Leon
Panetta speaks to the
media during a briefing
Monday.
that a faster withdrawal pace
will signal defeat.
Panetta made his remarks
to reporters on his plane on
the way to Australia, the first
stop on a weeklong trip aimed
at strengthening U.S. military
relationships in the Pacific and
Asia. Panetta, along with Secretary of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton, is to attend a U.S.-Australian security and diplomatic
meeting in Perth today and
Wednesday.
Panetta is then to travel
to Thailand and a summit of
Southeast Asian nations in
Cambodia before stops in both
countries by President Barack
Obama and Clinton.
One of Panetta’s main messages to nations in the region
is that the administration’s
“pivot” to Asia is real and bolstered by a commitment to
military spending in the region.
But defense officials say that
what they prefer to call the
“rebalancing” to Asia would
be undermined by deep cuts
to the Pentagon budget should
Congress not reach a fiscal deal
by the end of the year.
WA S H I N G T O N —
Republican leaders say the
government can raise tax
“revenues” without raising
tax “rates.” But they have yet
to detail how they would pursue it.
The distinction might mean
little to Americans who end
up with larger tax bills even
if their tax rates don’t change.
This politically tricky trade-off
is about to take center stage
in negotiations over how to
reduce the federal deficit and
avoid going over the “fiscal
cliff” in just seven weeks.
The White House says
wealthy Americans must pay
a higher tax rate to help produce more revenue to lower
the deficit. Congressional
Republicans refuse, and many
want tax rates to fall instead.
But they say they are open to
other means of higher tax collections, which might include
limits to itemized deductions.
About one-third of U.S.
households itemize deductions rather than take the
standard deduction. Some of
these itemized deductions,
such as the one for mortgage
interest payments, are popular
and deeply ingrained in the
American culture.
Many Republican lawmakers are tip-toeing around the
issue. But Sen. Saxby Chambliss, R-Ga., warns of possibly
huge changes affecting millions of people.
Chambliss told the Atlanta
Journal Constitution that federal revenues can be increased
significantly without raising
tax rates, by limiting deductions. But he noted the popularity of the most important
deductions, which are granted
for mortgage interest, charity
gifts and health care costs.
as the Social Security payroll might be acceptable. But they
“It can be done, but it’s levy.
have offered few details.
going to require the elimiChris Van Hollen, the
The tax code includes “all
nation of almost all— if not House Democrats’ top Bud- kinds of deductions, some
all — tax deductions and get Committee member, said of which make sense, others
tax credits,” Chambliss said. Republicans’ “obsession with don’t,” House Speaker John
“That’s going to be
small changes in tax Boehner, R-Ohio, said last
difficult.”
rates goes back to this week. “By lowering rates and
Co n g re ss h a s
pixie-dust theory that cleaning up the tax code, we
raised and lowered
if you cut tax rates know that we’re going to get
income tax rates
for wealthy people, more economic growth.”
many times over the
it pays for itself ”
Van Hollen said Democrats
past few decades.
through job creation. will demand specifics.
Currently, a mar“That theory went
U.S. taxpayers enjoy about
ried couple pays 15
bust,” he said.
$1.2 trillion in tax breaks
percent on taxable
Republican presi- each year, including credits,
income between Saxby
dential nominee Mitt deductions and exemptions
$17,400 and $70,700. Chambliss
Romney briefly sug- that lower their federal tax
Four higher tax rates
gested limiting item- bills. More than a quarter of
apply to incomes beyond that. ized deductions to $17,000 a those tax breaks go to houseThe rate a couple pays is year. The plan would have holds making above $1 million.
only one factor in their overall raised $1.7 trillion over the next About a third of them go to
tax bill. Deductions or credits decade, according to the non- households making more than
for child care, charitable giv- partisan Tax Policy Center. $500,000, according to the Tax
ing, medical costs and other But it would have increased Policy Center.
expenses can make big differ- taxes on millions of people,
In general, economists say
ences.
including about 27 percent of it is better to raise additional
President Barack Obama households making $50,000 to revenue by doing away with
campaigned this year on a $75,000 a year.
tax breaks rather than raising
pledge to end the Bush-era
Now, GOP congressional tax rates, said Roberton Wiltax breaks for families mak- leaders are suggesting that liams, a senior fellow at the
ing more than $250,000 a year. limits to itemized deductions Tax Policy Center.
The White House said Friday
he will veto any deficit-reduction package that fails to do
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Congress and the White
House seem unlikely to agree
on a new deficit-shrinking
plan of tax hikes and spending
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huge package of spending cuts
and tax increases, which both
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The debate highlights
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34872573
Afghan
deployment
under review
HICKAM AIR FORCE
BASE, Hawaii — White House
and Pentagon officials hope to
determine within weeks the
number of U.S. troops that
will remain for the long term
in Afghanistan after the bulk
of U.S. forces come home in
2014, Defense Secretary Leon
E. Panetta said Monday.
That number will in turn
determine the pace of the
drawdown over the next
two years for the 68,000 U.S.
forces currently in Afghanistan. Administration officials
have never publicly discussed
what number might remain,
although in Iraq, U.S. commanders originally wanted as
many as 20,000 troops to stay
behind, but a deal with the
Iraqi government collapsed
and all U.S. forces came home
late last year.
Panetta said that Gen. John
Allen, the top U.S. and NATO
commander in Afghanistan,
was overseeing the process.
The number, Panetta said,
will be based on how many
forces are needed for counterterrorism — that is, in commando raids like the one that
killed Osama bin Laden — as
well as for training and providing air transport and other
support to the Afghan security
forces.
In the past year, as a record
number of U.S. forces have
been killed in attacks by their
Afghan partners, there has
been a growing sense among
some in the administration that
U.S. troops should come home
sooner rather than later. At the
same time there is a concern
party gained seats in both the
House and Senate. In the new
political order, Democrats
will hold a 55-45 edge in the
Senate if independent Angus
King of Maine caucuses with
them as expected. Republicans’ advantage in the House
narrows and likely will stand
at 233-201.
The question over the
next seven weeks is whether
Obama and Congress can
agree now or later on how
to slash $1.2 trillion from the
deficit, raise revenues with
possible changes in the tax
code and address the entitlement programs of Social
Security and Medicare. And
they also have to figure out
how to stop across-the-board
cuts to defense and domestic
RICK DAVIS
GOLD & DIAMONDS
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The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Congress returns today to a
crowded agenda of unfinished
business overshadowed by
the urgent need for President
Barack Obama and lawmakers
to avert the economic double
hit of tax increases and automatic spending cuts.
One week after the elections — and seven weeks
after they last gathered in
Washington, Republicans and
Democrats face a daunting
task in a lame-duck session
that Capitol Hill fears could
last until the final hours of
Dec. 31. But even before serious budget negotiations can
begin, lawmakers will tackle
leftover legislation on trade
with Russia, military bud-
499-9162
RickDavisGoldandDiamonds.com
providing the video link and
holding the sessions at night.
The military said it intends
to fly the witnesses from
Afghanistan to Joint Base
Lewis-McChord if there is a
court martial.
“I think
it shows
they’re
going to
prosecute
this case no
matter what
it takes ,”
Robert
said Greg
Bales
Rinckey, a
former Army prosecutor from
1999-2004 who is now in private practice. “This was an
atrocity. This is not the fog of
war. It’s not like we were calling in artillery and an artillery
shell landed in a village.”
Prosecutors say Bales, 39,
slipped away from remote
Camp Belambay to attack two
villages early on March 11, killing 16 civilians, including nine
children. The slayings drew
such angry protests that the
U.S. temporarily halted combat operations in Afghanistan,
and it was three weeks before
American investigators could
reach the crime scenes.
Through a video moni-
tor in a military courtroom
near Seattle, Bales saw young
Afghan girls smile beneath
bright head coverings before
they described the bloodbath
he’s accused of committing.
He saw boys fidget as they
remembered how they hid
behind curtains when a gunman killed people in their village and one other.
And he saw dignified,
thick-bearded men who spoke
of unspeakable carnage — the
piled, burned bodies of children and parents alike.
From the other side of that
video link, in Afghanistan, one
of the men saw something
else — signs that justice will
be done.
“I saw the person who
killed my brother sitting there,
head down with guilt,” Haji
Mullah Baraan said Monday in
an interview with The Associated Press. “He didn’t look up
toward the camera.”
While there have been
cases of troops being sentenced to life in prison for
committing atrocities, the vast
majority of those convicted
for extrajudicial killings have
been let off with little to no jail
time for crimes that in civilian
courts could carry hefty sentences, legal experts say.
35065664
The Associated Press
JOINT BASE LEWISMcCHORD, Wash. — The
U.S. military has been criticized for its spotty record
on convicting troops of killing civilians, but a hearing
against Army Staff Sgt. Robert
Bales involving a massacre in
Afghanistan has shown that it
isn’t like most cases.
Government prosecutors
have built a strong eyewitness
case against the veteran soldier, with troops recounting
how they saw Bales return
to the base covered in blood.
And in unusual testimony in
a military court, Afghan civilians questioned via a video
link described the horror of
seeing 16 people killed, mostly
children, in their villages.
Law experts say the case
could test whether the military, aided by technology, is
able to embark on a new era
of accountability.
Bales faces 16 counts of
premeditated murder and
six counts of attempted murder. The preliminary hearing,
which began Nov. 5 and is
scheduled to end with closing arguments today, will
determine whether he faces
a court-martial. He could
face the death penalty if convicted.
The U.S. military system’s
record has shown it is slow
to convict service members
of alleged war crimes.
A range of factors make
prosecuting troops for civilian deaths in foreign lands
difficult, including gathering
eyewitness testimony and
collecting evidence at a crime
scene in the midst of a war.
At Bales’ preliminary hearing, the prosecution accommodated the Afghan witnesses, including children, by
35065730
Afghan massacre case tests military system
...
.
B
METRO& region
• • • Tuesday, November 13, 2012
timesfreepress.com/local
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INADEQUATE SEWERS: Dayton growth threatened, council hears, B5
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SCIENCE BUILDING: Dalton State breaks ground, B4
RICK DAVIS
Few voter ID woes reported; critics unconvinced
By Kate Harrison
Staff Writer
Only a fraction of voters complained they were restricted from
casting ballots on Election Day
because of Tennessee’s controversial and highly publicized voter
photo ID law, but opponents of the
law insist that even “low” numbers
are unacceptable.
“You can’t say it’s ‘not that many’
Haslam
support
broad,
poll says
when you’re talking about some- VOTING PROBLEMS?
one’s right to vote,” said Nashville
attorney Doug Johnston, whose The Tennessee Coalition for
firm is challenging the law in Ten- Action is collecting incidents of
people who had problems voting
nessee’s Supreme Court.
“The Constitution lays out the on Nov. 6. To submit, visit tnca.
qualifications, and they were per- org/problems-voting.
fectly qualified to vote,” Johnston
said. “I don’t understand the argu- tics on voter fraud which supposment that it’s not very many, when edly set all this law in action.”
[the state] can’t give any real statisThe Tennessee Legislature
passed the law in 2011 requiring a
photo ID to vote. Opponents argue
that the law was politically motivated to discourage groups that tend
to support Democrats — such as
the elderly, minorities and students
— from voting.
Voters without a photo ID cast
provisional ballots, which are
counted if the voter brings proper ID to the election commission
within two business days after the
election.
State Election Coordinator Mark
Goins said official numbers on provisional ballots won’t be available
until this week, but he said problems with photo IDs appeared to
be minimal.
“With everything you would
See VOTING, Page B8
Mathews’
interview
request
rebuffed
Boggs visits young patients
■ A U.S. attorney files a
response listing reasons
to deny the murder case
defendant’s motion to
videotape testimony
from a federal prosecutor.
■ An MTSU survey
reveals bipartisan
approval of governor.
The Associated Press
DAVID COOK
ON THE WEB
Readers can find
a new David Cook
column online at
timesfreepress.com/
davidcook.
By Todd South
Staff Writer
Staff Photo by Tim Barber
St. Louis Cardinals baseball player Mitchell Boggs, left, smiles as Dalton, Ga., resident Joshua Magana,
13, tries on Boggs’ championship ring Monday in the cancer ward at T.C. Thompsons Children’s Hospital.
Boggs is a Dalton native and visited the unit Monday.
Officer-involved wrecks trigger training
The Associated Press
BRUNSWICK, Ga. — State troopers
and other law officers in Georgia are
being assigned to brush up on their driving skills after a spate of crashes.
State officials have grown so concerned about the number of accidents
caused by emergency vehicles they are
instating a mandatory training program,
The Brunswick News reported.
Georgia State Patrol troopers will
start receiving annual, four-hour driving courses this month.
Statewide, there were 2,475 crashes
involving on-duty officers in 2011, resulting in three deaths and 386 people being
injured, according to the Governor’s
Office of Highway Safety.
In the Brunswick area, Glynn County Police Chief Matt Doering said his
agency already has initiated an annual
refresher program. There have been 15
crashes involving county officers so far
this year, with the police found at fault
in nine of them.
“Improper backing is one common
factor, for instance. It is an area where
training has and will help,” Doering said.
CLOSER TO HOME
On Oct. 25, former Varnell, Ga.,
police Officer James Smith was
indicted after his involvement
in a high-speed crash in March
that killed 70-year-old newspaper
carrier Leon Thurman. Smith was
charged with homicide by vehicle
in the first degree and reckless
driving. He was on duty and
speeding but not responding to
an emergency at the time of the
crash, according to authorities.
Drier, but colder, today
Hard freeze possible tonight
By Yolanda Putman
Staff Writer
Vance Templeton was determined that neither cold wind nor
rain would keep him from cleaning
the downtown Chattanooga CARTA
bus stop shelters Monday.
He worried that someone would
slip and fall if the slick leaves
remained near the benches.
He got it done, but it wasn’t easy.
And no sooner did Templeton load
his leaf blower onto his trailer than a
whirlwind swirled the leaves into the
air and back around the bus stops.
“I feel like I’m fighting a losing
battle,” he said.
Templeton was among many Chattanooga workers and residents enduring the morning rain and midafternoon winds Monday. About 0.6 inch
of rain fell, while the high temperature
hit 63 degrees, records show.
Not much rain but even colder
temperatures are expected today,
said Paul Barys, WRCB-TV Channel
3 chief meteorologist. Winds will
pick up from the north, dropping
today’s high temperature to about 55,
he said, and with the wind it’s going
to feel like 40 degrees. But at least it
will be sunny, he said.
The first hard freeze of the season could come tonight, with the
low expected to drop to 33, Barys
said. Temperatures on Wednesday
will rise into the mid-50s, he said.
It really doesn’t heat up that
much for the rest of the week, said
Jessica Winton, meteorologist with
the National Weather Service in
Morristown, Tenn.
By Thursday, temperatures are
expected to come back into the 60s,
and high temperatures will continue
around 60 into the weekend.
It may be just a bit colder than
normal, but it’s still pretty close to
average, Barys said.
Contact staff writer Yolanda
Putman at 423-757-6431 or
[email protected]
Staff Photo by Angela Lewis
Paul Davis delivers Coca-Cola products
to University of Tennessee at Chattanooga buildings Monday on Eighth Street.
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Federal prosecutors say
attorneys for Jesse Mathews
can use court records, but
they can’t get testimony
from the man who prosecuted the accused killer’s
family.
Assistant U.S. Attorney
Suzanne Bauknight on
Friday filed a response to
requests from Mathews’
attorneys, Lee Davis and
Bryan Hoss, to conduct a
video interview with federal prosecutor Steve Neff
to use in the potential sentencing phase of their client’s January death penalty
trial.
In her
written
r e s p o n s e,
Bauknight
said that
U.S. Attorney Bill
Killian’s
d e n i a l to Jesse
allow Neff Mathews
to testify in
state court falls within the
law, which allows federal
agencies to decide when
or if its members can be
called to testify in state
court proceedings.
Mathews is charged with
killing Chattanooga police
Sgt. Tim Chapin during the
botched robbery of a store
on Brainerd Road on April
2, 2011.
Bauknight asked for a
hearing on Nov. 16 to speed
up the process, followed by
a hearing before U.S. District Judge Harry “Sandy”
Mattice on Nov. 20 to
review the filings so far.
Davis has asked for a
hearing date on Nov. 26, 27
or 29, citing a previously
scheduled conflict for him
and Hoss.
Mathews’ mother, Kathleen; father, Ray Vance;
sister, Rachel; and sister’s
boyfriend, James Poteete,
were prosecuted by Neff
for crimes connected to
Mathews during his time
as a federal fugitive from
unrelated armed robberies
in Colorado.
Kathleen received 30
years in prison for her part,
the most severe of all sentenced.
During federal court
actions and in documents,
Neff called Kathleen a
See MATHEWS, Page B8
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35144284
NASHVILLE — A
recent poll shows Republican Gov. Bill Haslam has
strong bipartisan support
among Tennessee voters.
The Middle Tennessee
State University poll shows
Haslam has a 76 percent
approval rating among
independents heading into
the third year of his term,
75 percent of Republicans
like what he’s doing, and
54 percent of Democrats
approve.
More than two in three
voters, or 68 percent, say
they approve of the way
Haslam is handling his
job as governor. Fourteen
percent disapprove, and
16 percent say they don’t
know.
Jason Reineke, the
poll’s associate director,
said Haslam’s numbers are
impressive “considering
the partisan climate regarding national politics.”
Poll director Ken Blake
said the governor’s high
bipartisan support is similar to that of his predecessor, Gov. Phil Bredesen.
“Both men have tended
to govern from the political
center while steering clear
of hot-button social issues,”
Blake said.
The recent poll showed
Haslam was less popular
with African-American
voters. Forty-seven percent expressed approval of
his job performance, compared to 22 percent who
expressed disapproval, and
31 percent who said they
weren’t sure.
The poll conducted last
month surveyed 650 registered voters. It has an error
margin of plus or minus
four percentage points.
B2 • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • • •
.
timesfreepress.com ...
Breaking News: 423-757-News
OBITUARIES
HAMILTON COUNTY
Tommie Ashford
Tommie Ashford, 91, departed
this world Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012.
She was born in Courtland,
Ala., to the late Charlie and Bettie Blocker on Oct. 10, 1921.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, Willie Ashford;
brother, James Blocker; and sisters, Connie
Robertson,
Ethel Cal and
Marie Jennings.
She leaves
to cherish her
memories a
devoted sister, Geneva
Sims; and a
host of other
nieces, nephews, other relatives
and friends.
Funeral services will be held at
1 p.m. today at Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church.
Interment will be in Highland
Cemetery.
Arrangements are by John
P. Franklin Funeral Home, 1101
Dodds Ave., 622-9995.
James Beavers
James L. Beavers, 72, of Harrison, died Sunday, Nov. 11, 2012.
He was a lifelong resident of
Chattanooga and was a retired
truck driver.
Mr. Beavers was preceded in
death by his parents, Danny and
Hazel Steel Beavers; a grandson,
Harold Dennis (Dee) Lee III; a
sister, Patsy Moates; and stepson,
Johnny Carter.
Survivors include wife of 24
years, Linda F. Beavers, of Harrison; two sons, Ricky Beavers
and Jamie (Kim) Beavers, both
of Chattanooga; two stepsons,
Alvin Shook, of Harrison, and
James Carter, of Trenton, Ga.; one
daughter, Vicki (Dennis) Lee, of
Birchwood; two stepdaughters,
Trena Bridges, of Fort Payne, Ala.,
and Aline Stiles, of Chickamauga,
Ga.; one grandson, Daniel Lee, of
Birchwood; several stepgrandchildren, stepgreat-grandchildren,
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be at 2
p.m. Wednesday with the Rev.
David Dawson officiating.
Burial will be in New McDonald Cemetery.
The family will receive friends
from 2-8 p.m. today at the chapel
of Turner Funeral Home.
You may visit the online guest
book at www.turnerfamilyfuneral
home.com.
Arrangements are by the Highway 58 Chapel of Turner Funeral
Home, 3913 Webb Road, 622-3171.
Charles Davidson
Charles “Freck” Davidson, 79,
with his family who loved him
so dearly at his side, went home
to be with the Lord on Sunday,
Nov. 11, 2012.
Born in Soddy-Daisy on Feb.
11, 1933, Freck was preceded in
death by his parents, Addie and
Jack Davidson; brother, Homer
Davidson; and sisters, Florence
L ew i s a n d
Evelyn Keith.
He graduated from
Soddy-Daisy
High in 1951
and went on
to work for
DuPont for
25 years.
F r e c k
loved all people and lived his life to the fullest.
He was always good for a smile,
kind word, and often a funny
story. He coached little league
baseball and basketball throughout his son, Tobin’s, youth. Upon
retiring from DuPont in 1984, he
began a new endeavor, taking
care of needy children and feeding stray animals. He would often
sell items at the flea market in
order to buy presents for the children and food for the animals.
Charles “Freck” Davidson
dedicated his life to the Lord on
Christmas Eve 2007. He was a
member of North Hixson Church
of God. He was an avid Bible
reader and prayer warrior.
Freck is survived by his wife
of 57 years, Wanda; son, Tobin
Davidson; special daughter-inlaw, Tina Davidson; granddaughters, Christin Shockley and Hayley Thompson; great-grandson,
Wyatt Shockley; and several
nieces and nephews.
Mr. Davidson will be greatly
missed by all who knew him.
The family wishes to express
their gratitude and appreciation
to Memorial Home Health Care
and Hospice of Chattanooga, and
Drs. Gould and Bahdra for their
compassion and care.
The funeral service will be 3
p.m. Wednesday in the funeral
home chapel with the Rev. Rick
Smith and the Rev. Calvin Nunley
officiating.
Interment will follow the service at Dividing Ridge Church of
God Cemetery.
The family will receive
friends from 2 to 4 and 6 to 9
p.m. today.
Condolences and memories
may be shared at www.williamson
andsons.com.
Arrangements are by Williamson & Sons Funeral Home,
8852 Dayton Pike, Soddy-Daisy,
TN 37379.
Rhonda Early
Rhonda LeKeisha Early, 34,
received her “Angel Wings” at
Vanderbilt Hospital in Nashville
on Friday, Nov. 9, 2012.
Rhonda was a member of
Bethel Baptist Church. Graduate
of Howard School of Academics and Technology in 1996 and
attended Chattanooga State. She
was employed
by Siskin
Children’s
Institute for
15 years.
Survivors:
daughters,
Quatecia P.
McDaniel,
Shakia R. Holland; mother,
Stephanie Y.
(Paul) Brown; father, Ronnie Lee
Early; sisters, Minister Charie S.
Tucker, Shana M. Early; grandmother, Laura R. Jordan; best
friend, LaShawnda “Dee Dee”
Qualls and a host of other relatives and friends.
Funeral at noon Wednesday,
Nov. 14, 2012, at Greater St. John
Missionary Baptist Church, 4401
Ohls Ave., with Elder Delford L.
Hughley Sr. officiating and Dr.
Angela R. Evans, eulogist.
Burial following at Forest
Hills Cemetery.
Lie in state from noon to 8
p.m. today, Nov. 13, 2012, at the
funeral home. Family hour from
6 to 7 p.m.
Rhonda will also lie in state
one hour before the “Homegoing” celebration at the Church.
A Memorial fund has been set
up at Bank of America, Tennessee Avenue Branch.
Arrangements have been
entrusted to Advantage Funeral
& Cremation Services, FranklinStrickland-Pinkard-Bryan-Smith
Funeral Directors, 1724 McCallie
Ave., 423-265-4414.
Hamilton County
Mark Webb
Tommie Ashford
James Beavers
Charles Davidson
Rhonda Early
Virginia Elrod
Charles Evitt
Jane Humberd
Charlie Jefferson Jr.
Kay Lippse
Betty McBryar
Nathaniel McGowan
Harold Neville Jr.
Terry Palmer
Betty Phillips
Cynthia Purtee
Michael Reams
Bill Rogers
Trishel Sisk
Carlos Swafford
John Teems
Tennessee
Charles Evitt
Charles Edward Evitt, 84, of
East Ridge, passed away at his
home Sunday, Nov. 11, 2012.
He was a member of the Calvary Church of the Nazarene.
Charles was proud to have
served in the U.S. Army during
the Korean conflict and was one
of the last survivors of the battle
of Pork Chop Hill. He was also a
member of Operating Engineers
and Woodman of the World.
He was preceded in death
by his beloved wife of 55 years,
Ailene Evitt; father and mother,
John and Martha Evitt; sisters
and brother, Evelyn Long, Wanda
Georgia
Christopher Allen
Patricia Brown
Margie Ergle
Ann Graves
Ada Prather
Marcella Vanderweide
Pauline Vann
Alabama
James Gulledge
EDITOR’S NOTE: Obituaries printed in today’s edition
are submitted by funeral homes. The newspaper prints
the notices as provided. The first 50 words are free.
A charge of 50 cents per word is made for each word
after that. The photo charge is $25. For information on an
individual obituary, contact the appropriate funeral home.
The deadline for obituaries is 3 p.m. daily.
■ For more information about obituaries or to order a
laminated memorial bookmark, call 423-757-6348 or go
to memorialbookmarks.netfirms.com/chattanooganew.
■ To place an In Memory ad, contact the classified
advertising department at 757-6200.
Wilson, Clarence “Boots” Evitt
and Delores Dillard.
He is survived by one sister,
Diane (Darrell) Eachus, of East
Ridge; and several nieces and
nephews.
The family will receive friends
from 4-7 p.m. on Wednesday,
Nov. 14, 2012, at the Highway 58
Chapel of Turner Funeral Home
or you may visit the online guest
book at www.turnerfamilyfuneralhome.com.
Funeral service will be held
at 11 a.m. on Thursday, Nov. 15,
2012, in the funeral home chapel with the Rev. Mike Campbell
officiating.
Interment will follow in Lomineck Cemetery with nephews
serving as pallbearers.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions can be made to the
Calvary Church of the Nazarene
at 4400 Bonny Oaks Drive, Chattanooga, TN 37406.
Arrangements are by Turner
Funeral Home Inc., Highway 58
Chapel, 622-3171.
Virginia Elrod
Virginia “June” Standridge
Elrod, 84, died Sunday, Nov. 11,
2012.
She was born in Knoxville and
grew up in Athens, Tenn. She was
a graduate of the Erlanger School
of Nursing and worked for several years as an RN. She was active
in the Medical Alliance, served
as president
of the Hamilton County
Medical Alliance in 197071 and was
president of
the Tennessee Medical
Association
Alliance from
1979 to 1980.
She was also active in many garden clubs and served as a local
president from 2006 to 2008.
Virginia was an ardent Alabama football fan and on occasion cheered for UT. She was a
Doncaster consultant for over
30 years and enjoyed this opportunity to visit with old and new
friends.
She was a member of FirstCentenary Methodist Church
and the Morgan Sunday School
Class.
She is survived by her husband of 63 years, Dr. Bruce A.
Elrod; children, Gary A. (Lori)
Elrod, Francie Elrod and Harvey
Standridge Elrod; grandchildren
Perry, Fran and Michael Elrod.
Memorial services will be
held at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14,
2012, at First-Centenary United
Methodist Church.
Memorial contributions may
be made to First-Centenary
United Methodist Church, or the
Volunteers in Medicine, P.O. Box
81057, Chattanooga, TN 37414.
Visit www.heritagefh.com to
share words of comfort to the
family.
The family will receive
friends from noon to 2 p.m. at
the church.
Arrangements are by Heritage
Funeral Home, 7454 East Brainerd
Road, Chattanooga, TN 37421.
Shirley Bowman
Buena Daniel
Dean Grasham
Donald Helton
JoEtta Whitmire
Jane Humberd
Jane Whitt Edwards Humberd, 83, of Hixson, died Monday,
Nov. 12, 2012.
She announces that she has
had a change of address and now
resides in heaven with her Lord
and Savior, Jesus Christ!
She was preceded in death by
her husbands, Ralph G. Edwards
and John B. Humberd, and her
two sons, Jesse J. Edwards II and
Ralph G. Edwards II.
She was a devoted mother to
her daughter, Debbie Edwards
Rawlston; her son-in-law, Edwin
Gordon Rawlston; and a precious
grandmother to Kathryn Lynn
and Kimberly Anne Rawlston.
She also leaves behind her special friend, John L. Sanders, her
two grandsons Jesse J. Edwards
III and Jason J. Edwards.
She was laid to rest in a private family service at Greenwood
Cemetery with the Rev. Chuck
Patrick officiating.
Please share your thoughts
and memories at www.ChattanoogaValleyViewChapel.com.
Memorial contributions may
be made to Silverdale Baptist
Church Missions Fund, 7236
Bonny Oaks Drive, Chattanooga,
TN 37421.
Arrangements are by the
Chattanooga Funeral Home, Crematory & Florist, Valley View
Chapel, 7414 Old Lee Highway,
Chattanooga, TN 37421.
Charlie Jefferson Jr.
Charlie Lee Jefferson Jr., 40, of
Chattanooga, passed away Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, at a local health
care facility.
Charlie was a longtime resident of the Chattanooga area.
Charlie was preceded in death
by his aunt, Mary Cannon; and
grandmother, Martha Cannon.
Charlie
is survived
by his wife,
Kimberly
Bragg Jefferson; children,
Drea’Shun
Conner, Phillip Jefferson,
Charlie Jefferson II,
Charquel
Appling, CharMichael Jefferson,
Taylor Jefferson; and a precious
grandson; parents, Ruby Jefferson
and Charlie Jefferson Jr., Charlie
(Mattie) Jefferson Sr. and Mary
Robinson, of Huntsville, Ala.; siblings, Addie (Anthony) JacksonSmith, Charlene (Radford) Davis,
Anthony Jackson, Tameka (Carlos) Jackson, Kimberly Pines and
Felicia Milsaps; several nieces,
nephews, cousins and a host of
friends.
Funeral services will be 1:30
p.m. Thursday in the chapel with
the Rev. Wilbert McClure officiating.
Burial to follow in Forest Hills
Cemetery.
Charlie will lie in state from
1 until 7 p.m. Wednesday at the
funeral home.
Arrangements are by Advantage Funeral Cremation Services,
Franklin-Strickland-PinkardBryan-Smith Funeral Directors,
1724 McCallie Ave., 423-2654414.
Kay Lippse
Kay Fleming Lippse died
suddenly Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012,
four days following extensive
surgery.
Kay leaves a legacy of love, joy,
and a childlike faith. Her beautiful smile blessed everyone who
knew her, even to the end of her
life as she won the hearts of the
hospital staff
that tended
to her.
Kay was
born in Jenkins, Ky., the
daughter of
Oren and
Letha Fleming who preceded her in
death.
She is survived by Charles
Lippse, to whom she was married
for 52 years; and her three daughters, Angela Jill Watson and her
husband, Bo Watson, Vanessa
Gwen Guthrie and her husband,
Sam Guthrie, Hilda Sullivan and
her husband, Julian Sullivan; as
well as five grandchildren Grey
Watson, Wells Guthrie, and Ella
Marie, Sam and Charlsey Sullivan; in addition to her sister
Angela Jackson; and brother
Craig Fleming.
Kay met Charles when he was
appointed pastor of Pound United Methodist Church in Pound,
Va., and she served by his side in
churches throughout Virginia and
Tennessee until they concluded
their itinerant ministry at First
Broad Street United Methodist
Church, Kingsport, Tenn. For 20
years, Kay enjoyed teaching high
school in Tennessee’s Hamilton
and Washington counties.
Kay graduated from Pound
High School, Bluefield College
and the University of Tennessee
at Chattanooga. Kay lived life to
the fullest and was a member of
the United Mineworkers’ Union
and was named a member of the
West Virginia Amateur All-Star
Basketball Team in 1956.
A service celebrating her life
will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14, at First Broad Street,
Kingsport.
Kay was fortunate to make
multiple trips to the Holy Land
and had a special interest in providing opportunities for clergy to
do the same.
People wanting to make a
contribution to that cause can
donate in her name to Holston
Conference Foundation at P.O.
Box 900, Alcoa, TN 37701; or for
the same purpose, the Society of
Biblical Studies at 661 Mass. Ave.
Suite 40, Arlington, MA 02476.
Online condolences may be
sent to www.grissomfh.net.
Arrangements are by Grissom
Funeral Home.
Betty McBryar
B etty Jo Yokley Baker
McBryar, 80, of Hixson, died
Monday, Nov. 12, 2012.
Funeral services will be at
noon CST Wednesday, Nov. 14,
2012, with visitation from 10 a.m.
CST until service time at Rogers
Funeral Home in South Pittsburg,
Tenn.
Interment will follow at
Sequatchie Valley Memorial
Gardens.
Nathaniel McGowan
Nathaniel “Duke” McGowan,
64, passed in a local hospital on
Friday, Nov. 9, 2012.
He retired from Chattanooga
City School system as a custodian
at Orchard Knob Middle School.
He was a faithful member of The
Rose of Sharon Baptist Church.
He was preceded in death by
his parents, Clifford and Lillian
McGowan; brothers, Archie, Daniel, Elijah Benjamin McGowan; sister, Marie McGowan; stepmother,
Eva Allen McGowan; sisters-inlaw, Velma Jean Henderson and
Evelyn McGowan.
Survivors
include brothers, Stephen
(Virginia)
McGowan,
Bobby L.
McGowan;
sisters,
M a r t h a
McGowan,
Theresa
(Emmitt)
Ray, Johnnie Mae McGowan of
Nashville; godmother, Gertrude
Henderson; sisters-in-law, Diane
(Walter) Jones, Jeanetta Gilliam
and Alice McGowan; brothers-inlaw, Eugene Henderson, Richard
(Janie) Ervin; daughter, Sonya
McGowan, Atlanta; devoted
niece, Patricia Davis; a host of
nephews, nieces, other relatives
and friends.
Funeral services will be held
at noon Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012,
at The Rose of Sharon Baptist
Church.
Interment: Chattanooga
National Cemetery.
The family will receive friends
from 7 to 8 p.m. today at John
P. Franklin Funeral Home, 1101
Dodds Ave., 622-9995.
Harold Neville Jr.
Harold Neville Jr., 60, of
Soddy-Daisy, passed away Monday, Nov. 12, 2012.
Services will be announced
by Lane Funeral Home, Ashland
Terrace, 423-877-3524.
ane Funeral Home
Terry Palmer
Terry Lynn Palmer, 57, of East
Ridge, passed away Friday, Nov.
9, 2012.
She was preceded in death by
her parents, Jessie and Barbara
Brogdon; and 11 brothers and sisters.
Survivors include her sons, Jessie and wife, Kimberly Brogdon,
and Shane Palmer and girlfriend,
Wendy Johnson; two grandchildren, Hunter and Michael; and
two beloved pets, Ben and Jasper.
Condolences can be sent to
www.lane-southcrestchapel.com.
The family will receive friends
from 4 until 8 p.m. on Wednesday,
Nov. 14, in the funeral home.
Arrangements are by the South
Crest Chapel of Lane Funeral
Home, Rossville.
Kevin (Kirsten) Phillips and Casey
(Jessica) Phillips; great-grandson,
Camden Phillips and many nieces
and nephews.
The Rev. James Langston will
conduct the graveside service at
10 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012,
at Hamilton Memorial Gardens.
Send condolences at www.
CovenantFuneral.com.
Arrangements are by Covenant Funeral Home & Cremation
Service, Crox family owned and
operated.
Cynthia Purtee
Cynthia Ann Purtee, 45, of
Chattanooga, passed away Friday,
Nov. 9, 2012.
Services are private.
Visit www.lanefh.com to share
condolences.
Arrangements are by Lane
Funeral Home, Ashland Terrace,
423-877-3524.
ane Funeral Home
Michael Reams
Michael Sheridan Reams
went home to be with the Lord
on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012.
He was preceded in death by
parents, Donald Reams and Patricia; and Duane Fitzgerald.
He is survived by sisters,
D o n n a
Knight, Maggie Witt and
Noel Reams;
brother, Donnie Reams;
Michael was
married to
Linda Neal
and was loved
by his boys,
his g randdaughters; and several special
nieces and nephews.
A graveside service will be
held at 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov.
15, 2012, at Chattanooga National
Cemetery.
The family will receive friends
from 5 to 8 p.m. this Wednesday, Nov. 14. at John P. Franklin
Funeral Home, 1101 Dodds Ave.,
622-9995.
See OBITUARIES, Page B3
IN MEMORY
BETTY GREER
MILLER JAMES GREER
LOUISE MERONEY
LEON FRIDDELL
John 14:2-3
Your loving family
IN MEMORY
Betty Phillips
Betty Jean Gravitt Phillips, 76,
went home to be with the Lord on
Sunday, Nov. 12, 2012.
She was a member of Hillcrest
Baptist Church.
She was
predeceased
by her husband, Jack
L. Phillips;
sisters, Tracy
Southern,
Avie Mooneyham and Lilian Gamble;
brothers,
Grady “Tutor”
and David Gravitt.
Survivors include son and
daughter-in-law, Michael L. and
Lachone Phillips; grandsons,
GARY DEE
SEPT. 27, 1945-NOV. 13, 2007
Your comforting presence
is still missed every day.
Love,
Cora and family
IN MEMORY
A
Fresh
Take
WESLEY STONE
JAN. 19, 1952-NOV. 13, 2008
Wife, Iris Stone;
children; grandchildren;
mother, Marvella Kirkling;
brothers and sisters; aunts;
cousins; and other relatives
and friends.
We miss you
and we love you.
On
News
Gil&Curt
tremont
423.756.8603
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...
. timesfreepress.com
Obituaries
• Continued from Page B2
Bill Rogers
William Forrester “Bill” Rogers, 57, of Chattanooga, went to
be with the Lord Jesus Christ in
his sleep of natural causes early
Sunday, Nov. 11, 2012.
Bill was the youngest of five
children of Anne Forrester Rogers and S.L. Rogers Jr., of Chattanooga. He was preceded in death
by his father; sister, Carolyn Rogers Byrd, also
of Chattanooga; grandpare n t s , M r.
and Mrs. SL
Rogers Sr., of
South Pittsburg, Tenn.,
and Mr. and
M r s . W. B .
Forrester, of
Troy, Tenn.
Bill bore a remarkable physical resemblance to his greatgreat-grandfather, Arch T. White,
circuit rider for the Methodist
Church in the pioneer days of
Tennessee. He was a member of
Highland Park Baptist Church
of Chattanooga, attended the
McCallie School in Chattanooga
and briefly attended Vanderbilt University. Bill was an avid
proponent and volunteer at the
AIM center of Chattanooga. A
highly skilled writer and poet,
Bill contributed to various publications throughout his life and
was a seasonal employee of the
U.S. Stove Co.
He leaves a rich legacy of
writings and poetries to his
beloved mother, Anne F. Rogers; brothers, Steve Rogers and
Richard Rogers, all of Chattanooga; and sister, Julia W. Rogers, of Hendersonville, Tenn.
Bill will be deeply missed by a
large number of nieces, nephews,
cousins, many distant relatives in
several states and former spouse
and friend, Margaret Faye Rogers; and daughter, Tonya Marie
Sherlin, of Soddy-Daisy.
The family will gather with
friends at Rogers Funeral Home
in South Pittsburg, Tenn., at 3
p.m. CST on Thursday, Nov. 15,
and will have a memorial service
following the visitation at 4 p.m.
CST.
Condolences may be sent to
the family by visiting www.rogers
funeralhome.com.
Trishel Sisk
Trishel E. Sisk, a Chattanooga
resident since 1927, went to be at
rest with Jesus on Sunday Nov.
11, 2012.
She was a noted gospel songwriter having written “Crown
of Thorns,” “Calvary” and “The
Blood Still Flows.” She was a
lifetime member of the songwriters of America. She was of
the Christian faith. Ms. Sisk had
worked at numerous hosiery
mills before retiring from CobbleMuse Hosiery Mill after 17 years
of service.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, William F. Sisk.
She is survived by one son,
Doyle (Juanita) Sisk, of Chickamauga, Ga.; one daughter Joyce
Anderson, of Fort Oglethorpe;
one sister, Adell Carroll, of
Chickamauga; a sister-in-law,
Dot Hamilton, of Ringgold, Ga.;
four grandchildren; several greatgrandchildren; and numerous
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be at
12:30 p.m. today at the funeral
home chapel with Brother Bob
McCoy officiating.
Burial will be in Chattanooga
National Cemetery.
The family will receive friends
from 10 a.m. today until the time
of service.
You can visit the guest book
register at www.turnerfamily
funeralhome.com.
Arrangements are by the
Highway 58 Chapel of Turner
Funeral Home, 3913 Webb Road,
622-3171.
Carlos Swafford
Carlos C. Swafford, 87, of Hixson, passed away Sunday, Nov.
11, 2012, at a local health care
facility.
He was a retired minister and
pastored various churches in the
area for over 60 years. He was
also a retired machinist from
Johnson Control, and he was a
U.S. Army veteran of World War
II.
He was preceded in death by
his wife, Emma Jean Swafford;
and sisters, Johnnie Martin and
Lecile Thurman.
He is survived by his daughter, Marie (Andrew) Simons,
of Rome, Ga.; brother, Wendell
(Mary Lou) Swafford, of Chattanooga; sisters, Edna Thurman,
Glines Thurman, Billie Roberts,
Mildred Griffith, Wilma Griffith,
all of Chattanooga; two grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren.
Funeral service will be 1 p.m.
Wednesday in the funeral home
chapel with Pastor Doug Simons,
Brother Leonard Cameron and
Brother Mike Holland officiating.
Interment will follow the
service at Hamilton Memorial
Gardens.
Family will receive friends
from 6 to 9 p.m. today.
Condolences and memories
may be shared at www.williamson
andsons.com.
Arrangements are by Williamson & Sons Funeral Home,
8852 Dayton Pike, Soddy-Daisy,
TN 37379.
Breaking News: [email protected]
John Teems
Dean Grasham
John Wilkey Teems, 93, of East
Ridge, went home to be with the
Lord on Sunday, Nov. 11, 2012.
A longtime resident of Hamilton County, Mr. Teems was
retired from Chattanooga Yacht
Club after 25 years and formerly
employed with Chris Craft for 22
years.
H e wa s
a member
of Harmony Baptist
Church.
H e wa s
preceded in
death by his
granddaught e r, A m y
Teems.
Survivors are his wife of 69
years, Irene Teems; daughter,
Pamela Clark, Rossville; son,
Woody (Nora) Teems, East Ridge;
sister, Betty Brown, Valley Head,
Ala.; four grandchildren, Bryan
Teems, Danita Weaver, Kathy
Mercer and Carrie Williams; eight
great-grandchildren; and several
nieces and nephews.
Graveside services will be at
11 a.m. Wednesday at Lakewood
Memory Gardens, South, with the
Rev. Michael Turner officiating.
Memorial contributions may
be made to the Wounded Warriors Project, P.O. Box 758517,
Topeka, KS 66675.
Visit www.heritagefh.com to
share words of comfort to the
family.
The family will receive friends
from 4 to 7 p.m. today at Heritage
Funeral Home, 7454 East Brainerd
Road.
GRANDVIEW — Dean
Grasham, 77, died Sunday, Nov. 11,
2012.
Funeral services will be at 1
p.m. Wednesday in the chapel of
Vaughn Funeral Home.
Interment will be in Spring
City Memorial Gardens.
Visitation is from 6 to 8 p.m.
today at the funeral home.
Arrangements are by Vaughn
Funeral Home, www.vaughnfuneral-home.com.
Mark Webb
Mark Webb, 46, passed away
on Sunday, Nov. 11, 2012, in Chattanooga.
Arrangements are by John
P. Franklin Funeral Home, 1101
Dodds Ave., 622-9995.
Donald Helton
JASPER — Donald Lee Helton,
75, passed away, Sunday, Nov. 11,
2012, in a Chattanooga Hospital.
Mr. Helton was a retired
employee of CSX Railroad and a
veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps.
He was a member of Hopewell
Baptist Church where he served
as a deacon and member of the
choir.
His wife, Doris Ragan Helton,
preceded him in death, along with
his parents, John L. and Gladys
Lawhorn Helton.
He is survived by his son and
daughter-in-law, James Kevin
Stallings and Pam, of Spring Hill,
Tenn.; daughter, Stacey Helton, of
Ooltewah; brother, Kenneth (Brenda) Helton, of Nashville; sister,
Gloria (Joe) Carter, of Bridgeport,
Ala.; grandson, Chris (Amber)
Hardwick; and great-grandchildren, Alonna, and Addelynn.
Funeral services will be conducted from the funeral home chapel at 12:30 p.m. CST on Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012, with Brother
Steve Townson officiating.
Interment will follow in
Sequatchie Valley Memorial Gardens.
The family will receive friends
from 1 until 8 p.m. CST today, Nov.
13, 2012.
To send online condolences
visit www.tatefh.com.
Arrangements are by Tate
Funeral Home, Jasper, 423-9429500.
JoEtta Whitmire
TENNESSEE
Shirley Bowman
EVENSVILLE — Shirley
Edith Bowman, 64, passed away
Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012, at Rhea
Medical Center.
Funeral is at 11 a.m. today in
the chapel of Coulter-Garrison
Funeral Home with the Rev. Pat
Green officiating.
Interment will be in Welsh
Rogers Cemetery.
Visitation: 9-11 a.m. today
at Coulter-Garrison Funeral
Home.
Buena Daniel
CHARLOTTE — Buena Coleman Daniel, 94, retired school
teacher, died Saturday, Nov. 10,
2012, peacefully at her home.
She was the widow of the late
James E. Daniel. A native of Dickson County, Tenn., she was the
daughter of the late Lee and Vera
Wall Coleman. She taught school
for 37 years, teaching her first year
in a one-room schoolhouse grades
one through eighth, later teaching elementary and high school
students. She taught at Charlotte
High School and later taught at the
Dickson County High School. She
was history department chairman
and taught accelerated American
history until she retired in 1981.
Also, she formerly served on a
board for the accreditation of high
schools. Her students were one of
her joys of life.
She was well known for “put a
star by this” while she was lecturing, helping her students to know
they would see that again on their
test. She graduated from Charlotte
High School in 1936, from there she
attended Austin Peay State University receiving her B.S. in education
and later completing her masters
degree in education. She married
Dickson native James Daniel on
Nov. 19, 1938, and was married for
67 years until his death in 2006.
Mrs. Daniel had a great love for
history, teaching and travel. She
and James visited each state of the
Union as well as various places
in Europe and the Caribbean. She
was a member of the Delta Kappa
Gamma, honorary teacher’s society, the NEA and TEA. She was a
longtime member of the Charlotte
Fagan United Methodist Church
and member of the Order of the
Eastern Star. Thank you Ella Reynolds for your loving care through
many years with Buena and James.
Her life would not have been the
same without you and our many
other caregivers.
Survivors include her son,
James R. “Jimmy” Daniel and his
wife, Beverly, of Hixson; her two
grandchildren, Ron L. Daniel and
his wife, Debbie, of Hixson, and
Angie Brannan and her husband,
Dr. Mark Brannan, of Dickson,
Tenn.; her three stepgrandchildren,
Tonja, Scott and Doug McCarver,
of Chattanooga; her great-grandchildren; Kaleb and Christina Brannan, Holly Daniel, Josh Callahan,
Rebecca Wilkins, Mandi Roberts;
her stepgreat-grandchildren, Ashley Keef, Scott McCarver Jr. and
Madison McCarver; several greatgreat-grandchildren; and several
stepgreat-great-grandchildren.
Funeral services will be conducted at 11 a.m. CST Wednesday,
Nov. 14, 2012, from the chapel of
Taylor Funeral Home.
Place of rest will be in Dickson
County Memorial Gardens.
Those desiring memorials
may be made to the Charlotte
Fagan United Methodist Church,
Alzheimer’s Foundation or to Caris
Hospice.
Visitation with the family
will be from 4 until 8 p.m. CST
today, Nov. 13, and beginning at 10
a.m. CST until time of service on
Wednesday.
Services under the direction
of Taylor Funeral Home, Dickson,
Tenn.
DUNLAP — JoEtta Wilson
Whitmire, 69, formerly of Signal
Mountain, went to be with the
Lord on Sunday, Nov. 11, 2012, in
a Chattanooga hospital.
Mrs. Whitmire was a member of Delashmitt Road Baptist
Church.
She was preceded in death by
her parents,
William Hugh
and Alice
Lodema Narramore Wilson; sisters,
Ruby, Juanita,
and Lavina
Neal; brothers, J.W. and J.
C. Wilson.
Survivors include her husband, James
Edward Whitmire, Dunlap; sons,
Darrell (Bonnie) Whitmire, of
Hixson, and Jody Allen (Jennifer) Whitmire, of Soddy-Daisy;
daughter, Rhonda Sue (Jeff) Barnett, of Falling Water; grandchildren, Connie, Joey, Jake, and Jillian
Whitmire, and Jessica and Jeff T.
Barnett.
Funeral services will be held
at 1 p.m. CST Thursday, Nov. 15,
2012, in the Ewton Funeral Home
chapel with Brother Ronnie Smith
officiating.
Burial will follow in Sequatchie
County Memorial Gardens.
Visitation: 3-8 p.m. CST today
and Wednesday.
Arrangements are by Ewton
Funeral Home, 6936 Highway 28,
Dunlap, TN 37327, www.ewton
funeralhome.com, 423-949-2112.
GEORGIA
Christopher Allen
LYERLY — Christopher Lee
Cody Allen, 22, died Saturday,
Nov. 10, 2012.
Survivors include mother,
Doris Allen; sisters, Jennifer
(Gary) Nichols, Sarah Allen; girlfriend, Andrea Starrett; and nieces, Marissa and Myracle Nichols.
Funeral is at 3:30 p.m today,
Nov. 13, 2012, at Mason Funeral
Home, Summerville, Ga.
Patricia Brown
RINGGOLD — Patricia Ann
Brown, 80, died Sunday, Nov. 11,
2012, at her residence.
Graveside services will be
held 2 p.m. today in Ooltewah
Cemetery with Rev. Keith Jones
officiating.
Visit www.heritagefh.com to
share words of comfort with the
family.
Arrangements are by Heritage Funeral Home & Crematory,
Battlefield Parkway.
Margie Ergle
MARIETTA — Margie Ergle,
91, died Sunday, Nov. 11, 2012.
Survivors: son, Bobby (Ann)
Ergle; brother, Joseph Young; two
granddaughters; five great-grandchildren; and one great-greatgrandchild.
Graveside service will be at 3
p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012, at
Forest Lawn Cemetery in College
Park, Ga.
Mason Funeral Home is
directing.
Ann Graves
RINGGOLD — Ann B. Graves,
92, died Sunday, Nov. 11, 2012.
She was a native of Texas and
had lived in the Chattanooga and
North Georgia area for more than
60 years. Mrs. Graves was retired
from the Church of God headquarters in Cleveland, Tenn., after
15 years of service.
She was preceded in death
by her three husbands, Clifford
Bridges, Huey Carmical and Lowell Graves; two children, Claude
Bridges and Donna Taylor.
Survivors are her loving
daughters, Shirley (Jim) Forester,
of Ringgold, and Debi Stone, of
Chattanooga; brothers, Roy and
Wayne Jones, of Dallas, Texas;
sister, Dorothy Horton, Dallas, Texas; grandchildren, Holly
(Eddy) Trotter, Beth Henry,
Ryan Jordan, Lindsey Nadler and
Chelsea Brasell; and seven greatgrandchildren.
Funeral services will be at 11
a.m. Friday in the funeral home
chapel with the Rev. Wendell
Smith and the Rev. Jason Thomas
officiating.
Interment will be in Lakewood
Memory Gardens, East.
Visit www.heritagefh.com to
share words of comfort with the
family and view the memorial
tribute.
The family will receive friends
from 4 to 8 p.m. Thursday at Heritage Funeral Home & Crematory,
Battlefield Parkway.
Ada Prather
CHICKAMAUGA — Ada
Marie Melton Prather, 82, passed
away Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012.
She was born in Rossville to
the late Lee Harvey “Jack” Melton
and Jewell Lee Perry Melton. She
was a lifelong resident of Walker
County and of the Baptist faith.
She was a homemaker and
enjoyed going
shopping.
A l o n g
with her parents, she was
preceded
in death by
her husband,
O s c a r Jo e
Prather; sisters, Betty
Adams, Anita
Creekmore, Catherine Farmer;
and a brother, Charles Melton.
She is survived by her children and their spouses, Donna
and David Jones, Brenda and
Eddie Weathers, all of Chickamauga, Danny and Christy Prather,
of Ringgold, Ga.; grandchildren,
Jeremy Weathers, Gabrielle
Jones, Jesse Jones; great-grandchild, Maci Tinker, all of Chickamauga; her adopted sisters, Faye
Gibson and Hedi Sartain, both of
Chickamauga; and her beloved
dog “Cricket.”
The family will receive friends
today until the service.
Funeral services will be held at
2 p.m. today, Nov. 13, 2012, in the
chapel with the Rev. J.D. Gibson
officiating.
Burial will follow in Tennessee-Georgia Memorial Park,
Rossville.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made
towards her funeral expenses.
Online register book is at www.
wilsonfuneralhome.com.
Arrangements are by Wilson
Funeral Homes, Chickamauga
Chapel, Chickamauga.
Marcella Vanderweide
ROSSVILLE — Marcella
“Marcie” Lorraine Vanderweide,
80, passed away Sunday, Nov. 11,
2012.
Marcie lived most of her life
in California before moving to
the Chattanooga area in 1995. She
was of the Baptist faith and was a
loving mother, grandmother and
sister who will be missed.
Marcie was preceded in death
by her husband, Henry E. “Hank”
Vanderweide Sr.; grandson, Jimmy
Steeley; and five siblings.
She is survived by her children, Karen Vanderweide, Debbie
Goulet, both of Rossville, Henry E.
Vanderweide Jr., of Ripon, Calif.,
and William (Laura) Vanderweide,
of Rossville; sister, Phyllis Gordon,
of Michigan; 10 grandchildren; 20
great-grandchildren; and several
nieces and nephews.
A private family memorial service will be held at a later date.
Arrangements are by W.L.
Wilson and Son Funeral Home,
Fort Oglethorpe.
Pauline Vann
FORT OGLETHORPE —
Georgia Pauline Vann, 94, died
Monday, Nov. 12, 2012.
She was born on March 2,
1918, and was one of 11 children
born to Richard Harrison Bramblett and Sally Cochran Bramblett
who migrated to East Hamilton
County from Spring Place, Ga., by
horse and buggy approximately
130 years ago. Pauline graduated
from Ooltewah High School and
Erlanger School of Nursing. She
worked as an industrial nurse
for many years and retired from
Erlanger. Pauline was a member
of Cloud Springs Baptist Church
for many years.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, William Derwood
Vann.
Pauline’s siblings were as follows, Tom Bramblett, McDonald,
Tenn., Lee and Dewey Bramblett,
Apison, Mae Bramblett, Apison,
Fannie Goodner, Ooltewah, Chloe
Bramblett, Apison, Helen Goodner, Ooltewah, Edna Chadsey, El
Paso, Texas, and Betty Stryholuk,
Wilmington, Del., whose status is
unknown.
According to Pauline’s last will
and testament, she requested no
visitation and no services of any
kind.
Pauline will be interred next
to Derwood at Tennessee-Georgia
Memorial Park.
Visit www.heritagefh.com to
share words of comfort with the
family.
Arrangements are by Heritage
Funeral Home, Battlefield Parkway.
ALABAMA
• • • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • B3
Democrats still
hold most Alabama
courthouse offices
By Phillip Rawls
The Associated Press
MONTGOMERY, Ala.
— After losing their last
statewide elected office in
the Nov. 6 election, Alabama
Democrats still can console
themselves with one statistic: At least they still hold a
majority of the elected offices in county courthouses
statewide.
But even at the local level,
the Republican Party made
gains.
Counting all county races,
from probate judge to school
board and county commission, state Republican Party
Chairman Bill Armistead said
the GOP had a net gain of 45
offices in the election.
Party switches leading
up to the Nov. 6 election
and victories in that election increased the number
of Republican probate judges
from 20 to 32 and the number
of Republican circuit clerks
from 17 to 29, he said.
State Democratic Party
Chairman Mark Kennedy,
meanwhile, asserts he is
delighted his party still holds
a majority of those offices in
the 67 counties. And he says
even with their gains, the
Republicans fell short.
“Bill Armistead has been
saying for months that Alabama Republicans were
focused on a strategy ‘from
the courthouse to the White
House.’ They failed. Democrats came out on top in
many of the local races that
the Republicans targeted,”
Kennedy said.
TRENDING
REPUBLICAN
Maybe so, but Alabama
has been trending Republican for a generation.
It took 26 years from the
election of the first Republican in statewide office in 1986,
Gov. Guy Hunt, until the last
Democrat in statewide office,
Public Service Commission
President Lucy Baxley, was
defeated on Nov. 6.
The GOP now holds every
office elected statewide,
including governor, both U.S.
Senate seats, and all 19 appellate court seats.
At the district level, the
Republican Party holds six
of the seven U.S. House seats
and six of the eight seats on
the State Board of Education.
The only congressional and
school board seats now held
by Democrats are in predominantly African-American
districts. In the Legislature,
Republicans hold more than
three-fifths of the seats.
There were contested
races for 213 county offices,
with 149 having been held by
Democrats and 64 by Republicans. Republicans won 67 of
the seats that had been held
by Democrats, and Democrats won 22 of the seats held
by Republicans, according to
the state Republican Party.
Democrats were successful in urban counties with
significant African-American
populations. In Montgomery
County, the son of Joe Reed,
the chairman of the Democratic Party’s black wing,
defeated a longtime Republican probate judge. Democrats swept all county races
in Jefferson County and reelected a Democratic probate
judge in Tuscaloosa County
against tough GOP opposition.
RURAL INROADS
The GOP made inroads
into some rural counties as
well as counties in Northwest Alabama that always
had been Democratic strongholds.
“Republicans were elected
for the first time in modern
time in Colbert, Franklin and
Marengo counties, and the
first Republican countywide
officials were elected in Jackson, Tallapoosa and Washington counties,” Armistead
said.
William Stewart, retired
chairman of the political
science department at the
University of Alabama, said
the strong Republican showing in the presidential and
statewide races indicates
the majority of Alabamians
are conservative and don’t
like the national Democratic
Party. But he said many Alabama voters are willing to
split their ballots to vote for
Democrats in county races
where they know the candidates.
Stewart said county courthouses will likely remain the
base of the Democratic Party
for the next few years.
“I don’t see how they can
win statewide races any time
real soon,” he said.
Armistead is already
making plans for 2014, when
county sheriffs will be a focus
of the GOP.
Kennedy is plotting a
comeback in a big election
year when the governor,
Legislature and other state
offices will be on the ballot.
“We will study the Alabama electoral map, be strategic in what we do and invite
all Alabamians to join us as
we continue to rebuild the
Alabama Democratic Party,”
he said.
Worker dies in fall from parked train
The Associated Press
MACON, Ga. — Authorities say an autopsy is being
planned for a railroad worker who died in a fall from a
parked train in Macon.
The Telegraph reported
that 56-year-old Steve War-
ren, of McDonough, died
early Monday morning.
Authorities say the Norfolk Southern employee fell
off the side of the engine
that was parked near Raines
Avenue and Waterville Road
about 2 a.m.
design a Lasting
Commemorative
Memorial
Bookmarks
Laminated
In Loving Memory
or Obituaries
Choice of border,
symbols and poems.
Add a picture too!
For information call
423-757-6348
James Gulledge
FORT PAYNE — James O.
Gulledge, 80, passed away Monday, Nov. 12, 2012, at Crowne
Health Care of Fort Payne.
Mr. Gulledge served in the U.S.
Army.
The family will receive friends
and family after 4 p.m. CST today,
Nov. 13, at W.T. Wilson Funeral
Chapel.
Or visit
commemorativebookmarks.com/order_first.php?event=memorial&partner=20
B4 • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • • •
..
timesfreepress.com ..
Breaking News: 423-757-News
REGION
REGION
DIGEST
Autopsy
results
on baby
awaited
OAK RIDGE, TENN.
Computer again
is world’s fastest
The Oak Ridge National
Laboratory says it again has
the world’s fastest computer.
The lab’s $200 million
Cray XK7, dubbed Titan, is
No. 1 on the new Top 500
list released Monday at
the Supercomputing Conference in Salt Lake City,
according to The Knoxville
News Sentinel.
Titan achieved a sustained computing capability
of 17.5 petaflops — or 17.5
million billion mathematical calculations per second
— to qualify for the list.
The machine reportedly has
a peak capability of more
than 27 petaflops.
Jeff Nichols, ORNL’s
scientific computing chief,
stated in an email that the lab
did not have time to optimize
the computer fully before
the tests, so there is room for
better performance.
This marks at least the
fourth time that the Oak
Ridge lab has the world’s
fastest computer.
Sequoia — an IBM Blue
Gene/Q system at Lawrence
Livermore National Laboratory in California, is now
the world’s second-fastest
computer.
MURRAY COUNTY,
GA.
Holiday House
set for Dec. 8, 9
The Whitfield-Murray
Historical Society’s annual
Holiday House will be held
at Carter’s Quarter/Rock
Spring Farm in southeastern Murray County on Dec.
8 and 9, a news release
states.
The event will be from
2 to 5 p.m. each day at the
farm on Old U.S. 411.
The former Carter plantation, one of the few to
make the transition from
slave labor to free labor
after the Civil War, produced agricultural commodities well into the 20th
century under Sam Carter, a
Murray County civic leader,
according to the release.
Today, Carters Quarter/
Rock Spring Farm is owned
by Carter descendants and
listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
The event will include
guided tours of the greenery-filled house, refreshments and visits to original
plantation outbuildings
such as the kitchen, cook’s
house, kettle house, spring
house, trunk house and the
family cemetery. Admission
is $10 per person ages 12
and up, and those under 12
are $5.
Proceeds support operation of the Whitfield-Murray Historical Society.
For more information,
call the society at 706-2780217.
■ Three-month-old Colin
Eugene Russell died in
June under conditions
officials called suspicious,
but no charges have been
filed.
By Ben Benton
Staff Writer
Contributed Image
An artist’s rendering of the Dalton State science building shows a three-story structure.
Dalton State breaks ground
on $15 million building
Structure will provide space for expanding science classes
By Joy Lukachick
Staff Writer
DALTON, Ga. — Seven years
after officials proposed expanding
its science department, Dalton State
College broke ground Monday on a
three-story, 58,000-square-foot science building.
School officials say they hope the
building, expected to be completed
by next summer, will attract more
students seeking science majors, prerequirements for engineering or other
degrees and premedical students.
“[We hope] it will be an attraction for the workforce in the local
industries as well as students who
are just interested in science,” said
Sandra Stone, the college’s vice
president for academic affairs.
The School of Science, Technology and Mathematics now offers
four-year degrees in biology, chemistry and mathematics, and the labs
for the science classes are at capac-
ity with 325 biology majors and 66
chemistry majors, Dean Randall
Griffus said.
Since Dalton State added the science degrees — biology six years
ago and chemistry two years ago
— the majors continued to grow
until officials had to stop adding students because of space problems,
Griffus said.
The new building, originally
approved by the state Board of
Regents in 2005, continually was
delayed, then its size reduced by half
in 2011. Earlier this year, once the cost
was reduced to $15 million, the work
at Dalton State was approved in the
2013 fiscal budget. The school also
received $500,000 from the John Willis Mashburn Charitable Foundation.
At Monday’s ceremony, officials
said the project has taken hard work,
determination and many hands.
“When we started working
on this in ’05, my hair was dark,”
Woman gives
$10,000 to
school band
Nice doggy
By Tim Omarzu
Staff Writer
A 70-year-old photo that fell out of a book
inspired Sue Sloan Carlton to donate $10,000
to the South Pittsburg High School band
program.
Carlton, a retiree who lives in Washington, D.C., was looking through some books
that belonged to her mother, Dubie Sloan,
who died in May.
“I was flipped through ... and this picture
NASHVILLE
fell out,” Carlton said.
The 1940s photo showed her father, Sam
Sloan, holding a trombone. Her mother, who
played clarinet, was in the photo, too, along
with other teens who had gathered to practice at a friend’s house.
A new partnership in
Since Carlton was searching
Tennessee is seeking to
FAST
for a way to honor her parents’
curb complications during
memory, she got in touch with
FACT
birth.
band director Jon Elliott.
Healthy Tennessee
The gift
“After talking to her, I realBabies are Worth the Wait
honors the ized she wanted to make a real
is an effort by the Tennesmemory
investment,” he said. “I was
see Department of Health,
of donor
March of Dimes, Tennessee Sue Sloan blown away. I’d never heard
of anything like this happenCenter for Patient Safety,
Carlton’s
ing.”
Tennessee Initiative for
parents.
The band desperately needed
Perinatal Quality Care and
new
equipment.
the Tennessee Hospital
“That was, in my opinion, the biggest
Association.
need that we have,” Elliott said. “We have a
It seeks to improve the
tuba that’s 50 years old, and it’s in horrible
health and development
condition.”
of babies in the state by
Along with a new tuba, Elliott plans to
emphasizing the imporuse Carlton’s money to buy a set of timtance of full-term delivery.
— Staff and Wire Reports pani, or kettledrums, and a soprano saxophone.
“It’s like the instrument Kenny G. plays,”
he
said.
REGION CONTACT
Elliott’s goal is to have a complete set of
■ Region editor:
saxophones — alto, tenor, soprano and bariAlex Chambliss
tone — so students can perform at events
423-757-6306
as a quartet.
[email protected]
.com
See DONATION, Page B5
Partnership aims
at birth problems
laughed Jim Jolly, a member of the
Board of Regents of the University
System of Georgia. “This is a great
time.”
When the new building is complete, officials hope to attract more
students with its state-of-the-art
equipment, more specialized labs
and even private labs to encourage
student research, which officials
said is increasing in popularity.
At the same time, the science
department is continuing to better its curriculum, which has been
adapted to suit the needs of the local
industries, Stone said.
And the school is continuing to
build more partnerships for students who want to earn some of
their required courses at Dalton
then transfer to another school, she
said.
Contact staff writer Joy
Lukachick at 423-757-6659 or
[email protected]
Staff Photo by Alyson Wright
Noah Moran, 4, left, and Molly Moran, 2, play with Doodles, a Yorkshire terrier and Chihuahua mix, held by 2nd Lt. George King, a reenactor with Marshall’s Tennessee Battery, during the annual Chickamauga Battlefield Marathon in Fort Oglethorpe on Saturday.
Diversity declines as Georgia
Democratic caucus elects Fludd
By Bill Barrow
The Associated Press
ATLANTA — With a historically
low number of seats in the Georgia
House of Representatives, Democratic leaders acknowledge that they need
Georgia to widen their base
Legislature beyond African-Americans and white liberals in urban areas.
Ye t w h e n t h e
Assembly convenes in
January, the lower chamber’s minority party’s top leaders will all be black
Democrats, as Rep. Virgil Fludd, of
Tyrone, was elected caucus chairman Monday over Brian Thomas, a
■ David Ralston will continue as
House speaker.
white Democrat from Lilburn who
previously held the post.
“We have to reach out,” Fludd
said. “We do have to have honest
conversations about race moving
forward.”
Thomas said, “I certainly don’t
believe that we are headed to being
a ‘black Democratic Party.’ I think
everyone in our party and in our caucus understands there needs to be a
diverse base of voters for us to move
See LEADERS, Page B5
There still are no charges
filed in the June death of a
3-month-old who suffered
“major trauma” to his brain
under circumstances investigators and medical officials
called “suspicious.”
That could change with
the release of Colin Eugene
Russell’s autopsy, Marion
County, Tenn., detective Beth
Schindel said Monday.
The results will be turned
over to the
district attorney’s office
to determine
if there was
criminal
wrongdoing
in the infant’s
death, but
S c h i n d e l Beth
could not say Schindel
when those
results could come.
The infant’s family is “just
taking it day by day,” Schindel said.
“It’s very tragic losing a
baby, and they’re very upset.
They’re as anxious to get the
report back as we are,” she
said.
Meanwhile, the baby’s
father, Chris Russell, 23,
remains a “person of interest” in the case, Schindel
said.
Attempts Monday to contact Russell and the boy’s
mother, 24-year-old Leah
Collins, were unsuccessful. Collins’ Facebook page
shows several photos of her
son along with messages of
condolence from relatives
and friends.
The investigation was
launched after a June 17
emergency call from family
members when the infant
stopped breathing, officials
said.
Marion County Sheriff
Ronnie “Bo” Burnett said
the infant was taken to
Grandview Medical Center
in Jasper, where he was stabilized before being taken
to Vanderbilt Medical Center in Nashville. Burnett
said Vanderbilt officials
early on described the injuries as “major trauma” to
the child’s brain. He died
after the family decided to
discontinue life support on
June 23.
Schindel said initial medical scans and an MRI scan
performed before the baby
died showed he had retinal
hemorrhaging and brain trauma, injuries similar to those
found in cases of “shaken
baby syndrome.”
Medical officials also
found rib fractures that “were
at least 10 days old,” and they
noted that, for a few days
before he stopped breathing,
the baby had been throwing
up — a possible sign of brain
injury, Schindel said.
Contact staff writer
Ben Benton at [email protected]
timesfreepress.com or 423757-6569. Subscribe to his
Facebook posts at facebook.
com/ben.benton1 and follow
him on Twitter at twitter.
com/BenBenton.
Valley View
Highway
28
41
Infant’s
home
Jasper
72
24
41
IjW\\=hWf^_YXoBWkhWM$CYDkjj
...
. timesfreepress.com
• • • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • B5
Breaking News: [email protected]
Sewer problems threaten Dayton growth, council hears
By Tom Davis
Correspondent
DAYTON, Tenn. — Development north of Dayton may be
stalled because of inadequate sewer
service, Dayton City Council members were told Monday.
A six-inch sewer line that serves
Rhea County High School is nearing its capacity, but a more pressing problem is the size of the line
from the industrial park pumping
station to the sewage treatment
plant, sewer Superintendent Glenn
Fraley said. His comments came as
council was asked to authorize a
proposed 50-unit residential development near Rhea Medical Center
to tie onto the high school’s service
line.
Mayor Bob Vincent said many
people forget that that line was put
in solely to serve the high school
and 50 other properties.
“It was originally proposed to
be four inches, and it was a struggle to get a six-inch line instead,”
Vincent said. “We are inadequate
for sewer service up that way. My
understanding is that the processing plant is not a problem.”
Fraley said a huge water dis-
charger would pose trouble, but
right now residential development
is not a problem.
“The [treatment] plant is 40
years old, and eventually it will
have to be replaced,” Fraley said.
“If Dayton continues to grow, we’ll
have to expand.”
The council tabled consideration
of the request from developers of
the proposed Brookstone Heights
development for further study.
for bids to build a 6 million-gallonsper-day potable water treatment
plant to replace the current facility,
which has a capacity of 4 million
gallons per day. Vincent said plans
are being considered to refurbish
the present plant to provide additional capacity once the new plant
is on line.
They agreed to support the cost
of bringing the Heartland Angler
Series fishing tournament to Dayton on Oct. 3 and 4, 2013. CouncilPLANT BIDS
man Gary Louallen, who has helped
In other matters, the council coordinate efforts to bring tournaauthorized city officials to advertise ments to the area, said tournament
officials already have reserved the
entire Holiday Inn Express for the
week of the event, and will be contacting other motels as well.
BUDGET OK’D
Meeting earlier as the Dayton City School Board, members
approved a budget of $59,862 for
the final year of Race to the Top
funds. The money will be spent for
reading and science, technology,
engineering and math instructional
material.
Contact Tom Davis at [email protected]
volstate.net.
Barge launches
schools branding
campaign today
Lunch with a special veteran
Fran Millar, R-Atlanta, said
“the concept is good,” but he
ATLANTA — Georgians questioned Barge’s timing so
often bemoan the quality soon after voters overruled
of their public schools. But the superintendent on charstate Superintendent John ter schools.
Barge, fresh off a defeat in a
Barge angered many of his
debate over expanding char- fellow Republicans, includter schools, wants to change ing Gov. Nathan Deal, with
public perception.
his opposition to the conTaking a cue from cor- stitutional amendment that
porate America, the state affirms state power to create
Department of Education charter schools.
today will launch a marketMillar said he was unaware
ing campaign titled “Geor- of the unveiling today and
gia’s Future. Now!”
noted that it occurs at the
The campaign comes same time Dolinger’s group
with Georgia still trailing meets in Atlanta. Millar will
the national average in many be with Dolinger, as will
standardized test measures, many of the business leaders
while Atlanta schools con- that could help fund “Modtinue under the shadow of ern Teacher.”
alleged cheating on those
“That tells you all you
same tests in recent years. need to know,” Millar said.
And Barge contin“I’m trying to mend a
ues to face questions
lot of fences in spite
about his leadership
of this guy. Somefrom some of his feltimes it’s hard to tell
low Republicans.
what he’s thinking.”
Those realities,
Barge aides said
the superintendent
Deal’s office is aware
sa i d , re q u i re a n
of the program. But
aggressive response.
no one from the
“A lot of folks don’t
governor’s office will
know the good things John Barge
be part of today’s
going on because we
event.
historically don’t do a good
Still, Barge got some supjob telling them about it,” port from a recent opponent.
Barge said.
Bert Brantley, a spokesman
The effort, which Barge for the charter amendment
will announce today at a campaign, said this kind of
Buford school, includes old- effort is “definitely needed.”
fashioned outreach: printed
Brantley, who worked for
literature, knickknacks with Gov. Sonny Perdue, recalled
a logo, a speaker’s bureau the difficulty of navigating
of teachers to address com- what voters and outsiders
munity groups. If enough think about schools. “They
private money is raised, it are certainly better than peoalso will feature a Web TV ple think they are,” he said.
comedy series — with hopes
Brantley said political
of the show being broadcast campaigns can be a doubleon Georgia Public Television edged sword. “A lot of gov— titled “Modern Teacher.” ernors, superintendents and
Styled after the television legislators have run on a platseries “Modern Family,” form of ‘improving schools,”’
it depicts life in a Geor- he said. “The perception has
gia school. Producers have been built up over a lot of
developed a trailer, but not years.”
yet filmed full episodes.
The next step is for Barge
Target audiences are rank- to raise money to send
and-file teachers, parents, “Modern Teacher” into full
legislators, business leaders production. Dolinger said his
and taxpayers.
board members — executives
The program will explain, from top firms like Georgia
among other details, new Power, Lockheed Martin and
curricula and changes in AT&T — are receptive to the
teacher evaluations. Many program. As for underwritof the changes dovetail with ing it, he said, “they’re taking
Georgia’s participation in the a wait-and-see approach.”
federal Race to the Top grant
program.
The campaign also will
LARGEST SELECTION
highlight that Georgia is the
of Western Boots in
only state this year where
the Tri-State Area
students have increased
their average ACT and SAT
Mens • Ladies • Childrens
scores for college entry; the
as featured in the
number of AP college credits
latest edition of
earned; and the math, readMYSTYLE for women
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the National Assessment of
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Barge’s staff and consultant David Voss have shared
details, including the “Modern Teacher” trailer, with
several outside groups.
“I’ve been one who has
been complaining for years
that there is a lack of clear
messaging from the system,”
said Steve Dolinger, president
of the Georgia Partnership
for Excellence in Education,
a group heavy on business
Check Out
leaders.
Yet among top elected
officials, Barge appears to be
going about it largely alone.
Senate Education Chairman
By Bill Barrow
The Associated Press
Staff Photo by Dan Henry
Girls Preparatory School eighth-grader Chandler Gentry enjoys lunch with her grandfather, Kayo Erwin Jr., who
served in the Navy during the late 1960s. The lunch was in honor of Veterans Day.
Raising the band program’s profile by doing
more performances was one
of the things Carlton asked
for when she donated the
money, Elliott said. Carlton
plans to make two more
$5,000 donations to the band
over the next two years for a
total of $20,000.
Carlton, who served as an
aide to former U.S. Rep. Marilyn Lloyd, D-Tenn., hadn’t
seen the high school’s marching band or symphonic band
perform before she made her
donation.
“I have just been so
impressed,” said Carlton,
who met recently with Elliott
and band members.
“I thought, ‘They don’t
want to be bothered with
me,’” she said. “All of the
sudden I had people hugging me. I had high school
students wrapping around
me saying thank you. I was
totally blown away by the
whole thing.”
Now, Carlton is a regular
at band practices and Friday
night football games while
she stays in town on an
extended visit.
Elliott said Carlton has
become “part of the family.”
“She wants to be vested
here,” he said. “She wants to
be involved and have a relationship with the kids.”
Contact staff writer
Tim Omarzu at [email protected]
timesfreepress.com or 423757-6651.
Leaders
• Continued from Page B4
forward.”
The Republican leadership
team, meanwhile, remains all
white. The GOP renominated
David Ralston, of Blue Ridge,
for another term as speaker.
He will be elected when the
entire body convenes.
Larry O’Neal was re-elected as majority leader without opposition. Republican
Caucus Chairwoman Donna
Sheldon, of Dacula, withstood
a challenge from Delvis Dutton, a tea party conservative
from Glennville.
The caucus is one seat
shy of a two-thirds majority,
enough to override vetoes
from Gov. Nathan Deal
or approve constitutional
amendments without a single
Democratic vote.
From a policy perspective,
there may be little consequence to any of those votes.
The Associated Press
KNOXVILLE — The
number of veterans who are
students at the University of
Tennessee in Knoxville has
increased 70 percent since
2009, and the school wants to
help them make it to graduation.
The Knoxville News
Sentinel reported that UT
doesn’t track the retention
of its veteran students, but
nationally, the numbers are
not encouraging. However,
most veterans who make it
past the first few semesters
tend to do well.
At UT, a task force was
established last fall to connect veterans to services
like financial advising, early
course registration and counseling.
Ashley Blamey, the director of UT’s Safety, Environment and Education Center,
is chairwoman of the com-
mittee.
“People are really open
to helping this community,
and they tend to be a pretty
self-sufficient people, so all
we’re doing is really providing opportunities,” she said.
UT also wants to connect
veterans to other veterans.
That includes handing out
special American flag lapel
pins in the shape of the
Power T that allow veterans
to find each other.
There’s a cute one
The Associated Press
Yolanda Chen, right, an assistant professor at the University of Vermont, points out
bugs as Celia Whitman looks on during the Entomological Society of America’s
annual convention in Knoxville on Monday. “This is my first time at a convention to
just pause and enjoy looking and buying bugs, “ Chen said.
But Fludd’s ascension underscores the increasing racial
and demographic polarization of Georgia’s electorate.
The dynamic is accentuated
by the legislative districts
that the Republican majority
redrew after the 2010 census,
further confining Democrats
to metropolitan Atlanta and
other urban areas, many of
them dominated by nonwhite
voters.
The difference was obvious in the simultaneous caucus meetings at the Capitol.
Republicans filled much of
the House chamber with
113 of their 119 members, 24
of them just having won reelection. They could reach
the supermajority threshold
should independent Rep. Culver “Rusty” Kidd join the GOP,
as he said last week he is considering. Kidd was not in the
House chamber Monday.
The 60 Democrats,
meanwhile, gathered in the
much smaller Senate chamber. Speakers addressed the
meeting without needing a
sound system.
Minority Leader Stacey
Abrams, of Atlanta, told her
colleagues that last Tuesday
was a success, despite the
GOP gaining seats. The new
legislative maps, she said,
gave Republicans a natural
advantage in 124 districts. So
keeping them at 119, she said,
is a victory: “Democrats are
on the ascendancy.” She did
not address the possibility of
Kidd’s switch.
Abrams and Minority
Whip Carolyn Hugley, of
Columbus, were re-elected
to their party posts without
opposition.
Taking the long view,
Abrams said that demo-
graphics in Georgia favor
Democrats. The state’s electorate is becoming younger,
less native and less white; a
slim majority of Georgians
under 18 are nonwhite.
Fludd promised that
he would not wait for the
demographic shifts to show
up at the ballot box. He said
he would recruit candidates
immediately for 2014 elections. He said he’d start a
caucus political action committee and target unions,
plaintiffs attorneys and corporations for support.
As for reaching more
white voters, he said, “We
have an economic message
that appeals to working class
voters in every district.”
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B8 • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • • •
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Breaking News: 423-757-News
6 inmates Wet trek
break out
of jail in
Georgia
Mathews
• Continued from Page B1
within hours; three are still
at large.
The Associated Press
• Continued from Page B1
read in the newspaper, everyone thought [voter ID] was
the issue,” Goins said Friday.
“We received hundreds of
calls on our voter hotline on
[Election Day]. ... I think we
received a total of two photo
ID questions.”
Thirteen Hamilton County
voters had to cast provisional
ballots because they lacked
photo ID, according to the
county election commission.
Two voters, determined
to have their votes count,
returned with their IDs after
the races already had been
called.
“Considering we voted
140,000 people, it’s probably
about what I expected,” said
Scott Allen, assistant administrator of elections for the
Hamilton County Election
Commission. “We haven’t
had much of an issue since
it went into effect. I think it
was just about having good
communication about it.”
Eleven invalid votes may
seem like a small fraction of
142,000 cast, but it’s still too
many for Hamilton County
Lawmaker urges Haslam to oust DCS chief
The Associated Press
NASHVILLE — A Tennessee legislator who repeatedly asked the Department of Children’s Services for information is calling for the commissioner’s
ouster.
State Rep. Sherry Jones, D-Nashville,
is asking Gov. Bill Haslam to remove
DCS Commissioner Kate O’Day, according to The Tennessean.
“It’s time for O’Day to resign or for
the governor to step in and replace her,”
Jones said.
“She has had two years, and there
is nothing getting better at the Department of Children’s Services,” Jones
added. “As a matter of fact, it’s getting
worse.“
In her budget presentation to Haslam
last week, O’Day offered nothing that
indicated a turnaround was coming at
DCS, Jones said.
A statewide association of groups
that do business with DCS also
expressed frustration with O’Day, sayDemocratic Party Chairman
Paul Smith.
“Those people wanted to
take part, and they should
have been able to,” Smith
said.
Other anti-voter ID activist groups argue it’s impossible to measure how the
law may have discouraged
potential voters.
“We won’t ever know fully
the number of people who
stayed home because they
didn’t have the photo ID,”
said Mary Mancini, executive
director of Tennessee Citizen
Action, which is compiling
incidents of voting problems
across the state.
Election officials said they
credit voters’ preparedness
to statewide publicity about
the law.
“The Legislature gave election officials plenty of time
to hold community meetings
and get information out in the
media,” Goins said.
WHERE TO VOTE
Local officials’ biggest
problem turned out to be
voters’ confusion over where
they were supposed to vote.
Redistricting last year by the
Legislature, based on numbers from the 2010 U.S. cen-
United Way
of Greater Chattanooga
“
”
It’s time for [DCS Commissioner Kate] O’Day to resign or for
the governor to step in and replace
her.
— State Rep. Sherry Jones,
D-Nashville
ing she has not responded to requests
to meet with the group.
Darci Halfman, executive director
of the Tennessee Alliance for Children
and Families, said O’Day hasn’t met
with the group in more than a year and
noted the previous DCS commissioner
met with the alliance quarterly. The
group issued a public request to meet
with O’Day.
The alliance includes 39 agencies
which, combined, provide services to
half of the children under DCS care.
sus, meant that many voters
were assigned new polling
places.
“From what I understand,
there were a lot of people
who were confused about
where to go,” said Allen. “I
feel like we did all we could
do, mailing people new registration cards in July, but
some people still all had their
old [voting] cards when they
showed up to the polls.”
Election officials blame
the mix-ups on the fact that
state redistricting came during the same year as a presidential election.
“That’s basically a recipe
for confusion for the voters who come out only for
presidential elections,” Allen
said.
Smith argued that redistricting changes and the ID
laws were just two factors in
an “orchestrated effort” to
reduce the vote in communities that traditionally vote
Democratic.
“The whole debate is they
were trying to slow the voting down in certain segments
of society. And what we’ve
seen is they were successful
in doing that,” said Smith, citing lower county voter turnout than in the 2008 presi-
Haslam defended O’Day last week,
saying his department head seeks to
correct the agency’s problems.
“I have known and worked around
Kate for a long time,” the governor said.
“She’s a person with great compassion
for children. She’s smart and understands this business, and she wants to
get it right.
“When I have somebody who really
wants to make it right, is bright and looks
around the country to find the best solutions and cares about kids, I think that’s
the right formula,” Haslam said.
A number of problems have plagued
the department. Among them was a
computer system that failed to make
proper payments to foster parents and
private agencies. The department’s attorney acknowledged DCS had violated law
by failing to tell legislators about deaths
of children who had come into contact
with the department. As many as a quarter of the calls made to a statewide child
abuse hotline rang unanswered.
dential election.
Currently, 33 U.S. states
have voter ID laws, and 17
of those mandate photo IDs,
according to the National
Conference of State Legislatures.
Tennessee and Georgia
are two of four states with
“strict” photo ID laws —
meaning that voters without
it may vote only by provisional ballot and must show
their photo ID later to be
counted.
Georgia’s law was upheld
by the state Supreme Court in
2011. In Tennessee, the Court
of Appeals upheld the law just
days before the election.
But laws continue to be
challenged across the nation,
including several high-profile cases in the months leading up to the election. Texas’
photo ID law was struck
down, Pennsylvania’s was
halted temporarily, and South
Carolina’s was approved —
though it could not be imple-
mented until 2013.
Johnston’s case will be
heard by the Tennessee
Supreme Court early next
year. He and partner attorney George Barrett are
representing Memphis and
two voters there who were
unable to vote in August
despite presenting library
cards. The Court of Appeals
ruling upholding the law
also said library cards were
valid forms of ID in Shelby
County.
All vote totals, including
provisional ballots, are unofficial until certified by the Tennessee Division of Elections.
Contact staff writer Kate
Harrison at [email protected]
timesfreepress.com or 423757-6673.
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35138621
SWAINSBORO, Ga.
— Three suspects remained
at large Sunday night after
six inmates escaped from the
Emanuel County Jail, authorities said.
One of the escapees who
broke out of the East Georgia jail on Saturday night
is a man accused of murder, The Augusta Chronicle
reported.
The men escaped about
11 p.m. through a door into
a plumbing mechanical area
in the jail, Emanuel County Sheriff Tyson Stephens
said.
The jail had plumbing
work done Friday night and
a worker neglected to lock a
door, he said.
Once the men got into the
mechanical area, they were
able to reach the roof and
then climb down to freedom,
the sheriff said.
Three inmates were back
in custody by 6 p.m. Sunday,
but three others remained at
large, Stephens said.
One of the inmates who
was back behind bars had
escaped from the Emanuel
County Jail before, in 2002,
according to records from
the Georgia Department of
Corrections.
That inmate was sentenced to five years for
escape, on top of the five he
had received for entering a
vehicle.
“I have been chasing him
around since he was 8 or 10,”
Stephens said. “I’m glad to
have him back.”
35046572
■ Three are recaptured
“fairly rare breed of criminal”
who is evil, manipulative and
has had strong influence over
her son’s criminal career.
Davis and Hoss want to
get Neff’s testimony to present as evidence to a jury if
their client is found guilty.
After a death penalty case
conviction, jurors decide the
punishment and, in the sentencing portion of the trial,
both sides offer evidence to
influence jurors to decide on
the appropriate sentence.
Bauknight listed five reasons for Killian denying the
request:
■ Neff had not been personally served with the summons.
■ The testimony sought
is protected because it is
part of the “deliberative process.”
■ The Mathews family
sentences are on appeal.
■ Neff’s testimony could
be considered hearsay and
might not be permitted in
state court.
■ Neff ’s testimony is in
the sentencing transcript,
a public record that can be
used in place of his testifying either on video or in
person.
Hamilton County Criminal Court Judge Barry Steelman, Davis, Hoss and state
prosecutors Bill Cox and
Neal Pinkston traveled to
Nashville on Nov. 7 to begin
screening jurors for the
scheduled Jan. 22 trial.
Contact staff writer Todd
South at 423-757-6347 or
[email protected]
Follow him on Twitter @
tsouthCTFP.
DIFFERENT BY NATURE
UNITED BY MISSION
Join us. Help create opportunities for a better life for all. Want to
get involved? Find out how at LiveUnitedChattanooga.org
United Way’s 2012 Campaign Chair, Alison Lebovitz, stands united with Solomon
McGee, manager of the Westside Youth Development Program, a United Way-funded
program helping kids stay on track for success. They hail from different backgrounds,
but they share the same goal: creating a better community for all through United Way
of Greater Chattanooga. See their stories at LiveUnitedChattanooga.org
®
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OPINION
B6 • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • • •
Established 1869 Adolph S. Ochs, Publisher 1878-1935
HARRY AUSTIN
Editorial Page Editor
WES HASDEN
Associate Editor
EDITORIALS
Petraeus’ swift fall
G
iven history, it hardly can be a
surprise that another notable
American in public service
has been forced from office or had his
reputation sullied as the result of an
extramarital affair. What is startling to
most Americans, though, is that the latest figure whose life and career have
been marred by such a scandal is David
Petraeus, until last week the director
of the Central Intelligence Agency and
before that a four-star Army general
whose leadership in Iraq and Afghanistan made him one of the nation’s most
well-known and admired individuals.
Petraeus resigned Friday as the
head of the CIA, admitting that he had
engaged in a n extramarital affair, apparently with Paula Broadwell, his biographer. The decision to resign is appropriate. Petraeus occupied positions of
extraordinary trust and had access to
the United States’ most closely guarded military and intelligence secrets.
Though there has been no suggestion
that national security was breached
by the affair, Petraeus’ resignation is
appropriate. Given the potential security breach and the former general’s
oft-stated personal code of honorable
conduct, there was no other choice.
Unfortunately, the fall from power by
such a high-profile figure is not rare.
Former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and former New York Gov.
Eliot Spitzer are recent examples. Former
Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt, Dwight
D. Eisenhower and Bill Clinton are earlier examples. Their positions, too, made
it impossible for them to avoid scandal,
either immediately or in the judgment
of history. Public office, unlike work in
private enterprise, makes it likely that a
heavy penalty for infidelity is exacted.
Petraeus understood that, publicly
admitting Friday that “such behavior
[the extramarital affair] is unacceptable,
both as a husband and the leader of an
organization such as ours [the CIA].”
The resignation, however, will not end
the intrigue and queries surrounding
Petraeus.
Some questions are personal. Even his
closest aides from his Army days seem
stunned that Petraeus would risk his reputation and honor with an affair, which
apparently started after he left the military. The act, they almost unanimously
agree, is totally out of keeping with the
disciplined life he led for decades.
There are other, more public questions that still must be answered following Petraeus’ affair and resignation.
The most pressing is why Congress —
especially its intelligence committees
— were not notified about the possibility of an incident that could have security repercussions. That’s a legitimate
concern, one that should be examined
fairly in light of long-standing policy that
information about ongoing FBI criminal
investigations is not shared with anyone
outside the agency — including Congress and the White House.
Following his resignation, members
of both political parties praised Petraeus’
service. They said little, of course, about
the conduct that ended that service. His
fall, though, is a reminder that public
servants are held to a high standard, and
that violation of it often results in a swift
fall from grace.
We live on shaky ground
A small earthquake that occurred in
eastern Kentucky on Saturday was felt
as far south as Atlanta and as far north
as Ohio, and it prompted many calls
to public safety officials in the tristate
region and nearby states. Though the 4.3
magnitude quake caused no reported
damage, it is a useful reminder of the
elemental forces at play below the surface of the planet we call home.
The earthquake, which took place
shortly after noon, was centered more
than half a mile underground and about
eight miles west of the town of Whitesburg, was by traditional measures a
minor one. Many people, in fact, did not
notice it, but some near the epicenter
and as far as 300 miles away did. Such
mixed reaction, seismologists say, is not
unusual.
Earthquakes in Kentucky are not
uncommon, though more occur in the
western part of the state along the New
Madrid fault zone than in the east. The
same geography applies in Tennessee
and Georgia. Several quakes occur in
each state over the course of a year, but
most go unnoticed. If they are noticed,
a quick shake or bump is the most common feeling.
Still even a minor quake can cause
a stirring of concern or fear, especially
to those who are not familiar with the
earth-shaking event. The initial shock,
of course, is the primary worry, but
often a small quake triggers concern
that a larger one is to follow. Experts
say that usually is not true.
Most quakes in this region are similar
to the one on Saturday. They are usually
a single event. Indeed, seismologists
add, it is rare for major or even noticeable or aftershocks to follow the initial
event.
That’s reassuring, no doubt, but
residents in this region should not put
earthquakes out of their minds. Seismologists agree that it is impossible to
predict with any accuracy when and
where a quake will take place. And
while earthquakes occur more often in
western Kentucky and Tennessee than
in the eastern sections of those states,
strong temblors have taken place in this
region.
One of the more recent was a 4.9
magnitude quake near Fort Payne, Ala.,
in 2003 along a fault that extends from
Guntersville, Ala., toward nearby Jasper, Tenn. That quake did cause some
damage and was felt in Chattanooga
and nearby communities. It was — and
is — a reminder of the realities of our
physical world.
There are similar faults in the
tristate region. One, for example, runs
from Chatsworth to near Cartersville
in Georgia. Another crosses northwest
Atlanta. Still, the experts say, earthquake activity is low in the region
despite such faults, and it is limited
to a relative handful of mostly unfelt
tremors annually.
Slightly shaken residents of this
part of the country no doubt wish that
continues to be true. Saturday’s quake,
though, is another reminder that the
land on which we live is not as solid
and unshakable as we might hope and
believe.
COMMENTARY
Other things on his mind
Israeli friends have been
asking me whether a re-elected President Barack Obama
will take
revenge
on Prime
Minister
Bibi Netanyahu for the
way he and
Sheldon
Adelson,
his foolharThomas
dy finanFriedman
cier, openly
backed Mitt Romney. My
answer to Israelis is this: You
should be so lucky.
You should be so lucky that
the president feels he has the
time, energy and political capital to spend wrestling with Bibi
to forge a peace between Israelis and Palestinians. I don’t see
it anytime soon. Obama has
his marching orders from the
American people: Focus on
Bethlehem, Pa., not on Bethlehem, Palestine, and focus on
getting us out of quagmires
(Afghanistan) not into them
(Syria). No, my Israeli friends,
it’s much worse than you think:
You’re home alone.
Of course, no one here will
tell you that. To the contrary,
there will surely be a new secretary of state visiting you next
year with the umpteenth road
map for “confidence-building
measures” between Israelis
and Palestinians. He or she
may even tell you that “this is
the year of decision.” Be careful. We’ve been there before. If
you Google “Year of decision
in the Middle East,” you’ll get
more than 100,000,000 links.
Is this good for Israel? No. It
is unhealthy. The combination
of America’s internal focus, the
post-Arab awakening turmoil
and the exhaustion of Palestinians means Israel can stay
in the West Bank indefinitely
at a very low short-term cost
but at a very high long-term
cost of losing its identity as
a Jewish democracy. If Israelis want to escape that fate,
■ Obama has his
marching orders from the
American people: Focus
on Bethlehem, Pa., not on
Bethlehem, Palestine, and
focus on getting us out of
quagmires (Afghanistan)
not into them (Syria).
it is very important that they
understand that we’re not
your grandfather’s America
anymore.
To begin with, the rising
political force in America is
not the one with which Bibi
has aligned Israel. As Israeli
columnist Ari Shavit noted
last week: “In the past, both
the Zionist movement and the
Jewish state were careful to be
identified with the progressive
forces in the world. ... But in
recent decades more and more
Israelis took to leaning on the
reactionary forces in American
society. It was convenient to
lean on them. The evangelists
didn’t ask difficult questions
about the settlements, the
tea party people didn’t say a
word about excluding women
and minorities or about Jewish settlers’ attacks and acts
of vandalism against Palestinians and peace activists. The
Republican Party’s white, religious, conservative wing was
not agitated when the Israeli
Supreme Court was attacked
and the rule of law in Israel
was trampled.” Israel, Shavit
added, assumed that “under
the patronage of a radical,
rightist America we can conduct a radical, rightist policy
without paying the price.”
No more. Netanyahu can
still get a standing ovation
from the Israel lobby, but not
at UCLA.
At the same time, U.S. policymakers have learned that
the Middle East only puts a
smile on our faces when it
starts with them: with Israelis and Arabs. Camp David
started with them. Oslo started
with them. The Arab Spring
started with them. When they
have ownership over peace or
democracy movements, those
initiatives can be self-sustaining. We can amplify what they
start, but we can’t create it. We
can provide the mediation and
even the catering, but it’s got to
start with them.
We’ve learned something
else from our interventions
in Afghanistan and Libya: We
willed the ends, but we did
not will the means — that is,
doing all that it would take to
transform those societies. That
is why we’re quitting Afghanistan, staying out of Syria and
relying on sanctions, as long
as possible, to dissuade Iran
from building a nuclear bomb.
These countries are too hard
to fix but too dangerous to
ignore. We’ll still try to help,
but we’ll expect regional powers, and the locals, to assume
more responsibility.
Finally, we really have work
to do at home. Soon Americans will be asked to pay more
taxes for less government. It’s
coming. It will not make us
isolationists, but it will change
our mood and make us much
pickier about where we’ll get
involved. That means only a
radical change by Palestinians
or Israelis will get us to fully
re-engage.
So my best advice to Israelis
is: Focus on your own election
— on Jan. 22 — not ours. I find
it very sad that in a country
with so much human talent,
the Israeli center and left still
can’t agree on a national figure
who could run against Netanyahu and his thuggish partner, Foreign Minister Avigdor
Lieberman — a man whose
commitment to democracy
is closer to Vladimir Putin’s
than Thomas Jefferson’s. Don’t
count on America to ride to
the rescue. It has to start with
you.
My president is busy.
New York Times News Service
Election data dive
Since this may be my last
column about the 2012 elections, let’s have some fun.
Allow me
to arm you
with a collection of
facts and
data about
the election
results that
you can use
at your next
Charles
cocktail
Blow
party, coffee
break or PTA meeting.
First, a comment about the
exit polls from which most of
these data are drawn: They
were conducted only in 30
states. And, unfortunately, the
balance of states polled tilted
heavily toward those won by
President Barack Obama. Of
the 26 states Obama won, exit
polls were conducted in all but
three. Obama also won the District of Columbia, which had
no exit polls. Of the 24 states
Mitt Romney won, exit polls
were conducted only in eight.
With those caveats, let’s
dive in:
■ My analysis of the 2008
election found that even if
every black person in America
had stayed home on Election
Day, Obama would still have
won. That’s because the white
vote and Hispanic vote were
strong enough to push him
over the needed 270 votes to
win..
This year is a different story.
This year, his path to victory
required a broader coalition.
Without the Democratic
black vote joining with that of
liberal whites and Hispanics,
Obama would likely have lost
half the states that he won. This
fact may embolden those who
■ My analysis of the 2008
election found that even
if every black person in
America had stayed home
on Election Day, Obama
would still have won.
say that the president should
more directly address issues
facing the African-American
community.
■ There may have been
a backlash against voter suppression laws, bringing more
minorities to the polls, not
fewer. Hispanics as a share
of all voters were up in many
states won by Obama. That
can be attributed both to the
surging Hispanic population in
the country and to the Obama
campaign’s incredible getout-the-vote operation. It is
less clear why the black vote
held steady or grew in many
of those states. In Ohio for
example, blacks jumped from
11 percent of the voters in 2008
to 15 percent this year. Threaten to steal something, and its
owner’s grip grows tighter.
■ Romney won nine of the
11 states that were once in the
Confederacy.
■ Romney also won eight
of the 10 states with the
lowest population density:
Alaska, Wyoming, Montana,
North Dakota, South Dakota,
Idaho, Nebraska and Utah.
Obama won New Mexico and
Nevada.
■ Romney’s biggest margin of victory came in Utah,
home of the Mormon Church.
Utah was one of three states
in which Romney won every
county. The other two were
West Virginia and Oklahoma.
Obama won every county in
Connecticut and Vermont.
■ Among the states in
which exit polls where conducted, Obama won the lowest percent of the white vote
in the state with the highest
percentage of black voters
— the ever-reliable Mississippi, where Romney made
his famous “I like grits” comment. Thirty-six percent of the
voters in Mississippi are black.
Obama won a mere 10 percent
of the white vote there.
Conversely, Obama won
one of his highest percentages of white voters in the
state with the fewest minority voters: Maine. Ninety-five
percent of Maine’s voters
were white, and 57 percent of
them voted for Obama. That
ties with one other state for
the highest percent of whites
voting for Obama: Massachusetts, where 86 percent
of the voters are white. In
fact, Obama won the white
vote only among states with
small minority voting populations. The others Obama won
were Iowa (93 percent white),
New Hampshire (93 percent
white), Oregon (88 percent
white), Connecticut (79 percent white) and Washington
state (76 percent white).
This is quite a curious phenomenon.
■ Obama won all four states
that begin with “New” (New
Hampshire, New Jersey, New
Mexico and New York), but
he lost all five that begin with
a direction (North Carolina,
South Carolina, North Dakota,
South Dakota and West Virginia). OK, I just threw that
one in for fun.
Now, political junkies, go
forth and spout facts!
New York Times News Service
...
. timesfreepress.com
OPINION
• • • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • B7
Established 1936, Roy McDonald, Founder & Publisher, 1936-1990
Frank McDonald, President and Chairman, 1969-2000
Lee Anderson, Editor, 1958-2012; Publisher, 1990-1999
Drew Johnson, Editor
EDITORIALS
Oil, oil everywhere
M
uch like overpopulation,
the alleged horrors of DDT
and the notion that logging
is the chief threat to the bizarrely
ennobled spotted owl, the supposedly
impending depletion of the world’s
oil supplies has long been a source of
enthusiastic panic for liberals.
So, how about an update?
• Multiple nations — particularly
in Europe and developed parts of
Asia — face not-too-distant fiscal
catastrophe because of underpopulation. Citizens in liberal nirvanas
such as Denmark, for instance, “are
producing fewer babies than it takes
to replace themselves, continuing a
trend that is worrying demographers,
who fear that declining population
growth will undermine the welfare
system,” The Copenhagen Post helpfully notes. “(T)here will be fewer
taxpayers to shoulder the burden of
tomorrow’s pensioners and other
benefit recipients.”
• Tens of millions worldwide have
died of malaria because of environmentalist-backed bans on DDT, which
had been used effectively against
malaria-carrying mosquitos and
would have prevented those deaths.
• And even after vast, federally
imposed, job-killing reductions in
logging in the Northwest, populations of spotted owls have continued
to decline.
The spotted owls’ more aggressive cousins, barred owls, appear to
be a major culprit, competing with
spotted owls for food and sometimes
killing their kin. Oops.
That brings us back to oil depletion and related hysteria.
Oil is going to dry up, liberals
clamor, so the federal government
simply must subsidize development
and production of wind and solar
power — and fast!
The assumptions embedded in that
hypothesis are ludicrous to thinking
people. First, while oil supplies are not
infinite, there is little cause to believe
they’ll disappear anytime soon. Recall
a recent point in an Associated Press
article: “U.S. oil output is surging so
fast that the United States could soon
overtake Saudi Arabia as the world’s
biggest producer.” U.S. production is
expected to rise 7 percent this year
alone.
Then there is the inconvenient
fact that we still have mind-boggling
supplies of coal, as well as bountiful,
greenhouse gas-free nuclear energy
and the potential for a lot more.
In short, all three purchasers of
“The Collected Witticisms of Al
Gore” can keep reading it at night
without benefit of a candle.
But let’s suppose we do begin to
approach the depletion of world
oil supplies. The idea that that’s an
excuse for even more failed federal
green energy investment is nutty.
Even in the tattered remains of America’s free market, when supply drops
but demand stays the same or rises,
it creates a natural incentive to invest
in alternatives. If oil supplies begin
decreasing, prices will rise. (That is
not to be confused with current high
prices that are often related to absurd
bans on production in various locations.)
When oil prices finally rise enough
to make wind and solar power competitive — and to make consumers
actually consider them even when
they aren’t dipped in tax-credit sweeteners — private development and
production dollars will flood those
industries and make them more feasible.
But when federal busybodies
indulge their appetite for economic guesswork and opt for subsidies
over the self-correcting workings of
the free market, we wind up with
taxpayer-robbing debacles such as
Solyndra.
Someone will no doubt protest that
oil companies, too, have gotten subsidies from one Congress and one
president after another. In truth, oil
companies haven’t received direct
handouts in years. But if they had,
they would be as inexcusable as the
unconstitutional giveaways to green
energy.
Congress should tear all energy
giveaways out by the root, let energy
companies compete without governmental favors and let the American
people vote with their dollars on how
they will heat their homes and fuel
their cars.
COMMENTARY
Avoiding the fiscal cliff
By Scot Faulkner
The impending “fiscal
cliff” is the most thoroughly
predicted disaster since the
end of the Mayan calendar.
The problem is no one is
willing to design and implement a real solution that has
any chance of bipartisan
support.
The cycle of dysfunction
has existed for decades. The
federal Budget Act of 1974
created what was supposed
to be a rational process for
planning, approving and
implementing government
spending. It quickly became
an empty paper exercise as
appropriators ignored the
budget resolutions. When
the difference became
embarrassingly stark, the
Senate simply gave up on
passing budgets at all.
Presidents create new
budgets every year. Hidden
inside the hundreds of pages
is the “current services budget,” or “baseline.” This outlines how much it costs to
maintain existing services
at current levels. It factors in various cost drivers
— cost of living increases,
escalation clauses in contracts, etc. Budget battles
are fought over the increase
above current service levels. When officials propose
budget cuts, they are talking
about cutting this increase,
not about cutting current
service funding levels.
The latest looming cliff
is supposed to wrench the
Washington policy players
out of denial and avoidance,
forcing them to actually do
something real. This will
not happen unless certain
reforms are put in place.
• Start with the basics
■ Having everyone
discover that they can all
agree on something will
shift [us] from the culture of
confrontation to a culture of
collaboration.
— Use the “current service
analysis” levels as the budget framework. Administration and opposing budgets
can be aspirations compared
against the true baseline.
That will level the playing
field and keep everyone
honest about what is really an increase and what is
really a reduction.
• Rise above ideology
— Both Democrats and
Republicans contributed to
making the cliff. Both sides
spend like there is no tomorrow. Both sides embrace
“sacred cows.” Both sides
live in a world where their
people are angels and their
opponents are demons. A
good first step is to admit
that each side has some
good ideas and each side
has looney ones. Democrats need to understand
that even their most cherished domestic assistance
programs are riddled with
waste and ineff iciency.
Republicans need to realize that the Departments
of Defense and Homeland
Security are just as bloated
and dysfunctional as any
other government program
they assail.
• Make inspector generals and the GAO “rock
stars” — The Government
Accountability Office, or
GAO, has 3,100 employees.
There are also 73 inspector
general offices embedded
in Cabinet departments and
major agencies. All these
offices are filled with highly
trained, dedicated objective
civil servants who document waste, fraud, abuse
and inefficiency, and recommend actions to eradicate
and prevent future squandering of public resources.
They document more than
$650 billion in waste annually. That is $6.5 trillion in
cost avoidance and direct
spending reductions over
the 10 years everyone uses
to discuss the fiscal cliff.
Except in rare instances,
these reports, and their
detailed recommendations,
are universally ignored. Fix
this by passing budget bills
that specifically mandate
GAO and IG recommendations are implemented and
corresponding amounts of
documented waste, fraud
and abuse are cut from
programs and agencies.
This resurrection of effective congressional oversight
would be very welcome and
is already long overdue.
Having everyone discover that they can all agree
on something will shift [us]
from the culture of confrontation to a culture of collaboration. Beginning swimmers
start in the shallow end of
a pool and then move into
deeper waters as their skills
and confidence improve.
Congress and the White
House could move into
more complex and contentious waters as their ability
to respectfully and constructively disagree improves.
Scot Faulkner was chief
administrative officer for
the U.S. House of Representatives. He blogs at citizen
oversight.blogspot.com.
COMMENTARY
A time of soul-searching
Last week, I kept thinking
of those images you see after
tornadoes hit towns — homes
reduced to
kindling,
s u r v ivo rs
picking
through
wreckage.
That’s pretty much
how it felt
Wednesday
E. Thomas
morning.
McClanahan
I believed
the predictions that Mitt Romney would win big, especially
after uber-guru Michael Barone opined that Romney might
even take Pennsylvania. Romney did not take Pennsylvania.
Nor did he take the essential
swing states of Virginia, Florida and Ohio.
The autopsies will go on
for some time, but what looms
large for me is the issue of
trust.
For much of the late spring
and summer, President Barack
Obama’s campaign pumped
out a narrative smearing Romney as a heartless rich guy, an
impression Romney did little
to counter.
Romney got a bump after
naming Paul Ryan, who had
advanced a smart reform plan
for Medicare, as his running
mate. This was a signal that
if elected, Romney would
do the big things needed to
avoid a European-style debt
crisis.
But big things — entitlement reform and tax reform
— are complicated. And in the
proposal-and-debate phase, the
■ Winning a mandate for
a weighty agenda requires
trust and Romney, despite his
surge after the first debate,
failed to connect with voters
to the degree required.
key details are often of interest only to wonks. Winning a
mandate for a weighty agenda
requires trust, and Romney,
despite his surge after the first
debate, failed to connect with
voters to the degree required.
He didn’t stress how his taxcut plan would have boosted
economic growth.
Like many others, I underestimated Obama’s appeal and
historical status. The electorate
apparently was not willing to
fire the first black president in
favor of a wealthy man whose
proposals were not fully understood by many voters.
Which leaves the country
facing continued deadlock
with largely the same players,
a situation Harvard economist
Greg Mankiw likened to JeanPaul Sartre’s play, “No Exit.”
The play has three characters who arrive in hell expecting to be tortured. Instead, they
are locked in a room together.
Soon they detest each other
and realize their punishment
is never to escape.
Close, but perhaps in our
case purgatory would be a better metaphor. Escape is possible, but you can’t see how
— unless some unknown factor changes. Until that change
occurs we face uncertainty. It’s
hard to shake the feeling that
on Nov. 6 the nation made an
irrevocable turn toward a more
ominous future, one in which
the government role is hugely
enlarged at still-unknown costs
— both in terms of money and
a “depleted” national character, as Paul Ryan put it.
Yet it’s also clear that the
Republican Party must change
or be left behind by a changing nation. The harvest of the
GOP’s anti-immigrant fervor
was 70 percent Hispanic support for Obama. Many Latino
voters were angered by Romney’s remark earlier in the
year that the answer to illegal
immigration was “self-deportation.”
Opposition to gay marriage
is another loser for the GOP.
Maine, Washington and Maryland approved gay-marriage
measures by popular vote.
Voters in Minnesota rejected
a gay-marriage ban. Wisconsin elected the first openly gay
senator, Tammy Baldwin.
Fighting this losing battle
turns off gays who might otherwise vote Republican, and
it taints candidates in the eyes
of young voters. It’s time to let
it go. Gay marriage is gaining
acceptance.
For the immediate future,
the test for Obama is whether
he can redeem the promise
of his first campaign, reach
for the center — and deal
seriously with the nation’s
festering problems. How he
handles the looming “fiscal
cliff ” negotiations will do
much to shape the character
of his second term.
McClatchy Newspapers
Letters to the Editors
—— ❖ ——
Americans don’t
respect future
On Nov. 7, there was a
column by Walter Williams
that said, “Today’s Americans have betrayed the values that made us a great
nation, and that does not
bode well for future generations.” I strongly support this
statement because I believe
America has acted selfishly
in its political sentiments. No
matter who is in office, I feel
it is obvious that many Americans do not have the future
in mind. Remaining apathetic
about the decisions our country makes or even going so
far as to make a decision but
an uninformed one is disrespectful to our future.
People have a reason for
their level of involvement in
politics and many are justifiable, but the one that breathes
of ignorance is a slap in the
face to every other citizen in
this nation. Be involved. Be
knowledgeable. Be responsible. You only have one life
on this earth. Make it mean
something.
AVERY McKINNEY
Collegedale
Weak case made
against fracking
A letter’s claims (Nov. 9)
concerning the problems
associated with hydraulic
fracturing are wildly exaggerated. The citation of only
one case study by an obscure
environmental organization,
the results of which are obviously skewed in favor of their
view, is ludicrous. There has
not been one proven instance
of tap water in the U.S. being
made flammable that can be
linked to fracking.
TO SUBMIT
LETTERS
■ Keep them topical,
short (200 words or
fewer), legible and not
more often than one
every 30 days. Letters
may be edited for clarity
and length and should
not previously have been
published elsewhere.
■ Must be signed with
name, address and
telephone number.
■ Send to: Editorial
page editor (either Times
or Free Press), P.O. Box
1447,
Chattanooga, TN 37401;
fax: 423-757-6383;
or email: [email protected]
timesfreepress.com.
Lessons of wisdom
are important, too
Era after era has changed,
and this era is one in which
we hope all our kids go to high
school and college.
However, I think we must
teach things that show wisdom. Things we learned from
the era that didn’t go to college
and often didn’t finish grammar school.
A balance of textbooks and
wisdom is hard to pass along,
but wisdom or “street smarts”
is equally important. Lots of
our ancestors worked hard in
a different way. Some on farms,
or raising siblings, others working at 12 as delivery boys.
My grandfather worked several jobs through the Depression and always said the neatest life lessons like, “Just do
your best and then you know
that it’s all you can do.”
Once you’ve given your all,
be proud whether you got an
A-plus or a D-minus. Maybe it
meant you divorced or stayed
together, but whatever it meant
it helped me just as much as
textbooks.
Another older woman I’m
friends with pointed out she
decided to take her dishwasher
out. She said there’s something
about having her grandkids
learn hand-washing dishes.
Probably the responsibility
or the routine she was raised
with.
All these lessons of wisdom
are just as important as the
education we learn in school,
sometimes more.
CHRISTINE DIWAN
On top of that, the vast
majority of the upper Devonian shales of the Appalachian
Basin, notably the Chattanooga shale, are at depths that
are greater than the freshwater aquifers from which we
obtain our drinking water, and
are hydraulically isolated from
them. According to the U.S.
Geological Survey, these shales
contain 12.2 trillion cubic feet
of badly needed natural gas
which will help us overcome
our dependence on foreign
fossil fuels and help our economy to recover in spite of the
current administration’s insistence on pursuing prohibitively expensive “alternative”
energy boondoggles like solar
and wind.
It has not been proven that
fracking does as much damage
as environmentalists claim it
does, and it has been proven
that it provides us an ecoA merry heart doeth good
nomically feasible way to get
at the vast, dependable energy like a medicine: but a broken
spirit drieth the bones. Provreserves that we have.
RICHARD W. SHULTZ erbs 17:22.
Bible Wisdom
...
.
C
BUSINESS
STOCK
WATCH
DOW
12,815.08
NASDAQ
2,904.26
S&P 500
1,380.03
6-MO
T-BILLS
.14%
30-YR
T-BONDS
2.74%
CRUDE
OIL
$85.57
GOLD
$1,730.30
q
q
p
n
q
q
n
-.61
+.18
...
-.01
-.50
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REFRESHING COCA-COLA: Marketers revamp corporate website to tell story, C5
Possible office project gets rezoning
Mike Pare
-.31
timesfreepress.com/business
q
q
PENNEY PLUNGE: Investor anxiety sinks company’s stock, C2
• • Tuesday, November 13, 2012
Staff Writer
A Chattanooga developer said
Monday he’s looking at putting up
a 15,000-square-foot office building
next to his large Waterside mixed-use
project in East Brainerd.
Developer Ken DeFoor said he has
“no big tenant” yet for the 2-acre tract
at McCutcheon and Gunbarrel roads.
But he secured a zoning change from
the Chattanooga-Hamilton Regional
Planning Commission to allow for the
commercial development.
The panel turned back the initial
staff recommendation that the rezoning of the tract from residential to
mixed-use be deferred. The planning
agency staff had said there’s a lack of
“
To my knowledge, I don’t know of a single office building
anywhere in the city that has a 50-foot landscape buffer. If we were
protecting the Sistine Chapel, I understand that.
”
— Mike Price,
MAP Engineers
safe traffic infrastructure in the area,
and DeFoor has other rezoning cases
nearby on Gunbarrel Road.
“Staff recommends that the applicant combine his existing zoning
cases into one overall development
proposal,” its report said.
But Mike Price of MAP Engineers
told the panel the staff met with him
and DeFoor last week and came up
with a proposal to allow the rezoning
and avoid the safety issue.
He said a certificate of occupancy
couldn’t be issued until the city’s
planned widening of that stretch of
Gunbarrel Road was done.
“That doesn’t mean he can’t start
construction,” Price added.
Dennis Malone, assistant city engineer, said the city has set aside funds
to widen Gunbarrel to Standifer Gap
Road.
“Our intent by fall of next year is to
be under construction,” he said.
City Councilman Jack Benson, who
also is a planning cmmission member,
said the widening of the two-lane road
was contingent upon the developer
giving the city the right of way.
“That’s an expensive right of way
in there,” he said.
The first phase of widening of
Gunbarrel is from Shallowford Road
to just north of McCutcheon Road in
front of the DeFoor property.
See OFFICES, Page C2
”
Trailer court
wins zoning
Chattanooga planners Monday approved
a proposal to redevelop
a site into a trailer court
for people working during maintenance outages
at Sequoyah Nuclear
Plant.
The ChattanoogaHamilton County
Regional Planning
Commission gave
approval to a zoning
change on the 2500 block
of Igou Ferry Road near
the plant. Property owner
Bobby Keyes said the
first phase of the trailer
court would cost about
$100,000 to develop. He
said about 1,200 to 2,000
people come in and do
maintenance to the plant
about every 18 months.
BASF to build
plant in Texas
The German-based
chemical giant BASF,
which currently operates emulsion polymer
plants in Chattanooga,
Pennsylvania and Mexico,
announced plans Monday
to build another such plant
in Freeport, Texas. The
new plant will employ
about 25 workers and is
expected to begin production in mid-2014.
“This new plant
strengthens our position
as a leading supplier of
emulsions in North America and demonstrates our
commitment to customers
in the coatings, construction, adhesives and paper
industries,” said Derek
Fairclough, senior vice
president of dispersions
and pigments for BASF in
North America.
In addition to the Texas
plant, BASF also is building manufacturing facilities for emulsion polymers
in India. The company
also opened new plants
this month in China and in
South Africa in September.
“
This is a neighborhood who worked
long and hard to
become what they are,
and that’s lots of singlefamily dwellings.
BUSINESS
BRIEFING
— Carol Berz,
city councilwoman
Hilltop
denies
duplex
By Ellis Smith
Staff Writer
The Associated Press
In this long exposure photo, a pumping unit sucks oil from the ground near Greensburg, Kan.
American energy
U.S. seen overtaking Saudis as biggest oil producer
By Pablo Gorondi
The Associated Press
T
he United States will become
the world’s largest oil producer by around 2020, temporarily overtaking Saudi Arabia, as
new exploration technologies help
find more resources, the International
Energy Agency forecast on Monday.
In its World Energy Outlook, the
energy watchdog also predicted that
greater oil and natural gas production
— thanks partly to a boom in shale
gas output — as well as more efficient use of energy will allow the U.S.,
which now imports some 20 percent
of its energy needs, to become nearly
See ENERGY, Page C2
The Associated Press
Austin Mitchell, left, and Ryan Lehto work on an oil derrick outside
Williston, N.D.
It’s time to banish
duplexes to the dustbin of
history, Hilltop Neighborhood homeowners argued
on Monday.
More than two dozen
neighbors, along with City
Councilwoman Carol Berz,
successfully fought an
effort by Energy Way Corp.
to win an exception to the
community’s single-family zoning at a meeting of
the Chattanooga-Hamilton
County Regional Planning
Commission.
The vote against the
duplex was unanimous.
“This is a neighborhood
who worked long and hard
to become what they are,
and that’s lots of single-family dwellings,” Berz said.
To hear neighbors tell
it, the duplex experiment
nearly destroyed their community, and they’ve just
now clawed their way back
from the precipice. Homebuyers won’t purchase
homes in a neighborhood
with duplexes, especially
those with absentee corporate owners who don’t
maintain the property, said
homeowner Bob Mitchell.
“We’re past the duplex
era; please don’t push us
back into a hole,” he said.
In the 1960s and 1970s,
city planners thought it was
a good idea to build multiSee DUPLEX, Page C2
Staff and Wire Reports
SMALLBIZ
BIGFIVE
Missouri salon operator
opens Hixson spa
Electric power leaders
■ Name: Apple Nails and
Pedispa
■ Location: 5243 Highway
153, Suite B, in Hixson
■ Owner: Peter Nguyen, who
relocated to Chattanooga this
year after working at another
spa in Jackson, Mo. “We just
love this area and wanted to
get in a bigger, more upsale
market,” Nguyen said.
■ Opened: Oct. 17
■ Service: “Our modern,
upscale nail salon offers a truly
unique nail experience such
as the area’s only manicure
bar and VIP pedicure room,”
Nguyen said. The spa offers
a variety of manicures and
pedicures and provides
complimentary water, soda
or wine. The spa includes 14
pedicure chairs and two wax
rooms.
■ Investment: More than
$100,000
■ Operating hours: Monday
through Saturday 9:30 a.m.7:30 p.m.. and Sunday noon-5
p.m.
■ Staff: Six employees
■ Contact: 423-710-3304
— Compiled by Business Editor Dave Flessner, who may be
Staff photo by Jake Daniels
reached at [email protected] Peter Nguyen works on the nails of Chrissy Hawks
press.com or at 757-6340 at Apple Nails and Pedispa.
The Southern Co., the parent of Georgia Power and
Alabama Power, is America’s biggest power utility.
The largest electric utilities in the United States,
based upon their sales last year, are:
1
2
3
4
5
Southern Co., Atlanta, revenues in 2011 of $17.7
billion
Pacific Gas & Electric, San Francisco, revenues
in 2011 of $15 billion
NextEra Energy, Juno Beach, Fla., revenues in
2011 of $15 billion
Duke Energy, Charlotte, N.C., revenues in 2011 of
$14.5 billion
Edison International, Rosemead, Calif., revenues
in 2011 of $12.4 billion
The Tennessee Valley Authority with revenues
in 2011 of $11.8 billion is America’s biggest
government-owned electric utility.
Source: Company filings for 2011
■ To contact Business • Phone: 423-757-6340 • Fax: 423-668-5085 • Email: [email protected]
C2 • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • •
..
timesfreepress.com ..
Breaking News: 423-757-News
J.C. Penney stock plunges on investor anxiety
By Anne D’Innocenzio
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — J.C. Penney Co.
executives may be confident in the
department-store chain’s everyday
low pricing strategy, but its investors are panicking.
The company’s stock fell more
than 13 percent on Monday — the
biggest percentage decline by far
for the day among big companies
in the S&P 500 index. Penney stock
lost nearly $3 to close at just under
$18, its lowest price since March
2009 when the United States was
in a deep recession.
The drop follows Standard &
Poor’s move to lower Penney’s
credit rating deeper into junk status on Friday. And that came on the
same day that the company reported its third consecutive quarter of
big losses and sales declines since
it decided earlier this year to get
rid of hundreds of coupons and
sales annually in favor of predictable low prices every day.
It’s the latest sign that Wall
Street isn’t any happier with Penney’s pricing than Main Street is.
Investors had pushed Penney stock
up 24 percent to about $43 after the
company announced the pricing
plan in late January. But customers
haven’t warmed to Penney’s pricing, and investors have grown cold
on the stock. With Monday’s drop,
Penney’s stock has lost nearly half
of its value this year.
Penney, which announced its
plans for the holiday shopping sea-
The Associated Press
A customer passes merchandise at a JC Penney store in New York.
son on Monday, did not immediately respond to requests seeking
comment about its stock price. But
in a meeting on Friday with investors, executives assured them that
the company has enough money to
continue with the strategy.
CEO Ron Johnson, the master-
British group meets tonight
Ted Cox, a certified
financial analyst for
Rochdale Investment
Management, will
offer “A Guide to the
Markets — After the
Presidential Election” to
the Chattanooga branch
of the British American
Business Group tonight.
The British-focused
business group meets at
5 p.m. at the Walden Club.
The meeting
includes appetizers,
an introductory meetand-greet session and
a presentation with
questions and answers.
If you plan to attend,
contact Terry Olsen at
[email protected]
After shakeup, Windows
leader leaving Microsoft
New York Times News Service
Steven Sinofsky, the leader
of Microsoft’s Windows business, is leaving the company,
just weeks after the company
released the biggest overhaul
in decades of its flagship
product.
Microsoft described the
departure of Sinfosky, a 23year veteran, as a mutual
decision by Sinofsky and
Steven A. Ballmer, the chief
executive of the company.
Julie Larson-Green, another
Microsoft veteran in its Windows division, will take over
leadership of all engineering
responsibilities related to
Windows. Tami Reller, the
chief financial officer of the
Windows division, will run
business and marketing for
mind behind Apple Inc. stores who
took the top job at Penney a year
ago, also reiterated his confidence
in the plan and said returning the
company to growth is “Job. No. 1.”
Additionally, he touted the early
success of the makeover Penney
began this fall of 700 of its 1,100
Times CEO starts amid BBC scandal
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — New
York Times Co. CEO Mark
Thompson started his job
Monday amid a widening scandal at his former
employer, the BBC.
When the Times hired
him in August, Thompson
was hailed as someone who
could help the company at a
time when print publications
are suffering from the loss of
readers and advertisers.
Thompson, 55, left the
British Broadcasting Corp.
in September after more
than three decades with the
public broadcaster. He joined
the company as a production
trainee in 1979 and spent
his last eight years there as
director general.
In recent months,
Thompson has faced questions over a decision by the
BBC’s “Newsnight” program
last December to shelve an
investigation into child sexual-abuse allegations against
renowned BBC children’s
the group.
Sinofsky was seen as
one of the most competent
managers within Microsoft
and earned high marks for
helping to improve the quality of its software after the
company released Windows
Vista, a widely criticized
version of the operating
system. His name was often
floated by people speculating
about a possible successor to
Ballmer, who has announced
no plans to retire.
But Sinofsky was also a
polarizing figure who alienated many other members
of Microsoft’s senior leader- • Continued from Page C1
ship team. For that reason, he
The planning staff also
was seen by many insiders as had recommended a 50-footan unlikely replacement for wide green buffer between
Ballmer.
future development and
houses that sit across Gunbarrel.
But Price said 50 feet was
too much.
“To my knowledge, I don’t
know of a single office building anywhere in the city that
earlier this month that the has a 50-foot landscape bufstrike, by about 30 percent fer,” he said. “If we were proof its workforce, could lead tecting the Sistine Chapel, I
understand that.”
to bakery closures.
Price suggested a 20-foot
“We deeply regret this
decision, but we have repeat- buffer.
John Bridger, executive
edly explained that we will
close facilities that are no director of the Regional Planlonger able to produce and ning Agency, said Waterside
deliver products because of is a big commercial center.
“We felt that a larger bufa work stoppage — and that
we will close the entire com- fer was warranted given the
pany if widespread strikes
cripple our business,” Hostess Brands CEO Gregory F.
Rayburn said.
Hostess said customers
will not be affected by the
• Continued from Page C1
closures.
self-sufficient around 2035.
That is “a dramatic reversal of the trend seen in most
other energy-importing countries,” the Paris-based IEA said
in its report. “Energy develtem.
Now RIM is hoping opments in the United States
that BlackBerry 10, and the are profound, and their effect
smartphones that will run will be felt well beyond North
the software, will help it America — and the energy
return to relevancy in a cut- sector.”
Rebounding U.S. oil and
throat market.
“It’s make or break,” said gas production is “steadily
Peter Misek, managing direc- changing the role of North
tor at Jefferies & Co. RIM’s America in global energy
“survival depends on the trade,” the IEA said.
For example, oil exports out
success of” BlackBerry 10.
RIM said Monday that of the Mideast will increasit would launch BlackBerry ingly go to Asia as the U.S.
10 on Jan. 30. The company becomes more self-sufficient.
will also unveil the first two That will increase the global
smartphones that will run on focus on the security of strathe platform and announce tegic routes that bring Midwhen they will go on sale, dle East oil to Asian markets.
which analysts are pegging Tensions between Iran and
Western powers have raised
for March.
Offices
Hostess closing 3 bakeries
following nationwide strike
The Associated Press
Hostess Brands Inc. is
permanently closing three
bakeries following a nationwide strike by its bakers
union.
The maker of Twinkies,
Ding Dongs and Wonder
Bread said Monday that the
strike has prevented it from
producing and delivering
products, and it is closing
bakeries in Seattle, St. Louis
and Cincinnati. The facilities
employ 627 workers.
Hostess, based in Irving,
Texas, operates 36 bakeries
nationwide and has about
18,300 employees. It warned
BlackBerry 10 launch set
Los Angeles Times
BlackBerry 10 is finally
making its debut in January
after a lengthy delay, but it
may be too little, too late for
troubled Research in Motion
Ltd.
The latest operating system is a crucial product
for the Canadian company,
which has seen both its stock
market value and consumer
perception plummet in just
a few years. BlackBerrys
were once the go-to phone
for corporations and everyday smartphone users but
have since been overshadowed by Apple Inc.’s iPhone
and devices running Google
Inc.’s Android operating sys-
stores with 10 sectioned-off shops
inside each that feature different
brands such as Levi’s and Penney’s
new JCP line of casual clothes.
“The CEO was selling the hope,
but now investors are looking at
what the company will look like in
the first half of the year,” said Brian
Sozzi, a chief equities analyst for
research firm NBG Productions
who follows the company. “Investors are digesting the reality.”
The reality is a lot harsher than
Johnson imagined when he rolled
out his pricing plan on Feb. 1. The
goal was to wean customers off
of the deep discounts that they’d
become addicted to, but that were
eroding profits.
He got rid of coupons and nearly 600 sales Penney offered at various times throughout the year. In
their place, the company rolled out
a three-tiered strategy that permanently lowered prices on all items
in the store by 40 percent, offered
monthlong deeper discounts on
select merchandise and added
periodic clearance events throughout the year.
But as Penney’s coupons and
sales disappeared, so did its customers. The company’s losses and
sales declines began to pile up.
Johnson made some tweaks to the
pricing plan — he got rid of the
monthlong sales events in August.
But that didn’t help.
On Friday, Penney reported
its third consecutive quarterly
loss that missed Wall Street estimates. The company, based in
Plano, Texas, said it lost 56 cents
per share, or $123 million, in the
quarter ended Oct. 27. Revenue
dropped nearly 27 percent to $2.93
billion. Analysts had expected a
loss of 15 cents a share on revenue
of $3.27 billion.
Energy
television host Jimmy Savile. That decision was made
while Thompson was still in
charge of the company.
Thompson has said he
only became aware of the
investigative report after
speaking with a BBC journalist at a cocktail party long
after it had been canceled.
When he inquired later about
its cancellation, he said executives told him it had been
terminated for journalistic
reasons.
Conservative lawmaker
Rob Wilson told The Associated Press last month that
he has written Thompson
seeking more answers.
Savile, who died in October 2011, was known for his
eccentricity, garish tracksuits
and Cuban cigars. Early last
month, BBC rival ITV aired
a documentary that detailed
sexual abuse allegations
against Savile. Since then,
scores of women have come
forward, alleging that they
were abused by Savile when
scale of that development
next to the houses across
the street,” he said. “Clearly,
there may be some middle
ground in between.”
Price said the side of the
office building would be
facing the houses. He said
there will be trees and other
landscaping in the buffer. A
20-foot buffer was approved
by planners, and the zoning
change will go to the City
Council for final approval.
Waterside currently holds
an hhgregg electronics store
and some other smaller businesses. Under construction
near the Shallowford Road
entrance is a $40 million
Embassy Suites. Waterside
still has 18 acres of developed
land and 60 acres of undeveloped land left to fill, according to newspaper archives.
Contact Mike Pare at
[email protected]
or 423-757-6318.
concerns that oil exports from
the Persian Gulf could be
blocked in a potential conflict
over Tehran’s alleged plan to
develop nuclear weapons.
The IEA added that global
trends in the energy markets
will be influenced by some
countries’ retreat from nuclear power, the fast spread of
wind and solar technologies
and a rise in unconventional
gas production.
The agency concluded
that despite the rising use of
low carbon energy sources,
huge subsidies will keep fossil
fuels “dominant in the global
energy mix.”
“Taking all new developments and policies into
account, the world is still failing to put the global energy
system onto a more sustainable path,” the IEA said.
Global energy needs are
forecast to increase by a third
by 2035, with 60 percent of
the additional demand coming from China, India and the
Middle East.
The Associated Press
Mark Thompson, newly named CEO of The New York
Times Co., arrives at the newspaper’s offices Monday
in New York.
they were underage girls,
sometimes in BBC dressing
rooms. Savile’s behavior was
the subject of speculation
long before that, but it was
never formally investigated
by the BBC.
I n t h e l a te s t tw i s t ,
Thompson’s successor as
the BBC’s top executive,
George Entwistle, resigned
on Saturday after a Nov. 2
“Newsnight” report wrongly
implied that a former British
politician sexually abused a
child.
After the Savile scandal broke, Times Chairman
Arthur Sulzberger Jr. sent the
company’s staff a letter that
said he was satisfied Thompson had no role in the decision to scrap the investigative segment on Savile.
Duplex
by Steve Steele and Sherry
Huff, longtime associates of
payday lender Carey Vaughn
Brown.
Though Brown attended
Monday’s meeting, the Chattanooga entrepreneur did not
speak.
Like many of Brown’s
companies such as Terenine
and Area203, Energy Way
Corp. was incorporated in
Nevada through Silver Shield
Services, a company that has
claimed on its website to offer
“protection from lawsuits,
government creditors and
state taxes through Nevada’s
incorporation-friendly laws.”
That type of property
owner rubs Robert Manor,
head of the Hilltop Neighborhood Association, the wrong
way.
“On the surface, it seems
like somebody is just trying
to revert this to R-3, but when
we found out the money trail
behind it, we found out wow,
we really don’t want that,”
Manor said. “They’ve got no
vested interest in our community other than making a
quick buck.”
The attempt by Energy
Way to re-establish the
rental property in the Hilltop Neighborhood may have
come at the worst possible
time, said Berz, because the
Chattanooga City Council is
preparing to place a moratorium on new exceptions to
R-1 zoning, she said.
“Obviously, there is no
doubt in my mind that this
should be turned down,” she
said.
Energy Way owner Carey
Brown said later that the company already had installed a
30-year architectural roof in
the 2,700-square-foot building and said he would maintain the area’s standards.
“I’m sure that the neighbors will be pleased when we
are finished,” Brown said.
Contact staff writer Ellis
Smith at [email protected]
press.com or 423-757-6315.
• Continued from Page C1
family homes in established
neighborhoods, Mitchell said.
The influx of affordable housing for two or more families
would revitalize aging communities and bring new
blood into Chattanooga for
businesses hungry for cheap
labor, they thought.
But the duplex craze didn’t
last long.
Crime moved into the
neighborhoods along with
the low-rent tenants, spreading drugs and violence into
family neighborhoods, neighbors say.
In 1989, planners reversed
themselves. Officials rezoned
the entire Hilltop Neighborhood back to single-family R1 zoning, and duplexes that
stayed vacant for 100 days
had to be converted to singlefamily homes.
Unfortunately, Energy
Way Corp. wasn’t aware of
the neighborhood’s history
when the company bought
the last duplex standing in
the Hilltop core.
“This was news to us,” said
Peter Johnson, an attorney
for Scenic City Legal Group,
which represents Energy Way
Corp.
Johnson argued that as
property owners and now
members of the neighborhood, Energy Way Crop. has
the right to keep using the
duplex as it was intended.
“If they cannot use this
property at its current use,
there’s nothing keeping this
home from being the next
gang house,” he said. “This
type of permit is not just for
the property owners around
it, [Energy Way Corp. has]
just as much right to use this
property as everyone else
has.”
Energy Way Corp. is listed
with the Georgia secretary
of state as being operated
timesfreepress.com
• • • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • C3
Breaking News: [email protected]
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RaymondJames.com/LawsonWinchester/Home
423-648-0570
©2011 Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC
©2011 Raymond James Financial Services, Inc., member FINRA/SIPC Raymond James is
a registered trademark of Raymond James Financial, Inc. 11-RPRET-0061 MM/EN 7/11
35153441
CUSTOM. INCOME
CUSTOM
INCOME. ST
STRATEGIES
TRATTEGIES
FSG mortgage lending sales manager Jill Green works to fund a customer’s loan.
FSGBank delivers hometown
customer service, assurance
35111856
Would you like to WIN $1,000?
SW I P E
S I GN
Sweepstakes
BY JACK HOWLAND
&
35111873
Now until 12/31/12, every time you use your FSGBank debit card, you are entered into the
“Swipe & Sign Sweepstakes”
You do not have to be an FSGBank customer to win. Please go to fsgbank.com or stop by any branch
location for a list of complete contest rules, regulations and restrictions.
Member FDIC
Put our 35 years of experience and Grace’s MBA in marketing
to work for you when selling and buying your home.
visit my website
GraceFrankGroup.com
35119096
It’s not about square footage, cathedral ceilings, or how many
baths...It’s about putting down roots where you can flourish. We
specialize in discovering the right environment for your unique
needs. It’s not about how bad the market is...It’s about having an
experienced campaign manager to market your property wisely.
Renaissance Realtors
office: 423 756 5700
direct: 423 355 1538
GraceFrankGroup.com
Sharon Inglis and Jill Green help clients fund their dreams.
FGSBank’s main office is located at 531 Broad St. For
banking and mortgage inquiries, call 423-308-2000 or
visit fsgbank.com.
FIRE AND WATER RESTORATION
Putting things back to the way they were.
Conventional Mortgage Loans
Home Equity Lines of Credit/HELOC
Construction Loans • Jumbo Loans
www.cdg247.net
Fannie Mae HomePath • USDA
423-305-0700
Turning Challenges
FHDA • FHA • VA
INTO FRESH STARTS
PERSONAL BANKRUPTCY
C h a p t er 7 a n d C h a p t er 13
• Free Consultations
• Affordable Rates
• Trustworthy Practice
• Prompt Communication
To contact a mortgage team member, please call
423-308-2000
or email [email protected]
Lorraine Raymond
Attorney at Law
3335 Ringgold Road, Suite 105
(423) 305-0394
35119075
MORE INFORMATION
NEVER...IS A GOOD TIME.
OUR MORTGAGE TEAM
SETS THE GOLD STANDARD.
35119085
to fall over the next year.
Doug Duncan, senior
vice president and chief
economist at Fannie Mae
says, “This has been a year
of steady growth in the
percentage of consumers
with positive home price
expectations.”
Chattanooga remains
affordable and a desirable place to live. With
mortgage rates at record
50-year lows, it may be
a great time to consider
purchasing or refinancing. There is no right
or wrong time to refinance one’s mortgage,
said Green -- “It really
depends on your financial goals and how long
you plan to stay in your
home.” Refinancing may
be a viable option even
if the interest rate difference is 1 percent, depending on the factors.
Throughout any home
buying or refinancing
situation, FSGBank’s experienced associates will
be there to lend a helping
hand.
Exceptional Views, Outdoor Activities, Location and Quality of Life
35111864
Purchasing a home, or
even just refinancing one, is
the largest financial transaction most people will make.
The Mortgage Department
at FSGBank is always there
to offer professional advice
and hometown customer
service.
The bank’s friendly
staff
members
pride
themselves on offering
personalized
service.
“We will work with you
one on one to ensure
a program is tailored
to meet your financing
needs” said Jill Green,
mortgage lending sales
manager. “Our approach
is different. As a community bank, we believe in
hometown relationship
banking and take a customer-centric approach.”
The bank’s products
cover a broad range of
clients’ needs. “Whether
you are purchasing your
dream home, a second
home
or
investment
property, or refinancing,
our team of experienced
loan officers can help you
find the right program,”
Green said. “We offer
fixed- and adjustable-rate
loans, VA, FHA, USDA
and Jumbo loans.”
Attention to detail
and customer service are
what sets FSGBank apart
from most competitors
and make it a welcoming
alternative to larger companies, she said.
“The skill set of our
team members is our
competitive advantage,”
Green said. “Our Processing and Closing Department is also local,
and that sets us apart.
Our operations team has
over 100 years of combined experience and our
Chattanooga loan officers have over 75 years of
combined experience.”
A recent survey by
Fannie Mae in October
2012 says Americans are
growing more confident
in the housing market.
Participants also believe
it is a good time to buy a
home and an increasing
number said it’s a good
time to sell. Only 10 percent of respondents said
they expect home prices
.
timesfreepress.com ...
C4 • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • • •
THE MARKETS
NYSE
NASDAQ
AMEX
1,440
52
3,040
1,400
Close: 1,380.03
Change: 0.18 (flat)
2,960
1,360
MARKET DIARY
Name
Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
MARKET DIARY
MARKET DIARY
Yest.
1420
1594
117
3131
75
89
Prev.
1472
1564
101
3137
59
114
Name
Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Yest.
1112
1292
121
2525
23
96
Prev.
1224
1205
117
2546
19
118
Name
Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Yest.
186
242
32
460
19
16
Prev.
219
211
39
469
22
11
3,200
1,450
3,100
1,400
3,000
1,350
2,900
1,300
VOLUME
1,078,063,151
1,359,653,318
47,556,664
2,485,273,133
Name
TitanMet
ChinaDigtl
iPBetaIMet
Jefferies
CSGlobWm
RoadrnTrn
CreXus
AegeanMP
ZaleCp
Chimera
Last
16.50
3.89
41.17
16.27
8.43
17.20
12.43
5.56
7.50
2.77
Chg
+4.93
+.90
+5.39
+2.00
+1.02
+1.86
+1.33
+.59
+.65
+.22
%Chg
+42.6
+30.1
+15.1
+14.0
+13.8
+12.1
+12.0
+11.9
+9.5
+8.6
LOSERS
Last
13.77
24.40
17.97
27.60
21.01
20.70
3.42
30.50
16.16
18.02
Chg
-2.87
-3.72
-2.67
-4.10
-3.09
-2.88
-.47
-4.00
-2.04
-2.26
%Chg
-17.2
-13.2
-12.9
-12.9
-12.8
-12.2
-12.0
-11.6
-11.2
-11.1
Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
Vol (00)
87,353,400
66,576,700
37,730,200
37,057,900
32,946,000
32,421,900
30,477,600
29,366,400
29,345,700
25,350,900
Last
138.27
9.39
41.16
2.77
5.61
15.53
5.39
17.97
16.50
10.97
Chg
+.11
-.04
+.16
+.22
+.06
+.03
-.12
-2.67
+4.93
+.04
22,630,922
36,310,781
3,572,616
62,514,319
HIGH
2,800
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
2,700
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
Commodity Exchange Unit
Oats
CBOT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Cocoa
ICE 10 metric tons- $ per ton
Coffee
ICE 37,500 lbs.- cents per lb.
Sugar
ICE 112,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
Cotton
ICE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
Wheat
CBOT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Rough rice
CBOT 2,000 CWT- dollars per CWT
Heating oil
NYMX 42,000 gal, cents per gal
Light sweet crude
NYMX 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl.
Gas blend
NYMX 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon
Natural gas
NYMX 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu
Last
5.90
3.18
27.13
2.76
6.21
3.99
73.93
4.60
4.50
2.60
Chg
+2.79
+.55
+4.38
+.42
+.79
+.49
+8.92
+.55
+.54
+.31
%Chg
+89.6
+20.9
+19.3
+17.9
+14.6
+14.0
+13.7
+13.6
+13.6
+13.5
Name
Vringo
DocuSec
CKX Lands
SilvrCrst g
GranTrra g
PowrREIT
Orbital
IncOpR
AdmRsc
Daxor
Last
3.65
2.84
14.24
2.93
5.75
7.94
2.87
3.43
31.95
8.48
Chg
+.26
+.14
+.50
+.10
+.18
+.24
+.08
+.10
+.87
+.23
%Chg
+7.7
+5.2
+3.6
+3.5
+3.2
+3.1
+3.0
+2.9
+2.8
+2.8
CATTLE
40,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
Dec 12
125.67 125.87
Feb 13
129.35 129.45
Apr 13
133.02 133.25
Frisales 52215
Friopen int 323490 up+2,897.00
CORN
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Dec 12
736.75 743.50
Mar 13
740.50 746.75
May 13
737
743.25
Jul 13
727.75 733
Frisales 470531
Friopen int 1295457 up+9,872.00
FEEDER CATTLE
50,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
Nov 12
144.15 144.25
Jan 13
145.92 146.37
Mar 13
148.10 148.70
Frisales 5266
Friopen int 26666 up+14.00
HOGS-Lean
40,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
Dec 12
80.80
80.87
Feb 13
86.35
86.47
Apr 13
90.72
91.00
May 13
Frisales 54791
Friopen int 215055 up+2,984.00
LOSERS
Name
ClovisOn n
BostPrv wt
RecoveryE
Inteliquent
Galectin un
Omeros
ExideTc
NektarTh
Lifevantge
Ambient lf
Last
12.50
3.33
3.30
2.96
4.25
6.99
2.71
7.04
2.51
3.13
Chg
-8.99
-.67
-.63
-.55
-.75
-1.23
-.44
-1.11
-.38
-.45
%Chg
-41.8
-16.8
-16.0
-15.7
-15.0
-15.0
-14.0
-13.6
-13.1
-12.6
Name
MeetMe
ComstkMn
eMagin
ImpacMtg
GoldResrc
Medgen wt
ContMatls
FAB Univ
RareEle g
BioTime
MOST
ACTIVE
Name
Facebook n
Microsoft
SiriusXM
PwShs QQQ
Cisco
GileadSci
Intel
Yahoo
RschMotn
Dell Inc
Vol (00)
66065500
59490600
48302900
28176800
27955800
27258400
26471400
22166100
20239600
19264700
Last
20.07
28.22
2.78
63.42
16.86
73.93
20.77
17.51
8.81
9.35
Chg
+.86
-.61
+.03
-.01
+.04
+8.92
-.04
+.25
+.27
-.07
Last
2.51
2.18
3.25
15.60
15.00
2.94
11.07
3.23
3.76
3.20
Chg
-.39
-.28
-.38
-1.73
-1.48
-.26
-.78
-.17
-.19
-.14
%Chg
-13.4
-11.4
-10.5
-10.0
-9.0
-8.1
-6.6
-5.0
-4.8
-4.2
ACTIVE
Name
Vringo
CheniereEn
NwGold g
Rentech
GranTrra g
NA Pall g
VirnetX
GoldStr g
AlldNevG
GoldResrc
Vol (00)
5207700
4721100
2053800
1534600
1285900
1091600
1023200
1012100
993700
889500
Last
3.65
14.19
10.67
2.74
5.75
1.46
35.35
1.82
34.45
15.00
Chg
+.26
-.49
-.03
+.18
-.03
-.08
-.05
-1.15
-1.48
125.30
129.10
132.90
125.35
129.35
133.15
-.40
712.50
716.25
713.25
704.50
718
722.25
719.50
710.25
-20.75
-19.75
-19.25
-18.75
144.00
145.50
147.92
80.15
85.90
90.42
-.12
144.00
145.95
148.32
80.32
86.27
90.95
97.50
-.20
+.35
+.32
-.43
-.05
-.05
Month Open Int. Vol. Settle Chg.
Dec 12
5879 1036 359.25 -4.25
Dec 12
23281 13354
2381
+23
Dec 12
45374 25281 153.05 +3.15
Jan 13
896
125 22.63 +.18
Dec 12
65082 25463 70.88 +1.30
Dec 12
162935 208381 857.75 -28.75
Nov 12
13
10 14.625 -.315
Dec 12
83758 39266 299.92
-.63
Dec 12
236478 265507 85.57
-.50
Dec 12
79489 58707 2.6763 -.0229
Dec 12
143814 90401 3.570 +.067
SOYBEAN MEAL
100 tons- dollars per ton
Dec 12
449.70 449.70
Jan 13
445.40 445.40
Mar 13
436.10 436.10
May 13
423.30 423.30
Jul 13
416.30 416.30
Aug 13
404.20 404.20
Frisales 91362
Friopen int 218488 off-4,168.00
SOYBEAN OIL
60,000 lbs- cents per lb
Dec 12
47.62
47.74
Jan 13
48.04
48.12
Mar 13
48.50
48.57
May 13
49.01
49.01
Jul 13
49.30
49.34
Aug 13
49.50
49.50
Frisales 17930
Friopen int 369797 up+5,307.00
SOYBEANS
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Nov 12
1452.25 1452.25
Jan 13
1448.25 1448.75
Mar 13
1435
1435
May 13
1415.25 1416.50
Jul 13
1405
1405
Aug 13
1375
1375
Frisales 259926
Friopen int 603152 off-11,011.00
430.80
426.30
416.80
406.40
401.80
392.50
431.40
426.70
416.90
406.90
402.60
392.50
46.52
46.89
47.35
47.85
48.31
48.66
47.39
47.76
48.22
48.72
49.19
49.34
1406
1402
1386
1369.50
1363
1339
AAR
ABB Ltd
AES Corp
AFLAC
AGCO
AGL Res
AK Steel
AOL
AT&T Inc
AbtLab
Accenture
Actuant
AdamsEx
AdvAuto
AMD
Aegon
Aetna
Agilent
Agnico g
AirProd
AlcatelLuc
Alcoa
AllegTch
AlliBGlbHi
AlliBInco
AlliBern
AlliantEgy
Allstate
AlphaNRs
AlpAlerMLP
Altria
AMCOL
Ameren
AMovilL
AEagleOut
AEP
AmExp
AmIntlGrp
Amerigas
Ametek s
Anadarko
Annaly
AquaAm
Arbitron
ArcelorMit
ArchCoal
ArchDan
ArlingAst
ArmourRsd
AstraZen
AtlasPpln
ATMOS
AutoZone
Avon
B&G Foods
BB&T Cp
BHP BillLt
BHPBil plc
BP PLC
BP Pru
BabCPtInv
BakrHu
BcoBrad pf
BcoSBrasil
BkofAm
BkNYMel
Barclay
BariPVix rs
Bard
BarrickG
Baxter
Beam Inc
BeazerH rs
BectDck
BerkHa A
BerkH B
BestBuy
Boeing
Boise Inc
BostonSci
Braskem
Brinker
BrMySq
BrkfldOfPr
BrwnBrn
CBL Asc
CBRE GRE
CBS B
CGG Verit
CLECO
CNOOC
CSX
CVS Care
CblvsnNY
Calpine
CdnNRs gs
CapOne
CapsteadM
Carnival
Caterpillar
CedarF
Cemex
Cemig pf s
CenterPnt
CntryLink
ChesEng
Chevron
Chicos
Chimera
ChinaDigtl
ChinaUni
Chubb
Cigna
Citigroup
ClearEnFd
CliffsNRs
Clorox
CloudPeak
Coach
CocaCola s
TICKER
LAST
CHG NAME
CocaCE
A-B-C
Coeur
AIR
14.12 +.03 ColgPal
ABB
18.22 +.03 CmtyBkSy
AES
9.91 -.05 CompDivHd
AFL
49.84 +.22 ComstkRs
AGCO 44.83 +.51 ConAgra
GAS
38.19 -.17 ConocPhil s
AKS
5.46 +.05
AOL
38.13 -1.41 ConEd
T
33.87 +.33 ConstellA
ABT
64.87 +.03 Cnvrgys
ACN
66.64 +.83 Corning
ATU
26.68 -.13 CorrectnCp
ADX
11.00 +.07 Covidien
AAP
78.27 -.14 Crane
AMD
1.99 -.04 CSVS2xVxS
AEG
5.41 +.06 CSVelIVSt
AET
41.91 -.21 CreXus
A
36.82 -.09 CrosTim
AEM
55.77 +.15 Cryolife
APD
79.95 +.22 Culp Inc
ALU
1.13 +.02 Cummins
Cytec
AA
8.43
ATI
28.29 +1.52
AWF
15.57 -.19
ACG
8.59 -.02 DCT Indl
AB
16.43 +.37 DR Horton
LNT
43.58 -.12 DTE
ALL
38.55 -.18 Darden
ANR
7.87 -.13 DeanFds
AMLP
15.87 -.28 Deere
MO
31.10 -.38 Delhaize
ACO
29.78 +.04 DeltaAir
AEE
29.86 -.50 DenburyR
AMX
23.65 -.15 DevonE
AEO
19.54 -.35 DiaOffs
AEP
41.27 -.53 DicksSptg
AXP
55.52 -.31 Dillards
AIG
31.98 -.19 DrxFnBull
APU
40.17 -1.13 DirSCBear
AME
36.06 +.02 DirFnBear
APC
70.75 +.10 DirDGldBll
NLY
14.87 -.11 DirxSCBull
WTR
24.91 -.05 Discover
ARB
36.25 +.14 Disney
MT
15.38 +.17 Div&Inco
DollarTh
ACI
7.36
ADM
25.26 -.13 DomRescs
AI
20.53 +.03 DmRsBW
ARR
6.96 -.01 DoralFncl
AZN
45.31 -.13 Dover
APL
31.72 -.77 DowChm
ATO
34.18 -.74 DrPepSnap
AZO
374.38 -2.51 DuPont
AVP
14.31 +.03 DukeEn rs
BGS
28.80 +.02 DukeRlty
BBT
27.70 +.15 DynexCap
BHP
71.35 +.13 EMC Cp
BBL
62.08 +.09 EastChem
BP
40.95 +.11 Eaton
BPT
72.79 -3.69 EdisonInt
MPV
14.48 +.03 EdwLfSci
Elan
BHI
40.71
BBD
15.65 -.02 EldorGld g
BSBR
6.81 -.01 EmersonEl
BAC
9.39 -.04 EnbrdgEPt
BK
24.07 -.04 EnCana g
BCS
14.84 +.31 Energen
VXX
34.79 -2.39 Energizer
BCR
94.70 -.03 EngyTsfr
ABX
35.88 -.19 Enerpls g
BAX
65.06 +.79 Enersis
BEAM
54.53 +.03 Ennis Inc
BZH
13.77 -2.87 Entergy
BDX
74.63 -.60 EntPrPt
BRK/A 128160.00 +575.00 EnzoBio
BRK/B 85.27 +.09 EqualEn g
BBY
15.85 +.55 EscoTech
BA
73.69 +.44 ExcelTrst
ExcoRes
BZ
8.05
BSX
5.21 +.06 Exelon
BAK
13.49 -.03 ExxonMbl
EAT
30.14 -.22 FBL Fn
BMY
31.94 -.29 FamilyDlr
BPO
15.89 -.06 FedExCp
BRO
25.91 -.17 Ferrellgs
CBL
22.28 -.12 FidlNFin
IGR
8.66 -.09 FstHorizon
CBS
34.53 -.35 FirstEngy
CGV
30.20 +.59 Fluor
CNL
39.75 -.63 FordM
CEO
206.83 +.53 ForestOil
CSX
19.96 +.08 FBHmSec
CVS
46.25 -.11 FrkUnv
CVC
14.46 -.33 FMCG
CPN
16.94 -.49 FresenM
CNQ
27.88 -.60 Frontline
COF
57.82 -.55 FullerHB
CMO
11.91 -.05 Fusion-io
CCL
38.46 -.70
CAT
85.18 +.23
FUN
35.31 -.31 GabelliET
CX
8.62 -.03 GabHlthW
CIG
11.17 -.22 GabUtil
CNP
20.16 +.01 GameStop
CTL
38.92 +.11 Gannett
CHK
17.23 +.19 Gap
CVX
105.93 +.09 GnCable
CHS
18.44 -.24 GenDynam
CIM
2.77 +.22 GenElec
STV
3.89 +.90 GenMills
CHU
15.11 -.28 GenMotors
CB
74.17 -.58 Gensco
CI
51.08 -.57 GenOn En
C
36.42 +.49 GenuPrt
CEM
22.95 -.60 Genworth
CLF
36.30 -.14 Gerdau
CLX
73.04 +.26 GlaxoSKln
CLD
20.04 -.20 GoldFLtd
COH
54.73 +.87 Goldcrp g
KO
36.08 -.21 GoldmanS
TICKER LAST CHG
CCE
30.51 +.18
CDE
23.92 -.84
CL
104.31 +.44
CBU
26.33 +.02
CODI
13.97 +.10
CRK
15.98 -.02
CAG
27.84 +.07
COP
55.64 -.03
ED
55.12 -.62
STZ
34.92 -.50
CVG
16.04 -.24
GLW
11.27 -.07
CXW
33.49 -.18
COV
55.59
CR
41.44 -.20
TVIX
1.32 -.15
XIV
16.65 +.99
CXS
12.43 +1.33
CRT
26.23 -.48
CRY
5.80 -.01
CFI
12.25 +.20
CMI
98.69 +1.59
CYT
67.07 +.84
NAME
NY CmtyB
NewellRub
NewmtM
Nexen g
NextEraEn
NiSource
NikeB
NobleCorp
NokiaCp
NordicAm
Nordstrm
NorflkSo
NthnTEn n
NorthropG
Novartis
NovoNord
Nucor
NustarEn
OGE Engy
OcciPet
OfficeDpt
OfficeMax
Olin
OshkoshCp
D-E-F
DCT
DHI
DTE
DRI
DF
DE
DEG
DAL
DNR
DVN
DO
DKS
DDS
FAS
TZA
FAZ
NUGT
TNA
DFS
DIS
DNI
DTG
D
DOM
DRL
DOV
DOW
DPS
DD
DUK
DRE
DX
EMC
EMN
ETN
EIX
EW
ELN
EGO
EMR
EEP
ECA
EGN
ENR
ETP
ERF
ENI
EBF
ETR
EPD
ENZ
EQU
ESE
EXL
XCO
EXC
XOM
FFG
FDO
FDX
FGP
FNF
FHN
FE
FLR
F
FST
FBHS
FT
FCX
FMS
FRO
FUL
FIO
6.23
19.40
58.56
51.37
16.93
85.68
35.54
10.30
14.74
53.94
65.76
48.70
82.86
102.23
17.10
18.16
13.93
52.07
41.16
47.45
3.41
85.80
49.19
3.42
.58
60.43
28.79
43.96
43.13
61.45
13.40
9.43
24.10
57.22
49.55
43.91
86.66
10.55
14.59
50.34
28.30
20.78
43.16
75.79
42.13
12.56
16.68
14.44
64.20
50.32
2.58
3.50
36.04
11.74
7.44
30.77
87.32
31.26
66.40
90.08
16.51
22.99
9.27
41.88
52.23
10.97
6.64
27.93
7.08
38.64
67.20
3.19
30.01
21.57
-.02
-1.20
-.63
-.24
+.19
+1.39
-.28
+.11
-.22
+.11
+.72
-.65
-.60
+.33
+.14
-.10
-.52
-.43
+.08
+.39
-.01
+1.80
-.14
-.47
-.14
-.03
-.57
+.45
-.21
-.51
-.10
-.05
-.12
-.31
+.50
-.26
-1.04
+.05
-.32
+.19
-.55
-.05
-.27
-.43
+.05
-.28
-.14
+.05
-.70
-1.07
-.10
+.10
-.04
+.06
-.34
+.11
-.12
-.10
+.35
-.30
+.11
+.23
-.60
+.07
+.04
-.16
-.06
-.15
+.29
+.54
+.08
-.10
-.34
G-H-I
GAB
GRX
GUT
GME
GCI
GPS
BGC
GD
GE
GIS
GM
GCO
GEN
GPC
GNW
GGB
GSK
GFI
GG
GS
5.49 -.04
9.28 +.09
6.70 +.04
23.09 +.98
16.79 -.32
33.50 -.12
28.02 -.01
64.18 -.27
20.89 -.11
39.20 -.17
25.26 +.22
58.25 +.61
2.41 -.05
61.36 -.42
5.54 -.07
8.86 +.02
43.03 -.52
12.61 -.03
43.44 -.73
117.24 +1.09
NAME
Goodyear
GreenbCos
HCA Hldg
HalconR rs
Hallibrtn
Hanesbrds
HarleyD
HarrisTtr
HartfdFn
HatterasF
HawaiiEl
HltMgmt
Heckmann
HeclaM
Heinz
HelixEn
Hershey
Hertz
Hess
HewlettP
HollyEnr
HollyFront
HomeDp
Honda
HonwllIntl
HostHotls
HovnanE
HugotnR
Humana
IFM Inv rs
INGPrRTr
iShGold
iShBraz
iShJapn
iSTaiwn
iShSilver
iShChina25
iShEMkts
iShSPLatA
iShB20 T
iS Eafe
iShiBxHYB
iSR1KG
iShR2K
iSSPMatl
iShREst
iShDJHm
TICKER LAST
GT
11.61
GBX
13.95
HCA
32.52
HK
5.38
HAL
30.65
HBI
32.79
HOG
45.84
HTSI
36.91
HIG
20.89
HTS
26.05
HE
24.83
HMA
8.02
HEK
3.53
HL
5.88
HNZ
57.68
HLX
16.70
HSY
71.13
HTZ
14.70
HES
50.57
HPQ
13.41
HEP
62.81
HFC
41.37
HD
61.16
HMC
29.56
HON
61.44
HST
14.25
HOV
4.74
HGT
7.02
HUM
69.16
CTC
1.52
PPR
6.23
IAU
16.82
EWZ
52.50
EWJ
8.86
EWT
12.97
SLV
31.37
FXI
36.55
EEM
41.16
ILF
41.38
TLT
126.19
EFA
52.76
HYG
91.42
IWF
63.75
IWM
79.15
MXI
58.11
IYR
62.88
ITB
19.76
CHG
+.08
+.38
-.10
-.13
+.09
-.84
+.55
+.25
+.08
-.03
-.23
-.03
+.18
-.16
+.21
+.17
+.78
+.36
-.16
-.20
-.64
+.62
+.20
-.39
+.61
+.01
-.42
-.07
+.39
-.02
-.02
-.27
-.09
+.04
-.17
+.09
+.16
-.15
+.21
-.05
+.03
+.09
-.23
-.15
-.10
-.54
NAME
iStar
Imation
IBM
IntlGame
IntPap
Interpublic
Invesco
ItauUnibH
TICKER LAST
SFI
7.91
IMN
4.09
IBM
189.25
IGT
13.18
IP
34.66
IPG
9.94
IVZ
24.07
ITUB
14.58
CHG
+.01
-.07
-.39
-.32
-.19
-.02
+.17
+.04
J-K-L
JPMorgCh
Jabil
JacobsEng
JanusCap
Jefferies
JohnJn
JohnsnCtl
JnprNtwk
KB Home
KC Southn
KA MLP
Kellogg
KeyEngy
Keycorp
Kimco
KindME
KindMorg
KindMM
Kinross g
KodiakO g
Kohls
KrispKrm
Kroger
LSI Corp
LabCp
LVSands
LeapFrog
LeggPlat
LennarA
LeucNatl
LillyEli
Limited
LincNat
LinkedIn
LockhdM
Lowes
LyonBas A
JPM
JBL
JEC
JNS
JEF
JNJ
JCI
JNPR
KBH
KSU
KYN
K
KEG
KEY
KIM
KMP
KMI
KMR
KGC
KOG
KSS
KKD
KR
LSI
LH
LVS
LF
LEG
LEN
LUK
LLY
LTD
LNC
LNKD
LMT
LOW
LYB
40.58
17.40
39.29
8.24
16.27
69.68
25.54
17.79
14.67
77.31
29.76
53.67
5.97
8.29
18.87
78.93
32.53
72.29
10.22
9.29
51.18
7.08
24.91
6.68
84.37
43.46
7.44
26.53
36.38
21.14
48.30
46.43
23.44
99.00
89.81
31.98
50.65
-.04
-.22
+.29
+.09
+2.00
-.19
+.02
+.14
-1.02
+.40
-.42
+.19
+.10
-.07
-1.71
-.05
-1.45
-.10
+.13
-.48
+.01
+.21
-.06
-.07
-.04
-.85
-.19
-1.73
-.66
+.83
-.05
-.13
+3.38
-.17
+.51
-.20
NAME
TICKER LAST
CHG
M-N-O
MFA Fncl
MGF
MGIC
MGM Rsts
Macerich
Macys
MagHRes
Manitowoc
Manulife g
MarathnO
MarathPet
MktVGold
MV OilSv s
MktVRus
MarkWest
MStewrt
Masco
MasterCrd
McDrmInt
McDnlds
McEwenM
MeadJohn
MeadWvco
Medicis
Medtrnic
Merck
MetLife
MetroPCS
MKors n
MidAApt
Modine
Mohawk
Molycorp
MonstrWw
MorgStan
MurphO
NRG Egy
NYSE Eur
Nabors
NBGre pfA
NBGrce rs
NatFuGas
NtHlthInv
NOilVarco
NatResPtrs
NewOriEd
MFA
8.00 +.02
MGF
6.89 +.05
MTG
1.63 -.05
MGM
9.59 -.42
MAC
55.90 -.10
M
38.70 -.23
MHR
3.38 -.15
MTW
13.74 +.24
MFC
12.29 +.11
MRO
30.23 -.21
MPC
53.88 +.76
GDX
50.04 -.63
OIH
37.54 +.25
RSX
27.31 +.19
MWE
49.69 -1.48
MSO
2.71 -.05
MAS
15.11 -.18
MA
470.00 +5.34
MDR
10.06 -.02
MCD
84.88 +.14
MUX
4.13 -.30
MJN
65.85 +.15
MWV
29.58 +.06
MRX
42.49 +.46
MDT
41.49 +.33
MRK
44.02 -.03
MET
32.04 +.02
PCS
10.05 -.11
KORS
50.58 +.15
MAA
62.19 -.27
MOD
6.73 +.05
MHK
83.82 -.71
MCP
7.17 -.33
MWW
6.35 -.15
MS
16.77 +.16
MUR
58.56 +.19
NRG
20.21 -.32
NYX
23.26 +.31
NBR
13.47 +.34
NBGpA
6.74 +.29
NBG
2.05 -.18
NFG
51.50 -.18
NHI
53.24 -.09
NOV
70.79 +1.82
NRP
18.21 -1.05
EDU
18.00 +.94
TICKER LAST CHG NAME
TICKER LAST
NYB
12.79 -.10 SocQ&M
SQM
57.49
SAH
18.69
NWL
20.49 +.15 SonicAut
SNE
10.65
NEM
47.71 -.36 SonyCp
SO
42.58
NXY
24.35 +.39 SouthnCo
NEE
66.79 -.59 SthnCopper SCCO 34.50
LUV
9.07
NI
24.02 -.28 SwstAirl
33.96
NKE
92.29 -.02 SwstnEngy SWN
15.71
NE
35.69 +.45 SpecOpps SPE
27.23
NOK
2.71 +.06 SpectraEn SE
TRK
15.34
NAT
8.50 -.06 SpeedM
S
5.61
JWN
54.69 -.10 SprintNex
PSLV
13.08
NSC
58.06 +.06 SprottSilv
14.88
NTI
23.63 +.23 SprottGold PHYS
XLB
35.56
NOC
65.40 -.20 SP Matls
XLV
39.37
NVS
60.00 -.30 SP HlthC
XLP
34.60
NVO
154.79 -1.74 SP CnSt
45.46
NUE
40.40 -.14 SP Consum XLY
XLE
69.69
NS
39.07 -3.07 SP Engy
15.53
OGE
55.32 -.88 SPDR Fncl XLF
XLI
36.37
OXY
76.53 -.12 SP Inds
XLK
28.20
ODP
2.90 +.04 SP Tech
XLU
34.38
OMX
8.05 +.08 SP Util
SPF
6.33
OLN
20.57 -.16 StdPac
68.67
OSK
28.42 +.03 StanBlkDk SWK
StarGas
SGU
4.06
P-Q-R
StateStr
STT
44.39
PNC
PNC
56.31 +.05 Statoil ASA STO
23.99
PPG
PPG
117.47 +.09 Sterlite
SLT
7.29
PPL Corp
PPL
28.26 -.42 Stryker
SYK
53.05
PVR Ptrs
PVR
23.50 -.01 SubPpne
SPH
38.86
PeabdyE
BTU
26.49 +.32 Suncor gs
SU
33.37
Pembina gn PBA
27.32 +.15 Suntech
STP
.95
Pengrth g
PGH
5.32 -.05 SunTrst
STI
26.54
PennWst g PWE
10.43 -.27 SupEnrgy
SPN
19.55
Penney
JCP
17.97 -2.67 Supvalu
SVU
2.77
Penske
PAG
26.72 +.24 Synovus
SNV
2.26
PepcoHold POM
18.96 -.09 Sysco
SYY
29.96
PepsiCo
PEP
68.61 -.24 TCW Strat TSI
5.59
PetroArg s PZE
4.21 -.08 TD Ameritr AMTD
15.62
PetrbrsA
PBR/A 19.81 -.41 TECO
TE
16.74
Petrobras
PBR
20.40 -.41 TJX s
TJX
40.97
PetRes
PEO
25.25 -.07 TaiwSemi
TSM
16.45
Pfizer
PFE
24.11 -.06 TalismE g
TLM
11.16
PhilipMor
PM
84.98 -.44 Target
TGT
61.98
Phillips66 n PSX
47.35 -.06 TeekOffsh
TOO
26.90
PiedNG
PNY
29.65 -.19 Teleflex
TFX
68.19
PiedmOfc
PDM
17.50 -.01 TenetHlt rs THC
26.57
PimcoStrat RCS
11.35 -.02 Tenneco
TEN
29.64
PitnyBw
PBI
11.92 +.02 Teradyn
TER
15.68
PlainsAA s PAA
44.06 -1.44 Terex
TEX
22.65
PlumCrk
PCL
42.68 +.06 TerraNitro
TNH
230.67
Polaris
PII
81.68 -1.30 Tesoro
TSO
38.21
Polypore
PPO
38.82 +1.81 Textron
TXT
23.79
Potash
POT
39.08 +.06 ThomCrk g TC
2.94
PrecCastpt PCP
179.69 +8.36 3D Sys
DDD
42.17
Primerica
PRI
28.08 -.50 3M Co
MMM
89.18
ProShtS&P SH
35.40 -.04 TimeWarn
TWX
44.65
PrUltQQQ s QLD
51.74 -.09 TitanMet
TIE
16.50
PrUShQQQ QID
31.96
TollBros
TOL
30.83
ProUltSP
SSO
56.25 +.09 Torchmark TMK
50.06
PrUVxST rs UVXY
27.60 -4.10 Total SA
TOT
48.10
ProctGam
PG
67.08 +.07 Toyota
TM
77.70
ProgsvCp
PGR
22.26 -.09 TrCda g
TRP
44.93
PrUShSP rs SDS
58.72 -.03 TrnsMont
TLP
32.57
PUSSP500 rs SPXU
42.84 -.20 Travelers
TRV
68.43
Prudentl
PRU
52.19 -.52 TriContl
TY
15.78
PSEG
PEG
29.60 -.30 Trinity
TRN
30.10
PulseElec
PULS
.38 +.10 Tronox s
TROX
18.72
PulteGrp
PHM
16.25 -.55 TurqHillRs
TRQ
8.30
PMMI
PMM
8.30 -.09 TwoHrbInv TWO
10.85
PPrIT
PPT
5.53
TycoIntl s
TYC
27.41
QuantaSvc PWR
25.85 -.24 Tyson
TSN
16.91
QstDiag
DGX
57.21 +.04 UBS AG
UBS
15.29
QksilvRes
KWK
2.91 -.14 US Airwy
LCC
12.29
RPM
RPM
27.04 +.14 USG
USG
25.76
RadioShk
RSH
2.12 +.01 UltraPt g
UPL
21.38
Ralcorp
RAH
70.94 -.04 UndArmr s UA
49.62
RJamesFn RJF
37.98 +.39 UPS B
UPS
72.30
Rayonier
RYN
48.83 +.14 UtdRentals URI
40.77
RedwdTr
RWT
15.50
US Bancrp USB
32.06
RegionsFn RF
6.53 +.08 US NGs rs UNG
21.01
RelStlAl
RS
55.52 +.01 US OilFd
USO
31.59
RepubSvc
RSG
26.75
USSteel
X
21.53
ReynAmer RAI
40.67 -.72 UtdTech
UTX
76.95
RiteAid
RAD
1.09 +.04 UtdhlthGp
UNH
52.20
RockTen
RKT
63.39 -.19 UnumGrp
UNM
19.53
RockwlAut ROK
77.46 +.34
V-W-X-Y-Z
RockwdH
ROC
43.90 -1.32
VALE
17.98
RoyalBk g
RY
55.93 +.17 Vale SA
RylCarb
RCL
34.29 -.15 Vale SA pf VALE/P 17.51
VLO
29.46
RoyDShllA RDS/A 68.10 +.10 ValeroE
VangTSM
VTI
70.81
S-T-U
VangDivAp VIG
57.97
SCANA
SCG
46.26 -.20 VangEmg
VWO
41.43
SpdrDJIA
DIA
128.04 +.12 VangEAFE VEA
32.69
SpdrGold
GLD
167.45 -.37 VectorGp
VGR
16.12
SpdrEuro50 FEZ
31.01 +.09 Vectren
VVC
28.57
S&P500ETF SPY
138.27 +.11 VerizonCm VZ
42.56
SpdrHome XHB
25.29 -.38 Visa
V
143.24
SpdrLehHY JNK
39.89 -.04 VMware
VMW
87.12
SpdrRetl
XRT
60.71 -.21 VulcanM
VMC
47.03
SpdrMetM
XME
43.49 +.33 WGL Hold
WGL
37.75
SPX Cp
SPW
65.80 -.44 Wabtec
WAB
81.17
SafegdSci
SFE
15.08 -.07 WalMart
WMT
72.48
Safeway
SWY
16.66 +.06 Walgrn
WAG
32.76
StJoe
JOE
21.98 -.20 WalterEn
WLT
32.70
StJude
STJ
36.39 -.62 WREIT
WRE
25.10
Saks
SKS
9.88 -.17 WsteMInc
WM
31.81
SallyBty
SBH
24.93 -.12 WeathfIntl
WFT
10.88
SandRdge SD
5.39 -.12 WeinRlt
WRI
26.43
Sasol
SSL
41.99 -.33 WellsFargo WFC
32.37
SBW
15.24
Schlmbrg
SLB
68.48 +.11 WstAsWw
Schwab
SCHW 12.95 -.11 WstnUnion WU
12.34
WY
26.43
SeadrillLtd SDRL
39.18 -.18 Weyerhsr
WHR
96.48
SempraEn SRE
65.77 -.02 Whrlpl
WmsCos
WMB
31.65
ServiceCp SCI
13.67
WEC
36.44
Sherwin
SHW 149.06 +8.22 WiscEngy
WWE
7.90
ShipFin
SFL
15.05 -.08 WldW Ent
XEL
26.11
SiderurNac SID
5.29 -.03 XcelEngy
XRX
6.33
SilvWhtn g SLW
39.49 -.90 Xerox
AUY
19.72
Smucker
SJM
85.36 +1.03 Yamana g
YUM
72.76
SnapOn
SNA
77.19 +.02 YumBrnds
LOW
CLOSE
12783.00 12,815.08
5018.83 5,058.47
443.31
443.99
8052.08 8,054.04
2383.93 2,386.01
2896.55 2,904.26
1377.19 1,380.03
967.71
968.82
14406.34 14,432.36
792.90
793.76
CHG.%CHG. WK MO QTR YTD
-.31
+40.19
-4.12
+.47
+.62
-.61
+.18
-1.00
-4.29
-1.26
...
+.80
-.92
+.01
+.03
-.02
+.01
-.10
-.03
-.16
t
t
t
t
s
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t +4.89
t +.77
t -4.45
s +7.72
t +4.73
t +11.48
t +9.74
s +10.20
t +9.42
t +7.13
Interest rates
Dollar
Today
Today Previous 1Yr Ago
Argent
Australia
Brazil
Britain
Canada
China
Denmark
Egypt
Euro
Hong Kong
India
Indnsia
Israel
Japan
Kenya
Mexico
N. Zealand
Pakistan
Poland
Russia
Saudi Arab
Singapore
So. Africa
Sweden
Switzerlnd
Taiwan
Venzuel
-18.30
-18.70
-19.60
-17.90
-15.10
-14.00
-.38
-.40
-.40
-.39
-.36
-.34
1411
-41
1405 -46.25
1388 -48.50
1375.50 -43.75
1368.50 -39.50
1343.50 -36.75
New York Stock Exchange
NAME
Dow Industrials
12861.28
Dow Transportation 5078.10
Dow Utilities
448.12
NYSE Composite
8067.90
Amex Market Value 2389.51
Nasdaq Composite 2920.01
S&P 500
1384.87
S&P MidCap
972.11
Wilshire 5000
14484.01
Russell 2000
797.73
Commodities
GAINERS
Name
Celgene rt
PizzaInn
Sarepta rs
Myrexis
Manntch rs
ConsuPtf
GileadSci
AtossaG n
Tufco
HorizPhm
MOST
ACTIVE
Name
S&P500ETF
BkofAm
iShEMkts
Chimera
SprintNex
SPDR Fncl
SandRdge
Penney
TitanMet
FordM
630,055,494
692,299,229
25,334,056
1,347,688,779
LOSERS
Name
BeazerH rs
BeazHTEq
Penney
PrUVxST rs
MesaRoyl
CabcoJCP97
DmRsBW
Molycp pfA
BeazerH13
ExactTgt n
MOST
Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
GAINERS
GAINERS
10 DAYS
VOLUME
VOLUME
Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
Stock market indexes
Close: 2,904.26
Change: -0.61 (flat)
2,880
10 DAYS
1,500
1,250
0CUFCSEQORQUKVG
4.7800
.9589
2.0475
.6297
.9993
6.2340
5.8663
6.0955
.7865
7.7507
54.970
9620.00
3.9378
79.46
85.45
13.2279
1.2223
95.90
3.28
31.6266
3.7503
1.2231
8.7669
6.7551
.9479
29.04
4.2927
4.7740
.9624
2.0463
.6288
1.0004
6.2411
5.8673
6.1205
.7866
7.7513
54.685
9625.00
3.9104
79.45
85.45
13.1901
1.2279
96.00
3.27
31.5586
3.7503
1.2240
8.7039
6.7392
.9487
29.02
4.2953
4.2590
.9736
1.7450
.6227
1.0133
6.3430
5.4151
5.9755
.7275
7.7779
50.005
8963.00
3.7137
77.17
93.60
13.5442
1.2739
86.67
3.19
30.3785
3.7505
1.2804
7.9159
6.6134
.9021
30.20
4.2948
Prime Rate
Discount rate
Fed funds
3.25
0.75
.00-.25
Treasuries
3-month T-bill
6-month T-bill
1 year T-bill
1 year T-note
2 year T-note
5 year T-note
10 year T-note
30 year T-bond
0.09
0.14
0.18
0.20
0.26
0.64
1.61
2.74
London Inter-Bank Offered Rate
3-month Libor
6-month Libor
0.31
0.53
Housing
FHLB Cost of Funds
Fixed 30 yr. mortgage
1.038
2.94
Money Market and CDs
Money market avg yld
90 day CD
0.01
0.29
Let us know
your favorite stocks
CHG
-.16
+.03
-.21
-.45
-.20
+.01
-.24
-.11
-.21
+.02
+.06
+.01
+.03
+.20
+.04
+.14
+.03
+.10
-.05
-.29
-.34
-.06
-.13
+.08
-.01
+.02
+.52
-.57
+.18
+.05
-.02
+.08
-.14
-.04
-.04
-.02
+.08
-.18
+.24
+.09
-.04
-.04
-.13
-.21
+.36
+.07
+.17
+.20
+4.17
+.62
-.07
-.02
-3.83
+.37
-.02
+4.93
-1.16
-.16
-.05
-.95
+.19
-.43
-.55
-.03
+.27
+1.19
-.10
-.13
-.15
+.10
+.22
-.32
-.33
-.16
-.27
+.05
+1.10
-.04
+.38
-.14
+.43
+1.11
-.70
-.13
-.12
-.11
-.13
+.04
+.11
+.12
-.02
-.03
-.07
-.08
+.31
-.47
+.69
-.44
+1.11
+.17
+.10
-.40
-.01
-.01
+.13
-.46
+.02
-.10
-.01
+.12
-.13
-.42
+.12
-.11
-.39
-.01
-.41
+.79
If you don’t see your favorite stock or
mutual fund and want it listed
regularly, call us at 757-6340 or
e-mail us at df [email protected]
Please list the full name of the stock or mutual fund and provide the stock
symbol or five-letter mutual fund symbol.
NASDAQ - Over The Counter
NAME
TICKER
LAST CHG NAME
A-B-C
ATMI Inc
Achillion
AcmePkt
ActivsBliz
AdobeSy
Agilysys
AllnceRes
AllscriptH
AlteraCp lf
Amarin
Amazon
AMovilA
ACapAgy
AmCapLtd
AmSupr
Amgen
Andrsons
ApolloGrp
ApolloInv
Apple Inc
ApldMatl
ArenaPhm
AresCap
AriadP
ArrayBio
Astec
Atmel
Autodesk
AutoData
AvisBudg
B/E Aero
Baidu
BassettF
BedBath
BobEvans
BoltTech
Broadcom
BrcdeCm
CA Inc
Celgene
Celgene rt
Celsion
Ceradyne
ChkPoint
CienaCorp
Cirrus
Cisco
CitrixSys
CleanEngy
Clearwire
ClovisOn n
CobraEl
CocaBtl
CognizTech
Colmbus
Comcast
Comc spcl
Comverse
Copart s
Costco
Covenant
CrackerB
Crocs
ATMI 19.35
ACHN 7.90
APKT 18.58
ATVI 10.77
ADBE 32.70
AGYS 7.88
ARLP 57.20
MDRX 12.26
ALTR 30.66
AMRN 10.95
AMZN 226.47
AMOV 23.69
AGNC 30.43
ACAS 11.63
AMSC 2.98
AMGN 85.52
ANDE 40.93
APOL 19.25
AINV 7.70
AAPL 542.83
AMAT 10.63
ARNA 8.72
ARCC 16.91
ARIA 21.18
ARRY 3.41
ASTE 29.01
ATML 4.81
ADSK 31.00
ADP 55.42
CAR 17.04
BEAV 44.45
BIDU 104.60
BSET 11.43
BBBY 57.54
BOBE 36.28
BOLT 14.01
BRCM 30.91
BRCD 5.47
CA
22.09
CELG 75.66
CELGZ 5.90
CLSN 4.99
CRDN 34.95
CHKP 44.59
CIEN 14.71
CRUS 30.85
CSCO 16.86
CTXS 59.29
CLNE 11.06
CLWR 2.21
CLVS 12.50
COBR 3.60
COKE 64.08
CTSH 65.95
CMCO 14.52
CMCSA 36.17
CMCSK 35.11
CMVT 3.38
CPRT 29.49
COST 95.98
CVTI 4.92
CBRL 62.75
CROX 12.41
TICKER
LAST CHG NAME
CrosstxLP XTEX 14.01
Ctrip.com CTRP 20.16
+.10
CubistPh
CBST 41.74
-1.11
+.22
D-E-F
+.11 DUSA
DUSA 7.95
-.20 DeckrsOut DECK 31.20
-.05 Dell Inc
DELL 9.35
-1.08 Dndreon
DNDN 4.31
+.08 DirecTV
DTV 48.17
+.02 DishNetwk DISH 35.74
-.26 DixieGrp
DXYN 3.60
+.16 DollarTr s DLTR 37.87
-.42 DonlleyRR RRD 9.17
-.39 DryShips DRYS 2.21
+.26 DynMatl
BOOM 13.46
-.23 Dynatron h DYNT
.49
+.35 Dynavax
DVAX 4.18
+.34 E-Trade
ETFC 8.13
+.50 eBay
EBAY 47.47
-.02 ErthLink
ELNK 6.38
-4.23 Ebix Inc
EBIX 16.47
-.04 EchelonC ELON 2.57
+.36 ElectArts
EA
13.02
+.01 EndoPhrm ENDP 26.92
-.05 Ericsson
ERIC 8.75
-.10 Exelixis
EXEL 4.96
+.40 ExpdIntl
EXPD 36.97
ExpScripts ESRX 51.92
+.06 EZchip
EZCH 36.30
+.12 F5 Netwks FFIV 86.14
+.40 Facebook n FB
20.07
+.20 FifthThird FITB 14.23
+.87 FstNiagara FNFG 7.55
-.26 FtSecG rsh FSGI 2.80
+.46 FstSolar
FSLR 25.43
+.10 Flextrn
FLEX 5.92
-.15 Fortinet
FTNT 18.37
+.30 FosterWhl FWLT 22.47
+.02 FrankElec FELE 57.30
-.12 FrontierCm FTR
4.41
+4.16 FultonFncl FULT 9.39
+2.79
G-H-I
+.39
-.02 GT AdvTc GTAT 3.73
+.25 Garmin
GRMN 36.52
+.18 Gentex
GNTX 17.10
-.45 Gibraltar
ROCK 12.48
+.04 GilatSatell GILT
4.99
-.88 GileadSci GILD 73.93
-.09 GluMobile GLUU 2.21
-.01 Google
GOOG 665.90
-8.99 GreenMtC GMCR 24.83
-.19 Groupon
GRPN 2.69
+.45 GulfportE GPOR 32.52
-.05 Hasbro
HAS 36.95
+.01 Hologic
HOLX 20.39
+.05 HorizPhm HZNP 2.60
+.01 HudsCity
HCBK 8.11
-.08 HuntBncsh HBAN 6.17
+.06 IdenixPh
IDIX
4.65
+.52 Intel
INTC 20.77
+.03 Inteliquent IQNT 2.96
+.24 IntervestB IBCA 4.02
+.27 Intuit
INTU 59.35
TICKER
LAST CHG NAME
-.28 IntSurg
ISRG 533.64
+.26
J-K-L
+.16
JDASoft
JDAS 44.63
JDS Uniph JDSU 11.16
-.01 JamesRiv JRCC 2.40
+.54 JetBlue
JBLU 5.33
-.07 JoesJeans JOEZ
.92
+.26 KLA Tnc
KLAC 47.60
-.66 Kirklands KIRK 9.21
-.12 KraftFGp n KRFT 43.94
-.03 LamResrch LRCX 36.68
+.13 Lattice
LSCC 3.84
-.25 LeapWirlss LEAP 5.91
+.01 LegacyRes LGCY 24.62
+.11 LibtyIntA
LINTA 19.73
+.00 LifeTech
LIFE 46.40
+.01 LimeEn hlf LIME
.60
+.05 LinearTch LLTC 32.43
-.26 LinnEngy LINE 38.11
+.02 LoralSpace LORL 80.69
-1.42
M-N-O
-.02
+.13 Manntch rs MTEX 6.21
MRVL 7.78
+.79 MarvellT
MDCO 21.41
-.05 MediCo
MelcoCrwn
MPEL
14.49
+.08
MCHP 30.35
+.24 Microchp
MU
5.57
-1.43 MicronT
MSFT 28.22
+1.13 Microsoft
-1.79 MdsxWatr MSEX 18.52
+.86 Mondelez MDLZ 25.96
+.07 MonstrBv s MNST 45.16
MYL 26.04
-.01 Mylan
Myrexis
MYRX 2.76
EGOV 15.67
+.88 NIC Inc
NIHD 5.76
-.07 NII Hldg
-.65 NektarTh NKTR 7.04
NTAP 26.82
-.38 NetApp
NFLX 78.19
+.10 Netflix
+.06 NewsCpA NWSA 24.29
Nvidia
NVDA 11.92
OReillyAu ORLY 88.19
OnSmcnd ONNN 6.20
-.28 OptCable OCC 4.25
-.49 Oracle
ORCL 30.30
-.20 OtterTail
OTTR 23.76
-.03
P-Q-R
+.24
PDLI 7.83
+8.92 PDL Bio
-.05 PacSunwr PSUN 1.58
PAAS 19.80
+2.87 PanASlv
+1.02 PaneraBrd PNRA 163.83
PTEN 16.23
-.07 PattUTI
+.49 PeopUtdF PBCT 11.63
-.27 Power-One PWER 4.09
+.07 PwShs QQQ QQQ 63.42
PCLN 633.43
+.31 priceline
+.08 PrUPQQQ s TQQQ 47.44
+.01 ProgrsSoft PRGS 19.12
+.48 ProspctCap PSEC 10.55
QCOM 61.62
-.04 Qualcom
-.55 QualitySys QSII 17.19
QCOR 25.36
-.13 Questcor
-.61 RF Inds
RFIL 4.26
TICKER LAST CHG
+4.04 RF MicD
RFMD 4.12
RschMotn RIMM 8.81
RiverbedT RVBD 17.49
-.09 RosttaG rs ROSG 4.30
+.01 RossStrs s ROST 55.19
-.30
S-T-U
+.02
SLM 16.80
+.02 SLM Cp
SNDK 40.47
+1.36 SanDisk
-.25 Sarepta rs SRPT 27.13
SCLN 4.71
+.28 SciClone
+.25 SeagateT STX 28.05
-.20 SearsHldgs SHLD 61.44
-.22 Sequenom SQNM 3.71
+.02 SvcSource SREV 4.65
-.25 SigaTech h SIGA 2.67
+.01 SigmaAld SIAL 69.69
SilvStd g
SSRI 14.45
SIRI
2.78
-.05 SiriusXM
-.98 SkywksSol SWKS 20.81
+.69 SmithWes SWHC 10.68
SnydLance LNCE 23.96
SonicCorp SONC 9.70
+.79 Staples
SPLS 11.09
+.01 Starbucks SBUX 50.68
+.14 StlDynam STLD 13.28
-.01 SteinMrt lf SMRT 6.75
-.27 Stericycle SRCL 92.38
-.06 SunHydrl SNHY 24.98
-.61 Suprtex
SUPX 17.37
-.13 SusqBnc
SUSQ 9.86
-.06 Symantec SYMC 17.96
-.10 TakeTwo
TTWO 11.45
+.17 Tellabs
TLAB 2.87
+.42 TexInst
TXN 29.51
+.84 TibcoSft
TIBX 24.02
-.37 TractSupp TSCO 91.33
-1.11 TripAdv n TRIP 34.98
-.53 TriQuint
TQNT 4.64
+.29 Unilife
UNIS 2.75
-.13 UtdCmBks UCBI 8.84
-.28 USecBc AL USBI 5.64
-1.08 UnivDisp
PANL 24.01
+.04
+.07
+.27
-.03
+.19
-.03
-.05
-.75
+4.38
+.46
-1.02
-1.07
+.11
-.14
+.13
-.38
+.03
+.24
+.42
+.58
-.06
-.28
-.01
-.15
-.03
+.72
-.79
+.03
-.01
+.42
+.01
-.01
-.56
-.87
+.67
+.09
-.05
+.18
-.05
-.40
V-W-X-Y-Z
-.05 VCA Ant
-.15 Verisign
VertxPh
ViacomB
-.06 VirgnMda h
+.01 Vivus
-.53 Vodafone
-.02 WarnerCh
+.18 Wendys Co
+.03 WDigital
-.02 Windstrm
-.01 Wynn
+7.56 Yahoo
+.07 ZaZaEngy
-.29 ZebraT
+.09 ZionBcp
Zix Corp
+.48 Zogenix
+.31 Zoltek
-.16 Zynga n
WOOF 18.98
VRSN 42.97
VRTX 44.00
VIAB 49.10
VMED 32.24
VVUS 11.37
VOD 26.39
WCRX 11.60
WEN 4.34
WDC 34.74
WIN
8.44
WYNN 107.42
YHOO 17.51
ZAZA 1.37
ZBRA 37.89
ZION 20.02
ZIXI
2.74
ZGNX 2.67
ZOLT 6.45
ZNGA 2.10
-.02
+1.49
-1.01
-.06
+.29
+.53
-.17
-.07
-.12
-.38
-.07
-.93
+.25
+.11
-.24
-.01
-.12
+.10
-.06
-.02
Stocks of Local Interest
NAME
AGL Resources
AT&T Inc
Astec Inds
BB&T Corp
Bank of America
CBL & Associates
CBL & Assoc pfD
Cigna Corp
Cintas Corp
Coca Btl Cns
CocaCola Co
Coca-Cola Ent
Comcast Corp A
Comcl Metals
ConAgra Foods
Convergys Corp
Corrections Corp
Covenant Transp
Cracker Barrel
Darden Rest
Dean Foods Corp
Dillards Inc
Dixie Group Inc
DuPont
Fst Horizon Natl
First Security Grp
Intel Corp
Johnson & Johnson
La-Z-Boy Inc
Medtronic Inc
Microsoft Corp
TICKER
GAS
T
ASTE
BBT
BAC
CBL
CBLpD
CI
CTAS
COKE
KO
CCE
CMCSA
CMC
CAG
CVG
CXW
CVTI
CBRL
DRI
DF
DDS
DXYN
DD
FHN
FSGI
INTC
JNJ
LZB
MDT
MSFT
52LO
RANGE
36.59
27.41
26.48
21.03
4.92
12.58
22.20
39.01
27.62
51.53
32.37
24.20
20.90
11.30
23.64
11.40
20.14
2.71
43.77
41.65
9.17
42.54
2.76
43.02
6.65
1.10
20.80
61.05
9.11
33.21
24.30
3
6
2
6
9
0
9
9
8
7
5
8
9
5
9
8
9
7
8
6
8
0
5
1
7
6
1
8
9
8
5
52HI CLOSE
43.00
38.58
40.68
34.37
10.10
23.00
26.00
53.75
45.60
70.93
41.25
32.55
37.96
16.48
28.80
17.42
35.73
6.00
69.30
57.93
19.17
86.71
4.79
57.50
10.99
4.48
29.27
72.74
17.13
44.79
32.95
38.19
33.87
29.01
27.70
9.39
22.28
25.54
51.08
40.55
64.08
36.08
30.51
36.17
13.59
27.84
16.04
33.49
4.92
62.75
51.37
16.93
82.86
3.60
43.13
9.27
2.80
20.77
69.68
15.60
41.49
28.22
CHG %CHG
-.17
+.33
+.40
+.15
-.04
-.12
-.01
-.57
-.10
+.45
-.21
+.18
+.05
-.09
+.07
-.24
-.18
+.03
+.24
-.24
+.19
-.60
-.03
-.21
+.23
...
-.04
-.19
-.09
+.33
-.61
-0.4%
+1.0%
+1.4%
+0.5%
-0.4%
-0.5%
...%
-1.1%
-0.2%
+0.7%
-0.6%
+0.6%
+0.1%
-0.7%
+0.3%
-1.5%
-0.5%
+0.6%
+0.4%
-0.5%
+1.1%
-0.7%
-0.8%
-0.5%
+2.5%
...%
-0.2%
-0.3%
-0.6%
+0.8%
-2.1%
WK MO QTR
t
s
s
s
t
t
r
t
t
s
t
s
s
t
s
t
t
s
s
t
s
t
t
t
s
r
t
t
t
s
t
t
t
t
t
t
s
s
s
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
s
s
t
t
s
s
s
t
t
s
t
s
s
t
t
t
t
t
t
s
s
s
s
t
t
t
t
s
s
s
s
s
s
t
t
s
s
s
t
t
s
t
s
s
t
t
YTD
CHG
-9.6%
+12.0%
-9.9%
+10.1%
+68.9%
+41.9%
+7.9%
+21.6%
+16.5%
+9.4%
+3.1%
+18.3%
+52.5%
-1.7%
+5.5%
+25.6%
+64.4%
+65.7%
+24.5%
+12.7%
+51.2%
+84.6%
+22.4%
-5.8%
+15.9%
+19.2%
-14.4%
+6.3%
+31.1%
+8.5%
+8.7%
1YR
VOL
CHG (Thou) P/E
-0.7%
+22.1%
-13.2%
+24.0%
+53.7%
+62.5%
...%
+21.7%
+44.1%
+17.5%
+11.3%
+19.4%
+69.9%
+12.5%
+14.3%
+42.8%
+57.7%
+56.2%
+44.9%
+15.1%
+71.9%
+53.7%
+17.1%
-5.4%
+30.3%
+19.2%
-9.1%
+13.7%
+59.6%
+23.7%
+13.1%
281
19664
37
3659
66577
1104
6
2794
267
6
9852
2708
8137
535
2086
462
490
8
132
763
3201
439
5
4732
3691
26471
9423
330
2912
59491
20
44
18
11
25
30
10
17
20
19
13
19
8
19
17
22
29
14
14
24
13
dd
13
dd
dd
9
23
18
12
15
9
DIV
1.84
1.80f
1.00e
0.80
0.04
0.88
1.84
0.04
0.64f
1.00
1.02
0.64
0.65
0.48
1.00f
0.20
0.80
...
2.00f
2.00
...
0.20
...
1.72
0.04
...
0.90
2.44
...
1.04
0.92f
The symbol above illustrates a stock’s
price in relation to its low and high
closing prices during the past 52
weeks.
NAME
Miller Inds
Mohawk Inds
Mueller Water Pdts
Natl Hlth Inv
Ntl Hlthcare Cp
Norfolk Sthn
Panera Bread Co
Raymond James Fncl
Regions Fncl
Reliance Steel Alu
Rock Tenn
Ruby Tuesday
Sanofi
Sonic Corp
Suntrust Bks
Unum Group
Vodafone Group
Vulcan Matl
WalMart Strs
Whirlpool
TICKER
52LO
RANGE
MLR
MHK
MWA
NHI
NHC
NSC
PNRA
RJF
RF
RS
RKT
RT
SNY
SONC
STI
UNM
VOD
VMC
WMT
WHR
13.55
49.02
1.96
40.92
35.31
57.89
129.19
25.87
3.51
41.81
49.24
4.98
31.61
6.49
15.79
18.28
25.63
29.35
56.26
45.22
2
9
9
9
8
1
8
9
8
9
6
6
9
8
8
2
2
9
8
0
A Fresh Take
On News
52HI CLOSE
17.80
89.28
5.42
54.81
49.68
78.50
175.26
39.99
7.73
58.80
76.18
9.39
45.72
10.94
30.79
24.81
30.07
49.99
77.60
100.66
14.36
83.82
4.99
53.24
45.41
58.06
163.83
37.98
6.53
55.52
63.39
7.32
43.58
9.70
26.54
19.53
26.39
47.03
72.48
96.48
CHG %CHG
+.14
-.71
+.06
-.09
+.14
+.06
-.02
+.39
+.08
+.01
-.19
+.06
+.14
...
-.02
-.13
-.17
+.69
+.17
-.13
+1.0%
-0.8%
+1.2%
-0.2%
+0.3%
+0.1%
...%
+1.0%
+1.2%
...%
-0.3%
+0.8%
+0.3%
...%
-0.1%
-0.7%
-0.6%
+1.5%
+0.2%
-0.1%
WK MO QTR
s
t
s
t
s
s
r
s
s
r
t
s
s
r
t
t
t
s
s
t
t
s
s
s
t
t
t
s
t
s
t
t
t
s
t
t
t
s
t
s
t
s
s
s
t
t
t
s
t
s
t
s
s
t
t
s
t
t
t
s
YTD
CHG
-8.7%
+40.1%
+104.5%
+21.1%
+8.4%
-20.3%
+15.8%
+22.7%
+51.9%
+14.0%
+9.9%
+6.1%
+19.3%
+44.1%
+49.9%
-7.3%
-5.9%
+19.5%
+21.3%
+103.3%
1YR
VOL
CHG (Thou) P/E
-13.5%
+62.6%
+114.6%
+32.8%
+14.7%
-16.7%
+22.5%
+30.3%
+59.1%
+31.4%
+6.8%
-2.4%
+37.3%
+34.3%
+42.2%
-7.1%
+2.5%
+59.7%
+27.2%
+87.3%
7
448
613
27
3
3441
230
499
15417
327
396
183
1042
383
2973
1106
4784
534
4262
1123
13
26
dd
19
13
11
30
17
12
11
17
73
16
8
5
dd
15
16
DIV
0.52
...
0.07
2.68f
1.20
2.00
...
0.52
0.04
1.00
0.90f
...
1.76e
...
0.20
0.52
1.99e
0.04
1.59
2.00
... timesfreepress.com
.
• • • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • C5
Mutual Funds
4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN NAME
NAME
AcadEm n 17.95 -.02
Alger Funds A:
SmCapGr 7.62 -.01
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGr 6.71 -.01
AllianceBern A:
DiscValA 16.83 -.05
AllianceBern B:
SMCpVlB t 16.12 -.04
Allianz Admin MMS:
MCapVal p 18.20 -.04
Allianz Funds B:
MCapValB 15.55 -.04
Amer Century A:
SCapVal p 8.29 ...
Amer Century Adv:
EqIncA p
7.76 -.01
HeritageA p 21.27 +.02
ValueA p
6.15 -.01
Amer Century Inv:
EmgMkI
8.20 +.01
EqInc
7.76 -.01
GlGold
19.64 -.23
GrowthI
26.97 ...
InfAdjBd 13.59 +.04
SelectI
42.53 +.15
SGov
9.77 ...
SmCpVal
8.33 ...
SmallCo
8.16 -.02
Ultra
25.22 +.13
ValueInv
6.16 ...
Veedot
6.68 -.03
American Funds A:
AmcpA p 20.87 +.10
AMutlA p 27.77 -.02
BalA p
19.95 +.03
BondA p 12.99 ...
CapIBA p 51.96 -.07
CapWGA p 35.58 +.02
CapWA p 21.54 +.01
EupacA p 39.30 -.04
FdInvA p 39.34 +.05
GwthA p 33.07 +.15
HI TrA p
11.23 ...
IncoA p
17.75 -.02
IntBdA p 13.80 +.01
ICAA p
29.89 +.05
NEcoA p 28.12 +.10
N PerA p 29.88 +.04
NwWrldA 52.26 -.03
SmCpA p 38.39 -.03
TxExA p 13.25 ...
WshA p
30.52 +.04
Ariel Investments:
Apprec
43.51 -.08
Ariel
48.83 -.15
Artisan Funds:
Intl
23.21 ...
IntlVal r
28.90 ...
MidCap
36.84 ...
MidCapVal 20.91 ...
Ave Maria Funds:
Group p
23.22 +.19
RisingDiv 13.73 +.01
Baron Funds:
Asset
50.25 +.01
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur
14.30 ...
BlackRock A:
EqtyDiv
19.40 -.01
FlexEqA 11.73 -.05
GlAlA r
19.23 -.01
BlackRock B&C:
GlAlC t
17.87 -.01
HlScOpC 30.41 +.21
BlackRock Instl:
EquityDv 19.44 -.01
GlbAlloc r 19.33 -.01
Brandywine Fds:
BlueFd n23.76 ...
Bridgeway Funds:
AggInv1
34.91 -.07
CGM Funds:
Focus
n27.26 -.18
Mutl n
27.47 -.12
Century Funds:
ShsTrInst 19.22 -.05
ChamplSC p 14.58 +.03
Cohen & Steers:
RltyShrs 66.23 -.15
Columbia Class A:
HiYldBd
2.92 ...
4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN
-1.0 TxEA p
14.41 ...
SelComm A 41.65 -.07
-2.8 Columbia Class C:
Acorn t
26.31 +.02
-2.9 AcornInt t 38.03 -.06
Columbia Class Z:
30.31 +.03
-1.3 Acorn Z
AcornIntZ 39.64 -.07
-1.3 Copley n 51.82 -.18
Credit Suisse Comm:
8.10 -.02
-2.0 ComRet t
DFA Funds:
-2.1 IntlCorEq n9.88 -.01
USCorEq1 n 11.88 ...
-2.9 USCorEq2 n 11.75 -.01
DWS Invest A:
14.22 -.04
-2.5 TechA
-3.5 DWS Invest C:
-3.0 DreHiRC 34.07 +.04
DWS Invest S:
+1.2 CoreEqtyS 17.51 -.01
-2.5 Gold&Prc 14.90 -.16
-4.2 LgCpFoGr 31.96 +.11
-4.0 LifeCmpRet 11.58 ...
+1.0 SmCpVlS r 18.62 -.01
-4.8 Davis Funds A:
-0.1 NYVen A 35.18 -.08
-2.9 RlEstA
28.05 -.05
-4.3 Davis Funds Y:
-4.2 NYVenY 35.61 -.08
-2.8
-4.0 Delaware Invest A:
Diver Inc p 9.47 ...
-1.7 Delaware Invest B:
-1.9 USGrB p 14.72 ...
-1.3 Dimensional Fds:
+0.3 EmMCrEq n18.99 -.03
-1.9 EmMktV 28.18 -.06
-1.5 IntSmVa n 14.82 -.03
-0.1 USLgVa n 21.87 -.01
-1.0 US SmVa 25.99 -.01
-1.6 IntlSmCo n 14.95 -.04
10.35 ...
-1.7 Fixd n
15.34 ...
+0.3 IntVa n
Glb5FxInc
n
11.31 ...
-1.3
+0.1 Dodge&Cox:
-2.3 Balanced 75.51 ...
-0.8 Income
13.94 ...
-1.5 IntlStk
32.46 ...
-0.4 Stock
116.40 ...
-2.3 DoubleLine Funds:
+1.0 TRBd I
n11.39 ...
-2.5 TRBd N p n 11.39 ...
Dreyfus:
-3.3 AMTMuBdZ 14.42 -.01
-1.8 Aprec
43.16 -.04
Discp
31.87 +.03
NA Dreyf
9.48 ...
NA GrInc
15.13 +.03
NA MunBd r 12.02 ...
NA OppMCVal A 29.91 -.06
Dupree Mutual:
-0.4 TNTF
11.89 ...
-1.2 Eaton Vance A:
TMG1.1
26.28 +.04
-2.5 Eaton Vance I:
FltgRt
9.10 ...
+0.6 FAM Funds:
EqtyInc n20.42 +.08
-2.8 FMI Funds:
-2.5 LgCap p n16.62 ...
-1.6
FPA Funds:
Capit
43.23 -.04
-1.6 NewInco 10.63 ...
-3.5 FPACres 28.27 -.04
Fairholme 30.42 -.21
-2.9
-1.6 Federated Instl:
KaufmnR
5.15 ...
TotRetBd 11.67 ...
-2.3
Fidelity Advisor A:
NwInsgh p 21.95 +.03
-3.0 StrInA
12.73 ...
Fidelity Advisor I:
-2.6 NwInsgtI n22.26 +.03
-1.8
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2010 n14.12 ...
-5.4 FF2015 n 11.80 ...
-3.3 FF2015K 13.00 ...
FF2020 n 14.26 ...
-2.1 FF2020K 13.39 -.01
FF2025 n 11.84 ...
+0.1 FF2025K 13.50 ...
+1.0
-2.6
-1.6
-0.6
-1.5
-0.5
NA
-5.4
-1.1
-3.0
-2.8
-6.9
-4.6
-2.9
-3.2
-4.0
-0.8
-3.7
NA
NA
NA
+0.4
-2.9
-0.4
-1.2
-0.8
-2.8
-3.4
-1.1
0.0
-1.5
+0.4
NA
NA
NAV
NA NAME
NA
FF2030 n 14.09
FF2030K 13.63
+0.3 FF2035 n 11.62
+0.4 FF2035K 13.66
FF2040 n 8.11
+0.8 FF2040K 13.69
-3.9 Fidelity Invest:
-3.0
-3.5 AllSectEq 12.60
-2.7 AMgr50 n 16.15
+0.8 AMg85 n 13.81
-0.8 Balanc n 19.80
BalancedK 19.80
BlueChGr n 47.63
NA Canada n 53.06
CapAp n 28.82
-2.8 CpInc r n
9.34
Contra n 75.29
+0.4 ContraK
75.31
DivIntl n
28.69
-0.7 DivrsIntK r 28.69
DivGth n 29.04
-2.6 EmergAs r n 28.56
EmrMk n 22.06
+0.3 Eq Inc n 45.83
+0.1 ECapAp 17.93
19.49
-1.7 Fifty r n
-3.7 FltRateHi r n 9.93
FrInOne n 28.56
GNMA n 11.79
-3.6 GroCo n 91.65
NA GroInc n 20.49
GrowthCoK 91.67
-4.4 GrStrat r n 19.90
0.0 HighInc r n 9.25
IntGov n 10.91
-4.4 IntlDisc n 31.44
IntlSCOp r n 10.69
-1.5 InvGrBd n 11.73
8.04
-1.5 InvGB n
-1.5 LargCap n 19.65
-1.7 LgCapVal 11.04
48.30
-1.8 LatAm
-2.1 LevCoStk n 30.16
-2.1 LowP r n 38.25
Gold
Date
High
Low
100 troy oz.- dollars per troy oz.
Nov 12
1733.40 1730.30
Dec 12
1738.00 1725.20
Jan 13
1738.20 1729.20
Feb 13
1740.10 1727.80
Apr 13
1741.10 1730.00
Jun 13
1744.00 1732.50
Aug 13
1743.40 1736.40
Oct 13
1745.10 1741.20
Dec 13
1747.70 1739.10
Feb 14
1749.80 1742.90
Apr 14
Jun 14
Aug 14
Dec 14
Jun 15
Dec 15
1775.70 1775.30
Jun 16
Dec 16
1795.00 1794.20
Jun 17
Dec 17
Jun 18
Est. sales:Fri’s sales: 179968
Fri’s open int: 462033
Close
Change
1730.30
1730.90
1731.90
1733.20
1735.40
1737.40
1739.30
1741.20
1743.30
1745.70
1748.00
1750.50
1752.80
1757.90
1766.30
1775.30
1784.10
1794.20
1809.70
1826.50
1847.90
-.10
-.10
-.20
-.30
-.30
-.30
-.30
-.30
-.40
-.40
-.40
-.40
-.40
-.40
-.40
High
Low
5,000 troy oz.- cents per troy oz.
Nov 12
Dec 12
3274.5 3217.5
Jan 13
3274.0 3240.0
Mar 13
3281.5 3228.5
May 13
3283.0 3249.5
Jul 13
3276.0 3268.5
Sep 13
3271.3 3271.0
Dec 13
3281.5 3257.5
Jan 14
Mar 14
May 14
Jul 14
Sep 14
Dec 14
3271.0 3250.0
Jul 15
Dec 15
3255.0 3251.5
Jul 16
Dec 16
Jul 17
3239.0 3218.4
Est. sales:Fri’s sales: 60941
Fri’s open int: 142611
Close
Change
3251.3
3252.2
3255.0
3260.7
3264.9
3268.5
3271.3
3274.9
3274.4
3273.5
3273.0
3272.5
3271.9
3271.0
3256.6
3251.5
3238.1
3229.9
3218.4
-7.7
-7.7
-7.7
-7.7
-7.6
-7.6
-7.6
-7.6
-7.5
-7.5
-7.5
-7.6
-7.6
-7.7
-7.6
-7.2
-7.2
-7.2
-7.2
searching
for your
Dream
Car?
Georgia Poultry
Georgia poultry market prices are not
available.
Tennessee Livestock
Reported auctions on Saturday at Carthage,
Crossville and Greeneville:
Cattle receipts: 2,855.
Trends: Compared to the same sale one
week ago: Slaughter cows/bulls mostly steady.
Feeder steers/bulls 2.00 to 6.00 lower. Heifers
5.00 to 8.00 lower.
Slaughter Cows Boners 80-85 pct lean
66.00-76.50; Slaughter Cows Lean 85-90 pct
lean 61.00-70.00; Slaughter Bulls 1100-2200
lbs 80.00-93.50. Feeder Steers Medium and
Large 1-2: 300-400 lbs 138.00-184.50; 400500 lbs 132.00-166.00; 500-600 lbs 122.00150.00; 600-700 lbs 120.00-142.50; 700-800
lbs 115.00-133.50. Feeder Bulls Medium and
Large 1-2: 400-500 lbs 123.00-159.00; 500600 lbs 112.00-141.00; 600-700 lbs 106.00129.00; 700-800 lbs 87.00-117.00. Feeder
Heifers Medium and Large 1-2: 300-400 lbs
122.00-155.00; 400-500 lbs 114.00-138.00;
500-600 lbs 105.00-131.00; 600-700 lbs
106.00-126.00; 700-800 lbs 89.00-115.25.
Source: The Associated Press
4-WK
CHG %RTN NAME
...
...
-.01
-.01
...
-.01
-2.2
-2.2
-2.6
-2.6
-2.6
-2.7
+.02
+.01
+.01
+.01
+.01
+.10
+.12
+.04
...
+.08
+.08
-.03
-.02
...
+.03
-.01
-.01
+.01
+.11
...
-.02
...
+.09
-.01
+.09
+.01
...
...
-.04
-.06
+.01
+.01
-.01
-.02
-.12
-.01
-.12
-2.9
-1.2
-2.1
-1.7
-1.6
-4.0
-2.1
-2.7
-0.2
-4.4
-4.4
-1.1
-1.0
-3.2
+0.8
-0.5
-2.9
-1.3
-3.5
+0.1
-2.3
-0.2
-5.3
-3.5
-5.3
-1.7
-0.1
+0.2
-1.2
+0.1
+0.5
+0.6
-4.0
-3.9
-1.8
-0.8
-1.8
4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN NAME
LowPriK r 38.24 -.12
Magelln n 71.31 +.06
MegaCpStk n11.51 ...
MidCap n 28.82 -.05
MtgSec n 11.36 ...
MuniInc n 13.67 +.01
NwMkt r n 17.78 +.01
NwMill n 32.08 -.04
OTC n
56.58 +.13
100Index
9.92 +.01
Puritn n
19.13 ...
RealEInc r 11.45 ...
SAllSecEqF 12.62 +.02
SCmdtyStrt n 8.90 -.02
SCmdtyStrF n 8.93 -.02
SrsIntGrw 11.37 -.04
SrsIntVal
9.02 ...
SrInvGrdF 11.73 ...
StIntMu n 10.90 ...
STBF n
8.60 ...
StkSlcACap n27.31 +.02
StratInc n 11.40 ...
TotalBd n 11.06 ...
USBI n
11.97 ...
Value n
72.65 -.10
Fidelity Selects:
Air
n38.79 +.21
Biotch n 107.28 +2.57
Brokr n
48.06 +.09
DfAer n
83.41 +.64
Electr n
42.50 -.06
Enrgy n
50.16 +.07
EngSv n 63.08 +.39
Gold r n
40.32 -.41
MedDl n 58.49 -.49
MdEqSys n 27.96 +.11
Fidelity Spartan:
500IdxInv n49.00 ...
500Idx I
49.01 +.01
IntlInxInv n 32.53 -.07
Fidelity Spart Adv:
ExMktAd r n38.96 -.04
500IdxAdv n 49.01 +.01
TotMktAd r n 40.21 -.01
-1.8
-4.0
-3.7
-3.6
-0.1
+1.1
+0.8
-4.4
-6.3
-4.1
-2.2
+0.2
-2.9
-5.6
-5.6
-1.9
-0.7
+0.5
+0.2
+0.1
-2.9
+0.1
+0.4
+0.3
-2.0
+3.2
-6.0
-2.1
+1.1
-0.7
-3.9
-6.0
-4.6
-6.8
-3.3
-3.5
-3.5
-1.2
-2.8
-3.5
-3.4
4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN
First Eagle:
GlblA
48.40 -.17
OverseasA 21.90 -.09
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
DynTchA 31.86 +.09
FedTFA p 12.86 +.01
GrwthA p 48.75 +.11
HYTFA p 11.04 +.01
IncomA p
2.17 -.01
RisDvA p 36.89 +.03
SmCpGrA p 12.04 +.01
SmCpVl p 44.53 -.04
USGovA p 6.82 ...
UtilsA p
13.35 -.09
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GlbBdAdv n13.41 -.01
IncmeAd
2.16 ...
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
HiIncC t
2.07 ...
IncomC t
2.20 ...
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 21.82 -.04
Frank/Temp Temp A:
GlBd A p 13.45 -.02
GlbOpA p 17.62 ...
GrwthA p 18.42 -.03
WorldA p 15.33 -.01
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
GlBdC p 13.48 -.01
GAMCO Funds:
GlTelAAA 19.74 ...
GE Instl Funds:
US Eq
12.35 ...
GMO Trust III:
Quality
22.68 -.06
GMO Trust IV:
IntlIntrVl
19.75 -.01
GMO Trust VI:
EmgMkts r 11.12 -.01
Gabelli Funds:
Asset
52.49 -.01
EqInc p
21.93 ...
NA
NA
-3.9
+1.3
-2.0
+1.4
-2.2
-1.6
-3.7
-0.7
-0.3
-5.7
+0.6
-2.2
+0.1
-1.8
-2.7
+0.6
-1.9
-1.8
-1.8
+0.6
-4.5
-3.7
-4.1
-1.6
-1.3
-1.6
-2.7
4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN NAME
Goldman Sachs A:
TechTollkp 12.85 -.04
Goldman Sachs B:
GrOppt
20.52 ...
MidCVB p 35.73 -.05
SCapB p 36.31 -.05
Goldman Sachs Inst:
HiYield
7.34 ...
Harbor Funds:
Bond
13.05 ...
CapApInst 40.58 ...
CmdtRRtn I 7.27 -.02
Intl r
58.47 ...
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppA p 32.47 +.13
Hlthcare p 19.83 +.12
Hartford Fds B:
GlbGrB p n13.54 +.06
MidCpB t n 16.90 +.02
Hartford Fds C:
Hlthcare t 17.82 +.11
HiYieldC tx 7.50 ...
Hartford HLS IA :
CapApp
41.31 +.08
Heartland Fds:
ValPlusInv p 28.80 ...
ING Funds Cl C:
EmgCntC
... ...
IVA Funds:
Wldwide I r 16.10 -.02
Invesco Funds A:
CmstkA
17.04 -.02
EqIncA
9.04 -.01
HYMuA
10.18 ...
SmCpEq p 13.21 -.02
Invesco Funds B:
EqWtdB
33.29 +.02
PacGrB
18.85 -.04
Ivy Funds:
AssetSC t 24.26 +.03
AssetStA p 25.12 +.03
AssetStrI r 25.38 +.03
EurOpB p 21.19 -.01
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBd A 12.16 ...
JPMorgan Sel Cls:
CoreBd n12.15 ...
HighYld n 8.10 ...
ShtDurBd n 11.01 -.01
USLCCrPls n22.38 +.02
Janus T Shrs:
Contrarn T 14.20 -.02
EnterprT 64.27 +.08
GlLifeSciT r 30.04 +.26
GlbSel T
9.33 ...
GlTechT r 17.64 -.06
Grw&IncT 32.95 -.06
Janus T
30.65 +.06
OvrseasT r 31.78 -.19
PrkMCVal T 21.42 -.04
Twenty T 59.49 +.11
John Hancock A:
FnIndA p 11.44 ...
TFBd A
10.60 ...
John Hancock B:
FnIndB p 10.61 ...
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSBalanc 13.31 ...
LSGrwth 13.18 +.01
Kinetics Funds:
Medical n19.70 +.07
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktI 19.12 -.02
Legg Mason A:
CBAppr p 15.50 -.01
Legg Mason O:
CBEquity 13.10 -.01
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 25.76 +.02
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondI 15.03 +.01
StrInc C
15.31 ...
LSBondR 14.97 +.02
StrIncA
15.22 ...
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdY 12.76 +.01
Lord Abbett A:
AffilA p
11.56 ...
BdDebA p 8.04 ...
ShDurIncA p 4.65 ...
4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN NAME
Lord Abbett C:
-4.1 ShDurIncC t 4.68 ...
Lord Abbett F:
-2.4 ShtDurInco 4.64 ...
-1.9 MFS Funds A:
-2.9 UtilA
17.89 -.09
ValueA
24.76 +.01
+0.4 MFS Funds B:
MCapB
n8.55 +.01
17.54 +.06
+0.3 NewDB
NA RschB n 25.67 +.03
24.97 +.01
-5.5 GlGrB n
NA MFS Funds C:
TotRC
n15.01 ...
17.82 -.09
-1.1 UtilC n
-3.7 MFS Funds I:
ValueI
24.87 ...
-1.8 Managers Funds:
-0.9 CapAppB p 15.09 ...
Yacktman p n18.62 -.03
-3.8 YacktFoc n 20.02 -.02
0.0 Manning&Napier Fds:
WldOppA 7.36 +.01
-2.3 Marsico Funds:
Grow p
20.75 +.09
-4.8 Matthews Asian:
AsiaDvInv r 14.18 -.07
0.0 Meridian Funds:
Growth
45.12 ...
31.57 ...
-0.2 Value
Metro West Fds:
-3.1 TotRetBd 11.11 ...
-2.5 TotRtBdI 11.11 ...
+1.5 MorganStanley Inst:
24.59 -.05
-0.5 EmMktI
Muhlenk n 54.88 -.03
-2.5 Munder Funds:
+1.5 Idx500A p 19.17 ...
Munder Funds B:
+0.1 GwthOppB 24.86 +.01
+0.2 Mutual Series:
12.98 -.02
+0.2 BeacnZ
20.86 -.02
-3.8 EuropZ
GblDiscA 29.19 -.05
GlbDiscZ
29.63 -.05
+0.4
SharesZ 22.04 -.04
+0.4 Needham Funds:
+0.3 Growth p n34.57 +.01
0.0 Neuberger&Berm Fds:
-3.0 GenesInst 49.48 -.09
Nicholas Group:
+2.0 Nicholas n48.31 +.14
+0.7 Nch II I n 22.62 +.02
-3.3 Northern Funds:
7.45 ...
-1.3 HiYFxInc
12.89 ...
-2.3 IncEq
23.63 ...
-3.4 LCGr
-2.8 SmCapVl 15.95 ...
15.00 ...
-2.6 Technly
-2.9 Nuveen Cl A:
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TNMBA p 12.33 ...
-4.2 Nuveen Cl C:
+1.3 HYMuBd t 17.14 ...
TNMuBd t 12.31 ...
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BlkOkEm
2.63 -.02
-1.4 LivOakHlt 14.61 -.01
RedOakT
9.69
+.01
-1.9
Oakmark Funds I:
EqtyInc
r
28.73
-.02
NA
GlobalI
21.50 -.13
Intl I r
18.94 -.06
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Select
32.06 -.11
-3.4 Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp
7.48 ...
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Oppenheimer A:
-2.3 DvMktA p 33.92 +.05
Disc p
61.39 -.02
60.47 ...
+0.3 GlobA p
-0.4 GblStrIncA 4.32 ...
6.54 -.01
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51.00 -.02
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25.48 -.27
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0.0 Oppenheimer Y:
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4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN
IntlBdY
6.54 ...
+0.5 PIMCO Admin PIMS:
TotRtAd
11.61 ...
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12.67 -.01
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-3.2 ComodRR 6.78 -.01
DivInc
12.25 ...
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9.54 ...
-3.4 HiYld
10.65 ...
-1.7 LowDu
RealRtnI 12.75 +.04
9.90 ...
-1.8 ShortT
11.61 ...
-4.1 TotRt
PIMCO Funds A:
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TotRtA
11.61 ...
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-2.7 RealRtB t 12.75 +.04
-2.5 PIMCO Funds C:
AllAsset t 12.42 -.01
-1.2 ComRR p 6.48 -.01
TotRtC t
11.61 ...
-4.1 PIMCO Funds D:
TRtn p
11.61 ...
+0.6 PIMCO Funds P:
TotRtnP
11.61 ...
NA Parnassus Funds:
EqtyInco
n29.23
+.11
NA
Perm Port Funds:
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AMTFrMu p 14.60 -.01
-0.8 Pioneer Funds C:
10.37 -.01
-3.6 HiYldC t
Price Funds Adv:
R2030A
p
n18.34
...
-3.6
Price Funds:
BlChip
n43.99
+.20
-4.4
CapApp n 22.94 +.01
EmMktB n 14.15 ...
-2.4 EmMktS n 32.15 -.01
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25.60 -.03
-2.4 EqIndex n 37.26 ...
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-2.7 Growth n 36.31 +.12
Gr&In n
21.94 +.01
-3.8 HlthSci n 41.51 +.40
HiYield n
6.88 ...
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IntlBond n 10.09 ...
44.59 -.04
-0.4 IntDis n
12.38 -.02
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IntlStk n
13.74 -.02
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NA MidCap n 57.48 +.02
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NA New Era n 42.01 -.12
N Horiz n 34.21 -.01
9.98 ...
-3.2 N Inc n
+1.3 OverS SF n 8.11 -.01
RealEst n 20.33 -.06
R2015 n 12.76 ...
NA R2020 n 17.64 -.01
+1.1 R2025 n 12.90 ...
R2030 n 18.50 ...
-5.7 R2035 n 13.06 ...
-1.4 R2040 n 18.57 ...
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ShtBd n
4.86 ...
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SuMuInc n 12.11 ...
25.59 -.03
-0.3 Value n
-0.5 Primecap Odyssey :
AggGr r n18.23 +.01
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-4.7 NatResA 43.88 -.03
-0.9 Putnam Funds A:
+0.7 AmGvA p 9.23 -.01
+0.2 AABalA p 11.66 ...
DvrInA p
7.64 -.01
-4.8 IntlGrth p 14.95 -.02
Putnam Funds B:
-0.9 GlNtRs t 17.06 +.02
-7.1 GlblUtilB
9.99 -.06
Putnam Funds M:
-0.9 MultiCpGr 48.42 +.04
+0.2
+0.5
GET MORE
NA
NA
-5.4
+0.6
-0.6
+0.6
+0.3
+0.2
+1.1
+0.2
+0.5
Breaking news
+1.1
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NA
-5.5
+0.4
is more than just one story.
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-5.4
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k`d\j]i\\gi\jj%Zfd
NAME
4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN NAME
Royce Funds:
PennMuI r 11.54 ...
PremierI r 19.83 -.01
TotRetI r 13.65 -.03
VlPlSvc
13.03 -.01
Rydex Investor:
InvNasdInvs 9.70 ...
SEI Asset Alloc:
DvrAgStkA 11.06 ...
ModGroA 10.64 ...
SEI Portfolios:
DvrAggGrA 10.77 ...
Schwab Funds:
1000Inv r 39.41 ...
S&P Sel 21.87 ...
Schwartz Funds:
CathVal p 17.84 +.01
Scout Funds:
Intl
31.12 ...
Sequoia 161.71 +.45
St FarmAssoc:
Balan
55.93 +.02
TCW Funds:
TotRetBdI 10.30 ...
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS
18.67 -.04
Thornburg Fds:
IntValA p 25.96 -.01
IntValue I 26.55 -.01
Thrivent Fds A:
SmCpStk 13.99 -.03
Tocqueville Fds:
Delafield n29.57 -.04
Gold t n
70.66 -1.04
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 24.70 -.02
UBS Funds Cl A:
GlobAllo t 9.44 -.01
UBS Funds Cl C:
GlobAllo n9.18 -.01
USAA Group:
EmgMkt
16.66 ...
-1.2
+1.5
-1.7
-3.8
NA
0.0
0.0
0.0
-3.4
-3.5
-2.9
-1.1
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-1.7
+0.2
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+0.5
-4.1
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-1.7
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4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN NAME
GrTxStr
14.51 ...
Grwth
16.13 +.03
Intl
24.22 -.06
PrecMM 29.80 -.43
SmCpStk 14.40 -.02
TxEIt
13.80 ...
TxELT
14.04 ...
TxESh
10.86 ...
Value Line Fd:
PremGro n29.67 +.05
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdml n23.36 ...
CAITAdm n 11.83 ...
CpOpAdl n 76.06 +.03
EMAdmr r n 34.48 -.03
Energy n 110.30 ...
EqInAdm n n49.54 -.04
ExtdAdm n 43.77 -.05
500Adml n 127.55 +.02
GNMA Ad n 10.99 ...
GrwAdm n 35.51 +.03
HlthCr n
61.04 -.05
HiYldCp n 6.04 ...
InfProAd n 29.51 +.01
ITBdAdml n 12.25 ...
IntGrAdm n 58.08 +.02
ITAdml n 14.49 ...
ITGrAdm n 10.52 ...
LtdTrAd n 11.19 ...
LTGrAdml n 11.22 ...
LT Adml n 11.90 ...
MCpAdml n 98.10 -.10
MuHYAdm n 11.36 ...
PrmCap r n 70.76 +.05
ReitAdm r n 90.12 -.18
STsyAdml n 10.79 ...
ShtTrAd n 15.94 ...
STIGrAd n 10.88 ...
SmCAdm n 37.02 -.06
TtlBAdml n 11.21 ...
TStkAdm n 34.48 ...
WellslAdm n 59.16 ...
WelltnAdm n 58.35 +.02
Windsor n 48.65 -.08
-1.2
-1.9
-1.3
-5.0
-2.4
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+1.1
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-0.3
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4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN NAME
WdsrIIAd n 50.88
Vanguard Fds:
DivrEq
n22.34
CapValue n 10.29
CapOpp n 32.92
Convrt n 12.76
DivdGro n 16.32
Energy n 58.73
EqInc n
23.63
Explr n
77.14
GNMA n 10.99
GroInc n 29.56
HYCorp n 6.04
HlthCre n 144.62
InflaPro n 15.03
IntlExplr n 14.18
IntlGr n
18.24
IntlVal n
29.35
ITIGrade n 10.52
LifeCon n 17.10
LifeGro n 23.01
LifeInc n 14.70
LifeMod n 20.62
LTTsry n 13.68
Morg n
19.29
MuInt n
14.49
PrecMtls r n 16.53
PrmcpCor n 14.78
Prmcp r n 68.16
SelValu r n 20.69
STAR n
20.44
STIGrade n 10.88
StratEq n 20.56
TgtRetInc n 12.17
TgRe2010 n 24.22
TgtRe2015 n 13.34
TgRe2020 n 23.61
TgtRe2025 n 13.42
TgRe2030 n 22.98
TgtRe2035 n 13.80
TgtRe2040 n 22.64
TgtRe2045 n 14.22
USGro n 20.47
Wellsly n 24.42
Welltn n
33.78
4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN
-.09 -3.0 Wndsr n 14.42 -.02
WndsII n 28.66 -.05
... -2.8 Vanguard Idx Fds:
-.02 -3.1 ExtMkt I n108.04 -.12
+.02 -0.7 MidCpIstPl n106.90 -.11
+.01 -1.3 TotIntAdm r n23.57 -.01
-.01 -3.4 TotIntlInst r n 94.27 -.06
... -4.3 TotIntlIP r n 94.29 -.06
-.02 -2.6 500 n
127.53 +.01
+.01 -2.2 Balanced n 23.35 ...
... -0.3 DevMkt n
9.31 ...
-.01 -3.4 EMkt n
26.24 -.02
... +0.3 Europe n 24.15 +.03
-.13 -3.1 Extend n 43.71 -.05
+.01 +0.8 REIT r n 21.12 -.04
-.03 -1.3 STBnd n 10.67 ...
... -1.1
+.05 -0.8 TotBnd n 11.21 ...
... +0.6 TotlIntl n 14.09 -.01
34.46 -.01
... -0.9 TotStk n
... -2.0 Vanguard Instl Fds:
n23.36 ...
... -0.3 BalInst
... -1.4 DevMkInst n 9.24 ...
43.77 -.05
... +1.9 ExtIn n
+.04 -3.6 GrwthIst n 35.51 +.03
... +0.7 InfProInst n 12.02 ...
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126.72 +.02
... -1.5 InsPl n
+.05 -1.5 InsTStPlus n 31.21 ...
-.09 -1.5 MidCpIst n 21.67 -.02
+.01 -1.1 SCInst n 37.02 -.06
... +0.2 TBIst n
11.21 ...
-.04 -1.5 TSInst n 34.48 ...
... -0.5 Vanguard Signal:
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... -1.3 STBdIdx n 10.67 ...
-.01 -1.6 TotBdSgl n 11.21 ...
... -1.8 TotStkSgl n 33.27 -.01
... -2.0
... -2.2 Virtus Funds I:
9.83 +.01
-.01 -2.4 EmMktI
... -2.3 Wasatch:
13.93 ...
+.05 -2.6 IncEqty
3.74 +.01
... -0.4 SmCapV
+.01 -1.5 UltraGr
21.45 +.03
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-3.8
Coke revamps website
to tell its story
■ Marketers recasting
communications with
consumers as storytelling
rather than advertising.
By Stuart Elliott
New York Times News Service
Silver
Date
NAME
The company known for
decades for promoting its
flagship brand as “the pause
that refreshes” is refreshing
its corporate website for a
new century, adopting an
approach and attitude more
akin to a consumer magazine
than a business portal.
The company is CocaCola, which on Monday gave
its site a makeover that executives describe as the most
ambitious digital project they
have undertaken. To underline the intent to re-present
the corporate website as an
online magazine, it will be
called Coca-Cola Journey,
after a magazine named
Journey that was published
for the company’s employees
from 1987 to 1997.
The reorganized website
will offer articles on subjects like entertainment,
the environment, health
and sports, including longer pieces given prominence in the same way that
magazines play up cover
pieces. Interviews, opinion
columns, video and audio
clips, photo galleries and
blogs also will be featured.
The main business-oriented content of the website
— material like biographies
of executives, investor information, job postings and
news releases — will remain
after the revamping.
The website draws about
1.2 million unique visitors
a month, executives said, a
figure they hope will grow
substantially with the more
consumer-focused philoso-
phy. When the site went live
in 1995, it represented the
first Internet venture for the
Coca-Cola Co. A website
devoted to the Coca-Cola
brand followed, with an
extensive presence for the
company and its brands in
social media like Facebook,
LinkedIn, Twitter and YouTube.
The last time the corporate website was redesigned
was in 2005, “a lifetime in
technology,” said Ashley
Brown, director for digital
communications and social
media at the Coca-Cola Co.
in Atlanta. “We wondered,
‘Was it really working as hard
for us as it could?”’
The journey to introducing Coca-Cola Journey began
about a year ago when Muhtar
A. Kent, chairman and chief
executive, “challenged us to
find a way to bring back Journey in the digital age,” Brown
said. “And we thought, ‘Why
should our great Coke story
stay internal?”’
The use of the word
“story” is significant because
the website changes are
indicative of the growing
interest among marketers in
recasting their communications with consumers as storytelling rather than advertising. Just as attention is being
paid to developing content to
use for brand storytelling, an
appetite also exists for corporate storytelling.
“The hot thing is to talk
about being publishers,”
Brown said. “We have this
belief in great, real content
and creating content that
can be spread through any
medium as part of our ‘liquid
and linked’ strategy.”
To make that easier, “my
team, the digital communications and social media team,
has been re-formed in the
last year to look more like an
editorial team at a long-lead
magazine,” he added, “with a
production schedule and an
editorial calendar.”
Four full-time employees
are devoted to the corporate
website, Brown said. Content is being created by 40
freelance writers and photographers as well as “people
throughout the Coke system,
in marketing and public relations.”
“We are acting as newshounds in the organization,”
he added. “It’s very much like
at a newspaper or a magazine.”
A notable difference distinguishes Coca-Cola Journey
from most of those media,
apart from custom publications or house organs: The
storytelling on the website
will be subjective, not objective, material that is favorable
to the brands, products and
interests of the Coca-Cola
Co.
Although the content
comes “with a point of view,”
Brown acknowledged, “we
want to be a credible source.”
For instance, plans call for
accepting opinion columns
that are at variance with the
views of the company, with
explanations at the top that
“would say, ‘Coca-Cola has
a different perspective’ and
there’d be space for us to
write a counterpoint,” he
said.
Asked if the corporate
website would accept an
opinion column by, say,
Mayor Michael Bloomberg of
New York, advocating restrictions on the sale of large sugary drinks, Brown replied:
“Anything’s possible. ... We
have a belief here that not
shying away from tough
decisions is a good thing
and gives us credibility.”
The Associated Press
Luxembourg’s Prime Minister Jean-Claude Juncker,
second from right, greets Greek Finance Minister Yannis Stournaras, second from left. European Commissioner for Economic and Monetary Affairs Olli Rehn
is at left and President of the European Central Bank
Mario Draghi is at right.
Euro nations split
on how to help
Greece cut debt
By Sarah Dilorenzo
And Juergen Baetz
The Associated Press
BRUSSELS — European
finance ministers appeared
no closer Monday to agreeing on whether they were
ready to take decisive action
to help Greece dig itself out of
its mountains of debt, despite
a proposal from the country’s
international creditors to
grant the country extra time
to meet its targets.
A draft document
obtained by The Associated Press Monday from
Greece’s so-called troika of
creditors — the European
Central Bank, the European
Commission and the International Monetary Fund —
recommends giving Athens
two more years until 2016 to
implement the reforms necessary to restart growth and
bring their debts down to a
sustainable level. Ahead of
Monday’s meeting of the 17
eurozone finance ministers
in Brussels, Irish Finance
Minister Michael Noonan
said that the extension would
cost between 31 billion euros
and 32 billion euros ($39.48
billion-$40.75 billion).
The troika has already
pledged 240 billion euros in
bailout loans to keep Greece
afloat while Athens implements economic reforms and
austerity measures to get its
finances in order. The country has received around 150
billion euros of those loans
so far.
Greece is waiting for the
next 31.5 billion euro ($40 billion) installment of its bailout
loan before it faces a bond
repayment Friday that it may
not be able to afford otherwise. It has passed a series
of spending cuts and reforms
this week to meet the conditions of the loan. But in
recent months, it has become
clear that country’s bailout
program is way off track, and
deep disagreements persist
among its creditors on how
to right it.
Target has earlier start for holiday kickoff
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — Target
Corp. will open its doors at 9
p.m. on Thanksgiving, three
hours earlier than a year ago,
to kick off the holiday shopping season.
The discounter joins several other major retailers,
including Wal-Mart Stores
Inc., that are opening earlier
in the evening on the holiday
and staggering deals over
the two-day period. Over
the years, stores have been
expanding their hours on
Black Friday to get ahead of
the competition, but the kickoff is increasingly happening
right after shoppers finish
their turkey feast.
“We thought long and hard
about the right opening time,”
said Kathee Tesija, Target’s
executive vice president of
merchandising. She said that
9 p.m. struck “a perfect balance” for customers.
Target, based in Minneapolis, plans to offer deals
that include an Apex 32-inch
LCD TV for $147 and a Nikon
digital camera for $99.99 for
the earlier opening. From 4
a.m. to noon, the next day,
customers who spend $50 or
more on clothing, accessories or home products will
earn a $10 Target gift card to
use toward a future purchase.
Target is also preparing additional early morning specials,
including Leapfrog Explorer
software for $15.
Wal-Mart said last week it
will begin its holiday sale at
8 p.m. on Thanksgiving, two
hours earlier than last year.
It then will have two more
rounds of sales events including a 10 p.m. sale on electron-
ics and another sale at 5 a.m.
the next day.
Sears Holdings Corp. said
its Sears stores will open at
8 p.m. Thanksgiving Day
and will stay open overnight
until 10 p.m. Friday. Last year
Sears stores were closed on
Thanksgiving. The company’s
Kmart stores have been open
on Thanksgiving for years.
Kohl’s Corp. and Macy’s
Inc. will again open their
doors at midnight, following
Thanksgiving. J.C. Penney
will announce its Black Friday promotions Monday.
34979028
C6 • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • • •
CHANNEL 3
7-DAY
FORECAST
WEDNESDAY
TODAY
15
Murfreesboro
53/30
Shelbyville 24
TN
59
AL
Sunny
High: 55; Low: 33
High: 58; Low: 39
High: 60; Low: 40
High: 61; Low: 39
High: 60; Low: 37
High: 61; Low: 38
High: 61; Low: 37
National
TEMPERATURE
Knoxville
52/31
75
High Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
Low Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Normal High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
Normal Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
Record High . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 in 1989
Record Low . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 in 1894
PRECIPITATION
Precipitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.51"
Month to Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.11"
Normal Month to Date . . . . . . . . . .1.70"
Year to Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44.77"
Normal Year to Date . . . . . . . . . .44.28"
SUN
Today
Tomorrow
Sunrise . . . . . .7:14 a.m. . . . .7:15 a.m.
Sunset . . . . . .5:37 p.m. . . . .5:36 p.m.
MOON
Today
Tomorrow
Moonrise . . . .6:51 a.m. . . . .8:02 a.m.
Moonset . . . . .5:31 p.m. . . . .6:27 p.m.
Atlanta
58/38
New
11/13
Southeast
Today Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
52/30/sh 54/34/s
59/38/s
51/40/pc
61/43/sh 61/41/pc
57/35/s
57/42/s
49/26/s
55/32/s
70/48/sh 62/48/mc
60/41/sh 59/42/pc
63/42/s
59/45/pc
80/65/s
79/63/pc
66/48/s
65/55/s
57/37/sh 56/40/s
55/32/s
57/39/s
78/61/pc 70/61/sh
City
Key West
Knoxville
Memphis
Miami
Mobile
Montgomery
Myrtle Beach
Nashville
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Savannah
Tallahassee
Today Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
81/72/s
81/72/pc
52/31/s
57/34/s
55/34/s
57/36/s
78/69/pc 78/68/pc
63/41/s
66/48/s
61/39/s
58/46/sh
66/42/sh 61/44/mc
52/30/s
55/34/s
82/61/s
81/62/s
69/51/pc 71/56/pc
65/44/s
65/54/s
70/51/sh 63/48/mc
71/50/pc 72/52/pc
City
Today
Hi/Lo
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
68/47
68/50/s
First
11/20
Full
11/28
Last
12/6
54/35
56/41/s
Los Angeles
Sunny
81/54
81/54/s
Chicago
Sunny
40/31
46/34/s
Memphis
Sunny
55/34
57/36/s
Pollen
Cincinnati
Sunny
45/27
47/27/s
Nashville
Sunny
52/30
55/34/s
PREDOMINANT POLLEN .Ragweed
FORECAST
Dallas
61/38
63/39/s
New York
53/36
49/37/s
Today . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Low
Tomorrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Low
Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Low
Atlanta
Today
Hi/Lo
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
55/32
57/39/s
Sunny
Las Vegas
Sunny
Sunny
Showers
Denver
Sunny
54/27
56/28/s
Orlando
Sunny
82/61
81/62/s
Detroit
Mostly cloudy
39/26
41/31/s
Pittsburgh
Sunny
42/28
43/30/s
Ft. Lauderdale
Partly cloudy
80/68
80/67/pc
Tampa
Partly cloudy
82/63
82/64/s
Houston
Sunny
66/43
67/42/s
Washington
Showers
51/37
49/37/s
110s
100s
90s
80s
70s
60s
50s
40s
30s
20s
10s
0s
L
H
H
L
H
National Extremes
Charlotte
Showers
Airports
The Northeast will see scattered showers, with the highest temperature of 79º in Germantown, Md. The
Southeast will experience widespread thunderstorms, with the highest temperature of 85º in Naples, Fla.
The central United States will see mostly clear to partly cloudy skies, with the highest temperature of 78º
in Corpus Christi, Texas. In the Northwest, there will be mostly clear to partly cloudy skies and a few
showers, with the highest temperature of 62º in Colville, Wash. The Southwest will see mostly clear to
partly cloudy skies, with the highest temperature of 79º in Fullerton, Calif.
LAKE LEVELS
Lake
Apalachia
Blue Ridge
Center Hill
Chatuge
Cherokee
Chickamauga
Douglas
Fontana
Fort Loudoun
Great Falls
Guntersville
Hiwassee
Melton Hill
Nickajack
Normandy
Norris
Ocoee No. 1
Tellico
Tims Ford
Watts Bar
Weiss
Wheeler
City
19
Sunny
Athens
59/38
Monteagle
NC
Chattanooga
Murphy
46/30
55/33
Cleveland 55/31
65
55/31
Bridgeport
Blue
Huntsville
57/35
Ridge
55/32
Dalton
Scottsboro
52/32
54/33
57/32
LaFayette
54/32
Calhoun
55/33
Fort
GA
Guntersville
75
Payne
Rome
55/33
52/36
57/32
53/30
18
Mostly Sunny
at Chattanooga through 4 p.m. Yesterday.
Dayton
55/31
17
MONDAY
Few Clouds
75
Crossville
49/29
16
SUNDAY
Few Clouds
Cookeville
51/30
40
SATURDAY
More Clouds
Local
Nashville
52/30
FRIDAY
Sunny, Breezy
Regional
City
Asheville
Athens, GA
Augusta, GA
Birmingham
Bristol
Charleston, SC
Columbia, SC
Columbus, GA
Daytona Bch.
Destin
Greenville, SC
Huntsville
Jacksonville
THURSDAY
14
13
This forecast
prepared by
Chief Meteorologist
Paul Barys
..
timesfreepress.com ..
Breaking News: 423-757-News
Norm
1280’
1691’
692.2’
1928’
1075’
682.5’
1002’
1710’
813’
800’
595’
1526’
795’
634’
880’
1020’
830.76’
815’
886.8’
741’
564’
556’
Curr
1276.5’
1672.4’
627.9’
1917.6’
1050.0’
677.7’
968.7’
1667.1’
811.6’
786.9’
594.1’
1492.4’
793.4’
632.9’
865.2’
1001.3’
826.9’
811.6’
882.7’
739.0’
560.4’
553.5’
Chng
-0.6’
-0.1’
+0.1’
0.0’
-0.2’
-1.0’
-0.2’
-0.6’
-0.2’
+0.3’
0.0’
-0.5’
-0.8’
-0.4’
0.0’
-0.2’
-0.2’
-0.2’
0.0’
-0.4’
0.0’
+0.6’
High: 91° in Alice, Texas
Low: -13° in Worland, Wyo.
City
Albany
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Baton Rouge
Billings
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Dayton
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Fargo
Today Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
47/27/sh 45/29/s
58/24/s
60/30/s
29/25/mc 35/27/sn
54/40/sh 52/44/s
62/38/s
65/39/s
52/39/sh 50/37/s
64/37/s
64/38/s
44/26/s
42/26/pc
57/37/sh 46/36/s
36/30/s
41/33/s
51/37/sh 49/37/s
54/35/s
56/41/s
40/31/s
46/34/s
45/27/s
47/27/s
37/28/sn 41/32/s
61/38/s
63/39/s
41/26/s
43/29/s
53/28/s
56/27/s
47/31/s
51/34/s
39/26/mc 41/31/s
59/39/s
66/43/s
-1/-10/pc 10/-9/mc
37/25/pc 40/25/pc
City
Grand Rapids
Greensboro, NC
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Lincoln
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Macon
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Peoria
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Today Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
39/27/s
44/30/pc
50/34/sh 53/35/s
40/28/pc 40/26/sn
84/72/s
84/71/pc
63/43/s
68/44/s
42/26/s
46/28/s
54/35/s
55/38/s
67/47/s
68/49/s
55/24/s
54/33/s
54/31/s
56/30/s
80/54/s
80/54/s
45/28/s
48/29/s
63/42/s
58/42/mc
39/26/s
44/31/s
42/30/pc 46/32/s
62/45/s
64/47/s
53/36/sh 49/37/s
52/41/sh 50/40/s
61/34/s
60/34/s
51/29/s
51/33/s
42/28/s
47/31/s
53/37/sh 51/37/s
80/50/s
82/54/s
City
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Santa Fe
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
San Jose
Seattle
Topeka
Tucson
Tulsa
Washington
Wichita
Wilmington, DE
Today Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
42/28/s
43/30/s
54/34/sh 48/35/s
52/41/sh 51/43/sh
54/35/sh 47/33/s
54/37/sh 55/37/s
44/25/mc 49/28/s
54/33/s
57/33/s
51/33/ra
51/34/s
65/49/s
67/48/s
50/32/s
52/34/s
51/25/s
53/31/s
43/30/s
45/33/s
62/42/s
64/44/s
76/52/s
77/55/s
65/52/pc 65/53/pc
66/50/s
65/52/s
51/42/sh 51/41/sh
56/30/s
56/35/s
75/47/s
80/51/s
58/32/s
60/35/s
51/37/sh 49/37/s
58/31/s
58/36/s
53/36/sh 51/36/s
City
Jerusalem
London
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
New Delhi
Paris
Today Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
61/50/pc 64/51/pc
55/45/pc 51/39/s
72/50/pc 71/49/pc
43/25/sh 38/26/s
39/31/mc 35/31/pc
82/58/s
81/58/s
50/32/pc 51/34/s
City
Port-au-Prince
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
Seoul
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Today Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
91/75/t
92/76/t
78/70/t
77/69/ra
74/55/s
70/54/mc
48/36/sh 47/33/s
70/59/s
66/60/mc
64/50/s
61/44/s
37/28/mc 38/33/pc
International
City
Athens
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Frankfurt
Hong Kong
Today Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
72/55/s
67/56/pc
46/27/s
47/28/s
47/31/pc 46/30/s
76/58/s
74/60/pc
76/62/s
77/63/s
47/30/pc 45/29/s
81/70/s
81/71/s
Weather (Wx): cl/cloudy; fl/flurries; pc/partly cloudy; mc/mostly cloudy; ra/rain; rs/rain & snow;
s/sunny; sh/showers; sn/snow; t/thunderstorms; w/windy
Cuomo
seeking
$30 billion
storm aid
The Associated Press
The Associated Press
People wait in a line for supplies donated to the victims of Superstorm Sandy at the
Red Hook Houses in the Red Hook section of Brooklyn, N.Y., Monday. Some of the
buildings in the complex are still without power and heat from Superstorm Sandy
two weeks ago.
The first buses enter the
Manhattan side of the
Hugh L. Carey Tunnel
Monday afternoon. The
tunnel reopened for limited rush-hour service for
buses only.
A woman surveys the piles of debris in Seaside Heights,
N.J., Monday.
The Associated Press
A woman surveys the piles of debris in Seaside Heights,
N.J., Monday.
The Associated Press
from the Obama administration for reimbursement for
many public costs of rebuilding.
Meanwhile, two weeks
after the superstorm socked
the region, cleanup continues
in New York and New Jersey,
which bore the brunt of the
destruction.
U.S. Secretary of Homeland
Security Janet Napolitano visited with disaster-relief workers Sunday in Staten Island’s
Midland Beach neighborhood,
which is still devastated two
weeks after Sandy hit.
The lack of power restoration for a relative few in the
densely populated region at
the heart of the storm reinforced Sandy’s fractured
effect on the area: tragic and
vicious to some, merely a nuisance to others.
On Staten Island, Napolitano said “a lot of progress” had
been made since the storm hit
and especially since her last
visit 10 days earlier.
“It seems like a different
place,” she said. “You can
really tell the difference.”
But, she added, there was
a lot more to do. “The last big
chunk” to solve, she said, is the
question of how quickly power
can be returned to thousands
of homes without it.
If homes are not inhabitable even after power returns,
she said, the government is
finding temporary apartments
and hotels where evacuees
can stay — preferably in the
same community so kids can
continue going to the same
schools.
Garbage trucks, hulking
military vehicles and mudcaked cars continued Monday to move slowly through
a Staten Island waterfront
neighborhood still reeling
from Superstorm Sandy’s
storm surge.
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ALBANY, N.Y. — Gov.
Andrew Cuomo plans to
request $30 billion in federal
aid to rebuild after Superstorm
Sandy, which heavily damaged
parts of New York City and
Long Island, he said Monday.
The administration will
seek a supplemental appropriation to cover infrastructure, repair and emergency
costs beyond those normally
covered by federal emergency
aid, Cuomo said. “I’ve asked
for 100 percent reimbursement,” he said.
Generally the Federal
Emergency Management
Agency will reimburse up to
75 percent of public costs, with
the state and local authorities covering the remaining
25 percent. There have been
cases, such as Hurricane
Katrina, where the federal
government has reimbursed
up to 90 percent of costs.
“The equity and the fairness is inarguable in this
case,” Cuomo said. It will
probably be a regional plan
including New Jersey and
Connecticut, with money for
infrastructure, housing, local
governments and small business, he said.
The plan to request federal
aid, first reported Monday by
The New York Times, would
help cover the cost of improvements like a power grid meant
to improve utilities’ ability to
find and fix outages. It would
also upgrade New York City’s
fuel supply capacity to help
prevent consumer shortages
and bring new oil and gas
pipelines from New England
to reduce dependence on
shipping the fuel.
Long lines at gas stations
led to alternate-day rationing
in both New York and New
Jersey after the storm.
Last week, Cuomo said the
storm would cost New York
state $33 billion, and he was
counting on a commitment
...
.
D
SPORTS
• • Tuesday, November 13, 2012
timesfreepress.com/sports
PREP FOOTBALL: Barger resigns after five seasons as Sequatchie coach, D6
q
q
BASEBALL: Trout, Harper named big-league rookies of year, D3
Fame
games
count
Saban pushes
forward look
Alabama coach emphasizes execution
By David Paschall
Staff Writer
■ The TSSAA’s 75
percent take from the
preseason basketball
contests maintains an
exhibit in Nashville.
By Gene Henley
Staff Writer
A little more than a
decade ago, the Tennessee
Secondary School Athletic
Association introduced the
concept of Hall of Fame
basketball games, which
at the time were meant
to be scrimmages treated
as games the week before
the official start date of the
season.
They also were to be
fundraisers to help build
a Hall of Fame building,
which would be used to
highlight the various facets
of the TSSAA, its member
schools and the overall history of the association and
media members who have
helped cover it.
Ten years later, no
building has been built, the
games are still being played
and some member schools
feel as though they’re being
“played” financially.
The games made more
than $200,000 statewide
during the 2001-02 season;
last year the figure was
$115,584. The TSSAA currently takes 75 percent of
the gate receipts from the
each Hall of Fame game.
The amount was scaled
down from 80 percent in
2007, but the projected
building has been scaled
down to an exhibit permanently displayed in the
Tennessee Sports Hall of
Fame inside Bridgestone
Arena in downtown Nashville.
So a lot of coaches are
asking: Where’s the money
going? TSSAA assistant
director Matthew Gillespie
has the answer, but that
reply creates more questions.
“After doing a lot of
research and discussion
with staff and the Hall of
Champions Committee,
it was decided that the
exhibit was a more practical choice for displaying
the history of the TSSAA,”
Gillespie said. “There was
initial talk of a building,
but after looking at other
buildings and halls of fame,
it was determined that the
exhibit we have now would
be a better fit.
“It was initially built as
a traveling exhibit which
was put on display on
site at football, basketball,
Spring Fling and Mr. Football events. After a few
years, we really lucked out
by interest from the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame
to host our exhibit.”
When asked why the
state association still takes
75 percent of the gate, Gillespie said it wasn’t really
the board’s decision.
“The formula has definitely changed over the
years,” he said. “It used to
be 80 percent to the Hall of
Fame fund before expenses.
The committee voted to let
the schools pay for officials
first, then give 75 percent
of what’s left.
“There are numerous expenses annually to
update, change and upkeep
the exhibit. The main portions of the exhibit are
changed out at an annual
basis.”
Another issue has been
the games themselves.
Previously, the TSSAA
dropped the maximum
number of regular-season
contests for each team
See FAME, Page D6
Knoxville News Sentinel by Amy Smotherman Burgess
Alabama has a thrilling
win over LSU and a heartbreaking loss to Texas A&M
the past two weeks, but
Crimson Tide football coach
Nick Saban believes they’re
one in the same.
“No matter how you cut
the mustard, whether we
won both
of the last
two games
or lost
both of the
last two
games, I
don’t think
w e ’ v e
executed
as well,”
Nick Saban
Saban said
Monday. “Whether we’re not
focusing as well, playing as
well, practicing as well or
getting as emotionally ready
as well, the focus has to be
on not what has been lost
but what can be gained from
the lessons learned.
“We need to look forward
in a positive way to what we
want this football team to be
remembered for, and there
are a lot of things moving
forward that we can accomplish.”
In racing out to an 80 start, the Crimson Tide
won every game by at least
19 points and built a combined 104-3 advantage in
first quarters. The competi-
TIDE, TAKE THREE
Three tidbits regarding
No. 4 Alabama
entering this week’s
game against Western
Carolina:
1. Alabama has played
WCU twice within the
past decade, defeating
the Catamounts by a
combined 104-6.
2. Quarterback AJ
McCarron has 20
touchdown passes
through 10 games,
matching the singleseason mark Greg
McElroy set two years
ago in 13 games.
3. The Crimson Tide
have allowed 46 points
and 853 yards the past
two weeks yet are No.
1 nationally in scoring
defense (11.1 points
per game) and No. 2
in total defense (247.8
yards per contest).
tion stiffened significantly
the last two weekends, and
Alabama’s early dominance
evaporated when LSU and
Texas A&M jumped out to a
combined 23-0 first-quarter
lead.
Saban believes his team’s
inability to move on from the
21-17 comeback win in Baton
Rouge was reminiscent of 10
years ago, when he coached
See ALABAMA, Page D4
Tennessee coach Derek Dooley walks alone through the end zone at Neyland
Stadium before Saturday’s game. His Neyland days could be over soon.
No decision
Dooley says Hart denies reports
can’t make that decision,” Dooley said. “I can give you compelKNOXVILLE — Derek Doolling arguments why I should,
ey walked into his usual news conand there’s plenty of compelling
ference room right at noon Monarguments why I shouldn’t. It’s
day and took his usual seat at a VOLS
not going to be your decision, it’s
table in front of the usual group
not going to be a bunch of these
GLANCE sources’ decision — it’s Dave and
of media.
A handful of the questions ■ at Vanthe chancellor [Jimmy Cheek],
Tennessee’s head football coach derbilt
and it’s their decision.
eventually answered certainly ■ Saturday,
“I can’t control what they think.
were unusual, though.
We’ve had a lot of good dialogue.
7 p.m. EST
After multiple media outlets, ■ ESPN2
I think he’s got a good handle of
including the Times Free Press, &106.5 FM
how I do things in our program,
reported Sunday that he is not
where we are and why we’re not
expected to return for his fourth season getting the results we want. You move on
with the program, the Volunteers’ coach and live with it.”
dismissed those reports and said athletic
The day after Tennessee fell to 0-6 in
director Dave Hart told him he had not yet the Southeastern Conference for the secreached a decision on his future.
ond consecutive season — with Saturday’s
Yet when asked if he believed he’d quadruple-overtime loss to league newback as Tennessee’s coach in 2013, Dooley comer Missouri — multiple sources told
admitted to some uncertainty.
“I’m worried about Vanderbilt, and I
See DOOLEY, Page D4
By Patrick Brown
Staff Writer
Mocs’ shots off,
but they win big
By David Uchiyama
Staff Writer
Nobody requested a curtain call.
But the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga freshman class played its role as
well as could be expected
in an 88-53 drubbing of Tennessee Temple on Monday
in the basketball Mocs’ season debut.
They had highlights
such as Farad Cobb setting
a freshman record and lowlights such as missing the
rim on 3-pointers. Most
importantly, they now have
one game of experience on
the college level.
“I thought Farad got more
comfortable just as this one
game went on,” UTC coach
John Shulman said. “You
wait until you see all these
kids five or six games later.
They were in a panic. Casey
[Jones] was worried about
pregame meal.”
The Mocs scored 42
points in the paint, forced 35
turnovers and turned them
into 44 points against the
crosstown Crusaders (2-2).
“I was anxious and I
was excited to play my first
game,” said Cobb, whose six
steals were a school freshman record. “I didn’t know
what to expect.
“I go out there and I had
a chance to make a layup in
the first minute and I kind
of slipped.”
Slipping is the excuse for
that miss. But the Mocs shot
only 41 percent from the
floor and 2-of-22 from the 3point line. They made up for
poor shooting by attempting
See UTC, Page D5
Dooley saga goes on; sequel unlikely
KNOXVILLE
— Though officially offlimits for media interviews Monday, Tennessee
quarterback Tyler Bray
couldn’t resist having a
little fun at the reporters’
expense.
Knowing at least a few
of us ink-stained wretches
were still lingering about
in the indoor practice
facility after talking to
the Volunteers who were
available, Bray shouted
loud enough for all to
hear: “I just got a text
from my dad. He wanted
to know if I knew that
they’d just fired Coach
[Derek] Dooley. This is
sooooo unbelievable.”
Bray laughed as he
spoke. It’s good to know
that at least one person
within the football program can find something
funny in
this rapidly deteriorating
situation.
Off the
record, in
hushed
tones
urgent
Mark
enough
Wiedmer
to make
Commentary
Watergate’s Deep Throat proud,
there seems to be a near
consensus that Dooley’s
days in charge of the Vols
are now down to less than
two weeks, his probable
pink slip to arrive within
48 hours of the end of the
Kentucky game on Nov.
24.
Not that Dooley’s acting as if that’s the case.
With a bowl bid still
claimable should his 4-
6 Vols win out against
Vanderbilt and Kentucky,
Dooley said Monday that
athletic director Dave
Hart “told me he had not
made a decision, whether
we go 6-6, despite what
all the reports are.”
Then again, maybe
Dooley’s in denial as he
nears the end of his third
season, because he also
said of his UT future, “I
didn’t ask him that.”
Sometimes you don’t
ask the question because
you don’t want to know
the answer.
So Dooley walks
around spouting comments befitting an attorney, which is what he
was before he decided to
pursue a career that can
make you even more disStaff Photo by Angela Lewis
See WIEDMER, Page D4
UTC’s Zaccheus Mason gets ready to take a shot as
Tennessee Temple 7-footer John Riek guards him
Monday at McKenzie Arena. The Mocs won 88-53.
■ To contact Sports • Phone: 423-757-6273 • Fax: 423-668-5049 • Email: [email protected]
Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • • •
..
timesfreepress.com ..
Breaking News: 423-757-News
PAGE2BITS
SCHEDULES
Area Colleges
INTHEBLEACHERS
All Times Eastern
Tuesday, Nov. 13
BASKETBALL
King JV at Chattanooga State (m), 7
Cleveland St. (w) at Ga. Northwestern, 7:30
Tenn. Temple (m) at Clayton State, 7:30
Wednesday, Nov. 14
BASKETBALL
Bryan (w) at Lincoln Memorial, exhib., 7
Tenn. Temple (w) at North Alabama, 7
Thursday, Nov. 15
BASKETBALL
Hiwassee at Covenant (w), 6
Oakwood JV at Ga. Northwestern (w), 6
Crown at Ga. N’western (m), Rossville, 7
Covenant (m) at Berry, 7
Tennessee Wesleyan (m) at Point, 7
Welch at Sewanee (w), 7
High Schools
Tuesday, Nov. 13
BASKETBALL
Hall of Fame Games
McMinn Central girls at Alcoa, 6
South Pittsburg girls at Notre Dame, 6
St. Andrew’s-Sewanee at Lookout Valley, 6, 7:30
Sale Creek at Oliver Springs, 6, 7:30
Chattanooga Patriot boys at Notre Dame, 7:30
Chattanooga Christian at Red Bank, 6, 7:30
Cookeville vs. McMinn County, 6, 7:30
Walker Valley at East Hamilton, 6, 7:30
Tellico Plains at Polk County, 6, 7:30
Bledsoe County at Meigs County, 6:30, 8
Boyd-Buchanan at Van Buren, 6:30, 8
Baylor girls at Marion County, 8
THE ODDS
Glantz-Culver Line
NCAA Football
OPEN TODAY UNDERDOG
FAVORITE
Wednesday
1
4 (59)
Ohio
at Ball St.
3 ⁄2
1
101⁄2 (69) Toledo
at N. Illinois
10 ⁄2
Thursday
1
31⁄2
at Virginia
North Carolina
5 ⁄2
Friday
1
231⁄2
Hawaii
at Air Force
22 ⁄2
FIU
1
1
at FAU
Saturday
1
13
Duke
at Georgia Tech 12 ⁄2
1
3
Temple
at Army
1 ⁄2
1
3
Kent St.
at Bowling Green 2 ⁄2
1
Virginia Tech
9
9 ⁄2 at Boston Col.
1
181⁄2
Minnesota
at Nebraska
17 ⁄2
1
Arkansas
at Mississippi St.
6
6 ⁄2
at Miami
7
7 South Florida
Purdue
7
7
at Illinois
1
61⁄2
at Kansas
Iowa St.
6 ⁄2
1
Houston
at Marshall
3
3 ⁄2
1
31 at Maryland
Florida St.
29 ⁄2
Buffalo
10
11
at UMass
1
61⁄2 Northwestern
at Michigan St.
6 ⁄2
1
171⁄2
NC State
at Clemson
18 ⁄2
1
Rutgers
at Cincinnati
6
6 ⁄2
1
17
Indiana
at Penn St.
16 ⁄2
1
Tennessee
at Vanderbilt
3
4 ⁄2
at Cent. Michigan
3
3 Miami (Ohio)
1
10
Memphis
at UAB
10 ⁄2
at W. Michigan
13
13
E. Michigan
1
10 at West Virginia
Oklahoma
10 ⁄2
1
4
at UCLA
Southern Cal
3 ⁄2
1
28 Colorado St.
at Boise St.
28 ⁄2
at Navy
13
13
Texas St.
1
at Baylor
Kansas St.
11
11 ⁄2
1
10 at New Mexico
Nevada
9 ⁄2
at Notre Dame
24
24 Wake Forest
1
21
Stanford
at Oregon
21 ⁄2
at Oregon St.
OFF
OFF
California
1
at Rice
SMU
3
3 ⁄2
East Carolina
10
10
at Tulane
1
1
3 ⁄2
UCF
at Tulsa
1 ⁄2
at Michigan
OFF
OFF
Iowa
Washington
20
20
at Colorado
1
BYU
6
3 ⁄2 at San Jose St.
at UNLV
OFF
OFF
Wyoming
UTSA
4
6
at Idaho
at Utah
OFF
OFF
Arizona
1
4
Syracuse
at Missouri
5 ⁄2
1
1
10 ⁄2
Texas Tech
at Oklahoma St. 10 ⁄2
Utah St.
+1
3
at La. Tech
1
3
Ohio St.
at Wisconsin
1 ⁄2
at LSU
20
19
Mississippi
1
4
at S. Miss.
UTEP
3 ⁄2
at Arizona St.
19
21 Washington St.
Arkansas St.
3
3
at Troy
at Louisiana-Monroe 11
10
North Texas
Middle Tenn.
10
10 at S. Alabama
1
1
3 ⁄2 W. Kentucky
at La.-Lafayette
3 ⁄2
Off Key
California QB questionable
Michigan QB questionable
UNLV QB questionable
Arizona QB questionable
NFL
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Thursday
at Buffalo
1
1
(45)
Miami
Sunday
at WashingtonOFF OFF (OFF) Philadelphia
Green Bay
3
3 (511⁄2)
at Detroit
at Atlanta
101⁄2 10
(45)
Arizona
Tampa Bay
1 11⁄2
(48)
at Carolina
at Dallas
8 71⁄2 (431⁄2)
Cleveland
at St. Louis
3
3
(38)
N.Y. Jets
at New England 91⁄2 91⁄2 (531⁄2) Indianapolis
at Houston
16 16
(42) Jacksonville
Cincinnati
31⁄2 31⁄2
(44) at Kansas City
New Orleans 61⁄2 41⁄2 (541⁄2)
at Oakland
at Denver
7 71⁄2 (491⁄2)
San Diego
at Pittsburgh
4 31⁄2 (451⁄2)
Baltimore
Monday
at San Franc. OFF OFF (OFF)
Chicago
Off Key
Philadelphia QB questionable
San Francisco QB questionable
NCAA Basketball
FAVORITE
LINE
UNDERDOG
at Valparaiso
19
N. Illinois
at UMass
71⁄2
Harvard
Temple
4
at Kent St.
at St. John’s
2
Detroit
at Xavier
Pk
Butler
1
Michigan St.
Kansas-x
1 ⁄2
at Princeton
101⁄2
Northeastern
at Richmond
14
UNC Wilmington
Wichita St.
at VCU
51⁄2
at Mississippi St.
5
FAU
at BYU
14
Georgia St.
at Southern Cal
1
Long Beach St.
Duke-x
11⁄2
Kentucky
at California
21
Pepperdine
1
at San Jose St.
Houston
1 ⁄2
at UCLA
22
UC Irvine
at Hawaii
121⁄2
Houston Baptist
1
at Rider
3 ⁄2
Stony Brook
at Charlotte
10
Georgia Southern
Wright St.
8
at E. Illinois
Tennessee St.
at S. Dakota St.
91⁄2
at W. Kentucky
6
Austin Peay
at Boise St.
7
Oakland
at Northwestern
23
Texas Southern
x-at Atlanta
———
NBA
FAVORITE
LINE
UNDERDOG
at Charlotte
2
Washington
New York
5
at Orlando
at Indiana
71⁄2
Toronto
1
at Brooklyn
5 ⁄2
Cleveland
at Sacramento
2
Portland
1
San Antonio
at L.A. Lakers
3 ⁄2
SPORTSONAIR
TUESDAY TELEVISION
■ Basketball
NCAA: Stony Brook at Rider, ESPN, 6 a.m.
NCAA: Northern Illinois at Valparaiso, ESPN, 8 a.m.
NCAA: Harvard at Massachusetts, ESPN, 10 a.m.
NCAA: Temple at Kent State, ESPN, noon
NCAA: Detroit at St. John’s, ESPN, 2 p.m.
NCAA: Butler at Xavier, ESPN, 4 p.m.
NCAA: Michigan State vs Kansas at Atlanta, ESPN, 7 p.m.
NCAA: Preseason NIT game at Ann Arbor, ESPN2, 8 p.m.
NCAA: Duke vs Kentucky at Atlanta, ESPN, 9 p.m.
NCAA: Georgia Southern at Charlotte, NBCSN, 9 p.m.
NCAA: Preseason NIT at Manhattan, Kan., ESPN2, 10 p.m.
NCAA W: Kentucky at Baylor, ESPN2, 6 p.m.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
TSN FCS Poll
ACC Standings
PHILADELPHIA — The top 25 teams in The
Sports Network Football Championship Subdivision poll, with first-place votes in parentheses,
records through Nov. 11, points and previous
ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. North Dakota State (121) 9-1
3930 1
2. Montana State (20)
9-1
3748 2
3. Sam Houston State (14) 8-2
3585 3
4. Old Dominion (3)
9-1
3496 4
5. Eastern Washington
8-2
3362 5
6. Georgia Southern
8-2
3113 7
7. New Hampshire (1)
8-2
2897 10
8. Appalachian State
8-3
2659 12
9. Wofford
8-2
2502 13
10. Central Arkansas
8-2
2341 14
11. Illinois State
8-2
2094 15
12. Stony Brook
9-2
1917 6
13. James Madison
7-3
1885 9
14. Lehigh
9-1
1843 8
15. Northern Arizona
8-2
1594 11
16. Villanova
7-3
1477 21
17. Cal Poly
8-2
1354 19
18. Indiana State
7-3
1294 18
19. Towson
6-4
1251 17
20. Richmond
7-3
1153 20
21. South Dakota State
7-3
1046 16
22. Eastern Kentucky
8-3
750 22
23. Tennessee State
8-2
450 24
24. Bethune-Cookman
8-2
423 —
24. Eastern Illinois
7-3
423 —
Others receiving votes: Colgate 213, Samford
200, Albany 136, Sacramento State 90, UT
Martin 75, Arkansas-Pine Bluff 52, Harvard 43,
Youngstown State 40, Wagner 29, McNeese
State 28, Northern Iowa 22, Lilberty 21, The
Citadel 20, Delaware 17, Southern Utah 16,
Penn 15, Southern Illinois 13, UTC 7, Coastal
Carolina 3, Alabama A&M 3, Alabama State
2, Drake 2, North Carolina A&T 2, San Diego
1, Jacksonville 1.
Atlantic Division
Conference
AllGames
W L PF PA W L PF PA
Clemson
6 1 310 171 9 1 429 224
Florida St.
6 1 277 110 9 1 431 130
NC State
3 3 152 160 6 4 266 223
Wake Forest 3 5 132 235 5 5 201 289
Maryland
2 4 104 152 4 6 189 240
Boston College 1 5 121 219 2 8 205 299
Coastal Division
Georgia Tech 4 3 278 209 5 5 382 302
Miami
4 3 231 209 5 5 285 312
Duke
3 3 156 219 6 4 307 326
North Carolina 3 3 216 212 6 4 405 257
Virginia Tech 2 4 146 181 4 6 266 250
Virginia
2 4 141 187 4 6 246 293
———
Thursday’s Game
North Carolina at Virginia, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Florida St. at Maryland, Noon
Virginia Tech at Boston College, 12:30 p.m.
South Florida at Miami, 3 p.m.
NC State at Clemson, 3:30 p.m.
Duke at Georgia Tech, 3:30 p.m.
Wake Forest at Notre Dame, 3:30 p.m.
SoCon Standings
Conference
AllGames
W L PF PA W L PF PA
Ga. Southern 6 2 249 163 8 2 376 189
Wofford
6 2 222 164 8 2 338 171
Appalachian St 6 2 255 238 8 3 358 314
Samford
5 3 191 164 6 3 235 187
The Citadel
4 3 196 194 6 4 286 284
UTC
4 3 185 146 5 5 257 207
Furman
2 5 169 187 3 7 252 296
Elon
1 6 168 236 3 7 250 326
W. Carolina
0 8 191 334 1 9 257 400
———
Saturday’s Games
W. Carolina at Alabama, 12:21 p.m.
Wofford at South Carolina, 1 p.m.
Georgia Southern at Georgia, 1:30 p.m.
The Citadel at Furman, 1:30 p.m.
Elon at UTC, 2 p.m.
Samford at Kentucky, 7:30 p.m.
SEC Standings
East
Conference
AllGames
W L PF PA W L PF PA
Florida
7 1 207 95 9 1 261 129
Georgia
7 1 268 145 9 1 369 188
South Carolina 6 2 229 169 8 2 326 185
Vanderbilt
4 3 136 150 6 4 256 180
Missouri
2 5 146 205 5 5 253 251
Tennessee
0 6 191 262 4 6 379 370
Kentucky
0 7 72 254 1 9 164 332
West
Alabama
6 1 254 90 9 1 370 111
Texas A&M
5 2 254 139 8 2 431 213
LSU
4 2 119 102 8 2 302 155
Mississippi St 3 3 133 168 7 3 294 214
Mississippi
2 4 148 174 5 5 295 277
Arkansas
2 4 130 192 4 6 255 300
Auburn
0 7 81 223 2 8 173 284
———
Saturday’s Games
W. Carolina at Alabama, 12:21 p.m.
Arkansas at Mississippi St., 12:21 p.m.
Wofford at South Carolina, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville St. at Florida, 1 p.m.
Georgia Southern at Georgia, 1:30 p.m.
Alabama A&M at Auburn, 2 p.m.
Mississippi at LSU, 3:30 p.m.
Sam Houston St. at Texas A&M, 3:30 p.m.
Syracuse at Missouri, 7 p.m.
Tennessee at Vanderbilt, 7 p.m.
Samford at Kentucky, 7:30 p.m.
TENNESSEE LOTTERY
Monday’s winning numbers:
Cash 3 Midday: 0-7-1
Lucky Sum: 8
Cash 4 Midday: 7-2-7-9
Lucky Sum: 25
Cash 3 Evening: 1-4-4
Lucky Sum: 9
Cash 4 Evening: 0-3-7-8
Lucky Sum: 18
Tennessee Cash: Not available
Cash Ball: Not available
Sunday’s winning numbers:
Cash 3: 4-2-0
Lucky Sum: 6
Cash 4: 7-6-9-4
Lucky Sum: 26
CONTACT
SPORTS
GOLF
Area Aces
At Bear Trace at Harrison Bay, John McDaniel, Sunday, his second, No. 4, 136 yards, 7-iron,
witnessed by Ron Copeland and Kelly Hogan.
TRANSACTIONS
Monday’s Moves
BASEBALL
COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE—Suspended free
agent RHP Rafael Martinez 50 games for
violating the Minor League Drug Prevention and
Treatment Program.
American League
TEXAS RANGERS—Agreed to terms with C
Juan Apodaca, OF Jim Adduci, LHP Neal
Cotts, OF Aaron Cunningham, and RHP Yonata
Ortega on minor league contracts.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES—Named Randy Ready
manager of Gwinnett (IL).
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
LOS ANGELES LAKERS—Named Mike
D’Antoni coach.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS—Signed CB Delano Howell to
the practice squad.
CAROLINA PANTHERS—Fired special teams
coordinator Brian Murphy. Promoted assistant
special teams coach Richard Rodgers to special
teams coordinator.
CINCINNATI BENGALS—Signed LB Ben
Jacobs to the practice squad. Released OT Jeff
Adams from the practice squad.
DALLAS COWBOYS—Placed DE Kenyon Coleman on injured reserve.
DETROIT LIONS—Released CB Alphonso Smith.
GREEN BAY PACKERS—Signed LB Vic So’oto.
Placed T Bryan Bulaga on injured reserve.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Activated NT Josh
Chapman from the non-football-injury list.
Signed TE Kyle Miller from the practice squad.
Placed DT Drake Nevis and CB Jerraud Powers
on injured reserve.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Signed LB Greg
Jones. Released WR Anthony Armstrong.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Placed DE Glenn
Dorsey on injured reserve. Signed CB Neiko
Thorpe from the practice squad.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Released LB Jeff
Tarpinian.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Signed CB Buddy
Jackson to the practice squad.
MOTORSPORTS
NASCAR—Fined Jeff Gordon $100,000 and
docked him 25 points for intentionally wrecking
Clint Bowyer during Sunday’s race. Docked
team owner Rick Hendrick 25 car owner points
and fined crew chief Brian Pattie $25,000 for the
same incident. Fined Brad Keselowski $25,000
for having an electronic device inside the car.
COLLEGE
PITTSBURGH—Announced sophomore basketball
G John Johnson will transfer to another school.
SHENANDOAH—Fired football coach Paul Barnes.
GEORGIA LOTTERY
Monday’s winning numbers:
Cash 3 Midday: 3-3-1
Cash 4 Midday: 5-0-1-9
Georgia FIVE Midday: 5-1-4-8-7
Cash 3 Evening: 0-7-9
Cash 4 Evening: Not available
Georgia FIVE Evening: 5-9-0-5-4
Fantasy 5: Not available
Decades of Dollars: 8-33-34-36-41-42
LOOK DAILY FOR ‘5 AT 10’
Sports Editor Jay Greeson provides
a morning look at sports developments Monday
through Friday at www.timesfreepress.com.
BOWLING
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
League Scores
USA Today/ESPN Top 25
HOLIDAY BOWL BRAINERD
Cracker Mixed
Men: Chris Colen 676, John Wallace 669,
Travis Staten 654, Kenny Reynolds 641, Danny
Coleman 630, John Allen 624, Ted Richardson
Jr. 620, James Lacey 617, Dale Douglas 611,
Wayne Gilbert 608. Women: Beverly Reynolds
603, Ashley Adams 520, Laura Smith 502,
Heather Templeton 481, Lillie Lacey 467, Karen
Bowman 475.
Classics Mixed
Men: Brian Williams 718, Joe Hall 599, Don
Gibson 581, Don Grimes 563, Ron Coyne
556, Robby McKinney 532, W.C. Sherrill 510,
Jay Shipp 509, Gilbert Aikens 503. Women:
Diane Parrish 545, Tina Hall 450, Donna Williams 461, Lois Eskew 443, Aileen Wilson 434,
Morenita Bautista 432, Elaine Forrester 431,
Dawn Brown 427.
Prime Time (Juniors)
Boys: Reginald Long 565, Nikolas Smith 478,
Branden Barnes 468, Bryan Wilson 467, Adrian
Smith 462. Girls: Tamya Long 526, Tia Nelson
515, Susan Turner 458, Debbie Chadwick 350,
Kiara Currie 330.
Lane Warriors (Juniors)
Boys: Jeremiah Turner 546, C.J. Williams 524,
Tyris Nelson 485, Justin Smith 446, Corwin
Dessert 439, Markus Holland 424. Girls: Tori
McWhorter 378, Jaida McWhorter 340, Elizabeth Nelson 337, Anya Nelson 311, Catilyn
Wilson 285.
Pee Wee (2 games)
Boys: Blaine Henry 164, La Jaun Coulter 159.
Girls: McKenzie Burke 123, Brooklyn Williams
120.
HOLIDAY BOWL HIXSON
Monday Rollers
Men: Allen Holland 715 (258), Joe Vandergriff
645, Doug Putnam 623. Women: Hilary Jones
648, Beverly Cagle 604, Kathy Long 546, Etta
Putnam 509, Thelma Milligan 496.
The top 25 teams in the USA Today-ESPN
men’s college basketball poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 11,
points based on 25 points for a first-place vote
through one point for a 25th-place vote and last
week’s ranking:
Record Pts Prv
1. Indiana (25)
1-0
768 1
2. Louisville (4)
1-0
740 2
3. Kentucky (2)
1-0
701 3
4. Ohio State
1-0
648 4
5. Michigan
1-0
638 5
6. N.C. State
1-0
601 6
7. Kansas
1-0
583 7
8. Syracuse
1-0
522 9
9. Duke
1-0
515 8
10. Florida
1-0
465 10
11. North Carolina
2-0
447 12
12. Arizona
1-0
426 11
13. Creighton
1-0
360 15
14. UCLA
1-0
351 13
15. Missouri
1-0
319 17
16. Memphis
0-0
310 16
17. Baylor
2-0
270 18
18. UNLV
0-0
241 19
19. Gonzaga
1-0
221 22
20. Wisconsin
1-0
212 21
21. Notre Dame
1-0
143 23
22. Michigan State
0-1
135 14
23. San Diego State
0-1
66 20
24. Cincinnati
1-0
63 —
25. Texas
1-0
60 24
Others receiving votes: Connecticut 58, VCU 54,
Murray State 34, Kansas State 19, Pittsburgh
15, Saint Mary’s 13, Marquette 11, New Mexico
11, Saint Louis 8, Tennessee 8, Minnesota 7,
Santa Clara 6, Colorado State 4, Florida State 3,
Iowa State 3, Stanford 3, Bucknell 2, Colorado 2,
Georgia 2, Maryland 2, Saint Joseph’s 2, Middle
Tennessee 1, Ohio 1, South Alabama 1.
TENNIS
ATP World Tour Finals
Monday
At The O2 Arena
London
Purse: $8.11 million (Tour Final)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
Singles
Championship
Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Roger Federer
(2), Switzerland, 7-6 (6), 7-5.
Doubles
Championship
Marcel Granollers and Marc Lopez (6), Spain,
def. Mahesh Bhupathi and Rohan Bopanna (5),
India, 7-5, 3-6, 10-3.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Area College Summaries
Men’s Game
CLEVELAND STATE 113, BRYAN JV 55
Bryan junior varsity
Erikson 7, Wharton 1, Chastain 7, Logan 7,
Chesser 11, Foster 4, Steinmetz 1, Arnold 15,
Bogard, Watson, Lucarini 2.
Cleveland State (5-0)
Jones 12, Eason 8, Suttles 12, Swift 17, Dando
3, Goncalves 11, McPherson 7, Everette 16,
Triplett 7, Okoro 20.
Halftime: Cleveland State, 54-22.
Women’s Game
TENNESSEE WESLEYAN 58,
TRUETT-McCONNELL 40
Tennessee Wesleyan (2-2)
Gobble, J. Davis, Gibson 6, Houck 21, M. Davis
20, Murr 2, McKinnon 9, Lumbasio.
Truett-McConnell
Dixon 13, Hammond 6, Lester, Montgomery
10, Gould 2, Benhart 4, Lawson 2, Rivers 3,
Johnson.
Halftime: Tennessee Wesleyan, 27-15.
The AP Women’s Top 25
The top 25 teams in the The Associated Press’
women’s college basketball poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 11,
total points based on 25 points for a first-place
vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and
last week’s ranking:
Record Pts Prv
1. Baylor (39)
1-0
975 1
2. UConn
1-0
931 2
3. Duke
0-0
883 3
4. Stanford
2-0
838 4
5. Maryland
2-0
812 5
6. Kentucky
1-0
766 6
7. Notre Dame
1-0
743 7
8. Louisville
2-0
677 9
9. Penn St.
1-0
665 8
10. Georgia
1-0
615 10
11. Oklahoma
1-0
548 12
12. California
1-0
518 13
13. Vanderbilt
1-0
426 16
14. West Virginia
1-0
407 17
15. Nebraska
2-0
375 18
16. Texas A&M
0-1
331 15
17. Delaware
1-1
285 11
18. Purdue
1-0
271 21
19. Texas
2-0
224 —
20. Ohio St.
0-1
198 19
20. St. John’s
1-1
198 14
22. Oklahoma St.
1-0
164 23
23. Miami
1-0
139 24
24. Tennessee
1-1
125 20
25. Georgetown
2-0
112 —
Others receiving votes: Kansas 103, Middle
Tennessee 82, Iowa St. 52, Georgia Tech 42,
UCLA 26, Green Bay 22, DePaul 17, Virginia
16, North Carolina 14, San Diego St. 13, Florida
St. 12, UTC 10, Rutgers 10, Dayton 9, LSU 8,
Michigan St. 4, Princeton 4, Gonzaga 3, South
Carolina 2.
The AP Top 25
The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’
college basketball poll, with first-place votes
in parentheses, records through Nov. 11, total
points based on 25 points for a first-place vote
through one point for a 25th-place vote and last
week’s ranking:
Record Pts Prv
1. Indiana (46)
1-0 1,598 1
2. Louisville (18)
1-0 1,572 2
3. Kentucky (1)
1-0 1,438 3
4. Ohio St.
1-0 1,339 4
5. Michigan
1-0 1,327 5
6. NC State
1-0 1,278 6
7. Kansas
1-0 1,222 7
8. Syracuse
1-0 1,163 9
9. Duke
1-0 1,109 8
10. Florida
1-0 1,007 10
11. North Carolina
2-0
944 11
12. Arizona
1-0
882 12
13. UCLA
1-0
746 13
14. Missouri
1-0
716 15
15. Creighton
1-0
678 16
16. Baylor
2-0
578 19
17. Memphis
0-0
570 17
18. UNLV
0-0
538 18
19. Gonzaga
1-0
437 21
20. Notre Dame
1-0
343 22
21. Michigan St.
0-1
325 14
22. Wisconsin
1-0
324 23
23. UConn
1-0
262 —
24. Cincinnati
1-0
152 24
25. San Diego St.
0-1
128 20
Others receiving votes: VCU 75, Murray St.
64, Minnesota 58, Pittsburgh 36, Saint Louis
32, Saint Joseph’s 30, Butler 22, Texas 20,
Marquette 18, Tennessee 18, Kansas St. 12,
Miami 9, Saint Mary’s (Cal) 8, Florida St. 7, New
Mexico 7, West Virginia 7, Ohio 6, Alabama 5,
Davidson 4, N. Iowa 4, Stanford 4, Bucknell 1,
Georgetown 1, Maryland 1.
Men’s Scores
SOUTH
Campbellsville 75, Indiana-Northwest 58
Carson-Newman 68, Lees-McRae 62
Clemson 77, Presbyterian 44
Delaware St. 95, Phila. Biblical 46
Florida St. 95, Buffalo 68
Kennesaw St. 67, SC State 65, OT
Lipscomb 73, Maryville (Mo.) 55
Maryland 67, Morehead St. 45
Memphis 81, North Florida 66
Mercer 70, Oglethorpe 25
NC Central 109, Johnson & Wales (NC) 46
Northwestern St. 71, Campbell 67
Radford 76, Cincinnati Christian 71, OT
S. Illinois 72, New Orleans 55
SC-Upstate 90, Hiwassee 36
Samford 59, Martin Methodist 40
UNC Greensboro 81, Winston-Salem 65
Utah Valley 64, NC A&T 55
UTC 88, Tenn. Temple 53
Virginia Tech 69, Rhode Island 50
William & Mary 71, Liberty 59
Wofford 87, Webber 54
Youngstown St. 68, Georgia 56
EAST
American U. 61, Quinnipiac 55
Canisius 83, Boston U. 75
Lafayette 98, LIU Brooklyn 94, OT
Providence 81, Bryant 49
Rutgers 88, Sacred Heart 62
Saint Joseph’s 61, Yale 35
Seton Hall 78, Norfolk St. 65
St. Peter’s 64, CCSU 61
UMBC 70, Eastern 52
MIDWEST
Akron 97, John Carroll 53
Bradley 78, Texas-Pan American 61
Illinois 89, St. Francis (NY) 64
Illinois St. 100, UC Santa Barbara 72
Indiana 87, N. Dakota St. 61
Iowa 73, Cent. Michigan 61
Iowa St. 98, Alabama A&M 40
Loyola of Chicago 64, Rockhurst 41
Minnesota 82, Toledo 56
Notre Dame 84, Monmouth (NJ) 57
SE Missouri 89, Lyon 61
SOUTHWEST
Ark.-Pine Bluff 62, Md.-Eastern Shore 52
TCU 75, Centenary 47
Texas 69, Coppin St. 46
Texas A&M 83, Troy 65
TOURNAMENT
NIT Season Tipoff-East
First Round
Lehigh 89, Robert Morris 60
Pittsburgh 86, Fordham 51
NIT Season Tipoff-Midwest
First Round
Kansas St. 79, Lamar 55
NIT Season Tipoff-North
First Round
Cleveland St. 79, Bowling Green 73, OT
Michigan 91, IUPUI 54
NIT Season Tipoff-South
First Round
Virginia 54, Fairfield 45
Women’s Scores
SOUTH
Armstrong Atlantic 79, Trinity Baptist 37
Campbell 55, W. Carolina 40
Coastal Carolina 58, NC Central 39
Elon 74, VCU 58
Gardner-Webb 86, Tenn. Temple 34
Hampton 56, Mississippi St. 48
Indiana 63, Murray St. 62
Jacksonville 68, Bethune-Cookman 54
Longwood 68, Air Force 63
Louisiana-Lafayette 83, LSU-Shreveport 42
Miami 69, Richmond 63
Northwestern St. 55, Alcorn St. 50
South Alabama 59, Tennessee St. 43
South Carolina 82, Louisiana Tech 58
Tulane 70, Louisiana-Monroe 60
UAB 72, Alabama A&M 53
UT-Martin 72, Arkansas St. 62
Vanderbilt 62, Lipscomb 45
EAST
Chestnut Hill 60, Lock Haven 50
NJIT 53, Rider 51
St. Bonaventure 51, Niagara 49
St. Francis (NY) 59, Army 47
Virginia 68, Penn 65
MIDWEST
Bradley 66, E. Illinois 65
Concordia (Mich.) 57, Siena Heights 55
Grand Valley St. 68, Olivet 50
Indiana St. 55, Marshall 49
Miami (Ohio) 63, N. Kentucky 52
Michigan 62, Xavier 53
Missouri 88, Chicago St. 55
Nebraska-Omaha 58, N.C. A&T 44
Oakland 70, American U. 60
UMKC 69, SE Missouri 64
SOUTHWEST
Houston Baptist 73, Schreiner 46
Lamar 87, Texas-Tyler 42
SMU 66, Texas Southern 50
Tarleton St. 77, Texas Wesleyan 48
Texas St. 88, North Texas 83
UALR 73, Tulsa 64
UTSA 88, Concordia-Austin 29
Wayland Baptist 86, N. New Mexico 39
FAR WEST
CS Bakersfield 71, N. Arizona 68
New Mexico St. 77, Loyola Marymount 76, OT
Utah Valley 78, Utah St. 62
SOCCER
MLS Playoffs
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Championship
Sunday, Nov. 11: Houston 3, D.C. United 1
Sunday, Nov. 18: D.C. United vs. Houston, 4 p.m.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Championship
Sunday, Nov. 11: Los Angeles 3, Seattle 0
Sunday, Nov. 18: Seattle vs. Los Angeles, 9 p.m.
MLS CUP
Saturday, Dec. 1: Eastern champion vs. Western
champion, 4:30 p.m.
AROUNDTHEREGION
UTC’s Wanuch
coaches’ all-region
Nathan Wanuch’s 20th-place showing in
the NCAA South Region cross country meet
Saturday at Tallahassee, Fla., did not get him a
berth in the Division I national meet, but it did
make him one of only four Southern Conference men’s runners to be an all-region pick by
the U.S. Track and Field and Cross Country
Coaches Association. Wanuch was the only AllSouth honoree; UNC Greensboro’s Paul Chelimo and Paul Katam and Furman’s Wilkerson
Given earned All-Southeast Region status.
VOLLEYBALL
■ UTC will be in the Southern Conference
volleyball tournament for the first time in four
years Saturday at Davidson College. Seeded No.
3 from the North Division, the Mocs (14-17, 8-8)
will face South runner-up College of Charleston
(23-7, 14-2) at 4:30 p.m. Georgia Southern (24-6,
15-1) and Samford (22-8, 14-2) are the top seeds.
■ Kendall Williams from Ringgold had
eight kills and three blocks as West Georgia beat
nationally ranked (Division II) Christian Brothers 3-0 in volleyball Sunday. That was the Lady
Wolves’ school-record 10th Gulf South victory.
SOCCER
■ The No. 1-ranked Lee University women’s
soccer team begins its last NAIA tournament
Saturday by hosting first-time qualifier Montreat
College from the Appalachian Athletic Conference. Lee’s Lady Flames have won the last four
national titles and have advanced through 20
consecutive NAIA tournament matches since
2008. The 15 campus-site winners Saturday will
join host Mobile from Lee’s Southern States Athletic Conference for the round of 16 and beyond
Nov. 26-Dec. 1 at Orange Beach, Ala.
BASKETBALL
■ Post players Cody Houck and Michelle
Davis scored 21 and 20 points as the Tennessee
Wesleyan women’s basketball team won 58-40
Monday evening at Truett-McConnell in Cleveland, Ga. Houcks had five steals and made nine
of nine free throws while Davis made four of
five and grabbed a game-high nine rebounds.
Krista Dixon led the hosts with 13 points.
■ Bursting to a 32-point halftime lead against
the visiting Bryan College junior varsity, the
Cleveland State men’s basketball team rolled
to a 113-55 victory Monday with Xavier Okoro
totaling 20 points and nine rebounds and Kahan
Swift and Tre Everette scoring 17 and 16 points.
Former Tyner standouts Travis Jones and Trey
Suttles added 12 points each, Jones with 10
assists and nine rebounds and Suttles with seven
rebounds, and Filippe Concalves contributed
11 points and five steals for the Cougars (5-0).
Brandon Arnold led Bryan with 15 points.
AUTO RACING
■ Johnny Lechford of Cleveland won the
Super Pro class and $1,500 Saturday night at the
Brainerd Optimist Drag Strip. Lechford won in a
1986 Corvette Sting Ray with a 6.29-second run
on a 6.29 dial. Brandon Sharp of Summerville,
just back from military duty in Afghanistan, was
second with a 6.11 run on a 6.10 dial in a ’76 Vega,
and Ron Lee of Ooltewah was third in a Chevypowered ’23 Ford Roadster owned by Marvin
Crutcher. Chris Hammon won the Foot Brake
class with a 6.60 burst on a 6.59 dial in a ’95
Chevy S-10 pickup, while Chris Smith was
second, Ashley Cook was third and Charles
McRae was fourth. Chris Grayson of Whitwell
had the low elapsed time (4.75 seconds) and top
speed (127.95 mph) of the meet.
GOLF
■ Covenant College golfers Levi Nix and
Trey Patterson are sixth and 10th individually
in the Georgia Cup individual standings after the
fall-semester competition involving six NCAA
Division III schools in the Peach State. Nix, a
freshman, had an average of 74.38 per round for
the fall season, while sophomore Patterson’s is
75.63. Both were invited to the National Christian
College Athletic Association national tournament, where Patterson tied a school record with
a first-round 68 and finished sixth and became
Covenant’s first golf All-American.
■ The Lee University women’s golf team
is ranked eighth in the NAIA preseason poll
released this past weekend, and the Lee men’s
team is ninth. Defending NAIA champion British
Columbia leads the women’s poll, while Texas
Wesleyan is No. 1 in the men’s with three returning All-Americans from a sixth-place national
finish. “I think starting the spring out ranked No.
8 is a great position for the Lady Flames, because
I think our best golf is ahead of us this season,”
Lee coach John Maupin said. Of his Flames, he
said, “We had a chance to win three times this
fall, and I think that experience of being in the
hunt will help us moving forward.”
Staff Reports
MARKTRAIL
Sunday’s winning numbers:
Cash 3 Midday: 0-5-7
Cash 4 Midday: 4-5-0-3
Georgia FIVE Midday: 0-3-5-1-9
Cash 3 Evening: 4-5-6
Cash 4 Evening: 5-8-8-3
Georgia FIVE Evening: 6-8-4-8-1
Fantasy 5: 7-9-16-18-24
■ SPORTS EDITOR
Jay Greeson (423) 757-6273
[email protected]
■ DEPUTY SPORTS EDITOR
Ron Bush (423) 757-6291
[email protected]
■ ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Jim Tanner (423) 757-6478
[email protected]
■ ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Ward Gossett (423) 757-6288
[email protected]
by phone: (423) 757-6364 or 1-800-733-2637 • by fax: (423) 668-5049 • by e-mail: [email protected]
■ ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Stephen Hargis (423) 757-6293
[email protected]
• • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • D3
Breaking News: [email protected]
Trout, Harper get rookie awards
By Ronald Blum
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — Mike Trout of the
Los Angeles Angels became the youngest American League Rookie of the
Year on Monday, and
Bryce Harper of the
Washington Nationals
was voted the secondyoungest winner of
the National League
honor.
Trout, who turned
21 on Aug. 7, received
all 28 first-place votes
from the Baseball Writ- Mike Trout
ers’ Association of America’s AL panel.
The center fielder was the eighth
unanimous AL pick and the first since
Tampa Bay’s Evan Longoria in 2008.
Trout, who hit .326 with 30 homers
and 83 RBIs, received the maximum
140 points. Oakland outfielder Yoenis
Cespedes was second with 63, followed
by Texas pitcher Yu Darvish (46), who
joined Trout as the only players listed
on every ballot.
Detroit second baseman Lou Whitaker had been the youngest AL winner
in 1978, but he was 2 months, 26 days
older than Trout when he took home
the award.
Before Longoria, the only unanimous AL winners were Nomar Garciaparra, Derek Jeter, Tim Salmon,
Sandy Alomar Jr., Mark McGwire and
Carlton Fisk.
Trout, a son of former Minnesota
minor league infielder Jeff Trout, spent
some time in the majors last year but
retained his rookie status. He began
this season in the minors and made
his first big-league appearance this
year on April 28 — the day of Harper’s major league debut. Trout’s season
put him in contention for the AL MVP
award along with Triple Crown winner
Miguel Cabrera of Detroit. That voting
is announced Thursday.
For winning the award, Trout earned
a $10,000 bonus on top of his $482,500
salary.
Harper turned 20 on Oct. 16. The
outfielder got 16 of 32 first-place votes
and 112 points from the NL panel.
Arizona pitcher Wade Miley was second with 12 first-place votes and 105
points, followed by Cincinnati slugger
Todd Frazier with three firsts and 45
points.
Harper was the top
pick of the 2010 amateur draft and batted
.270 with 22 home
runs and 59 RBIs as
Washington brought
postseason play to the
nation’s capital for the
first time since 1933.
Bryce
Only Tony Conigliaro
Harper
(24) hit more home
runs as a teenager.
Harper became the youngest position player in All-Star history. At 20
years, 27 days on Monday, he was 24
days older than New York Mets pitcher
Dwight Gooden when he won the NL
award in 1984.
Falcons’ center bristles
By Charles Odum
The Associated Press
FLOWERY BRANCH, Ga. — The
Falcons’ short-yardage woes in their
first loss of the season stirred memories of similar struggles the last time
they lost — in the playoffs.
In each case, Atlanta couldn’t come
up with just 1 yard.
The Falcons couldn’t score after they
had a second down at the Saints’ 1-yard
line late in Sunday’s 31-27 loss at New
Orleans. The Falcons, who had been the
NFL’s last unbeaten team, fell to 8-1.
In the 24-2 loss at the Giants in last
season’s NFC wild-card game, the offense
was stuffed on two fourth-and-1 quarterback sneaks and a third-and-inches run.
Center Todd McClure bristled Monday when asked if there were parallels
between the two losses. McClure said
the offensive line is unfairly blamed for
the short-yardage struggles.
“That’s two totally different ballgames, and that’s what [upsets] me off
more than anything, that you guys are
going to write about how bad we are
up front, that we can’t get in the end
zone,” McClure said.
“But there’s more to it than just
blocking up front, and that’s all I’m
going to say about that because I get
really frustrated when I hear things
and read things, knowing there’s more
to it than the five guys up front, but
we take the brunt of the blame. I
don’t want to talk about that anymore,
because I don’t want to say anything
I’ll regret.”
The Saints ranked last in the NFL
with their average of 176.5 yards rushing allowed per game before holding
the Falcons to 46 yards rushing on 18
carries, an average of 2.6 yards per
attempt. Michael Turner had 13 carries for only 15 yards. Jacquizz Rodgers
led the team with 29 yards rushing on
three carries.
New Orleans led 28-17 through three
NASHVILLE — Tennessee Titans coach Mike
Munchak wants his players
to rest as much as possible
now that they’re finally getting a break.
Munchak put his team
through a light workout
Monday, then gave them
the rest of the week off.
The Titans aren’t due back
at work until next Monday,
when Munchak plans to put
them through a practice in
preparation for a visit to
Jacksonville (1-8).
A week after being put
on notice by the owner, the
Titans (4-6) responded with
their biggest win of the season — beating Miami 37-3.
“It’s just something we
need, mentally and physically, because of what we’ve
been through,” Munchak said.
“I’m glad we won it because
we needed it. It will be a lot
easier to mentally be more
positive when we do come
back. I think we will be fine.”
The Titans are bangedup with 11 players listed on
last week’s injury report, not
counting right guard Leroy
Harris, who became the 11th
man on injured reserve this
season Nov. 7.
Receiver Kenny Britt
hasn’t missed a practice,
but coaches have limited his
playing time as he recovers
from three knee surgeries
over the past year. Linebacker Colin McCarthy has been
hampered by a right ankle he
sprained in the opener, and
he had his first interception
this season in the win over
Miami. He plans to spend
this week resting.
Munchak made clear to
his Titans before they left
that they still have hope when
EASTERN
CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
New York
Brooklyn
Philadelphia
Boston
Toronto
W
4
3
4
4
1
WESTERN
CONFERENCE
L Pct GB
Southwest Division W
L Pct GB
0 1.000
2 .600
3 .571
3 .571
6 .143
San Antonio
Memphis
New Orleans
Dallas
Houston
1
1
2
4
4
—
11⁄2
11⁄2
11⁄2
41⁄2
6
5
3
4
3
.857 —
.833 1⁄2
.600 2
.500 21⁄2
.429 3
Southeast Division W
L Pct GB
Northwest Division W
L Pct GB
Miami
Atlanta
Charlotte
Orlando
Washington
2
3
3
4
5
Oklahoma City
Minnesota
Denver
Utah
Portland
6
5
4
4
2
2
2
4
4
5
L Pct GB
Pacific Division
W
L Pct GB
2
3
4
5
8
L.A. Clippers
Phoenix
L.A. Lakers
Golden State
Sacramento
6
3
2
2
0
Central Division
Milwaukee
Chicago
Indiana
Cleveland
Detroit
W
4
4
3
2
0
.750
.500
.400
.333
.000
.667
.571
.429
.286
.000
—
2
21⁄2
3
41⁄2
—
1
⁄2
1
1 ⁄2
21⁄2
5
MONDAY’S RESULTS
■ MILWAUKEE 105, PHILADELPHIA 96
Brandon Jennings scored 33 points
and Monta Ellis had 18 to lead the
Bucks over the 76ers.
■ UTAH 140, TORONTO 133, 3OT
Paul Millsap scored seven of his 34
points in the third overtime, Al Jefferson
had 24 points and 17 rebounds, and
the Jazz picked up their first road win
of the season.
■ OKLAHOMA CITY 92, DETROIT 90
Russell Westbrook scored a seasonhigh 33 points and keyed a fourthquarter comeback as the Thunder
rallied to beat the winless Pistons.
■ BOSTON 101, CHICAGO 95
Rajon Rondo had 20 points, nine
rebounds and 10 assists to lead the
Celtics to a win over the Bulls.
■ MIAMI 113, HOUSTON 110
LeBron James scored a season-high
38 points, and Chris Bosh had 24
points and 10 rebounds as the Heat
rallied to beat the Rockets.
■ MINNESOTA 90, DALLAS 82
Nikola Pekovic scored 20 points
5
4
3
3
2
2
4
4
4
5
.750 —
.714 1⁄2
.500 2
.500 2
.286 31⁄2
.714
.500
.429
.429
.286
—
11⁄2
2
2
3
before leaving with an injury, and the
short-handed Timberwolves beat the
Mavericks.
■ PHOENIX 110, DENVER 100
Goran Dragic scored 21 points, including 4 of 5 shooting on 3-pointers, to
lead seven Suns players in double
figures.
■ ATLANTA 95, PORTLAND 87
TODAY’S GAMES
■ Washington at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
■ Toronto at Indiana, 7 p.m.
■ New York at Orlando, 7 p.m.
■ Cleveland at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
■ Portland at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
■ San Antonio at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
■
■
■
■
■
Brooklyn 82, Orlando 74
L.A. Clippers 89, Atlanta 76
Memphis 104, Miami 86
Oklahoma City 106, Cleveland 91
L.A. Lakers 103, Sacramento 90
SPORTSBRIEFS
Djokovic clips Federer
for 2nd ATP Finals title
The Associated Press
New Orleans wide receiver Marques Colston scores a touchdown despite
the efforts of Atlanta free safety Thomas DeCoud (28) and cornerback
Dunta Robinson in the second half of the Saints’ 31-27 win Sunday.
quarters before the Falcons rallied.
Matt Ryan, who passed for a careerbest 411 yards with three touchdowns,
threw a 6-yard touchdown pass to Tony
Gonzalez and Matt Bryant added a 20yard field goal in the final quarter.
Ryan’s 9-yard pass to Harry Douglas
gave Atlanta a second-and-goal at the
1 just after the two-minute warning.
Ryan’s second-down pass for Gonzalez was incomplete, Turner lost a yard
on third down and Saints cornerback
Jabari Greer broke up a fourth-down
pass for Roddy White.
“We get the ball on the 1, we’re
expected to get it in,” McClure said. “I
just get frustrated sometimes over the
past couple of years. There’s more to
it than just lining up and blocking the
guys wherever they line up. That’s it.
I can’t talk about it anymore.”
Coach Mike Smith seemed to point
to the offensive line in his postgame
analysis.
“We are not getting the surge that
we need to on the run plays,” Smith
said after the game. “We’ve got to be
able to move the line of scrimmage on
those third-down-and-1 situations.”
Monday, Smith said blame can’t
be pointed to only one part of the
offense.
“We’ve got to do a lot of things
better,” he said. “It’s not one position
group, it’s not one guy; it’s the entire
offense.”
Titans get week off after 34-point win
The Associated Press
NBA
BREAKDOWN
brushed aside any notion that
the Chargers would consider
sitting mistake-prone quarterback Philip Rivers.
Rivers’ latest big blunder
was a pass thrown straight to
Tampa Bay cornerback Leonard Johnson, who returned
it 83 yards to give the Bucs a
10-point lead in a game they
would win 34-24 on Sunday.
Monday, Turner was
asked if he’d consider sitting
Rivers, like he’s done with
running back Ryan Mathews
and wide receiver Robert
Meachem after they made
The Associated Press
Kansas City Chiefs running back Jamaal Charles (25) crucial mistakes that contribis hit by Pittsburgh Steelers cornerback Keenan Lewis uted to losses.
“You know, Philip Rivduring the first quarter Monday.
ers gave us a chance to win
that game,” Turner said. “He
PITTSBURGH 16, KANSAS CITY 13, OT
made so many plays that a lot
The Steelers escaped with a victory. The health of their franchise quarterof guys can’t make. It’s hard
back is another matter entirely. The Steelers edged the woeful Chiefs in
for me to answer that quesovertime but lost Ben Roethlisberger for most of the second half — and
tion because I just don’t think
perhaps a lot longer — with a right shoulder injury. Roethlisberger left the
people have an understanding
game early in the third quarter after getting slammed to the turf by Kansas
of what that question means.
City linebackers Tamba Hali and Justin Houston and did not return. The
What you do is you go put
Steelers (6-3) won their fourth straight anyway. Shaun Suisham kicked a
together a team, put together
23-yard field goal 51 seconds into the extra period, one play after Lawa lineup that gives you the
rence Timmons intercepted Kansas City’s Matt Cassel and returned to the
best chance to win, OK?”
5. Jamaal Charles ran for 100 yards and a score for the Chiefs (1-8), who
Rivers has committed
have lost six straight.
40 turnovers in the last 25
they return. Aside from the confident, about turning games.
AFC’s division leaders, only things around, about elimitwo teams have more than nating the mistakes that are Steelers cut Ta’amu
four wins in the competition killing their chances.
At Pittsburgh,the Steelfor the two wild-card slots.
Indeed, after coach Rex ers have parted ways with
The Titans already have a win Ryan again emphasized that troubled rookie nose tackle
over Pittsburgh and will visit Mark Sanchez is the starting Alameda Ta’amu and added
Indianapolis (6-3) on Dec. 9. quarterback despite his sink- wide receiver David Gilreath
ing play, Sanchez mentioned to the 53-man roster.
Jets still optimistic
Monday how “once things go
Ta’amu was chosen by the
At Florham Park, N.J., the right, they turn around so fast Steelers in the fourth round
numbers and their recent it will make your head spin.” of the NFL draft but has yet
Others might call that to play in a game. He was
level of performance indicate the New York Jets are spin. The Jets (3-6) describe suspended two weeks without pay last month following
done for 2012. Their com- it as staying optimistic.
run-in with police in the
ments say otherwise.
Turner defends Rivers acity’s
South Side neighborSomehow, in the wake of
At San Diego, in the wake hood that resulted in more
two awful outings in losses
to Miami and Seattle, the of another come-from-ahead than a dozen charges, includJets talk about remaining loss, coach Norv Turner ing multiple felonies.
LONDON — Even when
Roger Federer had the
lead, Novak Djokovic had
the answers. The top-ranked
Serb recovered from early
breaks in both sets and beat
Federer 7-6 (6), 7-5 Monday
in the championship match at
the ATP World Tour Finals.
Federer broke Djokovic’s
serve to take a quick 2-0 lead
in the first set, and then again
to open to the second set,
but the world’s No. 1 player
rebounded each time. It was
Djokovic’s second victory at
the year-end tournament for
the top eight players in the
world. He also won in 2008,
when the tournament was in
Shanghai. Federer, who is 15-3
in Britain this year after winning his seventh Wimbledon
title and the Olympic silver
medal, had been looking for
his record seventh title.
GOLF
■ PALM BEACH, Fla.
— Justin Rose of Britain
and Peter Hanson of Sweden won the Tyco Golf Skills
Challenge at the Breakers
on Monday. Rose and Hanson beat recent U.S. Ryder
Cup rivals Dustin Johnson
and Keegan Bradley in the
Reverse Scramble finale to
secure the title.The Reverse
Scramble went to two teeoffs before being decided in
a chip-off. Hanson chipped
to within 2 feet, 10 inches of
the hole, beating out Bradley’s chip that was 3 feet, 6
inches away. Rose and Hanson earned $285,000 in the
made-for-TV event that will
air on NBC in December.
The other two teams that
took part were Zach Johnson with Kyle Stanley and
Mark O’Meara with Nick
Price. The six skills were
long drive, mid-iron, bunker
shot, chip shot, trouble shot
and short iron.
BASEBALL
■ BOSTON — A baseball
official familiar with the deal
said the Boston Red Sox have
agreed with backup catcher
David Ross on a two-year,
$6.2 million contract. The
deal with Ross, who spent
the past four seasons with
the Atlanta Braves, is pending a physical. Ross, a strong
defensive catcher, batted .269
with 24 homers and 94 RBIs
in 227 games with the Braves.
Boston already has two catchers, Jarrod Saltalamacchia
(another former Brave) and
Ryan Lavarnway.
HOCKEY
■ TORONTO — The
Hockey Hall of Fame is wel-
coming four new members.
Mats Sundin, Joe Sakic,
Pavel Bure and Adam
Oates are being inducted
in the player category. The
former star NHL forwards
were presented with their
Hall of Fame member rings
at a news conference Monday morning.
CYCLING
■ NEW YORK — Lance
Armstrong, the seven-time
Tour de France cycling winner stripped of his titles on
charges he cheated, has
resigned from the board of
the Livestrong Foundation,
the charity he began 15 years
ago after testicular cancer
nearly ended his career. The
move, coming 18 days after he
stepped down as the group’s
chairman, is designed to further distance him from the
foundation as a way help it
survive the fall from grace
of one of the world’s bestknown athletes, officials
said Sunday in announcing
the move. Armstrong’s last
day as a board member was
Nov. 4. Livestrong spokeswoman Katherine McLane
said Monday that Armstrong
“remains the inspiration” and
is still its largest donor with
nearly $7 million over the
years. In a statement, new
board chairman Jeff Garvey
said Armstrong resigned
from the board to spare the
organization any negative
effects resulting from the
controversy surrounding
his cycling career. “Lance
Armstrong was instrumental in changing the way the
world views people affected
by cancer. His devotion to
serving survivors is unparalleled and for 15 years, he
committed himself to that
cause with all his heart,”
Garvey said.
COLLEGE ATHLETICS
■ DETROIT — Former
Michigan State basketball
stars Mateen Cleaves and
Steve Smith and former
NFL coach Tony Dungy
are going into the Michigan
Sports Hall of Fame. The
newest class will be formally
inducted in February. Other
honorees will include Lomas
Brown, Mark Howe, Pam
McGee, Dick Kimball and
Tyrone Wheatley.
Wire Reports
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Breaking News: 423-757-News
Torn ACL ends Vols linebacker Maggitt’s season
By Patrick Brown
Staff Writer
KNOXVILLE — Curt Maggitt
played most of the season with two
injuries.
A third one means he won’t be
playing for a while.
The Tennessee linebacker tore
the anterior cruciate ligament in his
right knee in the fourth quarter of
the Volunteers’ quadruple-overtime
loss to Missouri on Saturday.
“He’s been taking it pretty well,”
fellow sophomore linebacker A.J.
Johnson said after Monday morning’s practice. “He’s going to fight
through it. He’s going to come back
and rehab real hard.”
The 6-foot-3, 240-pound Maggitt
was playing with a nagging turf toe
and a stinger that made him miss
the Georgia State game. Those injuries limited his play count and his
effectiveness.
His knee injury occurred as he
chased Missouri quarterback James
Franklin downfield on a scramble.
Tennessee used him to “spy” on
the dual-threat Franklin, and Maggitt played perhaps his best game
of the season, finishing with five
tackles, 1.5 tackles for loss and three
hurries.
“That was a real blow [that]
hurt us that last [Missouri] drive
[in regulation time],” coach Derek
Dooley said. “He was doing a great
job of copping the quarterback the
whole game, and that hurt us there
on a couple of things toward the
stretch. He was playing great in that
game.”
Maggit’s sack and strip of North
Carolina State quarterback Mike
Glennon led to a safety in the opener, and he also had a sack against
South Carolina. This injury is the
worst of a growing list for Maggitt,
who battled shoulder and calf problems during his freshman season.
Recoveries from ACL injuries
typically take six months, meaning Maggitt might not be ready for
spring practice.
“He’s my roommate, so I saw
him after the game,” Johnson said.
“I know everybody’s spirits are
going to be down after they get
hurt, but his spirit wasn’t too down.
He talked to a couple of people who
had been hurt, and he knows what
he’s got to do to get well.”
who may face a decision to stay at
Tennessee or declare for the NFL
draft.
“A lot of people talk about it
and mention it and stuff like that,”
he said, “but right now I’m just
focused on the last two games of
my junior season.
“I’m not going to say nothing
about it,” he added with a laugh.
The 6-foot-6, 323-pound James, a
four-star recruit out of high school,
has started all 35 games of his Tennessee career.
James mum on NFL
Dooley said Monday that he
didn’t understand the “huge deal”
being made of his decision to let
the clock run out at the end of regulation with two timeouts left.
“I don’t feel any differently,”
Beyond receivers Justin Hunter and Cordarrelle Patterson and
quarterback Tyler Bray, right tackle
Ja’Wuan James is another junior
No second-guessing
he said. “We were struggling on
offense. The last four possessions,
I think, we didn’t execute well, and
we weren’t looking good. When we
went out there, we were going out
there to win the game. That’s what
our philosophy was. The first play
we screw up, get the ball batted,
and then the second play we screw
up the execution.”
“What was it, about 35 seconds
[left]? We had a third-and-10. I just
didn’t have confidence that we
were going to get it.”
Dooley said he didn’t want to
give Missouri a chance by punting to dynamite return man Marcus Murphy, who has three return
touchdowns this season.
“You put the best player on
their whole team out on the field
to change the game, and I didn’t
want to do that,” he said.
Dooley
• Continued from Page D1
UGA photo by Rob Saye
Georgia freshman punter Collin Barber, center, was inconsistent earlier this season but has been impressive the
past three games with seven kicks inside the opposing 20-yard line.
Dogs’ young punter excelling
By David Paschall
Staff Writer
Though he lags behind
quarterback Aaron Murray
and linebacker Jarvis Jones
in the attention department,
freshman punter Collin Barber has been just as hot as
the rest of the rampaging
Georgia Bulldogs.
Barber punted four times
for a 47.2-yard average during
Saturday night’s 38-0 blowout of Auburn, placing one
kick at the 3-yard line and
another at the 1. The 6-foot2, 200-pounder from Cartersville had a 48.2-yard average the week before in the
37-10 trouncing of Ole Miss,
which included a career-long
of 60.
“Earlier in the year, I was
adjusting from kicking in
high school to kicking before
more than 90,000 people,”
Barber said. “I was just wanting to get the ball off. I’m
more comfortable now, and
I’m not nearly as nervous as
I was.”
In the past three games,
Alabama
• Continued from Page D1
at LSU. After his Tigers rallied past Kentucky 36-33 in
an unlikely triumph dubbed
the “Bluegrass Miracle,” they
hosted Alabama and lost 31-0.
“You all live in the results
world out there, where we
kind of live in the process
world,” Saban said. “It’s hard
to get people to respond — it’s
kind of the Bluegrass Miracle
phenomenon. You play bad
but you win the game, and
then the next week you get
your [butt] kicked because
nobody responded to playing
bad because you won.
“We played a heck of a lot
better in this last game when
we got behind 20-0. Everybody all of a sudden got
emotionally better, so why
couldn’t it have been better
at the start?”
There was an emphasis
placed on tackling last week
after the Tide yielded 435
yards at LSU, Saban said,
but the Aggies broke their
share as well in racking up
418 yards.
Even Crimson Tide quarterback AJ McCarron seems
to have hit somewhat of a
ceiling. McCarron struggled
throughout the second half at
LSU before delivering a late
five-play, 72-yard touchdown
Barber has placed seven
punts inside the opposing
20-yard line.
“As you can tell, Collin
is really starting to punt the
ball extremely well,” Bulldogs coach Mark Richt said.
“I know one of his punts
against Auburn had a 4.8 or
4.9 hang time and went about
45 yards, and if you can do
that, that’s like gold. He’s had
some good punts, knocking
them inside the 10 and the
5.”
Georgia bid farewell
to Drew Butler and Blair
Walsh, a specialist tandem
now in the NFL, and began
this season with a starting
punter and kicker without
previous college experience.
That was a first for the Bulldogs since 1985, when punter
Chris Carpenter and kicker
Steve Crumley were redshirt
freshmen.
Marshall Morgan, Georgia’s freshman place-kicker,
has been for more adventurous than Barber, having
missed four extra points
this year and badly hooking
a 47-yard field-goal attempt
against Ole Miss. He enters
this week’s game against
Georgia Southern having
made 13 consecutive extra
points.
“I think Marshall is just
getting more comfortable
and doing what’s coming
natural to him, or at least
what he’s been doing in high
school,” Richt said. “I think
both of those guys are just
beginning to feel a little more
comfortable, and it’s good,
because it’s not easy to be a
true freshman and get thrown
into those roles.”
Barber had a 57-yard punt
in the opener but struggled
to a 36.6-yard average in the
second game at Missouri. He
did not punt particularly well
in additional league games
against Tennessee and Kentucky but has erupted the
past three weeks.
Much like the rest of the
nation’s No. 5 team.
“I would like to break
records, but I’m not going
to try and boot one 60 yards
just for my sake if they can
return it for 40,” Barber said.
“I want them all fair caught.
That’s my goal, because that
would benefit the team more
than it would benefit me.”
And the attention, or the
lack thereof?
“The better I do, the more
people hear about me and
know me,” he said smiling. “I
get a ‘good game’ every now
and then, and it’s something
that is gradually getting better.”
Odds and ends
Georgia’s home game next
week against Georgia Tech
will be televised by ESPN
with a noon kickoff. ... Sophomore center David Andrews
was named SEC offensive
lineman of the week after
grading out at 88 percent
and tallying six “dominator”
and three knockdown blocks
Saturday at Auburn.
Contact David Paschall at
[email protected]
com or 423-757-6524.
drive, and his 309-yard game
THIS WEEK’S SCHEDULE
against Texas A&M was offset by two interceptions, his
(times Eastern and p.m.)
Jacksonville State at Florida, 1
Pay-per view
first of the season.
Wofford at South Carolina, 1
Pay-per view
“My expectation is that he
Georgia Southern at Georgia, 1:30
Pay-per view
takes the bull by the horns
Alabama A&M at Auburn, 2
Pay-per view
and learns from the lessons
Sam Houston State at Texas A&M, 3:30
Pay-per view
that he’s learned the last
Western Carolina at Alabama, 12:21
WDSI
two games and try to work
Arkansas at Mississippi State, 12:21
Ole Miss at LSU, 3:30
CBS (WDEF)
on improving,” Saban said.
Tennessee at Vanderbilt, 7
ESPN2
“I don’t think there is any
Syracuse at Missouri, 7
ESPNU
reason to say he has reached
Samford at Kentucky, 7:30
CSS
a plateau. I think he needs
to continue to break through
SEC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
and not be satisfied with
Offensive and freshman — Texas A&M quarterback Johnny
where he is and to get the
Manziel (generated 345 total yards, 2 TDs)
players around him to help
Co-defensive — South Carolina safety D.J. Swearinger (13
him do that.”
tackles, interception); LSU safety Craig Loston (6 tackles, 100The Crimson Tide startyard TD interception return)
ed addressing their recent
Co-special teams — Missouri kicker Andrew Baggett; Florida
issues Monday as they began
defensive back Loucheiz Purifoy
Offensive lineman — Georgia center David Andrews
preparations for this week’s
Defensive lineman — Vanderbilt end Walker May
game against Western Carolina. Alabama will be heavily
favored Saturday and again
AROUND THE LEAGUE
next week against Auburn, so
Most of the start times for the games in the final week of the
it may not be until its likely
regular season have been set.
SEC championship date with
LSU and Arkansas will play at 2:30 p.m. on CBS the Friday after
Thanksgiving. Here’s the schedule for Saturday, Nov. 24: Georgia
Georgia that Alabama learns
Tech at Georgia, noon on ESPN; Kentucky at Tennessee, 12:21 on
whether this ironing out will
WDSI; Auburn at Alabama, 3:30 on CBS; Mississippi State at Ole
pay dividends.
Miss, 7 on ESPNU. The other league games — Florida at Florida
“Any break you can get
State at 3:30, Missouri at Texas A&M at 7 and South Carolina at
in this division is always
Clemson at 7 — do not have a telecast home yet.
good,” Tide tailback Eddie
— Jay Greeson
Lacy said Monday. “We’re
going to use practice this
week to make corrections and just do something.”
kickoff. ... Junior cornerback
and prepare.”
John Fulton suffered a turf
Said tackle Cyrus Kouan- Tide tidbits
toe injury against the Aggies
djio: “I still have a bad taste
and is questionable this
Alabama’s
game
with
in my mouth from what hapweek.
pened this past weekend. Auburn will be televised by
Contact David Paschall at
I’m just ready to go out there CBS with a 3:30 p.m. EST [email protected]
the Times Free Press that
Dooley won’t return next
season, but with the Vols
still needing wins against
the Commodores in Nashville and against Kentucky
in Knoxville the following
Saturday, a timetable on
an official announcement
from the university remains
unclear.
Dooley, who is 15-20 overall and 4-18 in the SEC with
the Vols, said he met with
Hart on Sunday but didn’t
ask if he’d be retained.
“I didn’t ask him that,
but I did ask him a lot of
things,” Dooley said. “We
talked very frankly about
it. He told me he had not
made a decision, whether
we go 6-6, despite what all
the reports are.
“Either the sources are
wrong or Dave wasn’t being
forthright with me, and
I have no reason to think
Dave’s not being forthright.
He’s an honest man, he’s
always been honest with me
and I’ve appreciated how
he’s handled everything
about this. I really have.”
Though he declined to
divulge any details of it,
Dooley said he addressed
his team about his status
before practice Monday.
“They’re getting banged
up on their phone the way
my kids were getting banged
up on their phone and the
way my wife was getting
banged up [on the phone],”
he said. “Everybody said I
was fired, and I didn’t even
know it. I’m sitting there
working on Vandy, and I’d
already talked to Dave.
“You’ve got to come
home and address all that
with your family, and you’ve
got to address it in the
morning with the team.”
The players who met
Wiedmer
• Continued from Page D1
liked than a lawyer.
For instance: “I can give
you compelling arguments
why I should [return],
and there’s plenty of compelling arguments why I
shouldn’t.”
Clarence Darrow
couldn’t have said it better.
Yet until Saturday’s 51-48,
four-overtime home loss to
Missouri — which entered
the game with the SEC’s
12th worst offense among
14 schools — a lot of Vols
fans struggled with that
very notion. Neither keeping him for a fourth season
nor canning him after three
delivered the kind of solution that brings easy sleep.
Possibly embracing
President Obama’s fouryear mantra of “We inherited a mess,” Dooley and his
incredibly shrinking fan club
have similarly campaigned
for patience, their argument
not without merit.
But every coach eventually reaches that moment
when his team’s supporters either believe in him or
believe it’s time to move on.
Assuming Dooley really is
gone sooner than later, Missouri will prove his point of
no return.
Missouri wasn’t just
a winnable game, it was
a game already won, the
Tigers down 28-14 on the
scoreboard after trailing
384-64 in offensive yards at
intermission.
Yet somehow UT lost
in four overtimes, though
Dooley officially lost the
fans at the end of regulation
with the media after practice
and before Dooley’s news
conference said it was business as usual, with the team
cleaning up mistakes from
Saturday’s loss and turning
its attention to Vanderbilt.
Offensive tackles Ja’Wuan
James and Antonio “Tiny”
Richardson said Dooley’s
pre-practice message was
nothing out of the ordinary.
Other players declined to
reveal any details.
“It’s an inside thing,”
senior linebacker Herman
Lathers said. “It’s between
us and the team, so I’m not
going to really disclose that
to the media. It’s a family,
and things stay inside.
“It’s the same as all the
past weeks. There’s a lot
of outside distractions, but
it don’t bother our team.
We’re a close-knit bunch,
and we’re staying together
no matter what.”
Throughout all the persistent distractions and
outside chatter surrounding
Dooley’s future in the past,
the players’ message has
remained the same: We’re
staying together.
“He talked to us and
let us know that we need
to focus on these next two
games,” James said. “There’s
a lot of negative outside, in
the media and stuff like that,
but we’re just going to try
to keep it in-house and win
these next two games.
“It’s pretty hard. Y’all
ask us; our families ask
us. I’m getting phone calls
from parents and stuff like
that, but I feel like we’ve
done a pretty good job and
we’ve shown we’re more
mature.”
Dooley said the most difficult part of the situation
was dealing with his family
“when they’re seeing things
are contrary to what their
dad’s telling them.”
Contact Patrick Brown at
[email protected]
or 901-581-7288.
when he allowed the clock
to run out rather than try to
avoid overtime.
So now we’re in a mess
of Dooley’s making and
Hart’s choosing, the athletic
director’s protracted public
silence only making matters
worse.
“My parents are on the
phone: ‘What’s going on up
there?’” said junior offensive
lineman Ja’Wuan James,
whose talent is proof that
Dooley the recruiter could
do grand work on occasion.
“We’re just trying to win
these next two games.”
What’s going on is a circus, soap opera and reality
show all rolled into one.
And we’re all a part of it
— media, players, coaches,
administrators, fans, all of
us — until Hart opens his
mouth concerning whether
to close the Derek Dooley
chapter in the UT football
history book.
For now, at least until or
unless another loss arrives,
Hart’s hesitation is arguably admirable. To cost the
current Vols players a bowl
game because you wanted
to please the fans can make
you as much a part of the
problem as the solution,
something no administrator wants.
Yet it’s also been said
that Nero fiddled while
Rome burned. If Hart
doesn’t already have a
replacement lined up and
the Next Big Thing heads
elsewhere before Dooley is
dismissed, such procrastination from the top could
torch UT football for years
to come.
Comment Mark Wiedmer
at [email protected]
...
. timesfreepress.com
Breaking News: [email protected]
• • • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • D5
UTC’s ‘circus’
hasn’t left town
By John Frierson
Staff Writer
What ever happened to
the “circus” plays?
Remember the middle
of the season when University of Tennessee at
Chattanooga quarterbacks
Jacob Huesman and Terrell Robinson were lining up all over the field,
passes were coming from
anywhere and nobody but
the Mocs knew what was
coming next?
The Mocs haven’t done
too many of what offensive
coordinator Marcus Satterfield called “circus” plays
since they did a bunch of
them in their 31-10 Southern
Conference win at Furman
on Oct. 13. Since then, they
have run a more straightlaced offense.
“I didn’t anticipate not
getting as crazy, but I guess
circumstances kind of dictated what we did,” Satterfield said Monday, two
days after UTC fell 16-13
in overtime at Wofford. “It
wasn’t a philosophical thing,
I mean, [coach Russ Huesman] loves it.”
Against Western Carolina, those kinds of plays
weren’t needed. Against
Georgia Southern and Wofford, two tight games that
went to overtime, limited
plays and possessions kept
UTC from trying anything
too wild or risky.
UTC (5-5, 4-3) is sixth
in the SoCon in scoring
offense (25.7 ppg) and last
in total offense (348.4 ypg).
Those aren’t gaudy numbers, but Huesman can
live with them because the
Mocs are fourth in scoring
defense (20.7) and first in
total defense (302.6).
“Are we the most dynamic offense in the world? No,”
he said. “But we’re pretty
efficient, I think. You know,
it’s easy to draw those plays
up. It’s hard to call them.”
Saturday is UTC’s season
finale, against Elon (3-7, 1-6),
and there might be a few
surprises left in the Mocs’
playbook.
“We’re not still creating
stuff,” Satterfield said, “but
we’ve got some stuff that
we’re not getting through
the year without using it.”
Kentucky
coach John
Calipari talks
to his team
during the
second half
of their 72-69
win Friday
against Maryland in New
York. The
Wildcats play
another ACC
team, Duke,
tonight in
Atlanta.
Jacob honored again
Jacob Huesman, a redshirt freshman, was named
the SoCon freshman of the
week Monday. It’s the third
time this season and second
time in three weeks he’s
earned the award.
In the
loss at
Wofford,
he was 22for-31 passing for 229
yards and
rushed for
68. On the
18-play, 72yard gameJacob
tying drive
Huesman
in the
fourth quarter, he was 5-for7 for 45 yards and ran the ball
six times for 27 yards.
Heading into Saturday,
Jacob has 1,478 yards passing
and 795 rushing. He needs
166 more passing yards to
set the freshman record.
Saying goodbye
The Mocs have a small
senior class of just seven
players to honor before
Saturday’s game: Adam
Miller, J.J. Jackson, Shane
Heatherly, Josh Williams,
Chris Awuah, Dustin Tate
and Jarrett Burns.
UTC also will recognize
some redshirt juniors who
will call it a career Saturday: Graham Nichols, Don
Cope, Steven Nease, Irvin
Hernandez, Ethan Poe and
Michael Slowey.
Top 10 trio
It is little consolation,
of course, but in the latest
FCS coaches’ poll, released
Monday, all three SoCon
teams to beat UTC — and
the three league co-champions — are ranked in the top
10. Georgia Southern is No.
6, Appalachian State is No.
8 and Wofford No. 9.
Contact John Frierson at
[email protected]
com or 423-757-6268. Follow
him on Twitter at twitter.
com/mocsbeatCTFP.
The Associated Press
Kentucky, Duke vie in Dome
By Gary Graves
The Associated Press
LEXINGTON, Ky.—
John Calipari isn’t happy
with Kentucky’s effort on the
backboards.
He didn’t specifically say
anything to the No. 3 Wildcats about their rebounding
during weekend practices.
But by the time players finished running, the coach had
gotten his message across.
T h e Wi l d c a t s we r e
pushed around in their 72-69
season-opening victory over
Maryland. The Terrapins
had 28 offensive rebounds
in outglassing Kentucky 5438. That’s not supposed to
happen against Kentucky’s
vaunted frontcourt featuring
7-foot Willie Cauley-Stein
and 6-10 Nerlens Noel.
Calipari doesn’t want it
to happen again. Neither
does Cauley-Stein, who said
he “doesn’t want to do anything” but rebound after the
extra running.
Kentucky plays No. 8
Duke tonight in Atlanta. It’s
the first meeting between the
storied programs since the
Blue Devils’ 95-92 overtime
win in 2001.
“My whole game is to go
get boards,” Cauley-Stein
said Monday. “Like, that’s my
whole plan. ... After all the
running we’ve had to do, my
sole purpose is trying to go
get boards.”
The freshman center
emphasized that Calipari’s
drills weren’t conducted in
anger.
“He wasn’t mad,” Cauley-Stein said. “He was like,
well, you’ve got to do it. It’s a
learning experience. Nobody
likes to run, so you’ve got to
have some kind of punishment. He had a smile on his
face.”
Calipari said he had
been too busy preparing his
young squad in other areas
to concentrate on rebounding drills. But that will have
changed when the Wildcats
take the floor against the
The Associated Press
his cool with a Texas Tech
graduate assistant along the
sideline during Saturday’s
win over Kansas.
The third-year coach
said he had watched a
replay of his outburst after
the 41-34 victory and saw
what had fans upset. He
called his actions “unfortunate” and said he had
apologized to Kevin Oliver, who works with special teams.
“It upset me, too,”
Tuberville said. “You don’t
do things like that, and it
was obvious I reached up,
grabbed his headset and
pulled on it. Heat of the
battle, some things happen
sometimes that you’d like to
take back.”
Tuberville said he did
not strike Oliver.
Video of the confrontation went viral on the
Internet. It shows Tuberville angrily facing Oliver
and appearing to strike him
after the Red Raiders had
difficulty getting the right
personnel on the field.
Cougars’ Wilson quits
At Spokane, Wash.,
Washington State coach
Mike Leach denied his players are subjected to any type
of abuse, as alleged by star
receiver Marquess Wilson.
Wilson made the allegations
in a letter he released Saturday in which he quit the
team and also complained
that the coaching staff
would “belittle, intimidate
and humiliate us.”
Leach said during his
regular Monday meeting
with reporters: “There is
no truth about it at all.” He
described Wilson as a disgruntled player.
if there had been
Tuberville apologizes anyAsked
actions by coaches
At Lubbock, Texas, that could be construed as
Tommy Tuberville took abuse, Leach replied: “No,
full responsibility for losing no, no. Next question.”
against Duke with some of
the same point guard questions they had before its
opener. Sophomore Ryan
Harrow, who has been bothered the past week by the
flu, played just 10 minutes
against Maryland and hasn’t
practiced. Graduate student
Julius Mays, who suffered
a cut under his eyebrow in
the game, also didn’t practice after swelling developed
Sunday.
Calipari said Mays didn’t
receive stitches but is expected to be available against the
Blue Devils. The Wildcats
don’t seem concerned.
One reason is Jarrod Polson’s play against Maryland.
Prepared to play extensive
minutes with Harrow ailing,
the junior responded with
career highs of 10 points,
three assists, two rebounds
and a pair of game-clinching
free throws.
“I definitely feel more
comfortable with my name
getting called,” Polson said.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL REPORT
MEN’S TOP 25
5 leagues to vie
for playoff spot
DENVER — The new
college football postseason
system will have six games
as originally planned, but
now a spot in the marquee
bowls will be reserved for
the best team from a group
of five conferences that
includes the Big East.
The tweak to the postseason format that will start
in 2014 was made Monday
during a meeting of conference commissioners and
university presidents.
In September, a proposal
was put forth to add a seventh game to the format that
would match the best team
from the Big East, Mountain West, Conference USA,
Sun Belt and Mid-American
Conference against a team
from the Pac-12 or Big 12.
Instead of that plan, a guaranteed spot was created
to give those conferences
access to the top games.
The national semifinals
will rotate through six bowl
games, setting up two playoff games and four major
bowl games every season.
The title game will be bid
out each year through a
separate process similar to
the Super Bowl.
The six games will
include three “contract
bowls” and three “host
bowls.” The spots in the
contract bowls are reserved
for teams that have deals
with those bowls.
The top team from the
other five conferences without ties to a contract bowl
will be assured a spot in one
of the host bowls. Under the
original plan, teams from
those five leagues could
get in only through an atlarge bid.
Blue Devils.
He said his players should
have a grasp of fundamental
concepts such as positioning
themselves for rebounds.
“It’s more or less us being
conscious about [the fact
that] we follow the flight
of the ball, which is I think
sixth grade,” Calipari said. “It
might be seventh grade [that
you learn] you don’t follow
the flight of the ball. You see
the flight and then you go
find somebody [to block out]
and then go get the ball.
“But again, if we haven’t
worked on it I can’t be
upset. And we hadn’t. I just
thought, we’re 7-foot, 6-11,
6-10, 6-9, we’ll rebound. No.
When your guards are taking
off and they’re wedging you
under and you’re looking at
the ball and you’re next to
the cheerleader, you’re probably not going to get the ball.
... It’s going to take time.”
Rebounding isn’t the only
issues the Wildcats have.
Kentucky enters the game
Staff Photo by Angela Lewis
UTC’s Lance Stokes (3) and Tennessee Temple’s
Aaron Walker (25) reach for a rebound Monday.
UTC
• Continued from Page D1
70 field goals and 41 free
throws.
“Could last year’s team go
2-for-22 from the 3-point line
and win?” Shulman said. “No.
I don’t care who we were
playing.
“Tonight, if we shoot it
well, we win by 50.”
Junior Zaccheus Mason
led UTC with 16 points in
19 minutes. Senior Drazen
Zlovaric scored 11 points and
grabbed eight rebounds in 17
minutes.
“Keep hustling, play
defense and rebound — if
we keep doing that, it will
give us a chance against
any team we face this year,”
Mason said. “The young guys
are willing to learn and play
and buy into what Coach is
feeding us. They’re picking
up a lot of things.”
Freshmen Gee McGhee
and Casey Jones started for
the Mocs. Every player in
uniform played, and all but
walk-on Alex Bran scored at
least four points.
The Crusaders were led by
12 points from Mack Hampton and 11 from Weedlens
Beauvil. Former Brainerd
High star Corey Sanders
started but did not score.
“I’m glad we went 2-for22 and we win big,” Shulman said. “If we didn’t make
shots, I didn’t know if we
could win. Now I know.”
1. Indiana
beat North Dakota State 87-61
■ Recap: Cody Zeller scored 22 points and Remy Abell added a
career-high 14.
2. Louisville
vs. Samford, Thursday.
3. Kentucky
vs. No. 9 Duke, Tuesday.
4. Ohio State
vs. Rhode Island, Saturday.
5. Michigan
beat IUPUI 91-54
■ Recap: Trey Burke scored 22 points and Glenn Robinson III added
21. Burke equaled a career high with nine assists and Robinson made
his first eight shots from the field.
6. N.C. State
vs. Penn State, Thursday.
7. Kansas
vs. No. 21 Michigan State, Tuesday.
8. Syracuse
vs. Wagner, Sunday.
9. Duke
vs. No. 3 Kentucky, Tuesday.
10. Florida
vs. No. 22 Wisconsin, Wednesday.
11. North Carolina
at Long Beach State, Friday.
12. Arizona
vs. UTEP, Thursday.
13. UCLA
vs. UC Irvine, Tuesday.
14. Missouri
vs. Alcorn State, Tuesday.
15. Creighton
vs. UAB, Wednesday.
16. Baylor
vs. Boston College, Thursday.
17. Memphis
beat North Florida 81-66
■ Recap: Tarik Black had 18 points and seven rebounds. Joe
Jackson finished with 14 points, six rebounds and six assists.
18. UNLV
vs. Northern Arizona
■ Recap: Late
19. Gonzaga
vs. West Virginia
■ Recap: Late
20. Notre Dame
beat Monmouth (NJ) 84-57
■ Recap: Garrick Sherman had 22 points and seven rebounds. Jack
Cooley added 16 points for the Irish
21. Michigan State
vs. No. 7 Kansas, Tuesday.
22. Wisconsin
at No. 10 Florida, Wednesday.
23. UConn
vs. Vermont, Tuesday.
24. Cincinnati
vs. MVSU, Tuesday.
25. San Diego State
at Missouri State, Saturday.
UTC 88,
TENNESSEE TEMPLE 53
Tennessee Temple (2-2)
Hampton 5-5 2-3 12, Jones 2-3 2-2 6, Sanders
0-6 0-0 0, Quinn 0-3 0-1 0, Beauvil 4-12 0-0 11,
Whittaker 0-2 2-2 2, Freeman 1-2 0-2 3, Bell 0-2
0-0 0, Clarke 3-5 1-3 9, Walker 1-2 0-0 2, Slade
1-1 1-2 3, Sneed 0-0 1-2 1, Riek 0-0 2-3 2, Brazier 1-2 0-0 0. Totals 18-45 11-20 53.
UTC (1-0)
Zlovaric 3-8 5-8 11, Mason 7-12 2-3 16, White
1-5 7-8 9, McGhee 2-8 1-4 6, Jones 1-5 2-2
4, Stokes 3-4 3-6 9, Watson 2-4 0-0 4, Bareika
2-3 3-3 7, Bran 0-1 0-0 0, Robertson 2-6 2-2
6, Cobb 3-11 1-3 8, Bryant 3-3 2-2 8. Totals
29-70 28-41 88.
Halftime—UTC, 46-27. 3-point goals—TTU 6-22
(Quinn 0-2, Sanders 0-2, Beauvil 3-10, Whittaker
01, Freeman 1-2, Clarke 2-4), UTC 2-22 (Mason
0-2, Whit 0-1, McGhee 1-7, Jones 0-2, Bareika
0-1, Bran 0-1, Cobb 1-5). Rebounds—TTU 28
(Hampton 5, Riek 5), UTC 49 (Zlovaric 8, Bryant
7). Assists—TTU 16 (Quinn 5), UTC 12 (White 3,
Cobb 3). Turnovers—TTU 35 (Whittaker 5), UTC
18 (Bareika 4). Blocks—TTU 3 (Jones, Beauvil,
Bell), UTC 1 (Jones). Steals—TTU 9 (Sanders
3), UTC 23 (Cobb 6). Total fouls—TTU28, UTC
22. Fouled out—Jones, Clarkes, Jones. Technical
fouls—TTU (Jones). A—2,625.
The Mocs, who will play
at No. 7 Kansas on Thursday,
opened in a full-court press
they rarely used last season.
They forced eight turnovers
in the first 12 minutes and
limited Temple to seven
points in the first 10 minutes.
It helped UTC build a 46-27
lead at halftime.
Shulman called off the
pressure in the second half,
yet UTC kept pulling away
and led by as many as 39
points with two minutes to
go.
“In the future,” Cobb said,
“I’ll be better performing on
both sides of the ball.”
Then the curtain calls will
come.
Contact David Uchiyama
at [email protected] or 423-757-6484.
Follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/UchiyamaCTFP.
The Associated Press
Memphis guard Joe Jackson (1) gets blocked by
North Florida forward David Jeune as guard Ray
Rodriguez (11) controls the ball.
WOMEN’S TOP 25
1. Baylor
vs. No. 6 Kentucky, Tuesday.
2. UConn
at No. 16 Texas A&M, Sunday.
3. Duke
vs. Presbyterian, Saturday.
4. Stanford
vs. No. 1 Baylor, Friday.
5. Maryland
at Saint Joseph’s, Saturday.
6. Kentucky
at No. 1 Baylor, Tuesday.
7. Notre Dame
vs. UMass, Sunday.
8. Louisville
at Austin Peay, Thursday.
9. Penn State
at No. 16 Texas A&M, Wednesday.
10. Georgia
vs. Presbyterian, Wednesday.
11. Oklahoma
vs. UCLA, Wednesday.
12. California
vs. Saint Mary’s (Cal), Thursday.
13. Vanderbilt
beat Lipscomb 62-45
■ Recap: Jasmine Lister led the Commodores with 24 points.
14. West Virginia
beat Boston University 60-57
■ Recap: Ayana Dunning had 16 points, 11 rebounds and four
blocked shots.
15. Nebraska
vs. Northern Arizona, Friday.
16. Texas A&M
at No. 9 Penn State, Wednesday.
17. Delaware
vs. Providence, Tuesday, Nov. 20.
18. Purdue
vs. SIU Edwardsville, Saturday.
19. Texas
vs. Jackson State, Tuesday, Nov. 20.
20. Ohio State
vs. Cincinnati, Wednesday.
20. St. John’s
vs. Hofstra, Saturday.
22. Oklahoma State
at Missouri State, Tuesday.
23. Miami
beat Richmond 69-63
■ Recap: Michelle Woods scored a career-high 20 points and Keyona
Hayes added 10 points and 11 rebounds.
24. Tennessee
vs. Rice, Thursday.
25. Georgetown
at North Carolina, Wednesday.
D6 • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • • •
Breaking News: 423-757-News
...
.
timesfreepress.com
Smith enjoying
Chatt State role
By Ron Bush
Staff Writer
Staff File Photo by John Rawlston
Chad Barger has resigned as Sequatchie County’s football coach after the Indians went 2-8 in 2012, his first
losing season in five years on the job.
Barger resigns at Sequatchie
By Stephen Hargis
Staff Writer
After one of the most successful stretches in program history,
Chad Barger has stepped down as
Sequatchie County’s football coach.
Barger resigned Monday following the
first losing season (2-8) in his five-year
tenure with the program.
“I just felt like I need to step back
and let somebody else have a shot at
leading the team,” Barger said. “We
struggled this year. We went backwards. You rack your brain to see
what you could do. We were extremely
young, but that’s no excuse. Maybe
some fresh blood will help turn things
around.
“I’m sure I’ll get the coaching bug
— it’ll bite me again. But I just think if
I’m going to coach again, it needs to be
somewhere else.”
Fame
• Continued from Page D1
from 26 to 24. When the Hall of Fame
games were added, they were thought
to be treated as glorified scrimmages,
and coaches were given the option of
counting them or not.
That choice created confusion as
some coaches counted the games
regardless of the outcome, while others
counted the wins but not the losses.
“My stand is that it’s an official
game,” East Hamilton girls’ coach
Derek Morris said. “We’ve counted all
of them, even the ones we’ve lost. You
don’t have as much time to prepare
nowadays, so we’re ready to get on the
court and see what we have. We get to
play other teams, and it doesn’t really
matter how we do. We’re tested early,
and if we’re blown out we have until
the next week to be prepared.”
The TSSAA ruled last season that
if a game is played, it is to be counted toward the regular-season record
— win or lose.
“In regards to the games and the
coaches counting them, our stance has
been that the games do and should
count,” Gillespie said. “The Hall of
Fame games are not a requirement.
It is an exception that is made to the
maximum number of 24 regular-season
games schools are allowed. If it was
not an exception to the regular-season
“
Barger, who compiled a 29-26 overall
record at the Dunlap school, brought
stability to a program that had had four
coaches in six years and had gone 1-19
the two seasons before he took over. A
1996 Bledsoe County graduate, he was a
Sequatchie County assistant from 2001
to ’04, working as defensive coordina-
tor and later offensive coordinator.
After he coached Cannon County
to to its first winning record in 29
years, he guided the Indians to a 6-5
record in his first season — the first
winning record for the program in
eight years — and led them to consecutive winning seasons for the first
time in 13 years. They reached the
second round of the Class 3A playoffs
two years ago.
“We really appreciate what he’s
done for our program,” Sequatchie
County principal Tommy Layne said.
“I told him he didn’t have to [resign],
but he had his mind made up. He did
a super job of turning the program
around. The numbers are up, and the
future is very bright because of what
he’s built.”
Contact Stephen Hargis at [email protected]
timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6293.
limit, then why would they not count
as regular-season games?”
Each team is allowed two Hall of
Fame dates in the week before the season. On the court, most coaches feel
it’s a benefit because their teams can
step on the floor in an actual game setting, with an actual crowd and officials.
Some coaches — mainly boys’ coaches
— shy away from the games because
they don’t have their football players back in the mix or they don’t feel
they’ve had enough
time to implement
their system.
“They’ve taken two
games away, which
really doesn’t bother
us because we already
have a hard enough
time scheduling opponents,” Bradley Central
Kent Smith
coach Kent Smith said,
“but the fact that we have to take 75
percent of our gate and send it to the
state is sometimes difficult to swallow.
“Does it take that much to keep up
the exhibit?”
Some also choose not to participate
in something that would benefit the
state association financially — especially when they don’t see where the
money is going.
Several area coaches said it’s cheaper to travel for the games as opposed to
hosting them, with the thought being
that the process of ticket-handlers, offi-
cials, security and concessions in addition to the TSSAA’s fee is a problem
better left for somebody else.
“It’s a pretty big
chore to keep up with
the paperwork and
f inances of everything that comes with
the game,” Cleveland
coach Jason McCowan
said. “After you send
the preset percentage
to the TSSAA, you have
to pay everybody else Jason
with what’s remaining, McCowan
in addition to getting your team ready
to play.
“That’s just one less hassle that I
have to deal with. I’d rather scrimmage,
go to Georgia or play away so I don’t
have to deal with the finances.”
Although most of them are participating, only 25 of the 78 area teams in
Tennessee are hosting Hall of Fame
games.
“I wish we didn’t have practice
until after Thanksgiving,” McCowan
said. “You’re out of the way of football, and you would have to only worry
about the Christmas holiday. Then as
coaches, you don’t have to worry about
whether or not your kids are as interested in March as they are when the
season starts.”
Contact Gene Henley at [email protected]
timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6311. Follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/genehenleytfp.
He did a super job of
turning the program around.
The numbers are up, and the
future is very bright because of
what he’s built.
”
— Sequatchie County principal
Tommy Layne
ANALYSIS
The Associated Press
immediate calls for Edwards
to be suspended.
But doing so would have
been the immediate end of the
policy, and Edwards instead
got off with a mere three races
of probation. Then came last
November at Texas, when
Busch blatantly put Hornaday,
a championship contender,
into the wall under caution.
Unlike Edwards, he absolutely deserved to be suspended. He had been out of
control most of last season
and arrogantly behaving as if
he were untouchable.
Gordon’s decision to wreck
Bowyer — he said for a season’s
worth of misdeeds — is more
like the Edwards incident.
were present for the unveiling, Smith said.
“It was a great event,” she
said.
While she is waiting until
the spring semester for relief
on her teaching load — “I
still want to be in the classroom; I love teaching,” she
said — she wasted no time
jumping back into her new
old role.
She surprised Jay Price,
who coaches both basketball teams, by having a lot
of details taken care of for
their Nov. 3 home openers before he even brought
them up.
“I like her energy. She hit
the ground running, trying
to get a lot of things done,”
Price said. “We’ve had a
really good relationship in
my 10 years here, and I think
we really believe in the same
things about working with
kids — trying to help them
as far as we can but also
pushing them to do the right
things.”
Said Dennis: “I have
known Kim since I got here,
and she has been nothing
but helpful and professional
in everything she has done
with me. I am sure she will
work to get this department
where we all feel it needs to
be, and her vision is a great
one for everyone involved in
our department.”
Price took both his teams
to national tournaments
two years ago, and Dennis
has had his baseball Tigers
ranked No. 1 in the country
and playing in the NJCAA
World Series, so Smith sees
her role as helping outstanding coaches focus on their
main jobs without having
to fret about background
details.
“I just want to make
things more efficient, more
unified and more productive
with everyone on board,” she
said, praising the support she
already has received from
president Jim Catanzaro
and dean Anne Carroll on
down. That includes business office, security, custodial and secretarial personnel as well as the coaches,
she noted.
“I’ve just been steering
the ship,” Smith said. “When
you have all these people on
the ship working with you, it
makes your job easy. They’ve
all been incredible.
“Yes, there have been
headaches to deal with, which
is to be expected, but I’m
thankful for the opportunity
to get back involved with college athletics. It’s something
I love and have a passion for.
There have been a few days
when I’ve come home and
just been exhausted, but that
was a great feeling.”
Contact Ron Bush at
[email protected]
or 423-757-6291.
North Pole Adventure
A portion of each ticket sold goes to support Ronald
McDonald House Charities of Greater Chattanooga.
November 16 to January 5
6-9 pm at Rock City
for more info call 1.800.854.0675 See RockCity .com
35119536
Rossville 706-861-9317
E. Brainerd 423-531-2677
www.bossvan.com
35111854
NASCAR had a real dilemma on its hands with this Jeff
Gordon mess hanging over
the season finale.
History suggested Gordon
could have been suspended
from Sunday’s race at Homestead-Miami
Speedway as
punishment
for intentionally wrecking
Clint Bowyer
at Phoenix,
sparking a
brawl in the
garage. That’s
the punish- Jeff Gordon
ment Kyle Busch got a year
ago for retaliating against
Ron Hornaday Jr. in a Truck
Series event at Texas.
But was NASCAR seriously going to sit the four-time
champion? From the season
finale?
Nope. He instead got a
$100,000 fine from NASCAR,
plus being docked 25 points
in the standings.
The penalty was the right
call by NASCAR, which
walks a fine line between
sport and entertainment.
Some viewed Sunday as a
black eye, but others were
celebrating it as one of the
best races of the season. It
certainly created a buzz.
“The sport was made on
fights. We should have more
fights,” winner Kevin Harvick said. “Fights are what
made NASCAR what it is.”
NASCAR heard the complaints from fans that drivers
had become too corporate,
the sport had strayed too far
from its rough-and-tumble
roots and scores were no longer settled at the track. The
2009 finale at Homestead
was one of those throwback
races, and the crowd roared
as drivers used their cars to
deliver old-school justice.
NASCAR relaxed at the
start of the next season, using
a “Boys, Have At It” policy
that allowed the drivers to
police themselves.
The boys tested NASCAR
just four races in when Carl
Edwards waited 153 laps for
his crew to fix his car so he
could get back on the track at
Atlanta to wreck Brad Keselowski. Edwards’ high-speed
contact sent Keselowski’s
car airborne, and there were
coach has embraced her
return to the athletic
director job.
A Magical Adventure for the Whole Family
Big fine for Gordon right call
By Jenna Fryer
Kim Smith had a full
day at Chattanooga State
on Saturday. She got there
well before the 1 p.m. softball scrimmage to make sure
things were lined up for that
and the 2 p.m. basketball
doubleheader, and she went
back and forth between the
two campus facilities until
basketball was done and she
could take softball Wall of
Fame honoree Charmaine
Johns to dinner.
As the athletic director
for nearly three weeks, Smith
now is responsible for a lot
more than her full load of
five physical education lecture classes.
And so far she’s loving
it. The former Kim Weems,
a Greeneville (Tenn.) High
School and University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga
and Carson-Newman College
basketball guard, has gone
back to her roots.
Smith came to Chattanooga State
in 1989 as
the women’s
basketball
coach, from
Andy Landers’ staff at
Georgia, and
served three
years in that
position. She Kim Smith
became the athletic director
in 1990 and continued in that
role until ’98. Motherhood
led her to ask for a teaching-only position, but she
soon was back helping with
athletics as the department’s
academic adviser.
She did that until three
years or so ago, but since
then she had stayed out of
the school’s athletic business
despite her office being near
the coaches’ quarters in the
gym. She had stayed active
in sports, though: With two
daughters now in the eighth
and sixth grades, she has
been a summer fastpitch
softball coach for nearly a
decade, and the week she
took over as AD again she
played golf with baseball
coach Greg Dennis for the
third year in Chatt State’s
intramural fundraiser.
Going to the baseball
alumni day on Oct. 27 was
her first official appearance
as AD, although she had
attended the Oct. 19 meeting with the softball players
when they were told that
coaches Beth Keylon-Randolph and Steve Jaecks were
leaving and new head coach
Blythe Golden was introduced.
Jaecks had been the AD,
and Smith took over on his
official departure to help
Keylon-Randolph at East
Carolina University.
In addition to the ceremony Saturday for Johns, the
2012 softball team was honored for its national championship, complete with a sign
on the outfield fence and a
permanent bronze plaque
including the names of all
the players. And all of them
■ The former basketball
...
.
E
LIFE
• • • Tuesday, November 13, 2012
timesfreepress.com/life
PERSON TO WATCH: JAIME JORGE
INBOX
THE
WHAT TO KNOW
■ CONSIGNMENT
FAVES. Three local
consignment sales are
in the running for Best
Consignment Sale in
the Chattanooga Area,
a contest sponsored by
consignmentmommies.
com, a national
consignment sale and
store directory. Included
are the Jack & Jill Kids
Sale, Duck Duck Goose
and Sweet WeePeets,
which won last year’s
contest. Those who fill
out the four-question
ballot are automatically
registered to win a $50
Visa gift card. Voting
continues through Nov.
21. Votes are limited to
one per email per Internet
Protocol address. Winners
will be announced Jan. 3.
SCANDALS: For the other woman, few happy endings, E6
q
q
BOOK AWARDS: Events seek a bigger splash, red carpet and all, E4
VIOLINIST
ABROAD
Ooltewah-based violinist celebrates
25 years spreading musical gospel
around the world
By Casey Phillips
Staff Writer
Make job
growth a
regional
effort
In the last few columns, I have been urging
more regional cooperation
in building infrastructure,
like the bridges at highways 30 and 60. The same
benefits would flow to
us in new jobs if we truly
practiced regional job
development.
Maybe
I am a
fanatic,
but when
you know
you have
a quality
Dalton
idea, you
Roberts
dare not
Commentary
back down
an inch.
And, my friends, I know I
am reasoning soundly on
this one.
In the seven years
I was chairman of the
Southeast Tennessee
Development District, I
field-tested it.
I was totally committed
to downtown development during my tenure
in office — from the time
the Tennessee Aquarium
was unpopular and called
“Jack’s fish tank” to the
opening of the Tennessee Riverpark. But I fear
some are so focused on
downtown development
that they do not grasp the
powerful possibilities of
a regional jobs program.
It’s not either/or but both/
and.
John Germ is an exception. When we were on
the River City board, he
was for bringing county
mayors from surrounding
counties on the board to
start tapping into regional
perspectives. For a while,
we did it, but it was
dropped.
There are three good
reasons for forging a
regional program. The
main one, as I pointed out
in an earlier column, is
that surrounding counties
have nearly all of the land
we need to locate companies desiring to bring jobs
here. We simply do not
have another windfall situation like the land where
we put VW and Amazon.
The economic facts of
life will force Chattanooga
to see our surrounding
county communities as
“us” rather than “them.” A
good example was when
officials with Variform
(now Ply Gem) took me
to dinner and said they
did not want to locate in
Chattanooga but were
impressed by Marion
County. Howell Moss was
See ROBERTS, Page E6
J
aime Jorge walked a path strewn with
plastic flower petals on his way to
becoming a celebrated, world-traveled
violinist.
During his childhood in communist
Cuba, Jorge’s mother noticed her son’s
aptitude for music at age 3 when he taught
himself to play melodies on an eight-key,
plastic saxophone.
By the time he turned 5, she had enrolled
him in private lessons. In a society in which
most families were living hand to mouth,
that was a luxury few could afford. To pay
his teacher, Jorge’s mother stayed up all
night once a week making plastic flowers
she would sell on the streets.
When Jorge was 10, his father submitted
a formal request to leave Cuba on religious
grounds. The family was approved, and they
moved to the United States in 1980.
Years later, while playing Vittorio Monti’s
“Csardas” at a talent show at Loyola University of Chicago, Jorge discovered the power
of music to move people. The realization
radically changed his perspective on his talent.
“Everybody stood up and clapped for
minutes and yelled. I was shocked,” he said.
“I thought that if music had that kind of
power, I should take it seriously and use it
to inspire and motivate and challenge others
with it.”
Years later, Jorge had a second realization, this time of a spiritual nature. Halfway
through medical school, he was paying for
his studies with near weekly concerts, but
something felt off. He prayed to God for a
sign of what he should do and afterward
became convinced to pursue music full
time.
Staff photo
by Jake
Daniels
For the last 25 years, Jorge, a
resident of Ooltewah since 2001, has
taken his musical ministry around the
world. He has performed secular and
religious selections in 42 countries
on five continents, including appearances at Carnegie Hall, the Lincoln
Center and on the Crystal Cathedral’s
“Hour of Power.”
Q: Was the move to America
meaningful to you at 10, or were you
too young to realize its significance?
A: It was almost like going from a
black-and-white TV to a color TV. The
day we arrived, I chewed gum and ate
an apple and a grape for the first time
in my life. I went to a store, and I
had never seen a store with shelves
and clothing and food and snacks
and drinks. We came from a very
closed environment. We found
Americans to be very kind, helpful and very generous and giving
people.
Q: Do you have much
contact with Cuba anySee VIOLINIST, Page E6
Jaime Jorge
ABOUT HIM
FAST FACTS
IF YOU GO
■ Name: Jaime Jorge.
■ Age: 42.
■ Occupation: Violinist.
■ Birthplace: Santa Clara, Cuba.
■ Education: Bachelor of Arts in literature
from the Wisconsin Conservatory in
Milwaukee.
■ Family: Father, Eugenio; mother, Mayda;
and sister, Maydele.
■ Favorite piece to perform: Beethoven’s
Violin Concerto.
■ Favorite movie: “A Few Good Men.”
■ Favorite book: “Atlas Shrugged.”
■ First car: Light blue 1983 Chevrolet
Chevette.
■ Person he’d like to meet: Paul
McCartney.
■ Personal motto: “Quitters never win.
Winners never quit.”
■ What: Jaime Jorge & Friends 25th
Anniversary Show featuring special guests
Michael Card, Kirk Whalum and Larnelle
Harris.
■ When: 6:30-8:30 p.m. Nov. 25.
■ Where: Collegedale Community Church,
4995 Swinyar Drive, Collegedale.
■ Admission: $16.50.
■ Phone: 238-7944.
■ Website: www.JaimeJorge.com.
TALENTSHOW
Boundless curiosity
lifts a young puppeteer
Garrison
Clower with
Beastie of
“Beastie’s
Birthday
Party.”
By Casey Phillips
Staff Writer
Garrison Clower has always been exceedingly curious, a characteristic that, at times,
has spelled trouble for the family appliances.
Some of the victims of his innate desire
to understand how things work include the
family vacuum cleaner, which he disassembled at age 2. Later, he turned his attention
to the toilet, which he flushed repeatedly
to figure out how it functioned, eventually
flooding the bathroom and leaking water
through the kitchen ceiling. The family was
forced to evacuate for a week while repairs
were made.
“If he sees something he’s never seen
before, he’ll stop and study it,” said Garrison’s mother, Anna Clower. “I had to learn
to slow down with him and stop and study
things I might otherwise miss.”
For years, Clower and her husband sought
an outlet for their son’s passion. They tried
all the “traditional sports,” but none took.
Garrison would dutifully take the field,
Clower said, but he was just as likely to be
bent over looking at grasshoppers as he was
to be paying attention to the game.
Last year, however, all that changed when
Contributed
Photo
See PUPPETEER, Page E6
■ To contact Life phone: 423-757-6645 • Fax: 423-668-5051 • Email: [email protected]
CLAIM TO FAME
Garrison Clower, 12, has
been one of the lead actors in
puppet-theater productions at
the Mountain Arts Community
Center on Signal Mountain this
year. He portrayed the lead
role in the debut performance
of an original play, “Beastie’s
Birthday Party” this spring, and
soon will take on several roles
in a reprisal of local theater
guru Fred Arnold’s adaptation
of “The Blue Bird.”
ABOUT HIM
■ Name: Garrison Clower.
■ Age: 12.
■ School: Sixth-grader at
Center for Creative Arts.
■ Siblings: Sisters: Mary
Jane, 13; Anabelle, 10; and
Madi, 9.
■ Hobbies: Reading,
puppeteering, acting and
cooking.
■ Favorite book: The
Fablehaven series by Brandon
Mull.
E2 • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • • •
.
timesfreepress.com ...
Breaking News: 423-757-News
Puzzles&Funnies
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Universal Uclick
Friends and associates
are likely to play critical
roles in your affairs in the
year ahead. You will have
an easier row to hoe if
you stand by them when
they need you, so they can
return the favor when
necessary.
SCORPIO (Oct.
24- Nov. 22):
Some changes
might be in store for you
where your finances are
concerned. Depending
upon how you handle them,
results could be either
adverse or beneficial.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 23-Dec.
21): In your
anxiousness to conclude
matters that have been
causing you a lot of
frustration lately, you might
deprive yourself of what is
rightfully due you.
Crossword
ACROSS
1 College donor,
often
5 401(k) cousin,
briefly
8 Garden ground
cover
13 Mount Olympus
wife
14 Break bread
16 Novelist Zola
17 “As if!”
20 Halley’s sci.
21 Full of vitality
22 Ideological suffix
23 Lift with effort
25 ’60s
counterculturist
Timothy
27 “As if!”
31 Rants about the
boss, e.g.
34 Jacob’s brother
35 Niagara Falls
prov.
36 Gorky Park city
37 Like hor. puzzle
answers
38 “As if!”
40 Hostility
41 Started,
as a keg
43 P.I.
44 Hypnotic trance
breaker
45 “Friend __?”
46 “As if!”
48 Pal of Threepio
50 Not at all droopy
51 Intro makers
52 One might say
“shay” for “say”
54 Inevitable end
57 “As if!”
61 Honolulu hello
62 Egg on
63 Sculling gear
64 Headwear in
iconic Che
posters
65 Many ESPN fall
highlights
66 Way to be
tickled
DOWN
1 Cry of
enlightenment
2 Film heroine
with memorable
buns
3 Java vessels
4 “Grumpy Old
Men” co-star
5 Rite words
6 Modern caller
ID, perhaps
7 Part of A.D.
8 Drop-line link
9 Wrigley Field
judges
10 Mouthing the
lyrics
11 Red Skelton
character
Kadiddlehopper
12 Cooped-up layer
15 Bird on old
quarters
18 Earl __ tea
19 Groundbreaking
tool
24 Greenland
coastal feature
26 Company that
rings a bell?
27 “Marvy!”
28 Green grouch
29 “Star Trek”
velocity
measure
30 Word in many
university names
32 Bar mitzvah
reading source
33 Didn’t lose a
game
36 Java order
38 Off! ingredient
39 Mike, to Archie
42 Upscale
sports car
44 Perch on
46 Like babes
47 Dennis the
Menace’s dog
49 Pay extension?
51 Stallion or bull
53 Craig Ferguson,
by birth
55 Asian tongue
56 Bring home
57 “Marvy!”
58 Monopoly token
59 Has too much,
briefly
60 Clucking sound
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Measures
that are predicated upon
sober evaluations will
produce desirable results.
Conversely, the opposite
will be true with situations
that you fail to properly
study.
■ 1312: England’s King
Edward III was born at
Windsor Castle.
ON THIS DATE
PISCES (Feb. 19March 20): Take
time to review
your objectives, because
you could be chasing
something unattainable.
The Associated Press
Today is Tuesday, Nov.
13, the 318th day of 2012.
There are 48 days left in the
year.
TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20- Feb. 18):
Before getting even
more deeply involved with
someone who is already
indebted to you, make an
attempt to get this person
to settle his or her old
accounts.
ARIES (March 21April 19): You will
be doing yourself a
great disservice if you let a
wild hunch take precedence
over your common sense.
Deal from a factual basis at
all times.
Today In History
By Jeff Chen
c.Tribune Media Services
Stumped? Call
November 13, 2012
1-900-226-4413 99 cents a minute
TAURUS (April
20- May 20): If at
all possible, engage
in projects that you have
the knowledge, experience
and expertise to handle
properly.
■ 1789: Benjamin Franklin wrote in a letter to a
friend, Jean-Baptiste Leroy:
“In this world nothing can
be said to be certain, except
death and taxes.”
■ 1909: 259 men and
boys were killed when fire
erupted inside a coal mine
in Cherry, Ill.
■ 1927: The Holland
Tunnel opened to the
public, providing access
between lower Manhattan
and New Jersey beneath the
Hudson River.
■ 1956: The U.S.
Supreme Court struck
down laws calling for racial
segregation on public city
and state buses.
■ 1969: Speaking
in Des Moines, Iowa,
Vice President Spiro T.
Agnew accused network
television news departments of bias and distortion, and urged viewers to
lodge complaints.
■ 1974: Karen Silkwood,
a technician and union
activist at the Kerr-McGee
Cimarron plutonium plant
near Crescent, Okla., died
in a car crash while on her
way to meet a reporter.
■ 1985: Some 23,000 residents of Armero, Colombia, died when a volcanic
mudslide buried the city.
Bridge
By Phillip Alder
Universal Uclick
In this deal, what do you
think of the bidding? And
how did East-West defeat
one heart?
West would have opened
one no-trump, except that
by partnership agreement
it would have shown only
TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS
12 to 14 points. When playing a strong no-trump, you
Actress Madeleine Sherwood is 90. Journalist-author should open one no-trump
Peter Arnett is 78. Producer- to avoid the rebid problem
director Garry Marshall is 78. after one club - one spade.
When South balanced
Actor Jimmy Hawkins is 71.
with one heart, North
Country singer-songwriter
decided to pass.
Ray Wylie Hubbard is 66.
Against one heart, West
Actor Joe Mantegna is 65.
led
the diamond queen.
Actress Sheila Frazier is 64.
Declarer
won in his hand
Actress Frances Conroy is 59.
Musician Andrew Ranken is and led the club king, which
West correctly ducked.
59. Actress Tracy Scoggins
is 59. Actor Chris Noth is 58. West took South’s second
club with his ace, East
Actress-comedian Whoopi
showing an odd number
Goldberg is 57. Actor Rex
Linn is 56. Actress Caroline of clubs. West continued
with his second diamond.
Goodall is 53. Actor Neil
Declarer won and tried a
Flynn is 52. Former NFL
spade, but West won with
quarterback Vinny Teshis ace. Now, how could he
taverde is 49. Rock musiget his partner on lead?
cian Walter Kibby is 48.
There was only one
Comedian Jimmy Kimmel
chance.
West shifted to a
is 45. Actor Steve Zahn is
low heart, and East came
45. Actor Gerard Butler is
through, winning with his
43. Writer-activist Ayaan
Hirsi Ali is 43. Actor Jordan king. East cashed the diaBridges is 39. Actress Aisha mond jack, on which West
discarded his remaining
Hinds is 37. Rock musician
spade, and East gave West
Nikolai Fraiture is 34. NBA
player Metta World Peace is a spade ruff. West then sat
back and waited for two
33. Actress Monique Colemore trump tricks. Pretty!
man is 32.
Cryptoquote
GEMINI (May
21- June 20):
When negotiating
a matter of importance,
don’t make any unnecessary
concessions. It’ll serve you
better if you deal from your
strengths, not from your
weaknesses.
CANCER (June
21- July 22): Try to
face career or work
issues head-on, instead of
attempting to circumvent
them. Problems will get
worse over time if you
simply sweep them under
the rug.
Jumble:
Monday’s Answer:
SPELL
RATIO
POUNCE
GROOVY
An important way to compensate our veterans is to
— PAY RESPECT
Answer to previous Sudoku
For more information about Jumble, visit www.jumble.com on the Web.
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Distractions
will reduce all your
productive efforts and turn
your day into a waste. If
you hope to succeed in your
efforts, you must focus.
VIRGO (Aug. 23Sept. 22): If you’re
not careful, you
could easily get so involved
in outside matters that you
fail to take care of the things
you should be handling.
Sudoku
Answer to previous Crossword
Complete the grid so every row, column and 3x3 box
contains every digit from 1 to 9.
LIBRA (Sept. 23Oct. 23): In order
to get others to do
your bidding, you could be
tempted to bribe them with
promises that you’ll not be
able to keep. This is not a
good way to get along with
your cohorts.
Call 757-6200
for professional help
or do it Yourself
timesfreepress.com
Answer to previous Word Sleuth
... timesfreepress.com
.
Breaking News: [email protected]
• • • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • E3
E4 • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • • •
EXPERTADVICE
LIFE
Dog pays the price for owner’s
inattention behind the wheel
DEAR ABBY: I want to share my experience
with being a distracted driver. One gorgeous, sunny
day a few months ago, I happened
to glance down at my iPad and the
next thing I knew, I had hit the car
in front of me. The airbags engaged
and hit me and my golden retriever,
who was in the front seat with me.
He was so freaked out he jumped out
the window into oncoming traffic. I
Dear Abby
chased him, but lost him as he darted
Written by
through traffic on the busy streets.
Jeanne Phillips
Fortunately, a couple found him
and brought him to a vet who scanned his chip. I
got him back, and it is a gift from heaven — but he
was severely injured. With time, he will make a full
recovery, but my stupid mistake hurt my most cherished companion. I can’t forgive myself. From now
on, those devices go in the trunk. — REFORMED
DISTRACTED DRIVER
DEAR REFORMED:
That’s a start. And in the
future, your cherished companion should ride in the
back seat — with the windows closed and wearing a
restraint so that in the event
of another traffic problem he
won’t be reinjured. Because
you are in communication
with your veterinarian, ask
him or her what type is recommended.
c. Universal Press Syndicate
HEALTH
Offer help and hope
to a grieving friend
DEAR DOCTOR K: A close friend suddenly and
unexpectedly lost her spouse. How can I help her
through her grief?
DEAR READER: It’s
not easy to console a grieving friend;
you can’t
fix the
situation.
Instead, just
be present
and offer
hope toward
the future.
Dr. K
Accept
Dr. Anthony
that your
Komaroff
friend’s
grieving is a natural process
that will gradually ebb. Here
are a few specific, practical
pieces of advice:
■ Name names. Don’t
be afraid to mention the
deceased.
■ Offer hope. People
who have grieved often
remember that the person
who reassured them that
things would get better was
the one who helped them
transition from pain to a
renewed sense of life.
■ Make phone calls.
Call to express your sympathy. Steer clear of such
phrases as “It’s God’s will”
or “It’s for the best.”
■ Write a note. If you
had a relationship with the
deceased, try to include a
warm, caring or funny anecdote.
■ Keep in touch. Your
friend may need you more
after the first few weeks,
when other people may stop
calling.
■ Help out. Be specific
when offering help. Volunteer to shop or do laundry,
bring dinner or pass on
information about funeral
arrangements. Sometimes
your help is most valuable
later. For example, offer to
help go through papers or
belongings whenever your
friend is ready to do so.
■ Make a date. Ask
your friend to join you for a
walk or meal once a week.
Don’t take it personally if
your friend rebuffs offers or
doesn’t return every phone
call. Keep trying.
■ Listen well instead
of advising. People often
work through grief and
trauma by telling their story
over and over. Unless you
are asked for your advice,
don’t be quick to offer it.
■ Avoid judgments.
Your friend’s life and emotional landscape have
changed enormously, possibly forever. You may wish he
or she would move on, but
you can’t speed the process
or even ensure that it happens. Let your friend heal at
the pace that feels right.
A patient of mine lost
her husband when they
both were in their early
50s. She had been a stayat-home mom with several
hobbies but no profession.
Their kids were in college
and unlikely to need much
more financial help. (This
was decades ago, when college tuition fees were more
manageable.) Friends and
family asked her if there
was something they could
do to help, but she couldn’t
think of anything. So they
had nothing to do.
One friend, though,
didn’t ask, “Is there something I can do?” Instead, she
thought about the woman’s
hobbies. The woman loved
looking at homes for sale,
even though she had no
interest in buying. The
friend said: “You ought to
become a real estate agent,
and I’ve done some homework. This is the training
and credentials you’ll need.”
It worked. The woman spent
the next 20 years as one of
the most successful agents
in her community.
Distributed by Universal Uclick
FAITH
God will never abandon you
Q: My husband walked out on me last month,
right after I was diagnosed with breast cancer. Why
has God abandoned me? I’m so discouraged. Sometimes I wonder if it’s even worth going through
treatment. — Mrs. V. McL.
A: My heart goes out to promise is true: “The Lord is
you. What your husband did a refuge for the oppressed, a
was selfish stronghold in times of trouand shame- ble” (Psalm 9:9).
Don’t be afraid to tell
less and was
a complete God exactly how you feel.
denial of the He won’t be shocked or
solemn mar- upset or turn his back on
riage vow he you. But don’t leave it at that.
Billy Graham made before Instead, ask Jesus Christ
God to be faithful to you both to come into your life and
in sickness and health. The assure you of his love. Then
Bible says, “When you make trust his promise that he is
a vow to God ... fulfill your with you every moment of
the day — even when you
vow” (Ecclesiastes 5:4).
But God hasn’t aban- don’t understand everything
doned you, no matter how that’s happening.
Then ask God to guide
you feel right now. God
loves you, and he knows you and give you courage
all about your situation. and hope. Listen: God has a
The most important thing plan for your life, and your
you can do is turn to him greatest joy will come from
for the encouragement and discovering it every day.
strength you need. Life isn’t God’s promise is for you:
always easy; in fact, at times “I know the plans I have
it can be very hard. But for you ... plans to give you
that’s when we need God’s hope and a future” (Jeremihelp the most — and he is ah 29:11).
c. Tribune Media Services
ready to give it. The Bible’s
.
timesfreepress.com ...
Breaking News: 423-757-News
Book awards seek a bigger
splash, red carpet and all
By Leslie Kaufman
c. New York Times News Service
When the publishing elite
gathers for the National Book
Awards dinner Wednesday
evening in Manhattan, there
will be signs everywhere of the
aspirations to turn this oncedowdy event into a glamorous
party.
The ceremony — held at
a Marriott in Midtown until a
few years ago — will be at the
cavernously ornate Cipriani
Wall Street. There will be an
Oscar-style red carpet inside
the ballroom to welcome celebrity guests like the former teenactress-turned-author Molly
Ringwald. Inside, a Brooklyn
DJ named Rabbi Darkside will
be spinning the tunes.
These flourishes are just
the most visible part of the
makeover for a literary award
considered one of the most
prestigious in the United
States. The National Book
Foundation, which presents
the prizes, has been instituting
changes behind the scenes as
well, tweaking the nomination
process.
This year it issued new
instructions to the judges, in
red ink no less, apparently
as a signal to the judges that
it was OK to nominate writers whose books were widely
read. Critics had complained
that in recent years judges had
preferred little-known authors,
which diminished the award’s
stature.
“Fame or obscurity, small
press or large, should have
no bearing on your deliberations,” the board wrote. The
result is the best-known list of
nominees for fiction in years,
including Junot Deaz, Louise
Erdrich and Dave Eggers.
And more changes are coming.
The foundation has been
taking a tough look at itself,
hiring a consultant to survey
industry insiders — booksellers, editors and even critics
— to see if the award process
itself needs to be reformed to
attract more attention.
On the table are proposals like expanding the judging
pool beyond just writers to
include well-known cultural
figures of all types, and limiting
for the first time who may submit award entries. (Currently
any publisher can submit as
many books as it wants in any
category as long as the author
is an American citizen.)
The goal is to add more sex
appeal to an industry that’s not
exactly known for it — but not,
the organizers insist, just for its
own sake.
“It’s not about being glitzy,”
said David Steinberger, the
chief executive of Perseus
Books and chairman of the
foundation. “It’s about increasing the impact great books have
on the culture.”
The Associated Press
Domingo Martinez, left, author of “The Boy Kings of Texas,” laughs with a former
high school classmate during a book signing after he gave a talk at the University of
Texas at Brownsville. The book has been nominated for a National Book Award in the
nonfiction category.
The unstated model here is
not the Oscars or the Emmys,
but rather the Man Booker
Prize, Britain’s top literary
honor. Man Booker gives only
one award, for fiction, but
its imprimatur gives books a
second life that traditionally
generates more sales, even for
nominees who don’t win.
“When a book is shortlisted
for the Man Booker prize, it
sells another 50,000 copies,”
said Morgan Entrekin, president of Grove/Atlantic Press
and vice chairman of the
National Book Foundation’s
board. “It can transform the
fate of book.”
“The winner of National
Book Awards succeeds,” he
added. “But I would like to see
it have that kind of the effect on
the shortlist as well.”
The foundation’s board
members believe that Man
Booker is so effective because
it has integrated itself with politics and the broader popular
culture in Britain.
Judges for the Booker, for
example, are not just writers
but also entertainment stars
with a literary bent — among
them Dan Stevens, the actor
who plays Matthew Crawley on
“Downton Abbey,” and Fiona
Shaw, the Irish actress who has
been in the Harry Potter movies and HBO’s “True Blood.”
When the National Book
Awards were first presented
in 1950, they had that same
crossover appeal. The award
ceremony was held at the Waldorf-Astoria and for the next
decades attracted people from
all walks of life including Eleanor Roosevelt and Mayor John
V. Lindsay of New York.
More important, it spotted
and promoted major talents
like John Updike and Philip
Roth.
By the late 1990s, however,
the event had narrowed and
was attended almost solely
by publishing insiders. Critics also complained that the
awards were increasingly being
used to recognize overlooked
authors who hadn’t obtained a
popular audience.
“The awards were stuffy
and were visited upon by
corporate elders,” said Paul
Bogaards, director of publicity
for Knopf Doubleday.
In 2004 the foundation
recruited Harold Augenbraum
as executive director. Three
years later he brought in Steinberger, who in turn brought in
Entrekin and the high-profile
literary agent Lynn Nesbit,
whose client list has included
Tom Wolfe, Gore Vidal and
Robert Caro among others. A
turnaround began.
The organizers built a series
of events apart from the dinner, which is also a $1,000-aplate fundraiser, to broaden the
award’s appeal. They started
a party earlier in the week to
honor fiction writers under 35
and created a mix of the literary and the musical. (Neko
Case, of the New Pornographers, will be the party’s host
this year, and the poet Thomas
Sayers Ellis will be mixing the
tunes.)
Then three years ago the
foundation moved the dinner
to Cipriani. The event quickly
drew a smattering of boldface
names like Vogue’s editor,
Anna Wintour, and the “Sex
and the City” author Candace
Bushnell.
The organizers also started
an after-party that was opened
up to awards attendees, as well
as younger people in the industry who might not be in on the
fundraising dinner.
The success of these ventures — the after-party now
has a waiting list — fueled a
desire by board members to
press further, and create a
more public presence for the
award.
This year for this first time
the foundation announced the
finalists live on television, on
MSNBC’s popular “Morning
Joe” program.
“Usually we get about
10,000 unique visitors” to the
website after the announcement, Augenbraum said, “and
we got 22,000 the morning we
announced on ‘Morning Joe.”’
The board also hired a consultant at the beginning of the
year who gave extensive questionnaires to people in the field
— writers, agents, booksellers, librarians and past judges
— to solicit their thoughts
on how the process could be
improved.
Augenbraum insisted nothing will be decided until the
December board meeting,
but he acknowledged that the
questionnaire asked whether
the number of entrants should
be limited. The current setup,
while democratic, produces a
reading burden so daunting
that few high-profile people
are willing to judge.
Another question being
considered is whether the
awards should have a long list
of nominees as well as a shortlist, similar to the Booker prize,
a feature that feeds anticipation
leading up to the announcement of the winner.
Laughing in the storm:
Comics don’t shy from Sandy
By Larry Neumeister
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — Comedian Dave
Attell told a packed house at the Comedy Cellar that New York after Superstorm Sandy had a familiar feel. “It was
dark. Toilets were backing up. ... It was
pretty much like it always was.”
Another comic, Paul Mecurio, told
the same crowd that he got so many
calls from worried family members that
he started making things up about how
bad it was.
“I’m drinking my own urine to survive,” he joked.
New York’s comedy clubs, some of
which had to shut down or go on generator power in the aftermath of the
storm, dealt with a bad situation like
they always have — by turning Sandy
into a running punchline.
“If they’re going to do jokes on
Sept. 12 about Sept. 11, then this thing
isn’t going to slow us down,” said Vic
Henley, the emcee of a show Oct. 28 at
Gotham Comedy Club.
Sean Flynn, Gotham’s operating
manager, said comics were including the storm in their acts but had to
be careful nonetheless not to make
people feel worse than they already
did.
“There’s the old adage that tragedy
plus time equals comedy. The variable
is the time,” he said. Still, he added:
“You can’t ignore the subject. That’s
what comedy’s all about.”
The Comedy Cellar, a regular stop
for decades for the country’s most notable comedians, was closed from Oct. 28
through Nov. 1, but reopened on Nov.
The Associated Press
Comedian Dave Attell
2 after a generator was brought in at a
cost of several thousand dollars. Power
didn’t return until the next day, and the
crowds came with it.
Everyone has a bad case of cabin
fever,” said Valerie Scott, the club’s
manager.
Mecurio said he thought the joke
was on him when he got a call from
the Comedy Cellar saying the club was
going ahead with its show even though
there was no light in the West Village.
He headed downtown from the Upper
East Side, hitting dark streets after midtown.
“It’s pitch dark,” he said. “And there’s
a room packed with people laughing.
It was so surreal. ... I’m calling it the
generator show. It was a really cool
thing.”
“You could feel there was something special about the show,” he said.
“The audiences were tempered in their
mood. You could tell something was up,
something was in the air. I knew it was
cathartic for people.”
He said a woman approached him
after the show to thank him, saying:
“You kind of brightened my day.”
Sometimes, comics used the storm to
get a laugh at the expense of the crowd,
like when Mark Normand looked down
from the Comedy Cellar stage at a man
with a thin beard.
“I like the beard,” he told him. “Is
that because of Sandy? You couldn’t get
your razor working?”
And Attell used Sandy to mock a
heckler, telling him: “You must have
been a load of laughs without power.”
At another point, Attell looked for
positives in the storm.
“There’s nothing better than Doomsday sex,” he said.
Mecurio said he has made a point
of including the storm and the havoc it
caused whenever he takes the stage.
“I feel like as a comedian in the spirit
of social satire, it’s what we’re supposed
to do,” he said. “It’s the elephant in the
room. How do you not do it?”
... timesfreepress.com
.
• • • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • E5
Breaking News: [email protected]
History returns to history with ‘Mankind’ Grady turned to music
local listings) examines assisted-suicide laws in Oregon and
Washington.
■ Savino wants a friendly
mayor on “Vegas” (10 p.m.,
CBS, TV-14).
■ Kristina barely copes on
“Parenthood” (10 p.m., NBC,
TV-PG).
■ Quicksand beckons on
“Covert Affairs” (10 p.m., USA,
TV-PG).
■ Jax gets busy and expects
the worst on “Sons of Anarchy”
(10 p.m., FX, TV-MA).
Tune In
Tonight
By Kevin McDonough
LATE NIGHT
■ Joel McHale and
James Fay appear on
“Conan” (11 p.m., TBS).
■ Greg Fitzsimmons,
Loni Love and Matt
Braunger are booked on
“Chelsea Lately” (11
p.m., E!).
■ Mumford & Sons
perform on “Late Show
With David Letterman”
(11:35 p.m., CBS).
■ Jay Leno welcomes
Keira Knightley, Whitney
Cummings and Gin
Wigmore on “The
Tonight Show” (11:35
p.m., NBC).
■ Sally Field, Finesse
Mitchell and Lee Brice
visit “Late Night With
Jimmy Fallon” (12:35
a.m., NBC).
■ Craig Ferguson hosts
Toby Keith and J.R.
Martinez on “The Late
Late Show” (12:35
a.m., CBS).
SERIES NOTES
Fox Photo
Chris Messina, left, and
Mindy Kaling star in “The
Mindy Project” tonight on
Fox.
Brian Williams gushes about
prehistoric cave paintings. Can
early agriculture be far behind?
Wait half a minute and you’ll
find out.
All the same, it’s nice to see
history on the History Channel,
instead of “Ancient Aliens” and
“Pawn Stars.” For disappointed
viewers, there’s always “Hardcore Pawn” (9 p.m., truTV).
DVD RELEASES
CULT CHOICE
A robot janitor looks
for love in a despoiled
universe in the 2008
Pixar hit “WALL-E” (8
p.m., Disney).
invented fire and cooking.
Cable star Anthony Bourdain
makes an appearance to tell us
(very briefly) how important
cooking is to culture. About
45 seconds later, newscaster
EPB
BATTL
LAFAY
CLEVE
RINGD
DALTN
CHATT
Josh Brolin narrates “Mankind: The Story of All of Us” (9
p.m., History), a six-part series.
This is a follow-up of sorts to
“America: The Story of Us.”
Gosh, I was waiting for “Belgium: The Story of Them.”
Broad surTO SEE IT vey histories
are the kind of
“Mankind: The
Story of All of films that give
history docuUs,’’ 9 p.m.,
History, Com- mentaries a
bad name. Narcast channel
ratives that try
126, EPBFI
channel 68 in to encompass
Chattanooga. “the history of
mankind” are
so vast as to be slightly absurd.
In history, as in fiction, good
storytelling requires a particular narrative angle. Take “The
Da Vinci Code” by Dan Brown,
a preposterously popular book.
If he had merely written a fictional tome filled with arcane
detours into the history of
Western art, architecture and
early Christianity, most readers would have passed. But
because he approached it as a
symbol-laden detective story
shot through with bizarre conspiracy theories, readers would
follow him anywhere.
A few years back, the documentary “Helvetica” discussed
modern notions of design, politics and societal attitudes, all
while explaining the history
of a single typeface. Films that
explore generalities through
a “Mankind” is a handsome
effort filled with cinematic reenactments, but it is literally all
over the map. History marches
on at a startling clip. We go
several billion years from the
Big Bang to the “dawn of man”
(yes, it uses that hackneyed
phrase) in about two minutes. Four minutes later, we’ve
6
PM
6:30
TV-themed DVDs available
today include “Friends: The
Complete Series (Blu-ray).”
OTHER HIGHLIGHTS
■ Tales of adoption on
“Raising Hope” (8 p.m., Fox,
TV-14).
■ Jess needs a job on “New
Girl” (9 p.m., Fox, TV-14).
■ Professional help on “The
Contact Kevin McDonough
Mindy Project” (9:30 p.m., Fox,
at
[email protected]
TV-14).
c. United Feature Syndicate
■ Frontline” (PBS, check
7
PM
TUESDAY EVENING
7:30
8 PM
8:30
3.1 NBC
Eyewitness
NBC Nightly
Entertainment Inside Edition
4
3
3
3
4
4
3
WRCB
News
News
Tonight 'TVPG' 'TVPG'
3.2 Antenna 216 148 148 148 216 216 163 All in Family
All in Family Eyewitness
3's Company
9.1 ABC
NewsChannel
ABC
World
Wheel
of
Jeopardy!
10 9
9
9 10 10 9
WTVC
9 at 6
News
Fortune 'TVG' 'TVG'
Sheena (1984,Adventure) A man helps a jungle queen defend
9.2 ThisTV 208 174 174 174 208 208 169
12.1 CBS
WDEF
12.2 Bounce
WDEF
18.1 PBS
23.1 TBN
23.2 Church
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23.4 Enlace
23.5 Smile
39.1 WYHB
45.1 PBS
WTCI
45.2 Create
53.1 CW
WFLI
53.2 MeTV
WFLI
61.1 FOX
WDSI
61.2 MNT
A&E
AMC
ANPL
BET
BRAVO
CMT
CNBC
CNN
COM
CSPAN
CSPAN2
CSSE
DISC
E!
ESPN
ESPN2
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FOXSS
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TVLAND
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USA
VH1
WGN
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12
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9 13
208
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179
36
43
22
126
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70
109
16
103
74
44
53
118
52
7
69
41
15
124
47
83
40
96
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30
2
2
49
58
52
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62
68
39
41
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85
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144
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127
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311
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29 29
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95
104
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33
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179
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43
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126
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61
30
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104
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36
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103
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118
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44
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32
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48
113
36
54
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22
21
52
75
35
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59
103
37
72
33
121
70
45
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60
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16
103
78
44
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40
265
24 23
53 78
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15 2
CINEMAX 320 515 520 515 320 15 520
DISN
136 43
43
54
64
57
HBO
302 500 500 500 302 302 500
HBO2
303 501 502 501 303 303 502
HBO FAM
305 503 504 503 305 305 503
SHOWTIME 340 400 400 600 340 14 540
TMC
350 408 406 408 350 62 560
■ A returning vet becomes
a victim on “NCIS” (8 p.m.,
CBS, TV-PG).
■ Live results on “The
Voice” (8 p.m., NBC, TVPG).
■ “Dancing With the
Stars” (8 p.m., ABC, TVPG).
■ A political tiebreaker
on “Hart of Dixie” (8 p.m.,
CW).
■ Ben needs a career to
talk about on “Ben and Kate”
(8:30 p.m., Fox, TV-14).
■ From Russia with
extreme dislike on “NCIS:
Los Angeles” (9 p.m., CBS,
TV-PG).
■ Ryan becomes a mentor on “Go On” (9 p.m., NBC,
TV-14).
■ A transplant rejected on
“Emily Owens, M.D.” (9 p.m.,
CW, TV-14).
■ A day without gadgets
on “The New Normal” (9:30
p.m., NBC, TV-14).
■ A camera crew follows
Sam on “Private Practice” (10
p.m., ABC, TV-14).
9 PM
after ‘My Three Sons’
DEAR STACY: I was sur- Knoxville, Ill. His eight-year
prised when I heard that marriage, to one-time “PasDon Grady of “My Three sions” cast mate Lindsay KorSons” died recently. Wasn’t man, ended this past spring.
They have a daughter,
he fairly young?
Isabella, 8. In addition
What happened?
to playing billionaire
What had he been
Oliver Queen/Green
doing in recent
Arrow on “Smallville,”
years? I had such a
his credits include the
crush on him when
horror flick “Red CanI was in junior high.
yon.”
— Jean K., Canoga
DEAR STACY:
Park, Calif.
Can you tell me if
D E A R J E A N: Stacy
Grady was 68 when Jenel Smith Steve Allen’s “Meethe died of cancer after Entertainment ing of Minds” show
is available for pura four-year battle last
June. The former original Mick- chase? Also, is Jayne Meadey Mouse Club Mouseketeer ows still alive? — Chloe E.,
pursued his first love — music Warren, Ohio
DEAR CHLOE: The
— after “My Three Sons.” He
Emmy
and Peabody awardwrote the theme song to the
Phil Donahue show, and his winning PBS show that
compositions were featured in brought historical figures
the children’s TV series “The (played by actors) together in
Kid-a-Littles” and the 1985 a panel discussion (scripted to
film “Girls Just Want To Have appear spontaneous) is availFun.” Grady also co-wrote the able for free viewing — see
song “Keep the Dream Alive,” http://www.ovguide.com/tv/
which was recorded by Herbie meeting_of_minds.htm. It has
Hancock, Della Reese and oth- also been released in audio and
ers for the Jazz to End Hunger VHS format, and the scripts
project. In 2008, he came out have been published. Because
with an album for and about of their educational nature,
baby boomers, “Boomer: Jaz- Allen made them available for
RokPop.” He left his wife of public performance without a
26 years, Ginny, and their two royalty attached. With numerous theater, film and TV roles
grown children.
DEAR STACY: Please to her credit, Meadows is now
give some information living a comparatively quiet life
about Justin Hartley on at 92.
“Emily Owens, MD.” Is he
To find out more about
married? Where from? Age?
I know he was on “Small- Marilyn Beck and Stacy
ville.” What else has he Jenel Smith and read their
done? — Taylor B., Cedar past columns, visit the Creators Syndicate web page at
Rapids, Iowa
DEAR TAYLOR: The www.creators.com.
35-year-old actor hails from
c. Marilyn Beck, Stacy Jenel Smith
9:30
10 PM 10:30 11
PM
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The Voice "Live Results Show" Go On (N)
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Two and Half Two and Half Twilight (2008,Drama) A teenage girl and a vampire fall in love. Kristen Stewart 'TV14'
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second chance at harmony. 'TVMA'
Fernandez 'TV14'
E6 • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • • •
‘Kash
for Kids’
■ Kangaroo Express
fundraiser will benefit
Junior Achievement
..
timesfreepress.com ..
Breaking News: 423-757-News
For ‘other’ women, few happy
endings after political scandal
Staff Report
The Pantry Inc., an independently operated convenience store chain in the
southeastern United States,
announces 72 Kangaroo
Express convenience stores
in Chattanooga, Cleveland,
Tenn., and North Georgia
will participate in its first
“Kash for Kids” campaign
to raise funds for Junior
Achievement.
Through Dec. 26, Kangaroo Express will encourage store visitors to make
donations to Kash for Kids.
Donations raised in Hamilton, Catoosa, Walker, Marion, Rhea and Sequatchie
counties will benefit Junior
Achievement of Chattanooga. Donations raised in
Bradley, McMinn, Meigs,
Polk and Monroe counties will benefit Junior
Achievement of the Ocoee
Region.
The nonprofit organization teaches economic fundamentals, entrepreneurship and work-readiness in
area schools.
By Roxanne Roberts
and Amy Argetsinger
c. The Washington Post
Locals are part
of tonight’s
‘Giuliana & Bill’
episode
Staff Report
Tonight’s episode of the
reality fashion show “Giuliana & Bill” (8 p.m., Style
Network) will include footage shot at She: An Expo
for Women held in July at
the Chattanooga Convention Center.
The show stars husband-and-wife tandem
Giuliana and Bill Rancic.
The show is in its fifth season. The couple were featured guests at the expo,
which is presented by the
Chattanooga Times Free
Press.
BESTBETS
Looking for something to
do today? Check out one
of these events.
■ PUNK ROCK
California punk-rock band
Social Distortion performs
at 8 p.m. at Track 29,
1400 Market St. Show
also features Lindi Ortega
and The Biters. $29 in
advance, $30 at door. 5212929, www.track29.co.
■ THEATER UTC’s
Department of Theatre
and Speech opens latest
production, “My Three
Angels,” at 7:30 p.m. in
the Dorothy Hackett Ward
Theatre in the UTC Fine
Arts Center, 752 Vine St.
$12 general admission,
$10 students with ID,
senior citizens and UTC
alumni. 425-4269, www.
tickettracks.com.
■ VETERANS MUSICAL
Greater Cleveland
Community Band
presents “Home for
Christmas: A Veteran’s
Story, at 7 p.m. First
Baptist Church, 1275
Stuart Road, NE,
Cleveland, Tenn. Free, but
donations appreciated.
423-559-8994, 423-4731114.
File Photos by The Associated Press
Clockwise from top: CIA Director David Petraeus with his biographer Paula
Broadwell; White House intern Monica Lewinsky; model Donna Rice Hughes; Harvard Business Review editor Suzy Wetlaufer and former GE head Jack Welch, Rielle
Hunter and baby, Quinn, her daughter with John Edwards.
Violinist
• Continued from Page E1
more?
A: I do go back. I am
involved in a lot of mission
work in Cuba. The nonprofit organization I work with
— La Voz de la Esperanza
— has a license from the
U.S. government to go there.
I’ve developed a passion for
the people of Cuba. For 20
years, I couldn’t go back.
Q: Your music seems
intertwined with your
faith. Do you use your
concerts as a forum from
which to minister to people?
A: Yes, very much so. My
desire from my concerts is
that people walk away motivated and inspired to use
their God-given talents to
serve God and humanity.
I have had people through
the years who have told me
... the power of the music and
the message and my words
of testimony have made a
huge impact in their lives.
There’s a certain satisfac-
tion that comes with seeing
that what you’ve done and
what you’ve invested your
life in has a positive impact
on other people’s lives.
Q: Where did you play
your first international
show?
A: It was in 1993 in Melbourne, Australia. It was
a n o t h e r c u l t u re s h o c k
because Aussies have a different accent and a different
demeanor — not to mention
kangaroos and koalas, which
I’d never seen before.
I quickly found out in
Australia — and later in
Europe, where I’ve spent
a lot of time performing
— that music is something
that brings us all together.
Even if I was in Germany or
Russia, I didn’t have to speak
the language to connect with
people. As soon as I started
playing my violin, everyone
knew what the music was
saying. That just blew my
mind.
Q: Is music’s ability to
transcend cultural and
language barriers especially true of classical
music?
A: Certainly. In other
parts of the world, where
people are not that acclimated or accustomed to it,
the effect it has on people is
absolutely incredible. They
sit there spell-bound. It
does something for them. I
think it expands their minds
[because] classical music is
so large in its composition.
Q: How does the ministering and sharing of your
story work its way into
your performances?
A: Oftentimes, I find the
best way to do that is to talk
and share things that make
me come across as a human
being, just like the people
sitting there. It’s a way to
earn people’s trust.
Music is one of the most
powerful ways to communicate and affect people, and I
take that very seriously. My
desire for every concert is
that, if something happens
after the concert that I could
never play music again, I
could look back and think
that that was the best concert I could have done.
Contact Casey Phillips at
[email protected]
or 423-757-6205. Follow him on
Twitter at @PhillipsCTFP.
There’s nothing like a political sex scandal to get Washington buzzing. While pundits
debated the future of CIA
Director David Petraeus, few
concerned themselves with
the fate of Paula Broadwell.
No surprise there. Powerful men can bounce back from
even the most lurid affairs, but
the Other Woman rarely survives the firestorm intact. Call
it sexism, bad luck or lousy
PR — these modern Hester
Prynnes live on in Google
forever.
Bill Clinton has never been
more popular; Monica Lewinsky, despite a degree from the
London School of Economics, has never managed to hold
down a job. John Edwards’s
mistress, Rielle Hunter, is even
more despised than the ruined
politician after writing a tellall memoir. Megan Marshack,
the former radio reporter
who was with Nelson Rockfeller the night he died in 1979,
hasn’t worked on-air for more
than 30 years.
A rare exception to the
rule: Donna Rice Hughes,
who rebounded from her liaison with Sen. Gary Hart into
a happy and relatively public
life. “I think it’s harder for the
women,” she told us Sunday.
“They’re not as well known
and get sensationalized.”
Rice Hughes was 29 in 1987
when her brief relationship
with Hart — then the leading Democratic prospect for
the 1988 presidential nomination — exploded into public
view. Within days, her name
and picture were everywhere,
and she remained in the headlines for the next 18 months.
“It took on a life of its own,”
she said.
Now it seems there’s a sex
scandal every few months;
back then, there was no role
model, no map of how to
navigate a storm like this. Rice
Hughes lost her commercial
acting and pharmaceutical
jobs. “I knew I wanted to
Roberts
• Continued from Page E1
county mayor in Marion,
so we met with them, and
they have provided 180 to
200 jobs ever since.
For many long years, residents of our neighbor counties have come here to work.
Due to their ownership of
most of the available land
for new companies, you will
see more Chattanoogans
driving to work at companies in other counties
Another reason to work
regionally is that Chattanooga can use the sewage
treatment business of the
smaller counties. Few things
are more expensive to build
than sewage treatment
plants. If memory serves me
correctly, the last expansion
of our facility was a $90 million investment.
The biggest surprise to
me when I accepted chairmanship of the SETDD was
the quality of leadership
and the commitment to the
people of those who served
take the high road,” she said.
“I prayed continually that I
would make wise choices and
tried to take the long view. I
really wanted the pain to count
for something good.”
That meant not exploiting the situation for money
(she passed on millions from
Playboy and others), taking personal responsibility
for her role in the affair, and
asking for forgiveness from
her family, friends and God.
A “devastated” Rice Hughes
went underground for seven
years in which she renewed
her Christian faith, married,
moved to Washington and
looked for a job.
“People told me I’d never
been taken seriously,” she said.
But she was hired by the antipornography group Enough
Is Enough, where she’s now
president and an acknowledged expert on Internet
safety issues — she frequently
testifies before Congress and
has produced a film series on
the subject.
While Rice Hughes has
thrived professionally, other
upbeat endings for the Other
Woman usually involved marriage. Argentine beauty Maria
Belen Chapur is now engaged
to former South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford, despite
the fact their affair effectively
ended his political career.
And remember Suzy Wetlaufer? The former Harvard
Business Review editor had
an affair with departing GE
head Jack Welch while writing a profile of him — and lost
her job, but went on to marry
and co-author books with the
multimillionaire corporate
executive.
And Broadwell? The ambitious first-time author is married with two small sons. She
and her doctor husband celebrated her 40th birthday in
Washington, Va.
But a party for friends was
canceled; she disabled her
Facebook account just hours
before the affair went public
Friday and has given no interviews ... yet.
with me. It was a genuine
joy to work with them. Our
board meetings were lively
with swarms of good ideas.
When a dozen people
elected to do the same job
get together, you can expect
ideas to proliferate that way.
Nothing is more important to good government
than good ideas. I once told
someone, “My only addiction
is to ideas.” I am convinced
that the way an elected person gathers, processes and
prioritizes ideas determines
the quality of their leadership and their success.
Email Dalton Roberts at
[email protected]
What’s going on
in your community?
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST
33
CCS planning
activities at its
home football
games.
PAGE 11.
COMMUNITY NEWS
Serving Downtown,
18, 2010 • Vol. 3, No.
FAMILY
FANS
Metro
Lookout Mountain, St.
Elmo, East Ridge, Brainerd
and Southside
Potlikker
event dips
into South’s
traditions
W. Miller
By RebeccaNews
Writer
Community
ready
COMEDY: CBC downtown
PAGE 5.
to host show Aug. 21.
provide
TEA TIME: Events social
women with networking, PAGE 7.
outlet.
g
Finding some good readin
young Beth Cordle
Richelle Cordle helps
books during
find her favorite children’s
at
Library Book Sale
the Friends of the
last week.
W. Miller
Eastgate Town Center
Photo by Rebecca
host the
Warehouse Row will
Alliance
Southern Foodways Aug. 20,
Potlikker Film Festival food culshowcasing the South’s enterand
ture with films, food
tainment.
on
“We make oral histories — the
food
the people behind the and
people who grow, cook of the
preserve the great food who is
Hall,
South,” said Mellissa
Southresponsible for planningevents.
ern Foodways Alliance
festivals are
“Our Potlikker film
food or
designed to showcase city.
food
products of a great
SFA
the
to
We introduce people
through their own food.”
must be
Tickets are $50 and
the event. Bereserved online for
festival guests
tween 5 and 8 p.m.,
documenwill watch three short
film directaries directed by SFA
See POTLIKKER, Page
ent and NEW THINGS
Valley
New Owner, New Managem
Commons at Hickory
starting at
• Studio Apartments
happening with The
at
Hickory Valley Road
1521
Chattanooga, TN 37421
423.894.9223
10 – 3)
(Mon – Fri 9 – 6 / Sat
4
$
$
399
499
$
• One Bedroom starting
759
at
• Three Bedrooms starting
Place & I-75
Minutes to Hamilton with ad
• $20 application fee
• $199 Deposit
• Restrictions apply
water/sewer/trash *
• Price does not include
32091506
Fine Arts trains
CLASS: School of
12.
local musicians. PAGE
• Continued from Page E1
he discovered acting through
a class at the Mountain Arts
Community Center. After
years of play-acting in amateur videos he made with
his friends and putting on
impromptu home-theater
shows for his parents, taking
that energy to the stage was
only natural.
“I don’t really get nervous
in front of an audience,” Garrison said. “I get excited to
show people who I am and
how I can act and for them
to enjoy a performance I’m
putting on.”
During his first performance as The White King
in “Wonderland,” Garrison
was a fifth-grader at Nolan
Elementary School. The show
was presented by Skwalking
Heads Production Company,
whose director, Colleen Lalib-
NEXT UP
Garrison Clower
will portray several
characters in a
production of Fred
Arnold’s puppet theater
adaptation of “The Blue
Bird” at the Mountain
Arts Community Center,
809 Kentucky Ave.,
Signal Mountain. Shows
are at 7 p.m. Friday, 2
and 7 p.m. Saturday
and 2 p.m. Sunday.
Tickets are $5.
erte, recommended that Garrison audition for Center for
Creative Arts. He was accepted this fall as a sixth-grader
with an acting major and a
musical-theater minor.
While working on another
production last fall with Laliberte, Garrison wandered into
the prop room and discovered a collection of puppets
left over from shows designed
by local theater impresario
diately.
“With puppeteering, you
are admired for your skill,” he
said. “I feel proud that I can
be one of the puppeteers.
“The main thing is thinking about the puppet’s characteristics and putting it in
your performance. It was fun
working with others to make
one character come alive.”
Garrison also has been
cast in a reprisal of “The Blue
Bird,” a play Arnold adapted
from a 1908 stage work by
Belgian playwright Maurice
Maeterlinck. He will take on
about five roles in the show,
which starts Friday and features a cast of a dozen puppeteers controlling about 50
puppets.
Laliberte said that, while
Garrison’s curiosity might
have been the bane of his
household during his early
years, it is a great benefit to
directors. Figuring out how a
production functions — much
like a machine — is key to
helping it become more effi-
cient, Laliberte said.
“I could definitely see him
inventing something someday,” she said. “I think he’ll
take my puppets and make
them better. He’s a great asset.
I don’t want him to grow up
and go away.”
Contact Casey Phillips
at [email protected]
com or 423-757-6205. Follow
him on Twitter at @Phillips
CTFP.
TALENT SHOW
Do you know a child age 17
or younger with a precocious
talent in academics, athletics
or the arts? The Times
Free Press is searching for
children to feature in “Talent
Show,” which appears in the
Life section on Tuesdays.
To nominate a child as a
possible subject of a future
feature article, email staff
writer Casey Phillips at
[email protected]
com or call him at 423-7576205.
COMMUNITY NEWS
EVERY
WEDNESDAY
THE
ULTIMATE
STADIUM
THEATER
www.
EASTRIDGE18.com
423-855-9652
I-24 @ Moore Road
(exit 184)
34785256
Puppeteer
Fred Arnold.
When he held the Sea
Witch, a puppet Arnold built
for his adaptation of Hans
Christian Andersen’s “The
Little Mermaid,” his curiosity
immediately was piqued.
“She’s still my favorite
one,” he said. “I was thinking
it would be so cool to be able
to hold her and be in a puppet
play. I liked how they looked
and the attention I would get
for being a good puppeteer.”
Earlier this year, he got
his chance when Laliberte, a
veteran puppeteer, debuted a
new play, “Beastie’s Birthday
Party,” which she created in
collaboration with Arnold.
Garrison was in charge of
directing the movements of
the head of the title character, a massive puppet moved
through the coordinated
efforts of several actors.
Learning to manipulate
inanimate objects and give
them life through subtle
movements is something Garrison said he enjoyed imme-
SECTION
F
Tuesday, November 13, 2012
CARS HOMES
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JOBS
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FEATURED VEHICLE
2003 CHEVY S10 2WD
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BUSINESS HOURS:
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FRIDAY 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY
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UPLOAD: [email protected]
Not all photos will be printed
Beautiful Walnut $
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125
Text “Antiques”
to 423-415-1139 to receive
shipment and sales notifications
FEATURED RETAILER
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SUMMER HOURS
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$49.99 Seasonal Cleaning
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CLOCK REPAIR
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Can Fix call 423-463-0872
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423.421.8785 or 423.421.9466
SPECIAL 10X40X4’’ $1099
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Concrete removal. 34 yrs. 825-0017
Electrical
Free Estimates
Call: 423-645-4082
Drainage Work, Land Clearing.
Lic./Ins. 25 yrs. 423-421-0664
REPAIRS TODAY
Will Beat All Prices
Excavators, Dozers,DumpTrucks
Free Estimates 423-595-9554
Lot Clearing, footings, road
building, septic systems, topsoil,
and fill dirt. 605-5374.
Bush Hogging
Electrical/Swimming Pools.
Lic & Ins. 423-667-1999
Dump Truck
Service
GRAVEL, FILL DIRT,
Bulldozer, Top Soil, Sitework,
Driveways, clearing, 20 yrs.
Lic. & Ins. 423-280-6347
Fencing
BUSH HOGGING
All Size Jobs
Jim Swafford 423-842-7266
Lawn Care
Paving
Affordable Leaf Removal
ASPHALT, CONCRETE &
PATlO. Light Excavation,
MACHINE CLEANED
TOPSOIL
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423-605-5374
Curb side vacuum pick-up also
available. No bagging required.
Call: 423-653-6081
chattanoogalandscapes.com
Call: (423) 954-3002
Professional Lawn Care
Fall Cleanup - Mow-Mulch leaves-Haul,
Comm/Res. Insured. 894-4233
STR CONSTRUCTION
Mowing & More, Gutters,
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interior trim, tile showers,
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Trees, Clearing, Plant, Mulch &
Hauling. Christian Man. 413-1251
Green Lawn Service. State of
the art leaf removal starts at
$35. Free quotes 423-716-5259
Leaf Clean Up, Mowing & More
Commercial & Residential
Terry 423-605-1293 --Since1986
Masonry
TL Hood Construction - Lic/Ins.
25 yrs exp. Remodeling & new
home. Work guar. 423-619-1339
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Lic. Contractor 320-4897
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“Tried the rest, now try the best”
423-344-7446/423-635-0057
PROFESSIONAL PAINTING
Ext from $995. Int from $95
Repair, power wash, deck stain.
Call David 423-227-0176
All roofs & repairs
Shorts waits & super low rates
320-9491, 886-2569
Marvin Jenkins & Son Plumbing
Abbott Painting & Pres-Wash
SPETZ PAINTING &
PRESSURE CLEANING
423-316-1363
Painting/Wallpaper
S & B LAWN SERVICE
Leaf Mulching. Veteran.
Ooltewah, TN. 423-716-3206
NEED A SERVICE?
p\g ... WE GOT IT!
Excellent Painter & Wallpaper
Hanger. Great work & Great
Rates. Call Cathie 423-304-3355
Tree Service
RON RABY’S TREE SERVICE
Honest, Quality & Professional
Tree Care for over 30 years.
Free Estimates/Fully Insured
ISA-Certified Arborist SO-6099-A
423/421-0479 - 706/965-9945
423-355-3777
Leaks repaired H Drains
Cleaned H Fixtures installed
Senior Disc Josh 423-598-1466
Affordable Roofing
HRepairs & RoofingH
ROOF MASTERS
AJ’S PLUMBING & SERVICE
All types of Service & Repair.
Lic/Bonded/Ins. 423-510-0676
Leak repairs, all types of roof
work & remodeling. Discount to
Senior Citizens & Churches.
423-355-6491/ 260-6523
DALE’S PLUMBING
H No Job Too Big or Small H
423-499-9301
All Plumbing & Gas
Pay by the job. Not the hour.
24hr. Call 314-4789
Ken’s Roofing & Leak Repair
Quality work, Written warranty
Senior Citizen Discount. 30 yrs
Exp. Great Rates!! Call Us 1st!!
Free Estimates. 423-991-7702
SHINGLE & METAL ROOFS
Referenced & Experienced.
Lic. & Ins. Free Estimates.
423-413-0438 & 423-443-1667
MASTER PLUMBER
Lic. & bonded. $25 service call
applied to repairs. 421-5380
LEAK REPAIR &
SMALL ROOF JOBS
Pressure Washing
423-903-4701
Roofing Repairs
COLD OR HOT Up to 250
degrees, Rust, Battery acid, Fertilizer Stain Removal, Hydraulic
& Oil Spill Clean-up. Eco Friendly
Licensed & insured. Business
& residential 423-504-9872
Mid-South Roofing & Repairs
30 yrs. experience.
Licensed, Bonded, Insured.
423-593-7124
Toppers Roofing & Repairs
Licensed & Insured. 25 yrs.
experience. 423-605-4485
Sheet Metal
Abbott Press-Wash/Painting
3Chem Low Press Wash All Exteriors
3Painting 3Decks 423-314-6970
HUSKEY SHEET METAL
Roofing
Custom metal work of all types.
Stainless Steel is our speciality.
No job too small. 423-629-6826
Sheetrock
Lowest Prices All Work Guaranteed
Int/Ext painting & restorations.
Press wash, paint decks, roof,
carpentry. Ins. 423-314-6970
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
PAINTING & STAINING. Lic.
& Ins. Free estimates. Call
CMI Enterprises 423-605-6381
706-861-6404, 423-593-2191
H & H Inc. Lic., Bonded & Ins.
24 yrs. exp. BBB Rating A+
Call David 423-227-0176
JOLLY PAINTING
Finest of all Topsoil
A-1 ROOFING
Quality home repairs low rates.
Master Plumber. 423-785-7430
Pressure Wash -specialize in
Vinyl siding. Driveways from
$99. Repair, Painting, Deck Stain.
Int/Ext. Decks, Fences, Comm.
Lic/Ins. Free Est. 423-698-1831
Top Soil
SCENIC CITY
Master Plumber. Sewer Jetting.
Great Rates. Bonded,
Lic & Ins. Matthew 423-509-4523
HAULING brush, trash, furniture, etc. Cleaning of attics,
garages, etc. 423-899-4850
House Leveling
Call J&R Construction
Licensed/Bonded/Insured
Residential/Commercial Repairs
Free Estimate - Senior Discounts
Roofing
423-505-8071
423-505-8071
DECK BUILDERS pool/spa
decks, Screened porches,
fences, 30 yrs. professional exp.
Lic./ Ins. Free Est. 629-8055
DRIVEWAYS, DEMOLITION ,
Bulldozing
% ANDY OnCall %
Est. 1993 Small jobs,
Home repairs & Maintenance
PLicensed & Fully InsuredP
Free Estimates! 423-624-9800
Decks
C.P. ELECTRIC
HANDYMAN CONNECTION
Licensed H Bonded H Insured
All work guaranteed.
HARDWOOD FLOORS
TWO LADIES AND A VACUUM
Res/Comm. 423-827-4622
[email protected]
COMPLETE CONCRETE
Autos/Trucks Wanted
Home Improvement
Remodeling
Place your ad today 423.757.6679
EXPERT ROOFING
Call us first! Discount Coupon
with this ad. We do all roofs &
leak repairs. 40 yrs exp. Super
low rates. 423-355-6214
TENNESSEE ROOFING
GAF Master Ellite Applicators
Full Insured/ Warrantied
All types roofs
Metal, Shingle & Flat
Residential & Commercial
FREE Estimates! 842-8826
Looking for a service provider? Check out our
Local Business Directory above. Look for the,
BBB torch logo, for services trusted
locally. You can find services online too.
visit - pg%k`d\j]i\\gi\jj%Zfd
HANGING & FINISHING
& REPAIRS - Up to 60 mi.
Ceiling Spray, Popcorn,
Knock Down & Slick.
Free Estimates
ABSOLUTELY
AFFORDABLE
Limbs Trimmed & Trees Cut
stump grinding, root ball removal.
Firewood-split, stacked & del.
Best Rates. Free Estimates.
Lic & Ins. 423 320-1513
TRIPLE CROWN
TREE SERVICE
Trimming, Topping & Removal.
Free Estimates. Fully insured.
Senior Citizen & Military Discount
423-499-0134
L H Lewis Tree Service
42 yrs in business. Free Est.
Lic/Ins. W-Comp. 423-843-3593
WATKINS TREE SERVICE
Multiple trees, small or
large jobs. Fully equipped.
Insured. 423-260-0770
A CHRISTIAN TREE &
STUMP SERVICE-Ins. Free
Estimates. 423-544-2602
Treebusters Tree Service
Fully insured, 26 yrs. exp., 80’
bucket truck. 423-503-0949
NORRIS TREE SERVICE,
Inc. Tree work, stump removal
Licensed, insured. 892-7950
Northside Tree Service
Top trim removed. Insured.
Since 1978. 877-0717/843-9020
Wilson Tree Co. Oolt., TN.
Economy slow, bids are low.
Work Comp./Liab. 423-284-9872
Vinyl Siding
423-876-4445
CEILINGS REPAIRED
Textured, Finishing, 30 yrs.
Clay Simmons. 842-7786
Quality work + quality material
= Coffey Construction Co. 20
yrs. experience. 877-7147.
Stump Removal
Waterproofing
AAA STUMP GRINDING
We Fix Water Problems
Best Price - Just Call
423-825-CALL / 825-2255
Wet basements/drainage/crawl
spaces. Lic./Ins. 423-421-0664
F2 • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • • •
timesfreepress.com
GENERAL HELP
WANTED
special CLEveland
open house hiring event!
OPEN HOUSE
HIRING
EVENTS!
Immediate Openings
with on the Spot
Offers!
Earn up to $12.50 an hour!
join us at the cleveland holiday inn!
Integrity Staffing is
NOW HIRING
and looking for
energetic people to fill
picking, packing, and
shipping positions at Amazon.
Monday-Wednesday 11/12/12 11/14/12 from 8am to 5pm at
Holiday Inn Cleveland
4355 Holiday Inn Parkway
Cleveland, TN
(Off exit 27 on I-75 off of Paul
Huff Parkway)
Positions fill quickly, so apply
at our OPEN HOUSE!
Online:
IntegrityTnTimesPress.com
Questions?
Call: 423-414-3185
*Please bring HS
diploma/GED and
identification proving eligibility
to work in the USA when
applying.
MEDICAL
Heritage Healthcare
of Ft. Oglethorpe
Now Hiring
C.N.A. for weekend
7am-7pm & 7pm-7am.
earn up to $12.50 an hour!
Please apply in person at
1067 Battlefield Pkwy
Ft. Oglethorpe GA, 30742
706-861-5154
HOUSEKEEPING /
LAUNDRY
Integrity Staffing is NOW HIRING for Amazon Fulfillment
in Cleveland! Immediate Pick, Pack, Ship & Receive
positions are available at our Open House Hiring Event!
NHC Healthcare,
Ft. Oglethorpe has an
immediate opening for
PT Laundry & PT
housekeeping. Must be able
to work every other
weekend. Apply in person at:
2403 Battlefield Parkway,.
Ft. Oglethorpe, GA.
attend our SPECIAL hiring event at
Laundry Team Leader
Position available at
The Health Center
at Standifer Place.
Direct supervision of all
laundry employees, while
ensuring all aspects of
laundry procedures are
performed correctly and
efficiently. Apply online at:
www.standiferplace.org
EOE
The cleveland Holiday inn
Monday, Nov 12-WEDnesday, Nov. 14, 8am - 5pm
MDS / CARE PLAN
COORDINATOR
4355 Holiday Inn Parkway Cleveland, TN 37312
Skilled Nursing Facility is
seeking a RN to serve as
MDS Coordinator. Minimum
of two years experience in a
long term care setting.
Position is Monday-Friday.
Must be computer literate
and detail oriented. Very
Competitive salary and
benefits, Please apply in
person at:
2403 Battlefield Parkway,
Ft. Oglethorpe, GA
EOE
Can’t Make it in? Apply online!
Questions? (423) 414-3185
On-The-SPOT
JOB OFFERS!
35150430
Looking for a rewarding
career working with seniors?
Please bring proof of HS diploma/GED & identification proving ability to work in USA when applying. (We Can Help)
CEMETERY LOTS
BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITY
HIXSON-Hamilton Memorial
Gardens, 2 lots side by side
Garden of Everlasting Life
$3500/Both I Will Pay
Closing Cost, 423-332-1938
LODGE NOTICES
LOOKOUT VALLEY LODGE
#673- Will have an EA
Degree. On Tues. Nov. 13th
Eat @ 6:00 pm. Work To Follow.
Jared Hubbard , WM
LOST & FOUND
Lost Jack Russell Terrier, White
w/ brown spots, close to
Sequoia school, 423-843-0741
lost skeleton type house key,
Oct. 25th, at walmart / audi’s
Fort O, reward $50 894-7727
TICKETS
I NEED SEC
Championship Tickets
Please Call 423-802-2644
I NEED SEC Championship
Game tickets. Call
423-760-0717.
MONEY TO LOAN
Newspaper Carrier
KIMBALL Area
Be done with work before
most people start their day.
Home delivery routes
available.
Earn $900 to $1100/month
Earning potential varies by
route size and area
Be your own boss! Grow your
own business through sales
contests and satisfied
customers
Perfect opportunity for everyone! Seniors, homemakers,
students and people with
"regular" jobs
Qualifications:
Must be able to work 7 days
a week, approximately
3 a.m. to 6 a.m.
Must be at least 18 years old
Must have a valid driver's
license and proof of vehicle
liability insurance
Must have reliable
transportation
Must provide a trained
substitute if you're unable to
report to work
Find out why more and more
families and adults agree that
delivering the Chattanooga
Times Free Press suits their
extra income needs.
Call Larry today for the area
you are interested in!
423-584-9765
FIRST LOAN FREE!
$100 - $800
Call for details - 622-3776
BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITY
Newspaper Carrier
KIMBALL / JASPER TN.
Area
Be done with work before
most people start their day.
Home delivery routes
available.
Earn $900 to $1100/month
Earning potential varies by
route size and area
Be your own boss! Grow your
own business through sales
contests and satisfied
customers
Perfect opportunity for everyone! Seniors, homemakers,
students and people with
"regular" jobs
Qualifications:
Must be able to work 7 days
a week, approximately
3 a.m. to 6 a.m.
Must be at least 18 years old
Must have a valid driver's
license and proof of vehicle
liability insurance
Must have reliable
transportation
Must provide a trained
substitute if you're unable to
report to work
Find out why more and more
families and adults agree that
delivering the Chattanooga
Times Free Press suits their
extra income needs.
Call Larry today for the area
you are interested in!
423-584-9765
DENTAL LABORATORY
Position for full time Model
Worker available in a high
quality dental lab. Experience
required. Competitive salary with
benefits. Must have valid drivers
license and car for occasional
case delivery/pickup. Time
& mileage reimbursed. Drug free,
smoke free environment. Please
call 423-468-4819
EDUCATION &
TRAINING
Assistant Teacher
Needed Full-time
for Primrose School of Hixson.
High School Diploma req.
Must pass background
check. Apply in person at:
1985 Northpoint Blvd.,
Hixson, TN
EMPLOYMENT INFO
GOVERNMENT
WILDLIFE JOBS!!
HIGH PAYING POSTAL JOBS!
Don’t pay for information about
jobs with the Postal Service or
federal government. Call the
Federal Trade Commission
toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP, or
visit www.ftc.gov to learn
more. A public service announcement from the Chattanooga Times/Free Press and
the FTC.
GENERAL HELP
WANTED
Accepting applications for
employment. Soot Busters
Chimney Services. Call for
details: 423-855-5558
Must have valid driver’s license.
CLERICAL/
SECRETARIAL
DISPATCHER needed for growing heat & air conditioning company in Ooltewah. Computer
knowledge and good phone skills
a must. Experience preferred but
can train the right person. Pay
based on experience. Resumes
to: [email protected] or
fax to 423-910-0499
DENTAL
PERSONNEL
Newspaper Carrier
RINGGOLD(only) Area
Be done with work before
most people start their day.
Home delivery routes
available.
Earn $900 to $1100/month
Earning potential varies by
route size and area
Be your own boss! Grow your
own business through sales
contests and satisfied
customers
Perfect opportunity for everyone! Seniors, homemakers,
students and people with
"regular" jobs
Qualifications:
Must be able to work 7 days
a week, approximately
3 a.m. to 6 a.m.
Must be at least 18 years old
Must have a valid driver's
license and proof of vehicle
liability insurance
Must have reliable
transportation
Must provide a trained
substitute if you're unable to
report to work
Find out why more and more
families and adults agree that
delivering the Chattanooga
Times Free Press suits their
extra income needs.
Call or email Today!
423-503-7323
[email protected]
Advertising Sales
Assistant
Chattanooga's top media
company and Tennessee's
number one newspaper is
looking for the right person to
fill this important position.
The ideal candidate for this
clerical position will have
excellent verbal and written
communication skills;
possess strong organization
and multi tasking abilities;
thrive in a very fast-paced
deadline driven environment;
be a self-directed self-starter
who desires an entry level
opportunity to advertising
sales.
This is an excellent position
for someone considering a
sales career.
If these qualifications
describe you, email your
resume with cover letter and
income requirements to:
[email protected]
com
An Equal Opportunity
Employer
CARPET TILE INSTALLERS
needed: Must have valid
driver’s license & be willing to
travel nation-wide for a
minimum of 8 weeks at a time.
Starting salary: $26,000 per
year, up to $30,800 after first
year. Health insurance after
one year, solid advancement
opportunities 423-624-9700.
Customer Service
CONSTRUCTION
Full Time
Apply in person at: Express
Loans, 4330 Ringgold Rd.
No phone calls please.
PAINTERS
Looking for Dependable, Honest
& Experienced Painters.
References helpful.
Call 423-870-3615
DRIVERS WANTED. Professional, courteous, neat appearance, clean MVR. All
American Taxi 423-867-6190
GENERAL HELP
WANTED
CNC Operator /
Machinist
* Minimum 3 yrs machining
experience
* MasterCam experience
preferred
* Edit CNC programs (G
code)
* Setup / operate CNC machining and turning centers
* Setup / operate conventional mills and lathes
* Machine parts to blueprint
specifications, use precision
gauges, and work to close
tolerances.
* High school diploma or
equivalent (degree preferred)
Interested candidates should
send a resume with
references to:
RetubeCo Inc.
6024 Ooltewah-Georgetown
Rd., Ooltewah, TN. 37363
(Fax # 423-238-9028)
No phone calls please
Field Service
Technician
Typical Responsibilities:
l Operating retubing
equipment
l Maintaining, trouble
shooting, & repairing
retubing equipment
l Travel & field assignments
required to support onsite
retubing activities.
Skills Required:
l Experience in repairing
pneumatic & hydraulic
equipment
l Background in equipment
maintenance a plus
l High school diploma or
equivalent
* PRN LPN
* FT & PT Resident Assistants
* PRN RECEPTIONIST
Apply online at:
www.morningpointe.com
or come by:
9650 Leyland Dr.,
Ooltewah, TN 37363
423-396-6999. EOE
UNIT CLERK /
RECEPTIONIST
for busy GI lab. Monday thru
Friday day shift with flexible
hours. Great benefit package,
great team! Please contact
423-778-3828 for interview.
Fax resume to Plaza Center
at 423-778-3025
Unit Clerk / Receptionist for
busy GI lab. Monday thru
Friday day shift with flexible
hours. Great benefit
package, great team!
Please contact 423-778-3828
for interview. Fax resume to
Plaza Center at
423-778-3025
Are you
interested
in pursuing a
career in the
medical field?
See the Educational
classification for
more information.
MANAGEMENT
Immediate need!
Industrial Maintenance:
mechanical and electrical;
Hands-on; availability to work
any shift, any day; forklift
and/or welding exp. a plus.
Apply to:
P.O. Box 2492,
Chattanooga TN 37409
MASTER TECH AUTO
MECHANIC - $30 per hr.
Morgan Motor Co., 3506
Brainerd Rd., Chatt., 37411.
423-698-6171
PAINTERS - Experienced
residential Painters needed. Min.
2 yrs. experience. Must fill out
application at: 5627 Main St.
Ooltewah, TN 37363
NO PHONE CALLS
P r i n t e r n e e d e d in Chatt TN
plant. Operate 4-8 color press,
exp w/UV Inks & drying system req Superb hrly wage, xlnt
bnfts + prft sharing.Visit website www.mmcontainer.com
Fwd resume + wage reqmnts
to fax 423-800-0851 or email
[email protected]
m EOE We are a drug free/tobacco free facility.
COUCH & WINGBACK CHAIR,
$225.
Call 423-595-3091.
Couch and 2 Antique Chairs
Shades of Rose Brown Blue
Etc $600 423-892-4501
DEMI-JOHN, Circa 1850
3gallon. $45.
423-240-2068
DINING ROOM-1930, Walnut,
Table w/ pad, 6 chairs, China
cabinet $600 423-309-0355
DINING ROOM SUITE 6 Chairs
& Dining cabinet $400..
Call 423-698-7432.
DRESSER w/ Mirror
75 years old. $150.
423-309-9978
WANTED Silverware, Pocket
watches, Salt and Pepper
Collections. Call 622-2902
WRINGER WASHER Maytag
Large Rollers, Pump. Works
Well $125 423-698-3643.
ART & DECORATIVE
PRINT- Thomas Kincaide Light
of Liberty, canvas, signed,
$550obo. 423-825-1542.
WALL PICTURE Framed
Kirklands Magnolia Gold, 23”x39”
$20. Cash only. 706-937-3085
APPLIANCES
A C Dryers, Washers, Stoves,
Fridges, $75/up. Can deliver.
Guaranteed. 423-760-0123
Apply in person Monday Thursday between 9:00 a.m.
and 3:00 p.m. at:
400 E 11th Street
Chattanooga TN. 37403
Or call Noah Cusick at:
423-757-6650 for more
information
An Equal Opportunity
Employer
GLASS Turtle Ring,
Handmade, $5. Call
423-385-5155.
JEWELRY Everything new!
Pearls Cameos, Jade, High
end costume. $195. 821-0423.
CURIO CABINET, Oak,
5 shelf, Lighted, Good condition
$75. 423-653-0723
JEWELRY Gold Swarovski
Chrystal bracelets, necklaces
$100. 423-304-8808.
Ladies 14k two toned ring with
.78 carat round center brilliant
cut diamond & 8 diamonds
total .12 carat. Appraised at
$4700. Asking $1600 OBO.
920-376-0718
Dining Room Set- 54’’x 42’’, w/
4 mtch chairs, cherry wood
like new, $350, 423-855-9317
RING- 1/2 carat diamond. great
clarity14K gold band. Certified,
Markman’s, $600 774-8714
SEIKO Watch President, Looks
like Rolex, brand new $300, a
steal at $148. 624-8969 #132.
DINING ROOM TABLE & Chairs
Hutch, China cabinet, $350.
423-595-3091
DINING SET, Danish Walnut
Broyhill Table w/ 6 chairs &
China $400. 667-5443
DINING TABLE, NICE Oak
1 leaf, 4 winsor back chairs.
$300 423-314-4817
DINNING ROOM TABLE- D r o p
Leaf w/6 Chairs. $275
423-344-8226
COLLECTIBLES
ENTERAINMENT CABINET,
solid wood, 36” older TV,
$200 for both. 423-838-0392.
Beautiful 45’’ Leg Lamp- Like
in “The Christmas Story Movie
$120 obo 423-365-2588
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER,
Solid Oak, $200,
Call 423-802-1081
CHATT. Yesterday and Today.
Volume 3, 1961. Good cond.
$45. Call 706-866-2687.
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Good condition. $25
423-314-4817
DOLLS- Collectibles PORCELAIN, Many styles. Beautiful,
$300..423-304-8808.
File Cabinet/Desk Combo, Almost New, Cherry Finish $50
Cash Only 423-855-0889
FILE CABINET/ Desk Combo,
Almost New, Cherry Finish
$50 Cash Only 423-855-0889
Holiday Barbies- (16), plus (1)
Millennium, new, still in box
$350 423-344-6352
Fireplace Screen (Brown Wood),
Bombay Co., Fan/Half Circle,
$49, 423-290-9195
Chest FreezerFrigidaire $250/obo
423-298-5847
International First Day Covers,
Honoring Americas Bicentennial, 1976 $40. 706-866-2687.
Full Bed. Naughty Pine Spindle.
Nice! $50
423-800-0364
DRYER- Kenmore,
Late Model, Can Deliver.
$95.00 706-866-4586
GRANDFATHER CLOCKHoward Miller, Solid oak.
$850 706-935-9068
DRYER, Whirlpool Electric,
220v Used works good
$65.423-653-5097
LP COLLECTION -Various
genres, 75 in all, $50.00
423-240-2068
Monopoly 1935 original game
complete $30
423-618-2873
MONOPOLY 50TH Anniversary
edition (1985) $30
423-618-2873
FREEZER upright
Kenmore 10 cubic ft.
$175 423-892-4261
Nutcracker (Holiday Savvy), Silver Finish, Approx 4 Ft Tall,
$80, 423-290-9195
GE Microwave
Large Blk, 900 watt, only $60
423-718-3614
PICTURE-Thomas Kinkade
Forrest Chapel Home interior
$150 706-935-9068
GE Stove - Older model but
very nice/clean works great.
$200 obo. 423-316-2642.
Princess Diana Doll Still In Box
$300
423-994-3289
Records- Trunk Full of Records
and a Record Player, Variety
of Music $100 326-2908
AIR CONDITIONERS for sale!
Dryer/Washer $199. & up will
separ.Also avail. Stoves & Refrigerators. Guaranteed! 706-866-3347
DRYER- Whirlpool, heavy duty,
works perfect. Can deliver.
$85. call 423-635-4237.
I PICKUP UNWANTED Refrigerators, Freezers, Washer,
Dryers,Stoves.FREE 584-0401
Kenmore Dishwasher- Off
White, Very Good, Cond. $125
423-362-1313
Roekenbok table with LOTS of
accessories must see! call
423-598-1367 $300.OBO
REFRIGERATOR Roper
Good condition. $250.
423-624-4710
SANDI CAST Malamute #367,
$20 Cash only. Call
706-937-3085.
STOVE- 30”, Electric, Nice &
Clean! Can Deliver.
$135.00 706-866-4586
SNOW VILLAGE “Paramount
Theatre” $125. cash only.
706-937-3085
STOVE, Black, Flat top, Self
cleaning, Electric,Excel condi
$200. 423-521-7225
STEP ON 1 Cent scale, wate &
fate. 1950’s $125. Call for
info. 706-866-2687.
Vogue Hug- A-bye Doll- 1978,
original un-open box $25
423-618-2873
STOVE, Magic Chef, like new
Perfect cond. Will guarantee.
$175. Call 706-866-9117.
TRASH COMPACTOR,
New $35.
Call 423-698-7432.
Year Book 1980 Robert
Kennedy Iowa $200
706-965-3252
HUTCHES, 2 Ethan Allen, Solid
pine 77”hX15”dX40”w & 32”w
$300. will separ. 423-802-6734
Iron Bed Frame- Queen Size,
BLk, 2 yrs old, paid $550,
asking $175, 706-639-3355
J Raymon Collection Love
Seat Flower Design, $70
423-499-8497
King Bed, Solid Wood
and Brass $95
423-877-4179
LAMPS, (2) Large,
$125 for both. Call
423-260-1264.
Leather Bed
Spread/Comforter, King-size,
$400, 423.802.9130
LIVING ROOM SUITE,
White wicker, 4 pieces
$250. 423-875-6617
L I V I N G R O O M S U I T E , sofa,
loveseat, rocking chair, $250.
like new. Call 423-208-2964.
MATTRESS A1 Queen Pillowtop
Set. NEW in plastic. Coil matt.
$149. Can deliver. 423-400-6233
MATTRESS A 3-Piece Brand New
KING PILLOWTOP. Sacrifice
$189. 423-400-6233. Can deliver
MATTRESS AAA NEW QUEEN
ORTHOPEDIC Set. $139.
Never opened. 423-400-6233
MATTRESS A + Mattress Sets
all sizes. Can deliver $100 &
Up!!. Nice sets. 304-5807
WANTED DEAD OR ALIVE
Washer, Dryer, Fridge, Stoves
Cash Reward! 423-580-2031
COMPUTERS
WASHER/DRYER, Sears Premium Plus Series, like new
set, white, $675. 479-4799.
(7) Christmas Wreaths 20 in.
W/ red ribbon, & ornaments
All $25 423-238-9748
Mattress Full Double
$25
423-677-5443
Washer/Dryer, frontload, Samsung, 1.5 yrs old, pedestals.
$1,000 for pair. 423 475 6078
Bike, Girls, Huffy,
Like New! Asking $45,
423-238-9748
WASHER & DRYER, Whirlpool
Works good $100. for both
706-891-9408 /423-242-5136
DELL P-4 Desk Top. Complete,
XP Pro, Internet Ready. 30 day
Warranty! $125. 423-473-2767
NEW Hammary Lift-Top Coffee
Table w/2 End Tables Primo
Oak Reg $1200 Sell 4 $700
775-1821
WASHER- Kenmore,
Can Deliver.
$145.00 706-866-4586
HP Photosmart c6150 All-inone printer,copier,etc.
$45 OBO 706-965-7008
WASHER - Whirlpool, works
perfect, guaranteed, can deliver. $125. 423-635-4237.
LAPTOP , Dell Latitude CPI, Microsoft Wind XP Version $135
cash. 423-855-0889.
Whirlpool Side By Side Fridge
Parts Only! shelves, bins,
drawers, $100obo 423-260-7504
LAPTOP, Dell Latitude CPI,
Microsoft Wind XP Version
$135 cash. 423-855-0889.
BABY ITEMS
BABY BED, Solid wood, Brand
new mattress w/ bumper
guards $175. 423-521-7225
CRIB Childcraft Sleigh bed,w/
mattress.No scratches.
Exc. condi. $75. 423-842-5843
WOOD CRIB W/MATTRESS
Drop side Excellent shape
$50/OBO 423-280-3992
BICYCLES
BIKE , AMF beautiful, 26” cherry
red, 32 yrs old. completely restored. 1st $75 firm. 355-1880.
Scooter-Razor Pocket Mod,
pink, needs battery, $75.
706-965-8469
BUILDING
MATERIAL
Laser Printer Color.
Brother HL 4040 - CDN.
$100. Call 423-355-0311
PRINTER HP Deskjet 990
Proseries color double sided
$35 b.o. 706-965-7008
PRINTER HP Deskjet6122
color with 2 sided printing.
$35 OBO 706-965-7008
Toshiba Laptop- Mdl #L775D,
17.5’’ LED screen, 6 GB MEM.
New, $300 423-356-8806
BUSHHOG, 5 ft. 60 hp
gear box, $450. Call
423-598-1414.
Two Horse Factory Trailer
Good Cond. $1500
423-645-9323 or 706-539-2658
[email protected]<NFF;&=L<C
BRICK PAVER Solid, Red,
3.5x9”, from1920’s homes.
$.65 240-0153 can deliver
Door, entry, steel, 32", white, in
casing, with hinges and
threshold, $65, 892-5775
House Windows- (2) 37x63,
(2) 37x37, New
$300 will separate 423-624-4710
Kitchen Countertop, white tile,
L-shaped, w/sink & faucet, very
good cond. $185. 423-892-2192
FIREWOOD- Split Hardwood.
WHILE IT LASTS!
$45.00/rick. 423-313-2323
FURNITURE
ADJUSTABLE BED- Extra Long
Twin. Mattress. Headboard.
Linens. $1500 842-2610
Armoire w/ 32in TV , one year
old, $500 b.o.
call: 423-313-7032
Banquet Table- 8’ good for yard
sale, picnics ect. Legs fold.
$20. 423-842-0092
Bar Stool, From Storehouse
Co., Wood Frame w/ Celery
Green Cloth, $49, 290-9195
BED headboard bookcase expandable and rocking chair
exc $100 423-227-0080
Bed Rm Suite- Queen Size,w/
dresser, mirror, chest included
$275 706-820-9308
POLE BARN - 24x36, 10’ ceiling,
6x6 treated posts,Wood trusses.
Metal roof. Installed. $4000.
Other sizes avail. 423-595-2079
POWER POLE Temporary 100
amp w/ receptacle $125.
423-658-6580/ 834-6364
SAW MILL CUT PINE
1” & 2” $500 A THOUSAND
423-313-2323
s l i d e g l a s s d o o r s/14'hand
rail,[email protected]
plate$125.obo 423-842-1118
MATTRESS & BOX SPRINGS
king Very nice!cost $800 take
$100423-580-9483
Oak Cupboard
Glass Doors, $100
423-760-0239
OAK DESK
GOOD COND. $40
423-315-9510
Oak Pedestal Table
w/ hutch $400
423-718-3614
Oak Roll Top Desk
$225
423-718-3614
Ottoman - Contemporary style,
microfiber, like new, $65
423-892-4261
RECLINER La-Z--Boy
Burgundy Paid $750. $150.
423-332-9396.
Rocker Early American- Swivel,
good cond., $50
423-322-2530
Round Glass Top Dinette Table
w/four chairs w/scalloped edge
like new, $300 423-693-4233
Sofa & Chair, like new!
bauhaus, neutral, (4) pillows
$700 b.o. 423-488-9996
Sofa & Chair, like new!
bauhaus, neutral, (4) pillows
$700 b.o. 423-488-9996
SOFA & CHAIRS, 2
Queen Anne, mauve,
$325.706-866-0993.
Sofa- cherry wood trim, carved
legs 7ft. long, $800
423-479-4799
Sofa, Love Seat 2 Chairs &
$250. Must see to
appreciate. 423-892-8189
BATHROOM SINK Pedestal
style Glacier Bay $50.
423-867-7010/ 394-1154
You Can Too!
Evening part time hours are
available; up to 25 hours per
week. Applicants must:
Have excellent
communication skills.
A dependable vehicle
with a good driving
record and insurance.
Be willing to learn a
proven sales method.
COINS-JEWELRY
Hallmark Keepsake Ornaments
In original boxes, (30) for $30
423-336-1249
COUNTER TOPS 14 FT. White
w/ gold flakes Good shape
$3 5. 423-505-2302
HIRING NOW
HVAC Hook Up / Installers
needed. Tools & exp.
required. Fax resume:
706-820-1109 or
call: 423-265-8144
UNIFORMS, medium and large,
good cond. $40 for all or will
sep. 423-629-0404.
SALES AGENTS
Outside Sales
Our Top Sales Representatives average over $450.00
per week!!
Full-Time Positions up to 40
hours a week. Starting pay is
$7.75. Benefits include paid
vacation and insurance.
Please bring Social Security
Card and Driver’s License.
DRUG TEST IS REQUIRED!
Bed Frame, Antique Mahogany
full size, $100, needs refinishing, call 423-892-9335
CEMENT MIXER. Portable,
Gas Great shape Asking
$395. 423-894-4420
Be a part of our
Kiosk Sales
Team
Mr. Zip Store #537
1905 Gunbarrel Rd.,
from 10-2
FURNITURE
BATHROOM VANITY w/Sink &
Mirror. 48X21” New in box.
$150.423-867-7010/ 394-1154
6024 Georgetown Rd.
Ooltewah, TN. 37363
Fax # 423-238-9028
No phone calls please
Mr. Zip will be conducting
interviews Wednesday,
November 14th at the
following locations:
CLOTHING
Assistant Manager
Assistant Manager position for
Chickamauga, Georgia
grocery store. Experience
preferred. Apply in person at any
Shop-Rite location between
the hours of 8AM and 5PM.
Refer all applications to
Wayne McDonough. An Equal
Opportunity Employer
Send a resume with
references to:
RETUBECO Inc.
ANTIQUES
BEDROOM- A Queen/Full.
Very nice 5 piece set. NEW!
Still in boxes. Sacrifice. $399.
423-400-6233 Can Deliver.
BEDROOM-A Ralph Lauren-like
6 piece Cherry Sleigh set. Brand
new in box. List $2500. Must sell
$895. 423-400-6233. Can deliver
Bedroom set- twin size, basset,
solid oak, mattress & box
springs , $475, 423-479-5887
Bedroom Set- 1938 Hard Rock
Maple Jenny Lind 3 Piece Good
Cond $900/obo 706-866-8561
BEDROOM SUITE,
Ivory color, 5 pcs. $450.
Call 423-260-1264.
SOFA SLEEPER,
real good cond. $100.
Call 423-580-9483.
SOFA TABLE Mahogany
45”lX16”wX27”h $150.
706-820-2200
Table 6 Chairs All Wood, Bear
Claw Feet. Extra Leaf. $75
423-332-9396
TABLE KITCHEN, wood, oval
with 4 chairs, $65,00. CALL
706-820-0502.
TABLE (w/3 leafs) 6 Rush Seat
Chairs ( 2 captain style) Solid
Maple $275. 423-802-6734
THEODORE ALEXANDER
PIECES - $600/will negotiate.
423-280-7886
Triple Dresser. Pecan Finish.
W/ 9 Drawers. $150 Cash
Only! 423-855-0889
TRIPLE DRESSER. Pecan
Finish. W/ 9 Drawers. $150
Cash Only! 423-855-0889
TWIN BED,
4 Piece, Asking $85
423-486-7397
Twin Bed & Mattress Set
Fully Equipped Good Cond. $60
423-855-8664
Wing Back Chairs (2)
Nice, $90
423-362-1313
FURNACES/
FIREPLACES
FIREPLACE INSERT- 40”x
34”x 21”, logs & glass doors,
LP, Vented, $275, 240.0153
Fireplace insert/wood stove
35/20/27 in doors, screen, &
blower $350 423-309-2962
FIREWOOD.
$50 a rick. Delivered.
Call 423- 544-2602.
STORM WINDOWS- 20 total
New, will sep. Sacrifice
$800, 423-356-8806
BEDS, King size mattress and
box springs, commercial
grade, clean $149. Pictures
new & used $10-$30. Call
Hampton Inn, 423-265-0077.
FIREWOOD
Hardwood $65
706-539-2658 or 423-645-9323
Vanity Top- 36” w/ faucet &
matching toilet, $125
706-866-3918
Book Case
3 shelves, wht, $25
423-499-8497
HEATER, Kerosene, By KeroSun, New cond. Works great.
$85. 423-877-4179.
Previous marketing / sales
experience required. Will have
office responsibilities.
Fax resumes to 866-502-7709
CAMPING
EQUIPMENT
PROPANE HEATER, 4000 btu,
vent free, Thermocaire, just
serviced, $175. 838-0392.
TRUCKING
OPPORTUNITIES
WTB Old Coleman Lanterns &
Stoves CASH PAID will PICK
UP 706-858-8122
CEDAR CHEST 3 Handmade
$600. will separate
423-994-3289
China Cabinet w/dishes,
good cond $150
706-820-9727
Needed: OTR DRIVERS w/
CLOTHING
SALES/MARKETING
SALES
REPRESENTATIVE
min. 2 yrs. exp. Apply in
person: Ash Transport, LLC
86 E. 28th St. Chattanooga, TN
or call: 423-870-9681
ANTIQUES
BED, Double, chest,
dresser, 1920’s, $600.
Call 423-309-0355.
COFFEE TABLE, 3 End tables
French Provincial Very nice
$225. 423-595-3091.
Large black leather jacket
$50
423-580-9483
Conference Table,
Contemporary, With 5 Chairs,
$300 667-5443
Couch, 2 End Tables,
& Coffee Table, $225
423-313-1353
Couch/Loveseat, beige contemporary, raised magnolia print
great shape. $500. 238-6974.
Tennis Shoes- Size 10, Wilson.
New in box. $20
Call 423-240-2068
COUCH, Maroon w/ recliners on
each end w/ massager &
heater $75. 706-861-4788
COAT - Long Autumn Haze
Mink Coat, Med. $1800.
Apprais. $3500. 423-892-4501.
GIVEAWAYS
FREE HORSE MANURE
Free loading. Great for gardens.
E. Brainerd 423-280-3716
Giveaway
Lrg Beautiful Boston Fern Free
423-892-4953
GOOD THINGS
TO EAT
MISSISSIPPI SWEET POTATOES .36 cents per lb. Call
423-624-6075/ 423- 322-0385.
• • • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • F3
timesfreepress.com
Monty Jim Meddick
35110924
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
MISCELLANEOUS
MISCELLANEOUS
Deer Rifle- British 303, adjustable sights, ex cond w/box &
ammo $275, 423-598-1414
Aloe Vera Plants, Large,
20+ leaves, $30.
423-316-2642.
WEATHER STATION, Lacrosse
Direct, for alerts, temps, forecast. $20. 423-504-6667
LC Smith 12 Gauge Shotgun
Exposed Hammers, $1200obo
423-322-2530
Pistol WW II- P38 CYQ, Nazi
Proofs 9mm, nice $850
423-344-7079
Rifle AR15 S & W M&P 15 MOE
Green Model # 811021
NIB $1250 423-635-4342
Antique Bissell Century
Sweeper, 1920's-30's.
$35/OBO (423) 870-1585
AQUARIUM, 46 gal. bow front,
loads of access. Very nice, all
for $375 cash. 875-4100.
S A A Complete AR-15 Lower,
556 Caliber, $325
423-635-4342
AREA RUG Nice
Neutral gray colors Like new
$30 Call 423-892-4261.
Area Rug Nice Colors
Like New $45
423-892-4261
SHOTGUN, Stevens
311 $275. Call
423-821-7583.
Backgammon Table, Custom
Made, 24X36, Asking $400,
Call 423-802-9130
Smith & Wesson -.38 Cal
Model 10-5 w/ 2’’ barrel and
holster $400 423-344-7079
Bedroom Suite, 4 Pieces,
Mattress & Boxspring, King Size,
$350 Nice! 423-855-8664
SpringField Arms .45 GAP
Pistol 3 Mags, Case, Manual,
150 rds ammo.$635. 309-9666
Winchester High Brass 28 ga
and 20 ga 7.5 and 8 short..40
boxes. 225.00 Call 316-4181
BENCH OUTDOOR - Rocks,
very nice, like new. $50. Call
423-208-2964.
SHOOTING
SUPPLIES
BREAD MACHINE
Regal Kitchen Pro
$40. 423-314-4817
AMMO .357 Sig, Speer 125gr,
GBHP 50rnd box $30
423-635-4342
AMMO- 500 rounds Remmington 180 grain FMJ 40 SW
$175, 423-775-8061
AMMO 7.62 X39 Non corrosive,
Box $4.
423-629-7968
HANDGUN CARRY PERMITCLASSES $50.
Immediate opening, over 300
guns in stock. Fugate’s Firearms. 423-336-2675.
BOOKS, Hardy Boys Set of 34
$75. No Fri. or Sat. calls
please 559-8461
CEILING FANS, three, large,
wooden, like new. $75 Call
423-208-2964.
CHAINSAW Homelite timberman 45 18in bar w/case runs
good $75. 423-653-5097
Chair- pedicure, black and white
with full foot spa. $100 /obo
706-861-1771/ 423-488-2186
China- NoritakeService for 8 ,
pattern flourish, plus serving
pieces $530. 423-304-8808
Christmas Tree- Large Fur Pre
Lit, still in box, cash only, U
load U haul $60 423-877-8941
Hunting Equip - rifle, shotgun,
bow gun, tree stand & clothes.
$500/separate. 423-413-1613
Christmas Tree- brand new,
never used, 7 ft, 1538 tips, reg
$159.99 asking $80,260-1264
TRAIL CAM-Stealth 1540IR
w/Batteries Straps & SD card.
$40. Call 423-504-6667
CHRISTMAS WREATHS 2 Very
large Outdoor $70. will separate Call 423-629-0404.
HEATING/AIR
CONDITIONING
AIR CONDITIONER Recovery
unit For Freon w/ gages &
tank $100.706-866-3918.
HEAT PUMP, Goodman, 2 ton
13 Seer, 2 yrs. old, $295.
Call 423-544-4582.
HOBBIES/TOYS
BASKETBALL GOAL
on base, adjustable, $30
423-486-7397
Electric Scooter
$20 for Child
423-499-8497
TOYS-2 big bags,
assorted, $10
423-486-7397
LAWN/GARDEN
EQUIPMENT
Craftsman riding mower
42in 16.5 hp Automatic,
$250 423-238-6713
Garden Tillers- (2) good cond.
$250 will sep.
256-657-7047
garden tractor john deere,model
jd265, rear tire 23x10.50-12,
$750 b.o. 423-842-0092
Honda Riding Lawn Tractor
18hp, 46’’ deck, hydrostatic,
$1800, 423-479-4799
LAWN MOWER Craftsman
Self propelled. 6hp, 22”cut,
Big wheel $100. 423-622-4441.
LAWN MOWER- Snapper, walk
behind, 36” cut, Kohler engine $1000/obo 423-443-8464.
L A W N M O W E R , Zero Turn,
425, 25 hp, Briggs & Stratton,
4 ft. cut, $3000. 423-344-8679.
MOWER,COMMERICAL
60” ZERO TURN
$2500.Call 423-488-3309
MOWER ENGINE,
Snapper, 8 hp, $50. Call
423-892-5775.
Riding Lawnmower
2004, 42’’ inch cut , $125
423-596-3574
COMFORTER, Queen, Black w/
lavender stripes $35.
Call 423-629-0404.
Conveyer Roller. 10 X 18,
Good Shape, Asking $50
423-774-0493
DEHUMIDIFIER, Frigidaire 50 pint
Energy Star Used only 2 months
Like new $200. 706-820-2200
D O G P E N S , 1 metal 1 fiberglass for medium size dog,
$60 Call 423-227-0080
Dress- Size 12, Blk Velvet, Midi
Length, $10
423-899-8342
ADULT DVD’s XXX- New!
5 for $20 / will separate.
423-645-2295
DVD MOVIES XXX
4 movies $20. Brand new
never opened. 423-355-6600
FIREWOOD- Early Special! Seasoned Hardwd. Truck Load, u
pick up,$50, 314-4037
FIREWOOD. Ooltewah Area
Oak $60 truck load. Delivered.
423-238-6250.
FIREWOOD- Seasoned
Hardwd., Truck Load, Deliv. &
Stacked, $75, 423-314-4037
Free Firewood:
Pickup & Load It,
Please Call: 423-619-9776
Friendly Village 40 piece set
$200
706-935-9068
Heater 220 4 stack
$50
423-332-9396
WOODEN PRINTERS TRAYS
GREAT FOR SHADOW
BOXES 80 COMPT. 40.00
706-858-8122
Wood Privacy Fence
60 ft., New, $125
423-424-6021
WOODWORKER
Cherry log /Stump FREE
Call 706-891-5622.
Word Processor, Brother
WP-3900DS; has 11 CRT
$60/OBO (423) 870-1585
Zebco 33 (3) Stainless Steele
Rod and Reel $120
706-866-8561
MUSICAL
MERCHANDISE
Double Keyboard Electric Organ
$100 obo
423-875-2987
GUITAR- Brand New , Excellent
condition, $120.00
423-624-4710
ORGAN Electric Hammond Upper/lower keyboard Good
Cond $400 423-702-0999
SEWING
MACHINES
25 Ib weights (4)
small center, $95
706-375-8860
AIR HOCKEY TABLE,
used little, full size in great
shape, $75 423-894-2999
BASKETBALL GOAL
Adjustable Good condition,
$40.obo 423-876-0613
Exercise Machine- w/calorie
counter, cost $189.95, for
$75. 423-899-8342
FISHING REEL
SHIMATIO $18.00 cash only
706-937-3085
NORDIC FLEX &
Recumbent Exercise Bike $60.
Will separate 423-875-5119
NordicTrack
EXERCISE MACHINE
$30 423-903-4290
Skeet Shooting Machine W./
Clay Disc $50
706-866-8561
TACKLE BOX 2 tray w/ fishing
items including $25. cash only
706-937-3085
Titleist Golf Stand Bag-w/Drivers and Irons, $75, Blk
423-855-9317
HOBBY HORSE, Very nice,
Exc. Christmas gift. $50.
Call 706-866-0993.
TOTAL GYM 1100,
Like new, Rsell for $100. Call
706-820-0502.
Ice Scoop - 38 oz. solid
Aluminum $5
423-385-5155
TOTAL GYM 1500, like new,
$1400, A steal at $388/offer.
Call 423-624-8969 #132.
KEROSENE HEATER- Dynaglo
23k btu, used, good cond.
$50 423-774-0493
Total Gym by Chuck Norris
like new,
$175 423-987-2482
KITCHEN PRIDE 19pc Cutlery
Set New in box asking $50
423-892-4501
TOTAL GYM XLS, Brand new,
80 exercises, $1900, a steal at
$988/offer. 624-8969 #132.
RIDING MOWER Murray 12hp
38”cut New motor $300.
423-867-7010/ 394-1154
LUGGAGE Large 28” suitcase by
Atlantic Tapestry fabric Rollers
26”lX19”w $25. 706-820-2200
TREADMILL, Pro-Form
Accurate 730, over $500 new,
asking $150. 423-894-2999
RIDING MOWER, Husqvarner
21hp. 46” cut, 2012, new, 3
hrs, $1350. 423-875-9911
Man cave- 3 neon beer signs
and metal signs. All in great
condition. $525. 316-4181
T-shirts , Chatt Mocs Logo (18
Total) Adult & 2 Kids, $95 Will
Sep. 423-877-4179
Wanted. Lesco 0-turn Mower
60in Rider. Running or Not.
423-488-3309
Men’s Dress Shirts (4) Short
Sleeve, 17 1/2 brand new, All
for $25 423-875-4100
WEEDEATER gas powered
troy built $100.00
423-902-0296
MICHE PURSES Genuine
New 3 sizes Bases & shells,
$195. 423-821-0423.
TV/RADIO/STEREO
EQUIPMENT
MACHINERY &
TOOLS
Military Relics. German, Japanese & American World War
I&II Pay top prices. 842-6020
Mirrors, Wall Picts, and Lots of
Misc $150
423-892-8189
METAL WORKING MACHINES.
2 mills, 16” lathe, shaper.
$8000 for all. 423-618-4866.
Motar Mixer
2 bag, 8hp Honda,
$950, 423-322-2530
OXYGEN & ASCETYLENE
Torch, Brand New, 3-Tips,
$100 423-774-0493
PRESSURE WASHER, Ridgid,
3300 PSI 2.8GPM Powered by
Subaru $350. 423-629-9386
SHOP PRESS 40 TON
ASKING $500. OR M.A.O.
PH 865-243-1641
TABLE SAW
$65.
987-9199
PERCOLATOR, 9 cup
stainless GE Reheat / Strength
Control $25 423-698-3643.
PROPANE TANK, 500 gallon,
refurbished, good cond. $500.
Call 423-838-0392.
rocking horse radio flyer sand
box desk 25" tv $125obo
423-842-1118
ROOF MOUNT BASKET YAKIMA
40X42 w/ mounting bracket
$400obo706-861-4525
AMATEUR RADIO, Kenwood,
TS 520, w/speaker & desk
mike $300. 706-820-9727.
Electronics Vacuum 3m
$30
423-987-2482
SOFA, Loveseat & chair covers,
brown, “Surefit” brand, like
new, $60/all cash 875-4100.
GERMAN SHEPHERD Akc Pups
9wks Blk/ tan 2nd Shots &
Wormed $500 423-693-7183
German Shepherds Puppies
AKC, 8mons old female $300,
706-965-5749 or 423-315-0771
GOLDEN RETRIEVER- 6 AKC,
6 Wks, Male, Med Reds, Dark
Blondes $325 423-991-9224
LAB PUPPIES- AKC Beautiful
Reg. 2nd shots & wormed,
Blk &Yellow, 8 wks old on 11/8.
3 Pups Left $300.00 each.
423-785-7055
LHASO APSO Puppies AKC,
Gorgeous! Warranty!
$200. & up Call 423-775-4016
Maltese Puppies
Very Small & Very Cute!
$350 & up. Call 256-495-2569
Miniature Pinscher Pups,
4 M, 3 Female, Pure Bred, 6Wks
Old, $100, Call 413-214-3207
Mini Australian Shepherd
Puppies- Blk/Tri, Just in time for
Christmas, born 10/29/12
$500, 423-715-0606
OLD ENGLISH Bulldog
Puppies. 9 wks Triple Reg.
1st shots, $600. 423-280-6017.
POMERANIANS 8 wks Shots &
wormed CKC reg. Girls $300.
boys $250. 931-319-0000
SIBERIAN HUSKY PUPPIES,
CKC, Standard & Triple coats
$200 to $400 423-463-7114
Thanksgiving Mini Schnauzers
AKC Salt/Pep, Blk/Silver, Blks M/F,
Tails Docked, 1st Shots, Wormed,
$350 423-457-7887
YORKIES Shots/wormed. 6 wks.
CKC Reg. $350/f
$300/m 931-319-0000
Dog Coats & Shirts- sm, med,
Lrg, 10 for $60 or will sep
Call 423-304-3094
Samsung Flip Phone
2 months old, $20
423-596-3574
Dog Crate- 23’’ high, 22’’ wide,
30’’ long, $25
423-855-9317
TV, Color, 14”, bought new
one, asking $10. Call
423-877-3313.
DOG KENNEL- Airline
approved, Large size, like new,
$65 423.240.0153
LIVESTOCK
CASH 4 Diabetic Test Strips
$10 for 50ct, $20 for 100ct
Call Daniel: 423-401-8118
MEDICAL
EQUIPMENT
S T E E L R O D, threaded, 1/4”,
3/8”, 1/2” up to 12’ long. 50-70
cents/ft. Call 423-892-5775.
BEDSIDE COMODE
Nice! $25
423-899-3355.
STORAGE BUILDING Large,
10X14 Cost $6000 Sell $999
You move. 423-693-4233.
BEDSIDE TOILET -by Carex,
NEW, perfect condition.
$40 cash only 706-937-3085
TOP/JACKET- Black velvet, very
dressy, size med. New. $12.
Call 423-899-8342.
GO GO Scooter ‘11- Excellent
Cond., new batt, charger, $550
obo, 423-658-9659
TRAILER, Construction, 16 ft.
Steel frame, dbl axle, wood
sides, $1800. 423-693-4935.
JAZZY 1113,
$200 obo. Call
423-355-1720.
TREADMILL.
ELECTRIC, $65
Call 423-544-4582
JAZZY 600,
new batteries, $200 obo
Call 423-355-1720.
TYPEWRITER, Older, Royal, full
size, works well, new ribbon,
$30. Call 423-698-3643.
POWER WHEELCHAIR
Jazzy Select, Ex Cond.
$450. Call 706-866-3918
VACUUM, Dirt Devil,
new filter, needs work, $25.
Call 423-877-3313.
TRI WALKER, Chrome Folds up
Rubber tires & brakes w/ baskets $60. Call 423-899-3355
WHEELCHAIR
All Most New, $400.
423-855-8664
VANITY, white, brand new, with
stool, 3 mirrors, storage, $90.
Call 423-883-6156 Angela.
Vent ‘a’ Hood/Microwave Combo
Over the stove. $35. Call
423-316-2642.
AMERICAN PIT BULL & American Pit Bull Terrier Mix , No
papers, 6wks old, Several colors,
$150. 256-632-2190 after 2pm
Beagle Mix. 3boys, 1 girl
Free to Good Home 8wks old.
Call: 423-991-2284
WHEELCHAIR Invacare
$50
423-875-5119
WALL MIRROR, Large,
Ornate Gold frame, $45.
Call 423-892-4261.
DACHSHUND CKC
$100. & up
423-847-7853
WANTED- Diabetic Test Strips
1 Touch,Freestyle/Accucheck, up
to $10./per 100.ct 423-774-3994
McBee Angus Sale
140 head
Bulls – Cows - Bred Heifers Sale
12:00 Noon CST – Saturday
Nov. 17, 2012
375 McBee Ranch Lane
Cowan, TN 37318
Tom: (931)308-5175
Trail Horses (2) w/Saddles,
Tack, and Trailer $3000/obo
423-629-5064
FEED/SEED/
PLANTS
WANTED: VINYL RECORD
COLLECTIONS 33’s & 45’s
423-443-1507.
PETS
vs.
Pamela Starr Harvey
TO: PAMELA STARR
HARVEY
In this cause, it appearing
from the Sheriff’s return that
Pamela Starr Harvey, one of
the defendants, is a nonresident of the State, he is,
therefore, hereby ordered to
appear and make defense
within thirty (30) days to the
complaint, or the same will be
taken for confessed as to him
and set for hearing ex parte as
to him.
Within that time, defendant,
Pamela Starr Harvey, is also
required to serve a copy of his
pleadings upon Susan Arnold,
Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is: PO Box 174, Dayton,
TN 37321.
It is further ordered that this
notice be published for four (4)
consecutive weeks in the
Chattanooga Times Free
Press.
This 25th day of October,
2012.
35110922
Hamilton County Purchasing
Department, located at 455
North Highland Park Avenue,
will receive bids before 2:00
PM (ET), on Tuesday, the 4th
day of December, 2012 for the
following construction project:
HVAC Systems Modifications
For McDaniel Building/Wellness Center, Project #12-915.
The project includes but is not
limited to the modification of
existing HVAC systems and installation of new HVAC equipment and systems. The work
shall consist of furnishing all
labor, materials, equipment,
tools, supervision, incidental
and any other items necessary
or convenient to satisfactorily
complete the work.
A Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting
will be held on Tuesday, November 27, 2012 at 10:00 AM
(ET) at the McDaniel Building,
455 N. Highland Park Avenue
Chattanooga, TN.
Bidding documents will be distributed by: Campbell & Associates, Inc. located at 651 East
Fourth Street, Chattanooga,
TN., Suite 600, (423)
267-9718. The bidding documents will be available upon a
non-refundable payment of
$100.00 per set.
MECHANIC’S LIEN
BIRD CAGE Large
Round on Stand $125/obo
423-822-8283
Pyrex Clear Glass 3 qt. Bowl,
w/ handles 10” diam. x 3.25 in
deep, 423-855-0034
Civil Action No. 2012-CV-342
Jesse Dale Harvey
LEGAL NOTICE
GERMAN Wirehaired Pointer
AKC. 4F liver/roan, 2M white/liver
8 wks. old, great hunters. $500.
Call 706-463-2452.
Magnavox TV. 24in. W/ Cassette & DVD. Good Cond.
$100 706-375-8860
Motorola Android with 2 chargers and blue tooth. $100
423-949-4038
Lionel, American Flyer & Other
Old Toy Trains Wanted, Pays
Cash! 423-716-1677
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
DAYTON, TN
By: Lisa McClellan
Deputy Clerk
PET SUPPLIES
WANTED TO BUY
g
Auction who is requesting title
to said vehicle. All parties
holding any legal interest in the
vehicle, contact the person in
possession by certified mail,
return receipt requested within
10 business days of this ad.
2008 Zhan Roadmaster
LBXTGB3A68X080299
Jamie Holloway
Circuit Court Clerk
Galaxy Radio- 99V., side band
am, ex shape, $175
423-472-5767 call before 6PM
RUG
8’ x10’, burgundy, blk and teal
floral, $50. 423-344-5268
SHEET SET, Queen
size, like new, $15.
Call 423-892-4261.
SILVERWARE Legato by Towle,
Sterling silver, full set, used
twice, $1,500. 423-702-5278.
FREE PUG TO A GOOD HOME
W/CRATE INCLD
CALL 423-658-1574
Mike's Golf Shop - We pay
$CASH$ for golf equipment!
Facing 153 near Lee Hwy
423-558-0372
TOTAL GYM XL, weight bench
& weights, $175. Call
423-949-8237.
DRILL & SAW Rechargable w/
battery Great condition
$40obo 821-0423.
FREE: LHASA APSO’S
GROWN FULL BLOODED,
423-775-4016
EXERCISE MACHINE, Arms &
Legs $50. Call 423-624-6075
or 423-322-0385.
HEATER Oil filled Electic
1500w Delonghi $15
Call 423-653-5097.
ORGANIC SKILLET,
Cost $32, sell for $15. Call
423-877-3313.
Found: Lrg friendly Blk male fxd
Dog w/ wht chest & feet, on
Hwy 58 11/1, 423-504-3405
BASKETBALL GOAL, Graphite,
Slam-Dunk, rim, adj pole new in
box, $125. 423-894-2999
Taylor Made Burner- 2.0 irons,
4-PW+GW, super fast reg. all
orgn. nice $265, 423-802-1216
MOVING QUILTS
Set of 6, $25.
423-899-3355.
Found Big Chocolate Lab
must be able to ID.
423-802-9672.
SPORTS
EQUIPMENT
RIDING MOWER, Troybilt, 42”
cut, mint cond. Asking $600.
Call 423-413-9309.
CONVEYOR 15” wide, 55 ft.
Brand new, cost $20,000,
$10,000 obo. 423-362-2518.
Delta Woodlay Model 46700
Stand, Knives, DVD, $250
423-618-8216
DOBERMAN PUPPIES, AKC
Reg. Black & Tan, 11 wks
2 F, $600 423-509-5494
BROTHER NX-450-Q New
Retails $1250.+ many extras
sell $750. Call 423-645-9054
Heater, Edenpure, Infrared, W/
Remote, Asking $150,
Call: 423-842-9336
Monitor Case
by Porta Brace, like new, $100.
423.802.9130
Cavalier King Charles, AKC,
Champion Bloodlines, 4Wks,
(4) Tri-Colored (2) Blenheim
$975, 727-244-4283
Record Albums, Around 200
Total, Good Shape,
$200 for all, 423-313-7032
LAMP w/ vase & greenery &
pictures for Living Room
all $45 423-892-4261
Cat Reman Engine w/winch
D6C Serial #NK8615 95% under carr., New $17k 240-4696
BORDER COLLIE Pups, ABCA
Excel.stock dogs & pets $250/$350
931-939-2426/ 931-607-2426
O R G A N w/ Bench Hammond
Great for small Church or
Home $150 423-903-4290
Piano
Krakaure,
$350 423-825-1542.
LEGAL NOTICES
PETS
HAY- 4x5 Round Bails, Good
Hay, Outside $25 Out of Barn
$30 Lots & Lots 423-658-7489
423-240-3181
HAY FOR SALE- 4 x 4 round
bales fescue and orchard
grass $15. call 423-413-8026
LEGAL NOTICES
INTENT TO TITLE VEHICLE
The following vehicle located
at 2120 Stein Drive Chattanooga, TN 37421 is in the possession of Chattanooga Auto
Gant Automotive, 1724 Dayton
Blvd.,Chatt,TN 37405,
423-875-9915, will sell at auction on November 18, 2012 at
5 pm for towing & storage:
1988 Chevy S10
Owner: Farrell Farris
VIN 1GCBS14E4J2235618
2005 Ford Escape
Owner: Samuel Alhakeem
VIN 1FMYU03175DA12962
1985 Toyota Camry
Owner: Fred Brown
VIN JT2SV12E2F0275203
.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
STATE OF TENNESSEE,
HAMILTON COUNTY
WHEREAS, Bettye I Selby
A/K/A Bettye J Irvine, G.
Wayne Selby, and Rubye G.
Irvine e x e c u t e d a D e e d o f
Trust to AmSouth Bank,
Lender and FMLS, INC.,
Trustee(s), which was dated
December 1, 2004 and recorded on December 27, 2004
in Book GI 7381 at Page 533,
Hamilton County, Tennessee
Register of Deeds.
WHEREAS, default having
been made in the payment of
the debt(s) and obligation(s)
thereby secured by the said
Deed of Trust and the current
holder of said Deed of Trust,
E*Trade Bank, (the "Holder"),
appointed the undersigned,
Brock & Scott, PLLC, as Substitute Trustee, by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of
Hamilton County, Tennessee,
with all the rights, powers and
privileges of the original
Trustee named in said Deed of
Trust; and
NOW, THEREFORE, notice
is hereby given that the entire
indebtedness has been declared due and payable as provided in said Deed of Trust by
the Holder, and that as agent
for the undersigned, Brock &
Scott, PLLC, Substitute
Trustee, by virtue of the power
and authority vested in it, will
o n December 11, 2012, at
12:00PM a t t h e u s u a l a n d
customary location at the
Hamilton County Courthouse,
Chattanooga, Tennessee, proceed to sell at public outcry to
the highest and best bidder for
cash, the following described
property situated in Hamilton
County, Tennessee, to wit:
In the City of Chattanooga,
Hamilton County, Tennessee:
Lot Ninety-two (92), Murray
Hills Subdivision, Sixth Addition, as shown by plat recorded in Plat book 22, page
42, of the Register's Office of
Hamilton County, Tennessee. According to said plat
said Lot fronts 95 feet on the
east line of Tarpon Trail and
extends back eastwardly
between parallel lines to the
east line of said Lot, its north
line being 147.7 feet and its
south line being 148 feet in
length.
Being the same property
conveyed to Rubye G. Irvine
and Bettye J Irvine by Deed
from Ernest C. McBride and
wife Rosemary McBride,
dated February 7, 1975, recorded February 18, 1975, of
record in Book 2221, page
410, Register's Office for
Hamilton County, Tennessee. Betty J. Irvine is now
known as Betty J. Selby.
Parcel ID Number:129AH040
Address/Description: 4709
Tarpon Trail, Chattanooga,
TN 37416.
Current Owner(s): Rubye G
Irvine and Bettye J Irvine. Betty
J. Irvine now known as Betty J.
Selby
Other Interested Party(ies): .
The sale of the property described above shall be subject
35110923
LEGAL NOTICES
j
to all matters shown on any recorded plat; any and all liens
against said property for unpaid property taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements
or set-back lines that may be
applicable; any prior liens or
encumbrances as well as any
priority created by a fixture filing; a deed of trust; and any
matter than an accurate survey of the premises might disclose; and
All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower
are expressly waived in said
Deed of Trust, and the title is
believed to be good, but the
undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee.
The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place
certain without further publication, upon announcement at
the time and place for the sale
set forth above.
This office is attempting to
collect a debt. Any information
obtained will be used for that
purpose.
Brock & Scott, PLLC,
Substitute Trustee
c/o Tennessee Foreclosure
Department
3326 Aspen Grove Drive,
Suite 400
Franklin TN, 37067
PH: 888-251-0331
FX: 615-771-5895
File No.: 12-23152
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE'S SALE
WHEREAS, by Deed of Trust
recorded on December 27,
2000, in Book 5744, Page 828,
in the Register's Office of
Hamilton County, Tennessee
(the "Register's Office"), as
modified by Modification and
Extension of Deed of Trust recorded on January 30, 2003, in
Book 6526, Page 680, and
amended by Amendment to
Deed of Trust for the Addition
of Collateral and the Modification of Terms recorded on February 11, 2005, in Book 7426,
Page 885, and further modified by Modification and Extension of Deed of Trust recorded
on September 13, 2007, in
Book 8467, Page 588, as affected by Partial Release recorded on September 24, 2008
in Book 8765, Page 989, all recorded in the Register's Office
(collectively, as modified,
amended and extended, the
"Deed of Trust"), Janice M.
Casteel (the "Borrower"), conveyed to Fred T. Hanzelik,
Trustee for the benefit of
Northwest Georgia Bank
("Lender"), the property therein
described (the "Property"), to
secure payment of a Promissory Note dated December 13,
2000, executed by the Borrower to the order of the
Lender, in the original principal
amount of Thirty Thousand
Seven Hundred Ninety-Five
and 20/100 Dollars
($30,795.20), which Promissory Note was amended to increase the principal indebtedness to One Hundred
Seventy-Four Thousand Two
Hundred Two and 23/100
($174,202.23), and was further
amended to increase the indebtedness to Two Hundred
Forty-Five Thousand Seven
Hundred Ninety-Six and 33/100
Dollars ($245,796.33) (collectively, as modified, extended
and amended the "Note").
Lender remains the holder of
the Note.
WHEREAS, Bruce C. Bailey,
was appointed successor Substitute Trustee under the terms
of the Appointment of Substitute Trustee executed by
Lender on October 16, 2012,
and recorded on October 17,
2012, in Book 9774, Page 452,
in the Register's Office of
Hamilton County, Tennessee
("Register's Office"), with all the
rights, powers and privileges of
CDL DRIVERS WANTED!!!!
• Immediate Placement
• Home every night
• Top wages paid
• Overtime Opportunities
• Class A or B CDL req.
Minimum 1 yr. experience
in tri-axle dump truck.
Asphalt hauling experience
a plus.
Apply in person at:
GIBCO TRUCKING AND CONSTRUCTION
241 Industrial Way SW • Cleveland, TN 37311
(423) 476-7905
Gibco Construction is an Equal Opportunity Employer
35115853
GUNS
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
g
g
the original Trustee named in
the Deed of Trust; and
WHEREAS, default having
been made in the payment of
the Note, which remains unpaid and secured by the Deed
of Trust and in the performance of covenants contained
in the Deed of Trust to which
reference is made for recital of
terms and conditions, and
wherefore Lender, the lawful
owner and holder of the Note
and Deed of Trust, has declared the entire balance
thereon due and payable;
NOW, THEREFORE,
pursuant to the authority
vested in me as Substitute
Trustee, I shall, at the request
of the owner and holder of the
Note, at 10:00 o'clock a.m.
EST on November 20, 2012,
offer for sale at public outcry to
the highest and best bidder for
cash, at the West door of the
Hamilton County Courthouse,
Chattanooga, Tennessee in
bar of all statutory and
common law equities of
redemption, dower and
homestead and all other rights
and exemptions of every kind,
the real estate located at 2628
Broad Street, Chattanooga,
Hamilton County, Tennessee
which is more particularly
described in the Deed to
Borrower recorded in Book
6856, Page 209, in the
Register's Office and in the
Deed of Trust.
SUBJECT TO: (a) Notice of
State Tax Lien in favor of
Tennessee Department of
Revenue against Janice M.
Casteel filed February 13, 2012
in Book 9573, Page 296 in the
Register's Office;
(b) Rights, reservations,
restrictions, limitations,
easements, conditions and
stipulations as set out in
instrument recorded on in
Book 918, Page 410, in the
Register's Office; (c) Lease
as set out in instrument
recorded in Book 3875, Page
395, in the Register's Office;
(d) Lease as set out in
instrument recorded in Book
4712, Page 919, in the
Register's Office; (e) Lease
as set out in instrument
recorded in Book 4912, Page
214, in the Register's Office;
(f) Lease as set out in
instrument recorded in Book
5094, Page 33 in the
Register's Office; (g) Lease
as set out in Instrument
recorded in Book 5094, Page
34, in the Register's Office.
County taxes of the years
2011, 2010, 2009 and 2008 are
delinquent and now due and
payable: $2,783.00 (2011);
$2,997.15 (2010); $3,425.89
(2009); and $4,217.93 (2008)
plus penalty and interest.
City taxes for the 2011, 2010,
2009 and 2008 are delinquent
and now due and payable:
$2,013.047 (2011); $2,103.04
(2010); $2,405.45 (2009); and
$2,617.53 (2008) plus penalty
and interest.
City Storm Water taxes for
the years 2011 and 2010 are
delinquent and now due and
payable: $192.00 (2011); and
$174.00 (2010).
City and County taxes for
2012 are a lien, now due and
payable.
Tax Map No. 155C-B-018
The sale will be made
subject to all prior liens,
easements, covenants,
conditions, encumbrances, and
restrictions that may exist,
including, without limitation,
any unpaid ad valorem taxes or
other taxes, and also subject to
any right to redemption that
may otherwise exist.
The Trustee makes no
covenant of warranty or
seizing, but will sell and convey
as Substitute Trustee only.
The sale will be made for the
purpose of paying the
indebtedness secured by the
Deed of Trust and the
proceeds thereof will be
applied as provided by the
terms of the Deed of Trust.
Lender as the holder of the
Note has the right to bid,
including credit bid, at the
foreclosure sale.
Other parties interested
entitled to notice pursuant to
Tenn. Code Ann. §35-5-104(d)
are:
Tennessee Department of
Revenue
First Tennessee Bank National
Association
Advanced Photographic
Solutions, LLC
Juanita Barbee
This 19th day of October,
2012.
Bruce C. Bailey,
Substitute Trustee
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S
SALE
WHEREAS, by Deed of Trust
recorded on January 2, 2002,
in Book 6103, Page 843, in the
Register's Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee (the
"Register's Office"), as modified by Modification and Extension of Deed of Trust recorded
on January 23, 2007, in Book
8217, Page 987, (collectively,
as modified, amended and extended, the "Deed of Trust"),
Janice M. Casteel (the "Borrower"), conveyed to Bruce C.
Bailey, Trustee for the benefit
of Northwest Georgia Bank
("Lender"), the property therein
described (the "Property"), to
secure payment of a Promissory Note dated December 27,
2001, executed by the Borrower to the order of the
Lender, in the original principal
amount of Ninety Nine Thousand Two Hundred Three and
28/100 Dollars ($99,203.28),
(as modified, extended and
amended, the "Note"). Lender
remains the holder of the Note.
WHEREAS, default having
been made in the payment of
the Note, which remains unpaid and secured by the Deed
of Trust and in the performance of covenants contained
in the Deed of Trust to which
reference is made for recital of
terms and conditions, and
wherefore Lender, the lawful
owner and holder of the Note
and Deed of Trust, has declared the entire balance
thereon due and payable;
NOW, THEREFORE, pursu-
F4 • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • • •
Money Wanted
EMPLOYMENT
Administration
Accounting/Bookkeeping
Banking/Finance
Beauty
Computer Personnel
Clerical/Secretarial
Construction
Data Processing
Dental Personnel
Domestic Help
Educational
Employment Services
Employment Information
Engineering/Chemists
General Help Wanted
Insurance
Industrial Trades
Legal Personnel
Medical
Management
Manufacturing
Motel/Hotel
Musical Opportunities
Part-Time
Private Lessons
Professional
Retail
Restaurant/Food Service
Sales/Agents
Sales/Marketing
Technical
Trucking Opportunities
MERCHANDISE
Antiques
Art & Decorative
Appliances
Baby Items
Bicycles
Building Material
Camping Equipment
Clothing
Coins/Jewelry
Collectibles
Computers
Crafts
Estate Sales
Farm Equipment
Flea Markets
Fuel
Furniture
Furnaces/Fireplaces/Heaters
Giveaways
Garage Sales
Good Things to Eat
Guns
Shooting Supplies/Services
Heating/Air Conditioning
Hobbies/Toys
Lawn/Garden Equipment
Machinery & Tools
Medical Equipment
Miscellaneous for Sale
Music Lessons
Musical Merchandise
Musical Opportunities
Nurseries
Paint & Supplies
Photo Equipment
Pools/Spas
Portable Buildings
Rental Equipment
Restaurant Equipment
Sewing Machines
Steel*
Sports Equipment*
Business Equipment*
Storm Doors/Windows*
Tele Systems & Equipment*
Electronics*
Video/Computer Games*
PETS & SUPPLIES/LIVESTOCK
Pets*
Pet Supplies*
Kennels & Services*
Pet Medical Services*
Livestock*
Livestock Equipment*
Feed/Seed/Plants*
Farmers Market*
REAL ESTATE
Open Houses
Homes for Sale
Real Estate Services
Farms & Farm Land
Historic Homes
Custom Builders
Condominiums/Townhouses
Log Homes
Waterfront Homes
Waterfront Lots
Lease Purchase
Lots & Acreage
Manufactured Housing
Mobile Homes
Mobile Homesites
Out of Town Property
Real Estate Loans
Real Estate Wanted
Real Estate Auction
COMMERCIAL
Apts for Sale
Business Property for Sale
Duplexes for Sale
Industrial/Manufact for Sale
Income/Investment for Sale
Land/Tracts for Sale
Office for Sale
Retail for Sale
Warehouse for Sale
Business Property for Lease
Ind/Manufact for Lease
Office for Lease
Retail for Lease
Warehouse for Lease
RECREATION
Aircraft
Power Boats
Sail Boats
Canoes & Kayaks
Personal Watercraft
Motorcycles Accessories
Motor Homes
Recreational Vehicles
Marine Parts & Accessories
Boat Repair
Boat Rentals & Charters
ATVs
Motorcycles/Scooters
Automotive Services
Heavy Equipment
Buses for Sale
Auto Repairs/Parts/Access
Auto/Trucks Wanted
Station Wagons
Classics/Specialty Autos
Vans
Trucks
4x4 Trucks
Sport Utility
4x4 Sport Utility
Import Cars
Domestic Cars
Trailers
33280859
TRANSPORTATION
*These listings are in the order they appear in the classified sections.
LEGAL NOTICES
ant to the authority vested in
me as Trustee, I shall, at the
request of the owner and
holder of the Note, at 10:00
o'clock a.m. EST on November 20, 2012, offer for sale at
public outcry to the highest and
best bidder for cash, at the
West door of the Hamilton
County Courthouse, Chattanooga, Tennessee in bar of all
statutory and common law equities of redemption, dower and
homestead and all other rights
and exemptions of every kind,
the real estate located at 829
Oak Street, Chattanooga,
Hamilton County, Tennessee which is more particularly
described in the Deed to Borrower recorded in Book 4984,
Page 837 in the Register's Office and in the Deed of Trust.
SUBJECT TO: (a) Notice of
State Tax Lien in favor of Tennessee Department of Revenue against Janice M. Casteel
filed February 13, 2012 in Book
9573, Page 296 in the
Register's Office;
(b) non-exclusive permanent,
perpetual easement for
driveway purposes across
the southeastern corner of
Lot 1 of said Walldorf's Addition as shown on plat of
record in Plat Book 36, Page
337, and by deed of record
in Book 3088, Page 165 in
the Register's Office to provide ingress and egress to
Lot 2; (c) 5' easement for the
operation and maintenance
of a water service line over
the eastern portion of said
Lot 2 as shown on plat of
record in Plat Book 36, Page
337, and by deed of record
in Book 3088, Page 165, in
the Register's Office to provide water service to Lot 1;
(d) permanent, perpetual
easement for the operation
and maintenance, (including
the right to replace, if necessary) to connect to and to
utilize a sanitary sewer
across said Lot 2 as the
same is presently located
and the reserved right to get
upon Lot 2 and construct or
install a replacement for the
existing sanitary sewer, if
said existing sewer shall become inoperable or unusable.
Provided however, that
should grantor, her heirs,
successors and assigns
make repairs or replacement of said water line
and/or sanitary line, such replacement or repairs shall be
at the expense of the
grantor, her heirs, successors or assigns and further
provided that the surface of
Lot 1 and any landscaping
and/or improvements
thereon, will be restored by
grantor, her heirs, successors or assigns to as near
the same condition existing
at the time of such constructions as is possible, as provided and set forth in deed of
record in book 3088, Page
165, said Register's Office;
(e) conditions and easements of record in Book
2116, Page 186, in the
Register's Office; and (f) 3'
foot retaining wall easement
and private waterlines as
shown, described or noted
on plat of Casteel Subdivision, recorded in Plat Book
93, Page 148, in the
Register's Office.
County taxes of the years
2011, 2010, and 2009 are
delinquent and now due and
payable: $1,364.01 (2011);
$1,517.01 (2010); $1,734.05
(2009), plus penalty and
interest.
City taxes for the 2011, 2010,
2009 and 2008 are delinquent
and now due and payable:
$1,064.45 (2011); $1,064.45
(2010); $1,260.74 (2009); and
$2,617.53 (2008) plus penalty
and interest.
Taxes for the year 2012 are a
lien, now due and payable.
Tax Map No. 146A-D-033.
The sale will be made subject
to all prior liens, easements,
covenants, conditions,
encumbrances, and restrictions
that may exist, including,
without limitation, any unpaid
ad valorem taxes or other
taxes, and also subject to any
right to redemption that may
otherwise exist.
The Trustee makes no
LEGAL NOTICES
covenant of warranty or
seizing, but will sell and convey
as Trustee only.
The sale will be made for the
purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by the Deed of
Trust and the proceeds thereof
will be applied as provided by
the terms of the Deed of Trust.
Lender as the holder of the
Note has the right to bid,
including credit bid, at the
foreclosure sale.
Other parties interested
entitled to notice pursuant to
Tenn. Code Ann. §35-5-104(d)
are:
Tennessee Department of
Revenue
First Tennessee Bank National
Association
Advanced Photographic
Solutions, LLC
Alford Imaging, Inc.
Juanita Barbee
This 19th day of October,
2012.
Bruce C. Bailey, Trustee
PUBLIC NOTICE
OF MEETING
HAMILTON COUNTY
RAILROAD AUTHORITY
HAMILTON COUNTY, TN
The Hamilton County Railroad
Authority will meet on
Wednesday, November 14,
2012 at 2:00 p.m., in the
County Mayor’s Conference
Room 106, Hamilton County
Courthouse.
Public Notice
The City of Red Bank will hold
its regular scheduled Commission Meeting on Thursday, November 20, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.
at Red Bank City Hall, 3117
Dayton Blvd.
John H. Alexander
Interim City Manager
Public StoragePublic Auction
November 20th, 2012
Orangeco, Inc, will sell personal property consisting of
household and personal effects; office and other equipment; toys and appliances to
satisfy owners lien for rent due
iaw 66-31-105. All items or
spaces may not be available
on the day of sale. We reserve the right to refuse any
and all bids; buyers must secure spaces with own locks.
No checks. Cash only. T o
claim tax-exempt-Original
RESALE certificate for each
space purchased is required.
Ps #27902, 6712 Ringgold Rd
East Ridge, TN 10AM
Unit# Name
A008 Kathryn Summers
A012 Jeremy Yates
A033 Erica Hein
A06D Andrew Starnes
A06F Catherine Douglas
A07I Brandi Mays
A095 Marlene Sturkie
B057L Cherish Yuppa
B05H Ashlee Dunn
C003 Anisha Brown
C028D Bruce Herkley
C030 Roger Morgan
C06G Katie Kindelspire
C11B Clayton Bailey
C11H Donnie Strickland
D01D Darlene Banks
D058 Mary Pitsch
D137 Deanna Douglas
E006 Lakesha Moore
E050 Jeremy Adams
E059 Timothy Collins
E082 Kamela Howard
C013 Alecia Conner
Ps#27901, 7822 East Brainard Rd, Chatt, TN immediately
following:
Unit#
Name
C002 Tracy Ward
D036 Marcos Espinoza
G064 Terrance Cook
Ps#24323, 4255 Cromwell Rd
Chatt, TN immediately following:
Unit# Name
A043 John Gannotti
B053 Michael Mckire
B056 James Vines
D182 Ernest Patillo
D185 Adrian Price
D203 Thomas Boyd
D251 Sunora Jackson
D321 Dorothy Hayes
D344 Jake Daugherty
F437 Leonard Williams
F449 John Gannotti
F461 Corey Fletcher
G556 Shameca Burt
LEGAL NOTICES
G613
G654
G558
Felicia White
Robin Bledsoe
Keisha Curtis
Ps#27914, 5624 Hwy 153
Hixson, TN immediately following:
1076 Charla Reed
1088 Renika Hinton
2076 Jonathan Ledford
2109 James Crutcher 3rd
3006 Ronni Barnes
4009 Phillip Bade
Ps#27915, 1015 Gadd Rd
Hixson, TN immediately following:
B006F Alvin Riley
D026 Rebekah Householder
Ps#27916, 101 Harding Rd
Red Bank, TN immediately
following:
B079 Leslie Fitzgerald
C049 Dorothea Penn
C054 Elizabeth Penney
E019 Shawn Wells
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S
SALE
WHEREAS, default having
been made in the payment of
the debts and obligations secured by a Deed of Trust executed on June 25, 2009, by
Sabrina Michelle Wilson aka
Sabrina M. Wilson to Larry A.
Weissman, Trustee, for the
benefit of Mortgage Electronic
Registration Systems, Inc. as
sole nominee for SunTrust
Mortgage, Inc and appearing of
record in Register’s Office of
Hamilton County, Tennessee,
in Book GI8967, Page 263; and
WHEREAS, the beneficial
interest of said Deed of Trust
was last transferred and assigned to SunTrust Mortgage,
Inc and
WHEREAS, SunTrust Mortgage, Inc, as the holder of the
Note for which debt is owed,
(“Note Holder”), appointed the
undersigned, Nationwide
Trustee Services, Inc., as Substitute Trustee by instrument
filed or to be filed for record in
the Register’s Office of Hamilton County, Tennessee, with all
the rights, powers and privileges of the original Trustee
named in said Deed of Trust;
and
WHEREAS, pursuant to
Tenn. Code Ann. § 35-5-117,
not less than sixty (60) days
prior to the first publication required by § 35-5-101, the notice of the right to foreclose
was properly sent, if so required; and
NOW, THEREFORE, notice
is hereby given that the entire
indebtedness has been
declared due and payable as
provided in said Deed of Trust
by the Note Holder, and that
the undersigned, Nationwide
Trustee Services, Inc.,
Substitute Trustee, or its duly
appointed attorneys or agents,
by virtue of the power and
authority vested in it, will on
Thursday, December 6, 2012,
commencing at 11:00 am at
the Main Door (Walnut Street
side) of the Hamilton County
Courthouse location in
Tennessee, proceed to sell at
public outcry to the highest and
best bidder for cash, the
following described property
situated in Hamilton County,
Tennessee, to wit:
Located in the Second Civil
District of Hamilton County,
Tennessee:
Lot Twenty-two (22),
Maplewood Heights,
Northeast Portion, Unit Two
(2), as shown by plats of
record in Plat Book 27, Page
102, and by Plat Book 27,
Page 120, in the Register's
Office of Hamilton County,
Tennessee.
The source of Grantor's
interest is found in deed
recorded in Book 5029, Page
39, in the Register's Office of
Hamilton County,
Tennessee.
Subject to restrictions as set
out in instrument recorded in
Book 1941, Page 525, in the
Register's Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee.
Subject to ten (10) foot
drainage easement straddling side and rear lot lines
as shown, described or
noted on legend of recorded
plat.
Subject to ten (10) foot
sideline setback as shown,
LEGAL NOTICES
described or noted on legend
of recorded plat.
Subject to twenty-five (25)
foot front line setback as
shown, described or noted
on legend of recorded plat.
Subject to twenty-five (25)
foot rear yard as shown,
described or noted on legend
of recorded plat.
Subject to existing sixteen
(16) foot drainage and utility
easement along rear lot line
as shown, described or
noted on recorded plat.
Subject to EPB Easement
granted to the City of
Chattanooga, recorded in
Book 2023, Page 211, in the
Register's Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 4026
E Freedom Circle, Ooltewah,
TN 37363
CURRENT OWNER(S):
Sabrina Michelle Wilson aka
Sabrina M. Wilson
The sale of the
above-described property shall
be subject to all matters shown
on any recorded plan; any
unpaid taxes; any restrictive
covenants, easements or
set-back lines that may be
applicable; any prior liens or
encumbrances as well as any
priority created by a fixture
filing; and any matter that an
accurate survey of the
premises might disclose.
Substitute Trustee will only
convey any interest he/she
may have in the property at the
time of sale.
Property is sold “as is, where
is.”
For every lien or claim of lien
of the state identified above,
please be advised notice
required by § 67-1-1433 (b)(1)
was timely given and that any
sale of the property herein
referenced will be subject to
the right of the state to redeem
the land as provided for in §
67-1-1433(c)(1).
All right and equity of
redemption, statutory or
otherwise, homestead, and
dower are expressly waived in
said Deed of Trust, and the title
is believed to be good, but the
undersigned will sell and
convey only as Substitute
Trustee.
The right is reserved to
adjourn the day of the sale to
another day, time, and place
certain without further
p u b l i c a t i o n , u p o n
announcement at the time and
place for the sale set forth
above.
NATIONWIDE TRUSTEE
SERVICES, INC. 400
Northridge Road Suite 700MC- 7 Sandy Springs, Georgia
30350 404-417-4040 File No.:
1685312 Web Site:
www.JFLegal.com
Publication Dates: November
13, 20, 27, 2012
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S
SALE
Sale at public auction will be on
January 8, 2013 at 10:00AM local time, at the west door,
Hamilton County Courthouse,
Chattanooga, Tennessee pursuant to Deed of Trust executed by
Christina Featherstone, a
single person, to Charles Patrick
Flynn, Trustee, as trustee for
Mortgage Electronic Registration
Systems, Inc. ("MERS"), solely
as nominee for M&I Bank FSB
on August 25, 2010 at Book GI
9238, Page 308, Instrument No.
2010083100151; conducted by
Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP having
been appointed Substitute or
Successor Trustee, all of record
in the Hamilton County
Register's Office. Default has occurred in the performance of the
covenants, terms, and conditions of said Deed of Trust and
the entire indebtedness has been
declared due and payable.
Party Entitled to Enforce the
Debt: Owner of Debt: Wells
Fargo Bank, NA
The following real estate located in Hamilton County, Tennessee, will be sold to the highest call bidder:
Described property located at
Hamilton, County, Tennessee, to
wit:
Lot twenty-six, Northtower Forest Subdivision, Unit One, as
shown by plat of record in Plat
Book 26, Page 11, Register's
Office, Hamilton County, Tennessee.
Subject to any government
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for
real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal
opportunity basis.
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
j
y g
zoning and subdivision ordinances or regulations in affect
thereon.
Subject to restrictions as set
out in instrument recorded in
Book 1854, Page 99, in the
Register's Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee.
Subject to anchor easement at
the Northeast corner of said
lot, as shown by dotted lines
on said plat.
Subject to Five (5) foot drainage easement reserved along
the side and rear lot lines, as
set out on recorded plat; and
Street Address: 3010 Tower
Way Drive, Chattanooga,
Tennessee 37406
Parcel Number: 137B-G-012
Current Owner(s) of Property:
Christina Featherstone
The street address of the
above described property is
believed to be 3010 Tower Way
Drive, Chattanooga, Tennessee
37406, but such address is not
part of the legal description of the
property sold herein and in the
event of any discrepancy, the
legal description herein shall
control.
SALE IS SUBJECT TO
TENANT(S) RIGHTS IN
POSSESSION.
If applicable, the HB 3588 letter
mailed to the borrower(s)
pursuant to Tennessee Code
Annotated 35-5-117.
This sale is subject to all
matters shown on any applicable
recorded plat any unpaid taxes;
and any restrictive covenants,
easements, or setback lines that
may be applicable; any statutory
right of redemption of any
governmental agency, state or
federal; any prior liens or
encumbrances as well as any
priority created by a fixture filing;
and to any matter that an
accurate survey of the premises
might disclose.
This sale is subject to all
matters shown on any applicable
recorded plat any unpaid taxes;
and any restrictive covenants,
easements, or setback lines that
may be applicable; any statutory
right of redemption of any
governmental agency, state or
federal; any prior liens or
encumbrances as well as any
priority created by a fixture filing;
and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might
disclose.
All right of equity of
redemption, statutory and
otherwise, and homestead are
expressly waived in said Deed of
Trust, and the title is believed to
be good, but the undersigned will
sell and convey only as
Substitute Trustee.
The right is reserved to adjourn
the day of the sale to another
day, time, and place certain
without further publication, upon
announcement at the time and
place for the sale set forth above.
If the highest bidder cannot pay
the bid within twenty-four (24)
hours of the sale, the next
highest bidder, at their highest
bid, will be deemed the
successful bidder.
This property is being sold with
the express reservation that the
sale is subject to confirmation by
the lender or trustee. This sale
may be rescinded by the
Substitute Trustee at any time.
This office may be a debt collector. This may be an attempt
to collect a debt and any
information obtained may be
used for that purpose.
y
and any restrictive covenants,
easements, or setback lines that
may be applicable; any statutory
right of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority
created by a fixture filing; and to
any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose.
This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat any unpaid taxes;
and any restrictive covenants,
easements, or setback lines that
may be applicable; any statutory
right of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority
created by a fixture filing; and to
any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose.
All right of equity of redemption, statutory and otherwise, and
homestead are expressly waived
in said Deed of Trust, and the
title is believed to be good, but
the undersigned will sell and
convey only as Substitute
Trustee.
The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication,
upon announcement at the time
and place for the sale set forth
above. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within twentyfour (24) hours of the sale, the
next highest bidder, at their highest bid, will be deemed the successful bidder.
This property is being sold with
the express reservation that the
sale is subject to confirmation by
the lender or trustee. This sale
may be rescinded by the Substitute Trustee at any time.
This office may be a debt collector. This may be an attempt
to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for
that purpose.
Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP
Substitute Trustee
www.kirschattorneys.com
Law Office of Shapiro & Kirsch,
LLP
555 Perkins Road Extended,
Second Floor
Memphis, TN 38117
Phone (901)767-5566
Fax (901)761-5690
File No. 12-039322
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S
SALE
Sale at public auction will be on
January 8, 2013 at 10:00AM local time, at the west door,
Hamilton County Courthouse,
Chattanooga, Tennessee pursuant to Deed of Trust executed by
Shelley M. Watson, unmarried,
to Charles E. Tonkin, II, Trustee,
as trustee for Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc.
("MERS"), solely as nominee for
Mortgage Investors Group on
September 30, 2008 at Book GI
8774, Page 225; corrected by
Scrivener's Affidavit of record in
Book GI 9697, Page 742; conducted by Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP
having been appointed Substitute or Successor Trustee, all of
record in the Hamilton County
Register's Office. Default has occurred in the performance of the
covenants, terms, and conditions of said Deed of Trust and
the entire indebtedness has been
declared due and payable.
Party Entitled to Enforce the
Debt: Owner of Debt: Wells
Fargo Bank, NA
The following real estate located in Hamilton County, Tennessee, will be sold to the highest call bidder:
Described property located in
the Second Civil District of
Hamilton County, Tennessee, to
wit:
Lot 1, Final Plat of Steinman
Subdivision, as shown on plat
of record in Plat Book 64,
Page 159, in the Register's
Office of Hamilton County,
Tennessee.
Street Address: 805 Donaldson Road, Chattanooga, Tennessee 37412
Parcel Number: 156L-C-011
Current Owner(s) of Property:
Shelley M. Watson
The street address of the
above described property is believed to be 805 Donaldson
Road, Chattanooga, Tennessee
37412, but such address is not
part of the legal description of the
property sold herein and in the
event of any discrepancy, the legal description herein shall control.
SALE IS SUBJECT TO TENANT(S) RIGHTS IN POSSESSION.
If applicable, the HB 3588 letter mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5-117.
This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat any unpaid taxes;
Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP
Substitute Trustee
www.kirschattorneys.com
Law Office of Shapiro & Kirsch,
LLP
555 Perkins Road Extended,
Second Floor
Memphis, TN 38117
Phone (901)767-5566
Fax (901)761-5690
File No. 11-028873
FARMS - FARM
LAND
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S
SALE
Sale at public auction will be on
December 6, 2012 at 12:00PM
local time, at the west door,
Hamilton County Courthouse,
Chattanooga, Tennessee, conducted by Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP
Substitute Trustee, pursuant to
Deed of Trust executed by Virginia W. Smallen, widow, unmarried, to First Title Insurance
Company, Trustee, on October
29, 2004 at Book GI 7333, Page
439; all of record in the Hamilton
County Register's Office.
Holder: OneWest Bank, FSB
The following real estate located in Hamilton County, Tennessee, will be sold to the highest call bidder subject to all
unpaid taxes, prior liens and encumbrances of record:
Located in the City of Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tennessee:
Lot Twenty-four (24), Pitner's
Addition to East Brainerd, as
shown by plat recorded in Plat
Book 14, Page 10, in the
Register's Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee.
Subject to any governmental
zoning and subdivision ordinances or regulations in effect
thereon.
Subject to restrictions recorded in Book 778, Page 511,
in said Register's Office.
Street Address: 1038 Graysville Road, Chattanooga, Tennessee 37421
Parcel Number: 171A-J-025.00
Current Owner(s) of Property:
Virginia W. Smallen
Other interested parties: Secretary of Housing Urban Development
The street address of the
above described property is believed to be 1038 Graysville
Road, Chattanooga, Tennessee
37421, but such address is not
part of the legal description of the
property sold herein and in the
event of any discrepancy, the legal description referenced herein
shall control.
SALE IS SUBJECT TO TENANT(S) RIGHTS IN POSSESSION.
If applicable, the notice requirements of T.C.A. 35-5-117
have been met.
SALE IS SUBJECT TO ONE
YEAR RIGHT OF REDEMPTION HELD BY SECRETARY
OF HOUSING AND URBAN
DEVELOPMENT BY REASON
OF THE DEED OF TRUST OF
RECORD AT BOOK GI 7333,
PAGE 450, IN THE
REGISTER'S OFFICE OF
HAMILTON COUNTY, TENNESSEE.
All right of equity of redemption, statutory and otherwise, and
homestead are expressly waived
in said Deed of Trust, and the
title is believed to be good, but
the undersigned will sell and
convey only as Substitute
Trustee.
If the highest bidder cannot pay
the bid within twenty-four (24)
hours of the sale, the next highest bidder, at their highest bid,
will be deemed the successful
bidder.
This property is being sold with
the express reservation that the
sale is subject to confirmation by
the lender or trustee. This sale
may be rescinded at any time.
Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP
Substitute Trustee
www.kirschattorneys.com
Law Office of Shapiro & Kirsch,
LLP
555 Perkins Road Extended,
Second Floor
Memphis, TN 38117
Phone (901)767-5566
Fax (901)761-5690
File No. 12-040388
WATERFRONT
HOMES
Lakefront winterized cabin in
Crossville. Renovated ‘09 New
Electric, Plumbing, and Appl.
Furn and New pontoon ava.
$145k 931-456-1332
LOTS & ACREAGE
BIRCHWOOD 2 Acres. Set up
for double wide. $200 dn. $260.
mo. Call 423-344-9615
E L D E R M T N . By owner. 5.2
acres, lots 78, 81 & 82. 1207
Healing Springs Rd. Financing available. 423-718-3030.
MOBILE HOMES
HARRISON, TN. 5 Acre Farm
w/ 1,500 sq. ft. building w/ concrete floor. $86,500.423-344-2314
AREA
1 2
AREA
Loans
Money to Loan
1007 East Dallas
6 BR/5 baths! Built in 2006!
Home has been
completely remodeled!
All the extra amenities! A must
see! Priced to sell at Only
$449,000 Kimberly Wolf Cell:
423-240-4273
Office: (423) 664-1900
Keller Williams Realty
HOUSES FOR SALE
Dtwn, St. Elmo, Highland Park,
Avondale, Missionary Ridge
Handy Man Special! 2622
Cannon Ave. 2 BR/1BA,
single family,1377 SF,lot
included. Owner
Financing or Cash discounts
$250 down, $256 mo.
803-978-1539 803-978-1607
AREA 5
Business Wanted
Investments
N. Chatt., Mtn. Creek,
Riverview, Rivermont
OPEN SUNDAY 2-4 pm
HOUSES FOR SALE
Hwy 58 (city), East Dale,
Dalewood, Tyner
Chickamauga repo, 16x80, 3+2
w/ fireplace on rented acre lot.
$7500 cash. Call: 423-304-4041
REAL ESTATE
WANTED
H ANY HOUSE! H
Any Condition!
I BUY
HOUSES
CA$H!
316-3800
OFFICE FOR LEASE
Chatt. Repo, 2+1, Private
location. $5K down, $400/mo.
We finance. 423-304-4041
HOUSES FOR SALE
Hixson, Chattanooga
City Limits
Bonny Oaks Industrial Park.
3200 SF Class A office space w/
warehouse. Front door parking
899-7024
FOR LEASE
7500 sq ft M-1 Building
9 offices & warehouse space
2 Bay doors
Warehouse & offices
heated/cooled separately
Fiber or T-1 available
123 Industrial Park Dr
Soddy Daisy, TN 37379
[email protected]
HIXSON - 4BR/2.5BA, $239,900
Extremly Open Floor Plan!!!
Recent Upgrades, 423-322-2768
Lookout Valley:
Office Space for lease.
Various sizes. 423-894-0324
APTS-RENTFURNISHED
E.RIDGE- 1BR, utilities & cable
pd. No smokers, no pets.
$150 wk. + dep. Call: 760-0323
HIXSON- Cassandra Smith Rd.
3BR/2Bath, 2 car Garage, 1600
sq. ft., $165,000, 423-774-3249
PROFESSIONAL- Seeks same
to rent Bedroom & Executive
Missionary Ridge home, Utilities &
cable inclu. $600. 423-504-8981
APTS-RENTUNFURNISHED
HIXSON - Home on 6 acres.
3128 Hamill Rd. Very private, 15
min. from downtown & Hamilton
Place, 3 BR, 2 bath, 2200sf, Big
Ridge School. 1 mile from the
lake. Built in 1975. Heat and air
only 1 yr. old. Newly painted.
$238,000. 423-785-6902
423- 785-4020.
BRAINERD
RUSTIC VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
1, 2, Bedrooms & Efficiencies
Near Hamilton Place
Eastgate
Newly Redecorated Available
Call
423-894-0324
HIXSON -Stonewood Drive
3 BR /1.5Bath, 1620 Sq. Ft.
Newly Remodeled, $128,000
423-595-2759 / 423-595-6446
AREA 11
FINANCIAL
Business Opportunity
Business for Sale
OPEN HOUSE
North Chattanooga!
HOUSES FOR SALE
Catoosa County
RINGGOLD. 3 BR, 2 bath,
$89,500. Owner financing
available. 423-593-2729.
AREA 13
Licensed Massage
Services & Repairs
Special Notices
Tickets
HOUSES FOR SALE
N. Hamilton Cty., Soddy-Daisy,
Bakewell, Sale Creek, Middle Valley
CHICKAMAUGA- 2BR, Upstairs,
above a 3 car garage,
Reduced $550+ dep.
No Smokers! No Pets!!
423-309-6363
- FT. OGLETHORPE Ground Level Apts
with private patios
Garbage & Water paid
Established community
Close to everything!
Call for details
706-861-0455
FT. OGLETHORPE New
Efficiencies $320/350 Washer/
Dryer Great for Seniors.
706-861-1666 or 706-956-8864
HIXSON. Ely Rd./Ashland Terrace. 2 BR/2 BA. $700 mo. 6
mo. or 1 yr lease. 629-9627.
- HIXSON / RIDGESIDE APTS Large 1 BR Available!
Water Furnished!
Call today for your custom quote
423-842-8280
Soddy Daisy. Open House Sun.
2-5. Rolling Hills Subd. 9942
Rolling Wind Dr. Corner lot,
3BR, 2 ba, unfin. bsmnt. Remodeling complete. Everything like
new. $157,900. 423-544-8481.
AREA 16
Lodge Notices
Lost and Found
Moving and Storage
Position Wanted
Nursing/Elderly Care
Nursery & Child Care
Personals
Escort Services
HOUSES FOR SALE
Ooltewah
MISSIONARY RIDGE
562 W. Shadowlawn Dr.
Lilywood Apt. 1 BR Scenic view
Appliances furnished. All new
from ground up. $585 mo.
423-580-2587 No pets/ NO DEP
N. Chatt - River Hills Manor
Free Utilities!
OOLTEWAH- 9961 Fielding Rd.
3BR/2BA, 2000+ sq ft, new: roof,
siding, gutters, garage doors, all
on a 3/4 acre lot. $165,000
423-903-3977/ 902-0917
1 Bedroom and Studio
Furnished or Unfurnished
We welcome Seniors!
2627 Hixson Pike
423-756-3797
RIVERHILLSMANOR-CHA.com
Ringgold- Luxury
Apartments ! 2 BR, washer
/dryer/water/ garbage pick up
furnished $600 per mo. $300
dep. 706-937-3100
Rossville- 1 BR all utilities furn
Senior Citizen Special
706-858-0140
OOLTEWAH, Sunset Ridge,
FSBO $199,000. 3br 2bath
Very nice home!! Fenced yard
7620 Duskview Ct Available
Dec. 1st. 423-595-3107
AREA 19
Fitness/Self Improvement
Genealogy
Happy Ads
In Memory
Instruction
Insurance
Legal Notices
Legal Services
33412315
Announcements
Auctions
Attorneys
Adoption
Bundles of Joy
Cemetery Lots
Counseling Service
Excursion/Travel
AREA 8
All real estate advertised herein is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of
race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national
origin, or intention to make any
such preference, limitation or discrimination.”
ANNOUNCEMENTS
HOUSES FOR SALE
Walker County
SHEPHERD- 2 BR, 1 Bath
kitchen appliances, no pets,
1 yr. lease, $450 dep.
$575 mo., 423-855-2866
DUPLEXES
FOR RENT
Brainerd : 1 bd, 1 ba chalet duplex, appl, hkps, f/p, front door
parking $450/300
624.6746 #710
HARRISON- 3 BR, 2 full baths,
den, garage, no pets, lease,
deposit, $720 mo. 326-1200
ROSSVILLE repo. 3 BR, fenced
yard, selling as is $22,000
Call: 423-304-4041
AREA 22
Classified Index
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE:
AREA 6
timesfreepress.com
HOUSES FOR SALE
Bradley County/
Cleveland
Harrison - $595/mo $350 2/1.5
Newly Remodeled, Hookups,
No pets. 423-504-3651
Credit/Criminal Check sec 8
accepted
Lookout Valley: 2 BR, 1 or 1 1/2
bath. W/D connections. Starting at $525/mo. Call
423-894-0324.
Red Bank- $650 2BR, 2 story.
Fireplace, new carpet.
No Pets! Lease.
595-7800 or 877-0068
HOUSES-RENT
-UNFURNISHED
Cleveland- 11.5 Acres. 2 year
old premium manufactured
home. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, den,
$219,900. Bring Offer
423-790-7202
CONDOS TOWNHOUSES
Lookout Mtn., repo 3 BR, 2K sq.
ft., on golf course! Furnished.
Sold $499K,$159,900 304-4041
E. Brainerd: 3 bd, 2 ba home,
appl, hkps, f/p, screened in
porch, single garage, great
neighborhood. $995/500
624-6746 #733
Brainerd: 3 bd, 1 1/2 ba ranch
home, appl, hardwood floors,
f/p, lots of storage, on bus line,
$695/500 624-6746 #732
E. Brainerd: 4 bd, 3 ba home,
formal dining, formal living
room, den w/fireplace, double
garage, good school system!
$1095/500 624-6746 #736
E. Brainerd: 3 bd, 2 ba home,
appl, hkps, hardwood floors,
ceramic tile, den w/fireplace,
double garage, large fenced
y a r d $ 1 2 9 5 / 5 0 0
624-6746 $737
• • • Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • F5
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TRUCKS
4 X 4 TRUCKS
SPORT UTILITY
FORD TAURUS SES, 2005
CD, Good AC & heat Runs great
$4250.obo 423-598-1414
Chevy S10 2WD ‘03 $6,800
NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
Dodge Dakota SLT 4x4 ‘04
$6,800 NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
Nissan Murano 2WD SL ‘06,
$14,800 NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
Chevy Suburban 1500 4x4 LT
‘06, $11,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
Dodge Ram 1500 4x4 ‘02, 160K
$7,800 NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
Nissan Quest 2WD 3.5SL ‘07,
$11,800 NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
FORD TAURUS SES, 2005
CD, Good AC & heat Runs great
$4250.obo 423-598-1414
cars.timesfreepress.com
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Herb
Adcox
$13,950
$10,950
$8,500
Buick Lucerne CXL V6, 1 Owner, 80K Miles,
Leather, Alloys #150187 +TTL & $349 Doc
Fee 423-648-4314
Ford Ranger Edge ‘03, Auto, Bright Red,
117K Miles #12-009P +TTL
423-892-8310
Economy
Honda
$8,591
Economy
Honda
$8,323
$4,311
Chevy Aveo 5 ‘08, 5-Speed, Cosmic Silver,
Hatchback, 50K #T8B260785 +TTL & Doc
Fee 800-256-5286 www.economyhonda.com
Honda Accord EX V6 ‘01, Auto, 254K Miles
#T1A084667 +TTL & Doc Fee 800-256-5286
www.economyhonda.com
Herb
Adcox
Herb
Adcox
$12,950
$13,950
Chevy Impala ‘11, Alloy Wheels, Power Seat
#12-026P +TTL Herb Adcox 423-892-8310
Honda Civic ‘10, Auto, Urban Titanium Metallic, 40K Miles #12-025P +TTL
423-892-8310
Herb
Adcox
Mercedes-Benz C240 ‘02, Auto, Alabaster
White, RWD, 144K Miles #T2F246960 +TTL
& Doc Fee 800-256-5286 www.economyhonda.com
$13,950
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
$10,950
Chevy Silverado 2500 HD LT 4x4 ‘02, Power
Seat, Bed liner, Fixed Running Boards
#033118 +TTL & $349 Doc Fee
423-648-4314
Honda CR-V ‘08, Auto, Glacier blue Metallic,
78K Miles #11-091P +TTL 423-892-8310
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Chevy Venture LS ‘04, Auto, Sport Red,
113K Miles #T4D245181 +TTL & Doc Fee
800-256-5286 www.economyhonda.com
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
$5,481
Oldsmobile Alero GL1 ‘03, Auto, Bright Red,
FWD, 114K Miles #T3C193247 +TTL & Doc
Fee 800-256-5286 www.economyhonda.com
$8,591
Lexus ES 300, Auto, Crystal White, FWD,
154K Miles #T20057118 +TTL & Doc Fee
800-256-5286 www.economyhonda.com
Honda Odyssey EX ‘06, Auto, Auto, Silver
Pearl, FWD, 265K Miles #T6B076373 +TTL &
Doc Fee 800-256-5286
www.economyhonda.com
Economy
Honda
$6,591
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
$15,950
$12,950
Honda Odyssey EXL w/DVD ‘05, Sunroof,
Leather, Power Seat #033118 +TTL & $349
Doc Fee 423-648-4314
$5,950
$12,950
Ford Focus SE ‘01, 82K Miles, Automatic,
Alloys #295583 +TTL & $349 Doc Fee
423-648-4314
Lexus RX300 ‘02, Sunroof, Leather, Alloys
#122162 +TTL & $349 Doc Fee
423-648-4314
$13,950
Toyota Rav4 ‘06, Automatic, Power Windows, Power Locks, Cruise #007754 +TTL &
$349 Doc Fee 423-648-4314
Herb
Adcox
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Economy
Honda
$13,950
$8,950
$10,253
Ford Fusion ‘11, Auto, Sterling Grey Metallic,
38K Miles #12-021P +TTL 423-892-8310
HOUSES-RENT
-UNFURNISHED
Lincoln LS ‘02, 1 Owner, 82K Miles, Sunroof,
Leather #682947 +TTL & $349 Doc Fee
423-648-4314
AIRCRAFT
Toyota Sienna XLE ‘03, Auto, Desert Sand
Mica, 121K Miles #T3E540540 +TTL & Doc
Fee 800-256-5286 www.economyhonda.com
MOTOR HOMES
E. BRAINERD, 3 BR/ 2BA home.
2 car garage, large yard, private, $1000 mo., 1 mo. dep.
credit check req. Available
now. 423-316-5985
E. BRAINERD- Newly
Redecorated 3BR/2.5Bath
$1500/mo, 423-876-7648
Hixson: 2 homes/ $925 /$875
3 BR, 2 BA, Den, 2 car garage,
No Pets, New Carpet.
595-7800, 877-0068
Homes for Rent
E. Lake- 4 BR, 2 Bath $699
Rossvile/Chickamauga
2 BR, 1 Bath, $525
Harrison- 4 BR, 2 Bath, $975
Sec. 8 ok. 423-802-2083
Hwy 153/Shallowford 3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths. Private! Full
unfinished basement, 2 car
garage, deck. $865 month
423-855-7596 ext 101
HWY 153. Washington Hills. 3
BR, C/H/A, basement, D/W,
built in microwave, large back
deck. 2 car garage. All utils.
furn. $1275mo. $600dep.
Call 423-503-3943.
N. CHATTANOOGA 1045 Dartmouth St. 2 BR/1 BA, new
paint. W/D hookup. 629-9627.
BEECH BARON 1/4 Share.
Garmin Glass Panel, Many upgrades. $25,000. 423-667-2669
POWER BOATS
ALUM. CRAFT- 17 ft. 6”, 50 hp
Mercury, drive on trailer. Live
well.$5800/obo 423-443-8464.
BASS BOAT Stratos 242 16ft
Johnson 70hp fiberglass bottom w/ trailer $4000. 619 3742
STRATUS BASS BOAT 159 V
115 Mercury Motor, garaged
kept, $4,000obo.706-866-8613
PERSONAL
WATERCRAFT
Jet Ski’s- (3) Polaris, Kawasaki,
Yamaha, need work, All for
$500, 256-657-7047
Seadoos 98 & 92 Bombardier 3
seaters...Duel trailer...$4000
Call (423) 619-3742
MARINE PARTS &
ACCESSORIES
Canoe 14ft. Old Town, built in
cooler & cup holders $350
423-344-7079
NEED STORAGE??
Call us to hear Special Rates !
www.StorageWorksTN.com
Mertruiser Boat Engine4.3 w/ Out drive prop and foot
$600, 423-667-6040
(423) 332-8640
OOLTEWAH- 3BR, 2BTH,
Georgetown Landing, $1300/Mo
423-504-5912
Rent or Buy! All areas! 3-4 BR
homes starting at $800 per mo.
Low Down pmnt. CHA & New
Appliances. 800-624-0661
Stevens Realty Owner/Agent
RINGGOLD-Country Setting
3br/ 2bath 2 car garage, Lg. yard
Private, Won’t last @ $1100.
mo $850.dep 423-400-0519
RINGGOLD, GA - 3 BR, 2 Bath,
Modular Home, Xlarge Lot,
huge storage building, paved
drive, No pets, Must have references. $650/mo. 894-0039
or 355-1104
ROSSVILLE. 3 Bedroom,
1 bath, $550 per mo.
Call 423-593-2729.
ROSSVILLE, TN- 2/3BR, 1Bath,
Washer & Dryer Hook-Up, Ref
Required, $600rent / $400dep
423-580-0200 / 423-332-2822
Signal Mtn- 3 BR, 2BA.
$1,400/ month. New hardwood
floors. Close to schools.
Lancaster Rd.
Call 423-762-2208.
HONDA ODYSSEY FL250,
1979 Exc. cond. $1695.
Call 423-593-7918.
Polaris 2006- 90 CC, Some
broken plastic, runs really
good $400, 423-475-5022
YAMAHA YFZ 450 2006, Stock,
runs great, $2800 obo. Call
or text. 423-902-1288.
DFKFI:P:C<J
J:FFK<IJ
Harley-Davidson Ultra Classic, ‘06. Black cherry, 16k
miles, $13,900. 423-238-6974
HARLEY DAVIDSON ’05
ROAD KING CUSTOM.
For sale. $9,000 CALL 619-5402
HARLEY DAVIDSON FATBOY
2001, 9k miles $9k 842-7801
[email protected]
H-D FLSTC ‘09 , 4000 miles.
Many extras, like new. Red
$15,000 423-838-9774
H-D Softail Slim 2012, Gloss
black, less than 800 miles,
$18,000. 423-802-4054.
KTM 300 EXC ‘05- Exc Cond,
Lots of Extras $3500
423-637-1039
MOBILE HOMESRENT
SCOOTER, Vespa Stella 2005,
4 spd, 150cc, black, 800 miles,
$1800. Call 423-596-3558.
E. RIDGE/N.GA - $99 move-in
2 & 3 BR’s for $75.00 per week
& up! 894-0039 or 355-1104
Suzuki Blvd. ‘06 C50T, 800cc,
fully dressed, chrome, 8,000 mi.
Mint cond. $5200, 653-1531
Ford F150 2WD Regular Cab
XL ‘07, 5 Speed, 6 Cyl $9,800$218.48 MO. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
FOUR WINDS HURRICANE ‘031 Owner 32ft, No Accidents,
Great Cond, Sleeps 6, Class A,
41k Miles, $58,000
423-629-0821 or email
[email protected]
MATTRESS For Motor home,
Queen size New condition.
$150. 423-479-5887
MINNIE WINNIE ‘79- Good cond
Good tires, Self contained,
$3500.obo, 423-533-2715
MOTOR HOME Tote, for sewer,
27 gal. 4 wheels, new, cost
$385. Sell $150. 423-875-9911
MW V10 34K, Class C ‘01
Slide & Jacks $25,500 b.o.
423-843-9119
RECREATIONAL
VEHICLES
FIFTH WHEEL w/ awning
31’ super slide Excel condi
Fully equipped $7950. 903-4290.
Trailmanor ‘10 , Tows Like
Pop-Up, Exc , Loaded
$18k/obo 706-375-5589
Travel Trailer, ‘98
5th Wheel 27 Ft. $3750
423-822-8283.
Trailer Hitch Reese, 2” fits 2001
Honda Pathfinder, under
vehicle, $65. 423-653-1531.
AUTOS/TRUCKS
WANTED
AARON’S JUNK CARS,
TRUCKS, BUSES &
MOTOR HOMES. Will pay
cash in 30 min 423-521-7777
Buying Junk Cars & Trucks
Pay Top Dollar - Running or not
423-580-1611 Ken
‘88 Oldsmobile 4 Dr. V6, Auto,
Trans. Loaded, 43K
$3750/b.o. 423-762-5256.
Nissan Xterra 2WD ‘04, 108K
$7,800 NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
FORD COUPE ORIGINAL
STEEL FENDERS, front & rear,
1930-31 $450. 886-5729
VANS
Buick Rendezvous AWD CXL
‘04, 117K $7,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
Cadillac Escalade AWD ‘02,
$9,800 NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
CHEVY AVALANCHE LTZ,
2007, black, low miles w/warr.
$27,000obo. 423-802-9797.
YAMAHA V Star 1100 Custom,
orig. owner, nice. $4900.
Call 423-645-1850.
ROOMS FOR RENT
MOTORCYCLE
ACCESSORIES
TIRES, (2) Michelin, with good
tread, 215/60/16. $35.
Call 706-375-3694.
SIGNAL MTN. RD. $115 week,
$20 Dep. Free HBO & cable,
267-3783
MOTORCYCLE JACKET
Size 44 Exc Cond $50
706-861-3496
Tires set of 4 Bridgestone LT
245/70/16 Good Tread Left,
$250 423-650-6450
Nissan 350Z ‘07, 2Dr, Coupe,
V6, $16,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
Nissan Sentra ‘88, needs head
gasket, rough condition.
$400.Call 423-875-2490
Volvo V70 T5 ‘01, 126K $5,800
NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
ACURA 3.2 CL, Type S, ‘01.
145k, nice. $5200. Call
423-505-1377, 876-7146.
ACURA 3.2 TL, ‘02.
176K, black, $4800. Call
423-505-1377, 423-876-7146.
Pontiac G6 V6 ‘08, $11,800 NU
2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
BMW 528i 1998, black with tan,
auto, 185k, new tires, serviced. $4500. 423-596-3558.
BMW Z4 Roadster, ‘04.
White/black, exc. cond.
$10,900. 423-356-8806.
PORSCHE CARRERA ‘07- Red,
4S, Semi-Auto Trans, Leather
Brown All Custom Int. 29,500
Miles, $64,000 423-582-8598
SUZUKI X90, 1997
T-Top, asking $3500. Call
423-658-2737.
TOYOTA CAMRY ‘95 Auto, A/C. 110K mi., Reliable.
Great mpg! $2900 423-838-0339
Toyota Tacoma 2WD SRS ‘04,
$10,800 NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
GMC Sonoma 4x4 SLS ‘04,
$9,800 NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
Toyota Tundra 2WD Double
Cab ‘08, Auto, V8 $17,800$389.73 MO. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
CADILLAC COUPE ‘92 , Cold
Air, all power, only 94k miles.
$3000 Call [email protected]"
TOYOTA PRIUS ‘10 REDUCED
Slight hail damage LOW MILES
$21,900. firm 706-861-4525
DODGE WORK VAN ‘01. Good
on gas, 66k. Well Maint.
$7500 no trades. 893-3412.
FORD ’88- TON WORK VAN
7.3 Diesel, good cond. $2000
423-339-9408
Chevy Corvette ‘00, $13,800
NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
Volkswagen Beetle S ‘06,
$8,800 NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
CHEVY MALIBU LS ‘01- Good
Cond, Car Well Taken Care Of,
118k, $4300/obo 423-693-9479
Chevy Van ‘76,
$425.
423-875-2490
DODGE CARAVAN, ‘02.
3 seater, white/blue, $2900 obo.
Call 423-309-7863.
GMC Yukon 1500 2WD ‘04,
$8,800 NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
Honda Pilot EX-L 2WD ‘06,
$11,800 NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
4 X 4 TRUCKS
Chrysler PT Cruiser ‘04,
106,000 MI. runs great. $3450,
423-240-3302
CLASSIC T-BIRD ‘84 74.5K
Actual miles, trade for fire-bird
/suv $2500.obo. 706-639-6254
TOYOTA TUNDRA Limited ‘01.
Access Cab, 116k, All Power,
only $9950. Call 423-987-9277.
Hyundai Tucson SE ‘08- Mint
Cond. Tow Pkg, White Ext/Tan
Int, 33,400 miles, $10,500 firm
Call Bill 423-595-5045
CORVETTE ‘79, needs much
work but runs, ‘78 parts car,
newer “crate” motor. All for
$6500 neg. 423-413-8985
*Local inquiries ONLY!
CORVETTE ‘96- LT 4, 5k Miles
6Spd, Red Ext, Blk Int, New,
$29,950 423-718-5185
Factory GT Mustang 18" Wheels
with new Michelin tires $1,400.
423-421-4690
O W N E R S M A N U A L for 2002
Chevy Ext. cab, 1500 Series,
$20. Call 423-653-1531.
SIGNAL MTN. Rd. 1 & 2 bedroom, utilities paid, Call
267-3783, 1-4, Mon.-Fri.
Mitsubishi Montero Sport Limited 4X4 ‘01 $5,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
BMW 330 CIC, ‘04 Sport, Conv.
Auto. leather, like new!
$13,500, 423-991-2831
Chevrolet TrailBlazer 2WD LS
‘07, Auto,V8, 89K Miles $8,900$199.21 MO. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
Nissan Hardbody XE ‘96
$5,800 NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
MX-5 Miata 1997, red convt.
4-cyl,75,450 miles, good
cond. $5000. Richard 266-3255
ACURA RL, 2003, Champaigne,
garage kept, 170K, $6500.
423-505-1377, 876-7146.
JUMP SEATSFor Land Rover, $200.
Call 423-822-8283.
Saturn Alum Whls & Tires. (4)
P205-60-R15. Good Tread
$200, 423-488-2727.
Mitsubishi Eclipse Syder GS
‘02, 107K $6,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
Subaru Legacy AWD Outback
‘04, 107K $7,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
GMC Sierra 2007, 2WD, reg.
cab, LB, V6 auto, 52000 mi.
$10,495. 423-876-3465.
Malibu Wagon ‘82- Modified 350
eng & trans. $6,500 invested.
$3,500/trade 706-866-5346
Mustang ‘66- 3Spd, Does Not
Have Original Motor, Needs
Work $3000 423-227-8133
Jeep Transfer Case, 247J
$200 offer, 488-2727
423-847-8899
GMC Sierra 1500 2WD Reg.
Cab ‘05, Auto, V8 57K Miles
$10,900- $242.03 MO. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
Mercedes-Benz S420 ’94
smk grey, 130k m, disc changer
great cond. $6700,423-756-5080.
GMC Yukon 1500 ‘07, 4x4, Z71
124K, $20,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
SPORT UTILITY
Ford Ranger 2WD Reg. Cab
‘08, Auto, 4 Cyl., 55K Miles
$10,800- $239.89 MO. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
Ford Ranger SLX ‘86- 4x4,
needs fuel pump, $900 obo
423-875-2490
MERCEDES ‘94, C280 White
Great car! Auto 4 dr
$4000. 423-653-5438
FORD CROWN VIC. ‘98.
1 orig. owner, Car Fax, Gold
metallic, Impeccable condition.,
Performance pkg. 105k.
$5999. 706-965-4393.
Differential 4 Wh. Drive from ‘97
Blazer Auto. Excell. cond. $75
423-800-0364
HITCH RECEIVER
Ford Escort
$75.obo 706-861-4525
Ford Ranger 2WD SuperCab
Sport ‘06, Auto, 6 Cyl., 27K
Miles $14,800- $325.51 MO.
W.A.C. C & C Motors
423-499-9799
Mazda Miata Mx5 ‘06- 37k
miles, Auto, Leather, Maroon
Warranty $15,900 842-2610
MERCEDES E430 2000, Garaged, exc. cond. Great tires.
$5495 obo. 423-344-4067.
Jeep Wrangler 4x4 Sahara ‘04,
Auto, 6 Cyl, 91K Miles $11,800$261.29 MO. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
$200 - $1000
CASH FOR JUNK CARS
423-320-6971
I Pay More Than the Rest
CLASSIC
SPECIALTY AUTOS
FORD MODEL T ENGINE &
TRANSMISSION,1926, needs
rebuilding, $150., 886-5729
FORD F250 ‘04, 4X4 Super
duty, Extended Cab, $5500
or trade for van 423-488-3309
Mazda 929 ‘93- Auto, 134k, Air
Pwr, Sunroof, Runs Good
$1800 obo, 423-320-8731
MERCEDES ‘85 190E 4dr 4cyl
5spd. Rare edition Need clutch
kits. $2000.423-580-9082
GMC Sierra 1500 4x4 Ext Cab
SLT ‘00, Auto, 96K Miles, V8,
Leather $12,900- $284.84 MO.
W.A.C. C & C Motors
423-499-9799
FORD F-250 ‘08 Super duty
Crew cab, V-10 Triton, All
power, Leather, Sunroof, GPS,
$17,000. 423-667-2052
FAST SERVICE
BRA- Black Leather Mazda RX7.
Fits 85 model. $20obo.
706-861-3496
CHEVY RIMS 2005
16 in. Aluminum $160 No
centers. 423-987-2482
Ford F-150 XLT ‘99,
Auto, well taken car of,
in good shape & runs great. 4.6
liter, V8, 8ft bed, no oil leaks
264K miles, tires are like new.
$3500 Steve 423-704-0010
WHEELS 15’’
REPAIRS/PARTS/
ACCESSORIES
BUMPER
Volkswagen Jetta $30
423-875-5119
4 X 4 SPORT
UTILITY
for Chevy Colorado.
$120. 423-991-7161
I BUY JUNK CARS - running
or not. I pay top dollar.
Start at $300 & up.
Dennis 595-1132/ 843-4972.
Brigs & Stratton 5hp, Side Shaft,
$150/obo
423-645-2050
Volvo XC90 AWD ‘06, $12,800
NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
Dodge Durango 4x4 Limited
‘04, Leather, Sunroof $8,900$199.21 MO. W.A.C. C & C
Motors 423-499-9799
TRAILER HITCH
1965 Mustang $100.
706-965-3252
Wheels 16" from a 2003 Jaguar.
Set of 4. $100 Call or text
423-320-4607
Jaguar XJ8 ‘04, 4.2L V8, $8,800
NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
Ford F-150 ‘04, 4x4, Flareside,
V8, $15,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
REPAIRS/PARTS/
ACCESSORIES
TIRES- Set of 4, BF Goodrich,
265/70/16, $200. Call
423-650-6450.
Infiniti M35 2008, 88k miles,
Black, loaded asking $20,000.
Call 31-215-3102.
JAGUAR S TYPE ‘07- Ex Cond.
White/Tan Int, factory warranty,
46k m, $18,500, 423-362-1313
Dodge Dakota SLT ‘06, Club
Cab, 2WD, 6 Speed, 6 Cyl. Auto,
V8 $10,900- $242.03 MO. WAC
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
$10,950
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
TRAILBLAZER LT ‘03
Leather, Sunroof, Loaded, Clean
CarFax $5950 423-987-9277
Ford F-150 4x4 Styleside ‘00
111K $6,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
Toyota Highlander 4x4 ‘01, 1 Owner,
Leather, V6, Automatic, Cruise, #017673
+TTL & $349 Doc Fee 423-648-4314
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Ford F150 2WD SuperCrew
XLT ‘03, Auto, 85K Miles, V8
$13,900- $306.24 MO. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
$13,500
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Toyota 4Runner 2WD SR5 ‘05,
Auto, 6 Cyl, 83K Miles $14,800$325.51 MO. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
CHEVY TAHOE 2001,
Great cond. Asking $4800.
Call 706-264-2676.
Subaru Legacy 2.5i Premium ‘11, AWD,
Auto, 93K Miles #12-011P +TTL
423-892-8310
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Ford Expedition EL Eddie Bauer ‘07, 1
Owner, Leather, 8 Passenger, New Tires
#7LA25082 +TTL & $349 Doc Fee
423-648-4314
Dodge Ram 1500 4x4 Reg Cab
SLT ‘05, Auto, V8 $8,900$199.21 MO. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
Herb
Adcox
$7,200
Honda Odyssey EX-L ‘03, Auto, Taffeta
White, 153K Miles #153110 +TTL
423-892-8310
DODGE PICK-UP ‘1949Needs Restored $1500
706-937-4933
$7,052
Pontiac Sunfire ‘05, Auto, Sedona Beige,
FWD, 56K Miles #T5S186904 +TTL & Doc
Fee 800-256-5286 www.economyhonda.com
Herb
Adcox
Ford Escape XLT ‘05, Auto, Redfire, FWD,
157K Miles #T5KA03170 +TTL & Doc Fee
800-256-5286 www.economyhonda.com
Dodge Ram 1500 4x4 Quad
Cab SLT ‘03, Auto, V8, 88K
Miles, $14,800- $325.51 MO.
W.A.C. C & C Motors
423-499-9799
Economy
Honda
$7,591
$10,950
HONDA CIVIC ’10 LX Sedan
4 dr. Black pearl Gray cloth 32k
Auto $14,500. 423-240-6317
Dodge Ram 1500 2WD ‘04,
$8,800 NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
Economy
Honda
Economy
Honda
Chrysler PT Cruiser ‘07, 35K Miles, Power
Windows, Power Locks #597478 +TTL &
$349 Doc Fee 423-648-4314
Nissan Xterra 2WD ‘06, Auto,
6 Cyl., 74K Miles $13,800$304.10 MO. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
HONDA CIVIC ‘07. Auto
Cloth Int. 68K miles
Runs great. $9,900. 693-6930
Dodge Ram 1500 4x4 Quad
Cab SLT ‘02, Auto, V8 $10,800$239.89 MO. W.A.C. C & C
Motors 423-499-9799
Economy
Honda
$10,950
Honda Element EX ‘05, 1 Owner, Luggage
Rack, Automatic, Alloys #5L012648+TTL &
$349 Doc Fee 423-648-4314
Dodge Ram 1500 4x4 Reg Cab
SLT ‘02, 20” Wheels, 53K Miles,
Auto, V8 $13,900- $306.24 MO.
W.A.C. C & C Motors
423-499-9799
CHEVY SILVERADO ‘08. WT
LWB, V6, 145k miles. $7000.
Call 423-280-8003.
$15,000
Economy
Honda
$5,323
Chevy Silverado 1500 2WD
Reg Cab LS ‘03, Auto, V8, 60K
Miles, Southern Comfort
$14,800- $325.51 MO. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
Nissan Maxima SE ‘03, Sunroof, Leather,
Alloys #3T442618 +TTL & $349 Doc Fee
423-648-4314
Herb
Adcox
$12,950
CHEVY S-10 1999, Stepside,
auto, beautiful red, $3600
obo. Call 423-886-2943.
$10,591
Mercedes-Benz C240 ‘03, Auto, Brilliant Silver, 79K Miles #T3A430719 +TTL & Doc Fee
800-256-5286 www.economyhonda.com
$9,432
Honda CR-V EX ‘03, Auto, Satin Silver, 132K
Miles #T3U132244 +TTL & Doc Fee
800-256-5286 www.economyhonda.com
Chevy Colorado ‘05, 2WD, Ext
Cab, Auto, 5 Cyl., 82K Miles
$11,900- $263.43 MO. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
Economy
Honda
Economy
Honda
Chevy Malibu LX ‘11, Auto, Moca Steel Metallic, 37K Miles #12-020P +TTL
423-892-8310
GRAND PRIX ‘95 6-Cyl.,
$1,750.obo trade Nissan/Toyota
Chev. Firebird 706-639-6254
Mazda Millenia Premium ‘02, 1 Owner,45K
Miles, Sunroof, Leather, Alloys #723343 +TTL
& $349 Doc Fee 423-648-4314
Economy
Honda
GMC Sierra K2500 4x4 ‘03,
$13,800 NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
Ford Freestar Limited ‘04- Fully
Loaded , Rear Air, DVD,
Pwr Sliding Doors, New Tires
102K. mls, 5,900, 423-618-6062
Chevy S10 4x4 LS ‘04, 112K
$8,800 NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
Ford Escort ZX2 ‘00- Good
Shape, heat, no air , $1000
423-255-9939 leave message
Honda Odyssey ‘02, Good condition. New transmission built
by Hixson Trans. 75% tire
tread left $5,100 423-255-8819
Chevy 250 ’03HD ExtCab Auto,
PS,PB,AC,6.0 V8. Tool Box,
BedLiner $7250.423-580-7091
Jeep Compass 2WD Limited
‘07, Auto, 4 Cyl., Leather,
Heated Seats $11,900$263.43 MO. W.A.C.
C & C Motors 423-499-9799
CHEVY S10 BLAZER, ‘98, 4x4,
4.3 V6, 135K, leather, tires,
$3200, 423-635-6259
Toyota 4Runner,97. Limited Edition. New Tires. Run and looks
great. $5700. 423-883-0315
FORD FUSION Sport ‘11,
Factory warranty, 14k, black
/black, all power, leather, sunroof, etc. $23,975. 488-4239
Plymouth Grand Voyger SE‘98Green, Michelins, Hitch, AM/FM
w/CD $2,998, 423-875-9202
FORD Bronco 1988, blk. 158k
4x4 nice for age tilt cruise cold
air $3,500. 423/842/1118
Toyota Sequoia ‘02- 201,186
miles, very good condition
$6,500 423-596-4660
FORD TAURUS ‘98, SHO, 107k,
Loaded, Leather, Auto seats,
Moon roof, $4200. 305-3712
Ford Festiva GL ‘91- 114k Miles,
$2000
423-718-2540
Volvo V70 XC cross country,
‘02, auto, leather, sun roof,
88K, $7900 423-991-2831
TRAILERS
Enclosed Trailer6 x10, side door, Nice, $1550,
423-479-5887 or 423-400-2472
GMC SIERRA 2500 2001, Ext
cab, dsl., with 6 horse trailer,
$23,000obo 423-802-9797.
Heavy Duty Equipment
Trailer, Flat Bed,
$3000/obo 423-774-8714
UTILITY TRAILER, New 2012
5x10, with drop gate, $850.
Call 423-875-9911.
WANTED TO BUYSmall trailer, Cheap. Call
423-622-0851.