A Strategic Framework for Establishing East

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A Strategic Framework for Establishing East
Prepared by Six-Twenty Consultants:
Kristen Elkow, Matt Howatt, Eric Huang, Jeffrey Kelly, Benedict San Juan,
Damien Schaefer, Mark Sherman, Pamela Tiller and Ray Tolnay
Table of Contents
Page
Page
1.0
Executive Summary
05
6.0 Phasing
47
2.0
Introduction
09
2.1
2.2
2.3
12
13
14
6.1
6.2
48
50
7.0
Conclusion
53
3.0
Getting There!
17
8.0
Glossary
57
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
18
19
20
25
9.0 Appendix
61
9.1
9.2
62
65
4.0 Being There!
29
10.0 References
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
31
32
34
36
37
5.0 Thriving There!
41
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
42
43
44
45
Defining the Creative Economy
History of the East Bayfront
Why revitalize the East Bayfront?
Connectivity
The East Bayfront Brand
Attracting Business
Transportation
Mixed Use Zoning
Live-Work
The Streetscape
Public Art
Anatomy of a Creative Cluster:
Liberty Village
Economic Connections
Financial Analysis
Social Connections
Families and Housing
Phase 1
Phase 2
Appendix A
Appendix B
67
List of Figures
Page
Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
Figure 7
Figure 8
Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11
Figure 12
Figure 13
Figure 14
Figure 15
Figure 16
Figure 17
Figure 18
Figure 19
Figure 20
Figure 21
Figure 22
Figure 23
Figure 24
Figure 25
Figure 26
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East Bayfront precinct rendering
Polson Iron works October 23, 1914
East Bayfront, Liberty Village and King/Spadina in Toronto
East Bayfront context map
Connectivity of East Bayfront to adjacent neighbourhoods
Dumbo advertisement #1
Dumbo advertisement #2
Liberty Village advertisement
City of Toronto overall creative economy industries
Change of cultural and creative services in King-Spadina
Change of cultural and creative services in Liberty Village
Transit network in the East Bayfront
LRT median in Rotterdam
Transit capacity
Bicycle routes in Toronto
Bicycle lane in East Bayfront
Natural ecological features
First Waterfront Place ground floor animation space
Proposed building at First Waterfront Place
Street sign in Saint Boniface, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Liberty Village Street Furniture
Digital awnings
Programmable, interactive water feature
Memory walk – recording pedestrian movement
Liberty Village Business Inventory: Anatomy of a Creative Cluster
Ground floor animation space
The City of Toronto is experiencing significant employment growth in creative industries and related services. New spaces to accommodate this industry growth
are required. This is a strategic framework that has been created for Artscape to
help guide the establishment of a creative cluster in Toronto’s East Bayfront development.
The following document is the result of three months of intensive research on the
development and establishment of creative cluster economies. Two interim reports focusing on composition, international case studies and demand for creative clusters have been synthesized to form the final recommendations for a
strategic framework.
Three international case studies of creative clusters were observed. They consisted of: Brisbane, Australia; Dublin, Ireland; and New York City, United States.
The examination of international case studies provided an analysis of how public
and private sector strategies are employed to facilitate the growth of a planned
creative cluster.
Two local Toronto case studies of King/Spadina and Liberty Village were studied
in depth to help inform the composition of a creative cluster as well as strategies
which make these areas flourish on a local level.
This report is organized in three successive sections: Getting There!, Being There!
and Thriving There!
Getting There! is focused on how to connect the city and people to East Bayfront
and thereby draw in the creative economy.
Being There! is a description of how East Bayfront will exist within the context of the
city, as well as building a platform on which the creative economy will be experienced and the tools used to anchor these creative based uses with the district.
Thriving There! is composed of long term strategies to anchor East Bayfront’s creative economy and thrive successfully for years to come.
This framework has developed a phasing strategy to establish a cumulative process of building economic stability and animating space in East Bayfront, thereby
establishing the creative cluster.
Overall, this strategic framework is positioned to develop a successful creative
cluster economy within East Bayfront through numerous tools, initiatives and connectivity to the rest of the city and a successful Toronto neighbourhood for years
to come.
2.0 Introduction
The purpose of this report is to provide a detailed strategic framework to anchor a
creative cluster of work, live and recreational space within East Bayfront. Located
south of Lake Shore Boulevard along Toronto’s harbour between Jarvis and Parliament slips, East Bayfront is positioned to reconnect the urban realm of the City of
Toronto with the natural ecology of Lake Ontario (Figure 1). The opportunity exists
to also link the downtown core and the financial district with the new Filmport,
South Riverdale and the West Don Lands through East Bayfront.
This strategic framework has been developed as the final report in a series of three
successive reports. It is enabled and informed by the progression of work completed in the two previous interim reports that aimed to identify the composition
of creative clusters in the international and local context.
Interim Report I consisted of three key areas; a review of relevant planning documents that form the framework of development for East Bayfront, an analysis of
Toronto’s employment trends, and an examination of international case studies
based on creative clusters in Dublin, Brisbane and Brooklyn.
Through the review of relevant planning documents it was identified that section
37 of Ontario’s Planning Act can be used to make key infrastructure improvements that help to create an attractive area for creative based firms to locate in. The document review also revealed that lands slated for development can be
used in the interim to help animate the area as it matures to full build out.
The analysis of city wide employment trends revealed that in order for the City
of Toronto to meet its target of 60,000 new jobs according to the Places to Grow
forecast, a strong emphasis will be placed on the redevelopment of areas such
as East Bayfront.
The examination of international case studies provided an informative look into
how public and private sector strategies are employed to facilitate the growth
of a planned creative cluster. The Dublin Digital Hub case study identified that a
creative cluster should not over-rely on an anchor firm. A mixed base of employment types and scales is needed. The knowledge gained through Interim Report I
was used to guide the formation of the next successive report, Interim Report II.
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Figure 1: East Bayfront Precinct Rendering48
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Interim Report II examined two significant Toronto areas that have strong creativebased economies. The King/Spadina and Liberty Village areas were examined for
the purpose of developing a set of guiding concepts for East Bayfront’s cultureled regeneration. The analysis of these areas focused on the strategic mix of inter-related elements, such as live-work opportunities and mixed use zoning that
have enabled these areas to thrive. The concepts which were identified through
this process were the prioritization of prime locations for cultural industries, the
avoidance of early niche retail development, the provision of informal networking
opportunities through lobby and streetscape design, the inclusion of a variety of
transportation options and the creation of a distinctive identity for East Bayfront.
The progression of the preceding two reports has enabled the development
of the final strategic framework presented within this document. This strategic
framework functions as a detailed plan on how to achieve the ultimate goal of
this project: to anchor a creative based economy in East Bayfront.
This report has a linear structure that guides the reader through three sections.
The first section of the report “Getting There” outlines specific strategies to draw
individuals and creative firms into the East Bayfront. The following section “Being
There” describes the process of experiencing East Bayfront and the elements that
will be employed to anchor creative based uses within the district. The final section “Thriving There” details how the creative economy will be enabled to thrive
and be sustainable in the long term. Each section of this report combines to form
our complete strategic framework.
2.1 Defining the Creative Economy
The creative economy is a diverse mix of sectors that overlap, ranging from the
core arts of original compositions to the cultural industries that mass produce original works and creative services that facilitate the exchange of these goods and
services.
There is a clear gap between three major sectors; information and communication technologies (ICT), new media and creative industries.
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ICT industries are mainly defined as industries that have revolutionized the way
in which we communicate information such as peer-to-peer communication,
broadband services, telecom equipment, microelectronics and software development1. These industries continue to create and utilize the latest in technological
advancements.
New media industries are more defined as interactive online services where the
creations can be accessed via the World Wide Web including online art, online
television, blogs and online video games2. Therefore, this sector may comprise
portions of both ICT and creative industries via communication through the Internet.
Creative industries can be defined as a form of creating or exploiting intellectual
property or creating a service on a business to business level such as graphic
design, publishing or advertising. Sectors where the classic forms of intellectual
property are created comprise of radio and television, Software development (including traditional video game and computer program development), fine arts,
architecture, fashion, music and performing arts3.
2.2 History of East Bayfront
East Bayfront’s history begins in the late 19th Century, when prior to the Harbour
Commissioner’s landfill activities, the area consisted only of open water and a
number of wharves4. Soon after, the area was occupied with 22 wharves and
the new Keating Channel leading into the Don River5. Major industries in the area
c.1880 to 1900 consisted of the Polson Iron Works (Figure 2), the National Iron Works
and British American Oil6.
Over the next fifty years the port wavered along with the economy. The opening
of the St. Lawrence Seaway through the 1950’s and subsequent rise of shipping
through the area significantly increased port activities for the East Bayfront7. This
increase spurred the final infill process for the East Bayfront and the development
of the Queen Elizabeth Docks in anticipation of steady shipping activities in the
future8. This, unforuntuately, did not materialize, in major part to technological advancements and eventually resulted in the underutilized brownfields today.
Figure 2: Polson Iron works October 23, 191449
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Planning efforts in East Bayfront over the last decade have been very active. The
process began in 1999 when the City of Toronto made a call to action for revitalizing the waterfront. “Our Toronto’s Waterfront: The Wave of the Future” provided a
major catalyst for the three levels of government to come together6. In 2000, the
Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Task Force was established, presenting a second
report entitled “Our Toronto’s Waterfront: A Gateway to the New Canada”10. Not
long after in 2001 the Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Corporation (TWRC, now
known as Waterfront Toronto) was established to lead Toronto’s waterfront redevelopment11.
The City of Toronto and Waterfront Toronto worked together to create a development plan and a business strategy for the waterfront12. The city’s report, “Making
Waves” provided the Central Waterfront Secondary Plan focusing on high quality
public spaces, promenades, public gardens and a transit-first approach to development on the waterfront13.
East Bayfront was designated as an official Regeneration Area by the city and the
Precinct Plan was released to further articulate development for East Bayfront in
late 200514.
The last year has provided a lot of activity for East Bayfront. There has been significant media attention, including the new Corus Entertainment building as well as
a design competition for Jarvis Slip resulting in the choice of Sugar Beach. March,
2008 Waterfront Toronto released a Request for Qualifications (RFQ) for East Bayfront for possible developers.
2.3 Why Revitalize East Bayfront?
The City of Toronto’s revitilization strategies implemented in the form of East Bayfront have the potential to provide the city with a vibrant economic hub on the
waterfront built entirely on reclaimed brownfield land.
As politicians, planners and developers are looking for a way to curb urban sprawl,
the city must make a choice about intensification; more specifically within the
downtown. East Bayfront provides the city and Waterfront Toronto with a blank
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slate by which to develop a contemporary urban community along the waterfront. This under-utilized, former industrial land provides an opportunity for success.
Part of Waterfront Toronto’s mission is to bring Toronto into the forefront of global
cities in the 21st century15. By being a part of the larger waterfront redevelopment
scheme which includes the naturalization of the mouth of the Don River, the West
Don Lands and the Port Lands, East Bayfront can be a part of the larger success
of Toronto’s waterfront as well as a pillar on its own.
The East Bayfront revitalization provides a prime location that will allow it to
easily connect to the rest of the city and the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) (Figure 3 and 4). It is directly connected to two major expressways running into
Toronto, the Gardiner Expressway and the Don Valley Parkway. It is adjacent
to Union Station which is a regional transportation hub and is also undergoing
a number of upgrades including the Blue22, a direct rail link to Pearson International Airport.
The city’s 2001 Economic Development Strategy outlined the need for Toronto
to develop innovation and design. Through this, a number of policy initiatives
have expanded providing the East Bayfront with a solid base rationale for developing as a creative cluster along the waterfront.
Figure 3: East Bayfront, Liberty Village and King/
Spadina in Toronto50
\
Figure 4: East Bayfront context map51
15
16
“I walked to East Bayfront from King and Parliament where I work as a creative writer at an
Interactive Marketing firm. My boss has been thinking about relocating to the area and
I wanted to see it for myself. I hope we move. Once the streetcar line is done this will be
an awesome area; being so close to the water yet still connected to the rest of the city is
great.
I explored the area and almost forgot that I was Downtown. There’s something about
the lake that calms me, I slow down, breath and then I can think. I had a great idea and
can’t wait to get to my computer and work it out. Monday, I’m telling my boss that we
should be here. ”
Tobin McGregor, 26, Interactive Marketing
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3.1 Connectivity
Establish and integrate East Bayfront within the network of surrounding areas
East Bayfront is bounded by many districts and neighbourhoods; some old, some
newly completed, and others that have yet to be completed (Figure 5). East Bayfront must both function as a distinct neighbourhood, while also creating connections with surrounding areas.
East Bayfront connects with Harbourfront Centre along the edge of Lake Ontario.
Connectivity between the two areas is largely based on the planned waterfront
promenade that will allow an ease of pedestrian flow. Also tourist traffic generated from the successful programming and event scheduling within Harbourfront
Centre has the potential to result in spill over traffic into East Bayfront.
One of the key elements of connectivity to East Bayfront and its surrounding areas
is Union Station. Union Station will provide a crucial link for employees and visitors
commuting to the East Bayfront from the greater Toronto region.
The St. Lawrence Market neighbourhood has one of Toronto’s most diverse creative economies. There are a number of private galleries, small media firms, the
Canadian Opera Company, small niche retail and of course the St. Lawrence
Market itself. These independent small retailers will provide a form of trade or retail for creative industry in the area, as well as attract visitors and entertainment
seekers.
The Distillery District serves as a prime tourist and entertainment attraction adjacent to East Bayfront. The district will provide entertainment amenities such as fine
dining, nightlife, and theatre to East Bayfront. From an economic perspective,
the Distillery District can provide the type of conference and event space that
companies may choose to use because of its proximity and excellent reputation.
Both the Distillery District and Harbourfront Centre were considered during the
conception of the retail and cultural animation strategies.
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Figure 5: Connectivity of the East Bayfront to
adjacent neighbourhoods
The King and Parliament District has a well-established creative based economy
which has the potential to provide significant industry linkages with East Bayfront’s
creative based employment due to the relative proximity between the two areas.
The West Don Lands will serve as a major residential living space for those working
in East Bayfront employment areas. The West Don Lands will provide a diverse mix
of housing opportunities suited to serve all members of the East Bayfront workforce.
Filmport and Corus are the two large public investment projects along the waterfront. Together, as the first phases of development, these two developments will
serve to anchor creative based industry along the waterfront.
3.2 The East Bayfront Brand
Communicate a unified image of East Bayfront as a
creative, ecological point of arrival
Place-branding makes connections between existing perceptions, strengths and
future directions of a specific location. In order to successfully market East Bayfront, people’s experiences on the site must relate directly to the brand.
Currently existing at East Bayfront are a few industrial businesses and buildings.
The neighbourhood does not have strong transportation linkages to the rest of
the city. As such, few people have been in contact with the area, and therefore
strong public perceptions do not need to be considered in the initial branding
strategy.
An image for East Bayfront must revolve around existing strengths and plans. Adding on to Waterfront Toronto’s agenda to reconnect Toronto to Lake Ontario, East
Bayfront will posses many ecological qualities. As indicated in the East Bayfront
Precinct Plan, building and park spaces will be oriented in order to maximize connection with the waterfront. These connections will be strengthened by the integration of reclaimed and naturalized landscapes, such as the Lower Don Lands.
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Branding should be targeted toward potential new media businesses and tourists.
Given the strong marketing campaigns employed by new residential and condominium developers, branding geared to new residents will become a lesser focus.
Branding will be used to encourage new businesses, and create more through
traffic in the area in order to establish East Bayfront as a point of arrival.
An example of marketing promotions is provided in Figures 6 and 7. This example
located within Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass (DUMBO) in New
York City displays how Two Trees Management has incorporated a method of
attracting potential business interests and creative people to this area by inviting them to “come see what they see” and to “Live Work Play”. The branding is
simple yet effective in communicating the atmosphere that the area provides for
business and residential interests.
Similar examples are also present in Toronto at Liberty Village with “Creativity.
Possibility. Innovation.” and “Raw Space. Transformed” used as a description of
the Liberty Market building found on their web page. Another example as seen
in Figure 8 is marketing towards “Live. Work. Create.” moving along similar guidelines with a clear connection made between the creativity of artists and the type
of units potential buyers are becoming a part of.
Figure 6: Dumbo Advertisement #152
For East Bayfront, branding through marketing should incorporate an ecological
component and the waters edge as major assets. It must outline the creativity
and lifestyle that is being marketed in other creative districts.
Another marketing approach for East Bayfront includes the usage of the acronym
EBF. Acronyms can be used in marketing to create a catchy and easy to remember name. New York City’s DUMBO successfully built a brand identity around a
clever acronym. Toronto condominium branding such as 9T6, LTD. and M5V have
used three letter names to stand out in a competitive market. Condensing East
Bayfront to EBF could give the area an edge that speaks to the target creative
economy and population to be attracted to the area.
Figure 7: Dumbo Advertisement #253
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Recommendations:
Distinctive public realm and urban design attributes that visually indicate
sense of arrival in East Bayfront
Marketing towards new business and tourists
Brand focus on creativity and ecological attributes
Test the name EBF and East Bayfront with focus groups for branding potential
3.3 Attracting Business
Attract creative economy employment to locate
within the area
The overall objective of East Bayfront employment strategy is to attract some
8,000 high value-added new jobs to the area over a 15 year span of development16. There will be a focus on the creative economy employment for the
majority of the job creation.
Growth trends were observed through employment statistics and case studies
of King/Spadina and Liberty Village employment clusters. Cultural industries
and creative services show steady growth and are larger industries by firm
count then core arts. Figure 9 shows the growth of all three sectors of Toronto’s
creative economy industries between 2001 and 2007.
Figure 8: Liberty Village Advertisement54
On a micro level looking at Toronto neighbourhoods, more specifically King/
Spadina and Liberty Village (Figures 10 and 11 respectively), there is steady
employment growth when evaluated by office type17. Refer to 9.0 Appendix
A: Creative Economy Employment Categories for further information on employment analysis.
21
FIgure 9: City of Toronto Overall Creative Economy Industries by NAICs55
Figure 10 shows the breakdown of percent change from 1995 to 2005 by office
type for establishment and employment in King/Spadina. Total Cultural Industry by establishment and employment grew by 52% and 38% respectively. Total
Creative Services showed an 82% rise in establishment from 1995 to 2005 and
a impressive growth of 267% for employment positions. The overall percent
change for District Office Total was 21% establishment increase and a 103%
employment increase18.
Figure 11 showing the Liberty Village breakdown of establishments and employment positions shows and overall cultural industry growth of employment establishments (firms) by 16% and an employment position growth of 4% from 1995 to
200519. Total creative service establishments had a negative growth of -48% but
an employment position growth of 103%. This can be explained as fewer firms employing a greater people. Overall employment district growth showed a similar
trend with -35% establishment growth and 71% employment growth20.
To focus creative economy growth into East Bayfront several obstacles must be
overcome. The area has several brownfields, limited public transit and no public
access to Lake Ontario. The City of Toronto and Waterfront Toronto are initiating
22
Figure 10: Change of cultural and creative services in King/Spadina56
Figure 11: Change of cultural and creative services in Liberty Village57
23
various projects to overcome the obstacles and attracting the target employment to the area. The City of Toronto will be designating East Bayfront as one of
four Community Improvement Plan Areas (CIPA) on the waterfront.
Designating East Bayfont as a CIPA will enable the city to provide financial incentives to developers through tax grants otherwise not allowed. Grants will be given
to property owners who develop a new building or expand an existing building
for a preferred use. The development must meet environmental standards in construction to be eligible.
Developments that meet the criteria receive a portion of their taxes back for 10
years, 100% the first year, incrementally reduced by 10% each following year. This
type of grant system is referred to as Tax Increment Equivalent Grants (TIEGs)18.
A marketing campaign will be needed to inform businesses of the TIEGs and the
brownfield bonuses. In addition to grants the campaign should promote the waterfront location, proximity to other economic districts, district wide WI FI network
and clustering of the creative economy.
Lake-side views, proximity to parks and the water’s edge should be promoted
as prestige factors. In attracting the creative economy the area’s naturalization
and open space systems should be promoted as a natural link with creativity. The
opportunity for creative uses of the lake is an asset to the location that should be
promoted.
The clustering of creative firms and people within East Bayfront will be an important
component of the marketing strategy. The benefits of creative clustering should
be used to attract a variety of firms form the creative economy to the area.
Incubation space could be used to attract emerging businesses to the area. Incubator spaces such as Dublin’s Digital Depot offered furnished office areas with
a variety of floor plans. The Depot had common areas and a café to support the
networking between new businesses. Incubation space will bring innovation to
the area.
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Recommendations:
Market to the creative economy with a campaign that promotes; TIEGs,
waterfront location and ecology and creative new media clustering
Create incubation spaces and make them available to start up firms
working in the creative economy
3.4 Transportation
Support an integrated, multimodal transportation system for residents and
employees in East Bayfront
Transportation networks will play a vital role in the integration of East Bayfront with
the rest of Toronto, allowing for the movement of people and goods into and
throughout the neighbourhood. East Bayfront must provide sufficient transportation connections to surrounding neighbourhoods, allowing for the growth and
success of the area.
East Bayfront’s current transportation networks are highlighted in Figure 12. Currently, East Bayfront has one bus route running through it, the 75 Sherbourne22. In
addition, there is a lack of connectivity between East Bayfront and Union Station,
the closest transportation hub to the area. Though the road network is more exten- Figure 12: Transit network in the East Bayfront58
sive, it is heavily used to accommodate vehicular travel to other parts of the city.
The Gardiner Expressway also hinders pedestrian access north and south bound
traffic into the area. There is sufficient access to bicycle lanes into the area.
Travel into East Bayfront should be fast and convenient. Commuters should have
access to a variety of transportation methods. Traffic movement in the East Bayfront should be minimized in order to limit environmental impacts.
The East Bayfront Precinct Plan suggests the implementation of light rail transit
(LRT) with a right of way (ROW).
25
An LRT with a ROW running through East Bayfront would allow for proper connectivity between the area and the greater Toronto area. Union Station and East
Bayfront should be connected in order to facilitate access to GO Transit or VIA
Rail. LRT streetscapes can be complimented by unique design implements such
as garden rows (Figure 13).
Figure 14 indicates that an LRT with an exclusive right of way would be supported
with a demand capacity of 10,000 passengers or more per hour per direction.
East Bayfront’s anticipated population of 14,400 residents and 3,800 employees
would be supportive of this line23.
Figure 13: LRT median in Rotterdam59
Recommendations:
Support the placement of an LRT line in East Bayfront
Compliment public transportation with unique street features
Bicycle Transit
East Bayfront has two existing bicycle lanes north along Sherbourne St., and east/
west along Queens Quay East. (see Figure 12) However, there is a lack of connectivity between the east/west lanes. According to Figure 15, there is a gap
between the bicycle lane along Queens Quay East and Martin Goodman trail in
the west. The bicycle lane on Queens Quay East is ill-kept and often used as vehicularparking decreasing its effectiveness (see Figure 16).
Recommendations:
Provide adequate linkage between the Queens Quay East bicycle lane
and the Martin Goodman Trail in the west
Create a physical barrier, seperating the bicycle lane from vehicular
traffic
26
Figure 14: Transit capacity60
Figure 15: Bicycle route in Toronto61
Pedestrian Transit
A pedestrian promenade should be functional and aesthetically pleasing in order
to promote walking in East Bayfront. Safety must be considered in the design of
pedestrian pathways in establishing connections to adjacent neighbourhoods.
Recommendations:
Ample lighting, and signage to improve pedestrian safety
Walk safe programs that provide security for employees during off peak
hours
Use street furniture developed in accordance with recommendations
provided within this report in section “Being there: Street Furniture
Figure 16: Bicycle lane in East Bayfront62
27
28
“This is my favourite coffee shop. They serve almond milk lattes and it’s on a great corner
for people-watching. The street here is vibrant, even after I’m finished work for the day. I’ve also met a lot of cool people here too. Every time I stop by I seem to meet another
person involved in an interesting project here in East Bayfront. There have been quite a
few innovative ideas conceived here in this coffee shop between co-workers and people
involved in my field. There’s also a look and a vibe to the people in East Bayfront. My
theory is that with the public art on the street and the engaging design features people
see themselves as part of the artistic fabric of the area.
It’s part of my job to be creative and I like being in an area that celebrates that and in
turn inspires me.”
Dana Green, 32, Film and Theatre Set Designer
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4.0 Being There!
Frame the East Bayfront as an inspired place to live and work through urban
design features, live-work space and mixed-use areas
Live-work space, mixed-use zoning and urban design recommendations for East
Bayfront integrate both the natural and creative ecologies of the area in order to
create a distinctive sense of place. Place-making in East Bayfront celebrates Toronto’s waterfront location and inspires creativity in all aspects of the community
including built form, public space, business networks and the creative economy.
Creative people and businesses thrive in architecturally dynamic neighbourhoods. The raw, expansive industrial buildings and low to nonexistent rental rates
in the district currently known as Liberty Village led to a westward migration of artists from Toronto’s downtown core during the 1980s. This initial habitation of artists
brought a creative energy to the district which was harnessed nearly a decade
later by film and sound production companies and new media firms that established offices and studios there. The DUMBO district in New York City experienced a similar trend. Starting in the
1970s artists migrated into abandoned warehouses and factories in DUMBO because of their expansive, industrial architecture and low costs compared to similar rentals in Manhattan.
East Bayfront lacks the concentration of heritage buildings existing in Liberty Village and DUMBO. These cases indicate that expansive, adaptable, and affordable spaces with an engaging aesthetic are integral to the formation and success of a creative cluster.
Natural ecology in this context, refers to the waterfront ecosystem of Lake Ontario and watersheds such as the Don River. Continuity should be established with
the neighbouring community of the West Don Lands by incorporating naturalized
landscape elements and public art features that celebrate the areas ecological
setting. Examples include stormwater management parks and open space vistas
with a strong orientation to the lake (Figure 17). The area should be redefined as a
destination on the waterfront that connects locals with Lake Ontario and inspires
the creative workforce.
30
Figure 17: Natural ecological features63
One of the first signs of development in East Bayfront is Toronto Economic Development Corporation’s (TEDCO) First Waterfront Place scheduled for completion
in 2010 at the foot of Jarvis Street (Figure 18 and 19). The building will house Corus
Entertainment’s entire company of office, television and radio production in addition to retail space. An anchor firm such as Corus will help to establish a creative
ecology with over 1,000 jobs along with supportive businesses.
However, Waterfront Toronto’s Design Review Panel continually urged TEDCO to
revise their design for the building to further engage the public24. First Waterfront
Place will serve as a point of arrival for those entering East Bayfront and the Design Panel’s call for revisions has resulted in a performance stage added to the
ground floor in addition to a restaurant oriented outside toward the lake and a
glass atrium.
First Waterfront Place illustrates the challenge in East Bayfront to balance the
need for economic investment through development while upholding principles
of sustainable and engaging design that celebrate the natural ecology.
4.1 Mixed Use Zoning
Figure 18: First Waterfront Place ground floor animation space64
Mix residential, institutional, business, and cultural spaces to
support a vibrant creative economy
A mix of uses sustains continuous activities throughout the day. The energy and
opportunity generated by these diverse communities fuel the creative economy
thereby strengthening a city’s competitiveness.
Mixed use zoning enables core creative businesses such as anchor firms to establish themselves alongside supportive businesses. In addition, retail and residential
uses draw in visitors and residents to the area, ensuring a presence beyond normal work day hours seen in Toronto’s King/Spadina district (Figure 10). This dynamic mix of the social and professional spheres creates a knowledge interface used
by creative businesses to inform their work through networking and information
sharing25.
Figure 19:Proposed building at First Waterfront
Place65
31
To promote activity on a macro community level and a micro building level, the
concept of “cross-programming”26 promotes a healthy clustering of businesses
and individuals through locating more than one type of use in a given space.
These arrangements function as incubators for acreative economy. Over time
as goods and services are traded, networks form between businesses and a creative ecology develops.
Recommendations:
Permissible mixed use zoning scheme
Encourage building arrangements that incorporate more than one use
4.2 Live/Work
Ensure live/work space accommodates housing demands while providing a
space for the productivity of creative-based users
Live/work spaces provide a balance in creative districts by satisfying the demand
for housing while maintaining the production of creative goods and services. They
represent the interface where the professional and personal spheres of life mingle
and creativity is spawned.
Since creative firms do not always operate during traditional business hours the
provision of residential space is essential to maintain productivity. Bursts of creativity or a stream of thought can be articulated at any time when the paint brush,
guitar or laptop is within reach.
“If I have an idea I can get up and work on it instantly,” says Dennis Lin, a sculptor and installation artist who lives and works in a 2,600 square foot unit in Liberty
Village. Lin reserves the prime 2,200 square feet at the rear for work because of its
expansive windows and high ceilings that illuminate the space. His living space for
eating, sleeping and washing up comprises the remaining 400 square feet27.
32
In East Bayfront the implementation of live-work space is essential to meet the demand for housing and productivity. However, what constitutes a live/work space
varies widely between developers, artists, and potential buyers in Toronto.
The size of the space is the key issue to sustain live/work units as artists like Lin require expansive areas to fabricate their work. Similarly, an ICT firm may require
enough space to set up various technological tools, work stations, and meeting
areas, in addition to the living space. Developers, meanwhile, are marketing units
as live/work, such as Lanterra Developments’ Toy Factory Loft in Liberty Village,
that have a work area comprising less than a quarter of the entire unit size28. Currently under construction on Hanna Avenue, their efficiency to accommodate
creative-based businesses remains to be seen.
The size of live/work space ranges from one bedroom units of 753 square feet
to two bedroom plus den units of 2120 square feet. The size of ‘work’ space referred to alternatively as ‘den’ and ‘sleeping’ space remains between 100 and
150 square feet in all units29. In effect, developers of the Toy Factory Lofts have
created hundreds of isolated small workspaces within larger units.
Without sufficient work space artists and creative businesses will be stifled, unable
to thrive and incapable of networking with one another. The fundamental challenge is providing live/work space that is adaptable to different users, is accessible and large enough to accommodate more than one employee.
While it is not a live/work space, the Liberty Market Building in Liberty Village provides a better example of the type of space and aesthetic desired by creativebased businesses. Units range in size from 680 square feet to 18 270 square feet
with the average falling between 1,000 square feet a unit30. The revitalized commercial space still maintains its industrial heritage with concrete floors and exposed brick and beam supports. More importantly, units are adaptable to different users with ample floor plates and floor to ceiling proportions ensuring a mix of
office, studio and retail opportunities.
In DUMBO, Two Trees Management has maintained live-work accommodation for
artists since the late 1990’s. Currently, about 1,000 artists and arts organizations
33
thrive in buildings provided by public and private interests including the city of
New York Planning Department and Two Trees Management. In developing former industrial buildings, Two Trees covers the majority of renovation costs while
tenants cover the remainder. In addition, tenants usually sign long term leases of
of up 15-years at costs below market price ensuring their live/work space will remain as such and within affordability31.
Spaces vary from move-in ready “pre-built, pre-wired” units ranging in size from
1,000- 10,000 square feet to build-to-suit spaces with flexible floor plates of up to
26,000 square feet29. With the ability to divide or combine spaces as needed, Two
Trees Management offers adaptable space ensuring a diverse mix of potential
users.
In East Bayfront, live/work space will accommodate demands for waterfront housing while hosting the productivity of creative-based businesses providing a palpable energy day and night. In order to facilitate live-work space developers must
be willing to build spaces conducive to creative-based uses in which work space
is at least equal to or greater than the living space. A productive live-work unit will
boast tall ceilings and expansive windows and will be pre-wired and adaptable
for every creative use from the ICT firm to the sculptor.
Recommendation:
Ensure live/work units are adaptable to different creative-based users and
sufficient space is allotted for the accessibility, productivity, and networking of users
4.3 The Streetscape
Provide an animated, varied streetscape in the East Bayfront
The streets are the interface where open space meets development, people
gather and ideas are exchanged. The streetscape is experienced through an interaction of elements, including signage, street furniture and building frontages.
34
Streetscape design reinforces a neighbourhood image. Unique signage in Winnipeg’s French Quarter (Saint Boniface) is used to indicate arrival in the neighbourhood, as well as celebrating the areas historic francophone roots (Figure 20). The
street signs are complimented by an additional series of banners that highlight
local events and famous Saint Boniface residents. Street signs are used in Saint
Boniface to frame street interaction and reinforce the neighbourhood’s cultural
image.
A similar approach was adopted in Liberty Village through street furniture. Benches decorated by artists are placed throughout the neighbourhood, emblematic
of the creative workforce in the neighbourhood (Figure 21).
As indicated in the preceding examples, the streetscape should be used to reinforce specific neighbourhood attributes. Pedestrianism, the creative ecology, and
natural ecology should be central to all streetscape design in order to strengthen
East Bayfront’s image.
Similarly, the scale, ornamentation and orientation of signs and buildings will contribute to the East Bayfront image. For example, larger billboard signs should be
reoriented to a pedestrian scale opposed to being designed to attract attention
from automobile passengers.
Figure 20: Street sign in Saint
Boniface, Winnipeg, Manitoba66
Upper floor setbacks will also provide a more pedestrian scale. Smaller linear parks
and seating areas in mid-block connections between buildings will also maintain
a varied streetscape.
Foliage, plant life and street furniture should be integrated to reinforce natural
ecology.
East Bayfront’s creative economy should be incorporated into the streetscape
design. Opportunities to allow the public access to signage and displays via Wireless internet such as plans created for a project for Expo ‘08 in Zaragoza, Spain developed at MIT should be explored. This takes the form of digital awnings, which
are screens that can rotate in four directions: up, down, left and right (Figure 22)30.
Figure 21: Liberty Village Street Furniture67
35
Users of spaces control the movement of the awnings by either pre-programming,
a command by mobile phone, in response to people’s physical movements or in
the service of a special event.
Recommendations:
Use native plants on ledges and steps down to the lakefront
Follow the Toronto Green Development Standard, which recommends
the use of materials locally produced and manufactured
Create a distinctive set of street furniture and signage for East Bayfront
Prohibit billboards and aerial signs in order to keep signage at a human
scale
Provide authorized open spaces for community posters, announcements
and notices
Animated ground floor design, with upper floor setback from the street
level building frontage
Place distinctive features at neighbourhood gateways
4.4 Public Art
Provide a venue for interaction with the
public realm through art
Creativity can be encouraged in various forms, outside of the workplace. This can
be achieved through interactive public art pieces, such as water features, large
scale outdoor games, play structures and moveable sculptures.
The convergence of new media / digital technology with public art will create an
36
Figure 22: Digital awnings68
opportunity for the public to get involved with the creative process. Zaragoza,
Spain’s Digital Mile provides examples of wireless public-controllable water features (Figure 23)34, symbolic synchronized lighting schemes35 and motion-sensitive
lighting fixtures (Figure 24)36 to show how these concepts can be incorporated
into the urban environment.
Art fixtures that reflect seasonal weather changes are desirable for East Bayfront.
Seasonal art displays should evolve and change with weather patterns. An example of this type of installation includes ice sculptures that change shape through
natural cycles of freezing and melting.
Recommendations:
Interactive public art
Provide a venue for local new media businesses or students to display their
new media work products
Figure 23: Programmable, interactive water feature69
Incorporate public art that is responsive to seasonal changes, particularly
in limited seasonal use sites, such as Sugar Beach
Use public art light features, in accordance with the Bird Friendly Development
Use art to compliment the lakefront and future population
4.5 Anatomy of a Creative Cluster: Liberty Village
Figure 24: Memory walk – recording pedestrian
movement70
Highlight the diversity of creative-based uses in Liberty
Village’s core arts, creative and cultural industries
Liberty Village has evolved over several decades from a bustling wartime manufacturing district, to an artists haven, to a high-tech creative hub.
37
Currently, film and sound production studios, web design firms and advertising
agencies occupy former munitions manufacturing buildings and carpet factories.
Wired with broadband capabilities, renovated units feature expansive windows,
tall ceilings and a rustic brick and beam aesthetic. The unique environment celebrates the building heritage while progressing forward with a modern, servicebased economy.
Buildings such as the Carpet Factory at the corner of Mowat Avenue and Liberty
Street provide adaptable spaces for a variety of businesses deep within its expansive structure. Tenants such as II By IV Design, Cooler Solutions, and the Liberty
Village Business Improvement Area, are able to work in an environment of likeminded firms who may benefit from collaborative projects or networking information. Similarly, the Liberty Market Building at 170 East Liberty Street provides space
for its creative-based tenants to network in a second floor lounge and ground
floor cafes and pubs.
Informal meeting spaces such as the Warehouse Grill at 70 Fraser Avenue, The
Roastery at the corner of Pardee Avenue and Liberty Street and the linear park
featuring unique benches along Liberty Street provide spaces for informal meetings. The chance encounters or meetings outside the office can spark an idea
for a collaboration or facilitate information sharing important features of the creative-based economy.
The artist live/work spaces at 15-31 Atlantic Avenue provide smaller firms and individual artists the space to create at all hours of the day. Companies such as
Umomo at 17 Atlantic Avenue produce a wide range of products from hanging
mobiles and one-of-a-kind furniture to tee-shirts and housewares.
However, the creative energy generated by these firms which is palpable upon
arrival has become sought after by condominium developers moving westward
from the downtown core and driving up the cost of property in the area. Consequently, the fluctuation in the creative-based economy and the residential markets continue to alter the face of LIberty Village and the firms that call it home.
38
Sony BMG Canada is the latest anchor tenant to announce it will be leaving its
190 Liberty Street location for cheaper space in Don Mills to cut costs37. Corus
Entertainment is also leaving the Liberty Village cluster removing a key link in the
chain of the area’s creative economy. When an anchor pulls out of a creative
cluster of firms there are many supportive businesses that are affected. Nevertheless, in keeping with the ebb and flow of the creative economy EMI records will be
moving into Liberty Village in the wake of Sony BMG’s exit.
Recommendation:
A diverse mix of creative-based businesses in a range of scales from an
established creative-based firm to an independent artist are necessary to
provide a stable, thriving creative economy
39
1
1
2
3
2
5
3
4
Figure 25: Liberty Village Business Inventory: Anatomy of a Creative Cluster
40
4
7
6
5
6
7
“I’d done some freelance web design for a few arts-based companies in East Bayfront.
Every time I came here for a meeting I was struck by the energy on the street balanced
with the serenity of the lake. Eventually I came across a three bedroom condo for sale. I
consulted with my wife and two daughters and then bought it.
There’s a great network here for getting work in web design. My wife, who is an interior designer has already found some potential clients in the area. Outside our house is a huge
park with connections to the waterfront promenade and the Martin Goodman trail. My
daughters go to school within walking distance and have a curriculum that highlights the
ecology that we are surrounded by. We’ll be staying here for a while.”
- Ed Varnsen, 41, Freelance Web Designer
41
5.0 Thriving There!
5.1 Economic Connections
Sustain economic activities by renewing
connections to adjacent areas
East Bayfront is located in proximity to Toronto’s downtown core, the St. Lawrence
Market neighborhood, Distillery District, the Harbourfront Centre and the Don River
communities of South Riverdale and the West Don Lands. These well-established
areas at the periphery of East Bayfront will help develop critical mass to increase
economic activity and to animate the streetscape along the waterfront.
The presence of Corus Entertainment has the potential to develop valuable economic linkages between East Bayfront and the Port Lands based new media sector jobs. Corus Entertainment will provide an important connection with the Port
Lands and attract new media sector jobs with an emphasis on digital media and
film. However, the risk of relying on one anchor tenant in a creative economy is
evident in the failure of Media Lab Europe in Dublin. Numerous minor connections
between smaller enterprises and the community must occur to ensure the sustainability of the project.
Recommendations:
Build connections between anchor employers and adjacent communities, such as Corus Entertainment and the Port Lands
Facilitate concurrent minor connections between smaller creative-based
firms to reduce reliance on main anchors
42
5.2 Financial Analysis
Support the development of East Bayfront initiatives
through a focused financial strategy.
The following section addresses the financial strategy for the development of East
Bayfront. The project has a duration of 15 years with full build out being achieved
in 202138. The total project costs are estimated at $2.5 billion dollars with approximately $300 million in public sector investment and the remaining $2.2 billion coming from private sector investment39. Due to the extremely high degree of dependence on the private sector, public sector investment that creates an attractive
environment to creative based firms is crucial to the success of East Bayfront. The approximate $300 million dollar public sector investment is composed of government revenues generated from the project and the available government
funding40.
The available government funding is comprised of $211 million for East Bayfront
over 10 years41. Land sales represent the majority of the government revenues,
but additional sources include land and retail leasing, parking fees, development
charges, building permit fees, GST, land transfer taxes and property taxes during
development42.
Strategic investments, such as investments in the ground floor animation space
and public parking facilities shall be made to develop an atmosphere that is conducive to investment from creative sector industries. These investments are made
as a part of the long term strategy to anchor creative based uses in the area and
attract further supportive private sector investment (Figure 26)43.
Currently, it is under discussion whether employment lands that were originally
slated for sale to the private sector, should be developed on a long-term lease
basis. In order to realize increased land values over the duration of the project
Waterfront Toronto should pursue this strategy of long term leases44.
Figure 26: Ground floor animation space71
43
A sensitivity analysis was conducted to assess the affect of fluctuations on certain
project variables. These variables have the potential to drastically alter the total
project costs. The results of this sensitivity analysis revealed that the most sensitive
variable to the project was infrastructure construction costs45. A strategy to mitigate the effect of fluctuations in construction costs is to accelerate the construction of building shells. The increase in overtime pay will be more than offset by
the early completion date and the avoidance of potentially drastic increases in
infrastructure construction costs.
Recommendations:
In regards to employment lands that were originally slated for private sector sale, Waterfront Toronto should pursue a strategy of long term leases
as a means of capturing increased land values.
The construction of building shells should be accelerated as a means of
mitigating the effect of potential fluctuations in construction costs.
5.3 Social Connections
Strengthen ties between East Bayfront and the city of Toronto
to establish a sustainable district.
Guided by the principles outlined in the Central Waterfront Secondary Plan, this
section outlines the recommended future actions to establish connections with
the rest of the city to create a dynamic neighbourhood in East Bayfront where
creative industries desire to be and thrive in.
East Bayfront can be a unique district integrated into the city of Toronto by building on the existing social momentum in adjacent neighbourhoods through participation in regional clubs, and events. With the introduction of institutional space,
it is possible to use its associations with multiple parties to connect students, visitors
and professionals. The case study of Brisbane’s Creative Industry Precinct is a
44
mixture of student space and office spaces. It provides event venues for students
and professionals, allowing social connections and experiences to be made with
the different types of visitors, students and professionals. This framework envisions
a similar approach.
Recommendations:
Utilize public institutions such as schools and community centres to establish connections with the greater city of Toronto through sport and community event functions
Provide venue space for festivals, special events and exhibits
Link to existing festivals in Toronto such as Nuit Blanche, Buskerfest, North
by Northeast Music Festival, Fringe Festival
Host occupational events such as Toronto Technology Week, it360o Conference and Expo, and the Financial Services Technology Forum
5.4 Family and Housing
Establish a family oriented, affordable neighbourhood to anchor long range
tenants and maintain a lively year-round neighbourhood.
As neighbourhoods grow, so do their residents. People establish relationships and
families grow. In order for East Bayfront to successfully root itself in the long term,
families and children must be provided for.
The East Bayfront Precinct Plan calls for attracting a mix of residents, including
families with children, seniors and downtown workers. The plan moves to outline
a number of broad objectives to be achieved over the development of the district.
45
Current plans for East Bayfront include a number of facilities geared toward
children’s lifestyles and activities (i.e. primary school, day-care facility and playground).
Research on creative cluster neighbourhoods identified that demographics is
mostly composed of single or childless adults between the ages of 25 and 35
years of age46. Many condominiums in these locations have small units with one
or two bedrooms, unsuitable for families with children.
A number of housing units should be suited not only for artists, but for families
as well, by providing more than one and two bedroom accommodation. This
type of accomodation will allow families to settle in the neighbourhood, providing
long-term anchor tenants that help root the neighbourhood.
The city’s commitment of establishing 20% affordable housing units within any new
waterfront development is bold and attainable. These affordable units will allow
for families and low-income tenants such as artists, industry new-comers, new citizens, young professionals and entrepreneurs. Affordability for both living and accessory spaces such as studios or small retail shops is essential for the success and
longevity of East Bayfront.
Recommendations:
Provide safe, creative, stimulating and interactive spaces for children
within the neighbourhood.
Provide residential units with two or more bedrooms to accommodate
families and root neighbourhood residents.
Provide affordable residential spaces for new residents.
Provide affordable studio and small retail spaces for low-income tenant of
people just starting out.
46
47
6.0 Phasing
To provide a sequence of recommendations
into implementation phases
The purpose of this section is to provide a sequence to recommendations made
within the strategic framework. This sequencing of recommendations shall take
the form of a two phase implementation process. The first phase will be comprised
of recommendations which will create a base critical mass of development within
East Bayfront.
The second phase will contain recommendations which require the critical mass
to be established before their implementation. It is important to note that recommendations set forth in phase one may not be mutually exclusive to this phase and
may carry over to the next. The sequencing of recommendations pivots around
two main development approvals for the area; First Waterfront Place and Sugar
Beach.
All recommendations are sequenced in relation to this development framework
and sequencing priority is given to the recommendations which best accommodate these two developments.
6.1 Phase 1
Phase one seeks to establish a base critical mass in East Bayfront through recommendations that focus on accessibility, design elements, functionality of land and
built form, networks and marketing.
Accessibility
A transit first approach is critical to providing accessibility to East Bayfront. This
accessibility will help to establish East Bayfront by aiding growth and settlement in
the area. A highly visible LRT line, such as a Queens Quay LRT would serve to both
transport people into the area as well as transmit attention and publicity about
the area to the rest of the city.
48
Design
The design elements are crucial to the first phase of recommendations because
they serve to introduce and establish the overall identity of East Bayfront. This includes the use of distinctive public realm and urban design attributes that visually
indicate a sense of arrival in East Bayfront, such as distinctive features at neighbourhood gateways, distinctive street furniture and signage, the use of native
plants on ledges and steps down to the lake front, and unique design features
integrated into the public transportation framework. In addition to these design
features the presence of public art will be strongly reinforced and be made complementary to the lakefront location as well as to the future population. This will
include public art that is responsive to seasonal changes, particularly in limited
seasonal use sites, such as Sugar Beach, as well as public art that is manipulatable subject to those who engage with it. The creation of these first phase design
elements shall be undergone with adherence to the Toronto Green Development
Standard, which recommends the use of materials locally produced and manufactured should be followed.
Usage
How people are intended to live, work and recreate in East Bayfront should be
established in the first phase of development as a means to assure an ordered
growth of this creative cluster. During the first phase of recommendations mixed
use zoning and building schemes should be adopted as a means to accelerate
the development process. First Waterfront Place and Sugar Beach will serve as
geographic centres from which development should radiate eastward. Mixed
use buildings consisting of ground floor retail and upper floor creative-based firms
will harness the activity and business brought to the district by these anchor firms.
Once this has been established as a foundation for development the preceding recommendations for the encouragement of live/work units shall be pursued.
These units should be adaptable to different creative based users and promote a
diverse range of creative based businesses in a variey of scales.
In addition to the aforementioned recommendations, phase one will include provisions directed toward the settlement of families within East Bayfront. This includes
the provision for residential units with two or more bedrooms to accommodate
the space needs of families and the provision of safe, creative, stimulating and
49
interactive spaces for children within the neighborhood.
During phase one, interim lands which are slated for development but currently
remain vacant will be made available for use as venue space for festivals, special
events and exhibits. Large scale events in adjacent areas will be encouraged
to hold portions of the events on said interim lands. These vacant spaces will be
able to support the construction of temporary staging and event space which
then may be removed following the completion of the event.
Networks
It is important to establish an initial base of networking initiatives in the first phase
of recommendations. This initial base will include the provision of open spaces for
community posters, announcements and notices. Also during this first phase it is
important that as early as possible connections between anchor employers and
adjacent communities, such as CORUS Entertainment and the Port Lands, are
pursued.
Marketing
Marketing East Bayfront is crucial to the successful development of the area and
thus needs to be focused on as early as possible. The marketing strategy for East
Bayfront should focus on the three key elements; TIEG’s, the waterfront ecology
and the clustering of the creative economy.
6.2 Phase 2
Once a base critical mass of development has been achieved in East Bayfront,
the following set of recommendations will have the requisite conditions for implementation.
Accessibility
Once accessibility has been firmly established through a well developed transit
system, the inclusion of a bicycle lanes through Yonge Street and Spadina Avenue continuing into East Bayfront shall be pursued. This bike lane shall be included
following the redevelopment of the roadway system to allow for a more permanent tenure of the lanes on the newly developed roadway.
50
Design The integration of the aforementioned design elements in phase one, shall be
pursued throughout any and all development that takes place in East Bayfront.
The importance of these design elements should be elevated in the first phase of
recommendations, but as well remain a constant priority with each successive
development stage.
Usage
In phase 2 public spaces should expand to accommodate new growth areas.
This should include the development of a venue for local new media businesses
and students to display projects they have produced. As well public institutions,
schools and community centers should be used to link the neighborhood to the
greater city of Toronto through sport and community events. Networking
During the second phase networks will be further developed by promoting connections between smaller creative based firms as a means of reducing their overall reliance on larger anchor firms.
Marketing
Once a critical mass of creative based employment has been developed in East
Bayfront, the marketing shift should move to the promotion of art from and within
the area. Hosting well established arts festivals such as Nuit Blanche will showcase
emerging works from the district and integrate it into the city’s arts scene. With its
identity as a creative hub the area will be a strong candidate to host established
industry events such as Toronto Technology Week, IT360o Conference and Expo
and the Financial Services Technology Forum. Hosting one of these events would
serve as a strong marketing tool to further solidify East Bayfront as a thriving part
of the new urban landscape of Toronto.
It is strongly recommended that Waterfront Toronto create one master plan of
phasing that coordinates all of their redevelopment projects into one cohesive
masterplan.
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52
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7.0 Conclusion
The strategic framework recognizes the importance of connections with adjacent
areas in order for East Bayfront to thrive. East Bayfront must both function as a distinct neighbourhood, while also creating connections with surrounding areas. For
example, the King and Parliament District has a well-established creative based
economy which has the potential to provide significant industry linkages with East
Bayfront’s creative based employment due to the relative proximity between the
two areas.
Connections between anchor employers and adjacent communities, such as
Corus Entertainment and the Port Lands will help facilitate economic and social
ties between neighbourhoods. Concurrent minor connections between smaller
creative-based firms will reduce reliance on main anchor tenants and strengthen
the creative economy.
Adequate transportation means and creating a one-of-a-kind atmosphere
through urban design, economical and social interaction should be established
in the initial phases of development. Distinctive public realm and urban design
attributes that visually indicate a point of arrival in East Bayfront aid in place-making. Marketing the area to new businesses and tourists is vital in the initial stages
of development as well. Branding East Bayfront with a focus on creativity, ecological attributes and cultural events will also help to facilitate the clustering of
creative-based businesses.
Transportation linkages with adjacent communities and within East Bayfront
will ease development, networking, and draw curious outsiders in. This can be
achieved through the extension of the Queen’s Quay streetcar line and other
alternatives such as bicycle lanes linking adjacent areas. Ample lighting and signage improve pedestrian safety and negate reliance on cars. Walk safe programs
that provide security for employees during off-peak hours and the use of street
furniture can further bring aspects of place-making and security to East Bayfront.
Mixed-use zoning will encourage building arrangements that incorporate more
than one use, stabilizing East Bayfront’s creative economy with various scales of
economic employment. Live/work units are also adaptable to different
54
creative-based businesses as sufficient space is allotted for the accessibility, productivity and networking of users.
In order to maintain an ecological link with Lake Ontario and the naturalization
of the Don River, the use of native plants on ledges and steps down to the lakefront and adherence to the Toronto Green Development Standard, which recommends the use of materials locally produced and manufactured, is vital.
The provision of authorized open spaces for community posters, announcements
and notices is also important to keep visitors, workers and residents informed. Animated ground floor design with upper floor setback from the street level buildings
will ensure sunlight reaches the street level and activity remains there.
In regards to employment lands that were originally slated for private sector sale,
Waterfront Toronto should pursue a strategy of long term leases as a means of
capturing increased land values. The construction of buildings should be accelerated to mitigate the effect of potential fluctuations in construction costs.
Phasing of all Waterfront Toronto projects should be implemented into a single
Master Plan to ensure continuity in development. Concentrated clusters integrating affordable housing, improved public space in surrounding developments and
space for business incubators will help strengthen the creative economy and social atmosphere of East Bayfront.
The successful establishment of a creative-based community in East Bayfront relies on a myriad of factors, tools, and initiatives. Connectivity to established and
developing districts, forward-thinking built form plans and an awareness to the
local ecology are some guiding principles that will enable East Bayfront to thrive.
55
56
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8.0 Glossary
Brownfield
A former industrial site with residual contamination requiring remediation before
redvelopment.
Clustering
Agglomeration of several similar enterprises within a given geographic proximity.
Creative ecology
The macro system for a creative district all employees, businesses, and residents
that contribute to the sharing of ideas and knowledge in creative industries such
as film, new media, and marketing .
Creative Goods and Services
Products or services based on creativity or ingenuity.
Cross-Programming
The complex set of positive relationships resulting from having different users and
uses in a particular space.
Community Improvement Plan Areas (CIPA)
Areas identified within the city of Toronto for redevelopment from brown-field status.
Knowledge Interface
Social networks and relationships where one can receiveup-to-date information,
contacts and potential business deals.
Natural Ecology vs. Creative Ecology
The urban relationship between the natural environmental systems and the creative ecology. (see above)
Place-branding
Connections between existing perceptions, strengths and future directions of a
specific location.
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Prestige
A level of status that can be tied to ownership.
Regeneration Area
Official Plan designation identifying special areas of growth which are further
defined through a Secondary Plan44. For more information on Regeneration Areas please see the City of Toronto Official Plan, section 4.7.
Request for Qualifications (RFQ)
A solicitation document requesting submittal by private sector developers for a
bid on projects. Commonly used by provincial and municipal governments to
select partners for major projects. They contain the desired minimum qualifications of the firms, a scope of work statement, and project requirements.
Sense of Place
Knowing where one is in the urban fabric through landmarks and through a
sense of belonging.
Tax Increment Equivalence Grants (TIEG’s)
Developments that meet criteria receive a portion of their taxes back for 10
years. This begins at 100% the first year and is incrementally reduced by 10%
each following year.
Wayfinding
The Perceptual decision-making processes experience as one finds their path. How these processes are negotiated on a street level is largely determined by
the architecture, layout and signage.
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9.1 Appendix A
Core Arts Industry
62
Cultural Industry
63
Creative Service Industry
The preceding categories are based on information provided by Artscape and the North American Industry Classification
Data. These categories were used throughout the process of establishing a strategic framework for the East Bayfront to help
identify creative industries and occupations.
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9.2 Appendix B
Liberty Village Business Inventory
65
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Liberty Village Core Arts Breakdown
Name
Unit # - address
Dennis Lin/UMOMO
17 Atlantic Ave
25 Atlantic Ave
Illfire Entertainment
MT Wall Inc
54 individual tenants
Enriching Enterntainment
Limb Apparel
Rink-A-Dink Inc.
Grogs
Rains, Malcom
Bartnes and Associates
Fyfe, Lindy Calligraphy
Black Beret Theatre
551879 Ontario Ltd
Elegant Art
Mudslinger Pottery and Nature Art
29 Atlantic Ave
60 Atlantic Ave
219 Dufferin
219 Dufferin St. Suite 211B
216-171 East Liberty St
171 East Liberty St
7 Fraser Ave
4-7 Fraser Ave
1179a King St W
1209 King St W
25 Liberty St
6-77 Mowat Ave
14-77 Mowat Ave
Industry
Core Arts- Sculpture and Art
Installation
Core Arts
Core Arts- Custom Wall Finishing
Core Arts
Core Arts
Core Arts- Fashion Designer
Core Arts
Core Arts- Puppet Troupe
Core Arts- Artist
Core Arts
Core Arts- Artist
Core Arts- Theatre Company
Core Arts
Core Arts
Core Arts
66
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Liberty Village Cultural Industries Breakdown
Name
Unit #-Address
Industry
McJb Entertainment
1 Atlantic Ave
Employment Agent
Microtainment Plus International Inc.
1 Atlantic Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Alcina Pictures Ltd
100-1 Atlantic Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Spinerazor Records
105-1 Atlantic Ave
Music Representation Label
Docutainment Plus Productions Inc.
2 Atlantic Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
MAVC Group Inc.
15 Atlantic Ave
Communications Services
Grass roots Advertising Inc
17R Atlantic Ave
Advertising Agency
Atlantic Films
19 Atlantic Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Indispensable Communications
300-25 Atlantic Ave
Advertising Agencies
Piccolo Publishing
Nelvana
27 Atlantic Ave
30 Atlantic Ave
Book Publishing
Motion Picture and Video Production
Zebra Pictures/Mighty Brave Productions
31R Atlantic Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Arraymusic
218-60 Atlantic Ave
Services Allied to Music Production
Chisholm Jack Film Production
50-99 Atlantic Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Influence Entertainment Group
99 Atlantic Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Nomad Films Inc
411-99 Atlantic Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Channel 1 Media Solutions
308-99 Atlantic Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Context Publishing Inc
200-99 Atlantic Ave
Newspaper Publishing
1061899 Ontario Inc
104-99 Atlantic Ave
Services Allied To Motion Pictures
Bullseye Post
104 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Soho VFX
303 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Motion Picture and Video Production
Echo Bay Media
309 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Motion Picture and Video Production
Fuze Sounds & Concepts
407 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Audio Production
67
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Channel 1 Media
308 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Communications Services
Beach Marketing Consulting Ltd
416 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Marketing
Famous Players Media Inc
102 Atlantic Ave
Advertising Agencies
Turbopromote Inc
107 Atlantic Ave
Communication Services
Carpenter & Co Design Inc
110 Atlantic Ave
Advertising Agencies
Rich Colours
132 Atlantic Ave
Communications Services
Canadian Manda Group
165 Dufferin St
Services Allied to Pubishing
S & S Production Inc
219 Dufferin St
Motion Picture And Video Production
Wishbone Entertainment Inc
219 Dufferin St
Motion Picture And Video Production
Banger Productions Inc
205B-219 Dufferin St
Motion Picture And Video Production
Elliott Animation Inc
219 Dufferin St
Motion Picture And Video Production
Silhouette Media Group Ltd
Fusion Sound & Picture Inc
219 Dufferin St
300C-219 Dufferin St
Motion Picture And Video Production
Motion Picture and Audio Production
Yowza Animation Inc
102a-219 Dufferin St
Motion Picture And Video Production
Avid Tech
203C-219 Dufferin St
Animation and Motion Graphics
Banger Productions Inc
205B-219 Dufferin St
Music Production, Packaging Design
Brazen Entertainment
203B-219 Dufferin St
Music Production
Draxhall Jump
210C-219 Dufferin St
Illustration and Concept Design
Elliot Animation Inc.
210C-219 Dufferin St
Animation and Motion Graphics
Fresh TV Inc
212C-219 Dufferin St
Motion Picture And Video Production
Henry Less Productions
G12C-219 Dufferin St
Television and Theater Production
Hey World
102B-219 Dufferin St
Record Label and Music Production
Left of Centre
G4A-219 Dufferin St
Animation, Film, Television editing
Liberty Street Design
111A-219 Dufferin St
Web, print production and design
Media Fusion
300C-219 Dufferin St
Audio Production
68
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Mercer Street Films
G8C-219 Dufferin St
Motion Picture And Video Production
Pagasus Publication
201C-219 Dufferin St
Publishing
S+S Productions
100A-219 Dufferin St
Motion Picture And Video Production
Two Three Five Films
103B-219 Dufferin St
Motion Picture And Video Production
Zoom Animation Inc.
210C-219 Dufferin St
Animation
Wishart Advertising & Graphic
Blackbird Brand
210B-219 Dufferin St
Advertising Agencies
306B-219 Dufferin St
Communications Services
200A-219 Dufferin St
Advertising Agency
302C-219 Dufferin St
Music marketing and promotion
G18C-219 Dufferin St
Communications Services
LaCie
235 Dufferin St
Marketing
Image Gear Inc
358 Dufferin St
Motion Picture Distribution Services
T C Video Production
492 Dufferin St
Motion Picture And Video Production
Niagara Custom Lab
ISYS Canada
442 Dufferin St
200-171 East Liberty St
Services Allied To Motion Pictures
Voice, Data and Video Solutions Provider
Hatch Studios
206-171 East Liberty St
Animation and Motion Graphics
S-VOX Trust
230-171 East Liberty St
Television Production and Broadcasting
AJE Productions
235-171 East Liberty St
Television Production and Broadcasting
WIDEawake Entertainment Group
10-171 East Liberty St
Music Production and Representation
CEAD Global Inc.
LIFT- Liaison of Independent Filmmakers
320-171 East Liberty St
Radio Broadcasting
300-171 East Liberty St
Services Allied to Film Production
Canadian Film-Makers Distbn
171 East Liberty St
Motion Picture Distribution Services
Mirage Motion Media
210-171 East Liberty St
Advertising Agency
Gibson Marketing
218-171 East Liberty St
Marketing
Urban DNA
223-171 East Liberty St
Advertising Agency
Fuel Advertising
RGK Management
Zeppelin Communications & Design
69
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Precipice Studios Inc.
Studio City Inc
23 Fraser Ave
Design and Advertising Agency
Film/Televison/Radio Production and
Broadcasting
Motion Picture And Video Production
Cinefocus Canada
3-29 Fraser Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Intheory Tv
2-29 Fraser Ave
Services Allied To Motion Pictures
Prelude Magazine
Oz Media Group
6-29 Fraser Ave
103-33 Fraser Ave
Publishing
Audio and Video Production
Avcom Productions
33 Fraser
Motion Picture And Video Production
Post Shop Teleproductions Inc
G09-33 Fraser Ave
72 Fraser Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Film/Televison/Radio Production and
Broadcasting
N.E. Ware Communications
11-72 Fraser Ave
Communications Services
Radical Sheep Productions Inc
80 Fraser Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Marblemedia
200-74 Fraser Ave
Television and Interactive Media
Two Three Five Inc
Nelvana
235-37 Hanna Ave
33 Jefferson Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Motion Picture and Video Production
Nelvana
44 Jefferson Ave
Motion Picture and Video Production
YTV Canada Inc
18-64 Jefferson Ave
Television Production and Broadcasting
Country 95.3
18-64 Jefferson Ave
Radio Broadcasting
Stock Options Corp
111 Jefferson Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Housepower Inc
316-954 King St W
Motion Picture And Video Production
Kaimera Media Inc
329-1071 King St W
Advertising Agencies
Channel 500 Limited
Geneva Film Co Ltd
101-1179 King St W
1179a King St W
Motion Picture And Video Production
Motion Picture And Video Production
Nothing Inc
300-1179 King St W
Motion Picture And Video Production
Corus Entertainment Inc.
Corus Entertainment Inc.
324-171 East Liberty St
23 Fraser Ave
70
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Fusion Sound & Picture Inc
316-1179 King St W
Motion Picture and Audio Production
Yield Integrated Communications & Advertising
3-1179 King St W
Advertising Agency
Campwood Inc
Advertising Agencies
Krplink Inc
300-1179 King St W
1183 King St W 2nd
Floor
Advertising Agencies
Vibe Marketing Group Inc
4-1200 King St W
Advertising Agencies
Marketing Store
100-1209 King St W
Advertising Agencies
Parkdale Project Read
2-1209 King St. W
Book Publishing
The Marketing Store
100-1209 King St. W
Marketing
Susan J. Model & Talent Management
Toronto Academy of Acting for Film and
Television
215-2179 King St. W
Talent Agency
111-2179 King St. W
Motion Picture and TelevisionTraining School
Fusion Design Group
100 - 2 Liberty Ave
Communications Services
A V Projects Inc
24 Liberty St Unit A
Motion Picture And Video Production
Invisible Pictures Inc
35 Liberty St
Services Allied To Motion Pictures
A51
Nelvana
305 - 107 Liberty Ave
101-135 Liberty St
Marketing
Motion Picture and Video Production
Sirius Satellite radio
400-135 Liberty St
Satellite Radio and Television Broadcasting
Aircraft Pictures
147 Liberty St
Motion Picture And Video Production
Unit: PR
147 Liberty St
Services Allied to Video Production
Bonterra Productions Inc
147 Liberty St
Motion Picture And Video Production
Sony BMG
190 Liberty St
Music Production and Representation
The Lodge
102D-22 Mowat Ave
Motion Picture and Video Production
The Butcher Shop Type Films
102D-22 Mowat Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Peace Point Post
102D-22 Mowat Ave
Motion Picture and Video Production
Gullons Printing
102D-22 Mowat Ave
Publishing Services
71
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Master2DVD
120D-22 Mowat Ave
Services Allied to Video Production
What Publishers
67 Mowat Ave
Advertising Agencies
National Book Network
Geneva Film Co Ltd
241-67 Mowat Ave
110-67 Mowat Ave
Book Publishing
Motion Picture And Video Production
Sinking Ship Entertainment
445-67 Mowat Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Studio One Productions
229-67 Mowat Ave
Advertising and Media Management
Summer Pictures
32-67 Mowat Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Volume Eleven
231-67 Mowat Ave
Music Production
Brandon Communications
443-67 Mowat Ave
Communications Services
Fingerprint Communications
533-67 Mowat Ave
Communication Services
Fourth Dimension Media and Marketing
36-67 Mowat Ave
Advertising Agency
PMCK Management
37-67 Mowat Ave
Artist Management
Riddoch Communications
545-67 Mowat Ave
Advertising Agency
Scratch Marketing and Promotions
240-67 Mowat Ave
Marketing
Studio One Productions Inc
229-67 Mowat Ave
Advertising Agencies
Stromme Media
67 Mowat Ave
Advertising Agencies
P.I.M Publishing
33-67 Mowat Ave
Publishing Services
Synapse Cross-Media Adv
315-77 Mowat Ave
Communication Services
Phoenix Animation Studios Inc
77 Mowat Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Canadian Recording Industry Association
85 Mowat Ave
Services Allied to Music Production
AVLA Audio-Video Licensing Agency Inc
Studio City Inc
85 Mowat Ave
1 Pardee Ave
Services Allied to Music Production
Motion Picture And Video Production
Westwind pictures
203-2 Pardee Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Blueprint Entertainment
300-2 Pardee Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Resolution Pro Audio
302-2 Pardee Ave
Sound and Video Production
72
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Jazz Fm 91.1
100-4 Pardee Ave
Radio Broadcasting
9 Story Entertainment
001-6 Pardee Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Oasis Pictures Inc.
101-6 Pardee Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Amaze Film & Entertainment
101-6 Pardee Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Trace Pictures
Oz Media Group
103-6 Pardee Ave
103-6 Pardee Ave
Motion Picture And Video Production
Audio and Video Production
Nelvana
42 Pardee ave
Motion Picture and Video Production
Neth, David
101-77 Wilson Park Rd
Motion Picture And Video Production
73
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Liberty Village Creative Services Breakdown
Name
Unit #-Address
Industry
Altius Design
100-1 Atlantic Ave
Architecture and Design
Fleischer Ridout Partnership Inc.
1 Atlantic Ave
Landscape Architecture Firm
Kearns Mancini Architects
1 Atlantic Ave
Architecture Firm
NewCombe Design Associates Inc.
1 Atlantic Ave
Interior Design
9 Track Mind Inc.
107-1 Atlantic Ave
Technology and Marketing Solutions
Machine Merch
105-1 Atlantic Ave
Textile Design
Joseph Mimran and Associates Inc.
2 Atlantic Ave
Textile Design
Strasman Architect Inc.
2 Atlantic Ave
Architecture Firm
eCardBuilder.com
2 Atlantic Ave
Builds E-Cards
InfoClin
15 Atlantic Ave
Medical technology solutions
Davidson, Rob & Associates
19 Atlantic Ave
Commercial Photography
Stroud, Jason Photography
21R Atlantic Ave
Commercial Photography
2 Dog Design Inc.
27 Atlantic Ave
Graphic Design
M3 Brand
25 Atlantic Ave
Graphic Design for Events
Hi-tech Tattoos
25 Atlantic Ave
Custom Design for Electronics
Playstone Solutions
25 Atlantic Ave
Web solutions
Bioazure
25 Atlantic Ave
Cosmetics Importer
Pan Productions Inc
25R Atlantic Ave
Commercial Photography
Creative 7 Inc
25 Atlantic Ave
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
Webnetics Inc.
27 Atlantic Ave
Computers and Networking Consutltants
Lynne Greenaway Photography
27R Atlantic Ave
Commercial Photography
Creative Folio Ltd.
27 Atlantic Ave
Graphic Design
McWatt Anderson Design Consultants Inc
28 Atlantic Ave
Interior Design
74
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
McKenna Photography
31R Atlantic Ave
Commercial Photography
Filament Creative
31R Atlantic Ave
Web Design
David, Eric, Les
100 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Wholesale Textile Sales
Web Impact Inc.
200 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Web Design
Marketing Extension Inc.
204 - 99 Atlantic Ave
E-Business Consulting
Sandcat Software
208 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Software Development
Recursive Design Inc.
306 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Software Development
Thacker Consulting Group
312 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Corporate Organization
Snap Productions Inc.
402 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Corporate Promotions
I Love Rewards Inc.
404 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Interteractive Marketing
Club Support
407 - 99 Atlantic Ave
IT for Social Clubs and Golf Course
Sputnik Design
414 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Graphic Design
Interactive Ontario
411 - 99 Atlantic Ave
New Media Business Alliance
HI Next
418 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Computer Services
Calico Cat Production
307 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Commercial Photography
Distefano, Ernesto Photography
311-99 Atlantic Ave
Photographic Studios, Portrait
Idealminds Inc
305-99 Atlantic Ave
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
Plum Traders Inc
400 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Wholesale Jewelery
In Accessories
205~207 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Jewelery Design
Stones & Findings
212 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Jewelery Design
Eles Designs
DMD Broadcast Services Inc.
321 - 99 Atlantic Ave
102D-99 Atlantic Ave
Jewelery Design
Multimedia duplication and distribution
Cineplex Media
Rainville Graphic Solutions
102 Atlantic
Regional Head Office
110 Atlantic Ave
Graphic Design
L G W Designworks
110 Atlantic Ave
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
75
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Theatrictus Inc.
116 Atlantic Ave
Computer Services
Mark Anthony Studios
130 Atlantic Ave
Commercial Photography
Ideal Mattress
134 Atlantic Ave
Custom Made Mattress
Dakis & Associates Inc
100-153 Dufferin St
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
Fusion Interactive Inc
307-173 Dufferin St
Prepackaged Software
Zeppelin Communications & Design
201 Dufferin St
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
N5rCom Inc
217C-219 Dufferin St
Commercial Nonphysical Research
Left Of Centre Productions Inc
4A-219 Dufferin St
Public Relations Services
Udder Lodestone Productions
203B-219 Dufferin St
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
One Leisure Ltd
1D-219 Dufferin St
Landscape Counseling And Planning
Version 51 Inc
310B-219 Dufferin St
Prepackaged Software
Merge Inc
300B-219 Dufferin St
Prepackaged Software
Ravenscraft Technologies
219 Dufferin St
Prepackaged Software
Aphrodite Cooks
219 Dufferin St
Culinary Arts
Arthur Mendonça Inc. and Portrait Branding
Esqape Design Inc.
112C-219 Dufferin St
Textile Design
201B-219 Dufferin St
Interior Design
204B-219 Dufferin St
Website design and marketing
207B-219 Dufferin St
Graphic, print, online design
104A-219 Dufferin St
Web-based solutions, Online Consulting
100C-219 Dufferin St
G1D-219 Dufferin St
Architectural Design, Master Planning
Master planning, concept, schematic hotel resort
design
302C-219 Dufferin St
Talent Representative
G6C-219 Dufferin St
Business Solutions
307B-219 Dufferin St
Concert and Festival programmer
206B-219 Dufferin St
computer systems design, software consultants
Extreme Group
Fizheye Creative Inc
InterAd Media Design
Forrec Ltd
One Leisure Ltd
Paquin Entertainment
Ravenscraft Technologies
Soundstreams Canada
Sublime Solutions
76
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Telio+ Cie
106A-219 Dufferin St
Fabrics and Interior Design
G8A-219 Dufferin St
Network Consulting
117C-219 Dufferin St
Music equipment
103-219 Dufferin St
Digital Video Production tools and services
G10A-219 Dufferin St
Marketing Communications
200B-219 Dufferin St
Marketing Consultants
300B-219 Dufferin St
Marketing Consultants
310B-219 Dufferin St
Marketing Consultants
C3 Online Marketing Inc
4B-219 Dufferin St
Marketing Services
Gifford Design
442a Dufferin St
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
Dekla Group
106-171 East Liberty St
Interior Design
Stitchy Lizard Embroidery & Digitizing
266-171 East Liberty St
Textile Design
Tropics North
147-171 East Liberty St
Landscape counselling and planning
FDCC- Fashion Design Council of Canada
149-171 East Liberty St
National Fashion Design Council
TPL Marketing Inc.
201-171 East Liberty St
Commercial Lighting Design
GrandPrix
207-171 East Liberty St
Promotions Company
Pinnacle Communications
Graphic Design & Printing
Artscape
208-171 East Liberty St
220 & 224-171 East
Liberty St
Creative Economic Development Consultants
West Palm Media Inc.
245-171 East Liberty St
Marketing
Designer Transport & Services Inc.
249-171 East Liberty St
Furniture Design
Alaia Technologies Inc.
250-171 East Liberty St
Software Development
Radiant Core Inc.
253-171 East Liberty St
Web Design
Motion Clothing Company
258-171 East Liberty St
Textile Design
Wendy Tancock Deisgn Inc.
260-171 East Liberty St
Product Design
Clear Sky Media Inc.
263-171 East Liberty St
Web Marketing
Walled Networks
Wenger Corp.
Ordigraphe
LPI Communications
Matchstick Inc.
Merge Inc
Smack Inc.
77
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
The Think Tank
268-171 East Liberty St
Promotions & Marketing
Munge/Leung: Design Associates
290-171 East Liberty St
Interior Design
Studio NAFA
315-171 East Liberty St
Product Design & Fashion
MHz Design Communications
340-171 East Liberty St
Web Design
Mimran Group Inc.
360-171 East Liberty St
Fashion Design
Elemental Inc
276-171 East Liberty St
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
Nakd
267-171 East Liberty St
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
1056767 Ontario Limited
147-171 East Liberty St
Landscape Counseling And Planning
Suzanne Gardner Flowers
157-171 East Liberty St
Floral Designer
Upshift Marketing Group
205-171 East Liberty St
Marketing Communications
Fraser Ave Studios Inc
3-7 Fraser Ave
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
Motive Communications
29 Fraser Ave
Software Development
Km Reps Inc.
4-29 Fraser Ave
Talent Representative
Lucid Media Imaging
6-29 Fraser Ave
Graphic Design
K-Squared Communications Inc
208-33 Fraser Ave
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
Strategic Coach
201-33 Fraser ave
Marketing Communications
Banff Designs
66 Fraser Ave
Textile Design and Wholesale
Zvonimir Zupancic
1-72 Fraser Ave
Commercial Photography
Allsteel Inc.
90 Fraser Ave
Industrial Design
First Capital Realty
400 - 85 Hanna Ave
Region Head Office - Developer
KASIAN Architects
300 - 85 Hanna Ave
Architectural Design Firm
Spearmint Pelican Sales
201-51 Jefferson Ave
Apparel Wholesaler
Shift Marketing
113 Jefferson Ave
Marketing Communications
Howon Pope Design
Hala
117 Jefferson Ave
Textile Design
121 Jefferson Ave
Event Coordination
78
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Helen Tansey
123 Jefferson Ave
Photography Studio
Type Morris
1071 King St W
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
Architectural Design
1071 King St W
Architectural Services
Lucid3d Inc
207-1071 King St W
Prepackaged Software
Vbell Systems
1071 King St W
Prepackaged Software
Execugo Media
114-1179 King St
New Media
Lindy Fyfe
116-1179 King St. W
Calligraphy and Illustration
Loris Technologies
110-1179 King St. W
Software Development
Mercury Accessories
105-1179 King St. W
Textile Design
Point Clark Networks
211-1179 King St. W
Software Development
Redd Artists
Robertson Simmons Architects
1187 King St. W
Hair and Make-up
300-1179 King St W
Architect Firm
Rgw Designworks
307-1179a King St W
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
Hotson Bakker Boniface Haden
300-1179a King St W
Architectural Services
Mercury Accessories
105-1179 King St. W
Fashion Design
Patina Metalwear
11-1179 King St. W
Jewelry Design
BCP Technologies Ltd.
Diesel
218-1179 King St W
Technology Solutions
1207 King St. W
Fashion Design
Click Photo Co Inc
1209 King St W
Photographic Studios, Portrait
Marketing Store Worldwide LP
100-1209 King St W
Public Relations Services
Canopus Technologies Inc
1232 King St W
Prepackaged Software
Kill the 8 Merch Co.
WI Fidelity
49 - 2 Liberty Ave
Band Merchandise/Graphic Design
50 - 2 Liberty Ave
Software Development
Redhead Studios
25 Liberty St
Photographic Studios, Portrait
Digital Cement
100 Liberty St
Relationship Marketing
79
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Web Click Inc
203 - 107 Liberty St
Web Design
Trubo Promote Inc
304 - 107 Liberty St
Management Consulting
Indusblue
200-135 Liberty St
Marketing Communications
One Method Inc.
201-135 Liberty St
Marketing Communications
Sparq Multimedia
147 Liberty St
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
Extend Media
190 Liberty St
Media Marketing Research
Corporate Visuals Inc
18 Mowat Ave
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
70 Main Street Inc
Yangaroo Inc.
18 Mowat Ave
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
18 Mowat Ave
Digital media distribution
18 Mowat Ave
Marketing Communications
Fini
102D-22 Mowat Ave
Photographic Studios, Portrait
Rhl Architects Ltd
DMD Broadcast Services Inc.
2-22 Mowat Ave
102D-22 Mowat Ave
Architectural Services
Multimedia duplication and distribution
Ordigraphe
Balance Designs
39 Mowat Ave
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
244-67 Mowat Ave
Interior Design
Cooler Solutions
122-67 Mowat Ave
Industrial Design
Day Software Inc
331-67 Mowat Ave
Software Development
Frankland + Associates
307-67 Mowat Ave
Interior Design
Frontdesk
345-67 Mowat Ave
Software Development
Garth Grosjean Photography
143-67 Mowat ave
Commercial Photography
Infonaut
114-67 Mowat Ave
Software Development
Lineworks
31-67 Mowat Ave
Textile Design
Michael Snow Artworks
49-67 Mowat
Fine Arts and Illustration
Ellman Design Inc
343-67 Mowat Ave
Interior Design
MSA Consulting
342-67 Mowat Ave
Management Consulting
Corporate Visuals Inc
80
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
National Book Network, Rowman and Littlefield Publishing
Group
241-67 Mowat Ave
Publishers
Net Present Services
547-67 Mowat Ave
Software Development
Oasis Search Group
242-67 Mowat Ave
Executive Search
Offshoot
132-67 Mowat Ave
Website Services
On Road Communications
138-67 Mowat Ave
Website Design
Sandbox Communications
507-67 Mowat Ave
E-Business Consulting
Sewell Evans Design Group
315-67 Mowat Ave
Package Design
Sonic Boom Creative Media
335-67 Mowat Ave
Website Design
Space Database
301-67 Mowat Ave
Interior Design
Spalding Creative Communications
136-67 Mowat Ave
Graphic Design
Strano and Pettigrew Design and Associates
239-67 Mowat Ave
Graphic Design
The Transaction Project
48-67 Mowat Ave
Internet Services
Treibacher Industries Incorporated
332-67 Mowat Ave
Metallurgical Company
Web Relay
312-67 Mowat Ave
Website Design
The Word on the Street
142-67 Mowat Ave
Festival Production
Visual Contact Photosource Inc
241-67 Mowat Ave
Commercial Photography
Grosjean, Garth Photography
143-67 Mowat Ave
Commercial Photography
Conceptual-Fusion Design Inc
67 Mowat Ave
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
Frost Creative Inc
139-67 Mowat Ave
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
Parade Creative
240-67 Mowat Ave
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
Barnowl Design
67 Mowat Ave
Architectural Services
Artcast
47-67 Mowat Ave
Sculpture and gifts
Pady Sales
130-67 Mowat Ave
Apparel Wholesaler
Rodney Harris Sales
249-67 Mowat Ave
Apparel Wholesaler
DOP Inc
35-67 Mowat Ave
Acessesory Design
81
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Evolution in DesignZ
36-67 Mowat Ave
Web Design
Lauren Taylor Sales
233-67 Mowat Ave
Fashion Wholesale
Peer Partners Inc
146-67 Mowat Ave
Web Design
Quiksilver Canada
249-67 Mowat Ave
Apparel
SG Sales Group Inc
131-67 Mowat Ave
Apparel Wholesaler
Theresa Casey Interior Design
135-67 Mowat Ave
Interior Design
Webrelay
239-67 Mowat Ave
Digital Media
Marketing Era
30-67 Mowat Ave
Marketing Communications
IP Marketing Inc
445-67 Mowat Ave
Marketing Services
Get Digital
246-67 Mowat Ave
CD/DVD Replication
The Pulse Group
119-72 Fraser Ave
Marketing Communications
Design Source Consultants
304-77 Mowat Ave
Graphic Design
Kave Architects
112-77 Mowat Ave
Architecture Firm
II By IV Associated
109-77 Mowat Ave
Interior Design
Vintara Systems
411-77 Mowat Ave
Internet Services
Warren Rice Associates
316-77 Mowat Ave
Interior Design
Zvonko Photography
77 Mowat Ave
Photographic Studios, Portrait
Egalaxy Multimedia Inc
416-77 Mowat Ave
Commercial Nonphysical Research
Andy Verhiel Architect
77 Mowat Ave
Architectural Services
Beanfield Technologies Inc.
506-77 Mowat Ave
Internet and Hosting Services
Macromedia Canada
414-77 Mowat Ave
Software Development
The Marketplace Capabilities Group
508-77 Mowat Ave
Marketing Communications
TUCOWS
96 Mowat Ave
Software Development
Avcom Productions Inc
103-2 Pardee Ave
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
Lyton Promotions Development Group Inc.
101-2 Pardee Ave
Marketing Communications
82
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Macrae Designs Inc.
2 Pardee Ave
Marketing Communications
Trace Pictures Inc
103-6 Pardee Ave
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
Scott, David Photography Inc
11 Strickland Ave
Photographic Studios, Portrait
Outhouse Creative
34 Western Battery Rd
Commercial Art And Graphic Design
Liberty Village Other Services Breakdown
Name
Unit #-Address
Industry
Maple Kanko Tours Inc.
1 Atlantic Ave
Tour Company
NEXXT Development Inc.
1 Atlantic Ave
Real Estate Development Company
Nitido Inc.
1 Atlantic Ave
Networking Services
State Farm Insurance
1 Atlantic Ave
Insurance Agency
Tekcetera Computers Sales & Services
2 Atlantic Ave
Computers Sales and Services
Sim Video Productions Ltd.
2 Atlantic Ave
Equipment Rental Services
Iron Mountain
20 Atlantic Ave
Records and Information Mgmt
Sights and Sounds Productions
21 Atlantic Ave
Event Management
Law Office
21 Atlantic Ave
Law Office
Motoware
23R Atlantic Ave
Metal Work and Fabrication
Loft Communications and Events Inc.
27 Atlantic Ave
Event Management
Academy of Spherical Arts
108 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Pub and Poolhouse
Jaoan
107 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Furniture Store
Kevric Ontario Real Estate Corporation
304 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Real Estate Sales
InFlame Fire Places Inc
310 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Fire Place Sales
Parallel Productions Services
315 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Event Coordination
Berkeley Payment Solutions Inc
420 - 99 Atlantic Ave
Pre Paid Payment Card Sales
Naomi's Café
112 Atlantic Ave
Food Services- Coffee House
Reliable Parts Ltd
114 Atlantic Ave
Appliance Parts and Accessories
83
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Vic Gramic's Super Kick Karate
118 Atlantic Ave
Karate Studio
Sourceshop.com
119 Atlantic Ave
Lighting Equipment Sales
A Fares Café
120 Atlantic Ave
Food Services- Coffee House
In Japan
122 Atlantic Ave
Food Services- Restaurant
Dilly N Delicious
126 Atlantic Ave
Food Services- Restaurant
Wasabi Café
126 Atlantic Ave
Food Services- Café
System Builders Inc.
128 Atlantic Ave
Coputer Product Sales
Rich Colours
Haft2
132 Atlantic Ave
Paint Sales
116C-219 Dufferin St
Marketing, Branding solutions
Better Labour Inc.
169 Dufferin St
Employment Services
24-7INtouch
14C-219 Dufferin St
Call Centre Services
Brookshire Raw Materials Group Inc.
300A-219 Dufferin St
Business Services
Altus Canada
2A-219 Dufferin St
Accountant/Management Consultants
Blue Shoe Incentives
G5A-219 Dufferin St
Business Solutions Consultants
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Info Centre
G313-219 Dufferin St
Health Services
Canadian Distillers Association
G2B-219 Dufferin St
National Business Association
Career Action for Newcomers
G1C-219 Dufferin St
Job Training
Caseload Software
204B-219 Dufferin St
Information Technology
Credit Institute
216C-219 Dufferin St
Education Programs
Dimensional Strategies
108A-219 Dufferin St
Software and Services Consulting
Easy DNS Tech
304A-219 Dufferin St
Internet Domain Services
Enomaly Inc
G3A-219 Dufferin St
Technology Consultants
Enunciate Conferencing
317C-219 Dufferin St
Communications Consultants
Evans Caseload Inc
204B-219 Dufferin St
Case management
JobStart
G1C-219 Dufferin St
Job Training
84
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Keen Technology
105A-219 Dufferin St
Information Technology
Kerry's Place
G12A-219 Dufferin St
Autism Services
Kiondo African Design
224C-219 Dufferin St
Importer
Lite Source
107C-219 Dufferin St
Lighting Equipment Sales
No Regrets
G3D-219 Dufferin St
Food Services- Restaurant
Redline Legal Services
220C-219 Dufferin St
Legal Services
Rhapsody Entertainment Inc
307C-219 Dufferin St
Mobile DJ services
Sporometrics Inc
G20C-219 Dufferin St
Environmental services and consulting
Autism Society Ontario
004-1179A King St W
NGO
Condo Store
Real Estate
Cervélo Cycles
101-171 East Liberty St
102 & 222-171 East Liberty
St
Dekla Group
106-171 East Liberty St
Custom Kitchen Design
Merci Mon Ami
107-171 East Liberty St
Food Services- Café
Haveli Home
113-171 East Liberty St
Retail- East Indian Home Décor
GTA Construction
121-171 East Liberty St
Contractor
Boston House
123-171 East Liberty St
Antiques
Circles & Squares Bakery
133-171 East Liberty St
Food Services- Gourmet Bakery
Atelier Thuet
153-171 East Liberty St
161 & 170-171 East Liberty
St
Food Services- Restaurant
C2 Home & Casalife
Liberty Market Building Property Management Office & BLVD
Developments
Bicycle Manufacturing
Furniture Retailer
Developer/Property Management
ORO Café
204-171 East Liberty St
205 & 165-171 East Liberty
St
Salesfuel
211-171 East Liberty St
Management Consultants
iCon 1 Realty Services Inc.
217-171 East Liberty St
Real Estate
Food Services- Café
85
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Colourfield
221-171 East Liberty St
Hair Salon
Edcetera Training
244-171 East Liberty St
Course Design & Consulting
Skinscience™ a division of Luxury Brand
246-171 East Liberty St
Salon Product Manufacturer
JHC Holdings
252-171 East Liberty St
Holdings Company
demo soap studio
262-171 East Liberty St
Soap Manufacturing
Datacomp Electonics Inc.
269-171 East Liberty St
Scientific Product Manufacturing
Susanne Lang- Sula Beauty
272-171 East Liberty St
Beauty Products Manufacturing
Illy Canada
274-171 East Liberty St
Coffee importer
Kingwest Fitness
275-171 East Liberty St
Fitness Centre/Gym
Big Fish Interactive Inc.
277-171 East Liberty St
Management Consultants
Base2 eBusiness Solutions Inc.
300-171 East Liberty St
Technology Consultants
Taylor, Mitsopulous & Burshstein
330-171 East Liberty St
Entertainment Lawyers
Model Railroad Club Toronto
B1-171 East Liberty St
Non-profit Social Club
The Brazen Head
BH2-171 East Liberty St
Food Services- Pub/Restaurant
Grand Prix Association of Toronto
207-171 East Liberty St
NGO
On the Mark.It Physiotherapy
151-171 East Liberty St
Medical Services
Artscape
224-171 East Liberty St
NGO
Like Tribe Canada
278-171 East Liberty St
Mobile Internet Provider
iNKY Colour Management
276-171 East Liberty St
Printing Services
Canada Bread
2 Fraser Ave
Food Production
BodyArtPro
5-7 Fraser Ave
Tattoo Studio
Dylan McEwen
2B-7 Fraser Ave
Massage Therapist
Liberty Movement Studio for Yoga and Pilates
7-7 Fraser Ave
Fitness Centre/Gym
Redesign Research
12-7 Fraser Ave
Consultation Services
Joe Rockhead's Indoor Rock Climbing
29 Fraser Ave
Recreation
86
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Warehouse Grill
70 Fraser Ave
Food Services- Restaurant
Lasercorp
19-72 Fraser Ave
Computers
Gallop Logistics
100-74 Fraser Ave
Transportation
Performance Health Centre
102-74 Fraser Ave
Health Clinic
Kids Up Front Foundation
32 Atlantic Ave
Charity Foundation
Balzac's Coffie
43 Hanna Ave
Food Services- Coffee House
TD Canada Trust
61 Hanna Ave
Bank
Nice One Hair & Tanning
61 Hanna Ave
Salon
The MedSpa
61 Hanna Ave
Spa & Cosmetic Surgery
Block Buster Video
75 Hanna Ave
Movie Rentals
Spotless Dry Cleaners
75 Hanna Ave
Dry Cleaners
Select Sandwich Co.
75 Hanna Ave
Food Services- Restaurant
Convenience K
75 Hanna Ave
Conveniece Store
Global Ryan's Pet Food
75 Hanna Ave
Pet Supply Store
Liquor Control Board of Ontario
85 Hanna Ave
Liquor Sales
Bell Mobility
85 Hanna Ave
Telephone Services
Starbucks Coffee
85 Hanna Ave
Food Services- Coffee House
Arch Dental Center
85 Hanna Ave
Dental Clinic
Goodlife Fitness
200 - 85 Hanna Ave
Gym
Liberty Village Market and Café
65 Jefferson Ave
Food Services- Café
Parss Courier
101 Jefferson Ave
Courier Services
Christine Bib Catering
109 Jefferson Ave
Food Services- Catering Services
Christine Bib Catering
107,109 Jefferson Ave
Food Services- Catering Services
Stock Options
111 Jefferson Ave
Video Equipment & Supplies
Connected Insight Inc
123 Jefferson Ave
Project Management Services
87
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Rob's K9 Bakery
125 Jefferson Ave
Gourmet Pet Food
Magic Oven Pizza
127 Jefferson Ave
Food Services- Restaurant
Magical Catering
127 Jefferson Ave
Catering Services
Toronto Camera Service Centre
131 Jefferson Ave
Video Equipment & Supplies
Mad Batter Bakers
133 Jefferson Ave
Bakery
Vicatass Travel
135 Jefferson Ave
Travel Agency
The Rotisserie House Inc.
141 Jefferson Ave
Food Services- Restaurant
B & W Wines
16-1179 King St W
Food Services
Canadian Unitarian Counsel
18-1179 King St W
NGO
Caffino Mangeria and Espresso Bar
1185 King St
Food Services- Café
Gibson Pure
1205 King St. W
Musical Instruments
Ultranet Telecom
315-2179 King St. W
AV Projects
24 A Liberty St
Telephone and Long Distance
Wholesale Audio/Vissual Equipment
Sales
Balance Intregrated Health Care
24 B Liberty St
Naturopathic Clinic
Liberty Café
25 Liberty St
Food Services- Café
Kingcom Media
207-25 Liberty St
Marketing Services
Guayaca Financial Servies Ltd.
101 - 107 Liberty St
Finacial Services
Debit Freedom
201 - 107 Liberty St
Financial Services
Maro
135 Liberty St
Food Services- Restaurant
Esprit
300-135 Liberty St
Retail Head Office
Assured Mortgage Services
147 Liberty St
Financial Services
Fantail Communications
147 Liberty St
Public Relations Solutions
Wise Advisory Group
147 Liberty St
Financial Services
Dominion
100 Lynn Willams St
Grocery Store
Grasp IT
18 Mowat Ave
Online Marketing and Management
88
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Dominion Voting Services
20 Mowat Ave
Voting Services
Factz Research
135-67 Mowat Ave
Research
Lighting Technologies Solutions
134-67 Mowat Ave
IT Consulting Computers
Shoeless Joe's Bar & Grill
315-67 Mowat Ave
Food Services- Restaurant
Spire Tea
44-67 Mowat Ave
Tea Company
York Heritage Properties & Management
340-67 Mowat Ave
Property Development & Management
Aragon Group
544-67 Mowat Ave
Real Estate Management
Axsium Group
431-67 Mowat Ave
Workforce Management Services
CMN Productions
37-67 Mowat Ave
Project Management Services
Concierge Connection
137-67 Mowat Ave
Business Services
Euoko Inc
535-67 Mowat Ave
Cosmetics
Fastlife International
145-67 Mowat Ave
Online Dating Service
Horn Almand
444-67 Mowat Ave
Accountant
Cieo Creative Inc
42-67 Mowat Ave
Consultation Services
King's Cross Capital Inc
300-67 Mowat Ave
Asset Management Firm
LUXE Destination Events
503-67 Mowat Ave
Event Planner
Maxximum Canada
200-67 Mowat Ave
Liquor Sales
nCircle Solutions
540-67 Mowat Ave
Security Technology
Onroad Communications Inc
138-67 Mowat Ave
Business Services
Port Wine Club
229-67 Mowat Ave
Private Organization
RTC Health
441-67 Mowat Ave
Consultation Services
The Landings, St. Lucia
235-67 Mowat Ave
Real Estate
Exec-U-Speed Ltd
10-77 Mowat Ave
Courier Services
Frameworks
400-77 Mowat Ave
E-Learning Solutions
Liberty Village Business Improvement Area
101-77 Mowat Ave
Commuity Economic Development
89
Appendix B- Liberty Village Business Inventory
Moveable
502-77 Mowat Ave
Digital Printing Services
Star Processing Online
414-77 Mowat Ave
Payment Processor
Toronto Carpet Factory
100-77 Mowat Ave
Property Development & Management
Aiyoku A Cardio Lounge
001-77 Mowat Ave
Gym
Cape Communications International Inc
001-77 Mowat Ave
Security Technology
Eye Q
308-77 Mowat Ave
Technology Solutions
IndEco Strategic Consulting Inc
412-77 Mowat Ave
Consultation Services
Kinnear Lock & Key
8-77 Mowat Ave
Locksmith
USX Corporation
310-77 Mowat Ave
Freight Services
Alliance Rockliffe Ltd.
1 Pardee Ave
Real Estate
Brandtrust Ltd
201-2 Pardee Ave
Business Services
The Roastery Coffee
8 Pardee Ave
Food Services
90
10.0 References
1. Statistics Canada (2008). Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs). Retirieved March 23, 2008 from http://www.statscan.
ca/english/freehub181-004-xie/def/ictdef.html/
2. Pratt, Andy C. (2002). New media, the new economy and new
spaces. Geogorum_31.425-436.
3. Pratt
4. Bayfront Precinct Plan, Toronto Waterfront revitalization Corporation, November 2005. p. 11
5. Ibid.
6. Ibid.
7. Ibid.
8. Ibid.
9. Ibid. p.10
10. Ibid.
11. Ibid.
12. Ibid.
13. Ibid.
14. Ibid. p.1
15. Waterfront Toronto. Corportate Background: Mission. Retrieved March 29, 2008 from http://waterfrontoronto.ca/dynamic.
php?first=43fa759348c04
16. Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative East Bayfront Business
and Implementation Plan (July, 2006). City of Toronto.
17. City of Toronto Urban Development Services(1995, 2005). Toronto
Employment Survey, 1995 & 2005. City of Toronto
18. University of Toronto. Data Library Service (19 Hume, C. (2008, 02
02). What’s not so sweet about new Sugar Beach. Toronto Star. [Retrieved] 2008 02 02, [from] http://www.thestar.com/article/299759
88-2007). Canadian Business Patterns. Ottawa: Statistics Canada
19. City of Toronto Economic Development(2006) Liberty Village Employment District Profile. Toronto
20. City of Toronto Urban Development Services (1995, 2005). Toronto
Employment Survey, 1995 & 2005. City of Toronto
21. Waterfront Community Improvement Plans (2008). City of Toronto
[Retrieved] 2008 03 25, [from] http://www.toronto.ca/planning/waterfront_cip.htm
22. Toronto Transit Commission (2008). TTC Transit Maps. [Retrieved]
2008 03 25, [from] [from] http://www.toronto.ca/ttc
23. Toronto Transit Commission (2005). East Bayfront Environmental
Protection Analysis. [Retrieved] 2008 03 25, [from] [from] http://www.
toronto.ca/ttc
92
24. Hume,C. (2007). New Designs must impress. Toronto Star. Retrieved
February 2, 2008 from: www.thestar.com/comment/columnists/article/283743
25. Jeffcutt, P. (2004). “Knowledge relationships and transactions in a
cultural economy: Analyzing the creative industries ecosystem.” Media International no. 112, p. 73
26. Koolhaas, R. (1994). Delirious New York: A retroactive manifesto for
Manhatten. New York: The Monacelli Press. p.44
27. Laws, Alex. (2008, March 19, 2008) “Live to work”. Retrieved March
25, 2008, from Eye Weekly Website: www.eyeweekly.com/style/myplace/article/21344
28. Lanterra Developments. (2005). Technology. Retrieved March 25,
2008, from The Toy Factory Lofts Website: www.toyfactorylofts.ca
ibid.
29. ibid.
30. Lifetime Urban Development Group. (2007). Liberty Market Building. Retrieved March 25, 2008, from Liberty Market Building Website:
www.libertymarket.ca
31. Houpt, S. (2008, March 24) “Artists home finds unlikely saviour”. The
Globe and Mail, p.R1
32. Two Trees Management. (2008). DUMBO Commercial Overview.
Retrieved March 25, 2008, from DUMBO, New York Website: www.
dumbo-newyork.com
33. Frenchman, Dennis and Rojas, Francisca (2006). Zaragoza’s Digital Mile: Place-Making in a New Public Realm [Media and the City],
Places: 18, 2
34. Ibid.
35. Ibid.
36. Ibid.
37. Hatfield, E. (2008, March 21). Sony BMG Music Canada leaves
Liberty Village. The Villager. p. 1
38. East Bayfront Business and Implementation Plan. Final Draft. June
28, 2006. Waterfront Toronto. p.45.
39. ibid.
40. East Bayfront Business and Implementation Plan. Final Draft. June
28, 2006. Waterfront Toronto. p.46.
41. ibid.
42. ibid.
43. ibid.
44. East Bayfront Business and Implementation Plan. Final Draft. June
28, 2006. Waterfront Toronto. p.45.
45. East Bayfront Business and Implementation Plan. Final Draft. June
28, 2006. Waterfront Toronto. p.47.
46. City of Toronto (2006, June 27). King-Spadina Secondary Plan
Review. p. 7-8.
47. City of Toronto Official Plan (2007) 4.7 Regeneration Areas. City of
Toronto: Toronto. p.4-14
48. Waterfront Toronto. East Bayfront Precinct Rendering. Retrieved Mar. 23, 2008 from: http://waterfrontoronto.ca/gallery1.
php?id=46487b5b157b7
49. City of Toronto Archives (2008). Polson Iron Works - south side Esplanade East (between foot of Frederick Street and foot of Sherbourone
Street). Retrieved April 1, 2008.
50. First Based Solutions (2008) and Google Earth (2007). Satellite Image. Retrieved April 1, 2008.
51. First Based Solutions
52. Two Trees Management. Dumbo Advertisement. Retrieved
Mar. 23, 2008 from: http://www.dumbo-newyork.com/index.
cfm?objectid=99BD9351-3048-7098-AFD79290975B35B8
53. Two Trees Management
54. Milbourne Real Estate Inc., Brokerage. Are you in the Market Liberty
Market Lofts (Poster)
55. Urban Strategies Inc. (2006) East Bayfront West-Precinct Draft
Urban Design Guidelines. Toronto: Toronto Waterfront Revitalization
Corporation.
56. Ibid.
57. Ibid.
58. First Based Solutions.
59. Ibid.
60. First Based Solutions.
61. City of Toronto (2007). Toronto Cycling Map 2007. Retrieved April 1,
2008. http://www.toronto.ca/cycling/map/index.htm
62. San Juan, B. (2008). “East Bayfront Bicycle Lane”.
63. Ibid.
64. Ibid.
65. Ibid.
66. Elkow, K. (2007). “St.Joseph Street Sign”.
67. Frenchman, Dennis and Rojas, Francisca (2006). Zaragoza’s Digital Mile: Place-Making in a New Public Realm [Media and the City],
Places: 18, 2
68. Frenchman, Dennis and Rojas, Francisca (2006). Zaragoza’s Digital Mile: Place-Making in a New Public Realm [ Media and the City].
Places: 18,2
69. Ibid.
70. Ibid.
71. Ibid.
93

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