Fall/Winter 2012

Transcription

Fall/Winter 2012
what’s inside
celebrating 50 years in business
west coast ski escape
island style!
6
12
18
the resurgence of mining
grey’s journey –
a flight of the imagination
22
community spotlight: high level 24
Dear Liz
3
Meet the Crew
4
Recipe28
Photo Contest
30
Cover photo supplied by Mike Turner, local photographer
“I have lived in Terrace for most of my life. I work for
Northern Savings Credit Union and I am very passionate
about photography, especially outdoor photography. I
feel extremely blessed to live in an area that is so rich in
scenery and wildlife. One doesn’t need to look very hard
to find beauty in the Terrace area.”
Dease
Lake
Fort
Bob
Ware
Quinn
Tsaykeh
Fort
Nelson
Fort St. John
Dawson
Creek
Prince
Rupert
Rainbow Lake
High Level
Smithers
Prince
George
Terrace
Quesnel
Edmonton
Lloydminster
Williams Lake
CMA
Kamloops
Central Mountain Air
Vancouver
Campbell
River
Comox
Kelowna
Calgary
seasonal
CMA
Central Mountain Air
Northern routes Magazine Advertising sales
liz smaha
1-800-487-1216 (ext.226)
Direct: 250-641-4295
or email: [email protected]
Contributors
Joan Donaldson-Yarmey, Mike Edwards, Erik Gohan, Chris Howard,
Lydia Millett, Zach Sapers, Liz Smaha, Evan van Dyk
Layout & graphic design
Northern Routes own in-flight magazine, featuring local history,
events and festivals, and profiles of northern places and people.
Deadline to book ad space for the next issue of
Northern Routes: February 22, 2013.
The deadline to receive electronic ad files: February 28, 2013.
Thornley Hayne [email protected]
We would like to thank all the people who contributed to this magazine. Every
effort has been made to ensure all content is accurate and accredited wherever
possible. This magazine does not constitute and should not be construed as an
endorsement or recommendation of, and we do not assume responsibility for,
any carrier, restaurant, service or any other facility or activity in this publication.
HAWKAIRwww.hawkair.ca
Toll Free Reservations
1.800.487.1216
Mailing Address
4345 Bristol Road, Terrace, BC V8G 0E9
CMA
Central Mountain Air
Central Mountain Airwww.flycma.com
Toll Free Reservations
1.888.865.8585
Mailing Address
Box 998, 6431 Airport Road, Smithers, BC V0J 2N0
CMA
Central Mountain Air
NORTHERN THUNDERBIRD AIRwww.ntair.ca
Toll Free Reservations
1.800.963.9611
Mailing Address
3900 Grumman Road, Prince George, BC V2N 4M6
have a
story
idea?
2
If you have any stories
you would like to suggest for
an upcoming issue of
Northern Routes, contact:
LIZ SMAHA
1-800-487-1216 (ext.226)
Direct: 250-641-4295
or email: [email protected]
dearLiz,
As a senior in High School I am thinking about my future career path. I have
always been curious about what it is like to be a Flight Attendant. It seems like such
a glamorous and fascinating job! Can you tell me more about what it is really like to
be a Flight Attendant? – Rebecca R. Hazelton, BC.
Dear Rebecca,
The job of a Flight Attendant is a unique one that can be very interesting and rewarding,
but at times very stressful as well. I asked Hawkair’s wonderful crew of Flight Attendants to
share with you some secrets passengers don’t know about being a Flight Attendant.
1. We don’t give orders just to hear our own voice.
“Safety is our number one priority,” says Hawkair Chief Flight Attendant Kim Gagnon, “so
when we ask you turn off your iPod and keep your seatbelt buckled it’s for your own safety
and well being.”
Write to Liz Smaha at:
Hawkair Aviation
Services Ltd.,
Attn: Liz,
4345 Bristol Road,
Terrace, BC, V8G 0E9
2. We don’t like delayed flights any more than you do.
Delayed flights are stressful for passengers and crew alike. It’s likely that your Flight
Attendant has had a very long day flying multiple flights already. They are tired and want to
get home to their families just as much as you do.
3. Give each other a hand during boarding.
The hardest part of a flight is boarding. With everyone trying to properly stow baggage in a
tight space in a timely manner, passengers can get frustrated. According to Hawkair Flight
Attendant Monika Schmidt, ”If passengers worked together it would make our job a lot
easier, as well as help the flight get out on time.”
4. We are Flight Attendants, not waiters/waitresses in the sky.
Flight attendants are there to ensure your safety, not cater to your every need. They go
through rigorous training, including medical emergency training, CPR and training to
evacuate an aircraft. It is up to them to be aware of what is going on with the aircraft and
alert the pilot to any emergency situations.
5. Alcohol affects passengers differently at 25,000 feet.
Due to the high altitude, alcohol is more powerful when you’re on a flight. If you are
noticeably drunk or getting unruly, it is the responsibility of the Flight Attendant to control
the situation.
CMA
Central Mountain Air
CMA
Central Mountain Air
6. Meeting passengers can be the best thing about being a Flight Attendant.
“One of my favorite parts of the job is having interesting conversations with a variety
people from all walks of life,” says Hawkair Assistant Chief Flight Attendant Renata Penner.
“It’s amazing how many people travel to Northwest BC from all over the world, and they
always tell me how beautiful it is here!”
3
crew
CMA
M E E T T H E Central Mountain Air
WHAT DO WE LOVE ABOUT CENTRAL
MOUNTAIN AIR?
· Great team that works well together to ensure our
passengers are carried safely and efficiently to their
destination
· Enjoy talking to customers from around the world
and building relationships with our repeat customers
· Locally owned and operated; the owners are very
approachable by all employees
· Being located in Smithers, we are able to see other
departments and how all aspects of our business from
Reservations to Dispatch to Accounting need to fit
together to form a successful business unit
WHAT DO WE LIKE ABOUT
LIVING IN SMITHERS
· Magnificent view
· Many outdoor year-round activities
· Caring community, family orientated
· Chance to further our education without
leaving our community
CMA Reservations Staff
HOW LONG HAVE YOU WORKED AT CMA?
Back Row:
Jennifer Colton: 6 months
Sharon Hartwell: 7 months
Kelly Flint: 2 yrs
Carolyn Good: 9 yrs
Janet Benson: 1 ½ yrs
Jenny Howard: 2 ½ yrs
Chantal Ferrier: 5 yrs
Everyday Solutions
to help speed your recovery
At MEDIchair we provide more than just
mobility products and long-term solutions
to increase independence and safety.
We also carry a wide selection of braces,
supports, canes and crutches to help
you feel better and heal better from
many medical procedures or injuries.
Front Row:
Patty Peterson: 10 ½ yrs
Jessica Hunt: 16 months
Daniella Huget: 1 yr
Not Shown:
Heather Hill: 10 ½ yrs
4
4443 Keith Ave, Terrace • (250) 638-1301 • 1-866-638-1301
sales • service • rentals
www.medichair.com
Photo Credit: Geoff Andruik
Are you a thrill seeker looking for exhilarating outdoor experiences
close to big city amenities? Get to Prince George and hit the slopes,
fly through the sky, or trek through hidden valleys.
Get out for an urban wilderness adventure!
Toll Free 1.800.668.7646
facebook.com/tourismpg I twitter.com/tourismpg
101 - 1300 First Avenue • Prince George BC V2L 2Y3
www.tourismpg.com
Celebrating 50 years
in Business
1962 - 2012
“There’s a lot of optimism in the
area and a lot of opportunities,”
says Munson about the current
economic climate.”
A successful business is one that can weather the bad
economic times along with the good. And that couldn’t be
more true than in a region that has long been dependent
on natural resources prone to boom and bust cycles.
Companies that have learned to adapt to an increasingly
fickle economy are the ones that have staying power.
Bear Creek Contracting is just one of those northwestern
companies and its ability to adjust to market demands and
diversify its business offerings are among many reasons this
Terrace-based company is celebrating 50 years in business
this year.
You’re Invited!
FIFTY YEARS IN THE MAKING
Started in 1962 by George Munson, Bear Creek
Contracting began as a forestry company. It specialized in
working in the remote, difficult-to-access terrain that
makes northern BC so unique. They knew the geography,
the weather, the back roads – it was a company that
understood the needs of industry in the region, largely
because its employees were also from the area.
But what started as a logging company has morphed and
grown over the years, adapting to a changing economy. In
many ways, it was out of necessity.
In the wake of a destroyed forestry industry, many
contractors found themselves out of work in the early
2000s. Forestry took a beating and suffered from the
Story Continued on page 8
Celebrating 100 years of
his†ory and community
Fun · Friends · Family
Homecoming Week:
August 2 – 10
www.smithers2013.com
smitherscentennial2013
Supported by the Smithers District
Chamber of Commerce
6
SDCC 7749c (Smithers Cent ad).indd 1
17-09-12 10:37 AM
S M I T H E R S’
o nly
F U L L SE RV IC E HO T E L
discover the difference
Nestled among the majestic mountains of the beautiful Bulkley
Valley, rst-class hospitality and a warm welcome await you at
Hudson Bay Lodge.
• Fireside Pub
• Complimentary Airport
Shuttle
• Liquor Store
• Business Centre
• Fitness Centre
• Gift Shop
• Wireless Internet
• Coin Laundry
Photography by Dany Couture
• Zoer`s Restaurant
HBL 7813c (Hawkair Inflight Magazine).indd 1
Toll-free reservation line 1.800.663.5040 Local 250.847.4581
[email protected] · www.HudsonBayLodge.com
3251 East Highway 16, Smithers
24-09-12 4:45 PM
7
combined effects of the softwood lumber dispute,
unfavourable lumber prices, significantly altered forest
policy, the elimination of the provincial appurtency
policy and the subsequent closure of sawmills
throughout the north.
The ripple effect was felt hard by local, smaller companies
that provided goods and services to the industry.
Around that time Bear Creek Contracting, like many other
companies, was forced to sell off most of its assets, lay off
nearly all of its employees and was left with a skeleton crew
of less than 10 full-time employees.
“It was a tough time for everyone,” recalls the company’s
president, Ian Munson. At the time, he was forced to
watch a barge loaded with heavy equipment shipped off
and sold at rock bottom prices.
It was symbolic of the effects the languishing forestry
industry had on local contractors. Many businesses folded.
Some downsized. Log sort yards became overgrown and
sawmills were razed to the ground. Watching that barge
pull away from shore gave Munson pause for reflection
and rather than lamenting the past, he turned his
attention to the future.
savvy to a diverse range of business opportunities. The
company turned its attention to road building,
construction, marine, transport, and helicopter services
(Lakelse Air is one of the company’s subsidiaries).
Fast forward to 2012. The company has more than 140
employees – a long way from the bare bones crew it had
in 2005 – and is operating nearly 200 pieces of equipment,
with more capital investments on the horizon. It’s part of
a measured approach to growth.
“We had to reinvent ourselves,” he says. But one thing the
company had learned is that it could apply its business
Story Continued on page 10
Come and be a
part of the WOW!
Skeena Landing in
Terrace has retail and office
space available for lease.
[email protected]
778-634-3860
SunRonkai LLP
C H A R T E R ED A C C O U N T A N T S
TA X – A U DIT– A D V I SORY
250-638-0444
8
Terrace, BC
Phone: 250-635-3333
www.sunronkai.com
flying fish
cooking living & giving...
250-638-1808
Café Zesta
Visit us for Breakfast & Lunch!
250-635-3696
WELCOME TO
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9
Many major projects that had long been promised to
the region started coming to fruition in 2010. Those
include the Kitimat Modernization Project, LNG sites
and the building of the Northwest Transmission Line –
projects Bear Creek Contracting is working on. The
promise of more projects getting under way in the area,
such as the LNG pipeline and others, means there is a
lot of work coming this way.
“There’s a lot of optimism in the area and a lot of
opportunities,” says Munson about the current
economic climate. Companies are working flat out to
meet the demand. Skilled workers are more in
demand now than ever and the economy appears to be
on the rebound.
Bear Creek Contracting has not only significantly
grown its staff to meet the demand for their services
but it is also growing its home base to accommodate
the growth. The company recently purchased the
former Lomak building in Thornhill along with the 16
acres of land on which it sits. The property is adjacent
to the existing Bear Creek Contracting and Lakelse Air
offices and hangar.
“We needed more space to keep up with the growing
needs of a bigger company,” says Munson.
Just like the first days the company was in operation, the
2012 incarnation of Bear Creek Contracting is one that
is known for its ability to work in the hard-to-reach,
challenging terrain that defines northwestern BC. The
expanding business is representative of Munson’s
entrepreneurial spirit and high tolerance for risk. “We
like the challenge involved in getting in to new areas,”
Munson says. It appears to be paying off.
Recently, Bear Creek Contracting earned a Northern
BC Commercial Building Excellence Award for the work
it did building the Klemtu Ferry Terminal near Prince
Rupert. The terminal opened in August 12, 2012. The
ferry service is expected to increase economic activity in
the area, not just for Prince Rupert but also for the
Kitasoo/Xai-Xais people. It is considered an important
piece of transportation infrastructure and opens the
door to increased tourism opportunities in the area.
The project was a year in the making, required the
ability to work in adverse conditions, particularly
during the heavy snow and rain during the winter of
2011-12. But for a born-in-the north company
accustomed to doing business in remote logging camps
under all sorts of adverse conditions, it was a challenge
comfortably met.
Ski & Stay in Smithers
The Best Snow, The Best Rooms, The Best Price
Visit www.skiandstay.ca or book by
calling one of our preferred hotels:
1-800-663-7676
1-800-663-5040
www.skiandstay.ca
10
TOS 5175c (Hawkair Inflight Magazine).indd 1
29/9/2011 3:02:44 PM
AN INCREASED FOCUS ON SAFETY
Working for major projects under way in the region means
that local companies must keep pace with the expectations
with respect to safety, health and environment (HSE).
“Safety plays such an important part in how we do our
business in today’s worksite environment,” says Mike
Edwards, the company’s manager of HSE. “The clients
that we work for demand that we be the best with
respect to our safety culture.”
DEDILUKE LAND SURVEYING INC.
4801 KEITH AVENUE
TERRACE, B.C. V8G 1K6
BOX 2300,
NANAIMO, B.C. V9R 6X6
(102 - 170 WALLACE STREET)
TEL.: (250) 638-1449
FAX: (250) 638-1442
[email protected]
TEL.: (250) 716-1415
FAX: (250) 716 -1439
[email protected]
Developing a safety culture takes the ability to adapt to
a very dynamic and ever changing safety environment.
The rules and regulations of today have changed by
leaps and bounds compared to what was acceptable in
the 60s when Bear Creek was first founded. And
diversifying the company’s focus to construction has
definitely ‘raised the bar’ on the entire company’s
approach to working safely, says Edwards.
One thing that has not changed in 50 years, is the fact that
Bear Creek remains a local company, and ensuring
everyone works in a safe environment is important not only
because of increasing regulatory expectations, but because
the company’s employees are also friends and neighbours.
“We aim to have everyone go home in the same shape
they came to work,” says Edwards.
The company understands it is playing a small role in
the rebuilding of the northern economy by employing
local people as it grows – something that has long been
a cornerstone for the company.
“When we employ local people, not only is money
staying in the north, but the talented workforce that’s
out there remains here too,” says Munson.
Here’s hoping that continues for another 50 years.
ORDER YOUR
Roy Henry Vickers
ORIGINAL PRINT TODAY!
This original artwork was created by Roy Henry Vickers
for our Northern Routes magazine, Spring 2011.
Only 100 prints produced. $500* per print.
*Plus taxes, shipping and handling.
604.581.2827
www.thornley
Hawkair Northern
hayne.com
Routes
RVSD1
Date: Mar 28, SPRING 2011 Covers
2011
Folds to 8.375”10.875”
Bleed: .125”
Printed at: 100%
Contact Liz Smaha at Hawkair for more information. [email protected] 1-800-487-1216
11
West Coast Ski Escape
Island Style!
By Erik Gohan
“Mount Washington is one of
Canada’s unique destinations and sits
in a class of its own – towering a mile
high above the picturesque Comox.”
Exploring Canada’s vast natural landscape is an obvious
choice when it comes to memorable winter vacations
with a fantastic choice of holidays that include dog
sledding in the Yukon, ice fishing and snowmobile
adventures on frozen lakes and the opportunity to
experience local culture and traditional lifestyles.
Like many, some of my favourite winter memories are
those of epic depths of powder and quality time on the
slopes with family and friends. Sure I’m biased, but in
my opinion British Columbia boasts some of the best
skiing in Canada. We are spoiled for choice with so
many great resorts to choose from, each with their own
appeal. But how do you narrow it down when trying to
please the whole family?
My daughter and I are powder hounds looking for steep
and deep terrain; my wife prefers the wider groomed
downhill runs or cross country trails. Our son, who has
recently swapped out his skies to take up boarding, likes
to spend most of his time attempting new tricks and
hanging out with kids his own age. Apart from a shared
love of the alpine the one thing we have in common is
that at the end of the day we all enjoy relaxing as a
12
family away from the crowds – though I must admit that
a good bar and lively après atmosphere comes a close
second to bragging rights when choosing a resort for
my annual ski weekend with my buddies!
Mount Washington on Vancouver Island had been on
our radar for some time. The snow reports over the last
four or five years confirm one of the deepest natural
snow packs in North America. Friends’ accounts of the
untouched powder in the “Outback” sealed the deal for
me and my daughter, while the wide choice of ski-in/
ski-out accommodation and the option of a massage or
work-out at the newly opened Mountain Centre ticked
the boxes for my wife; a video posted on YouTube of the
Park was all that was required to get my son waxing his
board in preparation for our trip.
Mount Washington is located in the North Central
region of Vancouver Island, an area that is rapidly
gaining popularity as an all-season adventure
destination. It is a resort that the Vancouver Island
locals refer to as their “Island Mountain” but they are
friendly and happy for you to drop in for a few runs to
discover the local sweet spots – of which there are many.
The thought of getting to Vancouver Island for a ski
vacation had always been a stumbling block for us –
which now seems ridiculous as we found the journey
straightforward and enjoyable. In fact, looking back the
journey was an enjoyable part of the overall experience
of the island lifestyle.
For those travelling by air, boarding a connecting flight
to Comox (YQQ) from Vancouver or Calgary
International airports, followed by a local shuttle, will
have you on the slopes of Mount Washington quicker
than getting to many of the other mainland resorts. If
travelling by car as we did, the 90 minute ferry ride will
be the start of your vacation. Your total journey time to
the resort should be no more than a three hour scenic
journey from boarding the ferry in Vancouver to
checking into your accommodation on the mountain.
Mount Washington is one of Canada’s unique
destinations and sits in a class of its own – towering a
mile high above the picturesque Comox Valley on
Vancouver Island. If you are looking for full service
hotels, designer shops, trendy restaurants, wine bars and
night clubs - Mount Washington may not be for you. But
if you are looking for a relaxed, family friendly resort
where the focus is on winter sports and showcases the
best of a spectacular geographic location, you will enjoy
carving turns in fresh powder while taking in the
breathtaking view over the island-dotted ocean below
and the rugged Coast Range beyond, and marvel at the
unspoiled majesty of the surrounding mountain peaks
of Strathcona Park, BC’s oldest provincial park.
Come join us for a once in a lifetime
experience at Haa-nee-naa Lodge, located
in the pristine wilderness of Northern
British Columbia. Our 14 guest floating
saltwater fly-in fishing resort is nestled
in the calm waters of Dundas Island.
You will enjoy world class meals &
accommodations while you learn
Mount Washington is a place where great terrain, fun runs,
excellent powder and stunning views combine with a super
friendly atmosphere and wide choice of on-mountain
accommodation to deliver a relaxed and memorable ski
holiday... it is one of Canada’s unique mountains!
On the Slopes: The resort has facilities for those
strapping on skis or a snowboard for the first time or
teams of athletes in training. Instructors and ski hosts
Story Continued on page 14
what it is to truly “Fish the magic”!
Feel the pull of a magestic trophy chinook
salmon, fiesty northern coho, or bounce
the bottom for halibut. Our all-inclusive
packages run 4 or 5 days leaving from
Vancouver’s International Airport.
Call to book today, space is limited and
your memories await you.
Haa-nee-naa Lodge II | Silverback Fishing Adventures Inc.
DPO Box 22003, Prince Rupert, BC V8J 4P8
Phone: (250) 628-3357 Toll Free: 1-800-668-8955
[email protected]
www.haa-nee-naa.com
13
are readily on hand to ensure new
visitors enjoy all the snow has to
offer no matter your skill level!
Easy Acres and the four Magic
Carpets make Mount Washington
one of the easiest places to learn.
The progressive Snow School offers
private and group lessons for
beginners and skiers wanting to
progress or improve their style.
Mountain Kids Snow School is
designed to offer great instruction
and tons of fun on the snow for
younger family members. The Bear’s
Den Day Care offers a fun
environment for younger kids and
the Ozone Park has lift accessed
snowtubing for the whole family well
into the evening, with hot chocolate
waiting for you in the Coco Cabin
when you need to warm up.
The front side of Mount Washington
features a range of gentle terrain for
those just starting out, wide open
cruisers for intermediates and
speedsters and an excellent
selection of black runs, bumps &
jumps and gladed tree skiing. The
terrain park was a magnet for our
thrill seeking teens who spent hours
competing with each other in the
wild snow-cross course and pulling
crazy aerial maneuvers on the wideranging terrain features.
The back side of the mountain or
“Outback,” is where we found the
steep tree lines and powder-filled
gullies. Every run was exhilarating.
My favorites involved a short hike
from the top of the Boomerang
Chair up to the twin chutes of
‘Billabong’ and ‘Copper.’ The snow
seemed to regenerate itself each
time we surfed our way down the
natural half-pipe features.
However, the resort is not just about
downhill terrain for families like
ours. Mount Washington’s Nordic
Centre features 55kms (33 miles) of
scenic groomed track set classic and
skate ski and snowshoeing trails that
range in length from 0.5 to 9 kms to
cap off the breathtaking terrain that
ventures into adjacent Strathcona
Park. It is not hard to understand
why so many of the 2010 Olympians
chose Mount Washington for their
final pre-games training and
acclimatization.
Off The Slopes: The Alpine Village
is nestled just below the lifts offering
ski in / ski out access to the slopes
for first tracks and easy access back
to your cosy chalet at the end of the
day. Pub-style bar and grill with
regular live entertainment and
family-friendly section, sushi, pizzas,
fresh daily local specials, kids
favourites and tasty breakfasts, are
just a few of the winter dining
options available to enjoy. The
Comox Valley and city of Courtenay
is a ½ hour drive down the
mountain and looked like a great
place to explore if you were looking
for more dining options, nightlife,
arts and local culture.
We chose to spend our last night on
a Moonlight snowshoe tour and
fondue dinner which was a great way
to cap off our first experience of
Mount Washington – while the kids
headed back up the lifts with night
skiing running until 10pm!
Story Continued on page 17
14
Choose from multi-room suites in condo-style hotels to large 12 bedroom chalets - and just about everything in between!
discovermountwashington.com
Book online or call: 1.877.754.4661
www.
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16
@ezrockAstral
www.myezrock.com
After three days of alpine fun Island style I was kicking
myself for failing to venture across the Georgia Straight in
winter to discover Mount Washington before and
reluctant to leave the comfortable 2 bedroom suite in
the ski-in/ski-out chalet that we had booked online
through Tourism Mount Washington.
Visit www.discovermountwashington.com
to learn more.
“It is not hard to understand why so many
of the 2010 Olympians chose Mount
Washington for their final pre-games
training and acclimatization.”
Alpine Facts
Summit Elevation
1588m (5215 feet)
Vertical Rise:
505m (1657 feet)
Alpine Trails:
81 runs (14% beginner, 35%
intermediate, 36% advanced,
15% Expert)
Number Lifts/carpets:
9 - 2 high-speed chairlifts (1 six pack,
and 1 quad), 2 fixed grip quads, 1 triple
chair, 4 covered carpets.
Resort Website:
www.mountwashington.ca
Photo Credits:
Mount Washington Alpine Resort &
Brady Clarke
17
The Resurgence
of Mining
By: Evan van Dyk
Northwest British Columbia is
poised to be the capital of mining
development in British Columbia.
Kelly LaRochelle uprooted his family from Lillooet and
moved to Kamloops in the spring of 2011 after the
lumber mill he worked at shut its doors amid a
downturn in the provincial forestry sector.
He was steered toward the mining industry, and
discovered a program that would train him to become
an underground miner and work for New Gold Inc.’s
New Afton Mine, thanks to the British Columbia
Aboriginal Mine Training Association.
“[Life is] better now,” LaRochelle said during a recent
interview. “I have more family time because the days are
seven on and seven off. I have a four year old daughter
now plus my wife, and that’s why I wanted to go into
mining. The quality of life is better.” Kelly has his
family’s best interests at heart as he looks toward to his
future in the industry.
“New Gold is a great company,” he said. “They hire from
within and promote their staff. As long as you have a good
attitude and work hard you can advance in the company.”
But New Gold’s New Afton project is just a taste of the
mining industry boom that’s underway across B.C.
Across the country, companies are looking to hire tens
of thousands of new workers to meet the demands of
expansion in the coming years. An estimated 92,000
new workers will be needed to meet current and future
industry needs and to fill positions vacated by retirees in
the next decade. The situation in British Columbia’s
mineral exploration and mining sector, including
service and supply companies, is even more acute – an
estimated 15,000 new workers will be needed to meet
the industry’s expansion in the next 10 years. And the
jobs pay well.
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In 2011, the combined annual salary and benefits for
the average mine worker totalled $115,682. The mining
industry is also the safest heavy industry in British
Columbia with only 1.9 lost-time injuries per 100 years.
With jobs come increased real estate values in
surrounding communities. In 2000, Teck Resources’
Quintette Mine near of Tumbler Ridge halted
operations due to low metallurgical coal prices, causing
housing prices in the pristine community to plummet to
$45,998 per dwelling in a single year. But, in 2006, after
the resurgence of the coal industry, prices for a single
home skyrocketed 332% to $155,496.
The outlook of mining in northwest British Columbia
has drastically improved thanks to the construction of
the $385-$525 million Northwest Transmission Line.
The Northwest Transmission Line will offer a low-cost,
clean energy alternative to diesel generated power to
mine sites north of Terrace along Highway 37.
As resource companies are able to tap into BC Hydro’s
expanded grid, their operating costs will decrease
significantly, and they will no longer rely on dirty diesel
fuel to power their camps and operations. This
infrastructure investment improves the overall
likelihood that mineral projects in the area will advance
toward production.
Northwest British Columbia is poised to be the capital
of mining development in British Columbia.
There are 89 mineral and exploration projects
underway at several stages of development in northwest
BC. Imperial Metals’ Huckleberry Mine outside of
Smithers is moving toward an expansion, while
Thompson Creek Metals’ Endako Mine near Burns
Lake recently completed its expansion. Imperial Metals
has also started construction on its Red Chris mine near
Iskut along Highway 37 – it will be the first metal mine
to tie into BC Hydro’s expanded power grid once the
Northwest Transmission Line is complete.
Although there will be year round camps on site to
manage employees at northwest B.C.’s mines, businesses
in communities throughout the region stand to benefit
significantly from expansion in the area. Terrace is
positioning itself to become the service centre for
northwest British Columbia and supply and service
mine operations and camps across northwest B.C.
Terrace’s business community is already feeling the
Story Continued on page 20
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19
effects of the flurry of mining activity. More than three
quarters of local businesses are expecting a significant
increase in sales and revenue in the coming years.
The expansion of mining development in northwest
British Columbia is one reason why Terrace is a prime
location to host the 25th anniversary of the Minerals
North conference next April.
CMA
Minerals North is an annual meeting between northern
B.C.’s communities, the mining and exploration
industry, First Nations and the service and supply
companies that support development. Minerals North is
your best opportunity to network with industry to one
day tender contracts, gain meaningful employment or
learn about what is happening in your backyard.
Central Mountain Air
The conference is not only an opportunity for local
communities to showcase their capacity to service the
mineral industry, but also for community leaders to learn
about and discuss the economic and policy issues that
affect the minerals sector and for the industry to get its
fingers on the pulse of one of the most exciting and
promising mineral development regions on the planet.
The 2013 Minerals North theme focuses on celebrating
the ‘Northern Network’ – an appropriate theme as
many communities and businesses throughout northern
British Columbia will have to work together to capitalize
on the rich potential that B.C.’s natural geography
holds for all investors.
The conference is expected to bring in more than 800
delegates to Terrace, including a full trade show, site
visits and a line up of industry speakers who will provide
key insights into the current state of the mining
industry and what the future holds.
For LaRochelle, the recent resurgence in mining not
only brought about a new career opportunity, but
promises to ensure that jobs like his will be around for
years to come.
Minerals North 2013 is hosted by the City of Terrace, in partnership
with Terrace Economic Development Authority, from April 24th-26th,
2013. If you have any questions or would like to volunteer for the
conference, do not hesitate to contact the Economic Development
Officer for the Terrace Economic Development Authority, Evan van
Dyk, at 250 635 4168 or by email, [email protected]
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• Terrace
• Vancouver
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• High Level
• Lloydminster
• Rainbow Lake
Call us toll free 1-888-865-8585 or visit our web site at www.flycma.com
20
British
Columbia
Fort
Nelson
Fort St. John
Dawson
Creek
Alberta
Rainbow Lake
High Level
Smithers
Prince
George
Terrace
Quesnel
Williams Lake
Cambell
River
Comox
Edmonton
Lloydminster
Kamloops
Vancouver
Kelowna
Calgary
REGISTRATION
NOW OPEN!
Visit www.mineralsnorth.ca
•
•
For more information, contact
Evan van Dyk
Economic Development Officer
Terrace Economic
Development Authority
250-635-4168
[email protected]
Terrace
Your Terrace Business Connection:
• to local businesses & resources
• to sourcing services & suppliers
Are you doing
business in
Northwest B.C.?
2013
Northwest B.C.
Industrial Services
DIR ECT ORY
TERRACE / KITIMAT / STEWART /
PRINCE RUPERT / NEW HAZELTON
Call us at
1-877-635-4168 to
receive your copy of the
2013 Industrial Resources
Service Directory.
Terrace Economic
Development
Authority
www.teda.ca
Columbia
Developing Northwest British
250-635-4168 • WWW.TEDA.CA • 3224 KALUM STREET, TERRACE, B.C. 21
Grey’s Journey:
A Flight of the
Imagination
By Chris Howard
From serving your coffee and
instructing you on the location of
your emergency exits, to writing and
illustrating children’s books, Hawkair
flight attendants can do it all!
Grey’s Journey is a rhyming
children’s storybook about a baby
grey whale that becomes lost during
his migration and his adventures
into the Mediterranean Sea. The
story stemmed from a unique
incident in 2010 when a wayward
Pacific grey whale was discovered in
the Mediterranean, well off its
migratory pattern and somewhat
inexplicable to scientists who
studied the occurrence.
Like the little whale in her
children’s book, Grey’s Journey, one
could say that Lydia Millett was born
to be brave. Moving to Canada from
New Zealand in 2010, Lydia found
herself in the Bulkley Valley, in a
world as different to her as the
Mediterranean Sea would be to a
lost Pacific grey whale.
“I really was like a fish out of water.”
said Lydia, now a flight attendant
with Hawkair, who arrived in the
Bulkley Valley with little concept of
what it was like to live in a place
with bears, moose and snow. “It was
a steep learning curve, I had to
learn to drive on the wrong side of
the road, in the snow!” she says of
remembering the challenges of her
first few months in Canada.
It is not surprising that her story has
an aquatic theme as she grew up on
a boat sailing in the Pacific ocean.
Her first memories were of the sea
creatures she so vividly and playfully
depicts in the pages of her book.
“We had a rule on the boat, if there
were dolphins or whales our parents
were instructed to wake us up, even
if it was the middle of the night,”
recalls Millett, and she remembers
many bleary eyed mornings standing
on the deck in her pajamas watching
dolphins bouncing around the bow
of the family’s boat.
She wrote Grey’s Journey in New
Zealand not long before she arrived
in Canada. “I was working at the
time as a policy analyst for the
Ministry of Education and needed a
more creative outlet,” said the
author. She was taking a creative
writing diploma and wrote the story
during the ‘writing for children’
section of the program. “The week
we were expected to produce a
story for children I saw the
extraordinary report of the lost
grey whale in the news,” said Lydia,
and so baby Grey was born.
It was not until she was in Smithers
though that she found the time and
inspiration to turn a few pages of
text into a picture book. Inspired by
a few children in her life, and her
own childhood spent living upon
the ocean she began to paint.
As the days became shorter in the
Bulkley Valley and snow fell around
her new mountain home, images of
underwater creatures and the
adventurous travels of a lost young
HELPING YOU PUT DOWN ROOTS
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22
Lee York
whale named Grey, began to unfold
with each stroke of her paintbrush.
“Coming up with each image to tell
the story of Grey’s adventure was the
easy part,” says Millett, “the pictures
were already in my head but getting
them down on paper was another
thing altogether!”
Lydia produced twenty-seven acrylic
paintings for her book. The deep
oceanic blues she chose and the
playful cast of characters that she
illustrated combine to provide a
rich and engaging reading
experience for young readers.
Lydia had at first thought the book
would be something she would
simply share with her nieces and
nephews and nothing more but she
was encouraged by friends and
family to turn the project into a
published book.
Fortunately for her, Sandra Smith,
of Spark Design in Smithers was
charmed by the project and its
potential. Even before she began
hours of design work on the book
she enthusiastically reserved
advance copies for her own nieces.
The sophisticated layout, graphics,
and formatting tied the paintings
and story together into the
professional product that both
Lydia and Sandra had envisioned
and the finished book began to
take form. “Self publishing and
working with Sandra was so perfect
for this project,” said the author.
“Instead of signing over the rights
to my book in a publishing deal,
Sandra and I were able to make
decisions together to create the
finished product I had imagined.”
The finished copies arrived at
Spark Design the first week of
August in time to make its debut at
the Smithers Farmers Market.
Nervous and unsure how the book
would be received Lydia was
buoyed by the encouraging
presence of her own mother, who
was visiting for the summer from
New Zealand. The extra support
was appreciated but never needed
as mother and daughter, both
giddy with excitement, watched as
Bulkley Valley locals and tourists
alike snapped up numerous signed
copies that first morning.
Immediately the word was out
regarding the quality of the
illustrations and the playful
rhyming story and sales at the
market, local book stores and
online have been steady ever since.
“It has been an incredible
experience, the amount of
encouragement and support has
been overwhelming. I am so
grateful to have found myself in an
amazing community that really gets
behind people when they do things
like this.” said Millet, who no
longer feels like a fish out of water
in Smithers. In between her flight
attendant duties with Hawkair,
Lydia is now being booked at local
libraries, pre-schools and
elementary schools to appear for
readings. Hawkair added their
support by buying several copies
for their little passengers to enjoy
during the flights.
Kasiks
Wilderness
Resort
TERRACE, BC
Located in Northwest BC
on Hwy 16, Sixty
Kilometers west of
Terrace; minutes from
Shames Mountain Ski
Resort. Offering Deluxe
accommodations, home
cooked meals, dry
campsites, fish freezer &
ice. The perfect escape
from the everyday.
Take a walk through the
Old Growth Forest, enjoy
roasting marshmallows
around a campfire, find a
trail or just sit back, relax
and catch a movie in the
lounge.
Chris Howard is a teacher and
business owner in Smithers.
For each book Lydia sells to Hawkair customers she will donate 20% of proceeds to Jack
Armstrong, a three year old boy who lives in Terrace and is bravely fighting leukemia. To
purchase a book, and ensure that 20% of the proceeds go directly to Jack and his family at
this difficult time, buy online www.greysjourney.com and be sure to write in the special
instructions “Hawkair”.
[email protected] .ca
www.kasiks.ca
Reservations (250) 615-3521
23
how to tan a hide. Throughout the year other displays
are brought in to the museum including the local
artist’s exhibit during the Annual Art Show in June and
July. The museum is open year round with the winter
hours being scaled back.
High Level is part of the Peace River Country and
although about 202,350 hectares are farmed this far
north, there are millions more hectares waiting to be
opened. Because the grain elevators in the town are
north of the 58th parallel, they are said to be the most
northerly in the world. To see the elevators go south of
the museum to 114 Avenue and turn east.
COMMUNITY
spotlight
High Level
By Joan Donaldson-Yarmey
High Level is at Kilometre 298 on the Mackenzie
Highway (Highway 35), which runs from Grimshaw to
the Northwest Territories. Although the fur traders had
been coming through the area since 1786, it wasn’t until
1947 that the first settlers arrived. High Level was given
its name because it is situated on a height of land
between the Peace and Hay rivers. The town now has a
population of over 3500 residents with another 20,000
in its trading area.
The region has a subarctic climate, which means it has
long, very cold winters and short cool to mild summers.
However, the hottest recorded temperature was 35.2C
on August 9, 1985. The coldest temperature recorded
was -50.6C on January 13, 1972.
At the south end of town is the Mackenzie Crossroads
Museum Interpretive Centre in a large log building with
a red tin roof. Inside is a replica of a Northern Trading
Post with an old counter, scale, and merchandise on
shelves, most of which was donated by local residents.
Sometimes, because of lack of money, early settlers
would trade farm fresh food such as chickens, eggs, or
ducks for dry goods including cornstarch, lamp oil, and
peppermint extract.
There is also a trapper’s cabin with lynx, coyote, marten,
and fox pelts. Some of the native tools are a flesher,
scraper, and curved knife, plus there are instructions on
24
At the north end of High Level is the junction with
Highway 58 which runs to Fort Vermilion. A 32.4
kilometre drive along this highway takes you to a
parking area for the St. Bernadette’s Church on the
Child Lake Indian Reserve. Walk through the church
yard, past the cemetery, and down a slight hill to the
Eleske Shrine.
During the early to mid-1900’s there were frequent and
deadly tuberculosis outbreaks among the First Nations
peoples. Work on the Eleske Shrine, designed to
replicate Notre-Dame de Lourdes in France, was begun
in 1944 to thank St. Bernadette for saving the area’s
people from a tuberculosis epidemic. Even though the
shrine wasn’t completed until 1954, the first pilgrimage
was held on September 8, 1945. Every July since, an
annual pilgrimage is made to the shrine by local
residents and descendants of past residents.
High Level is in the Footner Lakes Forest region. The
forest, at 76,901 square kilometres, is the largest in
Alberta. Oil fields were discovered in the area in the
1960’s and the tower is a service center to the oil and
gas industry to this day. Hunting, trapping, fishing, and
recreational activities abound within the region, but
most of the forest is inaccessible so much of its flora
and fauna are unseen and unspoiled.
Story Continued on page 27
NORTHERN FARMS
Seventy five percent of all the farms in northern
Alberta are in the Peace Country, the only land
in Canada where full scale farming occurs north
of the 58th parallel. Because of the agriculture
and forest products of this region, politicians
decided, in 1905, to set the northern boundary
of Alberta at the 60th parallel, so the district
would be included in the province.
Your
Community
Connection
Our customers, our staff, and the towns and cities we serve all
make up the CityWest community. As a CityWest customer, you are
part of a connected community of over 15,000 northwestern B.C. residents
and businesses. With our advanced fibre-optic facilities, we connect
communities and people to the world and to each other. We create
jobs, invest in our region and support non-profit and civic organizations.
By supporting CityWest, you are supporting positive activities in your
community. As a member of the CityWest community, we want to hear
from you, so that we can serve you better. Welcome to CityWest.
25
26
If you want to do some picnicking
or fishing while in the area, go
another 30 kilometres north on the
Mackenzie Highway and turn left
onto the gravel road to the Hutch
Lake Recreation Area. As you drive
look to your left and in the distance
is the spillway for the dam on the
Meander River that forms Hutch
Lake. Shortly past that is the turn
left for the recreation area. You will
drive beside the grassed hill of the
dam, which was completed in 1989,
and reach the recreation day use
area where you can picnic, launch a
boat, fish, and swim.
From the junction of the Highway
58 and the MacKenzie Highway go
north for 3.4 kilometres to the Fox
Haven Golf Club. If golf is your
sport and you are in High Level on
the weekend closest to the summer
solstice, enter the annual Midnight
Open Golf Tournament. It begins at
midnight, because at this latitude it
is daylight most of the night.
NORTHERN LIGHTS
If you are travelling the
Mackenzie Highway at
night, especially in the
winter, watch for the aurora
borealis also known as the
northern lights. The
luminous rippling bands can
be seen about 300 nights a
year in this area and this is
the best road from which to
view them.
Between Peace River and
Edmonton, the number of
sightings drop to
approximately 160 a year
and in the south part of the
province they only appear
about 30 nights a year.
For those who want some exercise
combined with a nice walk through
the forest, get back onto the road
and drive another 5.3 kilometres to
the Hutch Lake Forestry
Interpretive Trail. There is a map at
the beginning of the trail and many
different signs to read as you walk. It
is a five kilometre loop so expect to
take a while. Bring along a hat,
sunscreen, water, and bug repellent.
Discover
the joy of
FingerCooking
PUT FOOD ON THE TABLE WITHOUT SETTING FOOT IN THE KITCHEN
For a great view of the area once
you have finished your hike,
continue on the gravel road and you
quickly begin to climb. Kilometre
3.7 you turn right into the parking
area for the Watt Mountain
viewpoint. Take the short trail to the
lookout where you will see the road
you just travelled and the
surrounding, tree-covered hills.
Joan Donaldson-Yarmey has written seven
travel books on Alberta, B.C. and the Yukon
and Alaska. She is the creator of the
Travelling Detective Series. “Illegally Dead”
is the first novel of the series followed by
“The Only Shadow In The House” is the
second. The third novel “Whistler’s Murder”
came out in 2011 as an e-book through
Books We Love.
27
Turkey Chili
Contributed by Zach;
Hawkair Flight Attendant
Ingredients
2 cups chopped onion
4 garlic cloves, chopped fine
1 cup chopped green pepper
1/2 cup of canned nibblet corn
1/4 cup olive oil
Two 35 oz cans stewed tomatoes, crushed
Two 15 oz cans kidney beans, drained
2 Tbsp tomato paste
3/4 cup of low sodium chicken or
turkey stock use
2 Tbsp chili powder (or up to 4 Tbsp
if you like it really hot)
1 Tbsp ground cumin
1 Tbsp dried hot red pepper flakes
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 Tbsp salt, plus more if desired to taste
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
3 to 4 cups of shredded, cooked turkey meat
Sugar
Shredded cheddar cheese, chopped red onion,
sour cream for optional garnish.
In preparation for Thanksgiving, and in anticipation of
turkey leftovers, I’ve been experimenting with various
turkey dishes that use cooked turkey. This recipe is an
easy one for turkey chili using turkey leftovers.
Directions
1In a large, 8 litre, thick-bottom pot, cook the onion,
corn and green pepper, over medium high heat,
stirring, until golden, about 5 minutes. Add the
garlic, chili powder, cumin, and red pepper flakes
and cook, stirring, for a minute or two more. Add a
bit more olive oil if needed.
2Add tomatoes, tomato paste, stock, beans, oregano,
salt, pepper, and cooked turkey meat. Bring mixture
to a simmer and reduce heat to low.
Simmer, uncovered, for an hour.
3Salt to taste. Add 1 to 3 teaspoons of sugar to take
the edge of the acidity of the tomatoes if desired.
The chili may be made in advance and chilled for 2
days, or frozen for 2 months.
Serve with shredded cheddar cheese, chopped red
onion, and or sour cream. Serve alone, over rice, or
with corn bread.
Office: 250-635-9184
Cell: 250-615-8993
Fax: 250-635-9186
Shannon McAllister
Owner/Managing Broker
200-4665 Lazelle Ave, Terrace, BC V8G 1S8
[email protected]
www.terracerealestatecompany.com
Helping You... Move up, Move on, And Move Around!
28
I
K
S PLay
LI
e
W
Y
.
t
i
VE
O
L
l
l
ou’
.
t
i
VE
Get
Shamed!
in over 40 feet of annual snowfall
2 Backcountry Ski/Fly-in Touring Cabins
28 Ski Hill Runs & Trails, Vertical 488 m
(1600 ft) + World-Class Ski Touring Access
Endless Front & Backcountry Sled Terrain
35km of Groomed XC Ski Trails
+ 5km of Lit Trails
2 Full-sized Ice Rinks & Curling Club
www.VisitTerrace.com & www.ShamesMountain.com
facebook.com/VisitTerrace
29
photo
C O N T E S T
Above: Sean Pylot after hip
surgery at Children’s Hospital
in Vancouver.
Grab your copy of Northern Routes
and bring it and your camera to some lovely or
faraway place. Take a picture of yourself or a
friend holding the magazine, with the cover
showing clearly, and send it to us. If we print
your photo in an upcoming in-flight magazine,
we’ll send you a t-shirt!
Mail your submission to: Hawkair, 4345 Bristol Road, Terrace,
BC V8G 0E9, or better yet, e-mail the submission as an
attachment to [email protected]
Label your submission “Photo contest” and remember to
include your name, mailing address and phone number.
Please also provide a brief description of where your photo
was taken.
Above Left: Jackson Reimer on the set of Gold Rush, with Todd
Hoffman, the main star of the show. Jackson used Hawkair, Airnorth,
and Fireweed Helicopters to get to the set.
Above Right: Blueberry Bert, Phyllis and Bill Bertran. He is the mascot
for the Sioux Lookout Ontario Blueberry festival. This year is the 30th
year it has run. The town is also celebrating it’s 100th year anniversary.
ARE YOU READY FOR
TRULY FLEXIBLE SOLUTIONS?
Kelowna Business Centre
250 470 - 4802
Kamloops Business Centre
250 851- 4917
Prince George Business Centre
250 561-5415
Terrace Business Centre
1 800 663-5035
Fort St. John Business Centre
250 787-7097
bdc.ca
30
“On August 24, 2012 my daughter
Carla Christiansen married the LOVE of
her life! Thank you Hawkair for flying
my family to witness the beginning of
a wonderful life together!”
– Susie Smith from the Haisla Nation
Above: Dave and Emma
Dannemiller, with their two
boys Max and “DJ”.with the
magazine being held in front
of the iconic “Las Vegas” sign.
Market fresh inspired menu changes daily
Above: Kathy Jewer and Liz Smaha
with Aaron Pritchett. Hawkair
sponsored him to come up to
Telkwa for their 100th birthday BBQ.
Right: Heimke Haldane in front of wall
that will be part of Olympic Museum
in London. It has all Team Great
Britain athletes (542) signatures that
took part in London 2012 events.
SHAMES MOUNTAIN
Get Out of the Red and into the Green
J
O
B
e
c
Moun ome a p IN US!
tain C
roud M
o-op M
embery
!
CANADA’S FIRST NON-PROFIT, CO-OPERATIVE COMMUNITY
OWNED SKI HILL. BUY YOUR MEMBERSHIP TODAY!
250-635-3773 • 101-4805 Hwy. 16 W. Terrace, BC, V8G 0H3 • www.mymountaincoop.ca
31
our community.
our airline.
Hawkair supports our local communities. We work as a team,
in our commitment to make our airline and our community
the best that we can be. We employ more than 100 people from
our local communities. For business or pleasure, traveling alone,
as a family or as a group, when you fly Hawkair we strive to make
the entire experience positive, professional, and easier for everyone.
We believe in our community, and we believe in ourselves.
Book online at hawkair.ca, call 1-800-487-1216, or your local travel agent.
FLEXIBLE, RELIABLE CHARTER SERVICES
Northern Thunderbird Air has been flying throughout British Columbia for over 40 years. With our
remote mountain terrain expertise and fleet of modern turbine aircraft, we are committed to providing
safe and efficient charter air travel for crew changes, supply and equipment delivery, and exploration
work. In BC and Yukon, we are the remote airstrip specialists.
Safety · Integrity · Experience 1-800-963-9611 · www.ntair.ca
NTA 7764c (Hawkair Inflight).indd 1
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