REGIONAL NSW

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REGIONAL NSW
YOUR GUIDE TO
REGIONAL NSW
BEYOND BONDI
SECRET AQUATIC AND
COASTAL TREASURES
FORKS IN THE ROAD
TRAVELLERS’ TABLES
AND FOOD FESTIVALS
FESTIVALS GALORE
MUST-VISIT EVENTS
TO BRAG ABOUT
CONTENTS
Short Breaks....................................... 4-6
Romantic retreats and
tables for two
Family Fun............................................7-9
Farmstays, snow business
and adventure escapes
Aquatic & Coastal............................10-11
Top dive spots and
hidden beaches
Intrepid Expeditions.......................12-13
Eco-stays, cycleways and
aerial extravaganzas
New South Wales is Australia’s most geographically diverse state,
offering holiday memories to last a lifetime.
From the ageless beauty of the state’s World Heritage Areas and its stunning
coastline of more than 720 ocean beaches and marine reserves to the
dramatic landscapes of the Outback, there’s a “selfie” moment at every turn.
Your Guide to Regional NSW will help you plan your next great escape, whether
it’s a road trip along the stunning South Coast, a romantic weekend away to explore
the thriving food scene in Byron Bay or a family holiday in the Snowy Mountains.
And our packed calendar of regional events will help you time your visit perfectly.
We’re sure you’ll agree that there's more to love in New South Wales.
Go Solo................................................... 14
Singular fun in NSW
Animal Attractions.............................. 15
Underwater wonders and
wildlife parks
NSW Event Highlights................... 16-17
Australia’s best
calendar of events
Festivals Galore............................. 18-19
Weird but wonderful
events for the calendar
Superscapes................................... 20-21
Picture-perfect New South Wales
More Memories to Make in NSW... 22-26
Your guide to the regions
Food & Wine....................................27-30
Top tables, food festivals
and stunning cellar doors
Aboriginal Culture............................... 31
Must-visit sites, galleries
and guided tours
The Great Outdoors.......................32-33
Camping grounds, holiday parks
and wilderness walks
Arts & Culture................................34-35
Heritage drives, art spaces
and museums
Sydney on the Move.............................36
Hot new dining precincts in
Australia’s culinary capital
Sydney Events — Editor's Pick..........37
The fab four
Sydney Event Highlights.....................38
Culture, sport, arts and
entertainment at a glance
Cover Photo by James Horan
Destination NSW acknowledges and appreciates all the photographers and event owners who have supplied images for use in this magazine, including: Anilette Photography, Annie Cochrane,
Ben Howland, Brett Boardman, Broken Hill City Council, Byron at Byron Resort & Spa, Clive Brookbanks, Coffs Coast Marketing, Dee Kramer, Destination Port Stephens, Destination Tamworth,
Discover Jervis Bay, Elements of Byron, Gaia Retreat & Spa, Gethin Coles, Inland NSW Tourism/Zoe Marsh, James Horan, Josh Vincent Photography, Kempsey Shire Council, Legendary Pacific
Coast, Lendlease Barangaroo, Lindsay Moller Photography, Liquid Assets Adventure Company, OEH/D Finnegan, OEH/Gavin Hansford, OEH/Nick Cubbin, Ozan Fikri Highlands, Perisher,
R a Stanley Landscape Photography, Rick Stevens, Sebastian Goldhorn Photography, Simon Dallinger, Skydive the Beach, Surfcamp Australia, Taronga Western Plains Zoo, Tourism Australia.
Events and other information are subject to change without notice. For full disclaimer, please see back cover.
© Destination NSW 2016
Proudly
Presented by
2 / FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO VISITNSW.COM
THERE’S MORE TO LOVE IN NSW / 3
Photos:
1Racine
2Subo
3Darleys
2
4Fins
5 Reserve Wine Bar
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SHORT BREAKS
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Be among the first to sample
Byron Bay’s newest luxe
resort and spa, Elements of
Byron. Gloriously positioned
overlooking Belongil Beach,
its romantic credentials
include a lagoon pool, a fire
pit and ocean-view villas from
which you can gaze out to
Cape Byron and Julian Rocks.
If the beach isn’t your thing,
Gaia Retreat & Spa in the
lush hinterland near Byron
Bay offers peace, tranquillity
and plenty of pampering.
Beautifully situated on one
of the highest points of the
resort, Gaia's new Komala
Villas are split-level, onebedroom oases, each with a
private deck and plunge pool.
An elegant fusion of original
art deco and brand-new styling
awaits at the Commercial
Boutique Hotel in historic
Tenterfield on the New England
Highway. It also boasts a craft
beer and wine bar, fabulous
food and live music.
At Mollymook on the NSW South
Coast, the new Bannisters
Pavilion is just a stone’s throw
from Bannisters by the Sea.
A highlight here is the expansive
rooftop lined with sun beds,
private lounge spaces, a bar and
grill and spectacular suspended
pool. Choose between suites
or two stunning penthouses.
Also on the South Coast is The
Shed Gerroa. This coastal/farm
escape, close to great beaches
and wineries, offers all creature
comforts: the master suite
has a king-sized bed, there’s
a claw-foot bath in the ensuite
and fabulous views across lush
green hills to the ocean.
just outside Forbes. It offers
self-contained accommodation
and the ultimate in peace and
quiet. Girragirra's owners
have embraced permaculture
principles and regenerative
farming practices, which
means there is healthy garden
produce to enjoy.
Also clustered around a
picturesque billabong, this
time at Pokolbin’s Billabong
Moon, are five romantic
The romantic hideaways
Pretty Beach House at Hardys
Bay on the Central Coast and
Halcyon House at Cabarita
Beach on the North Coast
are hard to beat. Their names
say it all; not only are these
gorgeous properties, but the
level of luxe is unsurpassed.
And “going bush” (in unabashed
comfort) has never been
easier than at Mansfield on
the Manning, near Taree
on the North Coast. Hidden
among gums and native
shrubs are two cabins and
a three-bedroom cottage,
with wrap-around decks and
prime local produce from the
verdant Manning Valley.
Perched on a billabong
overlooking 20ha of organic
farmland is Girragirra Retreat,
4 / FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO VISITNSW.COM
Learn about the state’s best
viticultural offerings under
one roof.
TABLES FOR TWO
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New South Wales has a wealth
of dining experiences to set
your pulse racing, whether
you’re in the first flush of
romance or celebrating a
significant anniversary.
DREAM MAKERS
If you’re looking for a romantic
escape, grab your partner and
head to one of the state’s very
special retreats.
RAISING THE BAR
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cottages, with spa baths and
wood fires.
At Darleys, in Katoomba, you’ve
got nothing less grand than the
Three Sisters as the backdrop
as you dine in one of the Blue
Mountains’ most beautiful
historic properties. But while
the setting is 19th-century,
and the service is appealingly
old-fashioned, chef Lee Kwiez
is determinedly contemporary
in his cooking, whether it’s
his North African-style quail
pastry with mixed grains,
eggplant and seared scallops,
In the Blue Mountains great
options include the super-luxe
Emirates One&Only Wolgan
Valley and Spicers Sangoma
Retreat, each set in beautiful
bushland, and the recently
refurbished The Hydro
Majestic Blue Mountains.
Swimming, boating, fine
dining, chilling out… it’s all
here in NSW.
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“A GOOD LOCAL SECRET
IS TO VISIT THE DOCKS
ON THE TWEED RIVER
TO BUY PRAWNS,
THREE-SPOT CRABS AND
BUGS STRAIGHT FROM
THE TRAWLERMEN.”
or the show-stopping mango
sorbet with coconut granita
and macadamia crumble.
They’re all about the modern
flourishes at Subo, which
offers a set five-course menu.
Named for both of its owners,
the romance at this hip
downtown Newcastle bistro
is as much about the service
and drinks from Suzie Vincent
as it is the food from her
partner, Beau Vincent.
Confit chicken wings with
corn, sage and hay paired
with a handsome Hunter
semillon, perhaps?
Skipping further north,
Fins has been one of the
great Australian champions
of seafood for more than 20
years. Its current location,
back from the breakers at
Kingscliff, is a celebration
of the good things caught by
the rod, reel and net — and
of the good things that go in
the glass.
Ferment, The Orange
Wine Centre
There are 390 NSW wines
to taste at this regional wine
centre, which also acts as
cellar door for 10 Orange
Region wineries. Serve
yourself from the enomatic
machine or take a seat at the
bar for a tasting.
The vibe is very relaxed,
but the quality of the fish
and wine is serious, whether
you’re talking a cool bottle
of Lake’s Folly chardonnay,
or a fragrant Portugueseinfluenced feast of the local
catch cooked with rice, wine,
saffron and smoked paprika.
They’re not so much about
the nets at Racine in Orange,
but chef Shaun Arantz knows
all about the local catch.
Swap the sand for views of the
vines and get a true taste of
Central NSW as the kitchen
fashions the likes of smoked
duck with blackbean puree,
savoury granola and beetroot,
using produce sourced almost
wholly from the region. Set
in the beautiful La Colline
vineyard, it’s hardly surprising
the restaurant has become a
popular wedding destination.
Bon appetit!
Steven Snow,
Chef and Owner,
Fins, Kingscliff
For more insider tips, go to
4
visitnsw.com
Photos:
1 Gaia Retreat & Spa
2 Halcyon House
3
3 Spicers Sangoma Retreat
4 Elements of Byron
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Reserve Wine Bar, Newcastle
A focus on NSW wines was just
one reason this venue picked
up a Best Small Bar gong in
its first year. Try wine from its
backyard, the Hunter Valley, as
well as lesser-known regions.
The Lookout, Katoomba
Stunning views over the
Jamison Valley are just one of
the reasons to visit this new
clifftop wine bar. The chance
to sample a wide range of
wines sourced entirely from
NSW vineyards is another.
Roth’s Wine Bar, Mudgee
Roth’s is a specialist Mudgee
wine bar with a comprehensive
list that includes the big guys,
as well as wineries so small
you may not have heard of
them. Enjoy the obvious big
Mudgee reds but try something
new. After all, they’ll have it.
Bistro on Cinders, Armidale
As an emerging wine region,
it’s all new territory, which
leads the winemakers of New
England to be experimental.
Sip your way through a range
of styles at this small daytime
restaurant, a champion of the
local drop.
THERE’S MORE TO LOVE IN NSW / 5
FAMILY FUN
CULTURE CLUB
With an endless line-up of
educational but thoroughly
entertaining experiences in
NSW, you’ll be able to win over
the kids with real-life fun.
Budding horticulturalists and
wildlife conservationists can
sign up for a guided tour or
check out the park heritage
exhibition at the Dorrigo
Rainforest Centre on the
state’s North Coast.
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DON’T MIND IF “I DO”
Looking for the perfect spot to
pop the big question or renew
your vows? NSW has a place
to suit every proposal. If you
fancy sinking to your knee in a
fragrant and romantic setting,
the heritage rose garden
in the 17ha Orange Botanic
Gardens in Central NSW or
the beautifully landscaped
Mayfield Garden near Oberon
in the Blue Mountains are just
two of the top picks.
For something a little more
unusual, the sparkling
limestone formations of the
Jenolan Caves in the Blue
Mountains set a dramatic
scene (you can even host your
wedding amidst the stalactites
and stalagmites). At the
Photos:
famous Govetts Leap Lookout
in the Blue Mountains the
views stretch into blue/green
infinity — ideal for a postproposal photo — while the
otherworldly surrounds of the
World Heritage-listed Mungo
National Park in Outback
NSW will provide equally
spectacular memories.
And who needs the Empire
State Building when the
beautiful Cape Byron
Lighthouse, perched on
Australia’s easternmost
coastline, can be one’s
high point?
Alternatively, take to the skies
above the Hunter Valley in a
hot-air balloon with Balloon
1 Australian
Reptile Park
Aloft. Active types, meanwhile,
might consider hiring a kayak
from Ocean Planet Kayak
Tours and popping the question
while drifting along pretty
Popran Creek, a quiet tributary
on the Hawkesbury River.
3 Australia
Walkabout
Wildlife Park
4 Houseboat on
the Murray
2
The ultimate in romantic
proposals? We reckon
anywhere on the idyllic Lord
Howe Island is certain to
provoke a resounding “Yes!”
2
1Cape Byron
Lighthouse
2Lord Howe Island
3Mayfield Garden
4Murray River
Paddle-Steamer
6 / FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO VISITNSW.COM
For a zoofari option, there’s
the award-winning Taronga
Western Plains Zoo, within
At the Australian
Reptile Park at Somersby
on the Central Coast,
youngsters can watch a
funnel-web being milked and
venture into the snake venom
room to see how life-saving
anti-venoms are made.
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The nearby Australia
Walkabout Wildlife Park is
home to kangaroos, emus and
wallabies, and you can check
out bilbies and baby crocodiles
as well as ancient Aboriginal
rock art sites.
To find out more about
Aboriginal traditions and
culture, visit Waradah
Aboriginal Centre at Katoomba
in the Blue Mountains or, for
a full-on adventure, journey
into the Outback with Tri
State Safaris, which operates
one-day to 18-day tours out of
Broken Hill.
SHED YOUR CARES
Photos:
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When it comes to learning all
about the animal world, who
could resist cheetah brothers
Warrior and Vongani, residents
at Port Macquarie’s Billabong
Koala and Wildlife Park? They
inhabit the grounds alongside
mischievous meerkats, red
pandas and snow leopards.
2 Waradah
Aboriginal Centre
An invigorating walk to
the summit of mainland
Australia’s highest mountain,
Mt Kosciuszko, might do the
trick or a gentle glide along the
river red gum-lined Murray
in an old-style Murray River
Paddle-Steamer.
Others will be amazed to learn
about the bizarre fish that once
lived in our rivers — some
had lungs, others had jaws
like crocodiles — at the Age of
Fishes Museum at Canowindra
in Central NSW.
coo-ee of the
Old Dubbo Gaol
(should anyone need
reminding of what
life could be like for
miscreants).
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For a truly memorable family
holiday, stay somewhere out
of the ordinary. The ultimate
river adventure awaits when
you hire a houseboat to explore
the magnificent Murray. If you
like to be near the water but
not on it, Trudgalong Farm,
on the banks of the Gloucester
River near Barrington Tops,
offers a chance to get up
close to cute animals. This
small working farm has lots
of puppies, miniature ponies,
goats, cows, chooks and guinea
pigs. Other options for nature
lovers include Highland Lodge
Farmstay near Jindabyne in the
Snowy Mountains, where you
can collect your own eggs, pick
vegies, get to know the alpacas,
ride a horse or learn to fish.
If you have your own horse,
take it with you to the new
Riverside Ranch on the
Clarence at Yamba in the
state’s north, which has
BYO horse facilities. The
homestead sleeps up to eight,
has a pool, offers fishing and
crabbing galore, plus stables
for your trusty steed.
This sandstone cave is a
unique escape but you don’t
have to rough it (the nearby
lodge has proper beds).
Setting your sights even higher?
Take a look at the Headkeeper’s
Cottage at Sugarloaf Point
Lighthouse at Seal Rocks or
the five-bedroom cottage at
Montague Island Lighthouse
on the South Coast. Can’t beat
those views.
Fishing, kayaking and biking
are on your doorstep at
Dickebusch at Patonga on the
Central Coast, a beautifully
appointed three-bedroom
home. Kids will love the
outside, hot-water shower.
The charming Yarrangobilly
Caves House in the middle of
Kosciuszko National Park is
also perfect for families, with
scenic walks and a thermal
pool nearby.
Sit around a campfire and
listen to stories of the local
area at the Hatter’s Hideout
in the Blue Mountains.
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THERE’S MORE TO LOVE IN NSW / 7
Photos:
1Oakfield Ranch
camel rides
2Newcastle
Heritage and
Ghost Tours
3Hunter Valley
Horse Riding &
Adventures
4Taronga Western
Plains Zoo
5The Big Banana
Fun Park
6Mogo Zoo
2
7BIG4 Dubbo
Parklands
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ADVENTURE SEEKERS
Step out of your comfort zone
(just for a while) and enjoy
an exciting ride across NSW.
Pretend to be the Man from
Snowy River as you canter
through alpine terrain, passing
brumbies along the way. Snowy
River Horseback Adventure
offers two to five-day treks
in the Snowy Mountains that
combine adventure with
comfort. If becoming a drover is
more your thing, join the Cattle
Drive organised by The Long
Paddock, which starts and ends
at Wanganella in southern NSW
in April. Think of the bragging
rights! (Minimum age 18.)
If you’re short of time but still
want to saddle up, explore
the Molly Morgan Range with
Hunter Valley Horse Riding
& Adventures. Or swap your
horse for a camel at Coffs
Harbour and Port Stephens. Sit
atop your “ship of the desert”
as you glide effortlessly along
the shoreline at sunset for
an unforgettable experience.
Find out more at Coffs Coast
Camels and Oakfield Ranch
camel rides.
Quad biking over the sand
dunes at Port Stephens is sure
to provide an adrenalin rush.
Enrich the experience and learn
more about Indigenous culture
with Sand Dune Adventures,
who can take you across the
Worimi Sand Dunes to ancient
campsites, revealing the
secrets of bush tucker along
the way. Similarly fascinating
cultural experiences can be
had in the Hunter, Wollombi and
Broke valleys, where Aboriginal
guides from Ngurra Bu will
share their knowledge.
Leaving the natural world
for the supernatural, Monte
Cristo Homestead in Junee
in the Riverina is said to be
Australia’s most haunted
house; Maitland Gaol
is rich in ghosts,
according to some,
and Newcastle
Heritage and Ghost
Tours promises
plenty of dark
history, perhaps
laced with psychic
phenomena and
the odd ectoplasm.
THRILLS AND SPILLS
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8 / FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO VISITNSW.COM
7
Be one of the first to see the
meerkats in their new home
at Dubbo’s Taronga Western
Plains Zoo. Large glass
panels provide a window into
the troop’s world and you
can see these cute creatures
enjoying themselves among
sand, stones, trees and logs.
Tunnels provide shelter and
shade and zookeepers hide
food within them to encourage
the meerkats to fossick as
they would in the wild. At Mogo
Zoo, near Batemans Bay on
the South Coast, the already
extensive Up Close & Personal
Animal Encounters now
include a behind-the-scenes
introduction to one of the world’s
most endangered species, the
rhinoceros. Meeting two-tonne
brothers Jabari and Kei really is
a huge deal.
Splashing out takes on a
whole new meaning at
The Big Banana Fun Park,
Coffs Harbour. Australia’s
original and most famous
“Big Thing” has just opened
its Water Park with four
awesome thrill slides, making
it the biggest of its kind
between Sydney and the
Gold Coast. The kids will love
it. BIG4 Dubbo Parklands,
meanwhile, also boasts a
fabulous new water park,
perfect for thrillseekers of
all ages.
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SNOW BUSINESS
Winter, Summer or in between,
there’s nowhere else in
the country that beckons
adventurers quite like the NSW
Snowy Mountains.
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For skiers and boarders, each
of the NSW snow resorts has
its own unique flavour. Thredbo
has the longest runs in the
country plus a thrilling mix of
tree-lined trails, open bowls
and groomed supertrails. Top
that off with a snug, Europeanstyle alpine village and a feisty
apres-ski scene and you have a
world-class resort.
If you want to max out your
Winter fun, Perisher is the
place to be.
Photos:
1 Charlotte Pass
2Kosciuszko
National Park
3Perisher
This mega-resort is the largest
in the southern hemisphere
with something for everyone at
Smiggin Holes, Perisher Valley,
Blue Cow and Guthega. There’s
sensational variety here too,
with seven peaks, 47 lifts and
more than 1,200ha of fantastic
skiable terrain.
Charlotte Pass is the highest
ski village in the country and,
if you’re looking to ski natural
snow cover, this is a great
place to be. The resort is totally
snowbound during the winter
— which only adds to its air of
isolated magic. With its gently
progressing terrain, Selwyn
Snowfields resort is popular
with families.
In spring and autumn, the
Snowy Mountains Highway
is a 500km loop drive that
showcases the rugged majesty
of the region. Starting from
Tumut or Cooma, the drive
encompasses Australia’s
highest mountains, the slopes
For a different sort of aquatic
experience, check out the
new Window on the Wetlands
Centre at Warren in the Dubbo
area, which showcases the
wonders of the largest
semi-permanent wetlands
in south-eastern Australia.
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where the Murray River is born
and an award-winning coolclimate wine region.
The streams that run through
the valleys of the Snowy
Mountains offer some of the
best fly fishing in the country.
Find a local guide in Cooma,
Jindabyne or Tumut to show you
where the fish are, fit you out
with the right gear and help you
land a big, wild, hard-fighting
river trout.
The vision of wildflowers
unfurling their summer carpet
across the high meadows is
one of Australia’s calendar
moments. Throw in glacial
lakes, rippling hills, twisted
snow gums and gurgling
streams and you have an idyllic
version of the great outdoors to
put wings on your feet. Walking
is the only way to see it, along
the extensive network of trails
in Kosciuszko National Park.
The most popular is the hike
to the 2,228m summit of Mt
Kosciuszko, while the 5km trail
from Charlotte Pass across
the Snowy River to Blue Lake
is stunning.
Cycling comes naturally in
the Snowy Mountains, a good
reason why L’Etape Australia
by Le Tour de France will debut
here in December. There are
hundreds of kilometres of
mapped trails, wilderness,
alpine, high plains, valleys and
forest rides. While there are
plenty of trails that demand
technical skills, there are
family-friendly rides around
lakes and alongside streams.
Regional Express (Rex) Airlines
will commence regular
services between Sydney and
Cooma Airport from March 28,
with five return services per
week and additional services
through the ski season.
THERE’S MORE TO LOVE IN NSW / 9
BEYOND BONDI…
Everybody loves Sydney’s
famous beaches. But there’s
a treasure trove of sandy and
secluded stretches to explore
across the state.
The aquatic paradise of Port
Stephens has two dozen
superb beaches that start
at merely fabulous and run
right off the meter. From calm
expanses tailored for family
fun to the wonders of One Mile
Beach, these are places to
refresh body and soul.
Just 8km south of Byron Bay,
Broken Head Nature Reserve
is a jaw-dropping stretch of
coast. Creamy surf, steep
headlands at either end and a
tangle of rainforest make for a
postcard-perfect experience.
Sheer dramatic beauty marks
the beaches of Mimosa
Rocks National Park north of
Bega, where crashing waves
have eaten a honeycomb of
caves from the cliffs and left
towering rock stacks from
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WAVE REVIEWS
Boomerang Beach near
Pacific Palms is a class act,
with a point-break setup at the
southern end over a rocky reef.
Along the beach there are great
banks providing epic waves in a
nor’easter.
Surfing is a big deal in
Crescent Head. Where else
could you hire a surfboard
from the local Post Office?
This is long-board heaven,
with a classic right-hand point
break that draws international
surfers for world-class waves.
Killick Beach, home of the
annual Crescent Head Malibu
Classic, Goolawah, Delicate
and Point Plomer are the
local heroes.
The beautiful Bawley Point
coastline offers plenty of
variety, from normally tame
waves at Bawley Beach to
cruisy surf at Gannet Beach.
The ultimate, Guillotines,
shines in light northerly
winds with a 3m groundswell
providing great reef breaks,
offering right-handers
with barrels.
Newcastle has spawned some
of the supremos of the surf
“I’M LUCKY ENOUGH TO
RUN A GUIDED TRIP TO
THE TOP OF MT GOWER,
ONE OF AUSTRALIA’S
BEST DAY HIKES.”
Jack Shick, third-generation
Mountain Guide and Owner,
Sea to Summit Expeditions,
Lord Howe Island
For more insider tips, go to
visitnsw.com
The warm ocean currents and
coral reefs surrounding Lord
Howe Island, less than a twohour flight from Sydney, provide
a habitat for many exotic
tropical fish. It’s the world’s
most southerly reef and teems
with more than 500 species of
fish (some found nowhere else
on earth) and 90 types of coral.
The long peninsula that curls
to embrace Shellharbour to the
south, Bass Point is a marine
aquatic reserve and one of
the South Coast’s dive and
snorkel hot spots. At Jervis
Bay, three hours south of
Sydney, crystalline waters, a
fantastic topography and a vast
1 Port Stephens
2Pebbly Beach
Each February, Newcastle
hosts Surfest, one of Australia’s
biggest surfing events. Don’t
miss out on the action.
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10 / FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO VISITNSW.COM
The canoe and kayak trails that
stretch along the Macquarie
and Murrumbidgee rivers
offer an inspiring way to
explore the state’s iconic
inland waterways.
Stretching north from Coffs
Harbour, the Solitary Islands
Marine Park is a pristine
underwater world, while Julian
Rocks, off Byron Bay, is a
treasury of marine life. Fish
Rock Cave off South West Rocks
offers excellent scuba diving.
2
1 Surfest, Newcastle
2Solitary Islands Marine Park
3Lord Howe Island
4Protesters Falls
PUSH THE BOAT OUT
Boating and fishing
opportunities abound in NSW,
home to the country’s largest
network of lakes, meandering
rivers and an ocean teeming
with marine life.
Photos:
Between Ulladulla and
Batemans Bay, Pebbly
Beach is a treasury of
wild sensations backed by
forest where eastern grey
kangaroos appear silently
from among the banksias to
congregate by the water.
Photos:
and varied marine population
combine to create one of the
finest dive sites in the state.
East of Nelson Bay the main
feature of the Fly PointHalifax Park Aquatic Reserve
is a 100m sponge-covered
ledge with schools of bream,
nannygai and blue groper.
Another superb site is nearby
Broughton Island, with an
outstanding feature in the
Looking Glass, a split through
the middle of the island
crowded with marine life.
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world, among them Mark
Richards, Matt Hoy, Simon
Law and Luke Egan. From
the awesome barrel action
of the harbour in the north to
the shifting, peaky waves of
Nobbys Reef to Merewether
Beach in the south, this is a city
where surf is serious stuff.
INTO THE DEEP
The astonishing wealth of
marine ecosystems along the
NSW coast makes it a paradise
for scuba divers.
On the eastern side of Lord
Howe Island, Neds Beach
takes its name from the local
who began the daily tradition
of feeding the fish scraps from
the island’s restaurants — and
still they come. Wade into the
water and wait just a short
time for the coloured wrasse,
parrotfish and trevally to
swim around your ankles in
anticipation of a feed.
Jervis Bay has a stellar array
of beaches, especially those
starting from Greenfields
just south of Vincentia and
continuing to gorgeous
Murrays Beach, in the shelter
of Bowen Island.
AQUATIC&COASTAL
With its dazzling coastline,
some of the world’s best
beaches and ideal conditions
for board lovers, NSW is the top
pick for surfers looking for the
perfect wave.
an ancient lava flow standing
proud in the sea.
On the Macquarie River,
a 150km trail runs from
Wellington through Dubbo
and ends at Narromine. From
Burrinjuck Dam, the 230km
Murrumbidgee River trail
passes through Jugiong and
Gundagai before arriving at
Wagga Wagga. Hire your own
canoe or kayak, join a half
or full-day tour or a longer
paddle with camping included.
A houseboat holiday is travel in
the slow lane, and Nambucca
River Houseboats can put you
in the driver’s seat. You’ll have
a world of adventure off your
bow, with all the comforts of
home. Better still, some of
the most beautiful parts of
the river are accessible
only by boat. Give
yourself time to linger.
Sleek and fast, Cougar
Cat 12 Coffs Harbour
Fishing Charters
is a 12m luxury catamaran,
purpose-built to provide a
stable base for keen fishers.
The beautiful Sapphire Coast
has some of the best inshore
and offshore fishing in NSW.
Merimbula Marina offers a
variety of fishing charters while
Bermagui Harbour has charter
boats operating deep-sea dive
and game-fishing trips.
On the lovely Bellinger River
just inland from Coffs Harbour,
Bellingen Canoe Adventures
offers single, double and
triple canoes and kayaks for
leisurely exploration. Stable
and comfortable, this is an
ideal way to see this rich
subtropical ecosystem, its
flora and fauna as well as the
aquatic culture unique to the
Bellinger Valley. Sign up for a
Full Moon or Night Time Tour,
and get up close to nocturnal
life along the river under a
moonlit sky.
4
TOP DROPS
Wild and inspiring, waterfalls are
one of nature’s most majestic
creations. NSW has the loveliest
you’ll see, with magnificent
scenery and great walks nearby
the icing on the cake.
At Repentance Creek in
Nightcap National Park, Minyon
Falls plunges 100m into a palmshaded gorge. A walking trail
leads through blackbutts and
scribbly gums to a swimming
hole at the base of the falls. Also
in Nightcap is one of the best
short rainforest walks in the
country. The track to Protesters
Falls on Terania Creek winds
through a forest of bangalow
palms to a sheer cliff face where
a 30m veil of water sprays into a
green pool.
Further south at Elands, an
hour’s drive north-west of
Taree, Ellenborough Falls
makes a spectacular 200m
leap into the gorge below. A
timbered walkway with 641
steps leads to the bottom,
complete with rest spots.
Ebor Falls is one of the scenic
climaxes of the incredible
Waterfall Way, between
Armidale and the coast, where
the Guy Fawkes River plunges
100m over two spectacular
leaps; three viewing platforms
provide grandstand views.
One of the highlights of Morton
National Park is Fitzroy Falls,
where Yarrunga Creek drops
more than 80m from the
coastal escarpment to flow into
Kangaroo River.
Minnehaha Falls, meanwhile,
descends into a Blue Mountains
valley — wonderful views can be
had from lookouts along the way.
THERE’S MORE TO LOVE IN NSW / 11
INTREPID
EXPEDITIONS
TICKET TO GLIDE
Just south of Sydney, Stanwell
Park in Wollongong is one of
Australia’s premier hanggliding sites, with a number
of experienced operators
offering tandem adventures
that will take you soaring with
the local sea eagles, against a
spectacular coastline.
FREE WHEELERS
Cycling is a great way to explore
the hills, rolling plains and
alpine country of NSW.
Australian Cycling Holidays
takes you on a self-guided
tour of the NSW South Coast
with a package that includes
overnight accommodation,
maps, gear transfer and
high-quality touring bikes
if required.
Scheduled for March 20, Bicycle
Network’s 170km Newcrest
Orange Challenge travels
through rolling hills, vineyards
and open plains, with food and
rest stops along the way.
1
INTO THE WILD
A home among the gum trees,
by a lake, or in the mountains
is the escape we all need
from time to time, and NSW
is well supplied with ecosensitive cottages and cabins
waiting to inspire you with
nature’s wonders.
Perched on the western edge of
the Blue Mountains, Clonturkle
Sanctuary’s four guest cottages
are framed by towering
gum trees in a hidden valley.
Ecological integrity was a high
priority for earth scientist and
ecologist Andrew Bolam, whose
simple, natural accommodation
connects guests with the great
outdoors in one of Australia’s
secret treasures.
Smart and sensational, Bombah
Point Eco Cottages bring a
touch of luxury to a pristine
location in Myall Lakes National
Park, 2.5 hours’ drive north of
Sydney. The handsome timber
and glass cottages are equipped
with everything you need for
a relaxing escape, from wood
fires and well-equipped kitchens
to barbecues and hammocks.
With thousands of kilometres
of trails, the Blue Mountains
is a natural paradise for
mountain bikers. Love to race?
Join the 25km CareFlight
Woodford to Glenbrook Cycle
Classic on June 26.
1
Designed to connect visitors
with nature through science
and sustainability, Billabong
Camp is a permanent tented
campsite that sits beside
a natural wetland and is
operated by Dubbo’s Taronga
Western Plains Zoo — a wild
night with a difference.
12 / FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO VISITNSW.COM
Gliding puts you into the
realm of eagles, and NSW has
world-class soaring conditions.
Narromine, about 40km west
of Dubbo, is the gliding capital
of Australia, and the ideal
conditions here attract glider
pilots from all over the world.
Bathurst Soaring Club is an
outstanding facility with joy
For mountain bike riders,
the Snowy Mountains has
hundreds of kilometres of
mapped trails. Experience
the adrenaline rush of steep
downhill descents, or take a
gentle cruise on a forest trail or
around an alpine lake.
L’Etape Australia by Le Tour
de France debuts in the Snowy
Mountains in December. This
amateur cycling event has
professional race conditions
featuring closed roads, a
challenging route, sprints and
a King of the Mountain section.
“The Race” covers 160km of
demanding road, while “The
Ride” is less strenuous.
In 21 scenic kilometres, the
Narooma to Dalmeny cycling
route wraps up the glories
of the NSW South Coast in a
family-friendly ride.
flights available on weekends
and public holidays. After taking
off from Tyagarah Airfield
with Byron Gliding Club,
you’ll fly low past Cape Byron
Lighthouse, keeping an eye out
for dolphins or whales before
gliding back from Mt Warning.
A helicopter, meanwhile, will
get you to places that nothing
else will. At Armidale, Fleet
Helicopters offers flights
over the rugged and mostly
inaccessible New England
Gorge Country. West of the
Blue Mountains, Capertee
Valley Helicopters offers
thrilling rides over the stunning
Capertee Valley, part of the
Greater Blue Mountains World
Heritage wonderland.
2
Repurposed from the original
farm houses, barns and
milking sheds in this quaint
Blue Mountains town, Old
Leura Dairy consists of six
self-contained cottages that
have been brilliantly restored
to offer luxurious, eco-friendly
boutique accommodation —
with evocative names such as
Moo Manor, Buttercup Barn
and The Milking Shed — for
groups from two to eleven.
Set amid dense rainforest on
the slopes of Barrengarry
Mountain overlooking
Kangaroo Valley, Restdown
is an original 1870s settlers’
cottage with water supplied
from a natural spring and
power from solar and
hydro sources.
A short distance further south
at Illawarra Regional Airport,
Southern Biplane Adventures
rekindles the nostalgia of the
pioneering days of aviation with
a flight over the Shellharbour
and Wollongong coasts.
Looking to supersize your
thrills? Sign up for an aerobatic
extravaganza aboard their Pitts
Special S2C, and hold on tight.
3
DRESSED TO THRILL
Some adventures require a
special suit of clothing, and
kitting up in a jumpsuit or
helmet and life preserver often
can be the prelude to the thrill
of a lifetime.
2
“WHEN I AM ON MY TRADITIONAL LANDS,
I FEEL A DIRECT CONNECTION WITH MY
ANCIENT PAST AND MY FAMILY HISTORY.”
Graham Clarke from the Paakantyi Tribal Group,
Owner, Harry Nanya Tours, Outback NSW
For more insider tips, go to
visitnsw.com
Photos:
1 Billabong Camp
2 B
lue Mountains
When you’re floating back to
ground level under a billowing
parachute canopy, the world
looks like a very different
place. Wollongong’s beaches,
the vineyards of the Hunter
Valley, the spectacular Central
Coast, the green hills of the
Coffs Coast and the subtropical
wonders inland from Byron
Bay are some of the backdrops
where fully accredited skydive
operators can take you up for a
ride you won’t forget.
Whitewater rafting is the
ultimate roller coaster ride
and the wild rivers of NSW
provide the ideal terrain for
thrill seekers. Inland from
Photos:
Coffs Harbour, the Nymboida
River is a whitewater classic,
a prime wilderness adventure
through rocky gorges and
calm, rainforest-fringed
stretches. In alpine country, the
Murray River offers a variety
of adventures, from gentle
grade-2 rapids to a foaming,
nail-biting grade-4 trip through
a narrow gorge with 8km of
tight chutes, tall drops and
immense boulders.
Deep underground in NSW is
a labyrinth of stalactite-lined
limestone chasms that share
their innermost secrets only
with cavers prepared to put
on a headlamp and abseil,
swim or slither through its
dark passages. Abercrombie
Caves, Bungonia and the wild
crevasses at Jenolan Caves
offer sensational environments
for enthusiasts, each with its
own distinct challenges.
1Southern
Biplane
Adventures
2Stanwell Park
3Fleet Helicoptors
4Skydive
the Beach
5Liquid Assets
Adventure
Company
6Jenolan Caves
4
5
6
THERE’S MORE TO LOVE IN NSW / 13
GO
SOLO
ANIMAL ATTRACTIONS
Photos:
1 Lennox Head
2Surfcamp
Australia
3Byron at Byron
Resort & Spa
2
4 Bells at Killcare
5 Encounter Travel
3
1
UNDERWATER WONDERS
Majestic creatures of the
deep abound in the state’s
waterways and there are many
opportunities to see them in all
their splendour.
1
4
LONE ARRANGERS
There’s an ever-growing
number of specialist operators
in NSW who organise tours
exclusively for those who
choose to travel on their own,
but not to be alone.
In July, boutique, women-only
operator Travelling Divas is
offering a Girls’ Getaway, with
four days of spa treatments,
yoga, a wellness session and
a private, full-day wine tasting
tour in the Hunter Valley.
Accommodation is at Bells at
Killcare, a byword for fine food
and dining on the Central Coast.
Solo travel specialist Encounter
Travel is offering a Snowy
Mountains Autumn Walk in
April to experience the region’s
wildflower meadows, lakes
and stunning alpine scenery
at their prime, with overnight
accommodation and dining at a
lodge in Thredbo village.
Spa retreats are ideal for solo
travellers and NSW has some
of the best. Founded by Olivia
Newton-John and set amid
lush sub-tropical surroundings
in green hills behind Byron
Bay, Gaia Retreat & Spa offers
individually tailored programs
that combine diet, exercise,
spa treatments and therapies
to renew, refresh and restore.
Within the sleekest resort in
town, the beautiful and soothing
spa at Byron at Byron Resort
& Spa offers a fully-fledged
array of treatments by expert
therapists with magic hands.
Perched on a clifftop and part
of the handsome Bannisters
hotel complex in Mollymook,
the sleek Pinnacle Day Spa
comes with an inspiring range
of treatments and therapies
for a deeply relaxing and
revitalising experience in a
Mediterranean-style complex
with a resort-sized serving of
facilities. Tucked away down
a quiet road in the Hunter
Valley, the luxurious Golden
Door Health Retreat and Spa
Elysia brings rigour, relaxation
and a comprehensive array of
treatments, diets, therapies
and exercise programs to
ensure a new level of health
and wellbeing.
Solo adventurers who love
the water can sign up for a
surfing safari to discover the
best surf breaks in the country,
with a few tips along the way.
Check in for a fun experience
at Gerroa’s Surfcamp
Australia on the South Coast
or the cool Evans Head Surf
Shack, where you can also go
ocean or river kayaking.
A dolphin or whale-watching
cruise along the NSW coast is
one of the biggest wildlife thrills
in the state. From Huskisson
at Jervis Bay, Dolphin Watch
Cruises operates a daily dolphin
excursion and whale-watch
cruises (May to November)
aboard The Spirit of Jervis
Bay, a 17m catamaran with five
viewing platforms.
Eden’s Twofold Bay is one of
the few places where you can
see humpbacks lunge feeding
on nutrient-rich krill; the 16m
Cat Balou was purpose-built
for the task.
The four vessels of the
Moonshadow Cruises fleet
based in Port Stephens offer
numerous daily options for
cruising with whales and the
bay’s resident dolphins.
Go Sea Kayak offers daily sea
kayak tours from Byron Bay —
if you don’t see a whale, dolphin
or sea turtle on the trip you
can go again for free. Whale
Watching Byron Bay operates
several cruises daily between
June and November.
Green Cape lookout in Ben
Boyd National Park is one of
the best places to see whales
from the shore. Prime time is
May to October, when migrating
humpbacks can be seen almost
daily. For local Aboriginal
people a long association with
whales is reflected at several
places along the NSW coast,
where rock art sites and
aural history document the
powerful relationship with the
creatures, which also feature
as clan totems.
More than a thousand fur seals
can be found at Montague
Island, off the NSW South Coast
at Narooma. Snorkelling with
these playful, acrobatic marine
mammals is an unforgettable
experience. The island is also
home to Australia’s secondlargest colony of little penguins
and myriad birds.
“THE SOUTH COAST IS A NATURE-LOVER’S
PARADISE, WITH AWARD-WINNING
LOCAL SEAFOOD AND WINE. WE ARE
VERY LUCKY TO LIVE HERE.”
Jenny Robb, Owner/Operator,
Kiah Wilderness Tours, Eden
For more insider tips, go to
visitnsw.com
ALL CREATURES, GREAT AND SMALL
More wildlife encounters can
be found on the land in NSW.
Tamworth Marsupial Park is
a bush oasis that’s home to a
variety of native animals and a
free-flight aviary while Altina
Wildlife Park at Darlington
Point has exotic and native
animals in habitats shaded by
river red gums.
2
5
Admire the amazing native and
endangered bird species of the
Murray-Darling river system
at the John Lake Centre in
Narrandera, which also has
baby turtles and fish-feeding
sessions. The Shoalhaven
Zoo is set on 6ha of native
bushland, on the banks of the
beautiful Shoalhaven River,
with more than 100 species of
native and exotic mammals,
birds and reptiles; and in the
colourful world of the Butterfly
House at Coffs Harbour,
hundreds of Australian
butterflies thrive in an indoor
subtropical rainforest.
Photos:
1 Montague Island
2 Tamworth Marsupial Park
THERE’S MORE TO LOVE IN NSW / 15
1 Commercial Club Albury Gold Cup Carnival March 17 – 18
Enjoy one of the premier country racing carnivals in Australia.
Albury
2 Newcrest Orange Challenge March 20
A cycling event passing Orange’s rolling hills, beautiful vineyards and open plains.
Orange
3 Deni Ute Muster September 30 – October 1
This family-friendly event attracts visitors to the flattest plains on earth.
Deniliquin
4 Orange Wine Festival October 14 – 30
In the cool-climate region of Orange this festival showcases stunning wines,
produce, farmers, chefs, and retailers.
Orange
2
NSW EVENT
HIGHLIGHTS
FEBRUARY 2016
Surfest
Until February 28
Australia’s largest festival of surfing
welcomes everyone.
Newcastle
Roaring 20s Festival and All That Jazz
Until February 28
Relive the golden age of extravagant
balls, vintage vehicles and jazz music.
Blue Mountains
Cobargo Folk Festival
February 26 – 28
The Bega Valley is the backdrop to
this vibrant music festival.
Cobargo
2016 Australian X–Tri Championships
& MultiSport Festival
February 27 – 28
Indulge your passion for outdoor
racing in this stunning alpine setting.
Lake Crackenback, Snowy Mountains
Australian Bowl–riding Championships
February 27 – 28
Australia’s only true ‘nationals’
skateboarding competition.
Newcastle
MARCH 2016
Crookwell Potato Festival
March 4 – 6
Soak up country life during this
celebration of the local crop.
Crookwell
TriTheGong Triathlon Festival
March 5 – 6
Have a go with friends and family or
just enjoy the beachside spectacle.
Wollongong
2016 National Touch League
March 9 – 12
Watch Australia’s best touch football
talent in action.
Coffs Harbour
Lambing Flat Chinese Festival
March 19
Celebrate Young’s gold rush history
and Chinese heritage.
Young
Australian Longboard Surfing Open
March 23 – 27
The warm surfing waters of
Kingscliff welcome this annual
surfing challenge.
Kingscliff
Bathurst Motor Festival
March 25 – 27
Celebrate the inaugural 6-Hour Race
for production cars.
Mount Panorama, Bathurst
Easter Long Weekend at Hunter
Valley Gardens
March 25 – 28
The fun and entertainment includes
a giant Easter egg hunt.
Pokolbin
APRIL 2016
Sculpture at Scenic World
April 8 – May 8
Thirty-three artists transform
an ancient rainforest with
stunning sculptures.
Katoomba
Orange F.O.O.D Week
April 8 – 17
Experience the best of the region’s
food and wine during the festival.
Orange
Bundanoon Highland
Gathering Festival
April 9
The highland setting is perfect as
the backdrop to a range of traditional
Scottish Highland games.
Bundanoon
Canowindra Balloon
Challenge
April 9 – 14
See the magic and spectacle as more
than 20 hot-air balloons take to the
skies over 5 days.
Canowindra
Sail Port Stephens
April 11 – 17
This family-friendly regatta is
held on the pristine waterways
of Port Stephens.
Port Stephens
1
Byron Spirit Festival
April 15 – 17
Yoga, music, dance, tantra and
indigenous arts come together in
Australia’s hippest destination.
Byron Bay
Boggabri Drovers Campfire Weekend
April 20 – 25
Bring your own RV, ute or 4WD for a
weekend of campfires, camp oven
cooking, shearing demonstrations
and district tours.
Boggabri
Kidgeeridge Music Festival
April 22 – 23
A diverse array of musical talent
features some of Australia’s most
recognised artists.
Milton Showground
XTERRA Asia-Pacific Championship
April 23 – 24
Professional and amateur triathletes
and trail runners compete in the
XTERRA World Tour.
Callala Beach, Jervis Bay
Wings Over Illawarra
April 30 – May 1
See jaw-dropping aerobatics plus
classic and vintage aircraft in flight.
Illawarra Regional Airport
MAY 2016
IRONMAN Australia &
IRONMAN 70.3 Port Macquarie
May 1
Swim, cycle and run in idyllic
locations around Port Macquarie.
Port Macquarie
Hunter Valley Wine and Food Festival
May 1 – June 30
The region’s wine and food are
showcased with a series of
delicious activities.
Hunter Valley
World Grand Masters
Hockey World Cup 2016
May 2 – 13
The 2016 tournament is set to be one
of the most thrilling.
Newcastle
Ultra-Trail Australia
May 11 – 15
Join this trail running festival in
the Greater Blue Mountains World
Heritage Area.
Katoomba
Eurobodalla River Art
May 20 – 29
Enjoy the wealth and vibrancy of local
artists in the beautiful Eurobodalla.
Durras Lakes
Batlow CiderFest
May 21
One of Australia’s best street parties
comes alive with entertainment,
cider and food.
Batlow
Port to Port MTB
May 26 – 29
A fun and challenging race for all levels,
from recreational to competitive.
Lake Macquarie, Newcastle, Hunter
Valley, Cessnock & Port Stephens
NCHA Futurity
May 31 – June 12
The pinnacle of horse-cutting
championships in Australia.
Tamworth
JUNE 2016
Peak Festival Perisher
June 10 – 13
Celebrate the opening of the winter
snow season with great music.
Perisher Valley
20th American Quarter Horse
Youth World Cup
June 23 – July 3
The Australian Quarter Horse
Association (AQHA) event attracts
youth members from around the world.
Tamworth
JULY 2016
Ballina Fine Wine
and Food Festival
July 1 – 3
Savour this showcase of the best local
food, drinks and entertainment.
Ballina
Please note that events are subject to change or cancellation.
Check relevant website for further details prior to the event.
For full disclaimer please see back page.
16 / FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO VISITNSW.COM
5 Rally Australia November 17 – 20
Coffs Coast hosts round 14 of the WRC World Rally Championship.
Coffs Harbour
3
Cricket Australia – Australian Junior
Indoor Championships
July 1 – 6
The best under-age indoor cricketers
in Australia battle it out for the annual
national titles.
Dubbo
Snow Time in the Garden
July 2 – July 17
Fun for the whole family features iceskating, ice toboggan, husky dogs and
Snow Play Zone.
Pokolbin
Eastern University Games
July 3 – 7
University and TAFE students will
play a variety of team sports in this
highly competitive series.
Wollongong
Westfield National Youth
Championships for Girls
July 4 – 8
Australia’s best female footballers
compete in this prestigious youth
tournament.
Coffs Harbour
AUGUST 2016
Australian Surf Festival
August
Watch more than 500 surfers
compete for the title of
Australian Champion on the
beautiful Coffs Coast.
Coffs Harbour
Bangalow Music Festival
August 12 – 14
The finest chamber and orchestral
musicians perform along with artists
from around the world.
Bangalow
Dubbo Stampede
Running Festival
August 28
This community event has plenty of
options — walk 5.5km, run 10km or
run a marathon.
Dubbo
4
SEPTEMBER 2016
Bravo Challenge
September 3 – 4
The challenge takes full advantage
of Wollongong’s adventure
playground status.
Wollongong
Coffs Harbour Running Festival
September 4
This event for the whole family offers
fun runs and walks.
Coffs Harbour
Tulip Time Festival
September 13 – 25
Admire beautiful spring gardens.
Bowral, Southern Highlands
CurryFest
September 24
Woolgoolga’s Punjabi heritage is
celebrated through music, dancing,
food and fun.
Woolgoolga
Taste Riverina Festival
September 30 – October 31
Celebrate the year’s harvest with fine
food, wine, beer and fun.
Wagga Wagga, Griffith
OCTOBER 2016
Murrambateman Moving Feast
October 1 – 2
A delicious event for the tastebuds
featuring local wines and food.
Murrumbateman
Barellan Working Clydesdales
and Heavy Horses Good Old
Days Weekend
October 1 – 2
Early farming and lifestyle practices
feature clydesdale horses, bullocks
and vintage farm machinery.
Barellan
FFA National Youth
Championships for Boys
October 3 – 7
Footballers from across Australia
compete in this prestigious youth
tournament.
Coffs Harbour
Supercheap Auto Bathurst 1000
October 6 – 9
Experience V8 Supercars’ most iconic
event of the year.
Mount Panorama, Bathurst
Real Juice Company
Citrus Sculptures
October 9 – 22
More than 60 large citrus sculptures
line the main street of Griffith.
Griffith
Wingham Akoostik Music Festival
October 14 – 16
Camping, music, food markets and
activities are on offer for all.
Wingham
ChromeFest
October 21 – 23
Join in this tribute to hot rods, low-rider
bicycles, rock’ n’ roll and rockabilly.
The Entrance
UON Central Coast Sevens
October 21 – 23
Catch all the action during Australia’s
premier rugby sevens tournament.
Wyong
Tastings on Hastings
October 28 – 30
Enjoy the North Coast’s premier food
and wine festival.
Port Macquarie
Eden Whale Festival
October 29 – 30
Celebrate the annual migration at
one of Australia’s premier whalewatching locations.
Eden
2016 Wollombi Sculpture in
the Vineyards
October 29 – December 3
Wollombi’s boutique vineyards
and historic village feature in this
popular event.
Wollombi
Dungog Festival
October
This country festival of film, music,
food, performances and markets
is fun for all.
Dungog
5
NOVEMBER 2016
Tastes at the Bay
Food Wine & Jazz Festival
November 5 – 6
Wine, food, music and markets are
the highlights.
Port Stephens
Carcoar Cup
Running Festival
November 5 – 6
Some of the nation’s best runners
compete on this challenging course in
this new race meet.
Carcoar & Neville
2016 ITU Cross Triathlon
World Championships
November 18 – 20
More than 1,000 of the world’s best
athletes tackle a gruelling event
surrounded by alpine beauty.
Snowy Mountains
MTV Beats & Eats
November
Enjoy a line-up of home-grown talent
and international performers and
food selection.
Regional NSW
DECEMBER 2016
L’Etape Australia by
Le Tour de France
December 3
This cycling event offers amateurs
the chance to cycle under
professional conditions.
Jindabyne, Thredbo and Perisher,
Snowy Mountains
Vanfest
December
A boutique music festival that’s
packed with world-class acts,
art and sports activation.
Forbes
For more event information go to visitnsw.com/events
THERE’S MORE TO LOVE IN NSW / 17
FESTIVALS GALORE
New South Wales leads the pack for world-class events, from smash-hit Broadway shows
to international sports displays. But the state’s off-the-wall offerings are just as appealing
2
Earn much-deserved bragging
rights by ticking off these
bucket-list beauties pitched at
the music lover.
Every January, all roads lead
to Tamworth and the famous
Tamworth Country Music
Festival — Australia’s largest
of its kind — with festival-goers
eager to find out who will win
the prestigious Golden Guitars
awards. With more than 700
artists across 2,800 events,
it’s no surprise this singularly
Australian music festival ranks
in the world’s top 10.
When it comes to Elvis
impersonators, Parkes has it
all shook up. Join an army of
“Elvi” at this annual five-day
festival, during which you can
listen to the best tribute artists
in Australia, channel your
Photos:
1 Tamworth Country Music Festival
1
inner-Elvis (quiff and sparkly
white jacket essential) or simply
soak up the music at the Parkes
Elvis Festival in January.
Other great musical events to
slot into your calendar include
Katoomba’s Blue Mountains
Music Festival, Thredbo’s
Snowy Mountains Country
Music Festival and Bermagui’s
three-day Four Winds Festival,
all in March; Thredbo Jazz
Festival in May; the Perisher
Peak Festival in June; Bello
Winter Music in Bellingen
in July; the Deni Ute Muster
and Wingham Akoostik Music
Festival in September/October;
2Slim Dusty Centre
3Sail Port Stephens
Mullum Music Festival in
November; and Vanfest in
Forbes in December.
And celebrate music legend
Slim Dusty at the excellent
new museum in Kempsey that
bears his name. You can even
sign up to be a Mate of Slim’s.
Starting with his first steps
into show business, his early
tours around Australia and
the Outback, when he and Joy
were still doing memory acts
and comedy skits as a prelude
to the rollicking country music
performances for which he
became famous, the Slim
Dusty Centre has it all.
“PICKING UP SOME
TAKEAWAY FROZEN
YOGHURT AND TAKING
THE KIDS TO TERRIGAL
BEACH FOR THE ARVO IS
ONE OF MY FAVOURITE
THINGS TO DO.”
Kasey Chambers, Singer/Songwriter
For more insider tips, go to
visitnsw.com
FUN AND GAMES BY THE WATER
From Byron Bay on the North
Coast to Eden in the state’s
south, a world of fabulous
events located on or beside
the water awaits. And whether
you have a super-competitive
mindset or are keen simply to
join in and have some fun, there
is something to suit everyone.
3
18 / FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO VISITNSW.COM
Sail Port Stephens (April 1117), a week-long regatta held
on the meandering waterways
of the NSW Hunter Region,
is a great event for the whole
family. The XTERRA AsiaPacific Championship (April 2324) on beautiful Callala Beach
at Jervis Bay, meanwhile, is
pitched at rugged athletes, with
prize money, titles and kudos at
stake. Those keen to prove their
NSW takes its position as the
“Events State” of Australia
very seriously, but we’re no
sticks in the mud. Here are
just a few of the more outthere offerings coming up…
Life’s never a drag in Broken
Hill, especially in September
when it hosts the Broken Heel
Festival, a tribute to all things
Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.
Expect lots of sequins, plenty
of platforms plus cabaret,
comedy and opera. Unleash
your inner Priscilla and join
in the Lap of the Main Drag
in Drag. Dancing Queen fans,
meanwhile, will love the
Trundle Abba Festival, near
Parkes, in May.
THE BEAT GOES ON
Where else could you rub
padded shoulders with
hundreds of Elvis impersonators
in a typical Aussie country town,
pay homage to the humble ute
while listening to the nation's
best musicians or soak up
some jazz in a majestic
mountainside setting?
WEIRD... BUT WONDERFUL
fitness credentials should head
to IRONMAN Australia (May 1),
where dogged participants can
cycle along the Pacific Ocean
bike trail, feel the sea breeze as
they run through Port Macquarie
and then swim across the
Hastings River. If chilling out
with a plate of freshly-shucked
oysters and a glass of sparkling
chambourcin by the water is
more your speed, make your
way to the Shoalhaven Coast
Winter Wine Festival (June
11-13) or the Narooma Oyster
Festival (October 1-2) on the
state’s South Coast, and start
tucking in.
When it comes to aquatic and
coastal experiences, NSW is
well ahead of the game.
Learn how to tie a turban,
have your hands henna-ed,
enjoy fabulous curries and
multicultural cuisine and
loads of entertainment as
the area celebrates its
cultural diversity.
In October the three-day
ChromeFest revs up on the
Central Coast — a tribute to
classic American autos, hot
rods, rock’n’roll, and rockabilly.
Then there’s Wollongong’s
Blender Festival in October,
which has nothing to do
with the kitchen. This
four-day event combines
technology, arts and music,
and is designed to blur the
lines between experts and
audience with its street art,
photography, live music,
debates and exhibitions in a
top coastal location.
4
MAKE A DATE
Talk to the animals during
the Dubbo Stampede in
August, when walkers and
runners participate in a
variety of events within the
Taronga Western Plains
Zoo, all designed to improve
health and wellbeing. What
the animals think of it all is
anybody’s guess.
How many of these can you tick
off your list this year?
1
In the Riverina, they do race
days differently. Organisers
of the Booligal Sheep Races
in April let competitors bring
along their own sheep… or hire
one on the day.
Fancy a highland fling? Tune
up those bagpipes and hone
your caber-tossing skills
for the Maclean Highland
Gathering in March, and/
or the Bundanoon Highland
Gathering in April. Both
celebrate all things Scottish:
the bagpipes and bands,
drumming, highland dancing
and sports, the tartans, the
clans, the whisky.
Citrus-lovers will enjoy the
whimsical creations during the
annual Real Juice Company
Citrus Sculptures from
October 9-22. Based on the
famous lemon sculptures of
Menton, France, this Aussie
version is wacky but
definitely wonderful.
Pass the salami. In Griffith,
where 60% of the townsfolk
claim Italian heritage, the
Festival of the Sausage in
August showcases the skills
behind traditional salami
making. Pass the pappadums
in September in Woolgoolga,
when it’s Curryfest time.
2
Photos:
1ChromeFest
2Bundanoon Highland
Gathering
3Booligal Sheep Races
4Deni Ute Muster
3
“MY DUTIES START ON THE MONDAY OF THE PARKES
ELVIS FESTIVAL, FOLLOWED BY SEVERAL
DAYS OF PURE JOY, STEPPING IT OUT FOR
THE KING OF ROCK’N’ROLL.”
Al ‘Alvis’ Gersbach, Official ‘Ambassador’
for the Parkes Elvis Festival
For more insider tips, go to
visitnsw.com
Orange F.O.O.D. Week,
April 8-17
Food, glorious food, and great
wine to go with it. The area
around Orange is one of the
state’s prime food baskets and
here’s your chance to sample
it all. Wine tastings, farm-gate
tours, restaurants, workshops,
cooking demos, cabaret, music,
night markets and picnics, it’s
all at F.O.O.D. Week.
Tulip Time Festival, Bowral,
September 13-25
Tiptoe through (or around) the
tulips and be amazed at the
colours of the massed blooms
at one of the largest floral
festivals in Australia.
Deni Ute Muster, Deniliquin,
September 30-October 1
It doesn’t get more Aussie than
this. Music, the Ute Muster and
the Blue Singlet Competition,
all played out on one of the
largest, flattest plains on
the planet.
Dungog Festival, October
Kick back in country style for a
night of revelry with fine local
food, wine, music and dance
under brilliant night skies, when
the table is set down the main
street of town for the hugely
popular Long Table Dinner.
Eden Whale Festival,
October 29-30
Be inspired by whale-watching
from shore and sea, and have
fun in this idyllic spot with
live shows, family fun, street
theatre, film, music, seafood
and local produce.
THERE’S MORE TO LOVE IN NSW / 19
SUPERSCAPES
More than any other Australian state, New South Wales is blessed with diverse and
dramatic landscapes. Intrepid travellers will find a magical moment at every turn
Photos:
5Mungo
National Park
6Minyon Falls
7Port Stephens
7
8Mount Kosciuszko
9 Canberra Region
1
2
3
6
8
Photos:
1 The Blue
Mountains
2 Outback NSW
3 Killcare Beach
4 Nightcap
National Park
9
4
20 / FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO VISITNSW.COM
5
THERE’S MORE TO LOVE IN NSW / 21
MORE MEMORIES
TO MAKE IN NSW
Don’t know Tibooburra from Tumbarumba? Constantly confusing Woolgoolga with Wilcannia?
Here’s a guide to the state’s many and varied regions to help you plan your next holiday
OUTBACK NSW
Broken Hill is a great base
from which to explore the NSW
Outback, including the beautiful
Menindee Lakes, World
Heritage-listed Mungo National
Park, and Mutawintji National
Park, home to one of the best
collections of Aboriginal rock
art in Australia. The most
intoxicating aspect of this grand
region is space — the Outback
is vast, open and liberating.
Red ochre earth merges with
clear blue skies and you can
contemplate ancient history in
Mungo National Park or walk
in the footsteps of explorers.
Touring by car provides an
unforgettable adventure and
is the best way to explore this
fascinating region.
THE MAIN EVENT
LORD HOWE
ISLAND
Plan your next NSW getaway
around one of the state’s famous
events, whether it’s hot vibes in a
cool location, a quirky gathering
of like-minded car or Elvis
enthusiasts, or a tasty food and
wine festival.
OUTBACK NSW
SYDNEY
See pages 16-17 for a full line-up
of the best regional NSW events
for 2016.
SOUTH COAST
SNOWY MOUNTAINS
SOUTH COAST
Stretching from Stanwell Park,
south of Sydney, along the
coast as far as Eden, the South
Coast is a region of unspoilt
natural beauty with more than
30 national parks, marine parks
and reserves.
Pass through small towns
and an Outback city (Broken
Hill), drop into friendly pubs
and camp out under the stars,
visit heritage homesteads
and historic shearing sheds.
Become bewitched by the
colour and glitter of opals,
travel by historic steamer
on the Darling River or sleep
soundly in an underground
motel at White Cliffs.
ROAD TRIP
The Darling River Run, a
meandering 730km route
that follows the river from
Walgett in north-western NSW
to Wentworth connects the
towns of Outback NSW. It’s
an amazing journey through
isolated towns that were
once thriving ports on the
river — Bourke, Louth, Tilpa,
Wilcannia and Wentworth. The
Long Paddock touring route,
meanwhile, stretches more
than 600km along the Cobb
Highway (named for the famous
coach company) from EchucaMoama, through to Wilcannia.
It leads on to the iconic towns of
Bourke, Broken Hill and White
Cliffs. Alternatively, fly to Broken
Hill and explore from there.
LORD HOWE ISLAND
This World Heritage-listed
paradise, 600km off the coast
of Port Macquarie on the NSW
North Coast, is a crescentshaped island measuring less
than 11km, end to end, and
barely 3km across. You’ll be
one of only 400 visitors at any
time. Flight time from Sydney is
less than two hours.
Outstanding natural attractions
include the island’s twin peaks,
Mount Gower and Mount
Lidgbird, lush Kentia palms
(native to Lord Howe Island) and
crystal-clear waters teeming
with marine life. The island
is also a bird-lover’s
paradise. Wood
hens are endemic
to Lord Howe and it’s the
only place in NSW where the
distinctive sooty tern breeds.
The spectacular
Lord Howe Island
phasmid, a giant stick
22 / FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO VISITNSW.COM
Uncrowded beaches and quaint
country towns ensure it’s a
popular holiday destination
year round. Crystal-clear bays,
lakes and rivers are perfect for
fishing, surfing, diving, canoeing
and boating, while the pristine
bushland is enjoyed by walkers,
bird-lovers and cyclists.
Seaside towns and villages
reveal fascinating histories and
are complemented by a thriving
food and wine scene. Walk on
some of the whitest beaches
in the world at Jervis Bay, go
whale and dolphin-watching,
explore Montague Island or
skydive over the shimmering
beach at Wollongong.
ROAD TRIP
The 138km Grand Pacific Drive
touring route crosses the
dramatic Sea Cliff Bridge and
passes through seaside villages
north of Wollongong. The
Sydney to Melbourne Coastal
Drive (1,033km) continues the
scenic drive south.
From Canberra, it’s less than
a two-hour drive to Batemans
Bay via historic Bungendore
and Braidwood.
SNOWY MOUNTAINS
insect once thought to
be extinct, was in 2001
rediscovered on Balls Pyramid,
23km southeast of the island.
Swim in the pristine waters
of the world’s southernmost
coral reef or explore this
palm-fringed paradise by
bike or on foot. Popular
activities include snorkelling
and diving, fishing, canoeing,
bushwalking, cycling and
mountain climbing, as well
as bird watching.
Home to exhilarating alpine
wilderness and Australia’s
highest peak, Mt Kosciuszko,
the Snowy Mountains presents
a stunning vista of rivers,
mountains and glacial lakes.
Enjoy skiing, snowboarding
and snow-play at Thredbo,
Perisher, Charlotte Pass
and Selwyn Snowfields;
when the snow melts, high-
altitude landscapes, lakes
and waterways are the
perfect natural setting for
adventure. Trek to the top of
Mt Kosciuszko, enjoy worldclass mountain biking and road
cycling, go bushwalking and
hiking, explore Yarrangobilly
Caves, go fly fishing (obtain
a fishing licence or go with a
registered guide) and horse
riding. Discover fine food and
wine, including Tumbarumba’s
renowned sparkling wines, or
beer and schnapps, and explore
exhilarating alpine routes.
Snow season runs from early
June to early October.
ROAD TRIP
The Kosciuszko Alpine Way
(108km from Jindabyne
to Khancoban), the Snowy
Mountains Highway (180km
from Tumut to Cooma), the
Snowy Valleys Way (140km
from Khancoban to Tumut
via Tumbarumba), the
Monaro Highway (south from
Canberra) and the Elliott Way
(69km from Tumbarumba to
Cabramurra) all pass through
stunning landscapes.
The region also provides
some of the best motorcycling
routes in Australia, including
the Snowy Valleys Way, Snowy
Mountains Highway, Monaro
Highway, Cann River Highway,
Alpine Way, Elliott Way, Tooma
Road and Batlow Road. Twowheel-drive vehicles require
snow chains from the June
long weekend to the October
long weekend. Tumut is the
northern gateway to the Snowy
Mountains; it’s an easy hour’s
drive from Tumut to the
Selwyn Snowfields.
THERE’S MORE TO LOVE IN NSW / 23
MORE
MEMORIES
TO MAKE
IN NSW
THE HUNTER
The Hunter region is about two
hours’ drive north of Sydney.
This area of varied landscapes
encompasses the beautiful
vineyards of the Hunter Valley,
Australia’s oldest wine region,
the horse studs of the Upper
Hunter, the vibrant coastal
life of Newcastle, and
the vast blue waterways
of Port Stephens. Be
pampered in a luxury day
spa, tee off on a championship
golf course, float above the
vines in a hot-air balloon or hike
through World Heritage-listed
rainforests in Barrington Tops
National Park.
Explore the famous sand
dunes of Stockton Beach on
a quad bike or gaze in awe
at dolphins and whales on
a cruise from Nelson Bay.
Sail on Lake Macquarie and
snorkel, dive and surf in idyllic
conditions on beaches along
the Hunter coast.
ROAD TRIP
Head north from Sydney on
the Pacific Motorway (M1).
If your destination is the
Hunter Valley vineyards (about
two-and-a-half hours from
the Sydney CBD), there are
several touring options to
make your experience even
more enjoyable, including
This vast region stretches
across the sunny western
plains from the cool rainforests
of the Great Dividing Range to
the ochre-coloured expanse
of Outback NSW. Savour the
award-winning wines of the
Southern Highlands as well as
its chic shopping and accessible
national parks; in the Canberra
Region visit orchards, taste
cherries, truffles and coolclimate wines, browse antiques
shops, galleries and museums.
Karen James, Meerkat Keeper,
Taronga Western Plains Zoo, Dubbo
For more insider tips, go to
visitnsw.com
THE HUNTER
CENTRAL COAST
SYDNEY
NORTH COAST
private tours with pick up and
drop off from Sydney, as well
as Hunter-based local coach
excursions. Rover Coaches
picks up from Morisset
train station, with transfers
arranged to match the train
timetable, so everyone can
enjoy wine tasting at the
region’s excellent cellar doors.
Stretching from Port Stephens
(2.5 hours’ drive from Sydney)
to The Tweed (an 80-minute
drive from Brisbane), this
region is full of stunning
natural treasures: beaches,
rivers, volcanic hinterland and
World Heritage forests.
Sample beach culture at Byron
Bay or go diving in the Solitary
COUNTRY NSW
“AS A DUBBO LOCAL, I WAS
VERY FORTUNATE TO GROW
UP WITH A WORLD-CLASS
ZOO IN MY BACKYARD.”
NORTH
COAST
COUNTRY NSW
On the Great Western Plains
visit the Taronga Western
Plains Zoo or head to Mudgee
for gourmet produce and
excellent wines. Pick seasonal
fruit, chat to a farmer/
producer in Orange or head to
Bathurst, Parkes and Forbes
for magnificent landscapes
and a rich cultural heritage.
Discover Tamworth, Capital
of Country, plus neighbouring
towns of Nundle, Willow
Tree and Uralla, or head to
Armidale, the hub for New
England High Country, known
for its spectacular waterfalls,
gorges, World Heritage
national parks, cool-climate
vineyards and diverse cultural
heritage. Top off your journeys
with a road trip to explore
Moree, Gunnedah, Narrabri
and the lush Liverpool Plains
— ideal for caravanning
and camping.
ROAD TRIP
One of the prettiest drives
in this region is through the
beautiful tablelands of New
England High Country on
the Waterfall Way (185km);
follow a discovery trail and
experience art, nature, gold
fever, science and technology
or food and wine across
Central NSW and take in
the gems of Cowra, Forbes,
Parkes, Orange and Mudgee.
Dubbo is an ideal base for
touring central and western
NSW, enjoying fine wines,
amazing scenery and unique
attractions. The Fossickers
Way (303km) starts at Nundle
and passes through Tamworth,
Manilla, Barraba, Bingara,
Warialda, Inverell, Glen Innes
and on to Emmaville. Meander
along the Poachers Way for
some of the prettiest NSW
countryside in the Canberra
Region or follow one of the
many short country drives in
the Southern Highlands, where
quaint towns and villages,
wineries and historic sites will
fill your itinerary.
CENTRAL COAST
Under an hour’s drive north of
Sydney and south of Newcastle,
this region is known for its
many natural attributes —
waterways, sparkling beaches
and lush hinterland.
The Central Coast is perfect for
a fun and adventurous short
break. National parks offer a
wide variety of experiences —
the beautiful Somersby Falls
in Brisbane Water National
Park, the secluded beaches
and bays of Bouddi National
Park and whale-watching
from Crackneck lookout in
Wyrrabalong National Park.
Enjoy surfing, fishing, sailing
and water skiing. Feed pelicans
at The Entrance or drop into a
local zoo; play golf, go cycling
and skydiving, enjoy a ziplining
adventure or a trail ride at
Australia’s largest horse-riding
and outdoor adventure centre
in Glenworth Valley.
Island Marine Park near Coffs
Harbour, experience the World
Heritage-listed Gondwana
Rainforests of Australia at
Dorrigo Rainforest Centre
or kayak in the Myall Lakes
National Park. Eat fresh
seafood, chill out in five-star
resorts, play on championship
golf courses, see dolphins and
whales up close. The North
Coast also has some of the
best camping and caravanning
spots in the state.
ROAD TRIP
Follow the glorious Legendary
Pacific Coast Touring Route
between Sydney and Brisbane.
Byron Bay is a nine-hour drive
from Sydney and about two
hours’ drive from Brisbane;
Port Stephens is under three
hours’ drive north of Sydney;
Coffs Harbour is just over
six hours from Sydney; Port
Macquarie is a five-hour drive
from the capital. Tweed Heads,
NSW’s northernmost town,
is about 1.5 hours’ drive from
Brisbane. Domestic airlines
fly to Byron Bay / Ballina,
Coffs Harbour, Gold Coast,
Newcastle / Port Stephens and
Port Macquarie.
STAY SAFE IN
NEW SOUTH WALES
There are endless things to do
in NSW, from soaking up the sun
on golden beaches and hitting
the road for an exhilarating
driving holiday to trekking
through pristine national parks.
Always plan ahead and take
precautions to ensure a happy
and safe holiday.
To avoid fatigue when driving,
ensure you’ve had enough
sleep before your trip and share
the driving where possible.
Take advantage of the many
designated rest areas available.
When bushwalking and hiking,
check weather forecasts and
park conditions before setting off
and always tell someone where
you are going. Carry a local
map and compass and consider
carrying a satellite phone or
personal locator beacon as
remote areas may have little or
no mobile-phone reception.
At beaches, avoid swimming or
surfing alone, avoid swimming at
dusk or at night, be aware of rips
and currents and always swim
between the red and yellow flags
at patrolled beaches. Never run
or dive into lakes, rivers or any
other body of water.
The sun can burn the skin even
on cloudy days, so always wear
a sunhat, glasses and waterresistant sunscreen. Avoid being
outdoors for lengthy periods
between 11am and 3pm when UV
rays are at their most intense.
THERE’S MORE TO LOVE IN NSW / 25
MORE
MEMORIES
TO MAKE
IN NSW
GETTING AROUND
BLUE MOUNTAINS
SYDNEY
MURRAY
AND RIVERINA
BLUE MOUNTAINS
Just 90 minutes’ drive west from
Sydney, the Blue Mountains is
one of Australia’s most popular
holiday destinations. Small
towns and villages spread
along a narrow escarpment are
surrounded by the sandstone
cliffs and deep valleys that
make up the vast Greater Blue
Mountains World Heritage Area.
This extraordinary landscape
offers a perfect backdrop
for activities ranging from
bushwalking and bird-watching
to canyoning and abseiling. Visit
Jenolan Caves, Scenic World at
Katoomba and Wollemi National
Park. Stay at award-winning
resorts or quaint B&Bs, browse
galleries and antiques shops,
play golf and wander through
pretty seasonal gardens.
ROAD TRIP
The most direct route is
west from Sydney CBD on
the M4 Motorway; the drive
to Katoomba takes less than
two hours. An alternative
scenic route via Bell’s Line
of Road starts at Richmond
and continues through to Mt
Tomah and Bell, and across
to Mt Victoria (a little over two
hours in total). The Greater
Blue Mountains Drive (1,200km
on major roads) encompasses
some of the region’s best
natural attractions, with a series
of discovery trails branching off
the main route.
NSW is well served by a
network of regional airlines,
trains, buses and coach
services. From Sydney, there
are air, rail and bus services to
major regional centres such
as Armidale, Ballina/Byron,
Bega, Broken Hill, Cooma,
Coffs Harbour, Dubbo, Lord
Howe Island, Newcastle,
Orange, Port Macquarie,
Tamworth and Wagga Wagga.
Visitor facilities such as car
hire, tour guides and transfers
are available at most major
centres. Contact the Visitor
Information Centre (visitnsw.
com/visitor-informationcentres) at each destination
for further details.
FOOD&
WINE
TRAVELLERS’ TABLES
How do you improve on
the perfect regional dining
experience? Easy: couple it
with an indulgent stay on the
same premises. Some of the
state’s most prominent culinary
players pair their food offerings
with accommodation that’s just
as tasty.
Top of the list has to be
Paper Daisy at Cabarita Beach
on the North Coast. Treat
yourself to a shared spread
from talented young chef Ben
Devlin’s beachy-luxe dinner
menu (local fish grilled on
paperbark with seaweed,
perhaps, or poached chicken
with almond and cauliflower),
retire to the superb rooms of
Halcyon House, decorated in
the same breezy Capri-viaPalm Beach style by designer
Anna Spiro, then wander
back in the morning for a
breakfast of crumpets topped
with ricotta, roast fruit and
honeycomb. Paradise.
BY AIR
qantas.com
jetstar.com
virginaustralia.com
rex.com.au
flypelican.com.au
The surfside good times
continue in Mollymook at
Bannisters, where a 1960s
vibe is just as much of a
drawcard. Here the menu is
written by seafood master
Rick Stein, and runs to the likes
of oysters with hot sausage,
and serious fish and chips.
Happy days. Retire to a
Collette Dinnigan-designed
suite after dinner.
At Biota in Bowral in the
Southern Highlands, the new
guest rooms are decorated in a
cool Nordic style that’s perfectly
simpatico with the elegance of
the food served by James Viles
in the restaurant. Thrill to such
delights as beef cooked over
coals with aged cheddar and
linger over a glass or three from
the superb wine list, safe in the
knowledge that your bed is only
steps away. Try one of Biota’s
new special packages including
meal, accommodation and
cooking workshop.
BY RAIL
nswtrainlink.info
BY ROAD
greyhound.com.au
murrays.com.au
grayline.com.au
MURRAY AND RIVERINA
The Murray River flows from
a tiny spring in Kosciuszko
National Park and travels
more than 2,500km, turning
into a mighty river that
forms a rich agricultural
region. The Riverina covers
diverse landscapes, from
Hay's sunburnt plains to an
oasis of irrigated pastures,
orchards and vineyards in the
Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area.
Life on the Murray is relaxed.
Take a paddle-steamer cruise
or hire a houseboat from
Echuca-Moama, Mildura
or Wentworth; play golf, go
cycling or walking by the
river. Enjoy wine-tasting in
the Riverina, which produces
a quarter of Australia’s wine,
and discover a variety of
produce-to-plate experiences,
including food and wine trails.
The 600-year-old Murray River
red gums that line the river
and wetlands are magnificent.
ROAD TRIP
From Canberra (375km) or
Sydney (560km), follow the
Sydney-Melbourne Heritage
Drive to Albury. The closest
Murray River destination from
Melbourne is Echuca-Moama, a
three-hour drive. Travel either
via the Calder Freeway (M79)
or the Hume Freeway (M31),
then the Northern Highway
(B75), exploring fascinating
little townships along the way.
Wagga Wagga is situated at the
intersection of the Sturt and
Olympic highways; if travelling
from Sydney or Canberra, turn
off the Hume Highway about
35km south of the township of
Gundagai. From Melbourne,
pass through Albury on the
Hume Highway then turn off
onto the Olympic Highway, 20km
north of Albury. Daily coach
services operate to the Riverina
from major cities with TrainLink,
Greyhound and V/Line.
1
3
FORKS IN THE ROAD
Want to be ahead of the game
when it comes to the hottest
new regional dining spots?
“THE RIVERINA IS AUSTRALIA’S FOOD BOWL,
WITH BEAUTIFUL PRODUCE AND WINE THAT
VISITORS FROM OUTSIDE THE REGION ARE
JUST STARTING TO DISCOVER.”
Tania Sibrey, Chief Cook, Bottlewasher & Food Explorer,
Food I Am, Wagga Wagga
For more insider tips, go to
visitnsw.com
It doesn’t get much better
right now than Byron Bay
and surrounds. Take a break
between yoga and beach
parties to squeeze in some of
the state’s most interesting
new eateries. Three Blue
Ducks at The Farm on the
road into Byron is an epic (but
enviro-friendly) adventure that
runs from charred pineapple,
melons, hazelnuts and labne
at breakfast to dry-aged local
beef grilled over the coals with
chimichurri for dinner.
The Oyster Shed at
Batemans Bay.
At Fleet in Brunswick Heads,
the room is tiny but the ideas
are big (and out-there),
whether it’s the wild wine
list or the roasted tuna head
with charred radicchio and
fermented cucumber.
Whether you choose
to hit the Canberra
District for NSW wines
on the ascendant, the
Southern Highlands
for hot restaurants
in cool-climate
surrounds, or
cruise Newcastle,
the Hunter’s new
capital of culinary
cool, you’ll discover
regions packed with
new flavours.
At the other end of the state,
the South Coast oyster trail is
looking particularly luscious.
Shuck and slurp your way from
Sydney to the border and back
again, stopping in at the likes of
The River at Moruya or
Photos:
26 / FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO VISITNSW.COM
2
1 Paper Daisy
2 B
annisters
3 Three Blue Ducks
A FEASTIVAL OF FUN
2
1
Photos:
1 Logan Wines
2 Bendooley Estate
1
3 Small Acres Cyder
STELLAR DOORS
When is a winery cellar door
more than just somewhere to
taste wine? When there’s food,
views and much more.
At Logan Wines on the outskirts
of Mudgee, you can stand at
the counter for a guided tasting
or retire to deep, comfy sofas
with a glass in hand and cheese
platter on the side. The space is
spare and contemporary, with a
fire blazing in winter and doors
open to the breeze in summer,
offering a view over Apple Tree
Flat and the vineyards.
De Salis on Mt Canobolas in
Orange is called Lofty Vineyard
for a reason. The 1,050m-high
cellar door is in a rustic shed
with a viewing platform that
affords spectacular vistas. The
shed is also where the wine is
made and aged.
Cupitt’s, the family-run
Shoalhaven vineyard and
winery near Milton, has its
cellar door in a cool, stone
1851-built creamery. The
family’s interests are broad:
take a walk through the
vineyards and winery past
grazing Black Angus, a pretty
restaurant, micro-brewery and
new cheese room.
There’s also a country cottage
for weekend stays.
The cellar door at Capital
Wines is housed in the
refurbished stables of the Royal
Hotel in the historic village
of Gundaroo. It’s a busy food
and wine centre, comprising
Grazing restaurant, a kitchen
garden and an epicurean centre
which showcases the fine
local produce.
In the Southern Highlands, at
the pretty Bendooley Estate
near Berrima, you can taste its
cool-climate wine, bury your
head in a novel at neighbouring
Berkelouw Books, stop for
a meal at the Estate’s
restaurant and then lay your
head down for the night at
Book Barn Cottage.
Keith Tulloch’s Hunter Valley
cellar door is an elegant French
Provincial outpost that provides
several attractive diversions,
including the award-winning
Muse Kitchen and Cocoa
Nib artisan chocolate shop.
As if there weren’t enough
temptations already? Join
a tutored wine tasting on a
verandah overlooking the
beautiful Brokenback Range.
BREW HORIZONS
The thirsty traveller in NSW can
now find a mouth-watering
array of very different drinking
experiences to enjoy.
3
This decade is proving to be
the best in living memory for
beer drinkers. “No boring
beer” is the motto at Murray’s
Craft Brewing Co, and when
you’re propping up the bar at
the Port Stephens brewery,
chowing down on pizza (made
with Murray’s MoonBoy Golden
Ale in the dough) and knocking
the froth off some bespoke
coldies, it’s an easy idea to get
behind. In postcard-perfect
Bellingen up on the Coffs
Coast, meanwhile, you’ll find
The Bellingen Brewery & Co,
a craft brewery decked out
with its own boutique bar hung
with enough industrial lighting
to put a Surry Hills speakeasy
to shame. Hit the flagship
Darkwood Ale for something
28 / FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO VISITNSW.COM
bitter and traditional, or branch
out with a lower-alcohol ginger
beer or a cider. If apples catch
your eye, too, consider visiting a
specialist. Small Acres Cyder,
in prime apple-growing country
just outside Orange, focuses on
the varieties traditionally used
for making cider rather than
eating, which results in drier,
crisper drinking that’s the last
word in refreshment. At Thirsty
Crow Brewing Co. in Wagga
Wagga, try a sample tray of
everything from crisp lagers
to sweet stouts, join a brewery
tour or just have a lazy chat with
a friendly brewer.
And for something a little
harder? Check out Red Dirt
Distillery at Dorrigo, which
takes potatoes from the fertile
soil of New England and turns
them into something twice as
interesting as chips and half as
fattening: vodka!
“THE THING I LOVE
ABOUT THE HUNTER
VALLEY IS THE SENSE
OF COMMUNITY. THERE
IS AN AWESOME BOND
BETWEEN WINEMAKERS.”
Mike De Iuliis, Winemaker De Iuliis
Wines, NSW Winemaker of the Year,
2015 Hunter Valley Legends Awards
For more insider tips, go to
visitnsw.com
2
3
Gourmet Traveller magazine
rates Orange F.O.O.D Week
(‘F.O.O.D’ being an acronym of
Food of Orange District) one of
the top 10 food festivals in the
country. Celebrating its 25th
birthday this year, the event is
the annual showcase of the best
produce, producers and chefs
in the region. Held from April
8-17, when both the weather and
the landscape are at their best,
the program is jam-packed
with 80 dinners, tastings, talks
and workshops and is as much
about the wine of the district
as the food. Outdoor events
such as Forage sell out quickly.
Attracting 1,000 people, this
leisurely stroll through four
vineyard properties offers nine
food and wine degustation
stations enroute. Other outdoor
highlights include the 100-Mile
Dinner in Molong, the Night
Market, with more than 50 food
and wine stalls under the stars
in Robertson Park and the
Sunday Producers’ Market in
historic Cook Park.
Port Macquarie comes alive
in Spring with the three-day
Tastings on Hastings festival
from October 28-30. A farmers’
market, celebrity-chef dinners
and masterclasses are part of
the riverside event, which also
includes food and wine stalls.
Northern Rivers residents
know to keep the first Saturday
in September free for Sample
Food Festival, the food and
wine extravaganza held in
the Bangalow Showground.
Farmers, artisan food
producers and 30 local chefs
offering tasting plates will
make for a winning combination
on September 3 this year.
Other diary dates include
Annual Porchetta Day,
Gunnedah, on September 24
and Cork & Fork Fest, part of
Taste Riverina Festival, on
Friday nights in October.
FOOD TRAILS
There are more delectable food
and wine experiences than you
could poke a fork at across
NSW. Here’s what awaits:
The gourmet highlights of
the Riverina in the state’s
south west are many and
varied. Find a picnic spot in the
grounds of the elegant 1880s
Borambola Homestead, base
for Borambola Wines, near
Wagga Wagga. Sign up for the
Catania Fruit Salad Farm Safari
in Hanwood and learn about the
60 fruits they grow. Marvel at
the scale of the Griffith wineries
— they are big, in the truest
sense of the word, and Casella
in Yenda is one of the biggest.
Pick oranges from the tree at
Glendale Citrus and Hazelnut
Orchard in Narrandera. Taste
Barellan Beer, made from
barley grown in the district and
brewed by and for locals. Learn
how to cook like a chef at Food
I Am cooking School in Wagga
Wagga — or just enjoy a slice
of home-baked cake at The
Ganmain Providore, in the old
CWA Hall in Ganmain.
The Poachers Way is a loose
collection of all you’ll need
for a leisurely and relaxing
weekend away — places to
Photos:
1Tastings on
Hastings
2Orange
F.O.O.D Week
3Tastings on
Hastings
4
eat and sleep and to sip and
savour. The trail, originally
put together by enterprising
locals, leads through quaint
and historic villages in the Yass
Valley. There’s plenty to take
in, including Kurt Neumann’s
restaurant, Grazing, in the
150-year-old Royal Hotel
in Gundaroo by way of two
exciting cool-climate wineries,
Clonakilla and Eden Road, at
Murrumbateman. Check out
Robin Rowe Chocolates and
the country smokehouse cafe,
Poachers Pantry, on a former
grazing property near Hall.
A visit to the monthly Mudgee
and Orange farmers’ markets
provides an inventory of all
the fabulous food experiences
in Central NSW. In Mudgee,
market organisers take things
a step further with a program
of farm walks, where you can
meet the farmer. In town, taste
artisan treats such as Spencer
Cocoa’s handmade chocolate
(buy it from local shops) and
butterscotch schnapps on a tour
of Baker Williams Distillery. For
coffee, join the queue at Good
Eddy in Orange or grab a seat
in the courtyard at Byng Street
Cafe. There’s no shortage of
good food or drink — both are
renowned wine regions, and
don’t forget to try Orange’s
famous apples. For other great
food experiences visit The Zin
House and Pipeclay Pumphouse
5
4Apples in Orange
5Food I Am
in Mudgee, Lolli Redini, Racine
and The Agrestic Grocer in
Orange, and Tonic in Millthorpe.
The Southern Highlands is
also home to a host of food and
wine experiences. Put local
produce such as Pecora Dairy’s
sheep’s milk cheese to the test
at the award-winning Biota
in Bowral. Buy just-picked
berries from Cuttaway Creek’s
farm gate, taste cider and
mead at Artemis Wines and
single malt whisky at Joadja
Whisky. For a quintessential
Aussie lunch, pick up a meat
pie from Gumnut Patisserie or
sit down to a feast at Eschalot,
in an elegant stone building in
historic Berrima.
THERE’S MORE TO LOVE IN NSW / 29
ABORIGINAL
CULTURE
GUIDING LIGHTS
The Blue Mountains
resonate with meaning for
the Aboriginal people who
trace their roots here and
Aboriginal Blue Mountains
Walkabout takes you for a
moderate-grade bushwalk
along a song line that passes
several sacred sites.
1
On the Central Coast, Nyanga
Walang Aboriginal Tourism
offers an Ocean Tour at
Patonga Beach and a Bush
Tour that explores beautiful
Brisbane Water National
Park and the Bulgandry Rock
Engraving Site.
Ngaran Ngaran Culture
Awareness specialises in
cultural immersion tours in
Yuin country in the Narooma/
Tilba region on the NSW South
Coast, including performances
of traditional songs and
dances and an ascent of
Mount Gulaga.
MEET THE PRODUCERS
Farm visits can be delicious,
as well as great learning
experiences, especially for urban
dwellers who don’t often get to
see first hand how their food is
grown. More NSW farmers are
opening their gates to visitors so
road trips can just as easily be
designed like menus.
Help collect eggs from the
chooks at Near River Produce,
an organic mixed farm inland
from Port Macquarie, as well as
visit the pigs and harvest lunch
ingredients from the market
garden. The Sunday morning
farm tours end fittingly with
a sit-down lunch featuring
produce from the property.
Meet the cheesemaker and
learn how to make cheese at
one of Debra Allard’s Cheeses
Loves You classes at Burringbar
in the Tweed Valley. Starting
with milk collected from a local
dairy, Debra guides you through
the process of making curd at
home. A lazy 25-minute drive
from Tweed Heads, at Carool,
is the premium Arabica coffee
plantation Wirui Estate, open
for farm tours, coffee tastings
and workshops.
An organic garlic farm and a
macadamia farm are just two
of the stops on the Taste Byron
Bay farm tour. Hop aboard
the Kombi van for a day trip
through the undulating hills of
the Byron hinterland.
Oysters are farmed all along
the NSW coast and it pays
to stop wherever you see a
sign advertising the fresh
bivalves for sale. At Greenwell
Point, near Nowra on the
South Coast, you can learn
all there is to know about
oyster farming from oyster
shucking veteran Jim Wild.
You can’t miss him; he’s the big
personality in the bright shirt.
Photos:
1 Wirui Estate
2 Jim Wild
3
4 Christopher Thé
1
In Summer, Clyde River Berry
Farm at Mogood, inland from
Batemans Bay, welcomes
visitors who want to pick their
own berries. The farm grows
blueberries, strawberries,
boysenberries, blackberries,
raspberries and even
tayberries — a delicious
cross between a blackberry
and a raspberry. Collect a
container at the farm shop
and pick as many as you like.
Nothing tastes quite like a
just-picked berry.
On a Straight To The Source
Winter Truffle Tour in the
Southern Highlands you might
find yourself on your belly in
the dirt, on standby to pluck
up a truffle as it’s unearthed.
The excitement of the hunt is
bookmarked with morning tea
by the open fire at Biota, in
Bowral, and a truffle-themed
lunch with chef Christopher
Thé from Sydney’s renowned
Black Star Pastry.
3Straight To
The Source
Set against the dramatic
backdrop of the Stockton
dunes, Sand Dune Adventures
is an Aboriginal-operated
tourism enterprise, owned by
the Worimi Local Aboriginal
Land Council, that combines
a cultural experience with the
thrill of piloting a quad bike over
towering coastal sand dunes.
Based in Wentworth, Harry
Nanya Tours takes visitors into
the remote Mungo National
Park and Willandra Lakes
World Heritage Area — a wild,
lonely moonscape of saltbush
and sand dunes with profound
significance for the Indigenous
people of the region.
Aboriginal guides explain how
rainforest plants have been
used for medicine and food at
Sea Acres Rainforest Centre
near Port Macquarie, while the
Spirit of the Land exhibition
will take you on a fascinating
journey through Birpai Country.
ROOMS WITH A VIEW
Aboriginal guides and World
Heritage national parks
offer special insights into the
landscape and its plants and
animals, as well as the roots of
Aboriginal culture. Galleries,
too, provide a window onto a
fascinating history.
2
“WHAT I LOVE MOST ABOUT THE
SOUTHERN HIGHLANDS IS THERE ARE SO
MANY DIFFERENT GROWERS PRODUCING
BERRIES, DAIRY, MEAT, VEGETABLES,
NUTS AND EVEN TRUFFLES.”
4
In its annual program of locally
curated exhibitions, Broken Hill
Regional Art Gallery includes
work by Aboriginal artists
from Outback NSW. Check out
the nearby Living Desert and
Sculptures while you're there.
The major focus of the Moree
Plains Gallery is the Kamilaroi
people, whose powerful
artistic tradition can be seen in
the carved trees housed in the
gallery’s gardens.
Mehi Murri Art Studio is a
studio/gallery established
by Aboriginal students from
the Moree TAFE Campus in
Kamilaroi country. This is a
unique, interactive environment
in which Aboriginal students
can express their culture
through art.
With its superb collection
of art and artifacts, the
Armidale Aboriginal
Cultural Centre and
Keeping Place invites
visitors to experience the
diversity of Australian
Indigenous arts and culture,
while Laddie Timbery
Bidjigal Aboriginal Art and
Crafts at Huskisson in Jervis
Bay sells a range of pieces
created by the Timbery family
from the Bidjigal clan of the
Eora nation.
Photos:
1Ngaran Ngaran
Culture Awareness
James Viles, Chef and Owner, Biota Dining, Bowral
2Living Desert and
Sculptures
For more insider tips, go to
visitnsw.com
3Moree Plains Gallery
2
3
4Mutawintji
National Park
4
MUST-VISIT
CULTURAL SITES
› Mutawintji National Park
is a dramatically beautiful
landscape in Outback NSW
with many rock art displays
within the Mutawintji
Historic Site.
› The Lake Mungo region was
once covered by shallow
lakes that provided a rich food
source for Aboriginal people.
Today, these dry beds offer a
snapshot that has unravelled
some of the mysteries of
Aboriginal life.
› On the southern flanks
of Jervis Bay, Booderee
National Park is one of the
coastal wonders of NSW, a
pristine wilderness featuring
many sites sacred to the
local custodians.
› The town of Brewarrina in
Outback NSW is home to
the Aboriginal Fish Traps,
which once brought
neighbouring tribal groups
together for initiation
ceremonies and exchanges.
› Near the town of Tilba Tilba
on the South Coast, Mount
Gulaga, also known as Mount
Dromedary, is the ancestral
home of the local Yuin people,
a symbol of motherhood and
a basis for Aboriginal
spiritual identity.
THERE’S MORE TO LOVE IN NSW / 31
CARAVANS, CAMPING... AND ENDLESS FUN
Step straight into your caravan
and camping holiday in NSW
by staying in one of the state’s
many well-located holiday
parks. You’ll be immersed in
nature in a caravan, holiday or
tourist park where you’re often
only steps away from sandy
beaches, national parks and
popular tourist attractions. The
Caravan and Camping Industry
Association NSW (caravancamping.com.au) represents
370 holiday parks located in a
wide range of fantastic NSW
holiday spots. Fingal Bay
Holiday Park is just across the
road from one of Port Stephens’
beautiful surf beaches and, like
many holiday parks, it’s petfriendly, has accessible cabins
and a variety of accommodation
types; Werri Beach Holiday
Park not only has a beautiful
beach across the road but a
resort-style pool and beautifully
landscaped gardens. Chill out on
the verandah of your riverside
cabin at BIG4 Deniliquin or
BIG4 Nelligen Holiday Parks
where there’s plenty of room
to fish, swim, paddle or cruise.
Likewise, Mudgee Riverside
Caravan and Tourist Park has
tents by the pretty Cudgeong
River as well as cedar cabins
where you can settle in with a
delicious Mudgee red from a
local cellar door.
1
SITES FOR SORE EYES
Under canvas or in a cabin,
National Parks are special
places to explore.
Robinsons Cabin, in Boonoo
Boonoo National Park near
Tenterfield, is a charming
bushland retreat with all the
comforts of home — and there’s
room for six at a family-friendly
price. Looking like they might
have sprung from a Banjo
Paterson poem, Moonbah
Huts are two unique stone
and slab huts on the banks of
the Moonbah River, the Snowy
Mountains’ premier fly-fishing
stream. Set among the forests
of Capertee National Park
north of Lithgow, Capertee
Homestead is the perfect place
to connect with nature, with
bushwalking and birdwatching
as highlights.
In Outback NSW, former Mungo
Shearers’ Quarters in Mungo
National Park have been fully
restored to provide comfortable
accommodation for families
or small groups, an ideal base
for exploring this sensational
World Heritage national park.
Looking for a spectacular
campsite? Set on a lightly
timbered slope within
Barrington Tops National Park,
the Polblue campsite offers
barbecues, drinking water
and powered sites in a World
Heritage national park. For
sheer barefoot beauty, the pick
of the campsites in Yuraygir
National Park is the spit at the
mouth of the Sandon River,
which has a beautiful beach,
safe boating and estuary
fishing nearby.
1
2
Murray Valley National Park
protects some of the state’s
precious river red gum habitat
and Ramsar-listed wetlands,
ensuring your camp-out is a
memorable one. For a taste of
wild country camping, there is
nowhere quite like Kosciuszko
National Park; one of its finest
campsites is the Thomas Boyd
Trackhead, in dense eucalypt
forests on the banks of the
Goobarragandra River and
part of the Hume and Hovell
Walking Track.
The tortured trachyte spires of
Warrumbungle National Park
bear witness to a history of
tremendous volcanic eruptions
and the best of its campsites is
Camp Blackman, a well-shaded
spot alongside a creek lined
with casuarinas.
START MAKING TRACKS
Nothing beats a walk in the
great outdoors, whether it’s
along sea cliffs with views
of whales and pounding surf
or through World Heritage
rainforest.
3
The Cape Byron Walking Track
circles the statuesque Cape
Byron Lighthouse, offering
expansive views of pristine
beaches before swooping down
to sea level, where the wind
licks your face with salty spray.
This is the first point on the
Australian mainland to feel the
glow of the rising sun: get up
early and you could be the first
to feel its warmth.
The icon of Warrumbungle
National Park west of
Coonabarabran is the
Breadknife, a 100m spur of
vertical rock that towers above
wooded slopes. The 12km
Breadknife and Grand High
Tops Walk is awesome every
inch of the way.
At Minnamurra Rainforest
just inland from Kiama, giant
roots claw at the forest floor,
the trees are lassoed with
strangler figs and raucous
bird noises erupt from the
canopy overhead. The Falls
Walk begins with an elevated
boardwalk, before climbing
through the rainforest canopy
to a spectacular view at the top
of Minnamurra Falls.
One of Australia’s classic
walks, the Six Foot Track from
Katoomba to Jenolan Caves
is a three-day adventure. It
winds through rainforest and
open grazing country, over
creeks and past caves, sheer
sandstone cliffs and waterfalls.
Near Glen Innes, the 45km
Gibraltar-Washpool World
Heritage Walk winds through a
wonderland of forest, streams,
granite tors and 3,000ha of
warm temperate rainforest.
Photos:
32 / FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO VISITNSW.COM
1 Warrumbungle National Park
3 M
innamurra Rainforest
Pretty South Coast Holiday
Parks Bermagui overlooks
Horseshoe Bay with views to
Mount Gulaga while the famous
Hume and Hovell Walking
Track passes right through the
Inland Waters Holiday Parks
Burrinjuck Waters. Copeton
Waters Holiday Park is also
ideally located, set amongst
prime bushland that’s ripe
for exploring.
SUITS YOU TO A TEE
Prefer your tee shot to come
with a sea breeze or the call of
a kookaburra or a whip bird?
Favour a traditional links-style
course, or a green, wellgroomed wonderland designed
by one of the greats of the
game? NSW has a prime array
of premium golf resorts, many
with glamorous on-course
accommodation, spas and
chic restaurants.
In the rolling green countryside
of the Southern Highlands,
Mount Broughton Golf &
Country Club is a long and
testing par-76 course with
tranquil surroundings and
challenging fairways.
Near Wyong on the NSW
Central Coast, acclaimed
course architect Ross Watson
has sculpted Kooindah Waters
Golf Club, a championship
course that tests all facets of a
golfer’s game.
Challenging design and quality
presentation are the hallmarks
of Magenta Shores Golf &
Country Club, a championship,
links-style coastal course
between Tuggerah Lake and the
shimmering Pacific Ocean.
Set in stunning countryside
with panoramas of vineyards
and mountains, Cypress
Lakes Golf & Country Club at
Pokolbin in the Hunter Valley
is a championship course with
play that varies from sloping
manicured fairways to a linksstyle layout on the back nine.
Consistently ranked among the
best courses in Australia, the
Hunter Valley’s The Vintage Golf
Club, part of the impressive
Vintage resort, is a stern test
for any golfer; it’s the only Greg
Norman-designed course in
NSW open to the public.
With its finely tuned fairways,
impeccable greens and
beautiful bushland setting, the
Bonville Golf Resort at Coffs
Harbour is one of the country’s
finest, while Lord Howe Island
Golf Club, with its ocean views,
is one of the prettiest and
friendliest you’ll ever visit.
Horizons Golf Resort at Port
Stephens’ Salamander Bay, a
superb championship course
created by Graham Marsh and
Ross Watson, is rated among
Australia’s top resort courses.
Mollymook Golf Club’s treelined fairways meander
across a bush-clad rise to
superb greens with natural
water hazards.
Photos:
2 Murray Valley National Park
The NSW Crown Holiday
Parks Trust (nswchpt.com.au)
operates 35 coastal and inland
holiday parks and a variety
of recreation reserves on
Crown Land throughout NSW
in some of the state's most
iconic locations. North Coast
Holiday Parks Red Rock is just
one example of their range of
great destinations. Based near
Yuraygir National Park, it’s an
ideal spot for bushwalkers,
surfers, canoe enthusiasts and
nature lovers.
1 BIG4 Nelligen Holiday Park 2 Y
arrawonga Mulwala Golf Club Resort
Consistently rated among
Australia’s best, Murray
Downs Golf Course at Swan
Hill is a Ted Parslow-designed
course that wraps itself
around a series of stunning
water features to provide
testing play for all golfers. The
accommodation and dining
is every bit as impressive.
Alongside the Murray River,
the picturesque Yarrawonga
Mulwala Golf Club Resort
is Australia’s largest publicaccess golf resort.
Teetering on the cliffs of the
Blue Mountains above the
Jamieson Valley, Wentworth
Falls Country Club is a
panoramic 18-hole course
with undulating fairways lined
with a mixture of native and
exotic trees.
“AT 340 MILLION YEARS, JENOLAN CAVES
ARE THE OLDEST IN THE WORLD. I LOVE
THE CAVES... AND THE FACT THAT THEY
ARE SO MUCH OLDER THAN ME.”
Craig Curran, Guide, Jenolan Caves, Blue Mountains
For more insider tips, go to
visitnsw.com
2
STATE OF THE ART
ARTS&
CULTURE
1
Albury is justly proud of its new
Murray Art Museum Albury,
otherwise known as MAMA.
A first-rate contemporary
art gallery, it showcases
international touring exhibitions
alongside self-curated shows.
As well as its impressive
Regional Art Gallery,
Newcastle now has The
Lock-Up, a multidisciplinary
contemporary arts space;
Tweed Regional Gallery has its
new Margaret Olley Art Centre,
complete with a re-creation
of the artist’s home studio;
and Lake Macquarie City Art
Gallery is the Hunter’s only
waterfront collection. In New
England high country, Walcha
is an art gallery in itself, with
more than 40 sculptures dotted
around the town. Broken Hill
is also known for its stunning
outdoor art; here you can
marvel at the Living Desert
and Sculptures, 12 sandstone
artworks silhouetted against
the skyline, all with a story to
tell. Visit at dusk.
1
DRIVING INTO THE GLORIOUS PAST
Get behind the wheel to discover
some of the best heritage sites
in regional NSW. Extending
north from Sydney to the Hunter,
the Convict Trail follows the
route of the Old Great North
Road, built between 1826 and
1836. This road was made by
convicts, and is now a World
Heritage site.
Dig up some dirt on New
England’s Fossickers Way, so
called because of the many
gems found in the area. It takes
in towns such as Tamworth,
Manilla, Bingara, Inverell and
Glen Innes with landscapes
varying from steep wooded hills
and native forest to wide valleys
fringed by a haze of blue ranges.
To turn back time, visit the
historic gold mining towns of
Hill End, Gulgong and Sofala
(you can still fossick for gold
dust in the Turon River), which
are all within cooee of Mudgee.
Drive through Lockhart, a town
famous (and classified by the
National Trust) for its turn of
the 20th century architecture,
beautifully restored facades
and shady verandahs.
Explore the Murray’s river
heritage by visiting one of the
many historic sites found in the
LIVING HISTORY AT A GLANCE
region. Take time out to laze
away the days on a houseboat
or join a relaxing cruise on an
historic paddle-steamer from
Echuca-Moama.
The city of Bathurst: Australia’s
oldest inland settlement
ticks off a long list of heritage
experiences — gold, 19thcentury architecture, Cobb & Co,
hops and honey. Even Charles
Darwin visited, in 1836.
Combine whale-watching
and heritage along the South
Coast between September and
December when humpbacks
are returning to Antarctica
with their calves. The Killer
Whale Trail is a scenic drive
linking the seaside towns
of Merimbula, Tathra and
Bermagui on your way to the
old whaling town of Eden,
where a siren is sounded every
time there is whale sighting in
Twofold Bay.
And in Outback NSW,
Lightning Ridge has its
quirky Car Door Tours, four
different routes demarcated
by colour-coded and
numbered car doors. Follow
the red route and you’ll be
driving through opal fields
and old mining settlements,
including Hatter’s Flat and the
Telephone Line fields, Amigo’s
Castle, the Astronomers’
Monument and Kangaroo Hill.
It also includes the optional
“Black Queen Experience”,
Outback theatre with a twist.
34 / FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO VISITNSW.COM
2
Photos:
1The Living
Desert and
Sculptures
3
Tenterfield Saddler: George
Woolnough’s saddlery enjoyed
local fame in the 1800s; his
grandson Peter Allen put it
on the world map, singing
Tenterfield Saddler.
Bradman Museum, Bowral:
Don Bradman, cricket… it’s
all here in the picturesque
Southern Highlands.
McCrossin’s Mill Museum,
Uralla: This three-storey flour
mill in what was once “Captain
Thunderbolt” country is now a
museum, with personality.
Carcoar National Trust Village:
With its oak trees and 19thcentury architecture, Carcoar
has the feel of a traditional
English village in Central NSW.
Trial Bay Gaol, South West
Rocks: The heritage-listed
ruins of this 19th-century
jail in Arakoon National Park
contrast with the stunning
coastal views.
Old Dubbo Gaol: A spooky night
tour of this 1847-built gaol is
suitably edgy, with a hangman’s
kit, gallows, dark cells and other
relics on show.
Cowra Japanese Garden and
Cultural Centre: A little piece
of beautifully landscaped
Japan in Central NSW
commemorates lasting links
between the two countries.
Historical Aircraft Restoration
Society Museum (HARS), Albion
Park: Ever wanted to sit in the
cockpit of the world’s fastest
jet bomber or a Qantas Boeing
747-438? This is your dream
come true.
Photos:
2The Murray
1Murray Art
Museum Albury
3Fossickers Way
2Bradman Museum
3Cowra Japanese
Garden and
Cultural Centre
“AS A FOURTH-GENERATION CATTLEMAN,
I’M PASSIONATE ABOUT KEEPING
THE HERITAGE ALIVE THROUGH
THE BOGGY CREEK SHOW.”
4Trial Bay Gaol
Tim O’Brien, Director & Cattleman,
Boggy Creek Show, Tumbarumba
For more insider tips, go to
visitnsw.com
3
2
4
THERE’S MORE TO LOVE IN NSW / 35
SYDNEY
EVENTS
SYDNEY
ON THE MOVE
EDITOR'S
PICK
VIVID SYDNEY
COLLEGE FOOTBALL SYDNEY CUP
The multi-award-winning winter festival of light, music and
ideas returns to illuminate Sydney with exciting new precincts
to explore, mesmerising new light art to inspire and plenty of
entertainment for everyone. This spectacular festival has grown
into the largest of its kind in the world, attracting more than 1.7
million visitors last year. In 2016, Vivid will be bigger and better
than ever, offering an expanded program of multi-genre music,
more stimulating ideas from global thinkers and creators, plus
dazzling light art across the city. Join in the fun and experience
it for yourself!
Sydney will host one of the hottest codes in sport this year in
an Australian first, when the University of California Golden
Bears play the University of Hawaii Rainbow Warriors in the
internationally televised opening round of the 2016 National
Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division One College
Football Championships. A fantastic afternoon of entertainment
is guaranteed for sports fans as the game, known as the College
Football Sydney Cup, is set to deliver all the excitement and
atmosphere of college football with the teams joined by their
cheerleaders, mascots and marching bands.
When: May 27 – June 13
Where: Various locations across Sydney
When: August 27
Where: ANZ Stadium, Sydney Olympic Park
1
CAPITAL OF CULINARY COOL
Sydney will strengthen its
position as the culinary capital
of Australia in 2016, with
existing hotspots growing and
new dining precincts — from
Barangaroo to Enmore —
coming into their own.
Martin Place will be front and
centre as a gaggle of seasoned
operators open venues all
around it. Fans of hip Italian
cooking will be spoiled for
choice when Andrew Cibej,
the hit-maker behind Vini,
121BC and Ester, opens his
as-yet unnamed bar and
trattoria on Angel Place. His
near neighbour will be Nathan
Sasi, the talented Fat Ducktrained chef who won acclaim
for his cooking at Nomad in
Surry Hills. Sasi’s new project,
Mercado, will be a 160-seater
Mediterranean restaurant.
And Bangkok-based Michelinstarred chef David Thompson is
getting ready to open a branch
of his Long Chim Thai street
food diner on the same street.
Nearby Bligh Street is a
magnet for diners thanks to
Rockpool Bar & Grill and Spice
Temple, but they will soon be
joined by Brasserie Hubert,
the first restaurant from the
Swillhouse Group (known for
their bars, Shady Pines, The
Baxter Inn and Frankie’s), while
the operators of the popular
Tapavino on Bulletin Place plan
to bring the Spanish-accented
magic to the block with their
new venture, Balcon.
3
4
Point your fork in just about any
direction radiating out from the
CBD and you’ll find good new
things. Oxford Street has seen
the arrival of The Unicorn and
The Paddington, two landmark
pubs revived by the team from
Mary’s and Porteno, and the
Merivale group respectively.
In Chippendale, new openings
continue apace around the
vibrant Kensington Street
and The Old Clare Hotel
precinct. Heritage terraces
have been converted into quirky
small bars and restaurants
while the hidden courtyards
of Spice Alley host several
Photos:
1Barangaroo
2Sam Miller,
Clayton Wells &
Robert Daniels
3Reynold
Poernomo
2
authentic hawker-style food
vendors doling out affordable
offerings. Check out the cool
new Koi Dessert Bar from
former MasterChef Australia
contestant Reynold Poernomo
and his brother Arnold. Other
big guns in the street include
British restaurateur Jason
Atherton’s Kensington Street
Social, headed up by executive
chef Robert Daniels, former
Noma sous chef Sam Miller’s
Silvereye and ex Momofuku
Seiobo sous-chef Clayton
Wells’s Automata.
The Porteno crew have been
busy in the inner west, too.
They’re part of a booming
scene on lower King Street
and Enmore Road, with their
new venues Continental (a bar/
deli/bistro) and Stanbuli (a hip
Turkish diner) joining such
exciting newcomers as
Rosso Antico (great
pizza), Bovine and
Swine (southernstyle barbecue)
and The Gretz
(cocktails
and seafood
snacks)
and existing
4Spice Alley
5Silvereye
crowd-pleasers Black Star
Pastry, Hartsyard, Earl’s
Juke Joint, Mary’s, Gigi’s and
Oscillate Wildly.
Then there’s the vibrant new
harbourside Barangaroo
precinct, where TV chef and
restaurateur Matt Moran will
open a three-level restaurant
showcasing Australia’s best
produce alongside more
than 50 new cafes, bars and
restaurants, including a highly
anticipated new sustainable
seafood-focused restaurant
from the team behind Bentley
Restaurant + Bar, Yellow and
Monopole. The as-yet-unnamed
dining spot will open in
September in the site currently
occupied by the Noma pop-up.
vividsydney.com
MY FAIR LADY
ALADDIN THE MUSICAL
This 60 Anniversary Production of Lerner and Loewe’s original
1956-Broadway show is directed by the woman who created
the role of Eliza Doolittle in the original production, the worldrenowned actor and director, Julie Andrews. The production will
feature original set designs by Oliver Smith and original costume
designs by Cecil Beaton. My Fair Lady is the Pygmalion story
about the transformation of Cockney flower girl Eliza Doolittle
into an “English lady” by appealingly arrogant phoneticist,
Professor Higgins. The much-loved score features unforgettable
numbers, including ‘Wouldn’t It Be Loverly?’, ‘On The Street Where
You Live’, ‘I Could Have Danced All Night’ and ‘Get Me To The Church
On Time’.
Sydney is home to the Australian premiere of Disney’s blockbuster
musical comedy, Aladdin, a story with universal appeal that has
enjoyed critical acclaim on Broadway since it opened in March
2014. It has been nominated for five Tony Awards and seven
Drama Desk Awards, and has been seen by more than one million
people. Based on the Academy Award®-winning animated film,
Aladdin draws audiences into an exotic world full of adventure,
comedy and romance, featuring songs from the film, including hit
‘A Whole New World’. The New York Times says it’s ‘fabulous’ and
‘extravagant’ while USA Today called it ‘pure genie-us’ and NBCTV declared it’s ‘exactly what you wished for’. Tickets on sale from
March 8 through Ticketmaster.
When: From August 30 for a strictly limited season
Where: The Joan Sutherland Theatre, Sydney Opera House
When: From August
Where: Capitol Theatre, Campbell Street, Sydney
th
myfairladymusical.com.au
36 / FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO SYDNEY.COM
ticketek.com.au
aladdinthemusical.com.au
LOVE EVERY SECOND IN SYDNEY / 37
5
SYDNEY EVENT
HIGHLIGHTS
2
1Handa Opera on Sydney
Harbour - Turandot
March 24 – April 24
2 Mercedes-Benz
Fashion Week
Australia &
Weekend Edition
May 15 – 21
1
FEBRUARY 2016
Australian Open of Surfing
February 27 – March 6
This free festival features the world’s
best surfers, skateboarders and music,
featuring Angus & Julia Stone.
Manly Beach
MARCH 2016
Sydney Gay and Lesbian
Mardi Gras Parade
March 5
The world’s loudest and proudest
celebration of diversity takes to the
streets of Sydney.
Oxford & Flinders Streets, Darlinghurst
Longines Golden Slipper Carnival
March 12, 19, 26
Enjoy the thrill of one of the world’s
best horse racing carnivals on a
championship track.
Rosehill Gardens Racecourse
Sydney Royal Easter Show
March 17 – 30
The largest agricultural event in
NSW showcases Australian country
life with fun and flair.
Sydney Showground,
Sydney Olympic Park
Handa Opera on Sydney Harbour
– Turandot
March 24 – April 24
One of Sydney’s most popular cultural
spectacles is presented on an
astonishing floating stage.
Mrs Macquaries Point, Sydney
Socceroos vs Jordan –
World Cup Qualifier
March 29
See the Champions of Asia play at
Allianz Stadium for the 2018 FIFA
World Cup Russia qualifying match
against arch rivals Jordan.
Allianz Stadium, Sydney
APRIL 2016
The Championships
April 2 & 9
The grand finale of thoroughbred
racing during the Sydney Autumn
Carnival is not to be missed.
Royal Randwick
MAY 2016
Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week
Australia & Weekend Edition
May 15 – 21
Be the first to tap into the Fashion
Week trends through exclusive
fashion runway events.
Carriageworks, Sydney
Vivid Sydney
May 27 – June 13
Sydney is the creative canvas for this
multi-award-winning winter festival
of light, music and ideas.
Various locations across Sydney
JUNE 2016
Holden State of Origin – Game 1
June 1
Don’t miss Rugby League’s greatest
rivals in action when the NSW Blues
play the QLD Maroons.
ANZ Stadium, Sydney Olympic Park
XiamenAir Australian Badminton
Open 2016
June 7 – 12
The best players from more than
30 countries compete for top
prize money.
Sydney Olympic Park Sports Centre
True Grit
June 11 – 12
More than thirty obstacles over a
rugged 10-12km military inspired
obstacle course through natural terrain.
Dargle Farm, Lower Portland, Hawkesbury
JULY 2016
Holden State of Origin – Game 3
July 13
See the NSW Blues play the QLD
Maroons in this thrilling finale of the
2016 Origin series.
ANZ Stadium, Sydney Olympic Park
Sydney Sings
July 28 – August 7
Australia’s International Festival
of the Voice.
Various locations across Sydney
AUGUST 2016
Bledisloe Cup Festival
August 13 – 20
A series of rugby events builds up to
the spectacle of the Bledisloe Cup.
ANZ Stadium, Sydney Olympic Park
V8 Supercars Sydney Motorsport
Park SuperSprint
August 26 – 28
Enjoy the roar of the V8 Supercars at
Sydney's home of motorsport.
Sydney Motorsport Park, Eastern Creek
College Football Sydney Cup
August 27
The opening round of the 2016 NCAA
College Football championships is on
in Sydney for the first time.
ANZ Stadium, Sydney Olympic Park
My Fair Lady
From August 30
Don’t miss this 60th Anniversary
production directed by Julie Andrews.
Sydney Opera House
Aladdin – The Musical
From August 2016
Disney’s new musical comedy direct
from Broadway.
Capitol Theatre
SEPTEMBER 2016
3
3Holden State of
Origin – Game 1
June 1
Holden State of
Origin – Game 3
July 13
Our websites are a one-stop shop for ideas on events, accommodation, attractions or getting around,
from current information on where to take the family for an adventure-packed holiday to the most idyllic
spots for a romantic getaway. And don’t forget to check out great accommodation deals across the state.
Download our free digital travel guides and apps at visitnsw.com/apps
For more general information go to visitnsw.com and sydney.com
Yokohama World Time
Attack Challenge
October 14 – 15
See the fastest teams in the world go
head-to-head in Sydney.
Sydney Motorsport Park, Eastern Creek
Sydney Opera House
– The Opera
October 28 – 29 and November 3 – 5
Seated facing those magnificent sails,
watch the epic tale of Sydney's famous
building come to life.
Sydney Opera House Forecourt
NOVEMBER 2016
Emirates Australian Open Golf
November
The world’s best compete in Sydney for
Australian golf’s most prized trophy.
Royal Sydney Golf Club, Rose Bay
Ballet Under the Stars
– Swan Lake
November 5
Under a blanket of stars,
The Australian Ballet brings a free
outdoor performance of world-class
ballet to Penrith.
Sydney International Regatta Centre,
Penrith
NSW Open Golf Championship
November 10 – 13
Watch the battle for one of Australia’s
most coveted golf titles since 1931.
Stonecutters Ridge Golf Club, Colebee
Blackmores Sydney Running Festival
September 18
Runners, joggers and walkers can
experience a fun day out to explore
the extraordinary scenic views
of Sydney.
Milsons Point
IRONMAN 70.3 Western Sydney
November 27
Athletes race along the iconic Penrith
Lakes, with stunning views of the
Blue Mountains.
Penrith, Sydney D
MotorWorld Sydney
November 30 – December 4
Check out the latest cars and
motorbikes on track, street and
off-road circuits at this brand new
family festival.
Sydney Motorsport Park, Eastern Creek
Please note that events are subject to change or cancellation. Check relevant website
for further details prior to the event. For full disclaimer please see back page.
For more event information go to sydney.com/events
38 / FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO SYDNEY.COM
CRAVING A RELAXING BREAK? DESTINATION NSW OFFERS
ALL THE DIGITAL TOOLS YOU NEED TO PLAN AND BOOK
THE PERFECT GETAWAY.
OCTOBER 2016
Dream Lover, The Bobby Darin Musical
From September 2016
The life and works of the amazing
Bobby Darin are celebrated on stage.
Sydney Lyric Theatre
NRL Telstra Premiership Final Week
September 26 – October 2
A series of fun-packed events builds
up to the much anticipated NRL
Grand Final.
ANZ Stadium, Sydney Olympic Park O
PLAN. BOOK. GO!
CONNECT WITH REGIONAL NSW
/visitnsw
#NewSouthWales
@ nswtips
+visitnsw
@ visitnsw
visitnsw.com
CONNECT WITH SYDNEY
/seesydney
#ilovesydney
@ sydney_sider
+sydney
@ sydney
sydney.com
Disclaimer: Destination NSW advises the details contained in ‘Your Guide to Regional NSW’ magazine are based on the best available information at the time of printing. ‘Your Guide to
Regional NSW’ magazine highlights the main events and is not a complete list of the events occurring from February 2016 – December 2016. Please go to sydney.com, visitnsw.com,
vividsydney.com and relevant event owner websites for the most up to date information. For all events, consult the relevant ticketing agency and or venue for ticket prices, booking
fees, surcharges and applicable taxes. Please consult the ticketing agency and or venue for total ticket prices before purchase. There may be other conditions imposed by the ticketing
agency/location as result of your purchase or attendance. Be aware of all conditions before purchase and or attendance, and note that individual activities may be subject to change or
cancellation without notice. Location capacity restrictions may apply for some individual activities. Offers contained in this magazine are by third parties not Destination NSW and may
be subject to change, conditions and availability. Destination NSW acknowledges and appreciates all photographs and images supplied by photographers, venues and event owners for
use in this magazine. Such photographs and images may be from previous editions of events and may not be an accurate representation of the event elements that will occur in 2016.

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