Enjoy Greece out of season Idyllic Ionian harbour guide Heart of

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Enjoy Greece out of season Idyllic Ionian harbour guide Heart of
GO FURTHER I SAIL BETTER I BE INSPIRED
DIGITAL SUPPLEMENT | SPRING 2016 | sailingtoday.co.uk
Med islands
Get off the beaten track in
Cyprus, Malta and Mallorca
SPORADES
Enjoy Greece
out of season
LEFKAS
Idyllic Ionian
harbour guide
MARMARIS
Heart of Turkey’s
beautiful south
CONTENTS
04
SPO R AD ES
HAVE THE NORTHERN ISLANDS ALL TO YOURSELF OUT OF SEASON
14
LE
FK
A
S
TH E FI N EST SH ELTER I N TH E I O N I A N
M A K ES A GR E AT BA SE FO R E X PLO R I N G
22
M E D ISL AN DS
CRUISE AWAY FROM THE CROWDS IN MALLORCA, MALTA AND CYPRUS
30
MARM ARIS
YOUR GUIDE TO THE GATEWAY TO TURKEY’S SOUTHWESTERN COAST
Welcome
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as much turquoise
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If you fancy sheltered waters, head for
the Sporades, where our intrepid Deputy
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season in May. The pay off for the odd bit
of woolly hat weather, as she discovered,
was a delightfully deserted coast. She had
her choice of town quays to go alongside,
and no shortage of tavernas and restaurants
to enjoy the view, uncluttered by tourists.
Or charter in the southern Med, on islands
better known for land-based tourism. The
harbours and anchorages on Mallorca,
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to welcome you. You’ll also enjoy our two
detailed Gull’s Eye guides - for the key
springboards at opposite ends of the Med.
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southwest coast. Or for the charming Ionian
waters of western Greece, there’s Lefkas.
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sailingtoday.co.uk MEDITERRANEAN
3
Cruising ~ Sporades
ALL QUIET ON THE
PHOTO: ALIA SCHAEFER
Visit Greece out of season and you’ll avoid the crowds and have the place all
to yourselves. But, as Emma Bamford discovers, there’s always a pay-off…
GRECIAN FRONT
M
y Sailing Today
colleagues are
bored to tears
with my constant
updates on the
Greek weather
ahead of my trip to the Magnesia
region and the Sporades islands.
“Look!” I say, gleefully, “27
degrees in April! One day of cloud
but then wall-to-wall sunshine.”
I make sure I pack plenty of
sunscreen, T-shirts and flip-flops.
Thessaloniki doesn’t disappoint.
It is hot when I arrive and, when
I reach the town of Volos, from
where Jason started his quest
on the Argo to claim the golden
fleece, people are sunbathing on
the narrow beach in Speedos.
Smug, I tuck into an ice-cream.
Sail Aegean, a charter company
which has its main base here in
Volos, with 14 yachts for bareboat
or skippered charter or flotilla,
ranging from 33ft (10m) to 51ft
(15.6m), lends me a new (2014
model) Jeanneau Sun Odyssey
469 – Rodi, named after Poseidon’s
daughter. With four double cabins
and four heads, it’s more than
enough for me and my tour guide the base manager, Christos Liapis.
It’s a boat undoubtedly suited
to charterers – the cockpit is huge
and fitted with subwoofer sound
system and up- and down-lights,
and our meagre supplies of oranges,
strawberries and a few Alfa beers
look lost inside the gigantic fridge.
Volos (39°20’.9N 022°56’.8E) is on
the northern edge of the Pagasitikos
Gulf (Kolpos in Greek), a circular
bay about 16nM wide with a narrow
3nM entrance at the south. The
mainland and islands of the region
are mountainous and green, and the
sea is deep. The prevailing winds are
from the northeast, so the eastern
edge of the gulf is protected by the
mountain range. If winds come from
the southwest, Volos can suffer (a big
blow in May 2014 saw three boats
sink) but in most conditions, it’s fine.
“Pagasitikos Gulf is like a
lake,” Christos tells me, and he’s
not wrong – we have a gentle
beam-reach sail in flat seas along
the eastern rim of the gulf.
The first stop is Kala Nera
(39°17’.5N 023°08’.5E), a small fishing
harbour about 8nM clockwise around
the gulf from Volos. Christos wants
to show me this place because Sail
Aegean will build a small marina
here, a base for its fleet that will
also welcome visitors. The plan is
for a small complex of apartments,
chandlers, showers and a supermarket
and the hope is to move boats there
for the summer 2017 season.
A windy spring
Pagasitikos Gulf
PAGASITIKOS GULF
s
e
CR ETE
Pagasitik Kolpos
(Gulf of Volpos)
Alonnisos
PalioTrikeri
Milina
Trikeri Peninsula
Stenon Trikeri
Skiathos
Skiathos
Skopelos
Peristeri
Skopelos
Skantzoura
l TOP LEFT
Emma tries raki
on Skopelos
l ABOVE
Pigadhi
6
Sea of Crete
e
Kira Panayia
Magnesia
el
ann
h
C
i
Ore
n
Volos
T U R K EY
a
Mt. Pelion
Northern Sporades
Izmir
c
d e
D o
Pelepo n n ese
Thessaly
Dhiavlos
Volpos
Aegean
Sea
G R E ECE
Athens
Orei
Evia
MEDITERRANEAN sailingtoday.co.uk
Skiathos to Skopelos
in 40 knots
l FACING PAGE
Sunset in the
Pagasitikos gulf
Another seven or eight miles
clockwise and we’re at Milina
(39°09’N 023°12’E). The wind is
picking up and we’re glad to tuck
behind a narrow island. There are a
few private moorings here and we try
to grab one, but the wind is up to 30
knots plus and Rodi, with her high
topsides and dinghy on deck, has a lot
of windage. We drop anchor instead.
When we up anchor after a lunch
of Greek salad (of course) and peek
around the corner of the little island,
it’s like we’ve jumped through a
gap in the space-time continuum.
The sunshine has gone, the water is
being whipped up into a very short
but shallow chop and the wind
Sporades
Tips
l Definitely visit Trikeri (39°09.2’N 023D 04.5’E) if
you can. Saturday afternoons and Sundays are the
busiest, when locals pop over for the weekend.
l Tzasteni bay (39°08.9’N 023D 07.9’E) looks like
little more than a white house from the sea but
head in and you’ll find a well-protected bay, pretty
curved beach and perfect water for swimming.
l We paid no harbour fees anywhere during our
trip. In Trikeri, if you use the jetty, it is suggested
that you visit the taverna, which can also provide
electricity and water for you. In high season there
may be small fess to pay in the Sporades islands.
l Christos advises boats to use official harbours for
overnight stays, rather than small bays, in case the
wind changes. But one bay he does recommend for a
night is Panormos (39°06’.6N 023°39’.3E), 3Nm from
Loutraki, which has good shelter in all wind directions.
But put out a lot of chain and run a stern line ashore.
l Good spots for a lunch and swim break are Milia
(39°06'6N 23°39’.1E) on Skopelos, and the three
bays next to Kastani (39° 07’.9N 023°38’.8E), which
is one of the places where the musical Mamma
Mia was shot. Most of the spots where the moviel
was filmed are on the north coasts of Skiathos
and Skopelos, so no-go areas in prevailing winds.
PHOTOS: EMMA BAMFORD
THE WATER IS BEING WHIPPED
UP INTO A SHORT, SHALLOW
CHOP AND THE WIND KEEPS ON
RISING: IT PEAKS AT 57 KNOTS
l Dasia island (39°07’.02N 023°39’.0E) near
Skopelos has a series of caves underneath.
Find the correct entrance and you can pass
right through the island in your dinghy.
l Planes fly low on their approach to Skiathos harbour.
Be careful not to anchor in their flight path.
instrument keeps on rising: 35 knots,
40, 42, 50, 54. It peaks at 57 knots.
“It is a good job we are this side
of the gulf,” Christos tells me, as we
surf, reefed (well, furled) at eight
knots with a following sea. “If we
were on the western side of the gulf
it would be bigger waves, like the
Aegean Sea. Here can be katabatic
winds but the sea is usually calm.”
Rodi, for a heavy whale of a yacht,
handles the wind really well. I’ve
only been in winds that strong a
couple of times – once mid-Atlantic
and another time in a squall on the
approach to Singapore that ripped the
clew off our jib – but this feels almost
easy. No struggling to bring the helm
over and no really bad heeling. In fact,
I am having more trouble trying not
to be blown over than the Jeanneau is.
It’s only 6nM to Trikeri, our
stop for the night (39°09’.4N
023°05’.0E), and with our high
boat speeds we’re there in no
time at all. We go alongside a tiny
concrete jetty, our stern a couple
of feet from a brightly-coloured
fishing boat behind us. Time for
a hot shower in one of the four
heads then it’s into Isalos taverna
for their famed crayfish spaghetti.
I’ve been hearing about this
crayfish spaghetti practically
since I stepped off the bus from
Thessaloniki. Christos’s sister
Anta, who also works for the
company, mentions it at least
three times the night before we set
sail. And it doesn’t disappoint.
But first, the tsipouro and the
small dishes that come with it.
sailingtoday.co.uk MEDITERRANEAN
7
PHOTOS: EMMA BAMFORD
Greece
Jeanneau Sun
Odyssey 469 Rodi
LOA: 46ft (14.05m)
Beam: 14ft 9in (4.49m)
Draught: 7ft 4in (2.24m)
Year built: 2014
Engine: 54hp Yanmar
Sail area: 105.5 sq m
Berths: 10 (4 cabins and two in saloon)
I usually have a healthy suspicion
about local drinks, and I fear that
tsipouro, distilled from grape skins,
is going to be like ouzo. But, mixed
with ice and water, it’s actually very
smooth, warming and refreshing
(and hangover-free). It’s served in
aeroplane-miniature bottles, and
comes either with or without aniseed.
Order a tsipouro in this area and, a
bit like aperitivi in Italy, small sharing
plates come with. Two tsipouros
cost about ¤7 (£5 or under), which
is fantastic value with all that food
thrown in. At Isalos we share a
delicious octopus stifado, cooked
with lots of onions and oil, skate, a
Greek salad, small fried fish with
garlic sauce and a deep-fried, breaded
cheese. And then comes the crayfish
spaghetti – eight palm-sized crayfish
still in their shells, tails digging
into their bed of tomatoey pasta.
There is only one other yacht in
our small harbour but in the summer,
Christos says, it’s a lot busier – maybe
10 boats on the jetty and another 10 at
anchor. It’s not quite Yarmouth-in-July
busy, though, and there’d be room.
The village of Trikeri on Trikeri island
(not to be confused with two other
Trikeris locally) is home to about
200 people in the summer but only
20 now in April. The two tavernas
are open but the small supermarket
is closed and shutters are drawn on
all the houses as we climb the hill to
the top, where there’s a monastery for
religious retreats. That’s closed, too.
With only a couple of cars on this
tiny island, it’s very quiet and I can
hear the clanking of bells that grazing
sheep wear around their necks.
l ABOVE
Skiathos town quay
l BELOW
Crayfish spaghetti
is the signature dish
at Isalos taverna
The place to ourselves
Everywhere we visit, over the
next few days, is like this – empty
ice cream kiosks, boarded-up
restaurants, empty tables and chairs
in the streets. Christos tells me of
charter guests who have complained
about Skiathos before, saying they
found it too noisy, busy and touristy.
Coming in April, long before
the season starts, means we have
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the places all to ourselves. We go
alongside several times just for the
hell of it. It’s a novelty factor for
Christos, who is used to squeezing
the stern of a yacht between the
bows of two others, rafting out sterto from the quay. In some places,
like Loutraki on Skopelos island,
the harbour authorities put out
floating pontoons for the season but
when we visit these are in storage.
The prices to be paid for all the
space, peace and quiet are the
weather (it swings between no wind
and 40kt); the cold (I haven’t brought
nearly enough warm layers with me)
and a reduced choice of places to eat.
The next morning we do a U-turn
around Trikeri island, pass through
the narrow Volos Strait and head
gradually northeast towards Skiathos.
After 7nM we stop at Tzasteni bay
(39°08’.9N 023°07’.9E), which Christos
tells me is his favourite. It’s a beautiful
spot. After we leave, the wind is
directly on the nose, so it’s a long headto-wind motor for 35nM towards the
town of Skiathos on Skiathos island
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Sporades
As well as Tsipouro, octopus is a
speciality of this region. It can be
boiled or grilled, or slow-cooked with
onions, tomatoes and fruit into a
stifado (a casserole-type pan). The
traditional way to prepare it is to slam
the octopus on to the stone floor
repeatedly to tenderise the flesh.
RESTAURANTS
Isalos taverna, Trikeri island
Papades taverna/tsipouradiko,
Volos, +30 24210 29360
Aegean Wave hotel restaurant,
Skopelos, +30 24240 33700
aegeanwave.com
Lagou Raxi hotel restaurant, Lafkos,
Pelion +30 24230 65144 lagouraxi.com
Kritsa hotel restaurant, Portaria, Pelion
+30 2428 0 99121 hotel-kritsa.gr
where, once again, Christos is amazed
to see few yachts on the quayside.
We stop at Koukounaries bay on
the way (39°08.9’N 023° 21.3’E). It’s
easily spotted from shore because
the large brown Skiathos Palace
hotel glowers on the hillside. There’s
a wide beach. “Don’t come in July
or August,” Christos says. “Can
you imagine people everywhere?
Very popular for watersports.” I can
imagine it, but now we’re the only
yacht at anchor. A couple of French
cruisers are barbecuing in the tiny
harbour behind a stone breakwater.
We take the dinghy into the harbour,
under a bridge – and once again it’s
like we’ve been transported, this time
into the middle of the countryside.
A lake of brackish water bends
north and west and as we putter
along I hear herons’ cracking
cries and watch swallows darting
over the flat water’s surface. Small
garden birds cling to tall plants and
sheep eye us suspiciously from the
bank. The smell of the pine trees is
thick in the air and I feel like I am
in New Zealand – not Greece.
PHOTO: ALIA SCHAEFER
Eating
DO IT YOURSELF
l There are frequent
scheduled flights from
London or Manchester to
Thessaloniki and Athens
with EasyJet, British Airways,
Ryanair and Aegean Airways.
Prices start at £30.
l Monarch flies direct
to Volos in August and
early September.
l ABOVE
A tranquil mooring
at Tzasteni bay
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l Seats are also available on
charter flights to Skiathos
during peak season, but may
involve a change in Austria.
l KTEL coaches run from
Thessaloniki and Athens to
Volos bus station and take
2.5-4 hours. A one-way
ticket from Thessaloniki to
Volos with KTEL is €18 (£13).
Don’t cut corners
Coming out of Koukounaries bay,
Christos, full of helpful tips and local
sailing knowledge, advises me to
head out to sea quite a way before
turning to port towards our harbour.
“There are many rocks and reefs
here and they have no lights,” he
warns. I ensure I do not cut corners.
We round the southern cape
of Skiathos and turn northeast,
still motoring into head winds. To
our right is a small island called
Tsoungria (39°07’.2N 023°29’.7E).
It’s a good anchorage for the day,
with a nice beach and a kiosk on
the beach for lunch. But Christos
warns not to stay at night. “Why?”
He grins. “Mosquitoes.” He also
advises avoiding the southern corner
of the bay as it’s “too shallow”.
Skiathos town (39°09’.7N
023°29’.8E) is a very popular resort,
narrow, steep alleyways crowded
with tables and chairs and shops
displaying their wares on the
flagstones. By the time we arrive, just
after sunset, I am chilled to the bone
but the wind and even a steaming
l Charter companies ask for
a skipper with a minimum
of RYA Day Skipper (or ICC)
and a co-skipper with at
least RYA Competent Crew.
l Sailing Holidays have
yachts for charter in the
Ionian Sea, Saronic Gulf
and Sporades islands
(sailingholidays.com).
shower doesn’t help all that much.
Again, in April the town is half asleep
and the good restaurants aren’t open
yet. Only kebab shops seem to be in
business but we manage to find a bar
that will fry some meat for us. I don’t
care that it’s not crayfish spaghetti, as
long as it’s hot, and I ask to sit inside,
out of the wind. In the morning, we
walk the town’s streets, which are
busy in a way – with business owners
painting and renovating their shop
fronts ready for opening in a month’s
time. Everywhere I look someone has
a tub of white paint in their hand.
The weather forecast says we’ll have
force seven winds from the northwest.
In Skiathos harbour in the morning
it’s quiet and calm and I doubt the
weathermen. But then I watch the
smoke from a tanker back 45 degrees
and when we leave the lee of the
island we’re in 40 knots and big waves
that have rolled all the way down the
north Aegean. Winds get funnelled
through the Skopelos Strait when they
have some north in them and it’s an
exhilarating ride over to Loutraki on
Skopelos’s west coast.
sailingtoday.co.uk MEDITERRANEAN
11
VOLOS
Volos
Cement Works
Fl.R.3s
Fl.1.5s
Ak Seskoulu
20
Fl(2)10s
20
Ormos
Agros
20
Ormos Volou
Cement Works
Ak Angistri
FR
SKIATHOS TOWN
N I S O S S K I AT H O S
5
Skiathos Town
N. Dhaskalo
Fl.3s
5
5
Ormos
Siferi
Ak Plakes
EMMA BAMFORD
Mirmingia Rks
On the quay... again
MEDITERRANEAN sailingtoday.co.uk
5
Cape Alexis
Pardhalos Pt
Ag Goirgos Cove
PALIO TRI KERI
Ag Sofia Cove
Cape Pithos
Pithos Cove
Palio Trikeri Hbr
Ag Ioannis
Cape Pakhoula
LOUTRAKI
Loutraki
Tavernas
Shops
Hotel
Many thanks to
Sail Aegean and to
Christos Liapis for
his local knowledge.
A one-week
charter with Sail
Aegean costs
€1,000 to €3,000
(£720-£2,170)
in low season to
€1,800 to €5,500
(£1,302-£3,976)
in high season,
depending on
boat length.
sailaegean.eu
5
Tavernas
5
12
PALIO TRIKERI
l ABOVE
Alongside in
Loutraki, Skopelos
Rock Wall
But when we motor into Loutraki
(39°09’.8N 023°36’.9E) and try to
berth against the quay, she’s not so
biddable. Even with a bow thruster,
her bow keeps being blown off by the
winds shooting over the breakwater.
It takes three goes until we are close
enough to jump onto the quayside
and wrap the thick stern line twice
around a makeshift bollard – a bin
someone has filled with concrete.
Sail Aegean is opening a second
base here this summer and Christos
tells me floating pontoons will be
lowered into the water from a smaller
jetty. The harbour can accommodate
30-40 boats, including those on
anchor in the southern part, clear
of the ferry’s turning circle.
We have a late lunch at Aegean
Wave hotel, a 15-minute walk up the
steep hill into Glossa village. There,
we sit on a terrace and look down on
Rodi, Christos marvelling that she can
be parked alongside on a quay she has
all to herself. The food here is excellent
– octopus so tender it could pass
for chicken, tsatsiki, Cretan cheese
bruschettas, very good homemade
wine and raki. The sun comes out, the
wind drops and finally, after days of
wearing all of the clothes I brought
with me, I peel off my jacket, my
jumper, scarf and second jumper, until
eventually I’m just in shirt sleeves. As
we’re the only customers, the owners
come to join us for a drink and a chat.
It’s a stunning spot and reminds
me why the Greek islands are so
popular. After years of cruising really
remote places like the Andaman
islands, the thought of tussling with
20 flotilla boats for a single rafting
place in a small Greek harbour hadn’t
really appealed to me. But coming
here, out of season and getting the
place all to myself, has re-ignited
my love for the country where I
first learned to sail. I’ll definitely
come again – out of season, in May
or September. I’ll just make sure to
pack my woolly hat next time.
N. Marango
Re
ef
Again, Rodi has no problems and I find
it easy to steer in the waves, bearing
away a little in the bigger gusts.
Ormos Skiathos
Fl.R.3s
Fl.G.3s
all
W
ck
o
R
BAREBOAT YACHT CHARTER & SAILING HOLIDAYS
In the Sporades – Greece




Quality yachts
Beautiful sailing waters
Unspoilt harbours and villages
A&C Yachting Milina is owned and run
by Andy and Christine Lewis, ex Sunsail
Managers
We offer both bareboat and skippered charter
out of Milina in Volos Bay, the most unspoilt
corner of Greece. As a small organisation we
have the time and enthusiasm to give you
everything you could want from a sailing holiday.
www.ac-yachtingmilina.com tel. Greece +30 2423 065597 +30 6937262731
Bareboat and Flotilla Sailing in the Sporades
Skiathos = Skopelos = Alonissos = Gulf of Volos
SAIL AEGEAN Charter Operator & Marine Services
SEAFARER Cruising & Sailing Holidays
( +32 2 771 74 71 - * [email protected]
www.sailaegean.eu
( +44 208 324 3118 - * [email protected]
www.seafarersailing.co.uk
GULL’S EYE
LEFKAS, GREECE
LEFKAS MARINA
38°49’.98N, 020°42’.78E
SOUTHERN ROUTE
The approach from the south,
from Ligia, is via canal and under
power cables with 40m clearance
FLOATING BRIDGE
DALLAS SPIROS/AIRPHOTOS.GR. MAIN PHOTO: GNTO
The floating bridge opens
every hour on the hour and
southbound traffic has priority
NORTHERN ROUTE
From the north, access is via
the Lefkas canal, marked at the
entrance by Santa Maura castle
ANCIENT LOCATION
The marina is next to the old harbour
and is very close to Lefkas town
MARINA OFFICE
CALM WATERS
Lefkas is one of the calmest natural
harbours in the Ionian and is
well-served by yacht services
S
E
W
N
Steeped in classical history,
Lefkas offers good cruising
and anchorages nearby
16
MEDITERRANEAN sailingtoday.co.uk
a popular base for cruisers and
charters in the summer and a place
to keep the boat in the winter.
The Ionian is a key yachting ground
for a reason – steady, reliable winds in
the summer months that build around
lunchtime and drop again at sunset,
and easy, tide-free, eyeball navigation.
There are other harbours
at Nikiana, only 7nM to the
south, Nidri, Vliho, Sivota and
Vasiliki, which is a must-see for
windsurfing fans. Porto Katsiki
38° 49’.98N,
020° 42’.78E
beach is one of Europe’s best.
Enjoy the natural beauty of
the island with a dip under Nidri
waterfall or explore the ancient city
of Nirikos. You can soak up the
Greek atmosphere in the old town
centre squares and cobbled streets,
stopping for a spanakopita (cheese
pie) and iced coffee at the shady
taverna terraces. Tuck into some
gourmet seafood at Thymari, where
the hostess Eleni can introduce
you to great Greek wines. Yamas!
Local berth holder
Kevan and Linda Whittle
Kevan and
Linda Whittle
have kept a
boat in the
Med for 23
years and
now split their time 50/50
between their 36ft Westerly
Conway sloop, Orion, and the
UK. Kevan said: “We’ve visited
most countries and wintered
the boat in most countries and
we’ve gravitated back here
because it’s such a nice and
easy cruising ground. We’ve
been at Lefkas now for about
eight years. We often cruise
locally near Lefkas on the
weekends - there are so many
anchorages and tavernas
with pontoons nearby.
“We’re just planning our
next trip but we’re thinking of
going up to Montenegro for a
month and then coming back
down and circumnavigating
the Peloponnese.”
MAIN PIC: NICHOLAS PITT/ALAMY
L
efkas – also called
Levkas and Lefkada
– is an island in the
Ionian Sea of northwest
Greece famed for its
white beaches and cliffs
(lefkes means white in Greek).
The fourth largest of the Ionian
islands, it has been claimed to
be Ithaca, the home of Homer’s
Odysseus, and legend has it
that the spurned poet Sappho
threw herself to her death from
the Cape Lefkada cliffs.
The island is 22 miles long and
nine miles wide and a bridge of
only 50m (160ft) links its northeast corner to the mainland.
The main towns are Lefkas, with
its impressive fortress at the end
of the ancient canal, the Castle
of Santa Maura (or Agia Mavra),
which was built around 1300 by
Prince Ioannis Orsini to protect
the town from pirates, and Nidri
(or Nydri), on the east coast.
Its position only 12 miles from
Aktion/Preveza airport, and its
average temperatures between
10°C and 25°C, makes Lefkas town
LEFKAS MARINA
M A R I N A GU I D E
Peace, calm – and berths for 620 yachts up to 4m draught
Lefkas Marina is situated on the northeast
corner of the island, tucked between the
town and a narrow isthmus. The harbour
is known to be one of the calmest in the
Ionian thanks to its position in a shallow
lagoon, behind the banks of the canal.
One of the most modern marinas in Greece,
it has been operating 24hr per day, 365 days
per year since 2002. Lefkas has 620 berths
and can accommodate yachts of up to 45m
as
fk
Le
I
H
G
l
na
Ca
F
E
6m
D
C
J
Fl.G
B
A
Marina
Entrance
Fl.R
MAIN PIC: GNTO
K
LEFKAS
MARINA
D
P
(147ft) LOA and 4m (13ft) draught.
There is hard standing for some
280 boats and a large covered shelter.
A selection of yacht services can be
found there, and the fuel dock on
pontoon K includes facilities for the
disposal of black water and oil.
Marina staff will guide visitors to
a berth and be there to take lines
if you call in on VHF Channel 69
as you arrive. Berthing is stern- or
bows-to, with lazy lines rather than
anchor. Electricity and water is
metered to all berths, while Wi-Fi is
available through pre-paid cards.
The marina has been awarded
Europe’s Blue Flag for eco-awareness,
meaning a high level of water quality
and environmental management.
There is a supermarket on site
for replenishing supplies, or it
is a short stroll from the marina
into Lefkas town, with Venetian
churches, the main square and
numerous cafes and bars.
Manager KG Med Marinas also
runs Gouvia Corfu, Kalamata and
Zea Pireaus, where annual berthholders receive 40 per cent off. Book
a berth online at medmarinas.com.
FACTFILE
LEFKAS MARINA
Marina office: open 24/7
medmarinas.com
[email protected]
+30 26450 26645
Duty officer: +30 6937 390 390 or VHF 69
Facilities: Electricity (220V and 380V),
water, 150-ton travel lift, fuel dock, pump
out at fuel dock, toilets and showers,
laundry, rubbish and oil disposal
Lefkas Port Authority:
+30 26450 22322, VHF Channel 12
Paleros Yacht Services:
pys.gr, +30 26450 29117
Nautilus Yacht Equipment:
nautilus.gr, +30 693 709 2092
Contract Yacht Services:
c-y-s.com, +30 264 502 4490
Port Police/Coastguard:
+30 26450 22322, VHF Ch12
Immigration: +30 26450 29374
Customs House: +30 26450 26520
Port police and Immigration are open 24/7.
Customs is open Mon-Fri 0800-1400
VISITOR BERTHING CHARGES (daily/monthly)
LOA
10.5m
11.5m
12.5m
13.5m
14.5m
15.5m
1 Apr–30 Sept
€36/€397
€40/€454
€45/€508
€51/€564
€56/€619
€59/€676
1 Oct–31 Mar
€20/€272
€23/€299
€24/€321
€26/€343
€29/€366
€30/€391
sailingtoday.co.uk MEDITERRANEAN
17
TAILOR-MADE YACHTING HOLIDAYS...
THE SUNSCAPE WAY
FLOTILLA & BAREBOAT
CHARTER
TURKEY
I
GREECE
I
CROATIA
I
SARDINIA
I
C ARIBBEAN
I
SICILY
I
BALEARICS
01737 300805
char [email protected]
Very
competitive
rates!
Luxury crewed Mediterranean yacht charter (Captain and chef).
Stunning food! Up to six guests.
Palma based until end of May then all points East.
www.tashatooiii.com | [email protected]
www.sunscapeyachting.co.uk
Gull’s Eye ~ Lefkas
Lefkas Bay
9
5
5
8
Fl.G.1.5s
83
5
7
5
5
8
Aq
ued
uct
Ru
in
Salt Lagoon
veza
to Pre
Fort Santa Maura
Fl(2)WR.12s
Swing Bridge
6
1
3
6
4
7
Salt Lagoon
NIKOLAOS LOUKAS/AIRPHOTOS.GR
Lefkas
2
7
Lefkas Marina
Salt Works
PA SSAGE PL A N N I N G
La f
A fort, a swing bridge, but don’t cut the corners
ka s
Ca
nal
Kaligoni
6m
L E F K A S
Ag Georgios
No.9
QG
No.8
QR
Salt Works
Paliochalia Pt
No.7
QG
Forti
No.6
QR
Kariotes
No.5
QG
No.4
QR
No.3
QG
Fort Agios
Georgios
5
Volios
No.2
QR
8
No.1
QG
5
5
8
7
8
12
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14
11
23
Fl.R.3s
Ligia
Fl.WR.1.5s
Drepamos Bay
l Imray: G11, G12, G121,
M20 Sardinia to
Cyprus and Port Said
l Pilots: Greek Waters
Pilot, Rod and Lucinda
Heikell; Ionian, Rod
and Lucinda Heikell
sailingtoday.co.uk/shop
Yachts approaching Lefkas will use
the Lefkas canal, which is described
in various places as being dredged
to 4.5m or 8m (8-26ft), and being
40-100m (130-328ft) wide.
From the north, the entrance to
the canal is next to the conspicuous
Santa Maura castle. There is a small
breakwater but don’t go too close to it,
as it frequently silts up off the end and
there is often a dredger at work there.
The north entrance to the canal is lit
at night by a port hand light at the
castle (Fl (2) WR 12s) and a starboard
light flashing green every 1.5 seconds.
At the end of the castle is a
floating bridge that opens on the
hour, every hour, between 0600 and
2200. It may also open on demand
– call the bridge operator on VHF
Ch12. South-bound traffic has
right of way through the bridge.
From the swing bridge, it’s a
half-a-mile transit south-southwest along the canal to the marina.
Anchoring is forbidden in the
harbour, as it is considered to be
part of the approach channel.
Coming from the south, enter
the canal through a buoyed
channel, between Ligia on
the island and Volios, with its
conspicuous Ag Georgiou fort.
There are four lit, port- and
starboard-hand buoys, all quick
flashing. Do not cut the corner, as
leading from the first red mark to
the land is an ancient underwater
breakwater. Locals warn not to
hug the red marks too closely.
The edge of Nisos Volios is also
marked by a white and red light
flashing every 1.5 seconds.
About three-quarters of a mile up
the channel, after a small island to
starboard and salt pans to port, are
power cables with a maximum air
draught of 40m (130ft). Just after
the cables, the canal starts. Keep
closer to the spit for deeper water.
Until the end of 2016 the north
and south entrances are being
widened and deepened so yachts
must be cautious of tugs, barges
and floating cranes and keep clear.
Charter companies
in the Ionian
l Sailing Holidays:
sailingholidays.com;
bareboatsailingholidays.com
l Late Sail: latesail.com
l Nisos Yacht:
nisosyachtcharter.com
l Tenrag: tenrag.com
l Sail Ionian: sailionian.com
sailingtoday.co.uk MEDITERRANEAN
19
Gull’s Eye ~ Lefkas
C RU ISI N G GROU N DS
A cruiser’s dream with charter opportunities
With few hazards, clear waters,
reliable sea breezes and pointand-go sailing, the Ionian
islands are a cruiser’s dream.
Being so close to the airport,
Lefkas is often a jumping-off point for
exploring the Ionian, and many charter
companies have their bases there.
The island is conveniently
positioned in the middle of the
PHOTO: STEPHEN FRENCH/ALAMY
Further contacts
20
Lefkas tourist information:
lefkasculturalcenter.gr
+30 2645026635
Archaeological Museum:
Aggelou Sikelianou, Lefkas
town, +30 2645 021635
International Folklore
Festival: Lefkas, last week
of August, lefkada.gr
MEDITERRANEAN sailingtoday.co.uk
Ionian chain. To the north are Corfu,
Paxos and Anti-Paxos, with secluded
bays, beautiful natural harbours
and white sandy beaches. On the
mainland in this area are pretty
waterfront fishing villages including
Plataria, Mourtos and Parga.
The southern islands include Ithaca
and Kefalonia, made famous by the
film of Louis de Bernières’ Captain
RESTAURANTS
Thymari: Lefkas town,
thymari-lefkada.gr
+30 26450 22266
Ef Zin: Lefkas town,
+30 6974 641 160
Kochyli: Lefkas town,
+30 26450 22436
Ksouras: Ligia town,
+30 26450 71312
l ABOVE
The secluded
and peaceful
beach of Poros on
Lefkas, Greece
Corelli’s Mandolin. The Kefalonian
port of Fiskardo is only about
10nM south of Vasiliki, which is
on the southern shore of Lefkas.
On Lefkas island itself, Nidri and
Vliho sit in an enclosed bay that
offers good shelter and Sivota is a
pretty village but very popular with
flotillas, so perhaps best avoided
in peak season, unless you enjoy
having your anchor fouled by
large groups of yachts rafting up.
To the east of Lefkas island, in the
enclosed areas framed by Lefkas,
Kefalonia and the mainland, are
the smaller islets, such as Meganisi,
Kastos and Kalamos. Skorpios, the
private island of the Onassis family, is
where Aristotle wed Jackie Kennedy.
It has since passed into the hands of a
Russian tycoon and remains private,
as does the islet of Madouri, home
of the poet Aristoteles Valaoritis
and owned by his family still. Many
islands are only a couple of miles
away from each other, so you can
easily breakfast on one and enjoy a
sundowner on another, stopping for
a swim at a third in between.
Go beyond
bareboating
Imagine your next holiday on a privately owned
yacht, free to explore secluded beaches, islands & the
beautiful crystal clear waters of the Mediterranean
Discover our fleet of luxury crewed charter yachts and take
the next step in yachting holidays.
CARIBBEAN
Antigua, St Maarten, St Barth, BVIs, The Grenadines
MEDITERRANEAN
Sardinia, Corsica, Italy, South of France, Greece, Croatia, Turkey
01702 535258
www.diyachtcharter.co.uk
[email protected]
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01227 69 49 59
21/03/2016 10:54
Cruising ~ Med islands
MARE
NOSTRUM
Cruising the lesser-known Med in Malta, Palma and Cyprus
22
MEDITERRANEAN sailingtoday.co.uk
MAURITIUS IMAGES GMBH/ALAMY
T
hink of the
Mediterranean, and
the chances are that
a sunkissed beach
with a little taverna
on a quiet island will
spring to mind. There are islands
beyond count here, literally
thousands, and many of them
well known to cruising sailors in
Croatia, Turkey and Greece.
Mallorca in the west, Malta
and Cyprus in the east are hardly
unknown Med islands, with
colourful maritime histories dating
back to the Phoenicians in 1500BC.
These days, however, they are often
overlooked when it comes to cruising
the Mediterranean. We decided to
set the record straight with help
from some daring, unconventional
cruisers who have explored these
and other lesser known islands in
southern Med. They uncovered
quiet anchorages, wildlife reserves
and even some friendly locals.
Malta
MICHAEL HOWORTH
Conquered, colonised and
governed by civilisations including
the Phoenicians, Carthaginians,
Romans, Normans, the Knights of
St John, the French and finally the
British, Malta and her sister islands
of Gozo and Comino form one of
the more exciting cruising spots
in the south of the Mediterranean.
The Rolex Middle Sea Race has
done much to put the island on
the world sailing fixtures list. With
a mild climate all year round, a
variety of attractions and a range of
accommodation facilities, Malta’s
strategic geographical position in the
heart of the Mediterranean, makes
it a natural cruising choice.
sailingtoday.co.uk MEDITERRANEAN
23
Malta
Explore 130 beautiful sandy beaches,
historic ports and pretty harbours
Only 2.5 hours from the UK to the Port of Mahón
Tel: +34 660 647 845
email: [email protected]
Circumnavigate Menorca
www.menorcacruising.com
l ABOVE
Colourful Maltese
fishing boats in
M’Xlokk harbour
l BELOW
The beautiful natural
wonder of Blue
Grotto, Malta
CLAIRE HOWORTH
l PREVIOUS PAGE
The Anglican
cathedral of St Paul
makes an imposing
backdrop to the
well-sheltered harbour
of Valletta, Malta
Fourten
Dufour 410 Grand’ Large
LOA: 40ft 6in (12.4m)
LWL: 36ft 6in (11.2m)
Beam: 13ft 9in (4.2m)
Draught: 6ft 10in (2.1m)
FRANCES HOWORTH
The island is littered with bays and
harbours in which to overnight.
Because one coast is not far from
the other, there are always some
that are totally unaffected by
wind direction and sea swell.
On Malta, our favourites include
Island Bay, Marsaskala, Grand
Harbour, Marsamxett, Baluta Bay,
Mellieha Bay, Paradise Bay, Golden
Bay and Ghajn Tuffieha Bay. Gozo is
smaller but even so, Mgarr Harbour,
Xlendi, Dwejra, Marsalforn, Ramla
il Hamra and San Blas all offer
good and safe anchorages. With
an area of just 1.35 square miles,
the smallest island of all is Comino
and there, the famous Blue Lagoon
anchorage is among our favourites
along with Crystal Lagoon, Santa
Maria Bay and San Niklaw Bay.
On our most recent trip, we
achieved several hours of sailing
every day, stopping for lunch and
swimming in as many quiet spots as
we could in a relaxed day. Exploring
caves by dinghy and in the water just
makes the whole experience more
fun. This is an island with a host
of things to do ashore – whether
you love archaeology, history,
diving, shopping, spas, fine dining
or late night action you will find
it here. With a church for every
day of the year, there is always
one village celebrating the feast
of its patron saint each weekend
in the summer, with magnificent
processions and fireworks, each
village trying to outdo its neighbour.
We were sailing in Fourten, a
Dufour 410 Grand’ Large chartered
from S&D Yachts. Having been met
by the company at the airport, we
were taken aboard the boat as she
lay in Roland’s Marina in Ta Xbiex
(pronounced tash-bish). After lunch
at the Royal Malta Yacht Club just a
FRANCES HOWORTH
Med islands
five-minute walk from the marina,
we set sail for two pleasant hours
beating up to Mellieha where we
spent the night tucked up safely
from the prevailing NW winds.
We sailed northwards and
across to the car-free and almost
uninhabited island of Comino and
anchored at Taht il Mazz in the Blue
Lagoon. This sheltered inlet with
its shimmering aquamarine water
over white sand is very popular with
day-trippers, so staying there when
they are not around is a great treat.
Gozo and the anchorage of Dwejra
was next, a short cruise away in
some exciting NW winds. From
there, we sailed to Ramla Bay before
heading back to the main island of
Malta and anchoring in Paradise
Bay on the northwestern tip, glad
to be sheltering from a boisterous
southeasterly. Departing, we sailed
south to Fomm ir Rih and spent an
afternoon further south at the Blue
Grotto, where we used the dinghy to
visit wonderfully scenic sea caverns.
Sailing into Malta’s Grand
Harbour and docking at the
Camper & Nicholson’s Marina
there, has to be a highlight of any
sailing trip to Malta. It makes a
dramatic approach, and from here
it is easy to take a walk through
the capital city, Valetta, a world
heritage site and visit the St John’s
Co-Cathedral to see Caravaggio’s
The Beheading of St John. Go to
Safe Haven Gardens in Senglea,
one of the Three Cities and enjoy
the stunning view of Valetta and
across to the marina at Vittoriosa.
Hire a local guide, as we did. Clive
Cortis (maltaprivateguide.com) is a
sailor at heart and knows his island
well. He took us to see the Neolithic
Mnajdra and Hagar Qim Temples.
Visit Mdina – the oldest city on the
island and an important UNESCO
heritage site to wonder at her curving
streets and fortified bastions. Stop
TOP MALTA
ANCHORAGES
St Julian’s Bay - swimming, good
local restaurants and bars
Marsascala - a picturesque bay
with good shoreside walks
Marrsaxlokk - pretty fishing
village in the southeast
Blue Grotto - more a day stop for
guests to view the grotto
Dwejra Bay (Gozo) - near-perfect
circular bay in Fungus Rock
Crystal Lagoon (Comino) crystal-clear water
sailingtoday.co.uk MEDITERRANEAN
25
Med islands
FRANCES HOWORTH
off at M’Xlokk and admire the
colourful fishing boats and the local
lace being sold in the small market.
So much culture will work up your
appetite and Malta has plenty of
excellent food to offer. Visit Stefan’s
Bakery in Misrah Muxi for Maltese
bread with its thick golden crust,
hot from the stone oven in the back
of his small shop. Ask if he has any
of his delicious Maltese pizza with
potato and herbs on top. Drop
into the Coronation Bar, a village
institution for a delicious local beer.
For great local cuisine try Rubino
in Valetta. Julian Sammut, the owner,
will introduce you to Maltese meze,
squid, marrow stuffed with ricotta
or the popular rabbit stew. Leave
room for Biskuttini Tar-Rahal (village
biscuits) flavoured with caraway
and lemon or Krustini, made with
olive oil. To wash it all down, break
open a bottle or two of Maltese wine.
There are some excellent vintages
available and if you want to take
some back to your yacht, visit the
Meridiana wine estate for a tasting.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Frances and Michael Howorth are
an award winning team of
professional freelance writers
specialising in yachts large and
small. Frances is a photographer, while
Michael is a qualified Captain certificated
to command large yachts up to 3,000
tons. The couple have written several
books mostly about yachts, yachting
l ABOVE
The author beats out
of the anchorage at
Cabrera under the
stern gaze of the 15th
Century El Castell
l FACING PAGE
Southwest of Palma,
the Cala de Portals
offers a safe anchorage
for up to 30 boats
Charter Operators in Malta
Domina Yacht Charter dominacharters.co.uk
Malta Sailing Charters maltasailingcharter.com
Malta Sailing Holidays maltasailingholidays.com
Nautica Yacht Charter yachtchartermalta.com
S & D Yachts sdyachts.com
Sailing Charters Malta sailingchartersmalta.com
26
MEDITERRANEAN sailingtoday.co.uk
Cabrera Islands (Mallorca)
JÖRG UNGER
In April 1991, the Spanish
government declared Cabrera and
the 18 surrounding islets of the
archipelago a national park. To
visit the island of Cabrera Gran,
which lies just 7.5 sea miles south of
Mallorca, we chartered a Bavaria 37
in the port of Palma that we soon
left to escape the hustle and bustle
of the big city.
As the wind was favourable and
the day long enough for reaching a
quiet and cosy bay outside the Bahia
de Palma, we set sail for the Cala de
Portals that lies southwest of Palma.
The bay near Sol de Mallorca offers
four small beaches, two bars and a
restaurant as well as enough space
for about 30 vessels. A few sailing
boats, motor boats and catamarans
had already dropped anchor and
their crews were going for a swim
or preparing for the night. We took
the opportunity to explore a huge
cave cut into the cliff in ancient times
and enjoyed dinner on the boat as
well as a nice sunset afterwards. The
glowing sunrise in the morning was
even more spectacular and promised
a great trip to the Archipelago of
Cabrera. By now the weather was
starting to change and when the
swell made the boat seesaw, we took
off to sail southeast across the Bahia,
heading for the islands.
Arriving at the island of Cabrera
is already one of the highlights of
a visit to the National Park. The
lighthouse of Cap de Llebeig to
starboard and El Castell, built by
Arabs in the 14th century to guard
against attacks by Berber pirates
JÖRG UNGER
Bavaria 37
LOA: 37ft 1in (11.3m)
LWL: 33ft 6in (10.2m)
Beam: 12ft 0in (3.7m)
Draught: 6ft 5in (2.0m)
READER
OFFER
Islas Baleares Pilot,
Graham Hutt /
RCCPF, Imray
Italian Waters Pilot
& Turkish Waters &
Cyprus Pilot, Rod
Heikell / Imray
Imray charts M3,
M50, M21
15% OFF RRP
sailingtoday.co.uk
/shop
JÖRG UNGER
led us into the Porto de Cabrera,
which is the best natural refuge of
the island and the only area of the
National Park with any facilities.
Anchoring here is forbidden, so
sailors have to moor to the 50 red,
yellow and white buoys in the bay. To
stay the night, skippers must apply
in advance for a navigation permit
in the headquarters of the National
Park (Plaza de Espana in Palma,
+971 725 010, [email protected])
Daylight anchoring is also
permitted in the Cala Es Burri in the
east of Cabrera from 8am to 7pm,
as well as along the coastline in the
north. Supervised by park rangers,
all other areas of the archipelago
are closed to sailing, anchoring and
diving to protect tortoiseshell and
green sea turtles. Storm petrels,
coral seagulls, and ospreys have built
towering nests in the steepest crags
of Cap Ventóis and Cap Imperialet
and flamingos, white storks and
other migrant birds take rest on
their journey to and from Africa.
Ashore here is the office of the
Natural Park; we had a snack in
Es Port, which is just a dusty pier
and a few buildings, ‘guarded’ by
two old cannons in front of the
former military canteen Sa Cantina.
We went up the trail to the castle
that was destroyed and rebuilt on
numerous occasions and can be
visited after recent repairs. From
its look-out, we had a great view of
the bay, the small pier and the cliffs
that edge both sides of the narrows.
On the way back, we visited a
memorial built in 1847 to the 7,000
French prisoners of war who were
marooned on the island during
the Battle of Bailén in 1809. Only
half of them survived the five years
of privation until they were freed.
A small museum tells the history
of Cabrera, which once belonged
to the Byzantine Empire and was
already known by Phoenicians,
Carthaginians, and Romans. Due
to the islands’ strategic location, a
garrison was established in 1916 and
its military status is another reason
why public visits are restricted.
Two marked trails invite you to
discover more of the island. One
leads to the lighthouse of Punta
Anciola in the southwest, which
was built in the 1860s, and the other
path winds up to the summit of
Miranda (485ft) that more or less
dominates the scenery. The park
service offers guided excursions to
the interior of the island as well as
to Cova Blava, a ‘blue grotto’ in the
north of Cala Gandulf. The cave,
175m long and 55m wide, impresses
with its radiant blue, imparted by
sailingtoday.co.uk MEDITERRANEAN
27
KARPAZ GATE
the sunlight that shines into the
cave in the afternoon, reflected by
the sandy ground of the cave.
Cabrera Gran, also called the
‘goatherd’, has a surface area of six
square miles and a coastline of 24 miles
– the biggest island of the archipelago.
The wild goats were evacuated several
years ago, as they jeopardised the
scrubland. Today the island is covered
with pines, junipers and wild olives,
and between rosemary, heather and
spurges, we also discovered the tall
pedicels of autumn sea squills.
Leaving the Cabrera, we passed the
islets of Illa des Conills, Na Plana and
Na Foradada with its lighthouse to
warn of the most northern islet of the
archipelago. While we headed to the
harbour of Sa Rapita, we even saw a
dolphin that bobbed up starboard to
catch a glimpse of our Bavaria 37.
MICHAEL BUERK
Med islands
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Jörg M. Unger is a freelance writer and
photographer from Thuringia,
Germany, who has been working for
English language travel and consumer
magazines, papers and websites for 17
years. He has sailed with friends in the
Baltic and Mediterranean Sea
numerous times.
Mallorca charter
Seamaster Yachting
seamaster.co.uk
Nautilus Yachting
nautilusyachting.com
Charter Mallorca
chartermallorca.net
Sunsail sunsail.co.uk
Mallorca Charterpoint
mallorcacharterpoint.com
CM Charter cmcharter.de
28
MEDITERRANEAN sailingtoday.co.uk
l TOP
The author cruised
to North Cyprus in
2010 with the East
Mediterranean Rally,
an event he praised as
being “as much a race
against liver failure as
a test of seamanship”
l ABOVE
Girne’s harbour has
seen millenia of
human activity, with
the area settled as
far back as 5,800BC.
The castle dates from
Byzantine times
North Cyprus
MICHAEL BUERK
It’s a long overnight sail to the
country that doesn’t exist. A painful
one, in my case. Just an hour out of
Alanya on the Turkish mainland, I
had deftly contrived to trap my little
finger in the port genoa winch and
snapped it like a bar of Kit Kat.
I am heroic by nature; stoical to
a fault. But my screams could have
kept us safe in the thickest fog. The
language would have shocked even the
Amazons of the Little Ship Club. It was
a good job the gin in Northern Cyprus
is a quarter the price it is in Turkey.
By the time I got there, I needed it.
It’s a strange place. Only one
country in the world acknowledges
the existence of the Turkish Republic
of Northern Cyprus –that’s Turkey,
the country that invaded in 1974
after the coup by Greek Cypriot
officers that it reckoned threatened
the Turkish minority on the island.
To cruise there is to sail off the
official map and into another time.
What you find when you get there
is the Mediterranean’s Marmite
Coast; love it or loathe it. In truth,
its delights and its drawbacks are
equally balanced. In its favour, it
has a good climate, (generally)
predictable and decent winds,
friendly people, cheap fuel, food
and booze, two quaint towns, two
cheap marinas. The scenery is
dramatic and it offers perhaps the
last unspoilt stretch of Mediterranean
coast. It is no secret that many UK
expatriates have taken up here.
But it is isolated. You can’t sail to the
Greek side from the North, though
you can cross by land. There are hardly
any safe anchorages and bureaucracy is
heavy with some backwater sloppiness.
Girne (Kyrenia) is the main town,
the most charming on the island.
It has a picturesque harbour and a
magnificent mountain backdrop.
Delta Marina is small, friendly,
crowded and quaint with two floating
pontoons and room for a maximum
80 boats afloat with the same number
on the hard. There’s a 30-ton travel lift
and a fuel dock. Think homely. The
town centre is a 15-minute walk.
Famagusta, by far the island’s most
KARPAZ GATE MARINA
Med islands
LOA: 43ft 11in (13.4m)
LWL: 35ft 4in (10.8m)
Beam: 13ft 0in (4.0m)
Draught: 6ft 6in (2.0m)
important harbour and thriving
tourist destination before the 1974
invasion, is now rather ramshackle
and sad, with few facilities for yachties.
Karpaz Gate Marina, on the north
side of the peninsula, is one of the
newest and best equipped in the
Med. It’s got the lot: 300 berths with
power, water and TV connections,
a 300t lift, beach club, infinity pool,
North Cyprus
Karpaz Gate Marina karpazbay.com
Delta Marina, Girne
delta-marina.com
North Cyprus tourist board
welcometonorthcyprus.co.uk
l ABOVE
Golden Beach on the
southern side of the
Karpaz peninsula is
famous for the turtles
which nest in the sand
broody turtles. Guzelyurt (formerly
Morphou) to the west is the great citrus
growing area. I was trapped there
for a week in 1974 in a UN post that
ended up in no-man’s-land during the
fighting. It’s quieter now. Very quiet,
in fact. So it’s great as a destination,
but not as a cruising area. A warm
place to overwinter, in remote luxury
at Karpaz Gate or in town at Delta.
MICHAEL BUERK
Skysong
Malö 43
jacuzzis, good security. The staff are
friendly and helpful with occasional
rough edges. We arrived there on one
East Mediterranean Rally, 40 yachts
desperate for fuel, to find they had
run out – despite a year’s notice.
But it is a great marina. And it has
been very, very cheap. Free, in fact,
when it first opened and still doing
very attractive deals. The snag is
that it’s 50 miles from anywhere.
I like Northern Cyprus perhaps
because it seems rather quaint, even
backward, in comparison to the
rampant development on the Greek
side. The ruins of Bellapais Abbey,
high in the hills over Girne is the most
picturesque spot on the island. The
Karpaz peninsula is largely deserted,
but famous for its wild donkeys and
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Michael Buerk is a well-known journalist,
presenter and broadcaster who has
sailed since his 40s. He keeps his Malö
43 in Göcek, Turkey and regularly cruises
Greek and Turkish waters with his wife.
sailingtoday.co.uk MEDITERRANEAN
29
APPROACH CHANNEL
Between Nimara/Yildiz (on the
left in this picture) and Kecil
Adasi (on the right here)
CRUISE SHIP DOCK
Berth here, on the outside,
if Marmaris is your first
port of call in Turkey, before
heading in to the marina
CUSTOMS &
IMMIGRATION
HARBOUR OFFICE
GULL’S EYE
OLEKSANDR IVANCHENKO/ALAMY
MARMARIS
TURKEY
36°51’.02N 028°16’.38E
ICMELER
Another pretty town
to explore, which
you can anchor off
OLD TOWN
Gulets line the town quay, with
the old town and castle behind.
Restaurants line the street on
the walk from the marina
NETSEL SERVICES
S
W
Supermarket, boatyard
facilities, workshops, ATM
and cafes are all on site
E
N
The bay of Turkey’s Marmaris
offers the town centre marina of
Netsel. By Emma Bamford
M
armaris Limanı
is one of Turkey’s
biggest yachting
centres. It is a
natural bay, a
little over 2nM by
3nM in size, protected to the south
by two islands, Keçi and Nimara
(also known as Yıldız), making it
a very sheltered piece of water.
This protection, coupled with
clear blue waters, high spring and
summer temperatures and the
pretty backdrop of the forested
hills of Marmaris National Park,
means it is a popular sailing
ground, both with charter outfits,
watersports enthusiasts (Neilsen
has a base here with yachts,
dinghies and small catamarans),
36° 51.02’N
028°16.38’E
MEDITERRANEAN sailingtoday.co.uk
firm and you’ll be left alone. Many
offer fresh fish, and you can choose
your dinner from a bed of ice. Finish
off with a short, strong coffee, served
with obligatory Turkish delight.
In the centre of the town is a
labyrinth of shops selling fake
‘designer’ goods, including electronics,
which vary in quality – don’t forget
to haggle. Find a decent-looking
copy of a well-known handbag
brand and your wife/daughter/
mother may love you forever.
Local berth holder
Mats Johansson
CREATIVE COMMONS/IHOURAHANE
32
and the local Turkish gulets, and
also as an overwintering spot.
Marmaris town, on the site of the
ancient city of Physkos, is in the
northern tip of the bay and visitors
using Netsel Marina have only to
hop off their boat to be in the town
centre. Next to the marina, across
a small bridge, is a promenade of
restaurants with outdoor seating. In
Turkish style, you’ll be accosted by
‘greeters’ (touts) as you walk past but
take their cards with a smile and be
We bought our
X-Yachts 482,
AleXandra, in
August 2014 and
have kept it in
Netsel marina ever
since. Marmaris is a
fantastic place that we really
appreciate and Netsel is a top
location in this beautiful area.
Security is high and all necessary
facilities are well priced. Most
berthholders are genuine yacht
people and the charter companies
being there, and an X-Yachts retailer,
is another positive.
We try to sail at least four weeks
per year. So far we have only had
time to explore the areas not too
far away from Marmaris, along
the Turkish coast towards Daccia
and east towards Fethiye.
FACTFILE
NETSEL MARINA
netselmarina.com +90 252 412
27 08/ +90 252 412 14 39
VHF Ch 06 call sign
‘Port Marmaris’
Open 0830-1900 Nov-Mar;
0830-2100 Apr-Oct
Travel lift 100 tonnes
VISITOR BERTHING CHARGES
NETSEL MARINA
M A RI N A GU I D E
The marina allows long-term liveaboards.
Those wanting to leave their boats for the
winter and fly home must file paperwork with
the marina office and customs. Marmaris is
one of the biggest yacht service centres in
Turkey and there are lots of businesses on site
at Netsel, which is run by Setur Marinas, which
operates 11 in Turkey and the Greek islands.
MIYC
Shopping Mall
d
Ca
i
s
de
in B
Elg
ros
rba
an
ulv
Ba
unir
fa M
Netsel is Marmaris’s town centre marina (there
are three others in the bay – Marmaris Yacht
Marina, Albatros and the charter base Pupa).
There is berthing for 720 yachts up to 90m
and 2.5m draught on the water and space for
130 on the hard. Berthing is Med-style on
long pontoons, stern-to with lazy lines out
at the bow rather than anchors. Cruise ships
dock alongside just outside the marina.
There is water and electricity to every
berth, toilets, showers and a fuel dock
and waste station near the entrance.
Wi-Fi is included in the rates and there is a
swimming pool (extra charge applies), fitness
centre with Turkish bath and sauna, beauty
salon and hairdresser, and an ATM on site.
Customs and immigration are located in
the southeast corner, on the way round to the
cruise ship dock (take original documents
with you). There are cafés within the marina,
as well as the restaurants on the promenade,
and a supermarket for provisions. The marina
office sells blue cards, which all yachts must
carry. These prove that you have had your waste
tanks pumped out at appropriate locations.
sta
Mu
NETSEL MARINA. GRANT ROONEY PREMIUM/WORLD PICTURES/ALAMY
Berthing for 720 yachts is available with good facilities
D
Town
Harbour
B
Marina
Entrance
Rock
Armour
C
L
M
Fl.G
N
A
SAILING
D
Fl(2)R.6s
LMANAC
NETSEL MARINA
E
F
K
G
H
Based on m2 boat area (LOA
and beam) x duration + 1%
stamp tax, eg boat 12m
LOA and 3.6m beam:
Daily
c£48 (€64)
Weekly
c£335 (€448)
Monthly
c£882 (€1,180)
Annual
c£3,653 (€4,887)
Water included
Electricity on pre-paid
card (€0.46 per kW)
Blue card c£2.50 (10 lira) –
available from marina office
Transit log c£57 (250 lira)
– available from agents
General yacht services
Mobile Marine +90 252 413
33 63 [email protected];
Anker Yatcilik +90 252 412 93
50 [email protected];
Cetin Marin +90 252 413 6461
Engineer Marlin Yatcilik +90 252
412 14 41 marlin.com.tr [email protected]
marlin.com.tr; Bogazici Marin
Teknik +90 252 413 42 59
Electrician AC/DC Marin
[email protected]
Fuel – in marina
Gas/gaz – available from
shops behind the marina
Weather VHF Ch 67
0700-1900 UTC
sailingtoday.co.uk MEDITERRANEAN
33
Gull’s Eye ~ Marmaris
PA SSAGE
PL A N N I N G
28°16’·0 E
28°14’·0 E
MARMARIS
Fl(2)R.6s
Look for a northeast
heading to Marmaris
but there’s good depth
to the quay and marina
17
3
5
Delihurma Br.
Fl(2)R
Anchorage
Area
10
Netsel Marina
Fl.R
25
20
17
20
Siteler
25
27
25
24
10
20
Goek Tepe
5
37
30
Yalancibogaz
Sedir Adasi
Fl.G
Marmaris Yacht Marina
Pamucak
33
ICMELER
20
34
25
Izmir
Cukuru
Golenye Koyu
KE C I AD A S I
Fl.Y.5s
20
Cagalli Br.
Bueyuekkargi
18
37
Kudukbogaz
Gecidi
30
36°48’·0 N
Akyar Br. 10
Kuecuekkargi
Hayitli Br.
Karatas
Karayar
Capievi Br.
Akburun
Ince Br.
Fl.3s
Buyukbogaz
Kizilkum
20
Gecidi
N I M A R A
AD A S I
Gemiparlayan Koyu
36
Karga Adasi
Keciada Feneri
Fl.R.2s
38
Kizilkum
40
38
20
28°14’·0 E
dock (Fl G light) to the southwest.
Marmaris is a port of entry and
the authorities are all at Netsel
(also at Marmaris Yacht Marina,
in the east of the bay, near Adakoy.
You will need to buy or have a
Transit Log (cruising and crew
record) – approximate cost £57.
There are agents near the marina
that sell these. If this is your first
port of call in Turkey you should
40
50
36°48’·0 N
Kir Br
55
Alicli Koyu
39
42
Sarimhemet Br.
40
Doekuek Br.
34
Kocakizilkum
ADAKOY
Kirselik Br.
34
34
37
Karabatakta
26
34
20
Ada Agzi
Gokburun
20
30
34
L I M A N I
Karakulak
30
Anchorage
Area
35
M A R M A R I S
Uectas
32
26
35
35
20
36°50’·0 N
1
5
Aksu Br
Abdireis Koyu
48
59
50
Imray: G36 Marmaris
to Kekova Adasi
East Aegean and
Turkish Waters &
Cyprus Pilot, both
Rod Heikell
Save 20% in the ST
shop sailingtoday.
co.uk/shop using
discount code
MAR316
l RIGHT
62
28°18’·0 E
dock near the cruise ships on the
outside of the marina while you
complete the entry formalities.
You will also need to buy an e-visa
before you arrive, which allows
you to stay no longer than 90 days
in a six-month period and can be
bought online at evisa.gov.tr.
For longer stays, for example
over the winter, you will need to
apply for a residence permit.
READER
OFFER
Street scene in
the old town
60
57
28°16’·0 E
l LEFT
Kuetuek Br
Alkaya Br
50
Marmaris old town
and harbour at dusk
MEDITERRANEAN sailingtoday.co.uk
Albatros Marina
CREATIVE COMMONS/SARP KOKNAR
AGENCJA FOTOGRAFICZNA CARO/ALAMY
34
FG
14
36°50’·0 N
On the approach to the bay from
the south, Nimara/Yıldız island is
conspicuous, with its 400m peak.
Boats must pass to the west but can
go either side of the smaller Keçi
Adasi, which is next to it. There’s
plenty of water either side. You
might want to pass to the west of
the smaller island if you are heading
for the anchorage at Içmeler before
moving on to Marmaris town;
otherwise it makes more sense
to pass between the two islands.
Rocks to the south of Keçi are
marked by a light (Fl R 2s) and
anchoring is not permitted in the
channel between Keçi and Nimara.
There’s another, white light (Fl 3s)
at the channel’s exit, marking the
northwestern-most point of Nimara.
Once past the islands you’ll
want a north-northeast heading
to Marmaris – you’ll be able to
see the town’s lights by night,
or buildings and a water park
on the hillside by day – and you
have plenty of depth (18-30m).
As you reach the marina there is an
old castle next to the town quay. The
marina entrance, which is less than a
cable wide, is between a mole (Fl R 6s
light) to the northeast and cruise ship
28°18’·0 E
IMAGE BROKER/ALAMY
C RU ISI N G GROU N DS
Cruise miles of beautiful Aegean coastline and the Carian coast
With 4,500 miles of coastline, there’s
plenty to choose from in Turkey,
the land where West meets East.
From Marmaris you have miles
of Aegean cruising. To the northwest you have the famous Carian
coast, home to Datca, Knidos,
with its ancient Greek ruins, and,
farther north, Bodrum. To reach
the Gokova Gulf it’s little more
than 10 miles by land but you have
to go the long way round by sea
(c70nM) – no bad thing, since there
are plenty of anchorages along the
way. You’ll come within spitting
distance of Greek territory as you
go (Simi and Nisiros islands) and
you’ll be on a beam reach for the
majority of the way, but there’ll be
no escaping some beating into the
prevailing NW meltemi at times.
Going the other way, eastwards
from Marmaris, you have the
Lycian Coast, wild, rugged and
mountainous. This takes you to
Fethiye (40nM) and on to Antalya
l ABOVE
Ancient sites including
this theatre, at the
ancient city of Knidos,
overlook the Aegean
(160nM) and you’ll be on a fast beam
to broad reach most of the way –
but be wary of the katabatic gusts
coming off the mountains. If you’re
heading back to Marmaris from
Fethiye on a charter, take advantage
of the calm early mornings to avoid
too much of a slog to windward.
Carry a long line (70m) and a good
length of chain (4-5m) for tying
stern-to to rocks, with a bow anchor
out, when you’re off the beaten track.
Sadly the number of refugees trying
to cross the sea from western Turkey
to Greece remains high, although
cruisers have not reported suffering
personal issues from this. Advice is to
report any sightings of boats carrying
refugees to the Turkish Coastguard
immediately on VHF Ch 16.
USEFUL CONTACTS
E-visa application
evisa.gov.tr UK citizens
Further
c£14
($20) forcontacts
90 days
xxx: xxx
Tourist
board gototurkey.co.uk
Turkish
Consulate Call
RESTAURANTS
Centre
(for residency or visa
xxx: xxx
enquiries) +44 (0)20 3608
8090 turkishconsulate.org.uk
Dalaman International Airport
is 90km away. Fly direct
from most UK airports on
EasyJet, Monarch and Jet2
Marmaris restaurants
– try any on Barbaros
Caddesi street.
National Park walks
nationalparksofturkey.com
Aquadream Waterpark
aquadreammarmaris.com
Pupa Yacht Hotel and Marina
pupa.com.tr +90 242 413 18
53 [email protected]
Marmaris Yacht Marina
yatmarin.com +90 252 422
00 22 [email protected]
Albatros Marina
albatrosmarina.com +90
252 412 24 56 [email protected]
albatrosmarina.com
Other Turkish marinas
seturmarinas.com
Gulet Yacht Charter
bluevoyageyachts.com
Yacht charter
perfect-sailing.com
sunscapeyachting.co.uk
sailingtoday.co.uk MEDITERRANEAN
35

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