2013 Annual Report - Community Action Agency of South Alabama

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2013 Annual Report - Community Action Agency of South Alabama
Community Action Agency of South
Alabama’s 2013 Annual Report
Table of Contents
Who We Service ……………………………………………………3-4
Letter from the Board President…………………..…….………..…..5
Letter from the CEO………………………………….……………….6
Our Mission & Vision ………………………………………………..7
Our Promise………………………………………...…………………8
Board of Directors …………………..………………..…………….8-9
Testimonials………………………………………………………….10
Head Start………………..……………………………………….13-18
Programs we Offer…………………………………...…………..19-22
Finance…………………………………………………………...23-26
Program Demographics……………………………………….….27-28
Sponsors …………………………………………..……………..29-31
2
Proud to serve the following counties:
3
Location of Sites
Crossroads Head Start Pre-K
Escambia County CAA Office
9411 Hurricane Road
3227 Pea Ridge Road
Bay Minette AL 36507
Brewton AL 36526
251-937-5698
251-867-4759
Jubilee Head Start
Clarke County CAA Office
24044 Highway 98
133 Court Street
Fairhope AL 36532
Grove Hill AL 36451
251-928-9193
251-275-8498
Magnolia Springs Head Start
10839 St. John’s Lane
Monroe County CAA Office
Foley AL 36535
251-965-7937
Brewton Head Start
1207 Belleville Avenue
Brewton AL 36526
11 Hines Street
Central Office
Monroeville AL 36461
26440 Pollard Road
251-743-3137
Daphne AL 36526
251-626-2646
Conecuh County CAA Office
251-867-9552
690 West Front Street
Freemanville Head Start
Evergreen AL 36401
115 School Street
251-578-2331
Atmore AL 36502
251-368-3996
Wilcox County CAA Office
Coffeeville Head Start & Pre-K
1740 Highway 84 West
50th
Anniversary
Coffeeville AL 36524
219 Claiborne Street
Camden AL 36726
334-682-4863
Of
251-276-0622
Community Action!
Fulton Head Start & Pre-K
Marengo County CAA Office
241 Bassetts Creek Road
101 East Coates Avenue
Fulton AL 36446
Linden AL 36748
334-636-9870
334-295-2244
4
Message from the Board Chair
It is with great pleasure that I bring to you some of the many achievements of the Community Action
Agency of South Alabama for the 2012 - 2013 program year. This Annual Report reflects back on the past
year, and some of the accomplishments that occurred through this agency for the children, individuals, and
families within our communities.
The Board of Directors and other committees worked diligently to maintain accountability for the
funds received through our agency, while ensuring that all of our practices were sound and transparent. The
unrelenting dedication of the volunteers who served in these capacities did not go unnoticed. We appreciate
all of the extra effort provided to us through the citizens in the counties served by the CAA.
Our many programs and services have been instrumental in producing positive outcomes, and changing the focus for individuals who previously saw little hope. As you will see in this report, lives were touched
in ways that started them on a new path of life that will enable them to become more self-sufficient, build
self-esteem, and impact the communities in which they live.
On behalf of the Board of Directors, I would like to thank each of you who partnered with us as we
worked to achieve much success during the past year!
The impersonal hand of government can never replace the helping hand of a
neighbor.
Hubert H. Humphrey
Rhondel Rhone
Board Chairman
5
Message from the Chief Executive Officer
First, let me say “thank you” to our Board of Directors for their commitment to the mission of the
Community Action Agency. The agency could not be sustainable without their untiring dedication and willingness to give of themselves so freely. Also, I would like to appreciate our staff who are the foundation of
the agency, and our partners and supporters who make our efforts easier through their generosity.
Numerous challenges faced us during the past fiscal year, two of which were sequestration and the
government shutdown. Through all of the adversities, as you will see through this 2012 - 2013 Annual Report, we succeeded in our mission of helping people and changing lives. We worked hard to ensure those
we served were empowered to make the necessary adjustments in their lives that would enable them to
continue on their journey to self-sufficiency.
This report highlights some of the activities accomplished through the many programs under the
umbrella of the Community Action Agency of South Alabama. Within our seven (7) county service area of
Baldwin, Escambia, Clarke, Monroe, Conecuh, Wilcox and Marengo Counties, these programs have been
instrumental in establishing positive outcomes within these communities.
It is with great enthusiasm that we present to you a snapshot of the past fiscal year. I look forward
to the future with great anticipation in knowing we have employees and volunteers who are focused on our
mission, and genuinely care about our customers, communities, and each other.
Now that it’s all over, what did you
really do yesterday that’s worth
mentioning?
Coleman Cox
Cassandra Boykin
Chief Executive Offiicer
6
Our Mission
As a non-profit business/
organization, we are charged to
provide programs and services
which promote and create selfsufficiency to individuals, families, and communities.
Our Vision
To be the leading agency that
provides quality services for
promoting self-sufficiency.
7
The Promise
In accomplishing our mission we adhere to the
"promise" that has been adopted by community
action agencies throughout our nation as follows:
"Community Action changes peoples’ lives, embodies the spirit of hope, improves communities,
and makes America a better place to live. We
care about the entire community and we are dedicated to helping people help themselves and each
other."
Board of Directors
Sector I
Sector 2
Sector 3
Public Representation
Private Representation
Poor Representation
Rhondel Rhone
Miranda Harvey
Joyce Bishop
Leonard Millender
Jerridine Perryman
Tyrone Moye
Charles Gruber
Brenda Lee
Betty Queen
Billy Ghee
Deann Servos
David Bishop
Lena White
Alex Roberts
Relia Lee
Tommie Conaway—Education
Ellen Wallace
Judge Jerry Boggan—Legal
Rev. Wayne Nevlous
Alex Roberson
Rev. Gilbert Leggett
Thomas Moore—Finance
Jesse King
Clifton Moore
8
Board of Directors members are willing to give of
themselves to ensure fiscal
accountability.
9
Lesley Schaniel received a boost from the Community Action Agency of South Alabama to help her regain a footing
in life.
When Lesley Schaniel walked through the doors of the Community Action Agency of South Alabama office in Daphne, she thought
of herself as a “lost woman.”
Having no home, little education and three boys to rear, Schaniel came to the agency to fulfill a job-training requirement needed for
her to continue receiving federal assistance with food and housing through the Alabama Department of Human Resources.
That day marked a turning point in her life, Schaniel said.
She found herself interviewing for a temporary 30-hour-per-week job, offered as part of an on-the-job-training program for recipients of federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families.
“I never worked in an office environment, and I was thinking, they’re not going to take me or let me stay,” Schaniel said. “But then
they said, ‘When can you start?’”
Long before Schaniel entered the agency, a number of local, state and federal programs and activities were brought together to
make this opportunity available. A key program was the Community Service Block Grant, administered at the state level by the
Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs.
This grant program provides significant support for the work of the Community Action Agency of South Alabama and 20 similar
agencies located across the state. ADECA receives CSBG funds from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to help
low-income residents achieve self-sufficiency through a variety of programs to mitigate the effects of poverty and address potential
barriers to success. Helping residents like Schaniel develop the skills needed for a job with a livable wage is the most effective route
to self-sufficiency.
Agency Executive Director Cassandra Boykin said Schaniel was quiet and reserved when she started, but soon an outgoing, friendly
personality emerged.
“She saw how giving back and assisting others can give you a positive outlook,” Boykin said.
Schaniel rotated around different departments as part of the job-training program, receiving guidance from several mentors in the
agency. She also received clothing from the agency’s thrift store and learned professional and computer skills through classes offered by the agency.
“I started believing in myself simply because they believed in me,” Schaniel said.
One qualification she lacked was a high school diploma. With the encouragement of Boykin and other staffers, Schaniel began taking a GED preparation class and studying while at work. In April 2013, she passed the exam and earned a GED.
These days, Schaniel is off all federal housing and food assistance and is working full time as the agency’s receptionist, but her aspirations do not end there. She is enrolled in college and working toward earning an associate’s degree in business.
“I’m no longer lost,” she said. “I’m not sure exactly where I’m going or how fast I’ll get there; all I know for sure is I want to be
better and smarter, and it’s all because of this one group of people in Daphne, Alabama.”
Community action agencies in Alabama offer a variety of services depending on the specific needs of the communities they serve.
Services may include employment support, parenting classes, transitional housing, summer youth programs, financial literacy programs and emergency food and shelter.
In the 2012-2013 fiscal year, ADECA administered Community Service Block Grants totaling $11.7 million; during the same period,
community action agencies served 256,591 Alabama residents who needed assistance and met the qualification requirements. More
than 34,000 received food assistance, 21,000 received child-care assistance and more 12,000 received health-care assistance.
10
People make it happen.
Services bring about change!
11
Staff and partners working
together
developing the road to
self-sufficiency.
12
Head Start & Pre
Pre--K Activities
Magnolia Springs children enjoying
their science fair.
Being creative while developing fine
motor skills.
Freemanville children riding in the float.
13
Head Start & Pre
Pre--K Activities (cont.)
“Play is often talked about as if it were a relief from
serious learning. But for children, play is serious
learning. Play is really the work of childhood.”
Fred Rogers
Physical activity is important for healthy
children.
Supporting children’s school readiness is an ongoing partnership between parents, families,
communities, and CAA of South Alabama’s Head Start. Head Start recognizes family engagement is a critical element in helping children be ready for school and for a lifetime of
success.
Socialization is a part of Head Start
that teaches the children about developing positive relationships.
Meal time is an extension of the classroom. Today it is green eggs and ham for
breakfast to celebrate Dr. Suess!
14
Total Number of Funded Enrollment
Number
of Children
473
Total Number of Children Served
555
Average Monthly Enrollment
467.8
Number of Children Receiving Medical Exams
547
Number of Children Receiving Dental Exams
551
Number of Children Seen by Mental Health Professionals
Number of Children with Diagnosed Disabilities
2
48
15
Monitoring Review:
The last onsite federal review conducted by the Office of Head Start occurred during December, 2012. The
Office of Head Start thoroughly evaluated the local Head Start Program’s effectiveness in delivering services
to children and families based on the Performance Standards and the Head Start Act.
The Agency’s Head Start Program was addressed as it relates to Head Start Performance Standards 74.37.
whereby it was stated that the grantee’s line of credit did not exclude the Head Start assets from use as collateral. After further review, and documentation from the financial institution, it was determined that
Head Start assets were not inclusive, and were not used as collateral. The Office of Head Start validated
through documentation that this was the case, and this matter was closed.
16
Thank you PNC for
the learning opportunities provided to
us!!
17
Male involvement during our
parent meeting.
Male Work Day
Breakfast with Dad
Breakfast with dad,
starts the day off
Thank you to the males of PNC
for spending time with us on
our Science Projects.
18
Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)
This program is designed to assist eligible
low-income households with financial assistance toward their heating bill during
the winter months and their cooling bills
during the summer months.
Family Day Care Program
This is a federally funded program that provides
healthy meals and snacks to children 12 years old or
younger. This is done by reimbursing participating
licensed day care homes for serving nutritious
meals to children.
19
Energy Conservation Programs
These programs assist households with minor home repairs to reduce the loss of energy and
stop air infiltration. Also, may assist with minor roof repairs, the installation of wheel chair
ramps, and the replacement of windows and doors.
After
Before
Food Pantry Program
Through this program, individuals and
households are assisted with emergency
food items, regardless of income. This is
made possible by donations from local
vendors.
Bay Area Food Bank
Panera Bread
Olive Garden
Longhorn’s Steakhouse
Kentucky Fried Chicken
Long John Silver’s
Pizza Hut
Winn Dixie
Target
20
Little Ceasars
JOBS Training Program
The agency has developed a training program
that is inclusive of assuring that low income
individuals have an opportunity to become a
part of the workforce and to develop their self
sufficiency. The levels of education for participants is not important; however, it has become a part of the program to offer an environment for motivating trainees to further
their education.
Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)
The VITA program offers free tax help to low– to moderate income people who
cannot prepare their own tax returns. Certified volunteers sponsored by various
organizations receive training to help prepare basic tax returns in communities
across the country. All locations offer free electronic filing.
21
Senior Awareness Initiative
The senior awareness initiative was designed to
celebrate and create an environment for individuals sixty years or older, to remind the communities that senior citizens are the source and beginning of all communities. Caring for our senior
citizens and making sure they have what they
need as it relates to their physical, emotional, and
mental wellbeing has been a direct goal for Community Action Agency of South Alabama.
Weatherization/Energy Counseling Training
Our agency currently provides Weatherization
services for seven (7) counties in Alabama.
Those counties include Baldwin, Escambia,
Clarke, Monroe, Conecuh, Marengo and Wilcox Counties. Weatherization assists households with minor repairs to reduce the loss of
energy and stop air infiltration. Weatherization
also assists in making minor roof repairs, installation of wheel chair ramps, and replacement of windows and doors.
22
Financial Overview
of the
Organization
23
Fiscal Audit:
The Agency’s annual audit was conducted by Allen, Allen, & Foster, CPA firm. The audit was
conducted in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards and the standards
which apply to the financial audits in the government auditing standards issued by Comptroller General. The auditor’s opinion expressed that Community Action Agency of South
Alabama’s financial position as of September 30, 2013, in all material respects, is sound and
conformed with generally accepted accounting principles as an operating entity in the United States of America.
Administrative
Funds
Functional Expenses
Salaries & Wages
Benefits & Retirement
Direct Client Assistance
Travel
Professional & Consulting
Program Operating Expenses
Equipment/Depreciation
Total Expenses before Indirect Alloc.
Program
Funds
$2,937,989
971,178
3,050,388
44,273
51,748
2,448,448
40,047
$9,544,070
Allocation of Indirect Costs
$75,016
$(75,016)
Total Functional Expense
$75,016
$9,469,054
24
9/30/2013
Total
$2,937,989
971,178
3,050,388
44,273
51,748
2,448,448
40,047
$9,544,070
$9,544,070
Financial Report for 2013
Funding Source
Budget
Wilcox County Commission (Special Projects)
Expenses
$27,550.00
$27,550.00
$2,115.12
$2,115.12
$59,435.00
$59,435.00
$3,156,424.00
$3,156,424.00
Office of School Readiness
$138,369.64
$138,369.64
Family Day Care
$371,913.85
$342,019.28
$5,000.00
$5,000.00
$788,042.00
$788,042.00
General Fund
$12,581.00
$12,581.00
Project Share
$18,972.10
$9,500.00
Head Start FY
$3,145,578.00
$3,145,578.00
Head Start- USDA FY
$311,272.81
$311,272.81
Head Start In-Kind
$949,154.24
$949,154.24
PNC Foundation
$22,000.00
$22,000.00
Support Revenue
$84,074.00
$84,074.00
Christmas Projects
Alabama Business Charitable Trust Fund
Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program
Volunteer Income Tax Assistance
Community Service Block Grant
Total Support Revenue
$9,544,070.00
25
Community Action Agency
of South Alabama
Combined Statement of Activities (All Funds)
For the year ended September 30, 2013
Revenues:
U.S. Governmental Funding Sources
Administrative
Funds
Dept. Health & Human Services
Department of Agriculture
Program
Funds
9/30/2013
Total
$7,167,853
698,405
$7,167,853
698,405
263,662
263,662
Department of Homeland Security
40,177
40,177
Department of Treasury
Non Federal Funding Sources:
Alabama Business Charitable Trust
5,000
5,000
$59,435
$59,435
Department of Energy
Alabama General Fund & DOE
In Kind Contributions
$12,581
178,200
1,002,107
190,781
1,002,107
Miscellaneous & Other
Total Revenues
57,155
$69,736
79,981
$9,494,819
137,136
$9,564,555
Community Services Block Grant (CSBG)
$874,043
$847,043
Low Income Housing Energy Assistance
Program (LIHEAP)
Head Start Program
3,079,988
4,471,472
3,079,988
4,471,472
Weatherization Assistance
Family Day Care
260,325
371,914
260,325
371,914
Emergency Food & Shelter
Pre K Programs
13,695
250,677
13,695
250,677
$75,016
146,940
221,956
$75,016
$9,469,054
$9,544,070
$ (5,280)
$25,766
$20,485
(1)
210,762
210,762
$236,528
$231,246
Expenses:
Other Programs, Services & Admin
Total Expenses
Change in Net Assets
Capitalized & Contributed Assets
Net Assets at Beginning of Year
Net Assets at End of Year
$ (5,280)
26
Gender
Program Demographic Report
10/01/2012
10/01/2012--9/30/2013
Ethnicity/Race
I. Ethnicity
Hispanic/ Latino
Not Hispanic/ Latino
Total
II. Race
White
Black/AfricanAmerican
Native American/
Alaskan Native
Asian
Native Hawaiian/
Pacific Islander
Other
Multi-Race
Total
Housing
Single parent/female
Single parent/male
2 parent household
Single person
2 adults/no children
Other
Total
152
15831
15983
3111
12550
7
104
131
15,919
# of Persons
3,030
91
798
4,266
629
84
8,898
Sources of Family Income
# of Persons
6,903
SSI
2,035
Social Security
3878
General Assistance/SDA/
SFA
Unemployment
Family Size
One
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Eight or more
Total
6,809
4,987
Unduplicated families
showing
Unduplicated families
showing
TANF
Pension
Age
Education Level of Adults
(24 yrs or older)
0-8
9-12/Non-grad
H.S. Grad/GED
12+ Some Post Sec
2 or 4 yr. College Grad
Total
13
3
# of Persons
5,576
10,367
15,943
# of Persons
0-5
6-11
12-17
18-23
24-44
45-54
55-69
70+
Total
# of Persons
Other Characteristics
No Health Insurance
Disabled
# of Persons
Male
Female
Total
999
170
1723
1866
1904
1217
3248
1851
2621
1509
15939
# of Persons
745
2,369
4,089
1,272
568
9,043
# of Persons
3,968
1,651
1,172
673
296
94
31
17
7,902
Level of Family Income (%
of HHS guideline)
Up to 50%
51% to 75%
76% to 100%
101% to 125%
126% to 150%
151% to 175%
176% to 200%
201% and over
Total
# of Persons
Family Type
Own
Rent
Homeless
Other
Total
# of Persons
2,874
2,026
2,253
1,273
666
223
73
91
9,479
325
0
254
Employment + other
sources
Employment only
397
1,245
Other
1,709
27
5,304
3,481
16
164
8,965
Agency Snapshot — 2013 Program Outcomes
Activity/Service
Unemployed and obtained a job
Employed and maintained a job for at least 90 days
Employed and obtained an increase in employment income/benefits
Achieved a living wage employment and/or benefits
Obtained skills/competencies required for employment
Completed ABE/GED and received certificate or diploma
Completed post-secondary education program/obtained degree
Obtained child care or dependent care
Obtained access to reliable transportation
Obtained healthcare services
Obtained safe and affordable housing
Obtained food assistance
Obtained non-emergency LIHEAP energy assistance
Number of participants demonstrating ability to maintain budgets
Jobs created or saved from elimination
Accessible living wage jobs created or saved from reduction
Safe and affordable housing units preserved or improved
Accessible safe and affordable child care opportunities
Accessible before or after school opportunities
Accessible new or expanded transportation resources
Number of participants opening an IDA or savings account
Number of participants who increased their savings through an IDA
Number of participants capitalizing a small business
Jobs created or saved
Accessible living wage jobs created or saved
Safe and affordable housing units
Safe and affordable housing preserved or improved
Accessible before and after school program opportunities
Accessible new or expanded transportation resources
Accessible or increased education and training placement opportunities
Increase in the availability or preservation of community facilities
Number of community members that participate in community revitalization
Number of volunteer hours donated to the agency
Increase in Available Preservation of Community Facilities
Number of community members mobilized by CAA
Number of volunteer hours donated to CAA
Number of low-income people participating in boards/councils
Number of people engaged in non-governmental
activities
Total number of organizations CAA works with to promote outcomes
Number of staff trainings
Hours of staff training
Senior citizens or disabled persons assisted
Households receiving emergency food assistance
Emergency rent or mortgage assistance
Emergency car repairs or home repairs
Emergency temporary shelter assistance provided
Emergency medical care provided
Emergency protection from violence provided
Emergency clothing provided
Youth assisted
28
Number Achieving Outcomes
105
29
261
145
56
3
3
88
1
82
5
785
2,811
23
27
2
11
1,014
108
825
12
12
2
4
6
2
7
3
5
6
2
113
8,058
2
113
6,041
74
161
220
305
5,358
4,114
2,002
22
2
1
3
1
6
1,998
Partnerships
Poarch Band of Creek Indians
Wilcox County Commission
Community Foundation Of South Alabama
Marengo County Commission
Alabama Charitable Trust Fund
United Way
Catholic Social Services
US Department of Internal Revenue
American Red Cross
Department of Human Resources
Literacy Council
Alabama Power Company
Salvation Army
County School Systems
Olive Garden
Ecumenical Ministries
Pizza Hut
Area on Aging
Kentucky Fried Chicken
Target
Workforce Development
Home Depot
Baldwin County Commission
Panera Bread
Escambia County Commission
Little Cesar’s Pizza
Clarke County Commission
Longhorn’s Steakhouse
Monroe County Commission
Bay Area Food Bank
Conecuh County Commission
Winn Dixie
And Others
29
Funding Sources
American Recovery & Reinvestment Act US Dept. of Health & Human Services
CSBG( Community Services Block Grant)
Low income Home Energy Asst. Program
DOE (Department of Energy)
ABC (Alabama Charitable Trust Fund)
AL Dept. of Children’s Affairs
Federal Emergency Management Agency
United Way
United States Department of Agriculture
Clarke County Commission
Monroe County Commission
Conecuh County Commission
Wilcox County Commission
PNC Bank
State General Fund
And Others
30
Our Partners
31
For all your insurance needs call:
Barry Broome
Phone: 251-706-2539
32
“If we are together, nothing is
impossible”
Winston Churchill
33
50 Years of Community Action: 1964—2014
34

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