Young Nation

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Young Nation
Sunday Nation May 16, 2010
Free with Sunday Nation
I love
bikes
»Pg4
Sean Kahihu Nderitu, 3, goes to Brighton Academy, Lavington. He likes watching cartoons
and playing outdoor games.
Photos/ALEX KAMWERU
»Pg6
»Pg8
May 16, 2010
2 Sunday Nation
Send your letters to the Editor; Young Nation,
P.O. Box 49010, Nairobi OR Email: [email protected]
KCSE candidates:
make smart choices and
work smart
I would like to inform this year’s KCSE
candidates that in life, one comes across
many challenges and it is up to you to
choose or determine how to overcome
them. It is these choices that that
determine your future. I personally believe
there is no such thing as peer-pressure in
school. It is your individual decision that
drives you to undertake in dangerous
ventures such as substance abuse and
premarital relationships. No one forces
you to indulge in these vices. If you are a
strong character and know what you want
in life, you are able to stand up for yourself
even if it means you are alone against the
whole class or school. Doing the right
thing is easy if you are focused.
We have been advised many times to
work hard. I advise you to work smart. If
you want to succeed in academics you
should plan and manage your time well
and keep away from pairing. Concentrate
on academics because after high school
and even when you are waiting for exam
results, you will have a lot of time on your
hands. It is not the quantity of work you
do that matters, but the quality. I wish all
the forth formers this year all the best and
success in KCSE at the end of the year.
Rooney Victor Oduor, St. Mary’s School,
Yala
Managing Editor:
Eric Obino
Chief Graphics Designer:
Rodgers Mogusu
Designers:
Mejumaa Mbaruku, Anini Andrew
QUOTES…
team
Creative Director:
Kamau Wanyoike
It’s about time politicians started
thinking about the country’s growth and
development instead of focusing on their
own selfish interests. In the past few
years they have caused a lot of havoc in
the country including the post election
violence. They are now busy diving people
in the ‘Yes’ and ‘No’ Constitution debate.
They should keep their selfish reasons,
ideas and decisions to themselves. Give
Kenyan’s a break for heaven’s sake.
Renfroe Cheruto, St. Joseph’s High School,
Kapsabet
Empowerment of women is vital in a
developing a country like ours. In Kenya,
Martha Karua, Prof. Wangari Mathai are
good examples of empowered women.
They are able to stand their ground on
issues of national importance without fear.
Young ladies, you too can be like them.
You should believe in yourself and the
fact that you too have the potential to be
whatever you want to be. Work hard at
acquiring the skills you need to pursue
your interests or choosen career, so you
can contribute to helping Kenya achieve
the 2030 Vision.
Shanniq Monicah, Bristar Girls’ High
School, Kalimoni
Water cannot be forced uphill.
- African Proverb
Editor:
Liz Wanjohi
Contributors:
Mworia Muchina, Chebet Karago, Fred
Orido, Patricia Mundia, Samuel Muigai,
Joash Osewe, John Muchiri, Tim
Kamuzu Banda, Jim Guteta
Stop preaching the gospel
according to yourselves
None is richer than the one who
has peace of mind - none.
- African Proverb
No one can corrupt you unless you
are corrupt.
- African Proverb
ROSE BIANKA, St. Teresa’s
Girls’ High School, P.O. Box 907,
Embu Kenya. Age: 16. Hobbies:
Mountain-climbing, travelling,
singing, dancing and making
new friends. Would like penpals
from USA, Australia and Europe.
DIANA MUMBI, St Teresa’s
Girls high School, P.O. Box 907,
Embu Kenya. Age: 15. Hobbies:
Reading novels, listening to
music and drawing. Would like
penpals from USA and UK.
VICTORIA KAMENE, St Teresa’s
Girls’ High School, P.O. Box 907,
Embu Kenya. Age: 15. Hobbies:
Reading novels, travelling and
making new friends. Would like
penpals from USA.
JACKLYNN CHELSIEG, St.
Teresa’s Girls’ High School, P.O.
Box 907, Embu Kenya. Age:
16. Hobbies: Reading novels,
dancing, composing songs and
making new friends. Would like
penpals from USA, Europe and
Australia.
If your mouth turns into a knife, it
will cut off your lips.
- African Proverb
ourselves can we have the right
attitude toward others.
- Wilfred Peterson
The art of being yourself at
your best is the art of unfolding
your personality into the person
you want to be. Be gentle with
yourself, learn to love yourself,
and to forgive yourself, for only as
we have the right attitude toward
Procrastination is the bad habit
of putting off until the day after
tomorrow what should have been
done the day before yesterday.
- Napoleon Hill
[email protected]
W
hile eating disorders may
occur in children, many
people are mostly concerned
about obesity. But some children
have become conscious about their
weight and as a result eat very little.
Children as young as six years old are
now dieting. This is not good because
children have lower levels of body fat,
they tend to become emaciated and
suffer the effects of starvation far more
quickly than adults. Children must eat
properly, a balanced diet, because they
are still growing. They must eat a lot
of fruits and vegetables and avoid too
much junk foods. This will help them to
grow up healthy and not to be either
too thin, or overweight because of
poor eating habits. Getting involved
in outdoor activities like sports too
help to keep your body fit. In our cover
story, we bring you the story of Hawa
Mukabi. The doctor was concerned she
was becoming too weak. Read and find
how her mother and teacher helped
her change her attitude towards food.
In ‘What You say’ column read and find
out what the children know about the
proposed constitution and what’s in it
that is good for them. All your favourite
columns are as refreshing as ever
including the ever hilarious Linda.
JUDY MURUGI, St. Teresa’s
Girls’ High School, P.O. Box 907,
Embu Kenya. Age: 15. Hobbies:
Watching movies, travelling and
making new friends. Would like
penpals from USA and UK.
May 16, 2010
Sunday Nation 3
Helping children
to eat healthy
By JIM GUTETA
M
eal times are the worst times
for little Hawa Mukabi. At only
six years old, Hawa fears food.
Hawa says: “I don’t like eating because
I will get very fat and all my friends will
laugh at me.” However, Hawa is too
young to start getting worried about
her weight. some girls in their teens
may fear getting fat and this makes
them develop an eating disorder known
as bulimia. Medical experts state that
the on-set of bulimia is often during
adolescence, between 13 and 20 years
of age. It is quite alarming that now
very young girls’ fear of being touted at
school is driving them towards bulimic
tendencies.
According to Teacher Elizabeth who
teaches in a city primary school, the
girls at school who are considered
trendy have many friends while the
others are bullied or made fun of.
“Bulimia is now prevalent among our
little girls who due to exposure to mass
media have adopted the stereotype
of slim model, dancer, musician,
cheerleader of whom they idolise as
fashionable. So fat girls are looked
down upon,” she says.
According to nutritionist Alex Matindi
of Kitchen Essentials, there are two
sub-types of bulimia. The purging type
bulimia person tends to self induce
vomiting usually by putting their fingers
in the mouths hence triggering gag
reflex. The food is rapidly removed from
the body before it can be digested. He
adds that non purging bulimics fast
Sean Tola Kofa
You are three
years old today
and we thank
God for your
good health.
May you grow
to lay humility as the foundation of
all virtues. Best wishes from Dad,
Mom, your brother Brandon, uncles,
aunties and grandparents. Happy
birthday, TK.
Jimmy Mutua Ndolo
Happy eighth birthday, Jimmy.
We thank God for your good
health. May
you grow into
a responsible
and God-fearing
person. Best
wishes from Dad
Kelvin, Mum
Njeri, cousins
Carlo, Gracie,
Linda, Kiki, aunties Tina and Agnes
Teacher Elizabeth of Umoja Springboard
Academy helps Hawa with her classwork.
Inset: Hawa Mukabi and her mother Joan
Mwaka-Hawa.
Photos/JIM GUTETA
excessively after eating much calories.
Purging-type bulimics may also exercise
or fast, but as a secondary form of
weight control.
Mr. Matindi says that chronic purging
among the bulimic persons leads to
many health problems - some of them
life-threatening. The most dangerous
side effect of bulimia is dehydration.
and uncle Mutua.
Josephine Bakhita Wanjiku
You are so pretty that your birthday
cannot pass unnoticed. Your
laughter and smile brightens even
the dullest day. As you celebrate
your second
birthday, may
God shower
you with lots
of blessings
and may all
our dreams
come true.
Warm wishes
from dad Karis, mum Trizah,
grandparents Mburu and Patrick,
cucu Jane, aunt Shiro, uncle Vinnie
and Bonni.
Joy Decimah Munala
Happy Birthday Joy! As you turn
five, we thank God for helping us
to be stewards over your life. May
you grow up as a God-fearing girl.
Bulimics are also much more likely to
suffer from depression and moods
disorders. One minute a bulimic person
may be overjoyed and all over sudden
they start crying.
Luckily for little Hawa Mukabi, her
mother Joan Mwaka and aunt Zena
Buvolu quickly noticed the bulimic
symptoms before it reached the
destructive level and took the necessary
steps to help her. She now eats healthy
foods.
[email protected]
Special wishes from mum Jane,
dad Edwin, uncles, aunties and
grandparents.
Wishes from loving mum Nancie,
sister Stacie, aunt Winnie, cousins
and your grandparents.
Stacy Amukune
Happy fifth birthday! May you
grow up to be a respectful, hard
working and God-fearing girl. Lots
of love from mum Catherine, dad
Steve, cousins, aunties, uncles,
grandparents and all your friends.
Lance Lunani
As you celebrate your first
birthday, may you grow to be a
God-fearing boy. May He give you
good health, strength and wisdom.
Best wishes from dad Evans, mum
Hellen, grandparents, aunties,
uncles and friends.
Promise Irungu
May you grow up to be responsible.
Best wishes from your mom
Zippora, brothers Joekevin,
Immanuel, cucu Beatrice and the
entire family of late Isaiah Mwathi.
Bhakita Ndanu
As you turn five, a special wish
comes your way because you are a
blessing to us. May you grow up to
be a God-fearing girl, humble and
above all always keep your smile.
May you live to blow 1001 candles.
Stephanne Wamuyu Muchoki
Happy eighth birthday! You are a
very wonderful and precious gift
to us from God. May He give you
a full life, good health, strength
and wisdom always to carry on
with the challenges of life. May
you grow up to be a God-adoring
person, loving, diligent and a
high achiever in life. We love and
cherish you. Best wishes from dad,
mum, aunties, uncles, cousins and
grandparents.
Faith Wairimu
You are now
nine years old.
We thank God
for your good
health. May you
grow in wisdom.
Best wishes from dad Kanyingi,
mum Nyambura, sister Wanjiru and
brother Mburu.
Trevor M. Maina
Happy birthday as you turn one
year old. May all our dreams turn
into realities. Warm birthday
wishes from dad Gerald, mum
Eunice, uncles,
aunties, cousins,
friends and
grandparents.
May 16, 2010
4 Sunday Nation
May 16, 2010
Sunday Nation 5
Hawa Mukabi,
Umoja Springboard
Academy
Zawadi kerubo,
Byfaith Junior School
Teacher told us that a
child has the right to
food, shelter, education
and good health.
So if the proposed
constitution they are
talking about guarantees
this rights, then I am ok
with it.
Ann Ayuma,
Innercore Bethel View
I have not read
theproposed
constitution but from
what I have heard, it
is a very good one.
But I have also heard
that it allows killing of
babies before they are
born. I do not want that
part.
‘What we
know about
the proposed
constitution’
Pauline Wangari,
The constitution
contains the rules
that we as citizens
must follow. I know
the proposed
constitution
addresses issue to
do with the rights of
children. So it must be
good.
Umoja Springboard
Academy
Know your rights
I hope they could
write the proposed
constitution in very
simple English for
children so that they
too can read it. The one
people are reading has
no pictures so I cannot
understand anything.
I think the proposed
constitution will
bring positive
changes in Kenya.
My parents believe
the constitution is
good so I know my
parents will not want
something bad for the
By Patricia Mundia
The law in relation to the youth
N
O
Hope Omondi,
Law Student at Catholic University
of Eastern Africa
ational Youth Policy
defines youth as
persons resident in
Kenya in the bracket
of 15-30 years. The Policy states
the rights, responsibilities
and obligations of the youth.
However, the Policy has no
binding force on either the
Government or the society. The
UN General Assembly defines
the youth as those persons
between the ages of 15 and 24
years. The World Bank describes
youth as that time in a person’s
life between childhood and
adulthood. The term youth in
general refers to those who
are between the ages 15 to
25. The Commonwealth Youth
Programme works with young
people aged 15 to 29 as its
definition of youth. Activities of
the youth include; engaging in
small businesses, studying and
socialising, amongst others.
The youth are most vulnerable
to: poverty, unemployment,
Absalom Odhiambo,
ne beautiful morning, I
woke up and ran to the
bathroom. I washed
and dressed quickly and ran
downstairs for breakfast. Why
the hurry? This was the day
my father promised us a trip to
visit Mr Okiomo’s farm. After
we all finished with breakfast
at nine o’clock, we got into the
family car ready to set off. My
father, who was always serious,
was in a jovial mood.
We drove through the
countryside where we saw
many cows and goats. After
30minutes, we arrived at
our destination. We were
received by a young man
whom I assumed was the son
of our host, Mr Okiomo. My
assumption was proved wrong
when my mother said, “Hallo
Mr. Okiomo? How are you,
thank you for inviting us.” I
nearly jumped out of my skin, I
did not expect a young man to
own a farm!
When Mr Okiomo took us
round his farm, I noticed that
he had 30 cows and that 20
of them were heifers. He told
us that each cow gave him 20
litres of milk. His sheep were so
many that I gave up trying to
count them. “How many sheep
do you have?” I asked. “I have
50 sheep,” he answered.
I have heard that if we
have a new constitution
Kenya will be a great
country. So I wish that
people vote for the draft
so that children can have
a good place to live.
Innercore Bethel View
Children and the law
By ALBRIGHT B. MANYONGE
A visit to the farm
Umoja Springboard
Academy
Bill Karimi,
Innercore Bethel View
My dad has been
talking about going
to vote for a new
constitution. I don’t
want him to go to vote
because it might make
people fight.
STDs/HIV and AIDS, lack of
education, armed conflict,
suicide, crime and child
prostitution etc. The law in
Kenya is insufficient in provision
for the youth. However, Kenya
has ratified the International
Committee on Economic, Social
and Cultural Rights (ICESCR)
which makes provisions for the
youth. The preamble to the
ICESCR provides that the ideal
of free human beings enjoying
freedom from fear and want can
only be achieved if conditions
are created whereby everyone
may enjoy his economic, social
and cultural rights. Article 6 of
the same convention recognises
the right to work, which
includes the right of everyone
to the opportunity to gain his
living by work which he freely
chooses or accepts, and will take
appropriate steps to safeguard
this right.
Article 10 of the ICESCR
provides that special measures
of protection and assistance
should be taken on behalf of
all children and young persons
without any discrimination for
reasons of parentage or other
conditions. Children and young
persons should be protected
from economic and social
exploitation. Their employment
in work harmful to their morals
or health or dangerous to
life or likely to hamper their
normal development should be
punishable by law. States should
also set age limits below which
the paid employment of child
labour should be prohibited and
punishable by law.
Article 10 of the same
covenant states that every
person has a right to education.
It has emerged that that the
right to education does not
only provide for basic education
but also provides for tertiary
education.
[email protected]
HELA
The ‘Kiswahili’ name
for one cent is
hela. The name
has its origins
in the German
name for coin,
heller. Hela
is a one cent
coin and 10
hela make 10
cents. `To make
one shilling, you
need 100 hela. The
use of the hela coin
was discontinued
in Kenya in the late
1960s.
Sports Quiz
Please send comments or
contributions to [email protected]
Animal sounds that you may
not know:
1. Flies buzz
2. Giraffes bleat or grunt
Next we visited the 10-acres
where he planted his crops.
We saw how the vegetables
were irrigated and he
explained that he had just
harvested kale, spinach,
carrots, aubergines, asparagus,
artichokes, cougettes, leeks,
lettuce, cauliflowers and
cucumbers.
After touring the farm,
Mr Okiomo invited us to his
house. When we got into
compound, I saw five dogs
and I ran and screamed very
loudly. He assured me that the
dogs would not bite me. In his
house, he gave us mango juice.
As we drank the juice, he told
us his life story. He said that he
did not know his parents and
he had grown up in the streets.
When he was 12 years old, he
was adopted by a couple who
died when he was 27 and left
him the farm. When he finished
telling the story, I recalled how
miserable his childhood was
before he was adopted, and an
adage came to mind, “Every
cloud has a silver lining.” The
visit to Mr Okiomo’s farm
was the most exciting and
memorable experience in my
life. I would love to live on a
farm like him.
- Manyonge is a Standard
Seven pupil at Providence
Academy
3. Tigers roar or growl
4. Tortoises grunt
5. Hawks scram
-Mercy Gakii
A woman is driving to Disney World when she
sees a sign that says: “Disney World Left.”
So she turned around and went home.
Teacher: Joe, can you count up to 20 please?
Joe: I don’t know how, but I can count up to 10
twice!
Snake 1: Are we poisonous?
Snake 2: I don’t know. Why do you ask?
Snake 1: I just bit my tongue!
Lima: I wonder what life would have been like
200 years ago?
Jill: History lessons would have been shorter!
Julia: What did the alien say to the puzzle?
Bob: I don’t know!
Julia: I come in peace, you come in pieces!
- SHEILA KIMANI
Walking from the woods, he made his debut on earth on
December 30, 1975. He was born in Cypress, California.
He later became a professional golfer whose
achievements to date rank him among the most
successful golfers of all time. Currently, he is the
World Number One; he was the highest-paid
professional golfer in 2008.
He has won 14 professional major golf
championships, the second highest of any male
player (Jack Nicklaus leads with 18), and 71
PGA Tour events, third all time. He has more
career major wins and career PGA Tour wins
than any other active golfer.
He is the youngest player to achieve the career
Grand Slam, and the youngest and fastest to win
50 tournaments on tour. Additionally, he is only the
second golfer, after Jack Nicklaus, to have achieved a
career Grand Slam three times.
Who is this athlete?
Which country does she play for?
Answers on page 8
May 16, 2010
4 Sunday Nation
May 16, 2010
Sunday Nation 5
Hawa Mukabi,
Umoja Springboard
Academy
Zawadi kerubo,
Byfaith Junior School
Teacher told us that a
child has the right to
food, shelter, education
and good health.
So if the proposed
constitution they are
talking about guarantees
this rights, then I am ok
with it.
Ann Ayuma,
Innercore Bethel View
I have not read
theproposed
constitution but from
what I have heard, it
is a very good one.
But I have also heard
that it allows killing of
babies before they are
born. I do not want that
part.
‘What we
know about
the proposed
constitution’
Pauline Wangari,
The constitution
contains the rules
that we as citizens
must follow. I know
the proposed
constitution
addresses issue to
do with the rights of
children. So it must be
good.
Umoja Springboard
Academy
Know your rights
I hope they could
write the proposed
constitution in very
simple English for
children so that they
too can read it. The one
people are reading has
no pictures so I cannot
understand anything.
I think the proposed
constitution will
bring positive
changes in Kenya.
My parents believe
the constitution is
good so I know my
parents will not want
something bad for the
By Patricia Mundia
The law in relation to the youth
N
O
Hope Omondi,
Law Student at Catholic University
of Eastern Africa
ational Youth Policy
defines youth as
persons resident in
Kenya in the bracket
of 15-30 years. The Policy states
the rights, responsibilities
and obligations of the youth.
However, the Policy has no
binding force on either the
Government or the society. The
UN General Assembly defines
the youth as those persons
between the ages of 15 and 24
years. The World Bank describes
youth as that time in a person’s
life between childhood and
adulthood. The term youth in
general refers to those who
are between the ages 15 to
25. The Commonwealth Youth
Programme works with young
people aged 15 to 29 as its
definition of youth. Activities of
the youth include; engaging in
small businesses, studying and
socialising, amongst others.
The youth are most vulnerable
to: poverty, unemployment,
Absalom Odhiambo,
ne beautiful morning, I
woke up and ran to the
bathroom. I washed
and dressed quickly and ran
downstairs for breakfast. Why
the hurry? This was the day
my father promised us a trip to
visit Mr Okiomo’s farm. After
we all finished with breakfast
at nine o’clock, we got into the
family car ready to set off. My
father, who was always serious,
was in a jovial mood.
We drove through the
countryside where we saw
many cows and goats. After
30minutes, we arrived at
our destination. We were
received by a young man
whom I assumed was the son
of our host, Mr Okiomo. My
assumption was proved wrong
when my mother said, “Hallo
Mr. Okiomo? How are you,
thank you for inviting us.” I
nearly jumped out of my skin, I
did not expect a young man to
own a farm!
When Mr Okiomo took us
round his farm, I noticed that
he had 30 cows and that 20
of them were heifers. He told
us that each cow gave him 20
litres of milk. His sheep were so
many that I gave up trying to
count them. “How many sheep
do you have?” I asked. “I have
50 sheep,” he answered.
I have heard that if we
have a new constitution
Kenya will be a great
country. So I wish that
people vote for the draft
so that children can have
a good place to live.
Innercore Bethel View
Children and the law
By ALBRIGHT B. MANYONGE
A visit to the farm
Umoja Springboard
Academy
Bill Karimi,
Innercore Bethel View
My dad has been
talking about going
to vote for a new
constitution. I don’t
want him to go to vote
because it might make
people fight.
STDs/HIV and AIDS, lack of
education, armed conflict,
suicide, crime and child
prostitution etc. The law in
Kenya is insufficient in provision
for the youth. However, Kenya
has ratified the International
Committee on Economic, Social
and Cultural Rights (ICESCR)
which makes provisions for the
youth. The preamble to the
ICESCR provides that the ideal
of free human beings enjoying
freedom from fear and want can
only be achieved if conditions
are created whereby everyone
may enjoy his economic, social
and cultural rights. Article 6 of
the same convention recognises
the right to work, which
includes the right of everyone
to the opportunity to gain his
living by work which he freely
chooses or accepts, and will take
appropriate steps to safeguard
this right.
Article 10 of the ICESCR
provides that special measures
of protection and assistance
should be taken on behalf of
all children and young persons
without any discrimination for
reasons of parentage or other
conditions. Children and young
persons should be protected
from economic and social
exploitation. Their employment
in work harmful to their morals
or health or dangerous to
life or likely to hamper their
normal development should be
punishable by law. States should
also set age limits below which
the paid employment of child
labour should be prohibited and
punishable by law.
Article 10 of the same
covenant states that every
person has a right to education.
It has emerged that that the
right to education does not
only provide for basic education
but also provides for tertiary
education.
[email protected]
HELA
The ‘Kiswahili’ name
for one cent is
hela. The name
has its origins
in the German
name for coin,
heller. Hela
is a one cent
coin and 10
hela make 10
cents. `To make
one shilling, you
need 100 hela. The
use of the hela coin
was discontinued
in Kenya in the late
1960s.
Sports Quiz
Please send comments or
contributions to [email protected]
Animal sounds that you may
not know:
1. Flies buzz
2. Giraffes bleat or grunt
Next we visited the 10-acres
where he planted his crops.
We saw how the vegetables
were irrigated and he
explained that he had just
harvested kale, spinach,
carrots, aubergines, asparagus,
artichokes, cougettes, leeks,
lettuce, cauliflowers and
cucumbers.
After touring the farm,
Mr Okiomo invited us to his
house. When we got into
compound, I saw five dogs
and I ran and screamed very
loudly. He assured me that the
dogs would not bite me. In his
house, he gave us mango juice.
As we drank the juice, he told
us his life story. He said that he
did not know his parents and
he had grown up in the streets.
When he was 12 years old, he
was adopted by a couple who
died when he was 27 and left
him the farm. When he finished
telling the story, I recalled how
miserable his childhood was
before he was adopted, and an
adage came to mind, “Every
cloud has a silver lining.” The
visit to Mr Okiomo’s farm
was the most exciting and
memorable experience in my
life. I would love to live on a
farm like him.
- Manyonge is a Standard
Seven pupil at Providence
Academy
3. Tigers roar or growl
4. Tortoises grunt
5. Hawks scram
-Mercy Gakii
A woman is driving to Disney World when she
sees a sign that says: “Disney World Left.”
So she turned around and went home.
Teacher: Joe, can you count up to 20 please?
Joe: I don’t know how, but I can count up to 10
twice!
Snake 1: Are we poisonous?
Snake 2: I don’t know. Why do you ask?
Snake 1: I just bit my tongue!
Lima: I wonder what life would have been like
200 years ago?
Jill: History lessons would have been shorter!
Julia: What did the alien say to the puzzle?
Bob: I don’t know!
Julia: I come in peace, you come in pieces!
- SHEILA KIMANI
Walking from the woods, he made his debut on earth on
December 30, 1975. He was born in Cypress, California.
He later became a professional golfer whose
achievements to date rank him among the most
successful golfers of all time. Currently, he is the
World Number One; he was the highest-paid
professional golfer in 2008.
He has won 14 professional major golf
championships, the second highest of any male
player (Jack Nicklaus leads with 18), and 71
PGA Tour events, third all time. He has more
career major wins and career PGA Tour wins
than any other active golfer.
He is the youngest player to achieve the career
Grand Slam, and the youngest and fastest to win
50 tournaments on tour. Additionally, he is only the
second golfer, after Jack Nicklaus, to have achieved a
career Grand Slam three times.
Who is this athlete?
Which country does she play for?
Answers on page 8
May 16, 2010
6 Sunday Nation
It’s story time
The hare and the elephant
L
ong time ago there
lived an elephant
and an impala. The
two were good friends and
each had a son. However,
one day a dispute arose
between the two over
whose son was more
handsome. Sadly, they
started fighting and in
the end impala was dead.
Angered by the death
of his mother the young
impala sought revenge. He
combed all the bushes in
search of the young elephant.
At last he discovered the elephant’s son asleep,
“This is my chance,” he said. The impala pierced the
young elephant’s belly with his horns and he bled
to death. When mother elephant learnt what of her
son’s death, she was enraged. She vowed to punish
young impala. On finding him, elephant charged
impala but it ran away. “Kubuu! Kubuu! Kubuu!”
elephant’s footsteps echoed in the forest as she ran
after the frightened impala.
Impala ran past giraffe’s homestead. The giraffe,
who was tending his crop asked, “Young impala,
why are you running so hard?”
“Elephant is after my neck because she killed
my mum. I killed her child in revenge. “Come into
my house and have some sweet potatoes and sour
milk,” the giraffe said.
When elephant approached giraffe’s home, he
called out, “Jambo giraffe! Have you seen young
impala today?”
“Oh Yes! He’s in my house eating my potatoes
and milk as if he’s helped working on my farm.” The
young impala took off
with the elephant hot on
his heels.
When impala came to
hare’s house he found
him outside playing a
harp. Hare liked impala
and invited him in. Before
long, elephant arrived and
asked, “Mr. Hare have you
seen young impala?” she
asked. Hare ignored him
and continued to play his
music. “Mr. Hare! Answer
me or I will throw you up
that tree,” Hare ignored and went on singing. Angry
elephant grabbed the hare and threw him up the
Lusiola tree. Hare went on with his music while he
was stuck up on one branch. “If you still refuse to
answer me, I will uproot this tree and swallow you
and your harp!” Hare was unmoved and continued
playing his harp.True to his word, the elephant
uprooted the tree and swallowed the hare and his
harp. But if the elephant thought he was done with
the hare, he was wrong.
While in his stomach, hare used a penknife he
always carried to find his way out – he cut open
the elephant’s stomach. Elephant was surprised he
heard hare’s music coming from somewhere behind
him. He looked around and saw hare alive, sitting
a short distance away, playing his harp happily
singing “Tweeng, nyumba ya khotsa, tweeng, iunya
lukano, tweeng…” Frustrated and in pain, elephant
walked away and decided to forget about young
impala.
- RUFAA SHEIKH AHMED
Send us an interesting, ‘It’s Story Time’ to Young Nation, P.O. Box 49010, 00100, Nairobi or email at [email protected]
Mambo
What can you
serve but
never eat?
Compiled by
MWORIA MUCHINA
The Middle
Eastern bee
makes a petal
sandwich nest
N
ot all bees live in wax beehives,
some live in nests lined with
colourful flower petals. The Middle
Eastern bee (Osmia avoseta) is a solitary
bee species. Females build nests under the
ground. They then line the nest’s chambers
with colourful flower petals. The female
then plasters a layer of claylike mud onto
the petals and finishes the lining with
another layer of petals, essentially creating
a petal sandwich.
The bees then deposit a nutritious mix of nectar
and pollen on the chamber floor, lay an egg, and
seal the chamber up by carefully folding the petals
at the top and sealing it with mud. This nest then
hardens, thus protecting the egg against
predators. This nest also help keep
humid air in, therefore the food the
mother leaves behind for the
larvae remains moist and
soft. The nests even float
like bubbles if they
get washed out
from the ground.
That’s easy
a voley ball
Playground gag
gag
Playground
SERIES
Playground gag
[email protected]
Sudoku
Crossword
Easy Sudoku
CROSSWORD CLUES TO YN
The rules of Sudoku are quite simple. You are presented with a 6x6
grid of boxes, some empty, some filled with numbers in the range of
1 to 6. That gives you 2 rows, 3 columns and also 2 larger squares of
2x3 boxes.
The idea of Sudoku is to completely
fill the empty grid squares with
numbers in such a way that the
following conditions hold true:
1) Every row should contain the numbers 1
to 6 but should not repeat the numbers 1 to
6 at any point within that row.
2) Every column should contain the
numbers 1 to 6 but should not repeat the
numbers 1 to 6 at any point within that
column.
3) Every 2x3 square should contain the
numbers 1 to 6 but should not repeat the
numbers 1 to 6 at any point within that
square.
�
0048
ACROSS:
1. The woody core of an ear
of maize on which the seeds
are set
3. Definite article
6. One who directs persons
to seats in a church, cinema
etc
7. To find fault with
continually
8. A female sheep
9. To swindle
11. Label or card attached for
identification
13. Beneath or below
14. A popular non-alcoholic
drink
15. Vast ages
DOWN:
1. An air-tight
�
sealed metal vessel
for preserving
liquids or foods
2. The largest
�
��
traditional kingdom
of Uganda
��
3. A special room
in a hospital where
��
medical operations
are carried out
4. To chop as a tree
with an axe
5. Poetic for before
9. To abridge as a passage or
book
�
�
�
�
�
�
��
��
��
10. United
12.A weapon with a metal
tube through which bullets
are discharged
May 16, 2010
Sunday Nation 7
QoÄssÄ aqo|
ÖwÇv ]ZWdS
with
Tim [c\gW
Kamuzu Banda
Title: A good Question
Author: Mary M. Mwangangi
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Reviewer: NYANDUAKI OKONGO SHEILA
Ereng, a boy who rarely spoke in class, is picked to share his eventful
mid term holiday with his classmates. In his narration, he speaks about
a perfect Friday morning gone sour when he witnesses a thief leaving
his neighbour’s house with a stolen tricycle. Eager to prevent the
crime from going unnoticed, he alerts his mother who later informs the
police and after an identification parade, where suspects are lined up
for identification, Kamzungu is put in a cell. The pupils applaud Ereng
for his bravery and the class continues as the pupils come up with
good questions on vandalism and crime creating a discussion forum.
Meanwhile, elsewhere, Kamzungu’s awful life behind the walls of the
prison cell is brought to our attention as he waits to be taken to court.
We also get to meet a few of his cell mates like Mambo, who has been
familiar with the place for some time and so educates Kamzungu on the
dos and don’ts.
A lot of societal ills are
revealed in conversations the
suspects have with each other
like the grim consequences of
illegal brews, child molestation
and burglary. Just when the
event of that holiday was starting
to fade from the mind of Ereng
and his mother, the inspector
comes with the news that they
would be needed to pose as
witnesses in court for Kamzungu’s
case. Will Ereng be brave enough
for this too? What would be
Kamzungu’s fate in the long run?
This book grips you from start to
finish with its interesting content
and lessons to ponder on. What
comes out clearly is that we should
not fear reporting to the authorities
about crimes committed against us or against other people. It may help
make the world a safer place for everyone. Have fun reading!
So you want to be a manager? Ruth Karanja, School Manager at
Multiple Academy, Kirinyaga, tells you what it entails.
What does the job of a
school manager entail?
Most of my work is to co-ordinate functions in
the school. This means ensuring that pupils are
well attended to and reporting to my director
on future plans like expanding the school. Also,
I deal with hiring of new members of staff and
ensure that our students achieve the best.
What are your hobbies?
I love reading the Bible with others. I also like
visiting Mt Kenya, which is the best place in the
world.
[email protected]
What are some of the qualities
required to achieve in this career?
One needs to be considerate especially in
minding the welfare of poor bright pupils.
Currently, we have awarded scholarships to 15
bright pupils. Other qualities include being a
keen listener and honest as this is what pupils
need to learn from me as their manager.
What are some of the
challenges of the job?
Sometimes pupils are not as many as expected
especially from other parts of the country.
This has been challenging as we would like a
situation where as many students as possible
from other parts country enroll in our school.
So the challenge is to go out and sell the
school to parents all over. We also have to run
the school even when some parents are not
able to pay fees.
What qualification do you
need for this job?
In this job one must at least
have attained a university
degree in Management. A
course in guidance and
counselling comes in
handy. However, for those
in high school, Business
Education, languages
and mathematics are very
essential.
[email protected]
Help the lamb reach
her mother
I
live in Mangu village. What
makes my school break fun is
drawing. At break time, I get
together with my friends who
also enjoy drawing and draw a lot
of pictures. In class I am the best
artist. My dream is to become the
best artist in Kenya. I work hard in
school so I can achieve my dream.
Samuel Kinyanjui Mbugua,
14, Sasumua Primary School,
Menengai West
May 16, 2010
8 Sunday Nation
SOLUTION
Teams strive to win ticket to SA
By CHRIS MUSUMBA
ootball is no longer a past time
event and even the youngest child
would know Didier Drogba or
Christiano Ronaldo. However, for a group
for Kenyan footballers taking part in the
Copa Coca-Cola football championship, it
is not the money they are looking out for
but the chance to display their talent. From
Western, Humphreys Otieno, a 15 year-old
boy and a Form Two student at Kakamega
High School is expectant; he will be able to
explore new ventures.
Otieno had never made a trip to Nairobi.
But because of his perfect dribbling skills,
he got an opportunity to visit Nairobi when
he was picked to represent his school and
later made it to the Western team for the
national competitions. Now he eyes the
rare chance to join millions in South Africa,
not for the World Cup event next month,
but for the International Copa Coca-Cola
championship. “It feels great to be a
member of this team. But making the trip
to South Africa will be a bonus,” he said.
His team mates are equally happy of the
success that their squad has registered in
the competition. “From the school each of
us has made efforts to improve the game.
From break time to games time, every little
chance we get we train and polish on the
skills the coaches has taught us,” said Evans
Maliachi, a Form Two student at Mukumu
Boys’ High School.
In his midfield role, Maliachi is the spine on
F
Western Province Evans Maliachi (left) dribbles
the ball past Central Province George Muchiri
during Copa CocaCola soccer tournament at
City Stadium. Western won 2-1.
Photos/CHRIS OMOLLO
which his team playing strategy is hinged
on. He has forged a good partnership
with striker Douglas Wamalwa of Kimilili
Boys and the two have become partners
in dismantling their opponents’ defences.
Western beat Central to advance to the
semi finals and now the prospects of
making it to the finals were more real than
before. But it is not ending there, the boys
are all optimistic they will be in South Africa
to witness as history is made in one of
lifetime when the World Cup starts on June
11 in South Africa. “This is what football has
made me to be. I now have the chance to
explore and see other people and cultures.
But it is important to work hard in class
and train hard too whenever you have the
chance,” said Jackson Macharia of Central
team.
The tournament, started by Coca-Cola,
has been used to scout talents with a view
of developing players for future national
soccer teams. “Everyone wants to travel
abroad and play football. But it is what we
do here at home that will lay the ground
for one’s success in the future,” said Gilbert
Mwangi of Central team.
At the end of the tourney, a squad of 16
most outstanding players will be selected
to represent the country in the International
Copa Coca-Cola championship to be staged
in South Africa. Copa Coca-Cola saw its first
ball kicked in 2008 in Nairobi and last year’s
tournament saw of the six best players
taken to Brazil. Now South Africa beckons.
Crossword
Crossword
SOLUTIONS TO YN 023
SOLUTIONS
TO YN 0048
ACROSS
ACROSS:
1.Arc 3.Dub 6.Obese 7.Pal
1.
Cob 9.Ole
3.The 11.Urn
6.Usher
7.Nag
8.Net
13.Decor
8.Ewe
14.Dot 9.Con
15.Eon11.Tag 13.Under
14.Tea 15.Eon
DOWN:
DOWN
1.Can
2.Buganda 3.Theatre
1.Asp 2.Collect 3.Denture
4.Hew
5.Ere 9.Odd
9.Tea 10.One
4.Use 5.Bet
10.Leo
12.Gun
12.Nun
Sudoku
ANSWERS
Sports Quiz
1. Who is this
golfer?
Tiger Woods
2. Which
country
does he
play for?
USA

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