The Southern Courier, October 8

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The Southern Courier, October 8
No Negroes Elected to New ASCS County Committees
l\10NTGOMERY -- �e­
gro ca n d ida te s d idn't do
much b e tte r i n th eAl a ba­
rna ASCS e l e c t io n s th i s
ye a r th a n
ye a r.
According
10
th e y
did
last
alternates, The white community com­
pIe joined in,
mitteemen easily outvoted the Negroes.
curiosity."
It seem ed like a discouraging end to
the latest figures from
bilization and Conservation Service, no
Negroes were elected to the powerful
ASCS county committees,
new c ounty committeemen. Another 76
Negroes were selected as alternates,
Last year, there were 1 1 Negro com­
munity committeemen and
85
alter­
nates,
In Lowndes County, where past elec­
were thrown out and three new
But he also said that much more
"The whole thing Is education," he
weeks of work by civil rights groups,
lay did some good. "We wouldn't have
said. "So many Negroes went back and
who had convinced a federal court to
had half as many people to win without
sold out, after talking like they were go-
move
the
election back from mld­
One More Chance
But Lewis Black, who coordLnated the
state-wide effort by the ALabama Coun­
cil on Human Relatlons, SNCC, SCLC,
and the National Sharecroppers Fund,
s a lrt he wasn't d isappointed,
"I didn't expect It to be as many as
last year," he said. "Considering ev­
erything,
I think
we did well,"
It gave Ne­
groes a lot of promises and didn't fulfill
them. Negroes are losing hope and go­
Ing back to the old ways,"
"There didn't anybody work as hard
county committeemen chosen, �egroes
put three white men into office, They
this
year,"
Black
added.
"There
did it by electing only three :-;egro com­
weren't as many CR folks In here to
munity committeemen and four :\egro
work anywa).
Not as many young peo-
county's five
community commit­
tees.
�aid, "one Negro had won and five
over again because of a rules viola­
others were winning. We can do bet­
tion the first time around.
teT this time.
county.
We're gonna take that
U we don't do It In Macon,
It can't be done."
The
community
committeemen
postmarked no later than Oct. 2 L, or
elect one new member to the three­
returned to the county office In Tus­
man county committee by majority
kegee on that date.
vote at a count)' convention.
A Civil rights worker who watched
else they
in the trashcan."
Collins said Oct.
25
is the final
the first election ballots counted last
da te for counting ballots In Macon.
month said he thinks �Iacon County
The count)' convention will be Oct.
has a good chance to elect more :-ie­
28,
groes than whites to three of the
:-iov. 1.
and the winner wtll take office
members already In office.
The Negro winners by county: 'WII­
7 alter­
(5 by petition); Lowndes--3 regu­
cox--7 regular (6 by petition),
But It wasn't all the Negroes' fault,
nate
Black
said.
"In Perry County, the
lar, 4 alternate (all nominated by peti­
whites
got their wives to vote. They
tion); Greene-- I regular and I alter­
paper right
one man was listed to vote In seven dif­
ferent beats."
Macon County election is being run
out Monday. They must be sent back,
Or
along with their husbands. In Greene,
"When we stopped counting," he
State ASCS director B. L. Collins
ballot
were listed there In the
county committeeman this year. The
said the new ballots will be mailed
"The morale is different, The move­
ment ISleavlng Alabama,
M ONTGO�IERY -- Negroes have
one more chance to elect an ASCS
Ing to !"aise some sand.
figured It wftn't worth it and threw the
He said he thought the month-long de­
Only 18 Negroes were elected to the
community committees that chose the
It,"
time was needed.
August to mid-September,
the state office of the Agricultural Sta­
tions
There wasn't as much
"Another trick is that they can't vote
in but one new county committee mem­
ber a year," Black pOinted out.
(The
special election In Lowndes County was
held u nder a court order.) "You gotta
have a lot of Negroes pulling together
to get just one man in power.
years,
year.
(both by petition); Marengo--16
alternates (2 by petition).
5 alternate (none by petition); Russell
--10
alternate (none by petition); Choc­
taw--7
alternate
--2 alternate.
One alternate position was won b), a
You can't beat 'em In one
We gotta keep working on educa­
tion."
Dallas, Bullock, Colbert, Houston, Jeff­
erson,
Limestone, :lladison, Pickens,
Tallad�ga, and Tallapoosa,
No Negroes were elected toany posi­
Negroes were nominated for the ASCS
tion at all In Hale, Perr} , and Sumter
communLty committees in two ways: b)'
counties, despite concentrated work b,
p etition
the civil rights groups.
or by the whLte committee
ER
\VEEKEND E DIT I O :-J : OCTOBER 8-9, 1966
Youth In Hospital Says
White Man Beat Him,
But Sheriff Denies It
l\IOKTGOl\IE RY --Law­
y e r Jame s Char l ey, 11, o f
C a mde n, i s ly ing i n St.
J ude's Ho s p i ta l h e r e w i th
a fractured skul l. Hos p i ­
ta l off i c ial s s a y h e ' s l ucky
to be a l i v e .
Cha r l ey e nte r e d C am-,
de n
l\lemo rial Ho s p ita l
t h r e e w e e k s ago. But h e
doe s n't r e m e m b e r i t . H e
was In a coma from a beating he says
On Saturday, Sept. 17, Charley said,
he and a frIend, CUlford Blackmon, 12,
were coming home from school "by the
raUroad tracks by the icehouse."
Two white men came along. Charley
said he recognized one of the men, who
said, "There's that nigger that comes
the flIUng station and buys drinks
all the time."
Then, Charley said, the man attacked
him.
When his friend ran away, they"shot
at him," Charley said. "They shouted
'Look at the damn nigger go. ' "
Then "they beat m e u p and [sorta
walked off a bit an' I fell."
C harley
remember� faIling on the
rocks and dirt_
The next thing he re­
m embers is "the floor of th� amhulance." A passe r by had seen him I) Ing
by the railroad tracks and called the
police.
attacking
He was taken at firsl to Camden
Memorial Hospital.
"There's nothing in the world to it,"
scld Wilcox C ount)' Sheriff p. C." Lum­
(CDGM).
mie" Jenkins. "We don't know how in
C DGM i s the s tate-wide Head Sta r t p r o gr a m run by
�egro e s from th e top o n down.
La te l a s t we ek, i t s
l e a de r s lea r ned th a t a new, bi-ra c i a l board h a d bee n
formed to r un a nti-pove r ty progr a m s in Mi s s i s sip p i .
C DGM, wh i c h h a s reac h e d m o re tha n 1 3 , 0 0 0 children
through 121 ce nte r s s i nc e l a s t !\la r ch , c a me to the end
of i t s gra nt in m i d-Septe m b e r. The H e a d Start group
the world he (Charley) was hurt, but
no white people had anything to do with
It.
He got hurt, and his folks want to
make i t appear that some whites did
it."
Jenkins said that some"nigger boys"
had been playing where Charley was
found.
accused.
He was just layin' there.
He couldn't talk or nothing. I wouldn't
think he'd be living now,"
The nextFriday--almost a week after
regained conscious­
Because the doctors thought
he needed brain surger)', he was brought
Now the doctors think
he may not have to have an operation
But he will be hospitalized
for a long time.
With the statement was a letter from OEO lawyer Donald Baker.
trained and unskilled, under conditions of Inadequate facllltl(!s." The letter also
said CDGM officials "have shown themselves unable to benefit either from ex­
perience or assistance."
nled even seeing Charley on the day of
the beating.
A nine-page list of Irregularities found b) OEO Investigators was sent along,
"I don't know anything
too.
about it," he said.
Sues
In Miss. Boycott
B Y GAIL FALK
GRENADA, Miss. -- Civil
that CDGM did not hire enough professional help.
CDGM oftlclals said this week t!.at there are good explanations for mostof the
charges. The OEO report says, tor example, that a woman was paid for working
In a Head Start center during eight weeks she was at a training school in Kansas.
St .. ff member David Emmons explained that although the woman was on a pre­
liminary list for the Kansas program, she did not �o at the last minute.
rights
But the ottlcials also said answering the charges one by one wouldn't make
leaders keep saying that if Negroes stay
for an "open city" to keep from going
broke,
But last week one white store owner
tried another way of saving his busi­
A. G,
Corporation,
owner of
Pak 'n' Sak groceries In Grenada, sued
the Grenada
County Freedom
Flower Baptist Church, New Hope Mis­
Baptist Church, St. Vincent
Grenada citizens for $962,134.
Pak
much difference. They said OEO's move to set u p a new, bi-racial group called
downtown stores long enough,
Grenada will have to give In to demands
'n' Sak got a court order last
Mississippi
JESSE A LLEN (II\' DOORWAy)
BUILT
·
·
BY VIOLA BHADFOHD
SE LMA
The ex-candidate wouLdn't talk about
F r e edom
Samso n C r um
c a ndidate
i s no l o ng e r i n the r a ce fo r
cery court Ln Grenada takes upthe case
sheriff of Dallas County.
Pak 'n' Sak, except as permitted by a
federal court order last summer.
But the Rev. S. P. CUnningham, pastor
(CONTINUED ON PAGE TWO, Col. 3)
Crum was chosen to run ior sherUf
by the Dallas County Independent Free
Voters Organization
(DCIn'O)
at Its
county convention �Iay 3. But this week
he sent a letter to Probate Judge Ber­
nard A. Reynolds, asking that his name
•
f,n
� �:
u
.
Although the new group was chartereJ
by Governor Paul B. Johnson Sept. 13,
there was no public knowledgeof it until
the story leaked to the press Sept, 30.
Eleven of the proposed
18
members
of MISSissippi Action for Progres� have
He sent questioners to
didn't say so, but Crum might have lost
been selected. These members are stili
his job If he had stayed In the race for
unwilling to give any information about
DCIFVO.
sheriff.
how the group was started, although
his reasons.
"On behalf of the Negro people of Dal­
las County, he withdrew," Williams
said.
"Crum felt that It was best to get
out of the race because of his position
with the post office. It would hinder him
from having an active campaign."
Federal law forbids government em­
the Balcony
BY MARY WISSLER
BIRMINGHA M -...: M r s.
Geo r ge C. Wallac e , Dem­
o c ra tic c a ndidate fo r gov­
e r no r,
kicked
off h e r
c ampa i g n l a st week w i th a
s e gr e gated ra l ly in M u n i ­
The main floor of the auditorium was
5,000
foot­
stamping, flag-waving Wallace
fans.
packed
But
50
with
more
"There were a lot of people who had
high hopes of Crum being In the race,"
Williams said.
"IT he were running,
than
Negro visitors, most of them
from Miles College, were shuttled in
through a side entrance and up to the
OEO officials admit they,made the tirst
contacts.
Temporary
board
chairman Owen
But this Is
Cooper explained that Ihe b'OUP is not a
The DCIFVO chairman said Crum Is
money from the goverllnlPllt, he said,
we could win hands down,
public agency now. lithe buard receives
his own decision."
"seriously concerned about the people
then it will talk,
His withdrawal will
CDGM's Mudd charged lhat the mem­
only mean a strong return in the tu­
bership of the new board shows 01· 0 b
of Dallas County.
willing to back awal from its pollcy of
ture."
What did that mean?
"Crum ls plan­
nlng on running for that same position In
the next general election," said Wil­
giving the poor a real �a�
in running
antI-poverty programs.
The three men who slbned the charter
liams. He also said the freedom organi­
are all wealthy white men.
zation will not-support any candidate for
Yazoo City Industrialist,
Cooper Is a
Leroy Percv
sheriff Since Crum Is out of the race.
Is a landowner trom an oLd Delta plan­
"This
tation tamll}.
independent organization does
not endorse or support any candidate but
their own," Williams explained. "We
urge people to vote their own convic­
tions."
In Dallas County, that means choosing
cipal Auditorium.
between racial moderate Wilson Baker,
the Democratic Party nominee,
and
segregationIst Sheriff Jim Clark, run­
ning as a write-in candidate.
Williams said Crum feels that his
withdrawal "will give more support to
Hoddlng Carter m is a
Greenville newspaper publisher,
In Its refusal of funds to CDG�I, OEO
said that the new board will Include six
poor p eople later on,
The original
charter gives the three signers the pow­
er to appoint all th. other board mt!m­
bel'S.
Most of the Negro hoard memlJers ot
Mississippi Action tor Progress have
been heavily pressured to \\ithdraw by
supporters
ot CDGM,
who say OEO
would have to re-fund CDGM If there
emp<y balcony.
the other Negro candidates." They are:
Mlles faculty members who accompa­
sor; Horace GrUftn Sr., tor tax collec­
to run a Head Start program in �l1ssls­
tor; A. D. Bush, Wilmer Walker, Mrs.
sippi.
Most of the Negroes, and the 15 white
nied them, arrived more than an hour
before the Wallaces were
While
to speak.
people wearing Wallace pins,
hats, and armbands streamed through
the lobby on the main floor, the Negroes
were told those seats were"reserved."
The bl-raclal group was led upstairs.
They had the balcony to themselves
untll all the seats downstairs were ml­
ed,
WALLACES GREETED FANS ON THE MAIN FLOOR OF THE AUDITORIUM
of any specific political party, Williams
CDGM's democralically elected board
I ectors,"Said CDGM directorJOhn
Clarence Wllllams Jr., chairman oUhe
ployees from working openly on behalf
be taken off the ballot.
But the Negroes Had to Sit Upstairs
T HE
Action for Progress, Inc., shows that OEO didn't want to re-fund
CDGM.
S am· son Crum W 1 thdraws
From DaIIas Sherl fir Race
Justice Neville Patterson. Until chan­
In December, Judge Patterson said, the
THIS CDGM CENTER IN ST. MARY.
"The Action for Progress in Mississippi group was formed in secrecy, without
NOW HE DOESN' T K N O W WHETHER IT WILL GET A PROGRA�I OR NOT.
-�..;,.�;..;
;;..;;.;;;.;;.;.�
..;.;;;..;;; ...;.;.;;..;.;.;.;;.;.....;.;-.;.;�,;;,;-----;
---.;,...----------.;,...----..., any consultation whatsoever with
week from Mississippi Supreme Court
defendants must not boycott or picket
The Ust included charges that employees were paid for work they didn't do,
that cars rented with government money were used for non-CDGM business, and
Pak 'n 'Sak
SCLC,
He charrpd
that "In most centers CDGM amounts at best to custodial day-care by persons un­
The man said the same thing. Hede­
of Be11 Flower Church and president of
Meanwhile, the man Charley accused
ter the funds and programs In the proposed grant.' "
Jenkins said the man has
Chapel and about 67 SCLC workers and
after all.
said, "The Director of OEO Is under a legal as well as moral obligation not to
all day.
ness.
to continue and expand its program during the next )'ear.
finance any group which has failed to 'demonstrate that It Is qualified to adminis­
"friends" who say that he was at work
out of
$20,300,000
In turning down this request Sunday, the federal Office oC EconomIc Opportunity
about the Incident to the man Charley
"and
to st. Jude's.
applied for
" Some of his own cronies could
probably have done It."
sionary
ness.
ove r M i s s i s s i pp i a l l s umm e r f i na l ly broke thi s week,
OE 0 a nnounc e d th a t i t w il l not g ive any more mo n e y to
the p re s e nt Child De ve l o pme nt Group of M i s S i s s ippi
him Is walking around
his mother, Mrs, Carrie Charley said,
the beatlng--he
BY GAIL FALK
JAC KS O N , l\li s s .--A s t o r m wh ich h a s b e e n gath e r ing
without criminal charges against him.
Movement, B & P Supermarket, Bell
Everyone thought he was going to die,
I did, too.
NO MONEY FOR CnGM
The sheriff said that he had spoken
two white men gave him.
to
of
TEN CENTS
OEO Decides:
•
BY ROBERTA REISIG
(none by petition);
Washlngton--4 alternate; :llontgomery
THE SOUTHE
VOL. 11, NO. 4 1
12 alternate
Monroe--3 regular,
(none by petition); Clarke- -4 regular,
Negro In each of the (ollowlng counties:
"They got tricks they been using for
100
nate
Then some white people tried to
find seats In the balcony, and word
(CONTINUED ON PAGE SIX, Col. 5)
Mrs. Addie Lily, running for tax asses­
Agatha Harville and Roosevelt McEl­
were no other bi-raclal group willing
Tougaloo College Pre�ldent George
roy, for district seats on the board ot
Owen, who was originally listed as a
revenue; Mrs. Nona Day and George
board member, said he would not st'rve.
Sa1l1e, board of education, and Nathan
That leaves five Npgroes on the board,
Including Aaron Henry, state NAACP
F, Payne, for coroner.
The
DCIFVO
candLdates for 28th dis­
trict state representatlve--Jlmmle
Stanley for place
1
L.
and Mrs. Pearl
president.
Henry said, In detense of hls partici­
pation,
that OEO officials told him
for place 2--were rUled otf
COG M could not be re-tunded. "I rea­
the Nov. 8 ballot by Probate Judge Rey­
lized that we were talking abou t a pro­
Moorer
nolds.
(CONT INUED ON
PAGE TWO, Col.
5)
PAGE TWO
Rights Leader Given Georgia Election
Six-Month Sentence
Causes Uproar
THE SOUTHERN COURIER
ROOM 1012. FRANK LEU BUILDING
MONT GOMERY. ALABAMA 36104
PHONE: (205) 262-3572
THE SOUTHERN COURIER Is published weekl y by a non- profit, non- share edu­
cation corporation, for the study and dissemination ofaccu rate Information a bout
events and affairs in the field of human relations.
10� per copy, $5 per year In the South, $10 per year elsewhere In the U .S.,
patron subscription $25 per year used to defray the costs of prln Ung and publica­
P rice:
tion. Second- class postage paid at Montgomery, A labama.
Editor: Michael S. Lottman
Lay-out E ditor: A my R. Peppler
Norman W arren
the circuit court h ere,
'Do you �ear this officer cu rsing me:
34, He was
8-9. 1966
Editorial Opinion
For the last six months, CDGM was where the action
was in Mississippi.
It was the single most valuable
project that ever wheedled a few thousand dollars out
Economic Opportunity.
CDGM was
grass roots from the ground up. Its Head Start cen­
ters were organized and run by local Negroes who
knew
the problems and learned how to fight them.
Maybe that was why OE 0 decided not to re-fund the
Child Development Group of Mississippi. It was too
good.
It scared the politicians, who prefer programs
headed by big names and big committees that guarantee
plenty of inaction.
In announcing its decision Sunday, OE 0 issued a list
of reasons. Most of them are petty and some are in­
Not that CDGM didn't make mistakes.
Bonner sa id the children were "afraid
the Russians, He just turned scallywag,
dren,
"Scatter,
you little niggers."
of the white pOlicemen, and were run­
ning
a cross
a
busy
main
st reet,"
After he had dismissed the demon­
strators, Bonner said, Willie Horton,
a Negro pOliceman, took him aside and
Ignerant, this was proven
by one of
Congressman
Democrats,
including
Charles Weltner, found
they could not support him.
This week Weltner withdrew from the
fifth district Congressional race, say­
Ing,
"I cannot compromise with ha­
Ired."
bany publisher James Gray, a segrega­
tio nist olJPonent In
the
primary,
as
chairman of the state Democratic Par­
ty.
Maddox, who
from
laborer
worked his way u p
to wealthy restaurant
owner, has lost three mayor's races
CDGM
Ends
(CONTINUED FROM P A G E ONE)
gram Involving 10,000 children, the ma­
jority of which are
Negro, and some
lied the total support of rural and work­
Ing-class whites,
With resentment high against school
desegregation guidelines and A tlanta's
recent racial troubles hammered away
a t by campaigners, the stage seemed
set for a hugh backlash vote. Th e elec­
tion results left many people convinced
that liberal A rnall had walked right Into
It,
Before
the
run-Off,
though,
there
were ru mors that " mad Democrats"
who switched to the R epubUcan party
In
1964 were planning to vote for Mad·
dox In the primary (R epublicans can
v ote In the Democratic primary, since
they have none of their own). Maddox
would be easlly defeated In the general
el ection, the ru mors went, because the
cross-overs would air go back to the
RepubUcan Callaway.
Observers say that this cross-ov er
vote actually took place, since in many
instances the same v oters who chose
Maddox over Arnall el ected George T.
Negro. I did not feel It was the respon­
go by default."
Henry also questioned CDGM's policy
tea chers.
people as Head Start
He said he didn' t think they
fluent society,"
The
con troversial CDGM program,
which has been under a ttack for months
by Mississippi S enators James O. East­
land and John StenniS, has been a seri­
ous problem to OEO at a time when the
whole anti-poverty program is fighting
regationist, P eter Zack Geer, In the
H these voters had really been for
Maddox, the theory goes, they w ould
h ave also voted for Geer.
If the cross-over vote goes back to
C allaway, as it was supposed to, Mad­
d ox's chances would be considerably
l ess. Now Ihat Maddox has emerged as
the backlash champion, though, n o one Is
sure the voters won't stick by him.
In fact, It's a good question now where
Callaway, once regarded as almost un­
crats," including the white blo c v ote,
chinks in our armor."
Birch conservatives, back In the Dem­
Presbyterian Church In
doing
Negro
churches
as
members.
"Once weaknesses started to appear
shall P eck In Washington , " those were
Thousands of telegrams and l etters
in lavor of the program were written to'
At the meeting In Enterprise, Hay­
OEO by CDGM parents, teachers, and
terian Church of Tuskegee promised to
the program had few poUtically power­
good said, the ail- white First P resby­
other friends during the last month. But
fu supporters,
end its pollcy
of racial segregation.
harmony with
welcoming all persons
of CDGM, once a civil rights worker,
Haygood reported. First Presbyterian
Ing his businessman's tle and dark suit.
kegee which
clothes again and start poUlical orga­
" ThE' church has gone on record in
regardless of race, color, or class ,"
worshippers this summer.
It may dema nd great sacrifice. A meri­
younger
candidate, who " stand s u p for Georgia"
a n d for "law and order," Maddox ral­
(In CDGM)," said OEO spokesman Mar­
na­
measure of success. There Is no st.ort
out paying your du es.
eral
This time a round, casting himself
In his old r01e as the common man's
--had agreed to go along with the
usually cooperated In helping, the chil­
The whol e emphasis on early treat­
poUticlans ramed a round Maddox, sev­
" F ree Enterprise.")
b ea table, will turn for votes. Maddox
was one of three white chu rches In tus­
You cannot get something very often.
some of our Boys alld
1965,
IntelI1gence and strength of character.
ment of mental or emotional disturban­
Yes,
In
and ordering white presbyteries to ac­
G irls make mistakes like some In the
While the state's old-line Democratic
property and laid under It the coffin of
for Its life.
cept
cut to success, success depends on hard
with a man more conservative than he Is.
35-
foot-high monument on the restaurant
he said, the Alabama Synod--state gov­
tional
work, you cannot go through Life with­
feeling.
of whHe churchmen.
away wlth separate Negro presbyte,rles
missed because of trips to the hospital.
can nominee, will have to fight It out
could give children " the beneflls of af­
" There were no re­
It was a very good thing."
er in-patient or out- patient treatment a t
dren to make up any work that was
Howard "Bo" Callaway, the Republi­
ter the meeUng.
erning body of the P resbyterian Church
treat colored any way without regard to
Congressman
of hiring poor
synod," Haygood explained,
enjoy We, one must have some
Instead of facing
opponent,
the Rev. Lawrence F , Haygood, pastor
"The commHtee then recommended
To
liberal
(To make
sure no one forgot, he erected a
l ieutenant governor's race,
that the presbytery go along with the
The main pillars of democracy are
race In a new Ught.
a
groes wh o tried to enter.
sible th'ing to permit this program to
committee
that confront him.
Maddox's v ictory unleashed a storm
of controversy and set the governor's
ness after driving off a group of Ne­
organization at Its meeting in E nter­
Haygood said both Negro chu rches
discharged from school because of eith­
off.
1964, protesting the Civil Rights
Smith, a moderate, over a militant seg­
of
were visited before the meeting by a
He has the courage to let
Arnall In the Democratic primary run­
In
A c t, he closed his fried- chicken busi­
2,000 empl oyees, many of whom are
jections,
what is best,
moderate former Governor Ellis
(all to moderates) In Atlanta, and alsll
a race for lieutenant governor.
Montgomery-­
A venue
of W estminster P resbyterian, said af­
his better judgement decide the Issues
A labama,
should
East Alabama
" W e were very warmly received,"
Most of these studenls kept on with
the Mental Health Institute. The schools
They think whites
Presbytery
prise,
He Is able to judge
sel
nor George Wallace, was to appoint Al­
were welcomed into the local church
He knows how to fit himself to condi­
atier segregationist Lester Maddox up­
Identifies himself with Alabama Gover­
Cleveland
R E V , LAWRENCE F. HAYGOOD
A TLA NTA , Ga. -- Georgia polltlcs
were in a state of disorder this week
The flrst act of the new nominee, who
Two mostly-Negro churches--West­
tions which exist.
Crenshaw Countie's attorneys in a re­
cently court hearing in Montgomery
1)
minster P resbyterian of Tuskegee and
I know of several students who needed
their school work. In no case were they
(CONTINUED ON PAGE SIX, Col.
quietly lowered its color bar last week,
LEITERS TO THE EDITOR
Begots, Inferrler and
" They said I touched the officer, but
I did not," Bonner countered, "I was
P resbytery of the Presbyterian Church
sissippi will be moving out of the Head Start centers.
The politicians will have to answer for where it goes.
Inhuman,
cla imed, "I'd have had t o burn him up."
TUSKEGEE -- The
erty programs are any indication. the action in Mis­
are
I think he's gettlng paid by
"If It'd been my brother ," the judge
East Alabama
sacrificed to political expediency. If other "safe" pov­
the W hite P eople think Colored People
something.
Two Churches Desegregate
Where that leaves the poor people of M ississippi is
a question nobody in Washington has an answer for.
But it is clear that. once again. poor people have been
Some of
of the officer's badges and called him
'It Was A Good Thing'
the whole poverty program.
and especially Luverne Ala.
Judge Burns said Horton w a s a " good
pimp, A commun ist got ahol d ot h lm or
congressmen will be happier. and stop trying to kill
by psychiatric help.
22.
by Judge
after a white policema n told the chil­
Mississippi's senators and
and who profited
sentenced
"really out of line. He took hold of one
the way Washington likes them--without
as they now exist In Crenshaw County
and
ers after their leaders were arrested.
rich people (black and white), is apparently going to
I want to call attentlQn to conditions
convicted,
colored o fficer," a nd that Bonner was
Its
As a Child W elfare Worker In Iowa
The officer then arrested him for
He sald he was called In by the marCh­
19.
gram over to the professionals. The state's mysteri­
ous new bi-racial anti-poverty board, top-heavy with
To the Editor:
I said, 'What is your badge num­
Burns on Sept.
NOW, however. OEO says it's time to turn the pro­
things
Turning a gain to the
loosa Citizens Act ion Committee march
ing, were slow to learn how to please the paper-pass­
ers in Washington. But even OE 0 admits CDGM did a
remarkable job, considering its inexperience.
run
Report It?'
" disorderly conduct." He was tried,
employees, unfamiliar with bureaucracy and bookkeep­
rocking the political boat.
It?
said that he was " setting an example."
BOlUler said he t ried to rest ore order
Jf1Iere the Action Was
What do you think we should do about
Burns,
protest ing slum conditions on Aug,
BY JIM SMITH
"I turned to the grou p a nd asked,
Officer,
, ,,
ber?
Bonner was arrested a fter a Tusca­
October
41
accurate.
city as a police o fficer.
According to Bonner, Judge Burns
R egional Circul ation Mgrs. : George Walker
I then asked If the of­
ficer was cursing a citizen In his capa­
sentenced to six m onths' hard labor for
.. disorderly conduct" has appealed to
fined $IOO-- by Municipal Judge Joe G.
Photography Editor: James H. P eppler
of
"cursed at me.
gIven the unusuall y stiff sentence- -and·
Business Manager: A ndrew CUrtis
,of the Office
BY ROB E RTA R EISIG
TUSCALooSA--A civil rights l eader
The man Is Ross Bonner,
E xecutive Editor: Mary Ellen Gale
V ol, II, No.
OC TOBER 8-9. 1966'
THE SOUTHERN COUHJEB
refused to admit Negro
Last Monday a central staff member
sat In CDGM's downtown office wea r­
"I guess I'U have to put on my oId
nlzlng," he said.
seems to h ave the
1964 " mad Demo­
the small businessmen, and the John
ocratic Party,
Although Callaway could go out to the
far right frontier and battle Maddox
h ead on, his handsome, youthful Image
gives him the best chance wlth young
couples and wHh many sludents (voting
age in G eorgia is
'
18).
To get the l iberal vote, C allaway
would have to make peopl e forget his
civll rights record in Congress, as well
as reckon with the original l1beral-­
A rnall
himself,
who has tentaUvely
agreed to a write-In campaign.
Anti-Poverty Board Ignores the Poor,
whlte Race, but our Hearts are made to
ces wlll receive a severe set-back if
Deed, they forgot that in R econstruc­
labels one as
Class Rooms our People were sent to
one student the right to attend school
the h appiness of mankind, schools and
R eferring to a court case of a few
tate to accept help for fear they also
be encouraged.
week a car pulled u p in lront of a tidy
Two Negro men and a white woman got
blead for every Utile thoughtless act or
treatment In a Mental Health Hospital
ca D emocracy Is founded on education.
tion Days when whites were sent to
Those who use this argument to deny
Ing necessary to good government and
the F ield for them.
days ago one of our Crenshaw County
unfit to attend school.
may find that other students wllI hesi­
may be stigmatized.
We have made
R eligion, moral1ty and knowledge be­
the
cize their school s.
one Negro Boy had ben commited to an
otry and prejudice should undo these
Most
tal health,
Insane Institution.
gains,
Yes the way Negro
Boys and Girls are treated by white
people here In Luverne and in the South,
Its enough to driv e anyone nuts.
It would be a shame if big­
it.
Our Street Lights are just a 11ttle
above that of a Lighting Bug.
H we are so Inferrlor to the Whlte
R ace, why do you call on us to clean
your houses, look after your Children,
and cook your food?
I remember well the
25 Day of De­
cember when my son was arrested by
the Laws o f Crenshaw County taken to
Jail, and in the meantime he taken sick
on the job was brought back to his moth­
year's
th oroughly
su bscription
enjoyed our
to (Your) paper,
I share It wHh my pa rents, then we
pass' It along to a Negro lady who Is
other friends o r relatives who we reel
will be Interested.
The articles are heart-wa rming and
written In such a calm, matter-of-tact
years old, this seem to worrie him, so
pealing and Impressive.
of his mine. The child thought that h e
to work with the SCLC, and It Is due to
did too.
enjoy every Issue. We thank you for
mltted to a Mental Institution and I be­
ported news.
d ltlon.
SO S L OW.
way, which makes them even more ap­
much so, unt1l he can never get it off
My son gave his summer a year ago
lieve this was the sole caus� of his con­
A s the Lawyer referred to his
two fine children, he should remember
I love my son the same as he l ove's his.
We all love our children.
In conclusion I say let us get the mote
that stimulus that we subscribed. We
sending up North this excellently re­
Tbere Is progress, I guess, but It is
Keep up the good work.
Gene Chambers
R iverton, N,J.
out of our own eye, then we can see
clearly how to get the beam 'out of our
neighbor'S eye,
Mrs. Beulah Lowery
Luverne
• • * •
To the Editor:
Great strides have been made in re­
• * * *
To the E ditor:
America has more Interest In educa­
tion than in any of her vast Industrial
corporation. One of the important aims
of education Is \0 combine kn owledge
with an abil ity to use It. Education en­
ables you to think for yourself. Educa­
tion encourages sel f-rel iance and ini­
cent years to encourage people to seek
tiative.
disorders,
done and thought.
early treatment for mental or emotional
We have come a long way
In removing the stigma that used to be
attached to mental Illness.
three picketers were dissatisfied cus­
E duc ation give you the ability
to do and think what you know should be
The rightly edu cated person knows
how to make himself a useful citizen,
tomers. their proposal for a chlld day­
money by the JCCE O, They charged the
anti-poverty board with dlscr1mlnating
To the Editor:
against the poor,
T h is is the best race paper I ever
ra ce to !lght,
the Doctor & he being a chUd 'only 17
This was the first time he was ad­
JCCEO Is the Jefferson Connt y Com­
mittee for Economic Opportunity. The
care center had not been given any
else.
er for medical attention, I taken him to
w a s being mistreated b y the Law, and I
marked JCCEO.
* * * *
read.
Sometimes we share them with
downlown.
forth In front of the building's main door
Midway
workin g for the MissiSSippi Delta fam-
111es, and she passes It on to someone
building
and started walking slowly back and
some kind or some type of student gov­
Miss Mary Lee Cobb
To the E ditor:
brick
afternoon last
out, picked up three red-lettered signs,
American school s today, have
and the gaining of new ones,
* • • *
have
Most human beings learn by doing.
of those talents which an individual has
F airfield
We
one-story
ernment, E ducatlon Is the developmen t
Mrs, Ralph M, Galt
Yes we pay Ught, Sewlge and Gar­
bage BlIIs, and hardly get anything for
BY MARY WISSLER
BmMINGHAM--One
One of the people's rights Is to criti­
much improvement In the field of men­
w omen were Immoral. He also stated
•
means of education shall forever
thought that some of our
attorneys
Says Group Picketing In Birmingham
The l eader of the picketers was the
I would not be without H. Than k
R ev. Johnnie Burrell. Burrell is pres­
you for pu blishing It, I t has brought the
ident ot the Chrlstlan Community Cor­
poration, which wanted to sponsor the
day-care center, and of the S mltht1eld
A. J, Florence
neighborhood advisory councll, which
Dozier
reports the problems of th at community
Grenada Suit Filed
to the anti- poverty board.
After B urrell's proposal was tabled.
(CONTINUED F ROM PAGE ONE)
the Grenada County F reedom Move­
be complained to the board In a letter.
specific
belleve or to assu me that the JCCEO
"We have no other alternative but to
ment, said the federal court order 15 so
that
the slate cou rt order
bas denied our request from a discrIm­
" won't stop us from doing anything we
ina tory POint of View," he wrote, And
a re doing now,"
then he started picketlng.
In the suit, Pak 'n' Sak store manager
"We'll be here every day unUi we get
G llbert Allen says most of his business
sa�slactlon,"
used to be Negro, but now only eight o r
board h ad
ten Negroes come In per day,
A lien
Is
fund our pr9(ram.
asking to be paid back
I don't kno w of any
against the OEO guidellnes.
We want
W a shington to know what's going
,
h ere."
pects to lose in the future,
on
" It's not true that there are no poor
A person cannot be sued for simply
people on the board," replied John H.
choosing not to buy at any particular
Carr, director ofJC CE O. "In any case,
store, But the suit claims Pal< 'n' Sak
the guidelines do not require that the
has a right to get Its money back be­
members
cause SCLC and the others engaged in
be
POOr,"
he e xplained.
"They require that members be poor or
" conspiracy, boycott, interference, and
representatives of the poor,"
restraint of trade" to keep customers
" W e have
out of the store.
$6,000,000 in proposals
that aren't being considered at this time
In
because federal funds are not avaU­
stopping work on the Negro-owned B &
able," Carr said, "Whenever there 15
P Supermarket, by halting vJithdrawals
from B & P's bank account.
"If the
poor people on that board and that's
$66,318 for the bUSiness he has already
lost, $100,000 for the good wlll he has
los.t, and $795,816 for Income he ex­
T h e court order has succeeded
Burrell said.
$100,000,000 they wouldn't
PICKET
IN FRONT OF JCCEO OFF ICE
(photo by Chris
money aVailable, we w1ll certainly con­
Mc!Nair)
sider Burrell's program,"
OC TOBER 8-9, 1966
THE SOUTHERN COURIER
.
PAGE THREE
. .
.
.f
---,� ....
-
.vP ...
'
..
___
.
-: t.... .
"
'.
CLAYTON ALLEY
_ .
You k now it '8 not 'white' becau.se it '8 not paved
......
.. :... -
-.-
Photographs by Jim Peppler
OC TOBER 8-9, 1966
T HE SOUTHER� COCRIEH
PAGE FO(;R
THE PRESIDENT'S HOUSE m SENEGAL
MARKE TPLACE IN NIGERIA
AFRICA
New Nations Struggle to Solve Tough Problems
TEXT AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY LAURA GOD OFSKY
Afrtca is so big that all of the United States, with
an extra Alabama thrown in, wouldnJt even begin to
You could add the whole European conti­
fill it up.
nent, India, Japan, and New Zealand. Even then there
would be some room left over.
Africa seems a long way away from Alabama, but
life in some parts of Africa is very much like life in
Alabama
and
the rest of the United States.
has large Cities, skyscrapers, factories, and supermarkets.
newspapers, slums, and rock-and"-roll.
Africa
II has traffic jams,
II also has small towns, farms, mines, and cotton fields. Among Its people are
mllllonalres and poor folks, teachers and preachers, farmers and truck drivers.
Arabs live In the northern part of Africa, In countries like Algeria, Egypt, and
Morocco.
But southern Africa Is almost all black.
The Negroes of "Black Atrlca" face some of the same problems Negroes do
In Alabama. But they also have special problems of their own.
Most of the nations In Black Africa are less than ten years old. Before they
became Independent nations, they were colonies of several different European
countries.
That means that although most of the people In southern Africa were
black, most of the money and power belonged to a tiny white minority.
But Africa's history didn't begin with Its white rulers. Long before Europeans
moved into Africa, the people who lived there had developed their own way of life.
They
governed
themselves
3fId
produced
art and cultur. 01 their own.
an
Now they are demanding the right to govern themselves again.
MASKS IN ZAMBIA STORE
Ghana, which was ruled by the BrlUsh for many years, was the first black African country to become Independent af­
ter World War n. That happened In
1957. Since then, about 30 other new na­
tions have been formed from the old co­
lonies.
In some Independent countries, just
as In the old colonies, a small group of
white people controls millions of black
people.
In South Africa, the white gov­
ernment has made racial separation the
foundation of Its power.
South Africa's pollcy of segregation,
called "apartheid," Is' something like
segregation In the American South be­
fore the clvU rights laws were passed.
But 11 Is even more thorough, The white
South African government tries to put
black Africans Into special schools and
vlllages and even special sub-countries
MODERN STONE SCULPTURE AT A RESEARCH CENTER IN NIGERIA
Corps
Peace
of their own.
BY PRINCELLA WADE
Bill ::ihurtlcff taught many African
children to read and write when he was
in the Peace Corps.
He first became interested in learn­
ing about Africa while he was a student
at Stanford
University in California.
Atter he graduated, with a degree In physics, he decided
to join the Peace Corps Instead of getting a job.
The Peace Corps sent him t o a small village In East
Nigeria.
There, he lived and worked with the Africans
tor nearly two years.
"I was very impressed with the attitude of the people,"
he sald,
"They were such a refreshing group of people
to live among."
He explained that they took life as It came, never com­
plaining.
They concerned themselves with the basics of
IIvlng--food and shelter.
The majority of the natives were staul\ch Catholics,
Shurtleff said. However, as a tradition they had dltterent
gods to whom they prayed and asked for blessings.
When questioned about their attliude toward him, he
only said, "They were overwhelmed with pride and joy
to have a foreigner come among them to teach their chil­
dren."
He pulled out an envelope of photographs taken In neigh­
boring villages In East Nigeria.
art work.
All the Pictures were of
The photos revealed the highly refined African
skllls of carving and painting.
There were pictures of
elaborate vases, utenSilS, and festive masks.
"Everything they make, regardless of how exquiSite or
how beautiful It may be, Is used dally," he said.
"This
Is unlike Americans who stash their fineries away until
Thanksgiving, Christmas, or Easter."
He sald he brought many of these carvings back to the
United States. He paid
In Africa.
75 cents or less for each of them
Here In America none oUhem have been sold
for less than
$50.
worthwhile," he said proudly. "After all, they will be the
future leaders of their country, and every country needs
Its share of trained leaders."
This brought the discussion to the subject of education
In the vlllage. His tlrst remark was this: "In the entire
two years that I taught at this school, not once dtd I have
to ask the students to be qUiet, or to discipline them In
any respect.
It was a great pleasure to teach there."
He explained that the privilege of an education 15 not
taken for granted.
The average famlly makes $45 a year.
School costs each student
$150 a year.
The education Is so expensive that only those who
afford It attend school.
have colorful scarves on their heads.
easily given up. One reason some of
Africans use their heads to carry
15 because the people feel more loyalty
So black Africans are al­
lowed Into the "white" part of the coun­
try to work.
But they have to live in
special areas. They have no privileges
and few rights under the law. They can­
not vote or partiCipate in the govern­
ment In any way.
There Is a freedom
movement In
South Africa, just as there Is In the
United States. But It faces even greater
OPPOSition.
effort
The
"This Is one thing [feel Is
Many hundreds of black
to hold
on to Its power.
white government of Rhodesia
wants to run things the way the South
African government does. That was why
Rhodesia
declared
lis
Independence
without waiting for Great Britain's ap­
proval. Rhodesia's Independent black­
ruled neighbors are trying to convince
Great
Britain to force Rhodesia Into
making plans to turn the government
over to the country's black majority.
But polltlcs Isn't all of llte In Africa
any more than It Is all of lite In Ala­
o
Like most pe ple around the
bama.
world, Africans spend their lives trying
to make a living and raise their fami­
lies.
Most black Africans are farmers.
They grow enough food or own enough
cows, chickens, and goats to feed their
can
Therefore, unless the child Is
highly intelligent, the father can't risk sendtng the Child.
The chUdren go to high school for five years. At the
end of this period, they must pass a very difficult exami­
nation.
When asked about sex and marriage In East Nigeria,
Although education gives people new
ideas, old ideas and leaders are not
But they could not operate without
ple.
black labor.
Its
He used the profits from these sales to send three young
African men to college.
Women often wear long,
brightly colored skirts or dresses and
tured, and killed by the government In
Teaching In East Nigeria
tlonal clothes.
Ing Industries are owned bl white peo­
Africans have been Imprisoned, tor­
Learns
Worker
N IGE RIAN CHILDREN CARRY FmEWooD HOME
South Africa's rich mines and grow­
families,
When they have to go shop­
ping, even In large Cities, many ot them
go
to
outdoor markets where their
neighbors or special traders sell things
they have made or grown.
Some Africans dress just like people
In Alabama do, but others wear trad-
things. They can carry heavy firewood,
pots, bananas, boxes, Of even pocket­
books on their heads and use their hands
for other
things.
African women tie
their babies to their backs and can eas­
lly carry their youngest children with
them this way.
homes do not have electricity or run­
At night, lanterns or can­
dles give light.
Cooking Is done over
open fires In large pots. Rlce and po­
tatoes are favorite foods. Water often
comes from a nearby well.
Health Is a serious problem In Atrl­
ca.
Many people have diseases that
come from drinking Impure water or
from eating the wrong foods. There are
not enough doctors, nurses, or hospitals
to help them stay well.
The new governments are working to
replace the old family and tribal lead­
ers.
They want the people to turn to
the government for help, and to support
to collect tax money that the people have
paid
to
trIbal
leaders in the past.
At the same time they are building
new nations, many of Atrica's black
leaders are trying to holdon to thespe­
clal things that make Atrlca dWerent
from the res t of the worldo
Africans are quick to point out that
their art and music have already won
respect outside their continent.
tions believe that the success of their
Most of the children who go
freedom 15 very important to the tuture
of black and white people everywhere.
to school stay only three or four years.
Those who want to go on to a high school
or college have to pass very hard tests
before they will be admitted.
Most of the new African nations think
education �s important, and are trying
to build new schools and colleges and
the old ones as fast as possible. Every
year, thousands of new students--adults
and chlldren--are learning to read and
write.
The U. S. Peace Corps Is helping to
education
bring
to
more
Africans.
In Nigeria, one out of every three stu­
dents Is taught by Peace Corps volun­
teers•
.
Shurtleff said, "Just as the moral codes are changing In
America, so It Is there.
The number of lllegitlmate
births Is Increasing yearly."
Marriage, however, Is much as It was In the old days.
The young man has to buy his bride from the father. The
more education she has, the more she costs. The young
men aren't very concerned abouUlndlng an educated wife,
Shurtlet! said.
Instead, the husband's primary concern Is
that his wife be fertile, stong and healthy of body, so that
she can bear him many children.
Shurtleff said that children are so prized that If a woman
has twins, two dolls are carved and put on a shelt
bois.
as
sym­
U one of the twins should dte, one of the dolls Is
taken down from the shelf and bathed and treated just as
the live twin Is treated.
The man's status In the village Is determined by the
number of children he has.
Polygamy (many wives) Is
stlll practiced on the continent.
principal of the local school had
Shurtleff said that the
200 children.
SCHOOLCHILDREN IN LmERIA
And
leaders of the new black African na­
special experiment In democracy and
Africa has too few schools, books, and
teachers.
to their family and their tribe than they
do to the government.
and obey It. The governments also want
Even In large cities, many African
ning water.
Africa's new nations have had trouble
NIGERIAN BOY
OC T O BE R 8-9, 1 9 6 6
P A GE F IV E
THE SOUTHERN C OUR IER
Mac on Loses Two Politicians
LASLIE DIES
One N egro Councilman Resigns in Tuskegee,
BY M ARY ELLEN GA LE
But Another Is , Appointed to Take His Place
TUSKEGEE-- Edward C . LasUe, an
unwavering segregationist who was
chairman c1 the Macon County Board
of Revenue for the last 15 years, died
last saturday in a M ontgomery hospital.
BY
Instead, the present board- -three
whites, one Negro--probably wlll select
a new chairman at Its regular m onthly
meeting M onday. Among the possible
choices are Probate Judge Preston
Hornsby and City Councilman J. A llan
Parke r , president of the A labama Ex­
change Bank. Both are cons idered mod­
erates.
However, the board may choose al­
most any county reSident, other than
one of Its own m embers, to be the
chairman.
Either Parker or Hornsby would be a
change from LasUe. As president of
the City Bank of Tuskegee , Lasue was
one of the strongest leaders In the fight
to preserve white supremacy.
But his grip on the board of revenue
had been loosening for a long time be­
fore his death at the age of 64. llIness
had kept him away from board m eetings
for months, and In his absence the board
slowly began providing services for Ne­
gro as well as white residents.
In the last year the board--pushed by
T uskegee's bl-raclal city council-­
supported the county's anti-poverty
program and the free surplus food pro­
gram.
Laslie was a leader of the Tuskegee
Methodist Church, which for two sum­
mers In a row has locked its doors
rather than allow Negro worshippers to
Join the white congregati on.
WJLD Radio Top
1. DON' T OP E N THE DOOR - ­
B , B. King (ABC)
2. W H A T BEC'OM ES OF'A BRO)(EN
H EAR r- =-Jlm my Ruffin (Soul)
3;-1 WORSHIP THE G ROUND-­
Jimmy Hughes (Fame)
4. TOO MANY TEARDROPS- ­
Joe Simon (S, S,)
5. BUT IT'S A L R IGH T - ­
J. J, Jackson (Calla)
6. YOU CAN'T HUR HY LO\,E-­
Supremes (Motown)
7. KNOCK ON WOOJ)o.. ­
Eddie Floyd (Stax)
M A RY ELLEN GA LE
TUSKEGEE - - The city council lost
one of Its two Negro members last week
and gained another to replace him in
k>ss than 24 hours. But there were
some Indications that the switch dldn't
make everybody happy.
The councilman who resigned was the
Rev. K, L, Buford. He explained that
he was leaving to become state field di­
rector for the NAACP.
" It was a ditricult decision," Buford
said. But 11 didn't surprise everyone
quite as much as It would have before
the Democratic primary electlons last
spring.
During the campatgn Buford, a leader
of Tuskegee's middle-class, conserva­
tive Negroes, spoke out against lucius
D. A me r son, a young Negro running for
sheriff. Buford said that the present
sheriff, Harvey sadler, should be re­
elected.
A fter Amerson won the Democratic
Party nomination, some of Tuskegee's
younger, more mllitant Negro leaders
said that Buford ought to reSign.
But some of those same people were
unhappy last week with the way the city
council m oved to replace Buford.
The morning after Buford's resigna­
tion, the councll appointed Dr. T, S. Wil­
liams, dean of Tuskegee ]nstltute's
school of veterinary medicine, to serve
for the two years left In Buford's term.
Williams w ill take office at the council's
next r�gular meeting Tuesday night.
Several months ago, the council ap­
pointed Williams to the city housing
authority, He described himself this
week as " one of those who feel Buford
has made a good councilman.
" ]' 11 be hard-pressed to equal his
record," Williams added. "I hope to do
as well for the good of the total com-
Laslle was re-appointed to the chair­
manship several Umes atter first ac­
cepttng the job on March 12, 1951. He
could have faced his tirst real struggle
in yea r s this January, when a sec ond
Negro wut take a seat on the four-man
board of revehue.
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ning and cost
We didn't want a big
time span."
"How did you feel personally?"
P inkard shot back.
"] felt a little queasy about It," Smith
said. " We were trying to make a juctg­
ment e
We weren't sure how people
would react."
W hen Pinkard said he thought an elec­
tion would have been " more desirable,"
Smith replied: "There's no question
about 11,"
But the councilman reacted clltfe rent­
ly when another questioner called the
city council's action "arbitrary."
" It wasn't arbitrary," Smith said
sharply. "They took the power that be­
longed to them."
Williams said this week that he hadn't
heard about the questions raised at the
civic meeting. But he promised to try
to represent the people the same way
an elected counCilman would represent
them ,
"I go In there with no preconceived
nottons," he said. "I expect to learn
about this business as I go along."
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T. S, W ILLIAMS
munlty as he has. I I
At a meeting of Tuskegee's newest
community action group late last week,
several people suggested that the com­
munity good would have been better
served by a public election to f1ll Bu­
ford's council seat.
"Why did- the city council appolnt ln­
stead of elect their new member?"
OtiS P inkard asked Tuskegee's other
Negro city counCilman, Stanley H.
Smith, before 75 members of Macon
County Com munity Com mittee �1.
"That's the way It's usually done,"
Smith replied. "We would be reluctant
to hold an election In terms of the plan-
Hits
8. L O \'E IS A II UR T IN' T HING-­
Lou Rawls (Capitol)
9. 'J'l'tAC H"OUT, I' L L BE THERE-­
l' oUi' T(jfls (M oto�)
1 0. BEAUTY ]S ONLY SKIN DEEP-­
Tempatalons (Gordy)
1 1 . FA F A FA FA F A - ­
Otis Redding (Volt)
1 2 . I'V E TO GO DO BETTER-­
Joe Tex (Dial)
1 3 . HOW SW E ET IT IS-­
Jr. Walker (Soul)
14. Y OU CAN'T BLAME M E - ­
Jimmy Norman (Samera)
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HAIRCUTTING
Call Eddie sanders 428-6619 or,
F A 2-9649
The Rev. F. L. Shuttleswor th
The Pas tor 's Stu dy
THE PASTOR'S STUDY Is a dally devotional prepared under
the auspices of and In conjunction with the Montgomery
Ministerial Alliance. Listen to your favorite m inister In
our Pastor's Study.
Also, for your continuing listening, our GOS PE L P R OG RAMS,
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MONTGO ME R Y
Distribut ors ! Advertisers !
Correspondent� !
THE
SOUTHERN COURIER 's
New Address
is
W ED NESDAY ,
OCTOBER 19th, 7:00 P. M.
M OND A Y,
OCTOBER 17th, 7 :00 P, �I ,
1012 Frank Leu Building
Municipal Auditorium
Sardis Baptist Church
1 2 4 0 North 4th Street
GUEST SPEAKER :
GUEST S PEA KE R :
DR.
R E '-':,. C . T , VIVIAN
Montgomery, Ala, 36104
M ARTIN LUTHER K]NG JR .
T H UR SDA Y,
18th , '7 :00- P. M ,
OCTOBER
,
,
St, JamU'Baptlst Church
1100 6th Avenue North
M etl'opOlitan A. M. E.
Zion
1 538 4th A venue North
P lease send all m a i l to this address.
20th, 7 :00 p. M .
8·SS
iii
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58
R E V , WYATT T E E WALKER
Y es , it' s true l Southern C ourier Want Ads a r e st i l l
absolutely FREE. Is there something you need i n yo u r
Sponsored by the
home , car . o r business ?
F ind it with a So uth e r n
C ourier Want Ad ! Would you l ike to sell a n old w a sh ­
ing machine, or give away some puppies ? A d ve r t i se
it here !
Send your ad to The Southern C ourier , 10 1 2
Frank L eu Building . Montgomery , Ala. 3 6 1 0 4 .
WANT
ADS
.
HAVE YOU HEARD THE
NEW SOUND IN TOWN ?
A LA BAMA DEMOCRAT]C CONFER­
Is holding Its semi­
annual meeting at the Jefferson Davis
Hotel in M ontgomery this weekend.
Robert Vance, new chairman of the State
Democratic EKecutlve Committee, will
speak at a public session at 3 p.m. SUn­
day. E. T. Kehrer, southern director of
the A F L-C]O Civil Rights Department,
will speak at a banquet Saturday night
at 8 P. m. Polltlcai workshops are
scheduled for Saturday afternoon.
ENCE , INC.- -ADC]
WANTED--Experlencer typest for
temporary position. Call The Southern
Courier, 262-3572.
GOOD JOB--Wanted: Agent and man­
agers to earn up to $500 per m onth In
their spare time, with Merllte Life­
Time guaranteed Ught bulbs. If Inter­
ested, contact T, L. crenshaw, 923 Ade­
line St" M ontgomery,
TWIN COVER L E TS WANTED - ­
Wanted, two hand-made quilted cover­
lets for a pair of twin beds, suitable for
a girl's roonf. Write to Mrs, M. B .
olatunJl, �, O. Box 358, Millerton, N , Y,
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the old- fashioned qualities of depend­
a nd thr ift st i ll guide - us here.
, MAil. O U " _AN. YOU ..
PIIiANCIAL H .ADQUAIIT ... S I
ALABAMA EXCHANGE &\l!K
Me m be r
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THAN
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A new antennK
ptus
new SludJutoi
plu ..
H
R ne,,, secret j n grcdlent
rtnkc thr famou8
\\PJLD
ou nd better thAn ('ver
You haVt'n'l l t vcd IlUt you hear the new Btg 0
WJLD 1400 RADIO
Binningham
F ederal R e s e rve System and
We Are can
sssssss,.,csss,s,"
FREE!
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G UEST S P EA K E Il :
R EV, C. K. STEELE
I
P . O. Box 7 2 8
WAPX
MONDAY THRU FRIDA Y , 9 : 0 0 to 9 : 1 5 A M
GUARAN T EED DE L I V E R Y
F ederal Dep o s it Insurance
most appreciated.
BROADCAST DAILY
O c t . 1 7-20
:llusic Center One Stop
P,O, Box 104 1
Birmingham, Alabam a
abil ity
Your patronage wlll be
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Radio Station
The weekly meeting wUl be held
Monday, Oct. 10, at the First Ebe­
nezer Baptist Church, 420 Gray­
m ount Ave. North, the Rev. J, F.
Hardy, pastor.
S E N D $ 1 . 0 0 F O R E A C H 4 5 R P M - - N O C .O .D.
TIMES HAVE
(HANGED, BUT
BY EXPERTS
1504 18th St. N., Birmingham
• Inadequate schools
HAS INSTI TUTED
Shoe Shines
Motemenl for Human Righh
Is to be the theme of
OCTOBER
One- Day Cleaning Ser¥ice
• tokenism In employment
•
" Yo u Cn n ', Ikot God G iving No MatlRr How
TUESDA Y,
Austin's
Barber Shop
• police brutality
A l a ba m a Ch ri.tia n
Apprec ia tion Week
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YAAC
(Young Adult Action Committee),
affllJate of SCbC, ls recrultlng young
adults In Jefferson County for com­
munity actlon to help end
CLOTHES WANTED--The La Ritz
SOCial & savings Club Is sponsoring' a
charity drive for the Boys Town , The
club Is soliciting clothing and linen. If
you want to contribute to the drive, call
Mrs. Nellie Hardy, at 263-0948 In Mont­
gomery, or drop offyour donation at her
house, 628 Colony st.
WORK FOR FRE EOOM--Interested
In peace action, academtc freedom, civ­
C orporaUOD
TUlkes• • , Alabama
.qtUJl � .".,.,..
WE NE E D tables, chairs, and books
for the new Com munlty Center on Ard­
more Highway In ]ndlan Creek. Help
the Com munity Center by giving Items
which lOU don't need. Call Arthur
Jacobs Jr., 752-4989, In Huntsvllle.
The Station Thllt ReAchcs Thc People 24 Hours " O":V
Il rights, or poverty? Students for a
Democratic SOCiety Is forming chapters
in Birmingham and elsewhere. W rite
to p. R. Bailey, Miles College, Blrm­
IDCham.
M OBILE -- Distribution m anagel ,.
and newsboys needed. Good pay f()1
short hours, chance to increase earn­
Ings. Call Andrew Curtis, 4:;7-7004 in
Mobile.
R ECEPTIONIST -- Glamorous pos i ­
tion for African-oriented young lady in
AFRICAN cultural center. R eqlllrp­
ments: typing, high-school diploma,
wlllingness to pursue further busllles�
training. W rite M. B. Olatunjl, 875 \I'ps
End Ave., New York, N, Y, 100ZS.
SKY D1VERS- -Four sport pal achufl'
for sale, never been used, pprfect con
dltlon, Various colors. Call 5!)�-234,
In Birmingham , afternoons ann eV(>lI­
Ings.
WANTED - - One parakept, yello\\ ,
with green breast and funny-lookl r.
tall, already named Francis if possihl"
for six little girls. CaU 264--I07� I I .
Montgomery.
WOIlK IN NEW YOI1 K - - U o j OU W I
sell-employment? Suitahl� couplp, \\" ,
or without family, wanted to 1'('- 101',1"
In New YorJc State, and ·takl' c a l P of t'e '
larded children who a r t! w<.lrds Of th,
state. l3-room house available fOI
rent. For more informaltoll, w n te t .
Mrs. M,B, O latunjl, P,O, Box 358, r.1 111erton, N. Y.
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FOR SALE--Nlne-room house,com ­
pletely furnished. Three bedrooms,
two kitchens, two living rooms, one back
porch, two front porches, gas hea t . A
splendid buy for middle-aged couple
who would IJke to rent out small apart­
ment or keep roomers. Old house In
good repair, covered with brick siding
about ten years ago. Good rooting. good
street. $6,000 cash and house Is yours
--or $5,000 and assume mortgage of
$1,220. C ollege town, no discrimina­
tion, two factories that hire Negro men,
two air bases. If Interested, contact
the Rev. Phil Walker, 220 N, High st.,
Xellow springs, Ohio.
Game of the Week
WOrker A.ppeals SenteJl(!B
CR
OC T U B E R 8 - 9 . 1 9 6 6
1 H e � U lJ f He .tU... C O U R IE R
PA GE S I X
Of Six
BTW
Months at Hard Labor
co-signed by Bonner as acting council
president, concerned segregation in
Judge Burns' court and on the pollce
force. and reports of police brutality.
Bonner said he was appeallng his
conviction "to show the people i n Tus­
caloosa that the} can get Justice."
(CONTINUED FROM PAGE TWO)
just standing there smlUng at him."
The da} before Bonner's arrest the
Justice Department had sent a rep..
resentative to Tuscaloosa to investigate
a complaint by the Tuscaloosa Council
on Human Relations. The complaint,
Where Do YOU Stand
O n Civil Liberties ?
"During the years of I ts existence tbe A merican Civi l Liberties Union
bas pla) ed a significant role In defending our basic Amencan Ireedoms.
Your voice has always been raised clearly and sharpl} when our Uber­
tle� have been threatened. A merlca is a stronger natton for )our un­
compromising efforts."
- -John F . Kennedy, June 22, 1962
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BY J. A. ROSS
MON'I'(JOM ERY-·A quick, smartly
drUled Booker T. Washington High foot­
ball team , revamped by Coach Arthur
"Buddy" Davis Since bowing to Tuske­
gee Institute High last week, sneaked
by the BulldOgs of Phenix City's South
Girard High School, 24 to 1 9, Saturda}
night in Municipal Stadium.
With two minutes remaining in the
first quarter, the Washington Yellow
Jackets received a forced kick from the
Bulldogs and advanced on first down to
the 40-yard marker. On the next play,
Quarterback Clinton Drake hit right end
Edward Wimberly with a 35-yard pass.
Wimberly scampered the remaining GO
yards for the TO .
The Yellow Jackets' hard charging
forward wall set up another touchdown
when they blocked a forced kick and
pounced on the oval in the end zone.
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F o r f u r th e r i nfo r m a t i o n . c l ip o ut a nd s e nd t o :
C i v i l L i be r t i e s U n i o n of A la ba ma
P . O . B o x 3 3 9 3 , B i r m i ngh a m , A l a . 3 5 2 0 5
HELP· HELP·HELP
R EV. ROOS E V E L T F R A � K LI �
01 Macon, Ga.
DIVINE
SPIR ITUAL H E A L E R
� � �1 [ ----
J esus Is truly giving victory to man} ,
many people's problems. S UC C E S S
C AN BE YOURS. S ee or write me
today. I have a spec ial message for
every troubled s oul. Last week
many, m any people were helped by
ml special selected Bible reading,
to be read on SPI!clal Days. If you
want to be delivere d quickly, Send
$ 1 .00 and stamped, self-addressed
envelope to:
.-\o mu. ss --_______________________
CITY ------- STATE ------ 7 I P -----
Occupatlon ---M••••••• • • • •••••••••••••• ••••••••••••
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Girard
South Girard received the kick-aU
and kicked on fourth down. Alter the
Jackets fumbled the ball, the Bulldogs
recovered on the 1 1-yard line. On the
first play from scrimmage, Bulldog
hall-back Theodore Rogers wormed
his wa} around his right end tor the TO.
The Jackets received the kick-oU on
the 29-striper, thenlumbled on the lirst
down play. The Bulldogs recovered on
the 34-yard line. Quarterback Gregory
·A lexander passed to the seventh into
the waiting arms of half-back Charlie
Rogers, who made the touchdown.
With 24 seconds to go in the second
quarter, Drake again spotted Wimberly
with a heave that netted 53 yards for the
Jackets' third touchdown.
On the second down late In the thlr:!
quarter, South Girard's Alexander pas­
sed to end Roosevelt Richardson, who
was stopped on the Jackets' 13-yard
line. Then Quarterback Winston Smith
completed a perfect pass to right end
Clifford Austin for the Bulldogs' third
TD. The pass-try for the extra point
was good.
In desperation, with less than a min­
ute and a half remaining In the game,
the Jackets' quarterback Drake again
hit his target, Wimberly, for a 35-yard
touchdown pass.
MALDEI BROTHERS
BARBER SHOP
407 South JQckson
REV. ROOSEVELT FHANKLIN
630 MORR OW ST.
Phone SHe 5-6475
Macon, Ga.,
You will get these
SPE CIAL SELECTED BIBLE
V E R SES BY RETURN MAIL
Montgomery. Alabama
262-9249
Nelson and Spurgeon Malden
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FOOTBALL
Carver vs.
Tuskegee Institute
WRMA
:
"This is :-lorman Lumpkin,
News Editor and Reporter. For one newscast I
write, call on the telephone, and talk with all sorts
of people for YOU. Hear news from Central Alabama as well as from \'let Nam on WRMA, 950
in Montgomery, Ala." Norman Lumpkin r eports
eight times daily , every hour on the half-hour.
Do ) ou have news'" Call 264 -6440 and ask for
Norman Lumpkin.
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High
H OR N E T S T A D I l l\! - - M O N T G O M E R Y
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ernor Wallace took the microphone.
Shadowed by a huge Confederate flag,
the governor attacked the national Dem­
ocrats, the national Republlcans, the
national bureaucrats, and the national
press.
First he welcomed the newsmen and
said he was glad to see that some 01
them had gotten their hair cut since the
primary. Then he hit at the Uberals.
"We'll send the lJberal, socialist ele­
ment in this country a clear, resound­
Ing message in November."
"I s tand for the people of Alabama,
for the free enterprise system, andfor
private propertY ,tt Wallace told the
.
crowd.
(CONTINUED FROM PAGE ONE)
passed down the stairs that there were
"coloreds up there."
Some people tried to get back down­
stairs, but the stair walls were jammed.
Several Wallace supporters finally
joined the Negro students in the balcony.
Back on the main floor, the rally
warmed up with hymns and h11lbllly mu­
sic. A young man began walking up and
down the aisles with a big red-lettered
sign:" !\I lssouri wants Wallace for pres­
ident." The crowd cheered.
The Wallaces arrived with a count­
down from the stage, and the rally went
on slate-wldp television. Mr. Wallace
pledged to work for better schools. bet­
ter roads, more job opportunitles, and
higher wages.
" There has been progress w ithout
compromise, accomplishment without
surrender," she said. " W e are re­
sponsive 10 only one thing, the w111 of
the people." Then she stepped back.
The pink and blue Wallace flags bob­
bed, a four- year-old boy clapped so
hard he fell off the s tep he was stand­
ing on, the band played Dixie, and Gov-
, . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . � . •• . •.. • • . • • • • • • • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .•
The Southern Courier
will
make a difference
in her life
"The natlonal Democrats did all they
could to stop this movement In Its
tracks," he s houted. " But we disposed
of the national Democrats. We want to
hurt both the national Democrats and the
national Republicans because neither of .
these parties have cared a bit about the
people of Atabama. But they care now."
As for the "natlonal bureaucrats,"
Wallace said, "they are after control­
ling the minds, thoughts, and hearts 01
all the people In this country. Even the
1 964 Civil Rights Law didn't go that
far."
"We shall continue," he said, uunUl
the fresh air of our state in the prevail­
ing wind of the country, untU the Com­
munist debris is swept away from our
shores , for the sake of- the Constitution
and our children."
During the speeches, the integrated
group In the balcony sat quietly, many of
them taking notes.
(Originally, Nell Friedman. head of
the freshman social science course at
M iles, had planned to require that all
his students attend the rally to hear what
Wallace had to say
•
(But Dr. Lucius Pitts, president of
Miles, called a meeting of the student
body on the day of the rally to veto that
plan. "All of you live at home," he
said, "and I can't control what you do
independently, but officially this thing
Is cancelled.")
A white woman watched one of the
Negro girls taking notes on Wallace.
" You write that down," she called over.
" You get it right. He really means it."
IT P A Y S T O
Maid Jobs
S t ud e nts 7 5 � , A d u l t s $ 1 . 2 5
Campaign
With Rally in Birmingham
7 : 30 p.m.
Friday, October 14
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Open
Wallaces
�ew York, Conn. & other points-­
Ages 18 to 50, single or m arrted.
S35 to 865 a week, free board & uni­
forms, off one day each week & ev­
ery other Sundal . :'Ilust have ref­
erence from \ our minister, teacher,
bu"ine �s ('oIH'prn, or former em­
plorer. Wnte for applications today.
If accepted, we 11'111 send tickets to
D'ham and to l our emplo) ment des­
tination. 24 hours service.
A D V E R T IS E
I N T H E C OU R IE R
I n )I o b i l e I t ' s
FH A � K U � ' S P H A R M A C Y
fo r
All toilet articles
and package medicines
Delivery service
M oney orders
P aying utility bills
DOMESTIC
EMPL. AGCY.
Co r n t' r o f
S . Wa r r e n & E l m i r a
4 2 4 �. 17th St., Birmingham
252-48 8 1
433- 5 7 2 7
The Southern Courier
Dlake a difference in YOUR life
Read
THE SOUTHERN COURIER
Covering R a c e Rel ation s i n the South
(C ut
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I a m s e nd i ng check o r
mo ne y o rde r .
for o ne y e a r .
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I n Chattanooga, Negroes and whites
got rough with racial prejudice . . .
instead of each other.
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\ \ rl lor ' 011 100 I orm .. 1 t..I l � ,lmong
m cm�� of .111 r 1\. .. , In \ ell' r . o",m\l",'\ Ihru
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ohlM� the p rohll.m, loll "..1 ... . I. on JdlOqul:n\.\
.lnJ l 'l tl l l JOt'!...
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