JU88 Player`s Manual

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JU88 Player`s Manual
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 1
Technical Brief
Junkers 88 A-1
as depicted in il2 Cliffs of Dover by Oleg Maddox 1C and Ubisoft.
Produced by II/JG53
Version 1.0, 1 September 2012
(as at il2 Cliffs of Dover BETA PATCH v.1.08.18956 - issued August 4, 2012)
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 2
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Introduction
Cockpit Familiarization
Figure 1 - Fuel and illumination dials
Key Commands - Options - Controls
Figure 2 - Digital and analog display
Engine Management
Figure 3 - Propellor pitch terminology
Basic Start-up
Figure 4 - red circle - landing gear lever, white circle - landing flap lever
Flap Adjustment
Take-off
Figure 5 - Propellor pitch control
Climb
Figure 6 - Instruments during climb
Cruise
Slow Flight and Landing
Navigation
Figure 9 - Maps and Navigation Tools
Introduction to the navigation tools and their implementation.
Navigation Instruments
Figure 10 - Magnetic, Repeater Compass and Gyro
Relationship between the directional gyro and the magnetic/repeater compass
Autopilot
Figure 11 - Typical view of navigation instruments at spawn
Align Repeater Compass
Figure 12 - Align compasses with magnetic north
Align Upper Gyro Band
Figure 13 - align upper gyro band with magnetic heading
Align Lower Gyro Band
Figure 14 - align lower gyro band with projected course
Align Repeater Compass with Lower Gyro Band
Bombing
Tuning the Altimeter.
Bomb Load
Level Bombing.
Indicated Airspeed (IAS) / True Airspeed (TAS) Tables.
Salvo Bombing
Navigating to the target
The Bomb Run
Figure 15 - the Bomb Bay Door handle
Bombsight
Adjustment of the horizontal line (cross hair).
Figure 16. Simplified explanation of dropping short or falling long
Figure 17 - Over shooting
Figure 18 - Lotfe bombsight view
Sturzflug / Dive Bombing
Typical Sturzflug Sequence in the JU88
The Gunner
The Human Gunner
Bail Out
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 3
Fuel Management
Figure 20 - Switch box (upper) and nine-lamp indicator
Figure 21 - Pumping diagram and fuel and lubricant gauges
Annexes:
A.
Cockpit Familiarisation
B.
Suggested functions to be assigned to a key (keyboard or joystick)
C.
Example Keyboard Layout
D.
Example List of Commands for Level Bombing and Checklist
E.
JU88 Performance Specifications
F.
Checklists
G.
Airfield Elevation
H.
CLoD Manual Metric IAS/TAS Table*
Acknowledgements
From Luftwaffe Skizzenbuch by Hans Liska, 1942
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 4
Introduction
The home of II/JG53 and II/KG53 is www.iijg53.com. We are a group of flight
simulation enthusiasts based on the il2 Cliffs of Dover game developed by Oleg Maddox
1C and Ubisoft. Jagdgeschwader (JG) 53 operate the Messerschmitt bf-109E3B and
Kampfgeschwader staffel (II/KG53) operate the Junkers 88A1 (JU88) as depicted in the
game. Normal progression to II/KG53 is via II/JG53.
The purpose of this brief is to provide II/JG53 Stab and Training Staff with a
compilation of information pertaining to the in-game performance of the JU88 that is
available to the general public. This document should be read in conjunction with the official
il2 Cliffs of Dover manual (and the JG53 Basic Flight School manual (JG53 members only)).
The information is provided in good faith and the compilers sole purpose is to encourage the
use of the JU88 in-game and form the basis of a II/KG53 Operations Manual in the future.
Any errors or omissions are the fault of the compilers. Many of our valuable
contributors are mentioned in the Acknowledgement section of the document.
Cockpit Familiarization
If this is the first time you have ventured from your bf109 cockpit you will find that
the JU88 is a far more complex aircraft. Just having a second engine doubles all the
instruments! Do not let this daunt you as many of the controls and gauges will be familiar
from your bf109 experience. Take particular note of the following (see Annex A):
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.
Directional Gyro
Magnetic Compass
Repeater Compass
Variometer
Markings (Red, yellow, green) on Tachometer and Manifold Pressure
Flaps control
Divebrakes
Cockpit Illumination - for low light and night missions:
● Primary (white circle left) operates pilot side illumination.
● Secondary (white circle right) operates
co-pilot illumination (bugged).
● The third dial is for tertiary illumination
- not modelled in-game.
● Fuel selector gauge (yellow circle), the
fuel gauges flank this dial.
●
Bug work-around. In low-light
missions the Pitot Tube Heater light
provides some illumination to the gyro
and instruments to the right. However,
the Pitot Heater should only be used
when over 2000m, never on take-off
as it reduces engine power.
Figure 1 - Fuel and illumination dials
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 5
Key Commands - Options - Controls
Many of the controls that have been assigned for bf109 operation will be applicable
for JU88 operation. In addition to those, it is suggested that the controls listed in Annex B be
assigned a key (joystick or keyboard) to enable the efficient operation of the functions listed.
Annex C and D provide examples of keyboard layout.
Game Difficulty - JG53 is a “full switch” unit. With the exception of “Anthropomorphic
Control” all difficulty options are on. Techniques described in this document are with the
game in this setting.
Figure 2 - Digital and analog display
Information Windows
Two engines are twice the fun! The Information Window can be setup to display
the key engine data in digital format or you can use the analog format that is the default
view. Note that you have information for each engine - see Figure 2 for display of digital and
analog display. Right click the window and select Information Window for the digital display.
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 6
Engine Management
From Luftwaffe Skizzenbuch by Hans Liska, 1942
The JU88A-1 has two Jumo 211B-1 engines. A detailed list of performance
specifications can be found at Annex E. The pilot should, as a minimum, memorise the
following factors:
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Never exceed Speed …........
Max flaps extended …...........
Max landing gear extended ...
Rotation Speed …..................
Stall Speed …........................
Stall Speed Landing …..........
Best Rate of Climb …...........
675, with dive brakes 575kmh
25 degrees 320, 50 degrees 275kmh
265kmh
175-180kmh
180kmh
160kmh
250kmh
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 7
Figure 3 - Propellor pitch terminology
Basic Start-up
A successful take-off starts with an orderly start-up procedure. Checklists for various
tasks are provided at Annex F.
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Illuminate gauges if required.
select both engines
throttle to idle
water/oil radiators closed
Set magnetos (port and starboard) to M1+2
Propellor pitch to full coarse (100% - 12:00) - (See Figures 3 and 5)
select engine 1 (left) - adjust fuel cock to left tank or both
ignition
select engine 2 (right) - adjust fuel cock to right or both
ignition
select both engines
warm engines until water temperature is 40C
elevator trim - counter-clockwise one revolution
flaps - set flaps to “0”
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 8
Figure 4 - red circle - landing gear lever, white circle - landing flap lever
Flap Adjustment
There are four positions for the flaps (see Figure 4):
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Landekl (landing) position 50 degrees deflection.
0 position - take off 25 degrees deflection.
The flaps are in the neutral position at the top and bottom selections.
Take-off
The following describes the sequence for taking off from a full length concrete
runway (e.g., Tramecourt on ATAG server).
● Open water radiator and oil radiator 30% on taxi.
● When lined up on runway, radiators to 100% open, throttle 100% on take-off (2600
rpm, 1.25 ata, 5 minutes maximum).
● Coarse pitch (100% - 12:00) with toe brakes deployed.
● Release brakes and focus on a straight run (tail will lift on its own),
● Apply slight back pressure (rotate) at 180/185 kmh (any slower you will stall, faster
will result tyre blowout).
● On lift off, landing gear up.
● Level out and gain speed (200 kmh),
● raise the flaps when in stable flight
● adjust elevator trim to obtain required flight attitude (climb, cruise, etc)
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 9
●
Adjust propellor pitch to obtain flight criteria for ATA, RPM.
Figure 5 - Propellor pitch control
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 10
Climb
Adjust throttle to 2400 rpm, 1.25 ata, maximum 30 minutes. Best airspeed for climb
is between 240-250 kmh (see Figure 6). The supercharger should only be used over
4000m.
Right - Monitor the variometer for rate of
climb (top), Indicated Airspeed (left) and
altimeter during climbout.
The RPM and ATA gauges are located in
front of the bombardier.
The best rate of climb is 4-500 metres per
minute at 250 kmh.
Trim flaps so engines remain in normal
operating range.
Figure 6 - Instruments during climb
Cruise
Standard cruise setting: 2250/2400 rpm, 1.15 ata. Trim water radiator flaps so that
the following maximum temperatures are not exceeded:
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Altitude - sea level: maximum temperature 110C.
1000m
…........…........110C
<4000m …..................100C
<8000m ….................. 80C
emergency < 10 mins - 120C
minimum temperature 40C, normal 80C
Right - The propellor pitch, engine oil
temperature and hydro pressure gauges are
located in the engine nacelle (Figure 7).
The radiator water temperature gauges are
located in front of the bombardier.
Figure 7 - Port engine nacelle gauges
Oil Radiator is to be trimmed so that the temperature is in the range 30-80C (normal
cruise 80C), in an emergency 105C should not be exceeded.
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 11
Right - co-pilot view, note green, yellow
and red marks to assist with correct
setting of RPM and ATA (manifold
pressure).
The radiator water temperature gauges
are located to the lower right (green
border).
Figure 8 - Gauges, co-pilot view
Slow Flight and Landing
The pilot should prepare the aircraft for slow flight or landing condition by following
this procedure:
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Reduce speed to 250 kmh
Set Flaps to 0
Throttle for slow cruising 220-240 kmh (ata 0.8 - 0.9)
Check auto prop pitch has adjusted to full coarse (100% - 12:00)
Lower landing gear
Flaps to Landing position
Glide not below 200 kmh, at the outside marker (of the airstrip), 5-10m altitude and
190 kmh
Monitor speed until touch down.
After touch down, flaps lever up (retract)
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 12
Navigation
Using the in-game map for navigation. This can be a very interesting part of the life
of a “Cliffs of Dover” pilot. Particularly when the weather module of the game is fully
operational.
Figure 9 - Maps and Navigation Tools
Introduction to the navigation tools and their implementation.
The map tools are easy to use.
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Open the Map, ensuring you can see the terrain you intend to navigate (ie start and
end point).
Right click the map, and choose Tools. The navigation toolbar will appear.
The Navigation Tools are:
○ Navigational marker,
○ Delete navigational marker,
○ Ruler and Protractor.
The course in the example is a simple out and back. More complex courses
may involve co-ordination with other squadrons, different egress course etc. The
navigational marker is useful in these instances. The ruler is useful for finding out the
distances to travel for fuel consumption, estimated time over target, etc. The most
important tool for navigation is the Protractor.
Select the Protractor symbol.
Left click over the starting point (in example, Tramecourt) and drag line due north,
then release.
Left click on point 2, (in example, the Radar Installation). Note the angle produced by
these two actions (in example, 58 degrees). As this number is to the west it will have
to be subtracted from 360 to give us the Grid bearing for this course. Grid bearing
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 13
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equals 360-58=302 degrees.
The navigational instruments in all aircraft are based on the magnetic compass.
To convert the grid bearing to magnetic the magnetic variation needs to be added
(northern hemisphere, subtracted in the southern). At this time (1940) the magnetic
variation was 10 degrees. So the bearing the pilot will have to steer to, or set the
autopilot to, is 302+10=312 degrees.
After completing the mission the return course will be 312-180 = 132 degrees
magnetic.
Map to ground. It is important that the pilot note prominent features on the course.
For instance, in the example, the first checkpoint could be that we pass to the
southern side of Boulogne.
Use the stopwatch to calculate time over distance.
Navigation Instruments
Left to right: Directional Gyro (square shape), Repeater Compass, Magnetic
Compass (in blue case)
Repeater/Magnetic Compass
This can be adjusted by clicking on screen
or via the Course Setter key assignments decrease/ increase.
Directional Gyro
This has two levels. The upper level
can be adjusted on screen or via the
Directional Gyro key assignments decrease/increase. The lower level is
adjusted by the Autopilot Adjust Course
key assignments - left/right.
Figure 10 - Magnetic, Repeater Compass and Gyro
Relationship between the directional gyro and the magnetic/repeater compass
There is no mechanical/electrical relationship between the directional gyro and the
compasses. The autopilot could be set without any reference to the magnetic compass.
However, it is good practice to align the compasses with the directional gyro. In practice,
only the lead aircraft has the option of engaging the autopilot. The other planes in the
formation fly manually due to the demands of formation flying. Having the magnetic/repeater
compass setup gives the pilot a visual reference to the current course.
In some cases the leader may prefer to fly using the magnetic/repeater compass
rather than setting up the auto-pilot. The complexity of the mission plan (course), length of
leg etc will usually dictate the practicality of employing the auto-pilot.
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 14
Autopilot
It is good practice for all members of the bomber formation to prepare their
instruments for auto-pilot flying. The leader’s aircraft may suffer a mechanical issue
or be shot down. The first step to prepare for auto-pilot flying is to align the navigation
instruments.
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Figure 11 is a typical view of the
instruments when spawning.
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First, note the direction indicated
by the red triangle on the magnetic
compass.
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In this example the red triangle is at
30 degrees.
Figure 11 - Typical view of navigation
instruments at spawn
Align Repeater Compass
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Align the Repeater Compass with
the direction found in step one, ie, 30
degrees (Figure 12)..
●
Hover and click the mouse over the
magnetic compass or use keys that
you have assigned to the task to bring
30 degrees to the 12 o’clock position.
Note that the plane image in the dial
corresponds to the magnetic bearing.
Figure 12 - Align compasses with magnetic
north
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 15
Align Upper Gyro Band
●
The next step is to align the
upper gyro band with the repeater
compass (Figure 13).
●
Use the on screen dial or use keys
that you have assigned to the task.
Figure 13 - align upper gyro band with
magnetic heading
Align Lower Gyro Band
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The next step is to align the lower
gyro band with the course that has
been determined by the map work see Navigation section.
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The lower gyro band (Figure 14)
has been aligned to a course of
312 degrees (as per the Navigation
example).
Figure 14 - align lower gyro band with
projected course
Align Repeater Compass with Lower Gyro Band
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The final step is to align the repeater compass with the lower gyro band. This
provides the pilot with a visual clue that he is on course (the plane symbol will be
pointing to the top of the dial - ie 312 degrees).
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Once the pilot has taken off and achieved stable flight, the pilot is to steer within 10
degrees of 312 degrees, then engage Autopilot - Course.
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Later in the mission it will be necessary to align the lower gyro band with the bomb
run course, so you can go to the bombardier’s position. On the bomb-run engage
Autopilot - R22.
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 16
Bombing
The JU88 is capable of conducting level bombing, dive-bombing and skip bombing
missions. It has two internal bomb-bays and wing mounts.
Tuning the Altimeter.
The altimeter measures air pressure (in millibars) to determine the aircraft’s height
above sea level. Altitude above target is one of the key factors the bombardier needs to
know to conduct a successful level bombing run. A rotating dial on the altimeter adjusts the
millibar setting which, in turn, modifies the altimeter display, ie altitude.
The method of tuning the altimeter is described below.
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Select an airfield and note its elevation above sea level (see Annex G).
Spawn at the airfield.
Rotate the altimeter calibration dial until the altimeter shows an altitude matching the
one in the Annex.
Hover your mouse over the mbar setting and note down the pressure it displays.
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 17
Bomb Load
The Bomb Loadout screen is discussed on p. 59 of the CLoD manual. Currently
this screen is only functional when online. For playing offline, it is recommended that the
preferred bomb loadout is saved online, then selected in the Full Mission Builder for offline
play.
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Front Bomb Bay. The front bomb bay can be loaded with:
GP SC50 Gde II Type J ….....
qty 18
GP SC50 Gde II Type J …...... qty 8
empty
Rear Bomb Bay. The rear bomb bay can be loaded with:
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GP SC50 Gde II Type J …...... qty 10
empty
Wing Mounts. The following bomb configurations can be loaded on the wing mounts:
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GP SC250 Gde 1 Type J …..
Semi AP SD250 …................
SC250 Gde 1 Type J …........
Semi AP SD250 …...............
SC500 Gde 3 Type K …........
Semi AP SD 500 Type A …...
empty
qty 2
qty 2
qty 4
qty 4
qty 2
qty 2
Detonators. It is important to allocate the correct detonator according to the mission
type. The following detonators are available for the bomb types.
Bomb
Detonator
GP SC50 Gde II Type J
C50 (5) High Altitude
C50 (25) Low Level
GP SC250 Gde 1 Type J
C50 (5) High Altitude
C50 (15) Dive Bombing
C50 (25) Low Level
Semi AP SD250
C50 (5) High Altitude
SC500 Gde 3 Type K
C50 (25) Low Level
Semi AP SD 500 Type A
C50 (5) High Altitude
Level Bombing.
The technique described for JU88 level bombing also applies to the Heinkel 111.
The potential bombardier should make themselves familiar with pages 79-82 of the CLoD
manual.
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 18
Indicated Airspeed (IAS) / True Airspeed (TAS) Tables.
A copy of the metric Indicated Airspeed (IAS) / True Airspeed (TAS) Table from page
112 of the CLoD manual is located at Annex H. The IAS/TAS table provide estimates based
on standard temperature readings at the altitude specified; actual temperature will vary,
therefore affecting actual TAS.
Salvo Bombing
The most common form of bombing in WW2 was salvo bombing (dropping all bombs
at once). This is what will be covered in this instruction. When starting your level bombing
career give yourself as much time as possible to complete all the steps correctly.
Normally there is plenty of time between taking-off and commencing the bomb run.
During this period ensure that you have completed the following tasks:
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Preset the bombsight to the estimated altitude of the bomb run.
Preset the bombsight to the estimated TAS.
If the loadout has bomb-bay one and two loaded ensure that both bomb-bays are
selected.
Select the correct Bomb Distribution Mode - In this example - Salvo
Select Bomb Distribution Distance - 1
Lastly, Arm the Bombs when commencing the bomb run.
Navigating to the target
One of the biggest challenges for the bomber crew is to get the aircraft aligned for
the bomb run. Consider the shape of the target. Is it best to approach the target from a
particular angle as the bombs fall in a line? What geographical feature will help in navigating
to the target? Due to camouflaging by the enemy the target may not appear until late so
estimating by geographical features will be the best guide initially.
In most cases the course to the target will be more than one leg. Find a prominent
feature that will denote the start of the bomb run. Know what the course is from this point
to the target. Use the bomb sight to identify this feature so you can trim the aircraft onto the
correct course.
The Bomb Run
Initially, the odds are that we will not be able to see the target. But we know
from our previous work that we are roughly on the bomb run/aligned with the target, as a
minimum, on our current course the target will appear in the bombsight.
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Confirm that the bombs are armed.
Open Bomb-bay doors.
○ The bomb bay doors can be opened by clicking and holding the bomb bay
door handle (see Figure 15) or by a key assigned to Open Bomb Bay Doors
and Close Bomb Bay Doors. The Toggle Bomb Bay Doors assignment does
not work on the JU88 because it has manual operation, unlike the he-111
which has electrically operated doors.
Aircraft Trim. Attain 320 kmh IAS and then engage R22 auto-pilot mode. It may
take a minute or so for the aircraft to settle in this mode, and possibly 500 feet of altitude.
Ensure propellor pitch, oil and water radiators and manifold pressure are at satisfactory
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 19
levels. During the bomb run you will need to concentrate on IAS, altitude and adjusting the
bombsight.
Figure 15 - the Bomb Bay Door handle
Bombsight
Before shifting to the bombardier position note the current airspeed (IAS) and
altitude of the aircraft. If the target is located above sea level it will be necessary to subtract
the target’s height above sea level from the altitude indicated. Use the IAS/TAS table
to estimate the true airspeed (TAS). During the approach return to the pilot’s position a
number of times to confirm aircraft altitude and IAS. Note that you can adjust the bombsight
altitude and bombsight velocity from the pilot’s position. You cannot check too often.
Move to the bombardier’s position and select Shift-F1 (default setting) to move to the
bombsight view. Input the TAS and altitude. Use the distance increase/decrease keys to
select a recognizable feature. Then select bombsight automation. If the crosshair is moving
above your chosen point, the bombsight is calibrating too slow, increase your speed setting.
Of course if it is falling below your selected point you will need to decrease your speed
setting. Once you are happy you have a good result turn off the automation. Make sure you
do this before the bombs drop!
Go back to the pilot’s position and get the current altitude and IAS. Repeat the
process. As you get close to the target you will first need to align the horizontal line with the
target, then set automation on. Adjust the vertical line with the Auto-pilot Adjust Left/Right
keys. Not the bombardier’s adjust left/right keys - these only tell you how many degrees to
the left or right of target you are - this is useful if you want to allow for crosswinds.
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 20
Adjustment of the horizontal line (cross hair).
This was mentioned in paragraph 16 and it can be confusing at first, so we will take
a second look at it. If the horizontal line is falling below the target the Lofte bombsight is
tracking too fast. This is caused by the Lofte bombsight velocity being too high and/or the
Lotfe altitude being too low relative to the aircraft’s position.
Put another way, the aircraft is travelling slower than the bombsight setting and/or is
higher than the bombsight setting.
Figure 16. Simplified explanation of dropping short or falling long
Figure 16 is a simplified explanation of some of the reasons for bombs falling short
or overshooting the target. It presumes one of the factors, altitude or TAS, is correct
and the other incorrect. More than likely, missing is caused by both factors being out by
some margin. Take note of where your bombs hit if they don’t hit the target. Try to learn
something from every bomb run.
Figure 17 describes the same thing but from a different perspective. At Point A the
bombardier sets the bomb-site on the target according to the observed altitude and TAS.
As the plane flies to Point B the horizontal line tracks to a position above the target. The
telescopic barrel of the bombsight is tracking too slow. This is caused by the aircraft flying
faster than the bombsight velocity input or the aircraft is flying higher than the bombsight
altitude input. The bombsight could be tracking a point in space indicated by where the red
line crosses the blue line.
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 21
Figure 17 - Over shooting
Lotfe Bombsight Patch
1.08.18956
The upper, dual triangle
mark is the current angle
the bombsight telescope
is at. The lower, single
triangle mark is bugged.
Figure 18 - Lotfe bombsight view
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 22
Sturzflug / Dive Bombing
To conduct Sturzflug operations follow this sequence:
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Set Altitude alarm at 1300m
De-activate autopilot
Switch supercharger to Ground (Stage 1)
Close radiators
Set trims to the red marking in the following order: Aileron, Rudder, Elevator-trim
Set Airbrake switch to OUT (extended)
Throttle back
Nose down
Upon hearing the Tone (from the altitude alarm) press the bomb release button Set
Airbrake switch to IN (retracted)
Throttle
Set the trims to the white marker
Open Radiators
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 23
Typical Sturzflug Sequence in the JU88
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Description of a typical sturzflug sequence in the JU88.
The pilot watches as the target passes the last marking on his lower window and
activates the air-brake. Automatically fins at the elevator push the tail of the plane
upwards and the plane dives at a 60° angle.
During the dive, the pilot keeps the target just below the highest point of his Reflector
sight.
When the bomber is 250m above the bomb release point (which has previously been
set at 1300m at the altitude meter), a warning tone starts. The pilot pulls the plane
slightly up so that the target is seen now at the lowest part of the reflector sight.
As the plane reaches the previously set bomb dropping altitude, the warning tone
stops and the pilot presses the button at the left side of his stick in order to initiate the
automatic procedure for bomb release and automatic plane recovery.
The nose of the plane rises slightly and the bombs are released.
After completion of the automatic plane recovery, the pilot retracts the air-brakes and
accelerates.
The Gunner
There are three gun positions in the JU88. The default command to remove the
cursor from the screen is F10. This will also result in the mouse controlling the gun while you
are in the gunner’s position. The left mouse fire’s the gun. Reload in the JU88 is automatic,
note, there is no reload animation like, for example, the bf-110.
The Human Gunner
With the plane in autopilot (recommended but not compulsory), move to the prefered
crew position. When returning to the pilot position do so via the bombardier. A current issue
is that the gunner position will not revert to AI if you shift directly from a gunner’s position to
the pilot position.
A multi human crewed aircraft requires all players to spawn at the same airfield. The
non-pilot crew then press ESC and select their position from the list available in the pilot’s
aircraft..
Bail Out
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To bail out of the JU88 the following functions need to be assigned a key:
Jettison Canopy/Hatch/Door (Toggle Canopy function does not operate in the JU88).
Bail Out.
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 24
Fuel Management
Fuel and lubricant management is controlled by the switch box, nine-lamp indicator
(Figure 20) (to the front left of the pilot) and the fuel gauges next to the co-pilot (Figure 21).
Switch Box. Left to Right:
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Port and Starboard fuel pumps (in engaged position)
1, 2, 3, 5, 6, and 8 - Fuel transfer pumps (see numbers below switches)
Nine-Lamp Indicator. The diagram of the aircraft around the nine lamp indicator is
called the Pumping Diagram. The lamps are, from left to right:
●
●
●
Signal lamp for lubricant tank filling up
Signal lamp for fuel tank filling (V)
Signal lamp for fuel tank emptying (L)
Figure 20 - Switch box (upper) and nine-lamp indicator
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 25
Pumping Diagram
Red - Hull tanks - 1
Green - Outer wing tanks - 2
Yellow - inner (main) tanks - 3
Black - Lubricant tanks - 4 & 5
As depicted in-game.
Figure 21 - Pumping diagram and fuel and lubricant gauges
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 26
Annexes:
A.
Cockpit Familiarisation
In game, hover the mouse over the the cockpit items detailed below to achieve a basic
familiarisation. Follow the instructions detailed in this document to complete your first flight.
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 27
B.
Suggested functions to be assigned to a key (keyboard or joystick)
Navigation Aides
General
Aircraft
Auto-pilot
Aircraft
Map
Course Setter
Course Autopilot
Adjust Course
Directional Gyro
M
Decrease
Increase
Cycle Modes
Previous Modes
Next Mode
Disable
Left
Right
Decrease
Increase
Bombing Operation
Aircraft
Airbrake
Bomb Bay Doors
Bomb Bay Doors
Toggle
Close
Open
Bomb Management
Aircraft
Bombsight
Aircraft
Bombs Armed
Toggle
Bomb Distributor Short Toggle
Delay
Select Bomb Bay
Previous
Next
Bomb Distributor
Previous
Mode
Next
Bomb Distributor
Decrease
Salvo
Increase
Bomb Distributor
Decrease
Delay
Increase
Safely Jettison Bombs
Sight Distance
Decrease
Increase
Adjust Sight
Left
Right
Sight Altitude
Decrease
Increase
Sight Velocity
Decrease
Increase
Bombsight Automation Toggle
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 28
View Bombsight
Take-off
Aircraft
Select All Engines
Select #1 Engine
Select #2 Engine
Bail Out
Jettison Canopy/
Hatch/Door
Bail Out
From bombardier’s
position
Shift-F1
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 29
C.
Example Keyboard Layout
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 30
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 31
D.
Example List of Commands for Level Bombing and Checklist
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 32
E.
JU88 Performance Specifications
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 33
F.
Checklists
Key: KBO - Keyboard Assignment Only
Startup
Junkers JU-88 A-1 (Cliffs of Dover Beta Patch v 1.08.18956)
Task
Control
Operation
Illuminate cockpit
Primary and Secondary
illumination dials
Set at preferred level
Open Fuel Cocks
Fuel Cock Levers - Port and
Starboard
Set to left, right or both.
Confirm Radiators are
closed
Water and Oil Radiator Levers Port and Starboard
Set to closed
Set Magnetos for
ignition
Magneto Switch - Port and
Starboard
Set to M1+2
Throttle to idle
Throttle - Port and Starboard
Set to 5%
Ignition - Left Engine
Engine Selection Switch
Select left engine (No 1)
(KBO)
Ignition Button
Engage (KBO)
Engine Selection Switch
Select right engine (No 2) (KBO)
Ignition Button
Engage (KBO)
Select both engines
Engine Selection Switch
Select both engines (KBO)
Engine Warm Up
Water and Oil Radiator gauges.
Temperature to 40C
Set Take-Off Trim
Elevator Trim Control
Rotate one revolution
counter-clockwise
Set Flaps
Flap Lever
Adjust to “0”
Navigation Prep
see Navigation Pre-Flight
checklist
Taxi to assigned runway
Water and Oil Radiator Levers Port and Starboard
Ignition - Right Engine
Set to 30%
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 34
Navigation - Pre-Flight Checklist
Junkers JU-88 A-1
Task
Control
Operation
Engines idling
see start-up checklist
Align repeater compass
Adjust magnetic
compass
Adjust until aircraft direction is
at 12 o’clock
Align upper gyro band with
repeater compass
Gyro dial at lower right of
instrument
Adjust until upper gyro band
matches repeater compass.
Align lower gyro band with
desired course
Course Autopilot - adjust
left/right
Adjust until lower gyro band
matches desired course (KBO).
Align repeater compass to
course
Adjust magnetic
compass
Adjust until repeater compass
matches lower gyro band.
Take-Off
Junkers JU-88 A-1
Task
Radiators to 100% open
Control
Operation
Water and Oil Radiator
Levers - Port and Starboard
Set to 100% open
Throttle - Port and
Starboard
to 100%
Rotate
Flight Controls
At 185kmh
Landing Gear raise
Landing Gear lever
Set to retracted
Flaps to neutral
Flap lever
Set to neutral
Apply Brakes
Throttle Up
Release Brakes
Adjust to Climb or Cruise
condition as required.
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 35
Engage Autopilot Checklist
Junkers JU-88 A-1
Task
Control
Operation
Pre-Take Off Navigation
checklist completed.
Align aircraft to course on
lower gyro band
Normal flight controls
Adjust course as necessary
Engage Autopilot Course
Course Autopilot Next
Mode
Engage Autopilot Course
Landing
Junkers JU-88 A-1
Task
Control
Operation
Align aircraft with assigned
runway or join airfield pattern
Flight Controls
Throttle back
Throttle levers
Reduce IAS 250 kmh
Flaps to 25 degrees
Flaps lever
Adjust to “0”
Lower landing gear
Landing Gear lever
Adjust to down position.
Flaps to Landing
Flaps lever
. Adjust to landing condition
. Maintain 200 kmh
Late final approach
Flight Controls
. at airfield perimeter
. altitude 5-10 m
. 190 kmh
Raise landing flaps
Landing Flap lever
Adjust to retracted position on
touchdown.
Taxi as directed by airfield
traffic control
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 36
Salvo Bomb Run
Bomb Run - aircraft aligned with target, will be seen through bombsight
Task
Control
Pre Bomb Run,
Bomb Management
Operation
* Can be set from pilot’s
position.
Select all bomb bays
Select Previous/Next Bomb
Bay
Select All - KBO*
Select bomb distributor salvo
Previous/Next Bomb
Distributor Mode
Select Salvo - KBO*
Select bomb distributor
delay
Previous/Next Bomb
Distributor Salvo Quantity
Select 1 - KBO*
Set bombsight to estimated
altitude at bomb release
Decrease/Increase Sight
Distance
As required - KBO*
Set bombsight to estimated
TAS at bomb release
. IAS/TAS Table
. Decrease/Increase Sight
Velocity
As required - KBO*
Arm Bombs
Toggle Bombs Armed
Turn On - KBO*
Open Bomb Bay Doors
Open Bomb Bay Doors
Turn Bomb Bay Door
Handle anti-clockwise
Engage Autopilot R22
Course Autopilot - Previous/
Next Mode
Select R22 - KBO*
Align vertical cross-hair with
target.
Course Autopilot - Adjust
Course Left/Right, or
Directional Gyro - Decrease/
Increase
As required - KBO
Align horizontal cross-hair
with target.
Decrease/Increase Sight
Distance
As required - KBO
Engage Bombsight
Automation
Toggle Bombsight
Automation
Turn On - KBO
Update aircraft factors
(altitude and speed)
Altimeter and IAS
(remember TAS conversion)
Return to pilot position, note
factors.
Update Bombsight crosshair alignment and aircraft
factors.
The alignment and
factor update should be
continuously checked.
Must be completed by the
time the bombsight reaches
40 on the top left reading.
Bomb Run
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 37
G.
Airfield Elevation
IL2 Sturmovik - Cliffs of Dover Airfield elevations
UK AIRFIELDS
Bembridge 13m 43ft
Biggin Hill 179m 587ft
Boscombe Down 127m 417ft
Canterbury 51m 167ft
Croydon 101m 331ft
Eastchurch 7m 23ft
Farnborough 77m 253ft
Ford 1m 3ft
Gatwick 60m 197ft
Gosport 1m 3ft
Hamble 20m 66ft
Harewell 120m 394ft
Hawkinge 158m 518ft
Heathrow 23m 75ft
Hendon 50m 163ft
Heston 30m 98ft
Hornchurch 10m 33ft
Kenley 174m 571ft
Larkhill 114m 374ft
Lee On Solent 10m 33ft
Littlestone 22m 72ft
Lympne 100m 328ft
Maidstone 84m 275ft
Manston 44m 14ft
Netheravon 119m 390ft
North Weald 80m 262ft
Northolt 37m 121ft
Old Sarum 79m 259ft
Portsmouth 1m 3ft
Ramsgate 47m 154ft
Reading 46m 151ft
Redhill 24m 79ft
Rochester 130m 426ft
Rochford 10m 33ft
Ryde 52m 171ft
Salisbury 131m 430ft
Sandown 21m 69ft
Southampton 9m 30ft
Tangmere 12m 40ft
Thorney Island 1m 3ft
Upavon 147m 482ft
Watchfield 100m 328ft
Westhampnett 21m 69ft
White Waltham 36m 118ft
FRENCH AIRFIELDS
Abbeville 61m 200ft
Achiet Grevillers 127m 417ft
Amiens Allonville 89m 292ft
Amiens Glisy 59m 194ft
Aras St Liger 109m 358ft
Arras 98m 321ft
Audembert 42m 138ft
Barly 122m 400ft
Beaumont Le Roger 139m 456ft
Beauvais Villers 120m 394ft
Beauvais Tille 99m 325ft
Berk 1m 3ft
Bernay St Martin 161m 528ft
Boisjean Ecuires 57m 187ft
Brias 150m 492ft
Brombos 191m 627ft
Boulogne Alperch 69m 226ft
Caen Carpiquet 61m 200ft
Caffiers 112m 367ft
Calais Marck 2m 7ft
Carquebut 20m 197ft
Champ Les Guines 75m 246ft
Colembert 198m 649ft
Coquelles 13m 43ft
Cramont Yurtench 121m 397ft
Crecy 141m 462ft
Creil 101m 331ft
Crepon 59m 194ft
Deauville St Gatien 140m 459ft
Desvres 200m 656ft
Dieppe 101m 331ft
Estree 80m 262ft
Grandvilliers 180m 590ft
Guinness 46m 151ft
Haute Fontaine 180m 590ft
Horm Elingen 161m 528ft
Hydrequent 78m 256ft
Le Havre Octeville 96m 314ft
Le Touquet 1m 3ft
Licescourt 70m 230ft
Marquise West 24m 79ft
Merville Calonne 9m 30ft
Monchy Breton 150m 492ft
Montdidier 108m 354ft
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 38
Wilmington 22m 72ft
Yatesbury 170m 558ft
Oye- Plage 2m 7ft
Persan Beaumont 42m 138ft
Peuplingues 101m 331ft
Pihen 96m 315ft
Plumetot 40m 131ft
Poiy Nord 171m 561ft
Querqueville 1m 3ft
Rezy Norrent fontes 94m 308ft
Rosieres En Santifer 82m 269ft
Rouen Boos 140m 459ft
Roye Amy 83m 272ft
Samer 61m 200ft
Sempy 120m 394ft
St Inglevert 129m 423ft
St Omer Arques 29m 95ft
St Omer Clairmarais 9m 29ft
St Omer Wizernes 78m 256ft
Theville 135m 443ft
Tramecourt 126m 413ft
Wailly Beaucamp 51m 167ft
Wissant 21m 69ft
Yvrench 110m 361ft
Zutkerque 36m 118f
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 39
H.
CLoD Manual Metric IAS/TAS Table
II/JG53 JU88A-1 Technical Brief ♤ 40
Acknowledgements
The compilers of this document would like to acknowledge the contributions of Blackdog_kt and
ATAG_MajorBoris via the ATAG and 1C forums. They have been the leaders in researching how to
operate the JU88 in il2 Cliffs of Dover and their contribution to the community has been significant.
Other contributors:
ATAG_Keller
“Flea” for the JU88 Performance Data (Annex E).
Felipe - Airfield elevations (Annex G)
Members of the 1C and ATAG forums
Other References:
CLoD Key Command Kit: Cliffs of Dover Key Command Kit v1.0
Junkers JU88 Pilot Notes Translated: Ju-88 Pilot Notes Translated
http://www.allworldwars.com/Ju-88-Flying-Operations-Manual.html
Level Bombing Guide v2.0 by Thor, dated Oct. 28, 2012
Google Docs was used to produce this collaborative document.
We hope you find this Technical Brief on the JU88 interesting and informative. If you would like to
learn more about how to operate the JU88, or the bf109, the fastest way is to join an on-line squad.
Of course, we would recommend II/JG53! We have a Fighter School and a Bomber School and pilots
with hundreds, if not thousands, of hours of experience to show you the ropes.
In development is a series of videos to support the training material in this document. We expect
this to be released to the general public, although you will get more out of them if you view them in
conjunction with attendance at our classes (membership required).
If you enjoy flying the JU88 as a single player, our advanced bomber class takes it to the next
dimension. See you there!
Look forward to seeing you online.
Happy flying,
II/JG53_Felix
II/JG53_Marmusman
Compilers
1st September 2012
www.iijg53.com/

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