Westark students heroically rescue car/truck accident victims

Comments

Transcription

Westark students heroically rescue car/truck accident victims
Parlez-vous Francais?
From the desk of the President
of the United States: "National
Foreign Language Week gives all
of us the opportunity to examine
the importance of foreign
language study and to reassess
the position of language instruction in our educational system.
My awareness of the importance of linguistic skills has been
sharpened by my travels in Latin
America.
I learned the enormous value
of being able to communicate
freely and directly on a person-toperson basis.
Friendly and peaceful relations
among nations depend greatly on
improved communication
between their individual citizens.
Becoming fluent in another
language is one of the finest ways
of achieving such improved communication and promoting better
international understanding and
goodwill.
In the spirit of foreign language
I proclaim October 9-15 as
Foreign Language Study Week
for the Nation."
The governor of Arkansas
followed through with the
president's proclamation bv
proclaiming October 9-15 as
Foreign Language Study Week
for the State of Arkansas.
On Wednesday, October the
5th, Mayor Jack Freeze came to
Westark and with the witness of
the foreign language teachers
from here and from all the Junior
High and Senior High Schools
signed a proclamation proclaiming October 9-15 as Foreign
Language Study Week for the
city of Fort Smith.
In conjunction with foreign
language week, the LRC will
have a display on foreign
language books, records, etc., in
the library.
The nooners that week will
consist of a karate demonstration
and language classes presenting
songs in Spanish at noon on
Monday, October the 9th.
On October 12th and 13th a
French and Spanish Cuisine will
be held at noon in which 20
people can sign up to be official
tasters.
Anyone can watch but the people who would like to be the
tasters should sign up with Stacey
Jones in the Student Union.
There will also be spot announcements on various radio
stations regarding foreign
language studies.
Habla Esparno?
Nancy Zechiedrich, Spanish
teacher, stated; "We would like to
call on every Westark student to
learn a few words of some foreign
language during this week.
If you can already speak one
language so that you can make
yourself understood, you can
learn another one with greater
ease."
In conjunction with this the
language clubs will have a booth
in the union where foreign
language phrases will be taught.
The Foreign Language
Department is also sending a
survey to all the faculty and staff.
The survey pertaining to what
foreign countries have been
visited in the past year or a
lifetime, what foreign languages
have been studied, how they
would rate their knowledge now,
if they have considered a
"refresher" course and any comments they might like to make
about the advantages or disadvantages of speaking a second
language.
In the spirit of this coming
week, I commend all those who
are currently teaching or studying
a foreign language, and I encourage other fellow citizens to
do so."
Group counseling arrives
by Robbie Wilson
Westark's Guidance and
Counseling services are being expanded this semester to include
group counseling.
Group counseling is a new and
innovative method of helping
students solve their problems and
dilemmas.
The program was proposed by
Fred Hagemeier, a Fort
Smithian, who is finishing his
Master of Education degree in
Counseling at the University of
Arkansas, and interning here at
Westark.
He is working on this service
under Dr. Jack Cutler, Dean of
Students.
The main purpose of group
counseling is to encourage the
group members to grow to their
full potential.
The group, which will meet
approximately one and one half
hours, one evening a week for 12
weeks, is limited to eight
members.
The members, whose only requirements are that they be
healthy individuals capable of
learning and unlearning
behavior, will be asked to set their
own goals and support their
fellow group members in attaining their goals.
The function of the group
leader, Fred Hagemeier, is to
promote understanding and interaction, summarize, and aid in
resolving conflicts.
Everything said at the group
meetings will be held in strictest
confidence, by both the group
members and the group leaders.
Although group counseling
may seem similar in some aspects
to the concept of traditional individual counseling, group
counseling offers many positive
advantages.
One of the advantages is that
individuals are more open in a
group situation because of the
comfort and security associated
with participating with their
peers.
Another of the advantages is
that it helps them to learn to listen
and understand the problems of
others.
Also, their problems don't
seem as traumatic and difficult to
deal with when they can see and
listen to others who share the
same or similar predicaments as
them.
Mr. Hagemeier is also
available for individual counseling.
He can be found on campus
every Thursday morning and
Monday evening in the conference room in the Fullerton
student union.
He is here at Westark for the
benefit of each and every student,
and is anxious to meet and
aquaint himself with everyone
associated with our school and
the surrounding community.
When Mr. Hagemeier is not on
campus, you can make
arrangements to meet with him
through the Guidance and
Counseling office.
Group counseling is a much
needed addition to any college
campus, and Fred Hagemeier is
an energetic and concerned individual, who's willing to devote
his time aiding all of us with our
problems and teaching us to
define and achieve our goals.
in a way that looked like it was
so proud to say I am
going to am
hit us.
It finally came to a stop not
more than ten or twelve feet from
the front of the Westark van.
Somehow, the teenage boy
riding in the back of the truck fell
out and managed to jump clear.
He suffered only a bloody
nose.
The passenger inside and the
driver, the boy's father, were not
so lucky.
As soon as the truck stopped
rolling, Westark students rushed
over to offer aid.
The truck was resting on its
side with the gas tank split open
aand gas spilling out everywhere.
The cab was badly smashed.
Fellow students Robert O'Neal
and Larry Gantt rushed to help
free the two men.
The passenger was only stunned with multiple cuts and bruises,
the driver was badly cut and
unconscious.
While this was going on, Linda
Kelly, a passer-by and myself
were at the rear end of the truck
holding onto the chrome sport
rails to steady it.
Linda was yelling at the
bystanders asking for help in
FRED HAGEMEIER
(Photo by Phyllis Griffith)
Westark students heroically rescue car/truck accident
By. Eleanor Smalley
I
student from Westark.
Saturday, on the way back
from a leadership convention at
Searcy, Arkansas, the seven
members of Student National
Education Association and their
sponsor, Dr. Gordon, stopped at
a Pizza Inn to have supper.
As we were leaving we were
siting in the driveway waiting for
traffic to clear when we witnessed
a two vehicle accident.
A pickup truck and a car
collided with such force that the
pickup turned over several times
steadying the truck.
If anyone did, I didn't see them.
It did see Fred Gott standing
on the other side of the truck
holding onto the bumper and
underside of the truck.
Dr. Gordon, along with the
other students, Cheryl Jackson
and Frances Cotner, stayed with
the van and made sure it wasn't in
the way when the police rerouted
the traffic through the Pizza Inn
parking lot.
When I took a moment to look
towards the car I saw the occupants had gotten out and were
sitting nearby on the side of the
victims
road.
We were at the scene of the
accident for over an hour.
This made us about an hour or
so late getting home.
I
havent't he
family complaining, not once
they found out why we were late.
As I said, I am very proud that
I am one of the people from
Westark who helped; especially
when the passer-by who also
helped asked if we were from
Westark and upon being told that
we were grinned and said, "Oh,
Kaundart Country!"
Why college, pt. II
Irritable intersection
"It took me fifteen minutes to
turn off Waldron.
I wish they would do
something about that road.*'
These are the sentiments of the
Collegian.
We realize of course that some
students use the road problem for
an excuse of being late for class,
but in some real incidents this is
just the case.
It's not only bad for people in
cars but for pedestrians, also,
How many times have you sat
at Kinkead trying to turn left
from the school or on Waldron
trying to turn left to the school.
Or perhaps you are the
pedestrian trying to cross the
street.
Do you risk all and run, or wait
awhile longer.
What can be done about this?
Well as far |as we can tell,
nothing.
Fort Smith Traffic Control.
After I told the Administration
secretary who I was and what I
wanted she connected me to the
Engineering secretary.
After I told her who I was and
what I wanted she connected me
to the Traffic Department
secretary.
After I told her who I was and
what I wanted she connected me
to Richard Grim the Superintendent of Traffic Control.
After I told him who I was and
what I wanted, we got down to
business.
I
traffic problem at Kinkead and
Waldron and asked him if a fourway stop or a signal light could be
put up.
Mr. Grim was very familiar
with this problem and stated that
a spot check had been done on
this intersection on September
the first.
The intersection, however, did
not meet with the Arkansas Traffic Manual for multi-way stop or
a warrant signal.
Mr. Grim stated that all states
go by this manual and all intersections must meet the requirements before a signal or
multi-way stop could be issued.
TheI requirements for a multiway stop are:
1. There must be a rate of five
accidents in a 12 month period.
All accidents must be a right or
left angle collision, rear-end
collisions do not count.
2. A total of 500 vehicles
must travel the main road
(Waldron) per hours in a total of
8 hours. This does not have to be
Campus pay phones
You need to make an impor- for installing 5 more phones on
tant phone call.
campus.
You finally scrape together 20c The campus currently has only
for the call and suddenly you two pay phones which are locarealize that there is no telephone ted in the gym and the studentin sight.
Union.
Automatically you run and ask
Locations for the phones, also
a secretary or teacher if you can proposed by Brody, were outside
use their office phone.
the technical building, Gardner
This not only interferes, with building, and the library; inside
their business, but also ties up the locations were phones upstairs
line.
and downstairs in the Fullerton
Many Westarkians have ex- Student Union.
pressed the desperate need for
A letter was written to Stacey
pay phones on campus.
Jones, Activities Director, reEd Brody, member of the Stu- questing that these phones be
dent Activities Council, ap- installed at these locations.
proached this problem by making
Immediately Mr. Jones cona recommendation to the Council tacted Dean Cutler and Jim-
To continue where I left off last
week, here are some more student
responses to my two-fold question about why there are in
college and why at Westark.
Ellen Paul gave her reason as,
"curiosity."
8 consecutive hours but a total of She elaborated by saying, "I
felt and still feel even more so
8 hours.
3. A total of 200 vehicles and now that I've attended college.
pedestrians must travel the minor I've found that there is more out
road (Kinkead) per hour in a total there in the world than just
of 8 hours, again it does not have graduating from high school and
workingthethe rest of my days.
to be 8 consecutive
toldhours.
Mr. There
Grim about
Without going past a high
must also be a total of a 30 second
school education, my outlook on
delay for each vehicle.
The requirements for warrant life would probably have been
signals are twice that of the narrowed.
But college is a step that is my
above.
own
Mr. Grim did say, however, It isdecision.
my choice to reach out and
that plans are being made for the further
any knowledge that I
future on this intersection.
accidentally pick up.
He said it is in the budget for might
One thing I've noticed about
next year but it will be a year to a students
college is that
year and a half before anything in every attending
day conversations they
will be done.
of the future, they are
He did state however that at speak
looking ahead and have goals set
the present a time change will be for
themselves.
set for the warrant signals at 50th Why
Westark? It gives me a
and Grand, and Waldron and taste of college
life.
Grand which should help the flow I wanted to test
it out before I
of traffic.
went
on
to
a
larger
school.
Grim
alsoto suggested
an the I have really enjoyed
took Mr.
it upon
myself
call
Westark,
alternate route.
it
was
what
I
was
looking
for at
I don't know about the rest of
you but a year and a half is a long
way away.
Perhaps a petition could help The Lion's Roar
move things along.
Let's get on this and see what "The Trojett (Southwest High,
can be done.
Trojans), The Harding (Hardy
College), Tech (Arkansas Tech
D.A.M. University)."
"Hey, wait a minute, what's
this "the Trojett" stuff?"
"Well, it appears to me that the
majority of high school and
college newspapers have names
that relate to their school."
"So? What's the deal?"
Bolin, Dean of Business Affairs. What is the 'DEAL'?
After some discussion, it was The Collegian staff would like
agreed upon to establish two to bring to the attention of
phones in the Fullerton Student students, faculty and administration that though the name The
Union downstairs.
JimBolin made the final deci- Collegian' is an appropriate name
for a newspaper and that we are
sion.
In the past, there have been pay very proud of our newspaper, the
phones located outside the Gar- name just doesn't relate the paper
dner and Ballman-Speer to Westark.
We, as a new staff, would like
Buildings.
They were removed because of to introduce a new name for the
Westark paper, The Lion's Roar'
vandalism.
However to be truthful it is not
The phones are now in the
really a new name.
process of being installed.
At one point in Westark
These phones are put on campus for our benefit, so let's take history the title The Lion's Roar'
care of them.
D. S. M.
How 'bout feedback
Don't you like your newspaper
or perhaps you think it's perfect.
even the best journalist and staff
can't put out a paper to suit all.
But perhaps this staff has,
we're really not sure though.
In fact we don't know what to
think.
Perhaps you would like to give
your two cents worth but don't
know to whom or where.
We really would like to hear
from you, perhaps you have a
complaint or a comment or an
idea or just some news we didn't
catch.
Whatever the reason we want
to hear from all of you.
Boxes to the staff can be found
in room 105 in the Breedlove
Building to the left of the door.
Each staff member has their pertaining to a person connected
with sports, relay them to the
own box and it is so labeled.
Karla Plymale.for
If you
I have letters, commentshardlySports
believeEditor,
the latter,
Clubs should provide informaon the newspaper, or editorials
relay them to the Editor, tion to the Publicity Editor,
Eleanor Smalley, except for
Deborah A. Murray.
If you have comments on news special news in which they should
stories or have some news to relate back to the news editor.
Also anyone interested in takreport, relay them to the News
ing an ad in the paper or knows of
Editor, Deborah S. Murray.
If you have comments or someone Who would like to take
stories relating to Student Ac- an ad should get in touch with the
tivities, relay them to the Ac- Advertising Manager, Kelly
Sosebee.
tivities Editor, Fae Conner.
All editors will appreciate comIf you have ideas for feature
stories or would like a special ments and stories and will be
feature story on someone, feel willing to either write the story or
free to relay them to the Feature you may write the story and turn
it in to the correct editor.
Editor, Chuck Rush.
Please let us hear from each
If you have comments or
stories on sports of both inter- and everyone.
collegiate or intramural or stories
D.A.M.
the time.
It has a good staff of teachers,
more freedom than high school
and a casual atmosphere.
Also, I heard that it was a well I
thought of school so I gave it a
try.
A community college is a great
invention."
Dell Bray answered by saying,
"I came to college to maintain; a
family tradition.
Everyone in my family has
gone to college and I wanted to
keep it going.
Also, it was a school that gave
me a scholarship."
Of all the answers I received, I
believe this one from Robert
Moore was the most colorful if
not the most philosophical.
"It seems that if you want to get
ahead and get a good paying job
today you have to go to college,
unless you just want to pick
squash.
But before long you'll probably
have to get a degree in
squashology just to do that." I
What else can I say to top that.
Next week a similar series of
student comments will be on the
question, "How is college life
different from high school life."
T.W.
returns?
was the official name of the
paper.
I am sorry to report we do not
know why or when the name was
changed
All we have is issues dated from
1947 to 1957 With the title The
Lion's Roar.' The next record is
1963 with the title the
Collegian.'
We are not trying to insult
previous issues with the title The
Collegian. We only wish to give
the Westark Community College
newspaper a name bearing to
Westark.
We are very proud of our
school and would like our paper
to carry a banner, letting all who
read her know she is a true
Westarkian.
We are open to all students and
faculty for any suggestions or
ideas you may have for a title.
Contact Deborah A. Murray,
editor by dropping a note in the
editor's box, room 105,
Breedlove Building. D.A.M.
Page three
ACROSS
45
46
PREVIOUS PUZZLE
SOLUTION
(Photo by Robert Houston)
Page four
HOW TO CLEAR OBSTRUCTED AIRWAYS.
The chance to take a course in
"Obstructed Airways—How to
Clear" is still available to
residents of Fort Smith and surrounding communities through
Westark Community College.
Class participants will be
taught during the two-hours session how to save a spouse or
friend who suddenly chokes on
food, or help a child who has a
foreign object lodged in his
throat.
Instructor Lyman Long said he
knows people are interested in
learning the procedure and in
learning it with confidence.
"You only have four minutes to
dislodge something from a person's throat," Long said.
"Knowing how to do it properly will clear the airway and not
cause any other damage to ribs or
other body areas."
Long said the emphasis will be
on the short time period available
for saving a life and on the
procedures.
The two-hour classes are continuing at 1 to 3 p.m. Thursday,
Oct 13; 1 to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Oct.
18; 1 to 3 p.m. Wednesday, Oct.
26; and 7 to 9 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 26.
Long said the two hour
Westark class will be taught by
the standards of the National
Research Council.
Techniques to be taught in the
class will involve a conscious
patient who is either sitting or
standing, an unconscious patient
witnessed and not witnessed, a
pregnant woman and an infant
or a child.
Further information is
available at the Community Service Office at the college.
Registration and payment of
the $2 fee may be completed at
the Business Office, located in
the Vines Building.
NURSING ASSOCIATION MEETING
W.S.N .A. is the Westark Student Nursing Association, which
met on October 3, 1977, at 12
O'clock noon upstairs in the student union to discuss a drive to
raise funds for having a
Halloween party at Bost School
for Exceptional Children.
The guest speaker was Mrs.
Wanda Swafford, director of
Bost School.
Also discussed was the
membership drive which is in
progress right now, and ways to
make the public aware that there
are facilities for exceptional
children right here in Fort Smith.
The W.S.N.A. meets the first
Monday of every month upstairs in the student union at 12
o'clock noon with Mrs. Anita
Hammack and Mrs. Monica
Snyder as the sponsors.
Persons interested in joining
Westark Student Nursing
Association are urged to contact
Mrs. Carol Wood in the Nursing
department.
HALLELUJAH THERE'S GOING TO BE A CHOIR CONCERT.
"Hallelujah! Hallelujah! I will
serve my God forever more!"
These are a few enchanting
lines from the song, "Pilgrim's
Chorus" from "Tannhauser" by
Wagner, designed not only to
arouse you, but to intrigue you.
The Westark Choir will be
performing this song and many
more October 16, at 2:30 p.m. in
the Breedlove Auditorium.
The public is invited and there
is no admission charge.
Logan Green, Chairman of the
Department of Music, will be
conducting the concert.
The Choir members are music
students who have enrolled in the
choir class offered here.
Chosen choir selections will be
"There is a Balm in Gilead," by
Dawson; Oh, Dear! What can
the Matter be?" arranged by
Jubik; "Dis ol' Hammer," arrnaged by Hairston;' "Pilgrim's
Chorus" from "Tannhauser" by
Wagner; and "Coronation
Anthem No. 4," by Handel.
Ensemble selections will include "Dry Bones," "Battle of
Jericho," and "Raccoon Hunt."
u
MUSIC GUILD CONCERT
On September 27, the
Breedlove Auditorium was filled
with an abundance of enchanting
Italian and German art songs
performed by Bill J. Harper,
tenor, accompanied by Barbara
Crooks Enders at the piano.
The concert was sponsored by
the Westark Music Guild.
The Guild, which meets the
first of every month at 12:10 in
BB 101, has just elected new
officers.
They are president, Paula
Johnson; vice-president, Gordon
Wells; and secretary-treasurer,
Beverly Parker.
Persons interested in joining
are urged to contact Mr. Logan
Green in BB 102.
"Ten West Coast Artists,"
traveling exhibition of the
Arkansas Arts Center in Little
Rock, are now on exhibit
through October 21 in the
Breedlove Gallery at Westark
Community College.
This exhibit includes 10
original color lithographs by contemporary west coast artists.
Lithography, invented in 1798,
is an important medium, used by
an artist to achieve an infinite
variety of effects.
independent workshops in the
fifties and sixties were influential
in involving many artists in
lithography.
Exhibit hours are 6 to 9 p.m.
Monday through Friday and 1 to
4 p.m. on Sundays, according to
Walter Minniear, chairman of
the Humanities Division at the
college.
This exhibit is part of the
Arkansas Arts Center's State Services traveling exhibits program.
MEETING CANCELLED
This is a special notice to all
involved with the Mental Health
Education Program.
Due to the fact that our
scheduled speaker will be out of
town, the next month's Mental
Health Education Program has
been postponed.
The newly scheduled date will
be announced in the next issue.
V.A. OFFICERS
On Tuesday, September 27th,
the Westark Veteran's Association elected their officers for the
Fall semester, 1977.
The officers are Richard Livas,
President; Carl Humphries, Vicepresident, Alexa Sumroc,
Secretary; Robert Carver,
Treasurer; and Joe Atkinson as
Master-at-arms.
Faculty sponsors for the club
are Dr. Kraby, Dr. Dodson,
Dean Cutler, Mr. Peters, Mr.
Porter, and Mr. Mynatt.
The next meeting for the
Veteran's Club is scheduled for
Wednesday, Oct. 12, 1977, in
Room 606 of the Technical Complex at 5:30 p.m.
All veterans are urged to attend.
Page five
Cash prizes offered for winning writing
by Fae Conner
Would you like to be the
winner of $100 or $50 or even $25
in cash and book prizes.
Your opportunity is here.
Writers of the best short story,
humorous essay, or other short
pieces between 250 and 1,000
words are awarded these prizes.
The deadline for this contest is
November 5, 1977.
All writers entering the contest
will receive a free copy of the
COLLEGE CONTEMPORARIES magazine.
Rules and official entry froms
may be obtained by sending a
self-addressed, stamped envelope
to: International Publications,
4747 Fountain Avenue, Dept. C3, Los Angeles, CA 90020.
You say that you can not write
but that you are a poet!
Well, we have something for
2. All entries must be original
you too.
and unpublished.
International Publications is
3. All entries must be typed,
sponsoring a National College double-spaced, on one side of the
Poetry Contest which is open to page only. Each poem must be on
all college and university students a separate sheet and must bear, in
desiring to have their poetry the upper left-hand corner, the
anthologized.
NAME AND ADDRESS of the
CASH prizes will go to the top student as well as the COLLEGE
attended.
five poems.
First place prize is $100, second
4. There are no restrictions
place is $50, third place is $25 and on form or theme. Length of
fourth and fifth are $10.
poems may be up to fourteen
There will also be awards of lines. Each poem must have a
free printing for all accepted separate title. (Avoid "Untitled"!)
manuscripts in International Small black and white ilPublications book, AMERICAN lustrations welcome.
COLLEGIATE POETS.
5. The judges' decision will be
Deadline for entry is October final. No information by phone!
6. Entrants should keep a
25, 1976.
The following are contest rules copy of all entries as they cannot
be returned. Prize winners and all
and restrictions:
1. Any student is eligible to authors awarded free publication
will be notified immediately after
submit his verse.
Typists using new learning
In the course, one works with
all of these materials in close
cooperation with an instructor
If one were to pass by room 106 until he has achieved the kind of
in the Vines building he might mastery of typing skills and forms
think it a mad house instead of a that employers will expect from
him in an actual job.
class.
Tests have shown that students
But the story is, it is a class, the
using the AVT system learn more
typing system class.
The AVT system is a recently completely and in less time than
developed teaching-learning students taking a similar course
method that makes it possible for taught by the traditional
one to master new material faster classroom method.
The AVT course is student
and more effectively than in the
centered, and is for the student to
traditional classroom method.
This system combines printed proceed at his own pace and on
materials (like a Student Hand- his own schedule and if one is
book) with recorded tapes already fully qualified in any part
(audio), sets of slides or films of the material covered in the
(visual), a nd the individual atten- course, he doesn't have to repeat
tion of a skilled instructor it.
When both student and in(tutorial) in order to achieve
minimum learning effectiveness. structor decide that he is ready,
by Deborah A. Murray
STUDENT USING new typing system. (Photo by David King)
system
he will take the progress and final
tests for the course with the
assurance that he can achieve a
score of at least 80% on each test.
A pretest is taken so that the
student and the instructor can
find out what one already knows
about typing.
The instructor may authorize
him to skip lessons covering
material with which he is already
familiar.
He will also comp e, for the
instructor's records, a student
authorization form found in the
handbook.
This form is his passport
through the AVT Introductory
Typing course.
When the course is started the
instructor or learning center aide
will show one how to operate the
equipment he will be using: a slide
projector, a cassette tape player,
and the particular typewriter on
which he will be learning to type.
The students' responsibilities
are to study handbooks, ask instructors and student worker
questions and do all lessons.
The grading is based on four
theory tests and a final unit test.
These grades are averaged with
the grades on three other best
three-or five minute writings.
If one scores below C, on any
theory test, he may work in the
areas in which he is weak and
then retake the test.
The typing system was
presented to Westark by Mr.
Paul Leggett, who is also an
instructor of the course, and instructor of business math and
office machines and has taught at
Westark for ten years.
Mr. Nolan Licky, Chairman of
the Business Department, says
there is also a Machine
Transcription class which will be
opened next semester that will
work on this system and there is a
hope in the near future the
Shorthand system will be opened.
Mr. Leggett stated that this
system is great, "The first week
was very hectic and there is a lot to
iron out.
The students of the typing
system seems to share Mr.
Leggetts ideas, however, an advanced typing student stated that
compared to last year, "It is
confusing at first, but it is better,
especially for beginning typists."
deadline. International
Publications will retain first
publication rights for accepted
poems. Foreign language poems
are welcome.
7. There is an initial one
dollar registration fee for the first
entry and a fee of fifty cents for
each additional poem. It is re-
quested to submit no more than
ten poems per entrant.
8. All entries must be postmarked not later than the above
deadline and fees be paid, cash,
check or money order, to
INTERNATIONAL
PUBLICATIONS
4747 Fountain Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90029
Veteran's
Corner
Why should the veterans at Westark feel a need for a Veteran's
Club?
The meeting on the 27th of September brought to the front of the
mind of everyone present the problems that a veteran must face
when enrolling for school.
One of the problems is financial.
From the veterans viewpoint, most of the general public feel that
because a veteran is going to school on his GI bill that he can afford
to pay his tuition, buy his books (anywhere from $50 to $150), meet
his household expenses, and pay his children's school expenses.
This is not true.
After a veteran enrolls, the time period involved before the
receipt of his first check can be anywhere from from 6 weeks to 8 or
10 weeks.
Could you afford to meet all of your expenses for two or three
months without any other assistance?
Our meeting this week emphasized the need for an organization
on campus specifically organized to assist others over this very
rought period.
A young veteran came to the meeting to ask for assistance.
He did not want charity but he was asking if we could help to
make his transition to student status at Westark a little smoother
and maybe allow him to remain in school.
This young man's utilities had been turned off, his family was
hungry, and the car that he purchased to enable him to get back and
forth to school was giving him trouble.
The easy way out would be to just quit school and go to work, but
how can you get ahead in the world without an education?
He was trying to help himself, he had not attended school for one
week during which time he obtained a full-time day job.
This did enable him to get some food and to pay his utility bills,
but he still needed some way to make it until his VA check arrived in
another month.
If he did remain on his job and drop out of school, he would still
have to repay the government any money that he had received this
semester.
This young man and all of the other veterans have served their
country when called on to do so and now they would like to
continue their education to be better able to support themselves and
their families.
So one of the reasons that there is an effort to get a club
established, is in the hope that some of the resources of this college
town can be compiled and, as need is found, utilize this aid to help
the veteran ENROLL in school and STAY in school.
There are lots of married women who have joint charge accounts
with their husbands who are wondering about the slips of paper they
are receiving with their bills asking whether they want credit
information about those accounts reported in their names as well as
their husbands.
The forms are being put out under the order of the Equal Credit
Opportunity Act, and women should think seriously before letting the
opportunity pass.
People who have never before had credit often have trouble getting
.t.
For years, credit information on married couples was reported in the
husbands names.
Women who are divorced or widowed may find that even though
their bills are paid on time, they have trouble getting credit because
those payments were made in their husbands' name.
Reports on accounts established after June 1, 1977. will
automatically be seperated for husbands and wives, but older accounts
must be changed by request.
Before you throw that form away, call the Consumer Protection
Division of Attorney General Bill Clinton's office free by dialing 1-800482-8982 and talk it over.
Thursday, October 6, 1977
Only fall will tell what is
in store for the spring
with four unbeaten teams
Flag football treks onward
Carter's beating Elrod's 21-0; and
BSU whipping Atkin's 14-7.
Atkin's also suffered at the
hands of the Knight's, 28-7.
Play continues through the
month of November with several
rainouts planning to be
rescheduled.
The Lion's baseball team is
having a terrific fall season.
After losing the opener of a
double header to John Brown University, the team has not lost a
twinbill since to the likes of
Bacone, Carl Albert, and Arkansas Tech.
Commenting about the practice games, Coach Crowder
believes the players are making
progress and things are coming
along pretty well.
He is expecting the team to
make a very good showing in the
spring.
Rick Riddley, right fielder,
feels that these fall games serve
the purpose of finding out what
the team needs to do to get in tune
for the spring season.
Greg Stanfill, pitcher, said that
practices are coming along great;
"sometimes we play fine."
Stan Clark, left fielder, mentioned that it is obvious that
everyone is working hard with
good team unity and a desire to
win.
In talking about the pitchers,
Jeff Strassle, one of the hurlers,
commented that "the staff has
great depth, strong arms and a lot
of potential.
I feel that we can come through
in tight situations."
The Collegian staff hopes the
team keeps up the winning ways.
Only spring will tell and
everybody is looking forward to
it.
Page seven
in tournament
Thursday, October 6, 1977
play
COLLEGIATE
RESEARCH
PAPERS
Golfers finish high
After taking a nine stroke lead
at the end of the first day of play,
Westark golfers faltered into a
disappointing second place finish
behind Seminole in their second
tournament outing of the fall
campaign last week at the
Seminole Fall Classic in
Seminole, Oklahoma.
Seminole, the host team,
finished the two day tourney with
a winning total team score of608.
Westark placed nine strokes
behind with a 617 total, followed
by Northeastern Oklahoma at
623, Claremore at 625, and Carl
Un se'vioo publico de este
penocfico y del Advertising Council
Albert at 650.
Tournament medalist was Jim
Shaffer from Northeastern
Oklahoma with a 147.
Westark individual scores
were: Neal Waygood with a 151,
Ronnie Ocker with a 154, Kevin
Laymon with a 156, Charles Fore
with a 158, and Mark Amos with
a 165.
Coach Ron Richard commented about the second place
finish by saying: "The tournament went terrible.
We had a big lead after the first
day and blew it.
We ended up getting beat by
nine strokes.
That means Seminole picked
up eighteen strokes the second
day.
It wasjustoneof those days for
us."
The golfers next tournament is
scheduled for October 13th and
14th at the Claremore Fall Invitational at Claremore,
Oklahoma.
Westark will take their still
very impressive fall record into
the tourney with hopes of returning to their tournament winning
form.
Choose from our library of 7,000 topics.
All papers have been prepared by our
staff of professional writers to insure
excellence.
Send $1.00 (air mail
postage) for the current edition of our
mail order catalog.
EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS
P.O. Box 25916-E,
Los Angeles, Calif. 90025
Name
; We also provide original
research — all fields.
Thesis and dissertation
assistance also available.
1!
Pero ha de pasar mucho
tiempo hasta que los habitantes de Guam lo olviden. Y
ha de pasar m u c h o tiempo
hasta que la Cruz Roja lo
olvide, pues tambien estuvimos ahi.
Aunque usted no lo crea, en
los ultimos 12 meses hemos
prestado auxilios en 30,000
desastres similares al de
Guam. Por eso nuestros fondos estan desastrosamente
bajos. Y por 6so tenemos que
contar con su respaldo continuo. iAyudenos!
Las cdsas que nosotros
hacemos ayudan a su vez. En
su propio vecindario. A traves
del continente. Y del mundo.
Guam
conto
am
nosotros.
Address.
City
State
After the first three weeks of
i intramural mixed bowling, a
: close chase for the top spot has
developed between three teams.
Superstars, 60 Plus, and Odd
Balls are all closely packed at the
top of the heap.
Individual leaders continue to
be Steve Cope in the men's division and Kathy Fraleigh in the
(Women's division.
2315 S. 57th St.
Fort Smith, AR 72901
Phone:(501)452-0400
COMPLETE LEVI S STORE
FOR ALL GUYS AND GALS
Announcing: T i l e
i C l i & l e t
SPECIAL: Fish and Chips Every Tuesday
$1.39
"A GREAT PLACE TO EAT"
Now Open Under New Management
Call In Orders Welcome
1920 Grand Avenue
La Cruz Roja.
Elbuenveano.
Assistance
ALL SUBJECTS
Zip
Three teams
battle for lead
in intramural
El furioso tifon que destruyo
Guam el 22 de Mayo de 1976
ya no es una noticia de primera
plana.
Contamos
con usted.
RESEARCH
782-1240
Hours 10:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Monday through Saturday ,
2:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Sunday
Team standings after three
weeks are:
Superstars
60 Plus
Odd Balls
Keglers
High& Light
Junkies
Kings Court
Won
11
10
9
6
5
5
2
Lst
1
2
3
6
7
7
10
Tl Pins
4892
5102
4881
4923
4849
4453
4412
Steve Cope holds the men's
high scratch game so far with a
236 and he also sits at the top of
the men's high scratch series with
a 585.
Kathy Fraleigh leads the
women' high scratch games with
a 179 and also series with a 460.
In the handicap column, James
Lipscomb leads with a 242 game
and 617 series in the men's division.
Leisha Caperton has rolled a
handicap 225 and Terri Winters a
617 series to lead the women's
handicap division.
The individual members of
each team are: Superstars Joey
Butler, Paul Kinder, Terri
Winters, and Mary Miilican; 60
Plus, Kathy Fraleigh, Fae Conner, Tom Walton, and Stacey
Jones; Odd Balls, Mark Amos,
Lisa Carlisle, Doug Walker, and
Connie Jones; Keglers, Rodney
Woods, Cindy Counts, and Steve
Cope; High & Light, Lee Pruitt,
Leisha Caperton, Nancy Law,
and Benny Spears; Junkies, Lisa
Brown, Joy Fallin, Bob Nelson,
and Danny Vernon; Kings Court,
Cheryl Majors, Esther Fawcett,
James Lipscomb, and Alan
Greenwood.
Page eight
Try to remember those events from
Thursday, October 6, 1977
September
Student Activities Council show their support of the United
Way Campaign by participating in the raft race on September
17th. The riders are Greg Rickman, Jim Kolp, Carl Willis, and
Alan Greenwood, Mike Stec, and
STUDENTS BOOGIE it on down at Disco Dance, Friday, Sept.
23. One of Student Activities more favorable events are the regular
dances.
A "Glenn Miller Medley" was just one of the numbers
performed by the U. S. Air Force Jazz Ensemble at a free
concert in the gym on September 10th.
Larry Edward of Westark Yamaha displayed one of his
gliders and answered questions about hang gliding on the circle
in front of the student union on September 15th and 16th. A
community service class on hang gliding will be starting soon.
The traditional "first week" activities included getting a
truckload of cold watermelons and then trying to get them cut
and eaten before they got warm.
Siherhawk make their first appearance at a "nooner" in the
student union on September 7th.
Photos by David King, Bob Nelson and Phyllis
Griffith

Similar documents