Toddler hit by car dies

Transcription

Toddler hit by car dies
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Saturday, May 9, 2015
Toddler
hit by
car dies
WEATHER
TODAY
High:
70
Low:
50
WHAT A
W RLD
By JONATHAN BISSONNETTE
[email protected]
Local and wire reports
BARK WORSE
THAN HIS BANG
MOUNTAIN HOME, Ark.
(AP) — An Arkansas veterinarian has kept a dog from
going out with a bang after
the animal ate 23 live rifle
rounds.
The Baxter Bulletin reports
that 4-year-old Belgian
Malinois, Benno, had surgery
last week to remove the .308
caliber ammunition from his
stomach.
Owner Larry Brassfield
says Benno has eaten socks,
magnets and marbles but he
didn't expect the animal
would bother a bag of bullets
by his bed. Brassfield and his
wife realized Benno needed
medical attention after the pet
vomited up four rounds.
The vet removed 17 rounds
from Benno's stomach but left
two in his esophagus, which
the dog was allowed to discharge on his own. Brassfield
says he won't leave ammo
lying around anymore.
The Times/Ernest A. Brown
Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo takes a walking tour of Main Street in Pawtucket with Pawtucket Mayor Donald
Grebien, center right, and other city and state officials on Friday. The governor was in the city to talk about her jobs
plan.
GOVERNOR, MAYOR TOUR
MAIN STREET BUSINESS
Raimondo, Grebien also discuss future of McCoy Stadium
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By JONATHAN BISSONNETTE
[email protected]
PAWTUCKET – Arti and Shekhar
Mehta would love to see Main Street
thrive, and as the owners of Artee
Fabrics & Home, they believe their
business and their building — located at 228 Main St. — can be a catalyst in the revitalization of the city's
downtown area.
The fabric store and the soon-tobe occupied property above the shop
were visited on Friday morning by
Gov. Gina Raimondo, Mayor Donald
R. Grebien, and other city officials
as part of a discussion on
Raimondo's jobs plan.
Shekhar Mehta said that Artee
Fabrics has been in the space on
Main Street since 2009. They rehabilitated a building that was “not in
good condition … bringing it back to
life,” doing so during the bleakest
periods of the recession, noting “we
took the chance.”
Shekhar Mehta said he hoped to
see Artee Fabrics become “the seed”
that brings life to the entire downtown area.
“We're hoping to get more activity, more positive things. If there's
100 more people, that's 100 more
opportunities,” Shekhar Mehta said.
“It's for everybody.”
Arti Mehta explained that the plan
is to “get all of Main Street up,” noting that it takes cooperation between
the businesses and city and state
officials to make it happen.
“Where there's a will, there's a
way,” she said, later adding, “To
make something work, you need to
have two hands shaking each other.
One hand can't do all the work.”
Arti Mehta said their property –
which houses Artee Fabrics & Home
on the first floor and this summer
will house a yoga studio on the second floor and nursing teaching faciliSee TOUR, Page A2
PAWTUCKET – Reports
late Friday indicated that the
16-month-old boy who was
struck by a vehicle driven
by his father earlier this
week has died.
Police detectives interviewed the father of the boy
– identified by Pawtucket
Police as Maxwell Teixeira
Det. Sgt. Paul Brandley said
on Wednesday. They reported in a statement that “at
this time, it (the incident)
appears to be a tragic accident.”
However, police noted
the investigation was ongoing.
At about 2:20 p.m.
Tuesday, police and fire personnel responded to 829
Main St. for a report of a
toddler struck by a vehicle.
Officers and rescue personnel arriving at the scene
found the boy seriously
injured, but details about his
injuries were not released.
The infant was accidentally struck by his father as
he went to move the vehicle, police later said, adding
that family members and
other witnesses say the
boy's father was backing out
of the driveway and didn't
see the child who may have
been playing with a toy.
The boy was transported
to Hasbro Children's
Hospital in critical condition.
Officers located video
footage, which was
reviewed by detectives, captured on a nearby surveillance camera. The video
footage supports the
accounts relayed to detectives, police said.
Follow Jonathan
Bissonnette on Twitter
@J_Bissonnette.
INDEX
Amusements........................B2
Comics................................B3
Obituaries............................A5
Opinion................................A4
Sports..................................C1
Television...........................B2
C.F. man convicted
on sex assault charges
By JONATHAN BISSONNETTE
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Vol. CXXVIIl
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CENTRAL FALLS – A city man
on Wednesday was found guilty of
two counts of first-degree sexual
assault stemming from an incident in
2014 in which he sexually assaulted
a woman he believed at the time to
be his biological daughter, the
Attorney General's Office said.
A Providence County Superior
Court jury also found the man –
Ernest Sabourin, 75, with a last
known address on Earle Street in
Central Falls – guilty of one count of
second-degree sexual assault and two
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counts of simple assault.
During the course of the trial, the
state proved that on April 5, 2014
and into the morning of April 6,
2014, Sabourin sexually assaulted a
23-year-old woman, who at the time
he believed to be his biological
daughter, the AG's office said.
On April 5, the woman went to a
party with relatives where she consumed “a significant amount of alcohol,” the AG's office said. Partygoers
transported her to Sabourin's home,
where she passed out on the couch.
Sabourin then sexually assaulted
See GUILTY, Page A2
Outdoor sex romp gets
100,000 Facebook views
Woonsocket couple arrested, charged
By RUSS OLIVO
[email protected]
WOONSOCKET – Two people were arrested after a video
of them having sex in public
was seen by more than 100,000
viewers on Facebook and other
Internet venues.
Danny Domenic Folco, 33,
of Woonsocket, and Jennifer
Bonsante, 35, of Smithfield,
were charged with one count
each of indecent exposure,
according to Detective Sgt.
Matt Ryan.
Police investigated a complaint of a couple having sex in
the parking lot of Family Dollar
on Clinton Street about 6:40
p.m. Monday. Arriving officers
found Folco and Bonsante fully
clothed and they denied the
allegations, so no arrests were
made at the time.
They were arrested Thursday
night after the video became
widely circulated. It depicts
Folco and Bonsanto with their
pants dropped around their
knees. Bonsanto can be seen
See SEX, Page A2
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FROM PAGE ONE/NATION
A2 THE TIMES
Saturday, May 9, 2015
Obama pitches trade at Nike
with jobs, labor rights at issue
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP)
— President Barack
Obama's case for international trade agreements is
built on three main arguments: The right trade deal
can create jobs at home,
counter China's economic
influence abroad and raise
labor and environmental
standards by U.S. trading
partners.
A visit to Nike headquarters on Friday allows
Obama to address at least
two of the three.
The giant athletic apparel
company is pledging to create 10,000 jobs in the
United States over 10 years
with its manufacturing partners if Congress gives
Obama "fast-track" trade
negotiating authority that
ultimately leads to the 12country Trans-Pacific free
commerce agreement.
The company says a
Trans-Pacific trade deal
would allow it to benefit
from lower tariffs on shoes
and speed up company
investments in footwear
manufacturing in the U.S.
But the 10,000 jobs
would be a small fraction of
the overseas workforce Nike
relies for manufacturing. Of
Nike's slightly more than 1
million factory contract
workers, more than 9 out of
10 are in Asia, with the
largest number in low-wage
Vietnam.
Nike, with such massive
outsourcing of manufacturing, also provides Obama
with an opportunity to talk
about labor standards he
seeks to enforce with trade
partners, particularly
Vietnam where the U.S.
concedes that worker-rights
protections fall short of
international standards. Of
the 11 countries the U.S. is
negotiating with in the
Trans-Pacific talks, seven
have manufacturers that
contract with Nike for shoes
or apparel.
Still, Obama's visit to
Oregon has created a backlash. Nike represents what
many liberal groups and
labor unions criticize about
trade deals: the potential for
shifting U.S. jobs to other
countries with cheap labor
and few worker protections.
What's more, Nike has had
to overcome a bad image
over its foreign contractors.
Outside a Democratic
Party fundraiser Thursday
night, more than 200 protesters greeted the president's arrival with chants of:
"Hey, hey, ho, ho, fast track
has got to go." Under the
authority Obama wants,
Congress could accept or
reject a trade agreement, but
not amend it.
Two decades ago, Nike
came under heavy criticism
for its use of foreign sweatshops, including numerous
reports of child labor, low
wages and poor working
conditions. Under intense
public pressure, Nike
improved conditions and
eventually wages climbed,
minimum-age requirements
were put in place and Nike
increased training and monitoring at the factories.
"We've made significant
improvements and driven
positive change for workers
in contract factories that
make Nike product," Nike
spokesman Greg Rossiter
said in a statement to The
Associated Press.
Despite the advances and
Nike's image makeover,
labor issues have continued
to plague its contracted
manufacturers. An
Associated Press investigation in 2011 found that
workers making Nikeowned Converse sneakers in
Indonesia said supervisors
abused them physically and
verbally. And in its latest
report on "sustainable business performance" Nike
found that one-third of its
contract manufacturers in
2013 did not meet its minimum standards — an
improvement over 2011
when half of the manufacturers fell short. Most of the
problems were over hours
and wages.
"Nike fully supports the
inclusion of strong labor
provisions because we
believe they will drive higher industry standards and
create economic growth that
benefits everyone," Nike's
Rossiter said.
But a Government
Accountability Office report
last year found that while
some Latin American countries under current free-trade
agreements have taken steps
to strengthen labor rights,
enforcement was limited
and monitoring of labor
standards in those countries
by U.S. agencies was inconsistent.
Rep. Earl Blumenauer, a
Democrat who represents
Portland and is supporting
Obama's trade agenda, is
pushing for an enforcement
trust fund to improve oversight.
"I agree enforcement is a
problem," Blumenauer said.
"I'm not through trying to
make it better."
Justice Dept. launches its own
investigation of Baltimore police
WASHINGTON (AP) —
The Justice Department
waded anew Friday into
fraught, big city police-community relations, with new
Attorney General Loretta
Lynch declaring the subject
"one of the most challenging
issues of our time." She
announced a wide-ranging
investigation into Baltimore's
police.
The federal civil rights
investigation, which city officials sought following the
death last month of a man in
police custody, will search
for discriminatory policing
practices and examine allegations that Baltimore officers too often use excessive
force and make unconstitutional searches and arrests.
The investigation is to
build upon the government's
voluntary and collaborative
review of the Baltimore
police that began last year.
Since then, the death of 25year-old Freddie Gray and
the days of rioting that followed exposed a "serious
erosion of public trust,"
Lynch said, and showed that
community concerns about
the police were more pervasive than initially understood
and that a broader investigation was warranted.
"It was clear to a number
of people looking at this situation that the community's
rather frayed trust — to use
an understatement — was
even worse and has, in
effect, been severed in terms
of the relationship with the
police department," Lynch
said.
The announcement indicated that Lynch, who was
sworn in last week as the
successor to Eric Holder, is
likely to keep the Justice
Department engaged in a
national dialogue about race
relations and law enforcement. That issue consumed
the final year of Holder's
tenure and flared most vividly last summer following the
shooting death of an
unarmed black 18-year-old
by a Ferguson, Missouri,
police officer.
The federal department
has undertaken dozens of
other city police investigations, including more than 20
during Holder's tenure. If
THE TIMES
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they find systemic civil
rights violations, the investigations typically result in
court-enforceable agreements
between the federal government and the local community that serve as blueprints for
change and are overseen by
an independent monitor. The
Justice Department has the
option of suing a police
department that is unwilling
to make changes.
In some cases, such as in
Ferguson — where Justice
found sweeping patterns of
racial discrimination — the
federal government has initiated the process on its own;
in others, including in
Cleveland and Albuquerque,
New Mexico, city officials
made the request.
A separate Justice
Department review of
Baltimore police policies, by
the Community Oriented
Police Services office, will
continue but its findings will
be folded into the new civil
rights investigation
announced on Friday, Lynch
said.
Lynch visited Baltimore
earlier this week to meet
with city and community
leaders as well as Gray's
family.
"We're talking about generations, not only of mistrust,
but generations of communities that feel very separated
from government overall,"
she said on Friday. "So
you're talking about situations where there's a flashpoint occurrence that coalesces years of frustration
and anger. That's what I
think you saw in Baltimore."
The Times/Ernest A. Brown
Gov. Gina Raimondo, left and Mayor Donald Grebien, center, listen to the concerns of business owner Arti Mehta at her business Artee Fabrics and Home Store in Pawtucket Friday.
Tour
ty on the third floor – is “here to make
things better.”
Raimondo, Grebien, and the myriad officials toured the first two floors of the
building Friday afternoon. After the tour,
Raimondo said she felt it was “extremely
important” to have businesses and owners
who are invested in their community and
the revitalization of a downtown area.
“Rhode Island needs an economic comeback, and everybody has a role to play, and
that includes our local businesses,”
Raimondo said. “They need also to step up
and be part of the comeback and we're so
lucky to have businesses like Artee and
others that say 'We want to invest. We want
to invest in Pawtucket. We want to invest
in Rhode Island'.”
“And then our job – my job and the
mayor's job – is to make Rhode Island a
place that is easy to do business and not
expensive to do business so that they do
want to invest,” the governor added.
Raimondo said she has proposed a comprehensive jobs plan to the local General
Assembly, which could help along the
process of revitalizing economies across
the Ocean State.
The plan “includes programs around
training people, programs to jump start real
estate development, getting rid of regulations that are burdensome, making it easier
to get permits … So we have to make it
easier and cheaper to do business in Rhode
Island. If we do that, then businesses will
want to expand here and add jobs here,”
Raimondo added.
Sex
pressing her buttocks in a
thrusting motion against
Folco’s lap as he rests
against a wall behind a blue
metal dropoff box for used
books.
The location is less than
a tenth of a mile from
police headquarters, and
even closer to Woonsocket
Harris Public Library.
Ryan said the police
weren’t anxious to draw
attention to the arrests, but
they issued a press release
after a number of media
Guilty
the woman, the AG's office
said. At some point during
the assault, the victim
blacked out.
The following morning,
the woman filed a complaint with the Central
Falls Police Department
and an examination was
performed and a sexual
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Dr. David A. Vito
Dr. Carl D. Corrow
Dr. John D. Corrow
Follow Jonathan Bissonnette on Twitter
@J_Bissonnette.
outlets made inquiries about
the video.
“That’s something you
downplay,” he said. “That’s
not the kind of behavior we
want to be associated with
our city.”
Ryan said police don’t
know who took the video,
which last just a few seconds. A female voice can be
heard on the video chastising the couple: “You could
get a room! You know that,
right?”
Folco and Bonsante
quickly pull up their pants
once they realize they’re
being watched, and the
videotape abruptly ends.
The video initially
appeared on the website
Barstool Sports and was
widely shared on Facebook.
A copy was also uploaded
to YouTube.
Barstool Sports added a
bit of satirical commentary
to the video.
“Aahhhh Woonsocket,
one of the most romantic
getaways in the world,” it
says. “As soon as you get
there you can just feel the
love in the air. It’s
America’s Paris.”
assault evidence kit was
taken at Women and
Infants Hospital in
Providence, the AG's office
said.
DNA evidence taken
from Sabourin matched the
DNA from the sexual
assault evidence kit. The
DNA also proved that the
victim and Sabourin were
not father and daughter as
they had previously
thought, the AG's office
said.
Sabourin has previously
been convicted of indecent
assault and carnal knowledge of a child in 1978 and
felony assault upon a
woman in 2002, according
to the AG's office.
Follow Russ Olivo on
Twitter @russolivo.
Follow Jonathan
Bissonnette on Twitter
@J_Bissonnette.
Woman who singer Chris Brown found in his home faces charges
LOS ANGELES (AP) —
A woman who authorities
say broke into the Los
Angeles-area home of
Chris Brown and spent
several days there before
he returned has been
For missed deliveries or damaged papers on weekends,
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Arti Mehta later said she would much
rather try to rehabilitate an older building
in a downtown area than move into a
brand-new building at a state-of-the-art
shopping plaza.
“It's easy to destroy old buildings and
build new ones … this gives a lot of character … you have to put in the effort,” Arti
Mehta said.
The property on Main Street is in an
ideal location, Arti Mehta said, offering
“beautiful architecture.”
While in Pawtucket Friday, Raimondo
also briefly discussed the proposal that
would move the Pawtucket Red Sox to a
new riverfront ballpark in Providence.
“As I've said, I would love it if the
PawSox could stay in Rhode Island, but at
what price is the question. And my job is to
protect the taxpayers, and I'm trying to go
slow and be thoughtful to make sure the
taxpayers get a good deal,” the governor
said.
Raimondo also said that she and Grebien
discussed what the future could hold for
McCoy Stadium if and when the team does
depart from Pawtucket.
“We talked a little bit about it.
Obviously, as the mayor of Pawtucket, he
cares deeply about this and he hasn't totally
given up. He wants to continue to talk to
the owners about the possibility of them
staying here, but he's also thinking about it
the right way, which is if they won't stay
here, then what's the highest and best use
of McCoy, and I think that's the right way
to think about it,” Raimondo said.
Dr. J. Lawrence Norton
Dr. Matthew D. Doyle
Dr. Michael R. Martinez
charged with felony burglary, stalking and vandalism.
The Los Angeles County
District Attorney's office
said Friday that it filed the
charges against 21-year-old
Amira Kodcia Ayeb.
Her arraignment was
scheduled for the afternoon.
Brown called the Los
Angeles County Sheriff's
Department around 8:30
p.m. Wednesday to report
finding an intruder at his
home in the city of Agoura
Hills.
The district attorney's
office said in a news
release that prosecutors
believe Ayeb broke in May
2, and over the next four
days vandalized Brown's
house and cars.
A representative for
Brown did not return a
request for comment.
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LOCAL
Saturday, May 9, 2015
Speaker promises closer look
at budget, HealthSourceRI
AWARDS NIGHT
Health exchange
worries Mattiello
By JOSEPH B. NADEAU
[email protected]
The Times/Ernest A. Brown
John Baxter, second from left, Pawtucket Arts Festival Board of Directors chairman, presents
the festival’s inaugural Medal of Excellence to Herb Weiss, second from right, Pawtucket economic development and cultural affairs officer, for his17 years of service to the Pawtucket Arts
Foundation during the Curtain Up! fundraiser Thursday at the Blackstone Valley Visitor Center
in Pawtucket. With them are Paul Palange, left, The Times/The Call general manager/advertising director; and Kathy Needham, the newspapers’ controller. The Times was honored with the
festival’s Working River Award.
Jobs return to center stage
on General Assembly floor
PROVIDENCE — Here
are the highlights from news
and events that took place in
the General Assembly this
week. For more information
on any of these items visit
http://www.rilin.state.ri.us/Ne
ws/
• Bill sponsors, speaker,
governor tout job creation
proposal
Speaker of the House
Nicholas A. Mattiello (DDist. 15, Cranston) was
joined by Gov. Gina M.
Raimondo and bill sponsors
to promote job creation legislation before the General
Assembly this session. Rep.
K. Joseph Shekarchi (D-Dist.
23, Warwick) introduced the
House bill (2015-H 5116)
and Sen. James C. Sheehan
(D-Dist. 36, North
Kingstown, Narragansett)
sponsored the Senate bill
(2015-S 0222). During a
news conference at the
InterLink Transportation Hub
garage in Warwick, the four
discussed the Qualified Jobs
Incentive Act, which encourages new and existing companies to grow and add new
jobs through a number of
personal and business tax
incentives.
• Governor, Senate
President open new state
pier at Fort Adams
Gov. Gina M. Raimondo
and President of the Senate
M. Teresa Paiva Weed (DDist. 13, Newport,
Jamestown), along with
Department of
Environmental Management
Director Janet Coit, officially
opened the new public pier at
Fort Adams State Park in
Newport. Construction on
the pier began in April 2014
to improve public access to
Narragansett Bay. The 240foot-long pier — with seven
rows of floating docks and a
public pump-out station —
was funded through the
state’s annual capital
improvement program. The
new North Pier is one of several capital improvements at
Fort Adams, and the opening
of the pier coincided with the
arrival of the Volvo Ocean
Race yachts, their crews and
race enthusiasts. The Volvo
teams are expected to stay in
Newport until mid-May, and
then head out on the next leg
of the race that began last
October.
• Legislation enacting
proposed pension settlement introduced
Rep. Raymond E.
Gallison Jr. (D-Dist. 69,
Bristol, Portsmouth) and Sen.
Daniel Da Ponte (D-Dist. 14,
East Providence) introduced
legislation (2015-H 6181,
2015-S 876) to enact the
terms proposed in a potential
settlement of unions’ lawsuit
over the state’s 2011 changes
to the state employee pension
system. The settlement,
which would provide small
cost-of-living increases and
changes to retirement-age
requirements, must be
approved by the General
Assembly to take effect.
THIS WEEK AT THE
RI STATEHOUSE
• Racial profiling bills
heard, headed for Senate
vote
The House and Senate
Judiciary Committees took
testimony on legislation
aimed at addressing police
racial profiling by requiring
data collection on police
stops and prohibiting police
searches of juveniles without
probable cause. The legislation (2015-H 5819, 2015-S
0669), sponsored by Rep.
Joseph S. Almeida (D-Dist.
12, Providence) and Sen.
Harold M. Metts (D-Dist. 6,
Providence), was recommended for full passage in
the Senate and held for further study by the House committee.
• Sen. Nesselbush bill
would increase sex assault
minimum penalty to 20
years
Sen. Donna M.
Nesselbush (D-Dist. 15,
Pawtucket, North
Providence) has submitted
legislation (2015-S 0882)
that would increase the minimum penalty for first degree
sexual assault from 10 to 20
years. The bill would also
create a category of aggravating circumstances wherein
the first 10 years of any sentence for first-degree sexual
assault would be ineligible
for the benefits of deferment
or suspension.
• Sen. Morgan’s sex
trafficking bill heads to
THE TIMES A3
governor’s desk
Both houses of the
General Assembly have
passed a bill (2015-S 0123)
introduced by Sen. Elaine J.
Morgan (R-Dist. 34,
Charlestown, Exeter,
Hopkinton, Richmond, West
Greenwich) that would
increase the penalties for
criminal offenses involving
the sex trafficking of a
minor. The bill now heads to
the governor. A similar bill
(2015-H 5070) sponsored by
Rep. Doreen M. Costa (RDist. 31, North Kingstown,
Exeter) was passed by the
House and is scheduled for a
vote in the Senate.
• Three election mail
ballot reform bills pass
House
The House passed three
bills reforming the mail ballot process during state elections. 2015-H 5951, sponsored by Rep. Robert E.
Craven (D-Dist. 32, North
Kingstown), changes the
time period in which mail
ballots must be securely
stored. 2015-H 5934, sponsored by Rep. Jeremiah T.
O’Grady (D-Dist. 46,
Lincoln, Pawtucket), changes
the procedure for counting
mail ballots. 2015-H 5930,
sponsored by Rep. Carlos E.
Tobon (D-Dist. 58,
Pawtucket), allows mail ballot applications and emergency mail ballot applications to also serve as an affirmation form for inactive voters, as long as the voter’s
application address is where
the voter is registered.
• Defense Economy
Planning Commission
holds meeting on cyber
security
The Joint Defense
Economy Planning
Commission held a meeting
regarding cyber security and
its potential threats and positive opportunities for Rhode
Island.
RUSTY WATER NOTICE
HYDRANT FLUSHING
The Pawtucket Water Supply Board has
begun our hydrant flushing program.This
is a semi-annual procedure to remove
the bulk of accumulated sediments in the
water mains and to improve water quality
throughout the distribution system.
We will be flushing the following hydrants next week:
Central Falls
The entire city on the Broad St East side and
working towards the Lonsdale West side sections
SUNDAY, May 10th thru
THURSDAY, May 14th
8:00 PM to 4:00 AM
Our customers in this area may experience some
discolored water and lower than normal water
pressure. Allow your cold water to run for a
short time to clear lines. We apologize for any
inconvenience this may cause you.
Thank you for your cooperation.
PROVIDENCE – With
the General Assembly in
the middle of its work on a
new state budget, a few
topics, such as what to do
with the state heath care
exchange set up under the
federal Affordable Care
Act, remain to be decided.
The state heath care
exchange is one of the articles in Gov. Gina M.
Raimondo’s proposed
budget that faces changes
from the General Assembly
before the budget process
closes.
Federal operational support for the state exchange
is winding down in the current budget and the state
would have to appropriate
a sum of money as a new
budget line item to keep
the exchange a state operation. The alternative is for
the state to modify the current system and rely on the
federally-operated
exchange as the source for
individual and small group
coverage now managed by
the state exchange,
HealthSource RI.
House Speaker Nicholas
A. Mattiello pointed to the
health exchange as a potential budget concern while
discussing the status of the
House’s budget work this
week.
Mattiello said the House
will be looking at certain
aspects of the governor’s
budget articles for potential
change as the budget work
continues.
Mattiello noted he has
already promised to restore
busing services and books
for Rhode Island private
and parochial schools that
were cut by the governor,
and also plans to reverse a
new state tax on second
homes, valued at over $1
million.
The House leadership
will also be taking a close
look at Raimondo’s proposed job creation plan
under Article 29, Mattiello
noted.
“I’ve always said I
applaud the governor and I
agree with her on incentives for job creation,”
Mattiello said. “And the
governor and myself will
ultimately be on the same
page regarding that, but I
think we need more controls and a little refining
and tweaking of the provisions in that article and that
is an ongoing discussion.”
Send your
local news
items to:
[email protected]
pawtuckettimes.com
Mattiello added that he
plans to continue working
with the governor and
Senate President M. Teresa
Paiva Weed to “make a
good proposal that much
better.”
As for HealthSource RI,
Mattiello said from his
view “the state system has
to be competitive in cost
with the federal system or
even less expensive than
the federal system.”
“So I have to be convinced that it would
become competitive and
that it will remain competitive for the long term in
order for it to remain a
state agency, and I’m not
convinced right now,”
Mattiello said.
It may be that the current system will have to
transition to the federal
system,” Mattiello said.
Under Raimondo’s
budget proposal, a new
state “assessment” on
health care premiums for
small employers and individuals would generate an
expected $11.8 million, of
which $6.2 million would
go to covering the costs of
running HealthSource RI in
2015 along with expiring
federal support. The new
funding would replace the
federal assistance that had
been in place to get the
program up and running.
The state expected the following year’s operating
costs for HealthSource RI
to again total $11.8 million.
The state program currently serves 30,001 individuals and another 10,000
customers under the small
group market. Individual
plans obtained by participants would be charged a
4.7 percent assessment
Maureen
Plouff
Another year has
passed and you
are still missed
every day - Happy
Mother's Day!
Love, Denise,
Becky, Sam & Joey
Marlene
Davis
Good morning, Mom.
Hope you have a
great Mother's Day!
Mom: you are the
greatest mom ever!
We love you.
Jake Davis &
Mason Davis
under the proposed budget
changes. and group market
plans just under 1 percent.
Paiva Weed said
Thursday that the health
exchange currently exists
through an executive order
and she does not believe
that setup provides enough
oversight in running the
exchange.
And while the exchange
would be state-funded for
the first time in the coming
budget, Paiva Weed said
the method of generating
that revenue may need
more work.
“I am concerned about
the assessments in that program and I think we should
look at alternative funding
methods,” she said.
“I believe in the state
exchange if the program is
structured to provide the
legislature with the necessary oversight,” she said.
State Sen. Joshua Miller
(D-Dist. 20, Cranston),
chairman of the Senate
Committee on Health and
Human Services, said the
question before the General
Assembly this year may be
how it can fund the most
“accessible and user friendly’ method of providing
affordable health care to
Rhode Islanders seeking
such coverage.
“I think the most effective exchange for Rhode
Island is not necessarily the
least expensive model,” he
said. And while some have
pointed to transitioning to
the federal program as a
way to lower the cost of
the coverage provided,
Miller said the federal system also has the potential
“to be as expensive or
more expensive that the
state exchange.”
Renee
Happy Mother's
Day to the best
mom ever.
I will luv u forever.
I am so glad
you're my mom.
Love, Ryan
Bea Malo
Loving wishes from
your 2 daughters,
6 grandchildren, 9
great-grandchildren
and 1 great-great
grandchild.
You are the best!
OPINION
Page A4
Regional Publisher: Jody Boucher
General Manager/Advertising Director: Paul Palange
Regional Controller: Kathleen Needham
Executive Editor: Bianca Pavoncello
Managing Editor: David Pepin
Sports Editor: Seth Bromley
Assistant Editor News: Russ Olivo
Distribution Manager: Jorge Londono
THE TIMES — Saturday, May 9, 2015
Everyone should
stop judging poor moms
About 30 percent of low-income parents
can't afford to change their children's diapers frequently enough, according to a Yale
University study. My organization,
National Diaper Bank Network, helps distribute diapers to those families in need.
But in the course of doing this work, we
sometimes encounter people who are
appalled by our effort: One man called me
screaming that impoverished moms should
"just use newspaper!" to diaper their
infants. In letters and phone calls, others
have accused us of encouraging mothers to
keep "breeding." (Barnyard animals breed,
mind you. Women have babies.) Our critics
believe the women who come to us are bad
mothers who should not have had children
in the first place. (We rarely get criticism
of fathers, as if women become pregnant
all by themselves.) They find the fact that
we are helping these mothers offensive.
It's not just diapers. The tendency to
brand low-income moms as "bad" extends
to how they feed their children (no candy!)
and entertain them (no swimming!). But
these perspectives make me wonder: What
makes a mother bad?
I'm a middle-class mom who has absentmindedly sent my kids to school without
lunch and missed deadlines for permission
slips. And, like low-income parents who
struggle to pay for diapers, there are
aspects of motherhood that I wasn't prepared for, either. I had a child with a chronic illness, and we had her on ineffective
treatment for a long time. Most would
agree that making sure your child gets
proper medical care is fundamental to
being a good parent, but it took years
before we got her the care she needed.
And yet, no one has ever accused me of
being a bad mother. Money covered my
many shortcomings. Those late permission
slips could be faxed in because I had a
landline and a fax machine, and because I
was fortunate enough to send my kids to an
adequately staffed school that had the time
to help out busy parents. And because we
could afford it, my husband and I went to
specialist after specialist until we found the
best care for our daughter. In many small
ways every day, middle-class resources
eased the pressures of raising three kids.
I'm proud of the people my kids grew up to
be, but while some of that is a result of
them being inherently terrific human
beings who were loved and supported, it
also comes from simply having enough
money and resources to keep our busy
lives running relatively smoothly.
Contrast that with the moms who rely
on diaper banks to keep their babies clean,
dry and healthy. Most child-care centers
require a family to provide a supply of disposable diapers. Families who can't afford
them can't get child care, which means the
parents can't work. And so parents are
branded as lazy and unmotivated, and are
accused of exploiting the system. Kids
from low-income homes miss school
because their parents can't afford detergent
to clean their uniforms, or because they
need to babysit younger siblings while
their parents apply for jobs. If you don't
send your kids to school, it doesn't necessarily mean you're a bad parent — it often
means you have only bad options.
America is big on the idea of pulling
yourself up by your bootstraps. But raising
a family on a low-wage job can leave you
strapless. Diapers for one infant cost an
average of $18 a week, or $936 a year. For
GUEST COMMENTARY
By Joanne Samuel Goldblum
parents with minimum-wage jobs, making
$15,080 a year, diapers alone eat up about
six percent of their paychecks. Meanwhile,
public support has provided less and less
help, even as diapers and other child-care
prices have risen. Some forms of federal
assistance have not kept pace with inflation, according to the Center on Budget
and Policy Priorities. The nonpartisan
research institute, in a review of the
Temporary Assistance for Needy Families
program (established by the 1996 welfare
reform law), wrote, "The amount of cash
assistance provided to families has eroded
in almost every state, leaving families
without sufficient funds to meet their most
basic needs."
When families cannot meet their most
basic needs, kids show up to school looking "neglected," because they aren't wearing the proper clothes for the weather.
Parents miss school appointments because
they can't afford bus fare. And babies go an
entire day or longer without a diaper
change because families need to make their
diapers last. Child-care providers even
have developed a phrase — "Monday
morning rash" — to describe how babies
from low-income families sometimes
arrive after a weekend of infrequent diaper
changes. These problems are not evidence
of bad parenting but of bad public policy.
None of this, of course, satisfies those
who say that people should not have kids
they cannot afford. They don't acknowledge that poverty often comes after the
children are already born. I am struck by
how often I encounter families who were
financially stable before a catastrophic illness hit. (Medical costs are the most common cause of bankruptcy in the United
States.) My organization also talks with
families who have been brought down by
long-term layoffs and with women who
were pulled into poverty when they left
abusive relationships. Everybody has a
story, and passing judgment based only on
what you see a parent buying at the grocery store or picking up at a diaper bank is
never a good idea.
On Mother's Day, many moms do not
get taken out to brunch or presented with
potted plants. For them, Mother's Day is
just like any other day — a struggle to get
by. There is one gift we can collectively
give them, though: We can stop judging.
We can throw away the good mother/bad
mother distinction. We can recognize that
most mothers genuinely want to do what is
best for their children. It is simply much
easier for some of us than for others.
Joanne Samuel Goldblum is the mother
of three children, a social worker and the
executive director of the National Diaper
Bank
As others see it: Terrorism
The following editorial appeared in
Friday's Washington Post:
There is no doubt that Kenya merits
U.S. support as a frontline state in the war
against terror. But some of Nairobi's rhetorical and policy responses to that challenge
could stifle civil society and inflame the
conditions that fuel radicalization.
Last month, members of the Somali
Islamist terror group al-Shabab conducted
a horrific attack at a university in Garissa,
gunning down nearly 150 people, including
142 students. The terrorists sought out
young Christians to be murdered. The massacre came some two years after alShabab's rampage at the Westgate shopping
mall in Nairobi, which left 67 dead.
Garissa was the worst terror attack in the
country since the 1998 bombing of the
U.S. Embassy in Nairobi.
The gruesome Garissa attack refocused
the world's attention on the murderous
exploits of al-Shabab — and on the difficult challenges Kenya faces in combating
the group. A long, porous border with
Somalia is one such challenge. The nation
deserves Western backing to meet the
threat. But it's important that Kenya not
react in ways that aggravate the danger.
Kenya's deputy president, William Ruto,
called upon the United Nations in April to
close the Dadaab refugee camp near the
border with Somalia. Dadaab, which was
set up in 1991 after Somalia's political collapse, is home to more than 400,000
Somalis and is the largest refugee camp in
the world. Ruto gave the U.N. High
Commissioner for Refugees 90 days to
close the camp before Kenya forcibly relocates it.
Such rhetoric serves only to alienate and
further marginalize Kenya's Somali population, exacerbating the divisions, both religious and ethnic, that al-Shabab exploits.
In a visit to Kenya this week, Secretary of
State John F. Kerry rightly said the solution
lies in solving Somalia's problems, not in
closing the camp. The United States
pledged $45 million in additional funding
to assist UNHCR refugee programs in
Kenya. On Wednesday, Kenyan President
Uhuru Kenyatta backtracked on the threat
to close the camp, saying that Kenya "has
been and will continue fulfilling its international obligations."
The United States should focus concern
on Kenya's tightening control over civil
society and media under the pretext of
fighting terrorism. In December, Kenya's
government deregistered more than 500
nongovernmental organizations, freezing
bank accounts and canceling foreign work
permits.
Restrictive laws have impeded the
media's ability to report on the government's security tactics. NGOs and journalists that criticize Kenya's counterterror
strategy risk reprisals. Kenyan police
forces and their anti-terror unit have been
accused of committing serious human
rights abuses with impunity, including
extrajudicial killings and violent raids on
Somali-Kenyan communities.
Mr. Kerry's visit to Kenya and surprise
trip to Somalia, along with President
Obama's planned visit to his father's homeland in July, signal an increased engagement with the region. The engagement is
welcome, but it must include a clear message that respect for human rights and civil
society is essential to an effective counterterrorism strategy.
Populism could divide the
Grand Old Party
If Republicans are baffled by Hillary
Clinton’s persistent lead in the polls despite
months of bad publicity, they need only
examine the tensions on display in their
party over the past few days.
It would be hard to conceive of a worse
stretch for Clinton than a
period that began with
scrutiny of her use of a
private email server
while she was secretary
of state and moved to
saturation coverage of
the Clinton Foundation’s
fundraising. Let’s stipulate first that her trustworthiness has taken a
E.J. Dionne
hit. In addition, it should
always be said that polls
this early are not predictive of next year’s
election and that Clinton’s nearly universal
name recognition helps her numbers.
Nonetheless, there was the Wall Street
Journal/NBC News poll released Monday,
showing Clinton ahead of both Jeb Bush
and Marco Rubio by six points, Scott
Walker by 10 and Rand Paul by three.
The New York Times/CBS News poll,
released a day later, showed what the GOP
is up against: Only 29 percent of Americans
had a favorable view of the Republican
Party, while 43 percent had a positive view
of the Democrats.
The survey also documented a steady but
little-noticed trend: Americans are becoming less conservative. In the fall of 2010,
the Times/CBS poll found, there were twice
as many self-described conservatives as liberals: 19 percent of Americans called themselves liberal, 38 percent called themselves
conservative. In the latest poll, liberals
stood at 25 percent, conservatives at 33 percent. In less than five years, a 19-point margin has shrunk to eight points.
Republicans and conservatives have a
brand problem. Their presidential campaign
will only aggravate it as candidates are
forced to double-down on an ideology that
is in danger of decline. Moreover, the next
year is likely to intensify deep stresses
inside their coalition. Mike Huckabee gleefully highlighted these frictions when he
announced his presidential candidacy, and
Clinton moved quickly to exploit them.
If Democrats have a problem with white
working-class voters, Huckabee brought
home how Republicans have challenges of
their own. While the GOP’s candidates fall
all over themselves to cater to ultra-rich
donors whose taxes the Republican hopefuls promise to cut, the party’s rank-and-file
have reason to wonder what’s in all this for
them. This is a real predicament for a party
whose money base is privileged but whose
loyalists are not. In a Washington Post/ABC
News survey in late March, 37 percent of
registered voters who identified themselves
as Republican earned less than $50,000 a
year. Another 34 percent earned between
$50,000 and $100,000 a year.
Huckabee spoke directly to these voters
on Tuesday. “I grew up blue-collar, not
blue-blood,” he declared. “I never have
been and won’t be the favorite candidate of
those in the Washington-to-Wall Street corridor of power.” His campaign, he added,
“will be funded and fueled not by billionaires but by working people across
America.”
It made you wonder: Is there an
Elizabeth Warren wing of the Republican
Party?
The big-money groups, starting with
Club for Growth Action, went to work
immediately to knock Huckabee aside.
Raising the class contradictions inside the
GOP coalition — as both Rick Santorum
and Newt Gingrich did with Mitt Romney
— is the last thing the party’s billionaire
caucus wants.
Republicans typically try to keep their
working-class voters onside by appealing to
them on social issues and immigration.
That’s why Clinton’s sideswipe at the
Republican field on the immigration issue
was a sophisticated form of wedge politics.
“Not a single Republican candidate,
announced or potential, is clearly and consistently supporting a path to citizenship”
for illegal immigrants, she said Tuesday in a
speech in Las Vegas. “Not one.”
Her goal was to put pressure especially
on Rubio and Bush. They hope to shore up
the GOP share among Latino voters, who
went 71 percent for President Obama in
2012. But both are in a box because, while
57 percent of all Americans favored a path
to citizenship in the latest Times/CBS poll,
only 38 percent of Republicans did. It’s no
wonder that their respective trumpets on the
immigration question have given a decidedly uncertain sound.
Republicans hope that if they can just stir
up enough doubts about Clinton, one of
their candidates will make it through in
2016. Perhaps this can work. But their antiClinton focus will do little to resolve the
underlying weaknesses of an ideology and a
party that, even against a 67-year-old
Democrat, do not look like the wave of the
future.
Read more from E.J. Dionne’s archive,
follow him on Twitter.
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OBITUARIES
Saturday, May 9, 2015
Marjorie R. Townsend; first woman to manage NASA launch
By MEGAN McDONOUGH
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The Washington Post
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Marcia Brown;
children’s book
illustrator
NEW YORK (AP) —
Marcia Brown, a celebrated
author and illustrator of children's books and three-time
Caldecott Medal winner
whose work ranged from the
bold strokes of “Once a
Mouse” to the more abstract
and lyrical sketches of
“Cinderella,” has died.
Brown died April 28 of
congestive heart failure at her
home in Laguna Hills,
California, publisher Simon
& Schuster announced
Friday. She was 96.
Brown won the Caldecott,
the highest honor for children's picture books, for
“Cinderella,” “Once a
Mouse” and “Shadow.” She
was a National Book Award
nominee in 1983 for
“Shadow” and in 1992
received a Laura Ingalls
Wilder Award for lifetime
achievement.
She is survived by her editor and longtime companion
Janet Loranger.
A native of Rochester,
New York, she had dreamed
of being an artist since childhood, but decided at first that
teaching was a safer choice.
She majored in English at the
New York State College for
Teachers (now the University
of Albany) and taught high
school English for three
years, continuing to paint
during the summer. She later
studied art at the New School
for Social Research and
absorbed the narratives of
children's books while working at the New York Public
Library.
17th ANNIVERSARY
EDDIE
E.
NAVARRO
May 9
Although we smile and go our way
We miss you more than words can say
And when old times we often recall
It’s then we miss you most of all.
Love Always, Mom & William
THE TIMES A5
WASHINGTON, D.C. —
Marjorie R. Townsend, an electrical
engineer who became the first
woman to manage a U.S. spacecraft
launch, died April 4 at a hospital.
She was 85.
A spokeswoman for the D.C.
Medical Examiner’s Office said the
cause of death has not been determined.
In 1959, Townsend was one of
the first female engineers to join
NASA. In the next decade, she
became the first female spacecraft
project manager at NASA’s
Goddard Space Flight Center in
Greenbelt, Maryland.
From the mid-1960s to 1975, she
managed the agency’s small astronomy satellite program, where she
was responsible for the design, construction, testing and orbital operations of NASA’s first astronomical
spacecrafts.
Most notably, she oversaw the
development and launch of Uhuru,
the world’s first X-ray astronomy
satellite. The space instrument,
launched in 1970 in Kenya, was
used to detect, survey and map
celestial X-ray sources and gamma
ray emissions. It was the first U.S.
spacecraft to be launched by another
country (Italy) in a foreign location
NASA photo
Johns Hopkins University’s Applied
Physics project manager Henry
Riblet, left, and NASA Goddard Space
Flight Center Project Manager Margie
Townsend inspect a spacecraft prior
to testing in 1974.
(the coast of Kenya).
According to the American
Association for the Advancement of
Science, the findings from the
Uhuru launch “quadrupled the number of X-ray sources known at the
time.”
"It was a really important
moment in the history of astronomy,” Josh Grindlay, a professor of
practical astronomy at Harvard
University, told the science association. The data collected from Uhuru
helped revolutionize the field of
high-energy astronomy and astrophysics, which examines the universe in terms of wavelengths and
examines high-energy phenomenon
such as black holes.
Townsend served as the program
manager for NASA’s applications
explorer missions program before
retiring in 1980. For her contributions, she received the agency’s
Exceptional Service Medal and
Outstanding Leadership Medal.
Marjorie Trees Rhodes was born
on March 12, 1930, in Washington.
Her father was an engineer and
inventor. She enrolled in college at
age 15 and, in 1951, became the
first woman to receive an engineering degree from George Washington
University.
“The thought seems to lurk in
people’s minds that women go into
a man’s field to catch a husband. In
fact, there was a wager on the line
when I went to school that I would
get married and never graduate,”
she told The Washington Post in
1957. “That gentleman had to pay”
up.
Early on, she was a physical science aide at what is now the
National Institute of Standards and
Technology. and worked on sonar
signal-processing mechanisms for
anti-submarine warfare at the Naval
Research Laboratory.
She moved to NASA’s Goddard
Flight Center in 1959 and helped
develop the first successful weather
satellites, including TIROS-1 and
the Nimbus satellite series.
After her retirement, she worked
with Washington-area government
contractors. She was director of
space systems engineering at BDM
International, and then vice president for space systems development
for Space America until her second
retirement in 1996.
She was named a Knight of the
Italian Republic Order for her contributions to U.S.-Italian space
efforts in 1972. She was also chairman of a local chapter of the
American Institute of Aeronautics
and Astronautics, past president of
the Washington Academy of
Sciences, and a fellow of the
Institute of Electrical and
Electronics Engineers.
Her husband of 53 years, Charles
Townsend, died in 2001. Survivors
include four sons, Charles “Chet”
Townsend Jr. of Fort Denaud,
Florida., John Townsend of Ellicott
City, Maryland, and Lewis
Townsend and Richard Townsend,
both of Potomac, Maryland.; 11
grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren.
Guy Carawan; promoted ‘We Shall Overcome’ as civil rights anthem
By EMILY LANGER
The Washington Post
The tempo marking for
“We Shall Overcome” reads
“moderately slow with
determination.” Slowly but
with determination — and
with help from folk musician Guy Carawan — is how
that song was transformed
from age-old spiritual to
labor protest music to the
anthem of the civil rights
movement.
Carawan, who died May
2 at 87, served for decades
as a leader of what is now
the Highlander Research and
Education Center in New
Market, Tennessee, a gathering place for social-justice
activists whose visitors over
the years included Rosa
Parks and the Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr.
Often traveling with a
bulky recorder, Carawan
spent much of his life collecting and preserving folk
songs so that they would not
be lost in the rush of time.
“We Shall Overcome,” with
its promise of deliverance
over struggle, was only one
of those numbers. But few, if
any, others matched its
enduring resonance.
Accounts of the song’s
history trace its origins to
"I’ll Be All Right Someday,"
a spiritual sung by slaves in
the American South. With
modifications by Charles
Albert Tindley, a minister
whose life spanned the end
of the 19th century and the
beginning of the 20th, the
song grew in popularity as
the church hymn “I’ll
Overcome Someday.”
In later years, labor
activists — most prominently a group of striking cigar
factory workers in
Charleston, South Carolina,
in the mid-1940s — adopted
the song for their cause.
They were credited with
evoking solidarity by changing the singular “I” to the
plural “we,” proclaiming,
“We will overcome, and we
will win our rights someday.”
Labor workers were said
to have taught the song to
Zilphia Horton, the musician
and social-justice activist
who preceded Carawan as
music director of the
Highlander Folk School, as
it was then known.
She was credited with
singing it for Pete Seeger,
the folk troubadour who
popularized tunes such as “If
I Had a Hammer” and “This
Land Is Your Land,” along
with “We Shall Overcome.”
In his version of the song,
Seeger preferred the verb
“shall” instead of “will,” he
said, because it “opens up
the mouth better.”
A turning point in the
song’s history came in 1950,
when Seeger recalled that he
taught it to Carawan.
Carawan joined the
Highlander center later that
decade and sang it for civilrights activists who met
there. They, in turn, sang it
at protests and in prison.
In 1960, Carawan performed it in Raleigh, North
Carolina, at the founding of
the Student Nonviolent
Coordinating Committee, an
organization that would help
fuel the civil rights movement for years.
“Playing music at these
kinds of situations, it wasn’t
just another form of entertainment,” he once told the
Chicago Tribune, which
reported that he had been
jailed four times. “It was
sustenance for people going
through hard times.”
The protesters, Carawan
said, enlivened the song with
their own touches.
“They said to me, in a
nice way, ‘Put that guitar
down, boy,’ ” he told the Los
Angeles Times in 2003.
“They had a way of singing
with a Motown beat. They
started singing with a triplet
rhythm . . . an insistent beat;
it was real powerful and just
caught on that way.”
In March 1965, President
Lyndon Johnson used the
song’s words in a speech
calling for legislation that
became the Voting Rights
Act of 1965. Three years
later, King cited its chorus
— “Deep in my heart, I do
believe, we shall overcome”
Mother’s Day Remembrance
Elsie Yates Lynch
May 10
HAPPY BIRTHDAY
It seems like it was just yesterday
that we first met.
I never stop thinking about you
my darling, you are the love of
my life and my best friend.
Sadly Missed,
Husband Pete & Family
Mother’s Day Remembrance
May 9
A face that is ever before us
A voice that we cannot forget
A smile that will linger forever
In memory we see him yet.
Love Always, Dad, Kayla,
Arnovia & Angel Gabriel
2nd ANNIVERSARY
In Loving Memory
including “Ain’t You Got a
Right to the Tree of Life?,” a
photographic, oral and musical history of the culture of
the Gullah community
descended from African
slaves.
The Carawans also wrote
“We Shall Overcome!” and
“Freedom Is a Constant
Struggle,” both collections
of freedom songs, and
“Voices From the
Mountains,” about the lives
and music of people in the
Appalachian South.
His first marriage, to
Noel Oliver Osheroff, ended
in divorce. Survivors include
his wife of 54 years, the former Carolanne “Candie”
Anderson of New Market,
and their two children.
Mother’s Day Remembrance
Mother’s Day Remembrance
Barbara
Ethier
To hear your voice,
to see your smile
To sit and talk with you a while
To be together in
the same old way
Would be our dearest wish today.
Loved and Sadly Missed,
Tony, Ron, Nancy & Petie
A rosary for you dear Mother,
Each bead a beautiful prayer
That God may grant you peace
And keep you in his care
That family ties are broken,
And loved ones have to part,
God has you in his keeping,
and we all have you in our
hearts.
Love Always,
Your Husband, Children
& Grandchildren
Loving memories of one so dear,
Treasured still with a love sincere,
In our hearts she is living yet,
We loved her too dearly to forget.
Love, Bryan, Christine,
Colleen and Phyllis
Mother’s Day Remembrance
Mother’s Day Remembrance
Mother’s Day Remembrance
Doris Wilkinson
Mary Walsh
L.
Madeleine
Courtois
17th ANNIVERSARY
EDDIE
E.
NAVARRO
before receiving a bachelor’s
degree in mathematics from
Occidental College in Los
Angeles in 1949 and a master’s degree in sociology
from University of
California at Los Angeles in
1952. He later moved to the
South, where he joined the
civil-rights cause as a musician and activist.
After a tour in Europe,
Carawan returned to the
United States and joined the
Highlander center, which
had been established in 1932
to help alleviate poverty and
other ills. He remained associated with the center until
the 1980s.
With his wife and chief
collaborator, Candie
Carawan, he wrote books
Thinking
of you on
Mother’s Day
Love Always & Sadly Missed,
Daughter: Elsie Yates Lynch
BIRTHDAY REMEMBRANCE
PAULINE
I.
ADAM
— in one of his final speeches before his assassination in
1968.
Decades later, the song
has been sung in protest of
oppression around the world,
including in South Africa
and Eastern Europe. “It only
takes one person,” Seeger
once said, "to teach it to a
thousand."
Guy Hughes Carawan Jr.
was born in Santa Monica,
California, on July 28, 1927.
His parents were from the
Carolinas, and he described
himself as “part Southerner.”
He played the ukulele in his
youth, later picking up the
banjo, guitar and hammered
dulcimer.
Carawan served in the
Navy during World War II
Anna E.
Marszalkowski
Happy Mothers Day
Mom, Grandma & Gigi
Your love was unconditional
May we carry on the same
love you gave us.
Love & Miss You,
Your Family - Debbie, Eric
& Family, Sara, Malam,
Tobey & Libby
Mother’s Day Remembrance
Lucilia
DaLomba
Fontes
August 19, 1922
April 3, 1997
Forget you Mom we
never will
We loved you then and
always will.
Till memory fades and
life departs
You’ll live forever in our
hearts.
Love Always,
John, Jackie, Sue and
Grandchildren
Margaret M.
Matthieu
1917 - 2015
Just to say that you’re close
in thought and heart
not now and then, but
Always!
Loved,
Children, Grandchildren &
Great-Grandchildren
Mother’s Day Remembrance
October 31, 1923
November 9, 2014
Carl W. Schmidt
March 5, 1938 - May 10, 2015
“A beautiful life”
A beautiful life
that came to an end,
he died as he lived,
everyone’s friend.
In our hearts a memory will
always be kept, of one we loved,
and will never forget.
Missing You,
Velma, Scott, Sarah,
Mom & Dad, Judy & Tom
We little knew that day,
God was going to call your name.
In life we loved you dearly,
In death, we do the same.
It broke our hearts to lose you,
You did not go alone.
For part of us went with you,
The day God called you home.
You left us beautiful memories,
Your love is still our guide.
And although we cannot see you,
You are always at our side.
Our family chain is broken,
And nothing seems the same,
But as God calls us one by one,
The chain will link again.
Missing You
Maria, Bobby & Jennifer
Mildred Biliouris
1923 - 2009
Myrtle Bachini
1925 - 2014
Forget you Mom we never will
We loved you then and always will.
Till memory fades and life departs
you’ll live forever in our hearts.
Miss You Mums! Trudy & Joel
A6 THE TIMES
BUSINESS/WEATHER
Saturday, May 9, 2015
Saturday will be cloudier and cooler than
the past few days. Areas near the water will
stay damp & dreary...highs only near 60°...farther inland, around Providence and western
parts of Rhode Island as well as interior Bristol
County, we will see some sunshine developing. Highs in those areas will be in the 70°
range.
Mother's Day looks cloudy and foggy in the
morning, followed by a quicker and more
widespread clearing.Highs climb into the
upper 70s away from the water, and in the
mid-60s closer to the coast.
SATURDAY: Fog & low clouds
linger...especially near the water. HIGH: 6072°
SUNDAY: Some early fog likely, partly
sunny. HIGH: 75-80°
MONDAY: Partly to mostly sunny. HIGH:
78°
TUESDAY: Chance of showers, partly
sunny. HIGH: 75°
WEDNESDAY: Partly sunny. HIGH: 70°
THURSDAY: Mostly sunny. HIGH: 65°
FRIDAY: Mostly sunny. HIGH: 69°
— Mark Searles, StormTeam10
BECAUSE EVERY WORD COUNTS
Submit ted photo
Citizens Bank Rhode Island Market Executive Barbara Cottam reads to a group of preschoolers
during “Every Word Counts” Reading Day, as part of Children’s Friend and Citizens Bank’s
recent celebration of Head Start’s national 50th anniversary. “Every Word Counts” Reading
Day encourages reading in order to enhance a child’s vocabulary in low-income households.
With centers in Providence, Pawtucket and Central Falls, Children’s Friend serves more than
30,000 of Rhode Island's most vulnerable children and their families each year.
Tech support scam revisits RI
PROVIDENCE — Thanks to a heads-up
from a savvy consumer who recognized it as
a scam, Attorney General Peter F. Kilmartin
is warning Rhode Islanders about a resurgence of the “tech support scam.”
In this recent twist on a persistent scam,
consumers have been receiving unsolicited
phone calls from individuals claiming to be
from technical support of a virus protection
software company. The scam then works
like this: the caller claims the consumer’s
computer virus protection software is outdated or that their computer has “corrupt files”
and needs to be fixed. The caller convinces
the consumer to provide remote access to
their computer and walks them through a
series of steps to allegedly correct the computer issue; however, the scam artist is actually installing malware or other software to
allow them to remotely control the consumer’s computer. The scam artist then tries
to charge the consumer an exorbitant fee to
“fix” the computer.
In some cases, the caller even gave consumers a legitimate-looking number to call
back that was associated with a company
called “PC Technozone Services.” Claiming
the technical problem was fixed, the scam
artist sent an agreement contract that asked
for credit card information. When the con-
sumer questioned the payment, the caller
locked the consumer’s computer and refused
to unlock it unless payment was made.
Kilmartin suggests the following tips to
protect from these telephone tech support
scams:
• Do not purchase any unsolicited software or services. If you’re concerned about
your computer, call your security software
company directly and ask for help.
• Never provide your credit card or financial information to someone who calls and
claims to be from tech support.
• Ask if there is a fee or subscription
associated with the “service.” If there is,
hang up.
• Never give control of your computer to
a third party unless you can confirm that it is
a legitimate representative of a computer
support team with whom you are already a
customer.
• Never give your password on the
phone. No legitimate organization will call
you and ask for your password.
• Do not rely on caller ID to authenticate
a caller, as criminals may “spoof” caller ID
numbers. They may appear to be calling
from a legitimate company or a local number, when they’re not even in the same country as you.
Saturday, May 9, 2015
THE TIMES B1
ALLIANCE
BLACKSTONE VALLEY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
594 Central Avenue, Pawtucket, RI • 401-722-8236 • www.ABVFCU.com
Mon. 9-5pm, Tues. & Wed. 9-4:30pm, Thur. & Fri. 9-6pm, Sat. 9-12pm
PRESENTS YOUR COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
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5
6
7
8
9
Woonsocket
Lincoln
Cumberland
Cumberland
Cumberland
North Smithfield
• The YWCA is hosting its
Women Holding Office celebration at Kirkbrae Country Club
from 6-8 p.m. There will be
speakers at the event recognizing women holding office with a
reception to follow. Tickets are
$25 and include hors d’oeuvres
and there is a cash bar. Seating
is limited. Visit ywcari.org for
ticket information.
• The Cumberland Public
Library is having its Tales for
Threes on Tuesdays at 10 a.m.
This is a chance to interact with
your three-year old through fun
stories and singing. No registration is needed.
Woonsocket
• There is a meat raffle at the Club
Lafayette, 289 Aylsworth Ave. from
2-4 p.m. Contech Michele at 401636-2085 or [email protected]
with questions.
• Shakespeare’s Much Ado
About Nothing being held by at
the Beacon Theatre Workshop,
3rd Floor; Beacon Charter High
School for the Arts in
Woonsocket; 7 p.m. Tickets: $10
and $5 for seniors and students;
brownpapertickets.com.
• The Cumberland Public
Library is having its Tales for
Fours and Fives on Wednesdays
at 10 a.m. This is a chance for
parents and preschoolers to
interact through stories, movement activities and songs. No
registration is needed.
• The Cumberland Public
Library will have its Tales for
Twos on Thursdays at 10 a.m.
This is a time for parents to
encourage their two-year-old’s
emerging language skills with
stories and songs. No registration is needed.
Woonsocket
Woonsocket
• Woonsocket Harris Public
Library: Creative Writing Group
Wednesdays, 7:30-9 p.m. Local
writers meet weekly to share
support, suggestions and criticism. An informal gathering of
both published and unpublished
writers who find a group useful
for incentive and inspiration.
There is no charge to join.
Contact 401-769-9044 or visit
woonsocketlibrary.org.
• The Woonsocket Harris
Public (303 Clinton St.) hosts
Adult Knitting Circle on
Thursdays from 7-8:30 p.m.;
Knitters and crocheters of all
levels of experience are invited
to attend this crafting circle. Led
by experienced knitter and crocheter, Jen Grover. Donations of
yarn are appreciated. For more
call 401-769-9044 or visit
woonsocketlibrary.org
Providence
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14
15
16
Cumberland
North Smithfield
Lincoln
3
May
Glocester
• Chepachet Grange will host a
Special Whist Party at 28
Chopmist Hill Road (Rt. 102) in
Glocester starting at noon; Buffet,
beverages, and whist entry fee is
$10; There will be door prizes,
basket, raffle, and other prizes;
RSVP by April 30th. Call Marge
(401) 568-2011 or Dianne (401)
934-1167.
Smithfield
• Swinging Squares of Rhode
Island Square Dance Workshop:
7-9:30 p.m. at East Smithfield
Neighborhood Center, 7
Esmond Street, Smithfield; Fee:
$6 per person; For more information contact Lynne at 508852-7164.
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12
North Kingstown
Cumberland
Cumberland
• Mother’s Day Road Race to
raise awareness and money for
migraine research featuring a
10-mile race and a 5k race starting at 9 p.m. Event takes place
rain or shine at the North
Kingstown Golf Club in Quonset
Business Park. Those interested
should register at mothersdayrace.com or register at 7
a.m. on race day.
• The Cumberland Public
Library will have its starlight story
time for children of all ages and
their families Monday evenings
at 6:30 p.m. This is a chance to
put on pajamas and participate
in reading, singing and fun.
• Hypnosis for Health at
Cumberland Public Library, featuring Patrick Bowe, 6 p.m.
• The Cumberland Public
Library is having its Tales for
Threes on Tuesdays at 10 a.m.
This is a chance to interact with
your three-year old through fun
stories and singing. No registration needed.
Rehoboth
• From 7 to 9 p.m. there will be
a community dance held at Goff
Memorial Hall, 124 Bay State
Road. The dance will feature
contra dance steps and a variety
of international and couple
dances, such as polkas and
waltzes. All dance steps will be
taught. Admission is free and
open to the public, and all ages
and beginners are welcome. It is
not necessary to come with a
partner. A potluck precedes the
dance at 6 p.m. For information,
contact Bob Elliott at
[email protected] or
call 774-644-1369.
Woonsocket
• The Woonsocket Knights of
Columbus will host an Open
Meeting at 7 p.m. at All Saints
Church Hall for members and
guests.
North Smithfield
• The Garden Club of North
Smithfield will be meeting at
6:30 p.m. at the Little Red
Schoolhouse in Forestdale to
make teacup flower arrangements. Participants will need to
bring their own supplies. New
members welcome. Call Jo-Ann
767-6889 for a detailed list of
supplies if you plan to attend.
Burrillville
• The Commissioners of the
Burrillville Housing Authority will
meet in regular session at the
Burrillville Housing Authority community room, Ashton Court,
Harrisville, Rhode Island at 6:30
p.m.
• The Cumberland Public
Library will have its Tales for
Twos on Thursdays at 10 a.m.
This is a time for parents to
encourage their two-year-old’s
emerging language skills with
stories and songs. No registration is needed.
• The 2015 American Cancer
Society Cancer Action Network
(ACS CAN) Day at the State
House will take place in the
Governor’s State Room at the
Rhode Island State House in
Providence. Cancer advocates,
survivors, and members of the
legislature are invited to attend
starting at 2 p.m. This is an
important day for those living
with cancer and their family
members and friends to come
to the State House to tell their
personal stories to their
Legislators. Register by contacting Todd Ellison at [email protected] or (401) 2432622. Training will be provided
in advance for advocates.
Woonsocket
Woonsocket
• Mended Hearts Monthly
Meeting: 5:30 p.m. held in
Christiansen Conference Center
at Landmark Medical Center, 115
Cass Avenue, Woonsocket;
Speaker will be Nancy Egelhofer,
RD, LDN. Topic: Diets. Contact 1508-883-1291 for more info.
• Creative Writing Group at the
Woonsocket Public Library,
7:30-9 p.m. Local writers meet
weekly to share support, suggestions and criticism. An informal
gathering of both published and
unpublished writers who find a
group useful for incentive and
inspiration. There is no charge to
join. For more call 401-7699044 or visit woonsocketlibrary.org
• Thursday Night Live, 6-11p.m.
Whether you like to experience
our local Stadium Theater, enjoy
a concert and dinning, you'll find
this event a Thursday nightlife a
great night out. If nightlife means
enjoying your favorite beverage
and food, with an energetic and
friendly crowd of locals with the
love for music, you will not want
to miss Thursday Night Live!
Located: Parking Lots of the
Legendary Chan’s Jazz Club &
The Historic Ciro’s Tavern.
Providence
• CrAfternoons are back at the
North Smithfield Public Library,
Fridays from 2-4 p.m. (or until
materials run out), drop-in when
you can, no registration necessary. Each Friday there will be
set out in the children’s room a
simple craft that can be completed by kids of all ages.
• Award-winning author
Jeannette de Beauvoir will be
appearing on May 8 at 7 p.m. at
Books on the Square, 471
Angell Street, Providence, RI,
02906.
• CrAfternoons are back at the
North Smithfield Public Library,
Fridays from 2-4 p.m. (or until
materials run out), drop-in when
you can, no registration necessary. Each Friday there will be
set out in the children’s room a
simple craft that can be completed by kids of all ages.
• WRD Classic Rock Music
Festival, 1-10 p.m. at Bouley
Field, Social Street,
Woonsocket. A full day of music
from some of the best local
bands in New England. Tickets
are $15, available at the gate.
• Community Cleanup from 8
a.m. to 12 p.m. Volunteers are
needed and should meet at the
Market Square Municipal
Parking Lot on Main Street; This
project will include the downtown area and will address litter
removal; Please dress appropriately for the cleanup. Gloves,
trash grabbers, trash bags,
snacks and bottled water will be
provided. Additional Information
can be found on at
ci.woonsocket.ri.us;
Woonsocket Recycles
Facebook page or via email
[email protected]
• The Lincoln Garden Club will
hold its annual plant sale from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Chapel St.
Congregational Church, 185
Chapel Street. (Rain date, May
23.) The sale will feature
perennials, herbs and vegetables. For more information call
333-2199.
Woonsocket
Woonsocket
• “Dancing into Summer” 4:308:30 p.m.; located at River
Island Park. A celebration featuring many forms of dancing
such as: breakdancing, salsa,
belly dancing and ballroom.Plus
exhibits and refreshments.
• “Salute to Veterans” 10 a.m.-5
p.m.; located at the Armed
Forces Park on Davidson Street.
We honor those that have served
our country. This event will feature live entertainment and there
will also be a display of military
vehicles and a military museum
exhibit.
•Buy Local Maker’s Fair and
Festival, River Island Park, 10
a.m. to 4 p.m.; Blackstone Valley
Independent Business Alliance
will feature local artisans and
their goods; Finest Quality catering truck.
Cranston
• The Champlin Scout
Reservation at 233 Scituate
Ave in Cranston will be holding
the annual Envirothon
Competition from 8:30 a.m.
until noon.
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23
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21
Greenville
Cumberland
Cumberland
Pawtucket
Woonsocket
North Smithfield
• The Village at Waterman Lake
welcomes veterans to attend
their Veterans Appreciation
Celebration to show thanks for
their service. Veterans and their
guests will enjoy a complimentary prime rib luncheon beginning
at 1:15 p.m. and entertainment
by local singer Chris Jason.
Note that seating will be limited,
so call 949-1333 for reservations. At 2:30 p.m., an outdoor
concert open to all, guests and
the public, will feature a performance by the Reggie
Centracchio Quintet, specializing in the sounds of big band
classics. Coffee and desserts
will be offered. For more information visit
villageretirement.com or call
949-1333.
• The Cumberland Public
Library will have its Babies and
Books storytime, for birth to 23
months, on Mondays at 10 a.m.
Connect with your baby through
stories, rhymes and songs. A
play time will follow. .
• The Cumberland Public
Library will have its starlight story
time for children of all ages and
their families Monday evenings
at 6:30 p.m. This is a chance to
put on pajamas and participate
in reading, singing and fun.
• The Cumberland Public
Library is having its Tales for
Threes on Tuesdays at 10 a.m.
This is a chance to interact with
your three-year old through fun
stories and singing.
•Fogarty Manor Tenant
Association BINGO is open
Monday and Wednesday Nights,
doors open at 4 p.m.; game
runs from 6:30-8 p.m. (214
Roosevelt Ave.)
Pawtucket
Woonsocket
• The Leon Mathieu Senior
Center and Shri Studio have
partnered to offer a “Yoga for
Seniors” on Tuesday mornings
from 9:30-10:30 a.m. at Shri
Studio, 21 Broad St. This class
is designed to introduce seniors
to gentle yoga postures and
meditation techniques from their
chairs, helping them reduce
stress, improve focus, build
strength, and increase flexibility.
The fee for Leon Mathieu Senior
Center members is $5 per person per month. Transportation is
available from the Senior Center
to the Studio for those who
need it. For more information
and/or to register for the class
contact the Senior Center at
728-7582.
• Creative Writing Group,
Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m.;Local
writers meet weekly to share
support, suggestions and criticism. An informal gathering of
both published and unpublished
writers who find a group useful
for incentive and inspiration.
There is no charge to join.
Meetings are held Wednesday
evenings 7:30-9 p.m.
• Adult Knitting Circle, hursdays, 7-8:30 p.m., knitters and
crocheters of all levels of experience are invited to attend this
crafting circle. Led by experienced knitter and crocheter, Jen
Grover. Donations of yarn are
appreciated. Woonsocket Harris
Public Library, 303 Clinton St.,
401-769-9044. woonsocketlibrary.org
• The North Smithfield Library
presents storybook yoga at 11
a.m. This is for children ages 3 to
9. Direction will be given by
Debbie Quinn of Color Me Yoga.
This will include simple yoga and
a storybook read aloud.
Registration requested by dropins welcome. Call 767-2780.
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27
28
Cumberland
Woonsocket
Cumberland
Cumberland
West Warwick
• The Cumberland Public
Library will have its Babies and
Books storytime, for birth to 23
months, on Mondays at 10 a.m.
Connect with your baby through
stories, rhymes and songs. A
play time will follow. No registration needed.
• The Cumberland Public
Library will have its starlight story
time for children of all ages and
their families Monday evenings
at 6:30 p.m. This is a chance to
put on pajamas and participate
in reading, singing and fun.
• The Woonsocket Knights of
Columbus Council 113 will hold
it's regular business meeting at
7 p.m.at All Saints Church on
Rathbun Street. All members
are encouraged to attend as
this will include the election of
officers.
• The Cumberland Public Library
is having its Tales for Fours and
Fives on Wednesdays at 10 a.m.
This is a chance for parents and
preschoolers to interact through
stories, movement activities and
songs.
• The Cumberland Public
Library will have its Tales for
Twos on Thursdays at 10 a.m.
This is a time for parents to
encourage their two-year-old’s
emerging language skills with
stories and songs. No registration is needed.
• The Pawtuxet Valley
Community Chorus
proudly presents ‘Lifting Our
Voices in Song’ on Saturday,
May 30, 7 p.m. and Sunday,
May 31, 2 p.m.; West Warwick
High School auditorium.
Tickets: Adults: $12 in advance,
$15 at the door; children 10
and under, $5; For tickets contact any chorus member or call
401-862-3105; also visit
www.pvchorus.com.
Pawtucket
•Fogarty Manor Tenant
Association BINGO is open
Monday and Wednesday Nights,
doors open at 4 p.m.; game
runs from 6:30-8 p.m. (214
Roosevelt Ave.)
Woonsocket
•Cash Mob gathers at 6 p.m. in
parking lot across from
Landmark Medical Center, 186
Cass Ave. Two local businesses
will be announced by Buy Local
at 6:15 as the evening’s targets.
24
Pawtucket
•Fogarty Manor Tenant
Association BINGO is open
Monday and Wednesday Nights,
doors open at 4 p.m.; game
runs from 6:30-8 p.m. (214
Roosevelt Ave.)
Cumberland
• The Cumberland Public
Library is having its Tales for
Threes on Tuesdays at 10 a.m.
This is a chance to interact with
your three-year old through fun
stories and singing.
Woonsocket
• The 118th and 1118th
Engineer Companies formerly
stationed at the South Main
Street Armory in Woonsocket will
hold their sixth annual reunion at
St. Joseph Veterans Association,
99 Louise St. Social hour from 6
p.m., pictures at 6:30 and dinner at 7. For more, contact Tom
Dunayeski at 508-883-4567 or
Sonny Vadeboncoeur at 401766-7953.
Pawtucket
•Fogarty Manor Tenant
Association BINGO is open
Monday and Wednesday Nights,
doors open at 4 p.m.; game
runs from 6:30-8 p.m. (214
Roosevelt Ave.)
Woonsocket
• WOON 1240 AM will air the
42nd annual St. Jude Children’s
Hospital Radiothon from 10:30
a.m. to 3 p.m.
Lincoln
• Vietnam Veterans of America,
James Michael Ray Memorial
Chapter #818 at 7 p.m. at the
Lincoln SeniorCenter, 150
Jenckes Hill Road in Lincoln.
Come at 6 p.m. and have dinner
with us. All Vietnam Veterans
welcome. Formore information
call Joe Gamache at 401-6516060.
Woonsocket
• Adult Knitting Circle, hursdays, 7-8:30 p.m., knitters and
crocheters of all levels of experience are invited to attend this
crafting circle. Led by experienced knitter and crocheter, Jen
Grover. Donations of yarn are
appreciated. Woonsocket Harris
Public Library, 303 Clinton St.,
401-769-9044. woonsocketlibrary.org
29
30
Pawtucket
• The Major Walter G. Gatchell
V.F.W. Post 306, 171 Fountain
St., is holding a spaghetti and
meatball dinner from 4 to 7 p.m.
Tickets are $8 and can be purchased at the door. For more ,
call the post after 4 p.m. at
(401) 722-7146.
Send your community events to [email protected] or woonsocketcall.com
AMUSEMENTS
B2 THE TIMES
Saturday, May 9, 2015
Teen fears she will regret
not choosing another path
DEAR ABBY:
I have been dating
“Brandon” for three years.
I’m 19, going to a four-year
college and I’m planning to
move in with him. I enjoy his
company and can see myself
with him in the future, but I
wish I hadn’t met him so
young. I wish I could have
experienced more — other
people and situations. I’m
afraid I’m falling into a trap
where it is more convenient
to stay with Brandon.
I don’t want to feel confined, but I also don’t want
to break up with him and
find it was the worst decision
of my life. We have discussed
it. He said he will understand
if I want to leave, but I’m
afraid it might destroy him.
I enjoy being around
Brandon, but I don’t want to
stay if it means missing half
my life. He isn’t the most
attractive guy compared to
others, so maybe that’s where
all this is coming from. More
attractive guys talk to me,
and I assume they would
treat me as well as Brandon
does. Maybe that’s what has
got me thinking. Some
advice, please?
— NOT SURE
IN NORTH CAROLINA
DEAR NOT SURE:
Feeling as ambivalent as you
do, do not move in with
Brandon. To do so would be
cheating both of you.
Because someone seems
DEAR ABBY
Jeanne Phillips
more physically attractive
than your boyfriend does not
guarantee the person would
treat you as well — or better
— than Brandon does.
However, this is a lesson you
may need to experience firsthand.
It could also be a growth
experience for Brandon to
date others. He has already
told you he will understand if
you leave, so he may be emotionally stronger than you
give him credit for. This does
not mean you won’t eventually wind up together, but it
may make you both more
appreciative of the special
relationship you share
because you will have something to compare it to.
DEAR ABBY:
I am a 13-year-old girl who
Horoscope
A - Cox B - Uxbridge, Millville Comcast
C - Blackstone, Franklin Comcast D - Bellingham Comcast
By HOLIDAY MATHIS
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
Come up with good reasons to
believe in yourself, because
there’s much you can do when
you have the confidence to dive
in. Good qualities, skills, accomplishments — add them to your
list.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
Expect a minor glitch as two of
your responsibilities conflict. You
don’t have to choose between
them, but you will need to find
someone to help cover one of
them.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
Get out and talk to people you
don’t know. A stranger looking at
your life from the outside can see
wonderful aspects that you are
currently missing due to your
inside, and overly familiar, position.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
It’s good to be prepared, though
over-planning leads to proceedings that are forced and stiff.
Trust your natural spontaneity.
Tonight, people will feel brighter
for having stepped into your
sphere of influence.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Make
sure everyone is taken care of,
especially the low-profile types. If
one cog in the wheel breaks,
everything comes to a grinding
halt. Most “cogs” you encounter
today can be fortified with a little
attention and good humor.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
Open-minded people will try
most things once. Adventurers
will try them twice just to make
sure nothing was missed or mistaken about the first time around.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
Stay in sync with your team.
Quick calls will keep you up to
date. You’ll have to be the one to
control the conversations and
keep them short, because everyone wants your attention.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
Jokes are telling. Listen to what
your loved ones say in jest and
what they laugh at in conversation, and you’ll get valuable
insights. It’s the kernel of truth
that makes things funny.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21). The small kindness you
extend will have an unforeseen
larger benefit. The inconvenience
you run into will also work in
your favor. The good fortune of
the day is a karmic payoff.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). Plans change, appointments
get canceled, the financial bottom line isn’t what you thought it
would be. Your decision not to
let any of this bother you earns
you “cool” status in someone’s
book.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). Make a checklist of what you
want, not because you’re likely to
get everything on it, but because
becoming clear about your needs,
wants and priorities is a key step
in the manifestation of your
desire.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
Your creative work gets the focus
today. There is a difference
between being an artist and a
craftsman, but one is not better
than the other. Do you desire
most to express yourself or to
master your craft?
would like to fix my relationship with my mom. I love her
dearly, but sometimes it is
difficult to spend time with
her. We have different tastes
in music, clothes and what is
fun. I know she notices the
distance between us and
would like to spend more
time together, but the things
she suggests we do don’t
appeal to me.
Dad and I are close, which
is probably because he’s
more like a kid. We have similar likes, and he isn’t as overprotective as Mom is. We’re
more like friends than father
and daughter.
I really want to be closer
to Mom, but I don’t know
how to do it so we’ll both be
satisfied. Is this a normal
teen thing?
— MAKING AN EFFORT
DEAR MAKING AN
EFFORT: Yes, I think so.
However, I’m pleased that
you want to build a closer
relationship with your mother
because, at your age, it’s
important. Being a mother
these days isn’t easy, especially if being the disciplinarian
and drawing the line is a role
that was “assigned” to her by
an overly permissive father
who prefers to be more of a
pal than a parent.
You and your mother need
to compromise regarding the
things you do when you’re
spending time together. Part
of the time, try the things she
A
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PGA Tour Golf The Players
7 7 Championship, Third Round.
PGA Tour Golf The Players
10
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12 News at 6 CBS Evening
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wants to do. If you do, you
might surprise yourself and
discover you enjoy them —
and vice versa. Talk to her
about your desire to be closer
to her and give it a chance.
I’m sure the result will be
rewarding for both of you.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also known
as Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother,
Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear
Abby at www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069.
To receive a collection of
Abby’s most memorable —
and most frequently requested — poems and essays, send
your name and mailing
address, plus check or money
order for $7 (U.S. funds) to:
Dear Abby — Keepers
Booklet, P.O. Box 447,
Mount Morris, IL 610540447. Shipping and handling
are included in the price.
Sudoku solution
SATURDAY EVENING MAY 9, 2015
7:30
Call the Midwife A diabetic girl
becomes pregnant. (N)
Wheel of For- Jeopardy! Å
tune Å
Inside Edition Chronicle Å
Weekend (N)
The Insider
Inside Edition
(N) Å
Weekend (N)
Access Hollywood (N) Å
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
9:30
(:05) Masterpiece Classic (N) Å Wolf Hall on Masterpiece Å
10:30
(:32) Spy Å
11 PM
Basic Black
11:30
Ask This Old
House Å
(:35) Phantom
Gourmet
(:35) Bianca
Unanchored
(:35) Glee Å
WBZ News
(N) Å
NewsCenter 5
at 11:00 (N)
ABC6 News at
(:15) NBA Basketball Conference Semifinal: Teams TBA. (N) Å
11pm (N)
7 News at
(:29) Saturday
The Voice “Live Top 6 Performances” Å
Saturday Night Live (N) Å
11PM (N)
Night Live (N)
NBC 10 News at Paid Program The Voice “Live Top 6 Performances” Å
NBC 10 News at (:29) Saturday
Saturday Night Live (N) Å
7pm (N)
11pm (N)
Night Live (N)
Wheel of For- Jeopardy! Å
Hawaii Five-0 A Navy Seal’s
Criminal Minds A prominent
News at 11
The Good
48 Hours Å
tune Å
daughter is kidnapped. Å
Boston attorney disappears.
Wife Å
Hell’s Kitchen Mardi GrasBones Brennan works with
Animation Domination HighFox 25 News at 10 (N) Å
TMZ (N) Å
themed dishes.
Aubrey. Å (DVS)
Def Å
Modern Fam- Modern Fam- The Big Bang The Big Bang Paid Program Paid Program Castle Murder victim is a male Two and a Half Two and a Half } Ballistic: Ecks vs. Sever
ily Å
ily Å
Theory Å
Theory Å
stripper. Å
Men
Men
(2002) Antonio Banderas.
Father Brown Father Brown
Masterpiece Mystery!
Call the Midwife A diabetic girl Doc Martin Bert Large has finan- Foyle’s War “Trespass” Å
(Off Air)
9 investigates another death.
“Grantchester, Episode 2”
becomes pregnant. (N)
cial trouble. Å
}
Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The How I Met Your How I Met Your
Two and a Half Two and a Half The Big Bang The Big Bang
The Simpsons Movie (2007, Comedy) Voices of Dan
14 Men
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Men
Theory Å
Theory Å
Serenity Now” Mother
Mother
Castellaneta, Julie Kavner, Nancy Cartwright.
Globe Trekker The history of the Super Skyscrapers “One World NOVA The wreck of a German
The Roosevelts: An Intimate History “Get Action (1858-1901)”
High School
Sing That
16 Vietnamese railway.
Trade Center” Å
submarine. (N)
Cousins Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt.
Quiz Show
Thing!
Scandal Fitz is faced with a hos- Scandal Olivia and Jake continue Monopoly Millionaires’ Club
Family Feud Å Deco Drive
7 News at 10PM on CW56 (N) Å Everybody Ray- Family Guy Å
12 tage situation. Å
to flirt. Å
(N) Å
mond
Eyewitness
Monopoly Millionaires’ Club
Hell’s Kitchen Mardi GrasBones Brennan works with
Family Guy Å Animation Domination HighEntertainment Tonight (N) Å
News at 10
(N) Å
themed dishes.
Aubrey. Å (DVS)
Def Å
Criminal Minds “Soul Mates” A Criminal Minds “Bloodline” A
Criminal Minds Suspect who
Criminal Minds: Suspect Behav- Criminal Minds: Suspect Behav- The Listener “In His Sights”
15 young woman is abducted.
family abducts young women.
embalms his victims. Å
ior “Jane” Å
ior “Night Hawks” Å
Assassination threat. Å
Criminal Minds “Soul Mates” A Criminal Minds “Bloodline” A
Criminal Minds Suspect who
Criminal Minds: Suspect Behav- Criminal Minds: Suspect Behav- The Listener “In His Sights”
young woman is abducted.
family abducts young women.
embalms his victims. Å
ior “Jane” Å
ior “Night Hawks” Å
Assassination threat. Å
CABLE
6 PM
A&E
37 64 37 37
A-P
42 56 63 63
AMC
25 71 59 59
BET
79
BRAV
70 63 57 57
CNBC
48 44 46 46
CNN
49 41 42 42
COM
58 67 61 61
CSNE
55 36 52 52
67
DISC
24 59 39 39
DISN
34 53 24 24
E!
63 72 34 34
ESPN
30 34 49 49
ESPN2
29 35 50 50
ESPNC
132 309 258 258
EWTN
22 96 56 56
FAM
38 50 26 26
FOOD
28 62 53 53
FX
53 30 30 30
HGTV
44 61 32 32
HIST
41 69 58 58
LIFE
40 28 36 36
MTV
60 76 28 28
NESN
56 37 51 51
NICK
35 52 25 25
SYFY
69 73 62 62
SPIKE
26 74 55 55
TLC
39 55 38 38
TNT
27 32 33 33
TOON
36 51 60 60
TVL
43 48 64 64
USA
52 31 35 35
WTBS
45 33 31 31
PREMIUM
ENC
292 630 326 326
HBO
200 400 301 301
MAX
220 450 341 341
SHOW
240 500 361 361
STARZ
280 600 321 321
TMC
260 550 381 381
6:30
7 PM
7:30
Hawaii Five-0 A Navy Seal’s
Criminal Minds A prominent
daughter is kidnapped. Å
Boston attorney disappears.
(:15) NBA Basketball Conference Semifinal: Teams TBA. (N) Å
10 PM
(:06) Moone
Boy Å
48 Hours Å
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
9:30
10 PM
10:30
11 PM
11:30
Bates Motel Emma and Norman Bates Motel Norma seeks guid- Bates Motel “Norma Louise”
Bates Motel Norman agrees to Bates Motel “The Pit” Caleb and (:02) Bates Motel Norman
take a day off. Å
ance from Romero. Å
Romero faces a new threat.
get help. Å
Dylan take a risky job.
spends the day with a visitor.
To Be Announced
My Cat From Hell “Multi-Million- My Cat From Hell “Psychic Dis- My Cat From Hell Bombadil is a Flipping Ships Boat plus camper My Cat From Hell Bombadil is a
Dollar Nightmare”
connect” (N)
nightmare; Percy disrupts.
equals Boaterhome.
nightmare; Percy disrupts.
} Jaws (1975, Horror) Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw, Richard Dreyfuss. A man-eating shark } Jaws 2 (1978, Horror) Roy Scheider, Lorraine Gary, Murray Hamilton. Tour- } Jaws 3
terrorizes a New England resort town. Å
ist town and police chief dread huge white shark at beach. Å
(1983) Å
(5:30) } Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins (2008, Comedy) } Our Family Wedding (2010) America Ferrera, Forest Whitaker. Premiere. Two } Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins (2008)
Martin Lawrence, James Earl Jones, Margaret Avery. Å
overbearing men wreak havoc with their children’s wedding plans. Å
Martin Lawrence, James Earl Jones. Å
The Real Housewives of Atlanta The Real Housewives of Atlanta } Hitch (2005, Romance-Comedy) Will Smith, Eva Mendes, Kevin James. A } Hitch (2005) Will Smith. A smooth“Reunion Part One”
“Reunion Part Two”
smooth-talker helps a shy accountant woo an heiress. ‘PG-13’
talker helps a shy accountant woo an heiress.
Paid Program Paid Program White Collar Convicts: Life On The Profit A meat wholesaler in The Profit Marcus revisits Athans The Profit An investor builds a The Profit A state-of-the-art dog
the Inside
Brooklyn, N.Y.
Motors and more.
car dealership.
care facility.
Smerconish
CNN Newsroom With Poppy
Somebody’s Gotta Do It With
CNN Special Report Inside
CNN Special Report
CNN Special Report Mishaps
Harlow (N)
Mike Rowe
popular online videos.
experienced by patients.
(:05) } Employee of the Month (2006, Comedy) Dane Cook, Jessica Simpson, (:45) } The Hangover (2009, Comedy) Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms, Zach
Dane Cook: Troublemaker Comic
Dax Shepard. Two store clerks vie for a coveted award.
Galifianakis. Three pals must find a missing groom after a wild bash. Å
Dane Cook performs.
SportsNet Cen- SportsNet
SportsNet
Deep Green
MLL Lacrosse Boston Cannons at New York Lizards. (Taped)
Quick Slants
SportsNet Cen- SportsNet
SportsNet Central (N)
Central
Central
tral (N)
Central
tral (N)
Deadliest Catch Huge waves test Deadliest Catch The captains
To Be Announced
Deadliest Catch: On Deck “The Deadliest Catch The captains
Josh’s mettle. Å
make hard choices. Å
Ultimatum” Å
make hard choices. Å
} Dr. Seuss’ Horton Hears a Who!
Austin & Ally Å Dog With a Blog Princess is
(:10) Kirby
Lab Rats:
Mighty Med Å Jessie Å
Girl Meets
Austin & Ally Å
pregnant with puppies. Å
(2008) Voices of Jim Carrey. ‘G’ Å
Buckets
Bionic Island
World Å
} Sex and the City (2008, Romance-Comedy) Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall, Chris Noth. The Royals The king makes a big The Royals An assassination
Botched Dwight Eubanks says
goodbye to his nose.
Time brings many changes for Carrie and her gal pals.
decision.
attempt.
SportsCenter (N) Å
30 for 30 Filmmaker Jonathan Hock documents the rise, fall and
SportsCenter
NBA Basketball Conference Semifinal: Teams
comeback of running back Marcus Dupree. Å
(N) Å
TBA. (N) Å
2014 CrossFit Games Women’s. 2014 CrossFit Games Women’s. College Softball SEC Tournament, Final: Teams TBA. From Tiger
Baseball Tonight (N) Å
SportsCenter (N) Å
From Carson, Calif.
From Carson, Calif.
Park in Baton Rouge, La. (N)
(5:00) } Splinters
30 for 30 Å
30 for 30 Å
30 for 30 An exploration of the class and power dynamics in col30 for 30 Å
(2011, Documentary) Å
lege sports. Å
Life Is Worth
Heroic Media Mother Angelica Live Classics Mary of Nazareth The life story of the Virgin Mary. The Holy
Living Right With Dr. Ray “Child Our Lady of the Rosary at
Living
(N)
“How to Pray”
Rosary
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Pompeii
}
}
(5:30)
The Birdcage (1996, Comedy) Robin Williams. A
Pitch Perfect Sing-Along (2012, Musical Comedy) Anna Kendrick, Skylar } What to Expect When You’re Expecting
son’s engagement throws a kink into a gay couple’s life.
Astin, Rebel Wilson. College students enter an a cappella competition.
(2012) Cameron Diaz, Jennifer Lopez.
Chopped Cheesy party food and Diners, Drive- Diners, Drive- Diners, Drive- Diners, Drive- Diners, Drive- Diners, Drive- Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives A Diners, Drive- Diners, Driveexpensive offal.
Ins and Dives Ins and Dives Ins and Dives Ins and Dives Ins and Dives Ins and Dives celebration of all-things mom.
Ins and Dives Ins and Dives
} 21 Jump Street (2012, Comedy) Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum, Brie Larson. Young cops go } Sweet Home Alabama (2002) Reese Witherspoon. A fash- Mike & Molly
Mike & Molly
Å
Å
under cover as high-school students.
ion designer demands a divorce from her husband.
Flip or Flop A Flip or Flop Å Flip or Flop Å Flip or Flop Å Property Brothers A frustrating Property Brothers “Kari &
House Hunters Renovation A
Log Cabin Liv- Log Cabin Livshort sale.
house hunt. Å
Boris” Å
young family from Australia.
ing (N)
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American Pickers An extraordi- American Pickers The guys tour The Universe: Ancient Mysteries The Universe: Ancient Mysteries (:03) Engineering Disasters
(:03) Lost in Transmission
nary New Jersey collection.
a vintage car company.
Solved Å
Solved “Alien Worlds”
(N) Å
“Drowned Delorean” Å
} Cleveland Abduction (2015) Taryn Manning. A single mother
} Stockholm, Pennsylvania (2015, Drama) Saoirse Ronan, Cynthia Nixon.
(:32) } Abducted: The Carlina White Story
spends 11 years locked inside Ariel Castro’s home. Å
Premiere. A kidnapping victim reunites with her family after 17 years. Å
(2012) Aunjanue Ellis, Keke Palmer. Å
Catfish A young man wants to
Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness } Freddy vs. Jason (2003) Robert Englund, Ken Kirzinger.
move to California.
Razor-clawed Freddy battles masked killer Jason.
Cruisin’ New
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NESN Next
MLB Baseball Boston Red Sox at Toronto Blue Jays. From Rogers Sports Today
Sports Today
Sports Today
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England
Producer
Producer
Centre in Toronto. (Subject to Blackout)
LIVE (N)
TV (N)
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(:36) Friends Å
mans Å
mans Å
ger Å
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(N) Å
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Dicky & Dawn mans Å
Bel-Air
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} The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (2010, Fan} Spawn
men battle the Sheriff of Nottingham.
tasy) Georgie Henley, Skandar Keynes, Ben Barnes.
(1997)
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Cops Å
Cops “Busted Cops (N) Å
Cops Å
Auction Hunt- Auction Hunt- Cops “Roadside Cops Å
Cops Å
Cops “Coast to
No. 2” Å
ers (N)
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19 Kids and Counting Jill’s delivÅ
Å
worker feels like she is dying.
plications arise. Å
ery; complications arise.
(4:00) } The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002, } The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003, Fantasy) Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen, Liv Tyler. Humans and creatures
Fantasy) Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen, Liv Tyler. Å (DVS)
unite to battle Sauron and his army. Å (DVS)
Movie
Dragon Ball Z King of the
The Cleveland The Cleveland The Boondocks American
American
Family Guy Å
Kai Å
Hill Å
Show
Show
Dad Å
Dad Å
Family Feud Å Family Feud Å Family Feud Å Family Feud Å Jim Gaffigan: Beyond the Pale (:09) Everybody Loves Raymond Everybody Ray- (:23) The King The King of
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mond
of Queens
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Queens Å
NCIS “Endgame” The team helps NCIS “Mother’s Day” Gibbs’ for- NCIS Investigation into a
NCIS Evidence leads to McGee’s NCIS A man in a diner pulls a
Dig Peter races to stop the
Vance face his demons.
mer mother-in-law. Å
grandmother.
gun on Gibbs. Å (DVS)
Marine’s shooting. Å
Order’s plans.
Everybody Ray- Everybody Ray- Everybody Ray- Everybody Ray- The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang Your Family or Meet the
mond
mond
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Smiths
6 PM
6:30
7 PM
7:30
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
9:30
10 PM
10:30
11 PM
11:30
(5:55) } Valkyrie (2008) Tom Cruise, Bill Nighy. Col. Claus } Legends of the Fall (1994) Brad Pitt. The forces of love
(:15) } Hart’s War (2002) Bruce Willis. A law student
von Stauffenberg attempts to assassinate Hitler. ‘PG-13’ Å
and war slowly destroy a Montana family. ‘R’ Å
defends a murder suspect in a Nazi POW camp. ‘R’ Å
(5:00) } Godzilla (2014) (:10) } This Is Where I Leave You (2014) Jason Bateman. Boxing Saul Alvarez vs. James Kirkland. Saul Alvarez takes on James Kirkland in the Fight Game
Aaron Taylor-Johnson. Å
Four world-weary siblings reunite after their father dies. ‘R’
12-round main event; from Houston. (N) Å
(:10) } Evolution (2001) David Duchovny. Alien organisms (7:55) } The Mexican (2001) Brad Pitt. A mob lackey goes } We’re the Millers (2013) Jennifer Aniston. A dealer goes
develop rapidly in Earth’s atmosphere. ‘PG-13’ Å
to Mexico to retrieve a priceless antique. ‘R’ Å
to Mexico with a fake family to score drugs. ‘R’ Å
} Vampire
(:15) } Exorcismus (2010) Sophie Vavasseur. A cleric per- Penny Dreadful “Fresh Hell” Å } Knock Knock, It’s Tig Notaro Mayweather vs. Happyish Å
Happyish
forms an exorcism on his possessed niece. ‘NR’ Å
(2015) Tig Notaro. ‘NR’ Å
Pacquiao
Academy Å
(5:35) } X-Men 2 (2003, Action) Patrick Stewart. A power- (7:55) Outlander “The Watch”
Outlander (iTV) Claire and Jenny (:05) Outlander Claire and Jenny (:10) Outlander Claire and Jenny
mad militarist pursues the mutants. ‘PG-13’ Å
Jamie and Ian join The Watch.
try to rescue Jamie. (N)
try to rescue Jamie.
try to rescue Jamie.
} God’s Pocket (2014, Comedy) Philip Sey- } Scary Movie V (2013, Comedy) Ashley
} Nurse (2014) Paz de la Huerta. An alluring
} Mine Games (2012) Joseph Cross. Friends
mour Hoffman, Richard Jenkins. ‘R’ Å
Tisdale, Simon Rex, Erica Ash. ‘PG-13’ Å
nurse lures cheating men to their deaths. ‘R’
discover a mine where time travels backward.
DISH DTV P-VF BrVF BuVF
2
6
6
6
2
2
4
4
5
5
6
7
10
10
10
10
12
12
12
12
7
8
28
28
9
9
36
36
8
8
18
3
3
44
26
64
64
11
12
11
15
15
15
CABLE
265 118 181 181 181
282 184 130 130 130
254 130 231 231 231
329 124 270 270 270
273 129 185 185 185
355 208 102 102 102
202 200 100 100 100
249 107 190 190 190
77
77
77
278 182 120 120 120
290 172 250 250 250
236 114 196 196 196
206 140
70
70
70
209 144
74
74
74
208 143
71
71
71
422 261 285 285 285
311 180 199 199 199
231 110 164 164 164
248 137
53
53
53
229 112 165 165 165
269 120 128 128 128
252 108 140 140 140
331 160 210 210 210
623 434
76
76
76
299 170 252 252 252
244 122 180 180 180
262 168
54
54
54
280 183 139 139 139
245 138
51
51
51
296 176 257 257 257
301 106 244 244 244
242 105
50
50
50
247 139
52
52
52
PREMIUM
526 340 350 350 350
501 300 400 400 400
512 310 420 420 420
537 318 365 365 365
520 350 340 340 340
544 327 385 385 385
COMICS
B3 THE TIMES
Retail
For Better or Worse
Blondie
By Norm Feuti
By Lynn Johnston
By Dean Young & Denis Lebrun
Mother Goose & Grimm
Baby Blues
By Mike Peters
By Rick Kirkman & Jerry Scott
By Pat Brady
Rose Is Rose
Funky Winkerbean
By Tom Batiuk
By Johnny Hart
B.C.
Cryptoquote
Saturday, May 9, 2015
Lio
By Mark Tatulli
Crankshaft
By Tom Batiuk
Garfield
By Jim Davis
Gasoline Alley
By Jim Scancarelli
By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
Zits
Marvin
By Tom Armstrong
Pearls Before Swine
By Stephan Pastis
Get Fuzzy
By Darby Conley
Su Do Ku
For the solution to today’s puzzle,
see Amusements — page B2
A7
© Puzzles by Pappocom
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B4 THE TIMES
Saturday, May 9, 2015
SPORTS
Blackstone Valley
Pic of the Day
Sponsor
THE TIMES, Saturday, May 9, 2015 — C1
HE’S GLOVING IT
Girls’ Ice Hockey
Photo by Ernest A. Brown
Lincoln-Cumberland’s Giana Ritchie, left, and
Mount’s MacKenzie Morin battle for the puck
during a game in March. With Cumberland
dropping girls’ ice hockey, Lincoln could find
a new co-op partner in the Mounties.
Mount’n
Lions?
Lincoln, Mount St. Charles
could form new co-op team
for girls’ ice hockey
By BRENDAN MCGAIR
Photos by Ernest A. Brown
North Smithfield junior right fielder Matthew Barrette (5) makes a diving catch for the short fly ball off the bat of Burrillville sophomore
Harold Dumais in the second inning at home on Friday. The Northmen won 11-6.
Baseball
North Smithfield knocks off Broncos, 11-6
By JON BAKER
[email protected]
NORTH SMITHFIELD –
There were two differing agendas on display before and during
a non-league clash between
Burrillville and North Smithfield
highs on Friday afternoon.
For Broncos’ skipper Peter
Berthelette, whose squad is in
the midst of its own Division III
playoff run, he wanted to expose
usual substitutes to varsity play,
get them used to the action they
don’t see from the bench or
while representing their JV
squads.
Northmen veteran coach Jon
Leddy had a different take. He
desperately wanted his starters
to exhibit more passion and
intensity, especially after his
contingent had suffered a tough,
7-6, eight-inning defeat at
Scituate the day before.
Despite a rather ugly affair,
one in which the two clubs made
15 physical errors between them
(and many more of the mental
variety), both believed they
achieved their pre-game goals
during North Smithfield’s 11-6
triumph.
“We wanted to see what the
younger kids and those who
don’t play much could do,”
Berthelette said after the loss,
one that dropped Burrillville to
5-6 overall (it already was 5-5 in
league action). “These kids have
[email protected]
At Lincoln High School, officials want to
continue playing Rhode Island interscholastic
girls’ hockey despite recently learning that
their co-op partner Cumberland will drop the
sport.
If the Lions are to keep playing, they’ll
need a new partner, as they lack the numbers
to field a team on their own.
One potential candidate is Mount St.
Charles Academy, a program that bears a
proud history in the sport but has seen declining participants in recent years.
Given their geogrpahical proximity, a cooperative arrangement between Lincoln and
Mount makes a lot of sense. Officials from
both schools have engaged in what have been
described as preliminary talks.
See HOCKEY, page C6
Commentary
Roussel packs
for Green Bay
Catching up with area athletes
Burrillville senior Nicholas Keens connects for an RBI single against North Smithfield in the top of the
second inning Friday.
patiently waiting their turn,
they’ve been working hard in
practice and deserve to play.
“We didn’t have much on the
line; we wanted to see what they
could do in the field, and we (as
a coaching staff) did,” he said.
“We have some issues, especial-
ly on the defensive side. We
made quite a few errors, but we
also made our fair share of good
plays. Now we know the things
we need to work on.”
Leddy explained prior to the
first pitch that he had installed
all of his usual starters because
“we need a confidence-booster.”
After the game, he – like
Berthelette – wasn’t thrilled with
the five miscues his Northmen
made, but couldn’t complain
about the verdict.
See NORTHMEN, page C6
Congratulations and
best wishes to
Pawtucket’s Jean-Daniel
Roussel, who is in Green
Bay this weekend on a
tryout deal with the
NFL’s Packers. A product
of St. Raphael and Sacred
Heart University, Roussel
was one of a reported 26
players that the Green
Bay front office invited
on a tryout condition.
The Packers were one
of the teams that saw the
5-foot-10 Roussel at
See MCGAIR, page C6
BRENDAN
McGAIR
Sports
Writer
Tigers pounce on Raiders
11-0, to take 2nd annual
McGee/Scanlon clash
By BRENDAN McGAIR
[email protected]
PAWTUCKET – The final score
was not important – the true reason
why the Tolman and Shea baseball
programs gathered at Slater Park’s
McConnon Field on Friday night
became abundantly clear immediately after the Tigers hung an 11-0
mercy-rule triumph over their
crosstown rival. Standing near home
plate, Tolman athletic director Frank
Laliberte said a few words that paid
homage to two longtime pillars of
Pawtucket athletes.
Facing Laliberte were Ray
McGee and John Scanlon, the men
of the hour if you will. McGee
might be retired from his AD post at
Shea and Scanlon likewise at
Tolman, but there are plenty of individuals in each camp that have prioritized the importance of making
sure that everyone in the city
remembers the contributions that
each one made.
Friday marked the second annual
McGee/Scanlon baseball game. It’s
a tradition that will remain a
See TIGERS, page C4
Photo by Brendan McGair
A good time was had by all Friday night at Slater Park’s McConnon Field, site of the Second Annual McGee-Scanlon
Baseball Game took place. Pictured from left, Shea baseball coach Dino Campopiano, Shea athletic director Kate
Corry, former Shea athletic director Ray McGee, former Tolman athletic director John Scanlon, Tolman athletic
director Frank Laliberte and Tolman baseball coach Theo Murray. The Tigers won the non-league encounter, 10-0.
SPORTS
C2 THE TIMES
HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY
BOYS
Volleyball
9 a.m. Little Rhody Tournament, (at
East Greenwich HS)
MLB
Farrell filling in as pitching coach for a bit
GIRLS
Softball
11 a.m. Tiverton at St. Raphael
1 p.m. Cumberland at East Providence
3:30 p.m. Lincoln at East Greenwich
Lacrosse
3 p.m. Barrington at Cumberland
Boys’ Volleyball
Rhody Invitational takes
place this weekend at CCRI
LINCOLN – At the Rhody
Invitational at CCRI in
Lincoln, there will be 20 of
the best teams from Rhode
Island, Massachusetts and
Connecticut. At East
Greenwich High School, 13
teams from Rhode Island and
Massachusetts will compete
in the Little Rhody
Invitational. The 33 combined schools surpasses last
year's record of 30, when the
tournaments were held at
North Kingstown and East
Greenwich High Schools
respectively.
Both tournament will start
at 9 am and end around 5:30
pm. They are being organized by the Rhode Island
Boys' Volleyball Coaches'
Association.
Here are the teams entered
in the Rhody. From
Connecticut: Ridgefield.
From Massachusetts:
Chelmsford, Chicopee Comp.,
Haverhill, Lincoln-Sudbury,
Ludlow, Milford, Needham,
Greater New Bedford Voc.
Tech., Newton North, Newton
South, Westfield, West
Springfield. From Rhode
Island: Bishop Hendricken,
Coventry, East Providence,
Mount St. Charles, North
Kingstown, North Smithfield,
South Kingstown.
Here are the teams entered
in the Little Rhody. From
Massachusetts: Brockton,
North Quincy, Taunton. From
Rhode Island: Central,
Chariho, Classical, Cranston
West, East Greenwich,
Exeter/West Greenwich,
LaSalle, Pilgrim, Scituate,
Westerly.
In 2014, North Kingstown
became the first team from
Rhode Island to win the
Rhody Invitational, which
made its debut in 2006. The
Skippers defeated Newton
South in the finals. Both
teams went on to win their
respective state's championship. In the inaugural Little
Rhody last year, Cranston
West beat Pilgrim in the
finals.
AREA ROAD RACE SCHEDULE
Saturday, May 9
CUMBERLAND — The Cumberland
Town Wide Learning 5K will be held at
10 a.m. at Cumberland High School on
Farm Drive and benefits art and music
programs at Cumberland High. There
will also be a health fair with food and
refreshments before and after the race
for the public. Pre- entry is $18 and
entries the day of the race are $20.
Cumberland students will be $15 and
teams of 10 or more will be $12. Email
Tom Kenwood at [email protected]
for entry forms. Enter online at
https://tlc5k.com/
Monday, May 25
WOONSOCKET — George Nasuti
Novans Pride 5K, 8:30 a.m. The Gym,
LLC, 2168 Diamond Hill Road. Third
annual event begins with a kids fun run.
Contact Michael Debroisse at (401)
475-6000 or [email protected]
for more information.
Saturday, May 30
NORTH SMITHFIELD —
Northmen/Navigant 5k Run/Walk
Challenge, 9 a.m. North Smithfield
Athletic Complex, 1850 Providence
Pike. 5k course starts on the
Providence Pike with an Olympic style
finish on the track. T-shirts to the first
300 entries. Parking at the Middle
School Parking lot. Entertainment: live
music along the route. Food Court.
Awards to top 3 male and female overall. Awards to the top 2 in each age division: 18 & under, 19-29, 30-39, 40-49,
50-59, 60-69, 70 & over. Contact Paul
Nordstrom at (401) 641-3206 or visit
[email protected] for more
information.
GLOCESTER — Chieftain Challenge
5K, 10 a.m. Ponaganset High School,
91 Anan Wade Road. Registration
through May 28 8 p.m. - $20 per person. Registration on day of race - $25
per person. The Ponaganset Middle
School Physical Education and Health
Department invite you to join in on a run
along the 3.1 mile course on Anan
Wade Road, and Route 102 to show
your support for lifelong fitness. Our
Middle School Student Running Club is
training to compete, and raise funds for
the construction of cross-country trails
at our new campus. Post-race festivities
will feature: Awards presentation,
Wellness Fair attractions, Food & more.
For more information, email
[email protected]
Sunday, June 7
PAWTUCKET — 5th Annual PFC Kyle
Joseph Coutu Memorial 5k Run/Walk,
9 a.m. Slater Memorial Park, 449
Newport Ave. Certified 5k course
through scenic Slater Memorial Park to
remember PFC Kyle Joseph
Coutu/Pawtuckets Hometown Hero.
Cash Prizes to the top 3 overall Female
& Male Runners. T-shirts to the 1st 250
entrants. BBQ provided by Outback
Steakhouse for all participants after the
event. Cash prizes to top male and
female, along with awards for age
groups. Contact Melissa Coutu at (401)
543-0658 or email [email protected]
On The Banner
PHOTO FEATURED IN PIC OF THE DAY LAST WEEK
April 16, 2015 - Lincoln’s Alex Corda battles Toll
Gate’s Hunter Heberg in number two singles action at
Lincoln Thursday. Ernest A. Brown/RIMG photo
May 9 — May 16
Pineview Big League seeks sign-ups
PAWTUCKET — Pineview LL/RI District 2 Big
League will be chasing its fourth straight state title
and trip to the East Regions in Dover Delaware this
summer.
The team will be holding sign ups for the 2015 season on the following dates and times: Saturdays and
Sundays, May 9, 10, 16 and 17 from noon to 2 p.m.
at Doreen Tomilson field on Daggett Avenue.
Eligible to play are players league age 15 through
18 who reside in the boundaries of Rhode Island
Little League District 2, which includes: Pawtucket,
East Providence, Barrington, Bristol, Warren,
Newport, Portsmouth, Middleton and Tiverton.
Sign up fee is $100 per player, which pays for jersey, hat, and all regular season fees. For more information attend sign-ups or contact manager Joe Clark
by e-mail at [email protected] or coach Norm
Clark at [email protected]
May 7
Woonsocket Senior Bocce League slates
organization and practice session
WOONSOCKET — The Woonsocket Senior Bocce
League will begin its season with an organization and
practice session on Thursday, May 7 at 8:30 a.m. at
Bouley Field.
The league is open to anyone over age 50 from
any community. League play is scheduled to begin on
Saturday, May 9, 2015
John Farrell
TORONTO (AP) — Boston
Red Sox manager John Farrell
says he will handle the duties of
pitching coach for at least two
days after the firing of Juan
Nieves.
Farrell said the team could
announce a replacement on
Saturday.
The Red Sox fired Nieves on
Thursday during an off-day.
They went into Friday night’s
game at Toronto with a 4.86
ERA, the worst in the AL.
Farrell said the Red Sox are
“working through some logistics” with their new hire, and
said they “hope to have an
announcement sometime later
tomorrow.”
Farrell, a right-hander, went
36-46 in an eight-year big
league career with Cleveland,
the Angels and Detroit. He was
Boston’s pitching coach from
2007 to 2010 before leaving to
take over as manager of the
Blue Jays.
He returned to the Red Sox
as their manager in 2013.
College Baseball
Bulldogs stun Knights with wild ninth-inning rally
SMITHFIELD – Sophomore Cole
Fabio (Mahwah, N.J.) capped an
improbable ninth-inning comeback by
scoring on a throwing error after hitting a game-tying two-run triple to give
the Bryant University baseball team a
dramatic 8-7 victory over Fairleigh
Dickinson in the opening game of a
four-game weekend series on Friday
afternoon at Conaty Park.
Trailing 7-4 entering the bottom of
the ninth, the Bulldogs (21-20, 12-5
NEC) scored four runs with two outs
to defeat the Knights (17-20, 8-9) for
the 10th straight game. It marked the
second time in three games Bryant has
rallied with two outs in its final at-bat.
Junior Dan Cellucci (Sudbury,
Mass.) opened the ninth with a walk
and sophomore Brandon Bingel
(Peabody, Mass.) worked a full-count
walk two batters later to give the
Bulldogs a pair of runners. A fly ball to
center put runners on the corners with
two outs and senior John Mullen
(Walpole, Mass.) followed with an RBI
single up the middle to make it a tworun game.
Fabio then stepped to the plate and
laced the first pitch from FDU closer
Eric Snyder down the right field line
and into the corner. Cellucci scored
easily and pinch-runner Jacob Marotta
(Bridgewater, Mass.) raced all the way
around from first to score the tying
run, sliding in just ahead of the relay
throw. The relay throw home, however,
bounced away from the catcher and
Fabio never stopped running, chugging
home from third and sliding just ahead
of the tag to win the game.
The late rally erased an outstanding
performance from the Knights over the
first eight and a half innings. FDU
used an infield error in the first inning
to score three unearned runs and take
control of the game. Two walks coupled with the error led to an RBI
infield single from Joel Roman and a
two-out, two-run bloop single from
John Giakas.
FDU extended its lead with three
more runs in the fifth inning, chasing
Bryant starter Kyle Wilcox (Sandy
Hook, Conn.). Dylan Sprague opened
the inning with a bloop to right-center
that bounced out of the glove of a diving Jordan Mountford (Guelph, Ont.).
After a walk and a sac bunt put runners
on second and third, a wild pitch
brought home a run and Roman
knocked home another with a single.
Bobby Romano's two-out RBI single up the middle scored the third run
and knocked Wilcox from the game.
The Bulldogs began to chip away in
the bottom of the fifth. Sophomore
Joseph Paparelli (Preston, Conn.)
slashed a double to left-center and then
came around to score as junior Buck
McCarthy (Saugus, Mass.) followed
with a double into right-center.
In the sixth, Bingel was hit by a
pitch and junior Robby Rinn
(Warwick) singled through the right
side to put runners on the corners with
no outs. FDU starter Joe Flack retired
the next two batters but junior AJ
Zarozny (Shrewsbury, Mass.) knocked
a single through the right side to score
a run. Paparelli and McCarthy then
worked back-to-back walks to force in
a run and make it 6-3.
Cellucci nearly tied the game right
there but FDU right fielder Shane
Siebler raced in to make a diving catch
and end the inning.
Bryant pulled within two with a run
in the seventh. With one out, Bingel
launched a first-pitch fastball over the
left field wall for his league-leading
seventh home run of the season.
In search of his seventh-straight
win, Wilcox allowed six runs (three
earned) on six hits over 4.2 innings. He
walked four and struck out four.
Freshman Justin Snyder (Georgetown,
Mass.) came on in relief of Wilcox and
was a big reason the Bulldogs were
able to comeback. He allowed just two
hits over 2.2 scoreless innings of relief,
handing the ball to junior James Davitt
(Wallingford, Conn.) with one out and
a man on third in the eighth. Davitt got
a strikeout and a fly ball to strand the
runner and allowed an unearned run in
the ninth. He earned his third win of
the year thanks to the Bryant rally.
College Softball
Johnson & Wales falls in game one at NCAA’s, 4-1
NORTON, Mass. – The Johnson &
Wales softball team suffered a 4-1 loss
to Wheaton in their first game of the
NCAA Division III Softball
Championship Norton Regional on
Friday afternoon.
The contest was the first NCAA
appearance in program history.
Wheaton started the scoring for the
day when pitcher Emily Berardi sent a
two-run homerun over the centerfield
fence in the bottom of the first inning.
JWU answered with one out in the top
of the second when designated player
Emily Schaper (Pompton Lakes, N.J.)
smacked a solo homerun to left to cut
the Lyons lead to 2-1.
Wheaton extended their lead to 3-1
in the third when Berardi doubled home
Madeline Hatch. WC picked up a run in
the bottom half of the fifth on a double
by Morgan Walsh, scoring Emma Hart
and improving their advantage to 4-1.
Junior Kristen Solari (Old Bridge,
N.J.) went 3-for-3 in the setback for
JWU while Schaper was 1-for-3 with
the homerun.
For the Lyons, Hart was 2-for-3 on
the afternoon while Berardi knocked in
three RBI to go with a 2-for-2 outing at
the plate.
Freshman Jennifer Corona (Middle
Island, N.Y.) tossed a complete game
for the Wildcats, allowing four earned
runs, eight hits and striking out two
Wheaton batters.
Berardi struck out 11 Wildcats in the
complete game effort, allowing just one
run on five hits.
Johnson & Wales is now 21-15 for
the year and will play in an elimination
game against Eastern Connecticut State
at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, May 9th.
Wheaton advances in the winner's
bracket to take on Husson at 11 a.m.
BLACKSTONE VALLEY MEMORIES
May 9
Eddie Dumaine hurled a
four-hitter, struck six and
walked seven in going the nine-inning
route as Mount St. Charles defeated
Sacred Heart 4-1 for the Hilltoppers
fourth victory against one defeat in
Northern Division action. The Beavers’
Ray Brochu tossed a five-hitter at “the
Flying Frenchmen” but six costly
errors by his supporting cast raised
havoc with Brochu. Roger Lemieux
laced two of the four Sacred Heart hits.
1955
Brian Randall knocked in the
winning tally with a double
as the Jets rallied for three runs in the
bottom of the sixth and final inning to
edge Galego Oil 5-4 in a Darlington
National Little League battle. Randall
was the winning pitcher allowing four
hits and striking out seven, while loser
Dave Denelle also yielded four hits and
fanned seven. Greg Costigan’s double
knocked in two runs to give the Jets a
2-0 lead until Ed Martell slammed a
two-run double in the fourth.
1965
Lefthander Bob Bracken,
showing an excellent assortment of breaking pitchers, allowed five
well-scattered hits, whiffed seven and
issued five free passes as Tolman shut
out Pawtucket West 5-0 in a Metro
Division encounter. John Karbowski,
the Tigers top hitter all season, was the
only Tolman player with two hits.
Steve Galuska lashed a single and double and stole two bases, while Steve
Panners also doubled and singled for
the Rangers.
1975
– By Bill Mulholland
BURRILLVILLE — The 10th annual Blackstone
Valley Heritage Golf Tournament will take place on
Monday, June 8 at the Crystal Lake Golf Course on
Bronco Highway.
The fee to play is $125 per person and includes
lunch, dinner, the golf tournament (an 18-hole scramble format), and a goodie bag. Registration and lunch
will begin at 11:30 a.m., with a 1 p.m. shotgun start.
The dinner, auction, and awards ceremony is expected to start at 6 p.m. The proceeds will benefit the
tourism-based environmental programs that protect
and promote the Blackstone Valley.
Visit www.golfblackstone.com to sign up, become
a tournament sponsor, or for more information.
sons, held Tuesday through Friday, June 23-26.
Each lesson will focus on a different swing skill.
Children will also learn the basics of golf safety, golf
etiquette, and respect for the game. The cost of each
children’s clinic is $109.
The adult clinics also consist of four one-hour lessons, each spaced one week apart (the same day
and time for four weeks), that will start on Tuesday,
June 30.
Each lesson will focus on a specific part of the
game, and at the end of each clinic, adults will have
knowledge of the basic fundamentals, such as how
to use a full swing with irons and woods, and “short
game” skills (pitching, chipping and putting). The cost
of each adult clinic is $159.
The instructor for the clinics is Barrie Bruce, a PGA
teaching professional from the Barrie Bruce Golf
Schools.
Equipment and practice balls will be provided. All
participants need are a pair of sneakers and a good
attitude.
Call the Parks and Recreation Department at (401)
334-9996 for more details or to reserve your space
in any of the clinics.
June 23-30
Spring/Ongoing
Cumberland Parks & Recreation holds
beginner golf clinics for kids, adults
Woonsocket Senior Softball League
holding pre-season practices
CUMBERLAND — The Cumberland Parks &
Recreation Department will conduct beginner golf
clinics for children ages 6-15 and adults at
Wentworth Hills Country Club in Plainville, Mass.
The children’s clinics consist of four one-hour les-
WOONSOCKET – The Woonsocket Senior Softball
League will be holding practices every Tuesday and
Friday at 9 a.m. at Baldelli Field.
The league is open to Woonsocket residents must
who are at least 58 years old and non-city residents
Thursday, May 14, at 8:30 a.m.
For more information call David Mencarini at 7623145 or Armand Renaud at 766-8438.
June 8
10th annual Blackstone Valley Heritage
Golf Tournament slated
who are at least 60 years old.
The season begins on Friday, May 15, and finishes
in October. For more information contact Don
Laroche at (401) 766-1462, Nick Haddad at (401)
465-8652 and Bill Sudan at (401) 749-3452.
Post 85 American Legion baseball seeks
manager, business sponsors
The Woonsocket-area American Legion Post 85
baseball team is seeking a manager for their junior
league team during the upcoming season. The program includes players from Woonsocket, North
Smithfield, Burrillville and students of Mount St.
Charles.
The program is also seeking business sponsorships for their players.
Anyone who is interested in either coaching or
sponsoring, contact Steve Girard at [email protected] or call (401) 309-7993.
Adult volleyball league seeks new players
BELLINGHAM — Bellingham Volleyball is looking
for new players for the spring session. Any adult age
18 and up is welcome.
Games take place at South Elementary School,
Harpin Street, every Tuesday night from 7 to 9 p.m.
Players of all levels are welcome in this recreational pick up league, which plays with different teams
every week. For more information e-mail Doug
Robbie at [email protected] or call (508) 9664053.
SPORTS
Saturday, May 9, 2015
THE TIMES C3
NBA
Playoffs are number-crunch time
TIM REYNOLDS
AP Basketball Writer
A look inside the numbers of
the NBA playoffs as the conference semifinals head into a pivotal
weekend.
3 FOR ALL: More 3-pointers are
being shot in playoff games than
ever.
By a lot. By a whole lot.
Entering Friday, the average
NBA game in these playoffs has
featured 50 free-throw attempts —
thanks, Hack-a-Everybody — and
a staggering 49 tries from 3-point
range. That's a pace well above the
44.7 attempts from 3-point range
during last year's playoffs, and is
also way ahead of any regular-season clip in league history.
It's been clear that this is easily
basketball's most three-happy era
since the arc was added, but consider that just three years ago the
average playoff game had 47 freethrow tries and 35 shots from long
range.
Now, the numbers are basically
even.
Atlanta is averaging 32 attempts
from 3-point range per game in
these playoffs. Of the eight teams
left, the only one that isn't at times
totally reliant on that particular
shot is Memphis, which averaged
about 13 attempts from distance in
its first seven playoff games.
And all that shooting from deep
partially explains this ...
Photo by Keith Allison | Flickr
Blake Griffin has been the unquestioned star of the NBA playoffs this year,
leading all players in total points, rebounds and assists.
CLANK: That's the sound everyone's hearing a lot of so far in
these playoffs.
Going into Friday, the league
was shooting at about 44 percent in
the postseason — on pace for only
the 40th-best single-playoff effort
in NBA history.
But that's not all on the 3-pointer, where teams have been connecting on about 35 percent of
their tries. Foul shooting has been
downright putrid as well.
Across the league, teams have
hit 73.5 percent of their shots from
the foul line in the playoffs, a number that is obviously watered down
by all the intentional hacking of
primarily DeAndre Jordan and
Dwight Howard. That's on pace for
just the 47th-best playoff season
from the line leaguewide.
There is some good news for
the lovers of offense, however.
Despite all those misses, playoff
games haven't had this many points
(202.5 per game entering Friday)
since 1992.
BREAKOUT BLAKE: Your early
front-runner for NBA Finals MVP
(provided he gets there, of course)
might very well be Blake Griffin
of the Los Angeles Clippers.
Here's all he's done in these
playoffs, going into Friday's play:
— He's the NBA playoff leader
in total points (229), rebounds
(129) and assists (69). Yes, the
Clippers had the benefit of playing
more games than anyone else so
far in the playoffs, but for Griffin
to have more assists than anyone in
the early going is unexpected, to
say the least.
— He has three triple-doubles.
The rest of the league has zero so
Injured point guards
leave major impact
in East, West semis
TERESA M. WALKER
AP Sports Writer
MEMPHIS, Tenn. —
John Wall hopes to test his
broken left hand and wrist by
trying to dribble a basketball.
“You have to be able to
dribble,” the Wizards’ AllStar guard said Friday. “It’s
basically taping my hand
behind my back and saying
dribble with one hand. It’s
not happening in this league.
It’s just something I have to
deal with. It’s frustrating. It’s
tough.”
Injuries continue to have a
major impact on the conference semifinals with
Washington replacing
Memphis as the team waiting
to see if its point guard can
or should try to play with
broken bones.
Sure, Mike Conley played
eight days after surgery to
repair broken bones in his
left cheek, but the Grizzlies’
guard missed three games
until swelling eased enough
in his face to wear a mask.
Even the Clippers’ Chris Paul
took off a couple games to
rest his strained left hamstring.
Memphis was able to
close out Portland without
Conley, and he returned in
time to help the Grizzlies
split with the Warriors in the
first two games in the
Western Conference semifinals. The Clippers split both
games Paul sat out in
Houston, giving him time to
rest up for Game 3.
Wall is averaging 17.6
points and 12.6 assists this
postseason. With five nondisplaced fractures, Wall
could hurt his hand and wrist
even worse by playing so
he’s not sure if he will be
able to play Game 3 on
Saturday no matter how
tough it might be sitting out.
“This series has to go on,”
Wall said. “This is a great
opportunity for these guys to
step up, play a key role and
win some games.”
A look at the two games:
Warriors at Grizzlies, tied
1-1, 8 p.m., EDT, ESPN
Golden State faces its first
true test after sweeping New
Orleans and easily winning
the opener against the
Grizzlies. Conley’s return
allowed the Grizzlies to take
home-court advantage with
them back to Memphis, and
masks already were waiting
for fans to turn up the volume Saturday night in appreciation of the guard’s gutty
performance Tuesday night.
Playing on the road has
been pretty easy for the
Warriors who posted not
only the NBA’s best record
overall in the regular season
but were the league’s best
away from home.
“For us, this is some of
the first adversity that we’ve
faced,” Warriors guard Klay
Thompson said. “We’ve got
a couple options: we can
hang our heads or we can go
in there and fight in
Memphis. We’re the best
road team in the NBA for a
reason. We can go in there
and win if we play hard
enough, and that’s what we
far in these playoffs.
— Nine games, nine doubledoubles. He's the only player with
one in every postseason game thus
far. And keep in mind, no one had
more than nine of those in the
entirety of the 2014 playoffs.
HOME-COURT ADVANTAGE: Or
more specifically, what home-court
advantage?
Home teams are 29-20 going
into Friday's games, and everyone
who had home court for Games 1
and 2 of the conference semifinals
no longer has the home-court edge
going into Game 3 of their respective series.
All of them are knotted at a
game apiece.
LEBRON 7K: LeBron James of
the Cleveland Cavaliers is closing
in on yet another longevity milestone, that being 7,000 minutes in
NBA playoff games.
He's at 6,966 heading into Game
3 of Cleveland's series with
Chicago on Friday night. He'll
become the 12th player in league
history to log that many playoff
minutes, and he's going to climb
the league's assist charts as well.
James goes into Game 3 with
1,059 playoff assists, tied with San
Antonio's Tony Parker for No. 6
all-time. Chances are, James will
be No. 4 on that list before too
much time has passed in Game 3;
Steve Nash is No. 5 on the playoff
assist list with 1,061, and Larry
Bird is No. 4 at 1,062.
Sprint Cup
Logano wins pole for Saturday
night race at Kansas Speedway
DAVE SKRETTA
AP Sports Writer
Photo by Keith Allison | Flickr
Wizards coach Randy Wittman, left, will have his hands full in
his team’s series with Atlanta if All-Star point guard John
Wall, right, sits out with an injured hand.
expect to do.”
Conley was testing a new
mask after practice Friday,
hopefully one with holes to
protect against fogging.
Having three days between
games has helped him recover, and Conley even has been
able to run and lift weights.
He’s even getting the feeling
back in parts of his face now.
“That’s a good thing,”
Conley said.
Hawks at Wizards, tied 11, 5 p.m. EDT, ESPN
The Wizards are preparing
to play without Wall against
the East’s No. 1 seed after
grabbing home-court advantage by winning the series
opener with their point guard
on the floor. Bradley Beal,
who took over at the point in
Game 2, is averaging only 4
assists this postseason.
Beal said he thinks he
tried to do too much in that
game, trying to compensate
for Wall’s absence. He said
the key for him is simply creating opportunities for shots
and rebound.
“I got to rely on my teammates and act like John is
there when he’s not there,”
Beal said.
Wall’s advice is for Beal
to be aggressive but smart if
double-teamed.
“Trust the guys are going
to make shots,” Wall said.
“Kick it out to them. That’s
something you have to build.
He hasn’t been in that situation too many times. Mostly
he was the guy being aggressive and I have to find guys.
Atlanta guard Kyle
Korver was with Chicago
when the Bulls lost Derrick
Rose to a torn ACL.
“We were all bummed,
but you know what, you still
have to play,” Korver said.
“We got beat four games in a
row, and I’m not saying
that’s going to happen here.
We have a lot of respect for
them and still think it’s going
to be a tough series.”
KANSAS CITY, Kan. —
Joey Logano will start at
Kansas Speedway right where
he left off.
The winner of last fall’s
Chase race drove his No. 22
Ford to a fast lap of 192.397
mph in the final qualifying
round Friday, easily topping
Kasey Kahne and Brad
Keselowski to earn the pole
for the Sprint Cup race
Saturday night.
“Last year it took us pretty
much all year to win one
pole,” said Logano, who has
only finished outside of the
top 10 twice this year. “It’s
pretty special to be able to
figure out these third sessions
and still have a lot of speed in
our cars.”
Logano was fast from the
moment his team unloaded
his car Friday, turning the second-quickest lap behind point
leader Kevin Harvick during
the early practice session.
Logano was third on the
speed chart during the afternoon session behind Erik
Jones and Jeff Gordon.
It was the fourth pole of
the year for Logano, but his
first at Kansas Speedway.
“The line I ran here in the
fall may not work this time.
Just trying to figure out
what’s the fastest for your
race car, and you never have
two race cars the same,”
Logano said. “You have to be
able to adapt to what’s new
and have an open mind.
Kahne posted a lap of
191.911 mph. He was followed by Keselowski, Martin
Truex Jr. and local boy Carl
Edwards, who was posted the
final lap of the last qualifying
segment.
“We’ve been really good,
spent a lot of time in race
trims, trying to get our car to
turn at the corner, make that
work,” Kahne said. “Our final
run was the best run of the
day, so I’m happy with the
car, the speed of the car, the
engine and the guys for making it better.”
Harvick qualified sixth,
followed by Greg Biffle, Kurt
Busch, Jamie McMurray and
Kyle Larson.
Jones also made the final
round of qualifying in his first
attempt in the No. 18, which
he’s driving this week while
Kyle Busch recovers from
injuries sustained in a wreck
at Daytona.
The 18-year-old Truck
Series star made his Sprint
Cup debut in relief of Denny
Hamlin at Bristol, but Jones
will be making his first Cup
start from the 12th position on
Saturday night.
“Not a bad ending there to
qualifying,” he said.
READER’S REWARDS
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2015 General Admission
Ticket Vouchers
Twenty 4-packs of vouchers will be awarded.
ENTRY FORM: Pawsox
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City:_______________________________________State:______
Phone Number:_________________________________________
Must be 18 years old to enter.
Entries must be received by
Monday, May 11, 2015 at noon.
Winners will be posted in The
Call & The Times on Tuesday,
May 12, 2015.
No Purchase Necessary. Employees of The
Call & The Times and their families are
not eligible.
Please mail or drop off entry form or 3x5 index card to:
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Visit www.pawsox.com for more information
SPORTS
C4 THE TIMES
Tigers
Continued from page C1
Pawtucket athletic staple as
long as Theo Murray and
Dino Campopiano remain the
baseball coaches at Tolman
and Shea, respectively.
“It’s a great thing for the
city and the two teams,” said
Campopiano. “John and Ray
are just wonderful men. I’ve
said this a million times: Ray
has been a second dad to me
over the years and John is a
great person.
“My friendship with Theo
goes back many years now
and it’s just a great thing for
us to do together,” added
Campopiano. “Even though
we’re not in the same league,
it’s still a great thing for us to
do together.”
The inaugural
McGee/Scanlon game was a
league contest that took place
inside McCoy Stadium and
was captured by the Tigers, 97. Both coaches made sure to
set their schedules accordingly
after the Raiders were reassigned to the Division III
ranks.
“We’re allowed two nonleague games a year so this is
going to be set no matter
what,” said Murray. “Dino
and I don’t even have to call
each other. We know to leave
one game open.”
The turnout was mightily
impressive and spoke volumes
about just how revered that
McGee and Scanlon were in
the community they served for
many years.
“It was a playoff-type
atmosphere as far as the
crowd,” said Murray.
Campopiano is also the
football coach at Shea, meaning he appreciates the significance behind an intra-city
contest as much as anyone.
He was asked if he envisions
the McGee/Scanlon baseball
game someday rising to the
level of the annual
Thanksgiving clash between
the Raiders and Tigers.
“I hope that someday it
does,” said Campopiano.
“The kids are getting into it
and are beginning to understand the significance behind
it.”
As for the action on the
field, Tolman jumped out to a
4-0 lead in the first inning
behind a bases-clearing double by senior Nate Gagnon.
He added a two-run double in
the second. Leadoff batter
Steve Otis finished with two
hits and two runs while Corey
Moral smacked two doubled
and scored twice.
Murray gave the pitching
nod to Kyle Depatie, a freshman who held the Raiders to
two hits while striking out
five.
“I wanted him to have this
experience and get a sense of
what could be in store come
the playoffs,” said Murray.
“He did great.”
Follow Brendan McGair
on Twitter @BWMcGair03
Boys’ Volleyball
Boys’ Lacrosse
Raiders rip Lincoln, 3-0
Tiverton/Rogers
edges Lincoln, 8-3
PAWTUCKET – Shea High
slowly wore down Lincoln in a
Division II-North showdown, eventually sealing a 3-0 triumph at “The
Cage” on Friday night.
With the 25-20, 25-12, 25-9 verdict, the Raiders improved to 7-4
overall (7-3 league).
The Lions dropped to 0-10.
Tolman falls to Hendricken
PAWTUCKET – After a lessthan-auspicious first set, Tolman High
MIDDLETOWN – If not
for four errors, St. Raphael
Academy may have been able
to make a game of its
Division I-A showdown with
Middletown High on Friday.
Instead, the Islanders utilized fine plate outings by
Chase Sinatra and Christian
Jorge to claim a 9-2 victory.
Sinatra finished 3-for-3
with an RBI and three runs
scored while Jorge chipped in
two hits (one a two-run double in a four-run second) to
lift Middletown to 7-6 in
league action.
Then again, senior righty
Jake Francis contributed, too.
In a complete-game performance, he scattered nine hits
and two walks with five
strikeouts.
Call SRA junior Nate
Vigeant a hard-luck losing
hurler. He allowed nine hits as
well through seven while
walking four and whiffing
one, but he yielded just four
earned runs.
“We just threw it around
too much,” said veteran chief
Tom Sorrentine, whose Saints
fell to 1-12.
Sorrentine nevertheless
gave credit where it’s due.
Stating juniors Jordan
Gillheeney and Dylan
Beauclair both had two hits,
as did freshman Jordan
Perdomo. His RBI single, followed by Pat Fleming’s RBI
two-bagger, plated the lone
two runs for SRA.
St. Raphael 000 200 0 - 2 – 9 – 4
Middletown 040 320 x - 9 – 9 – 0
Nate Vigeant and Jordan
Gillheeney. Jake Francis and Liam
O’Regan. 2B – Pat Fleming,
Christian Jorge.
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
CNBC — Formula One, qualifying for
Grand Prix of Spain, at Barcelona
10 a.m.
FS1 — FIA, Formula E Championship,
Monaco ePRIX
3:30 p.m. ABC — IndyCar, Grand Prix of Indianapolis
NBCSN — Formula One, qualifying for
Grand Prix of Spain, at Barcelona (sameday tape)
5 p.m.
NBCSN — GP2, at Barcelona, Spain
(same-day tape)
7:30 p.m. FS1 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Spongebob
Squarepants 400, at Kansas City, Kan.
BOXING
4 p.m.
9 p.m.
Moses Brown downs Tolman
with an RBI triple and tworun blast for the Quakers (120 overall).
Sophomore righty Megan
Salzillo took the loss for the
Tigers (8-2 overall, 8-1 in INorth).
Tolman 100 00 - 1 – 1 – 6
Moses Brown 003 44 - 11 – 10 – 1
Megan Salzillo and Brittany
Baptista. Janel Gamache and Lydia
DeAngelo. HR – Catalina Mazo.
Lions claw Novans
WOONSOCKET –
Lincoln High took advantage
3 p.m.
8 p.m.
ESPN — Atlantic Coast Conference, championship, at Blacksburg, Va.
ESPN2 — American Athletic Conference,
championship, at Orlando, Fla.
ESPN2 — Oklahoma St. at Oklahoma
ESPN2 — Southeastern Conference,
championship, at Baton Rouge, La.
GOLF
2 p.m.
4 a.m.
NBC — PGA Tour, THE PLAYERS
Championship, third round, at Ponte Vedra
Beach, Fla.
TGC — European PGA Tour, Mauritius
Open, third round, at Bel Ombre (delayed
tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
FS1 — Kansas City at Detroit
1:07 p.m. NESN, WEEI (103.7 FM) — Boston at
Toronto
4 p.m.
FS1 — Atlanta at Washington
8 p.m.
MLB — Regional coverage, L.A. Dodgers
at Colorado or San Diego at Arizona
MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7:15 p.m. WHJJ (920 AM) — Pawtucket at Columbus
8:15 p.m. ABC — Playoffs, conference semifinals,
Game 3
10:30 p.m. ESPN — Playoffs, conference semifinals,
Game 3
NHL
7 p.m.
NBCSN — Playoffs, conference semifinals,
Game 5, Tampa Bay at Montreal
SOCCER
7:40 a.m. NBCSN — Premier League, Sunderland at
Everton
9:55 a.m. NBCSN — Premier League, West
Bromwich at Newcastle
12:25 p.m. NBCSN — Premier League, Manchester
United at Crystal Palace
TRANSACTIONS
Northmen topple Tolman, 7-0
North Smithfield 7, Tolman 0
Singles: Alex Bourque def. John
Reall, 6-0, 6-1; Adam Destefano def.
Tyler Letendre, 6-2, 6-3; Zach
Racine def. Harrison Moran, 6-1, 63; Luke Marcotte def. Jared Paquin,
7-6 (4), 6-2.
Doubles: Pat Guertin-Alex Lachance
def. Joe Groves-Gabe Cumplido, 61, 6-4; Andrew LaBelle-Nick
Hanoian def. Brian Rego-Jeremy
Magnon, 6-2, 6-1; Rob Pela-Dennis
McGovern def. Jonny Villada-Fabian
Marmolejo, 6-0, 6-1.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
1 p.m.
New York
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Boston
Baltimore
Central Division
W
Kansas City
Detroit
Minnesota
Chicago
Cleveland
West Division
W
Houston
Los Angeles
Texas
Oakland
Seattle
W
18
15
14
13
12
L
11
14
15
15
14
W
L
18
18
16
10
10
L
Pct
10
11
13
15
17
W
L
19
13
12
12
11
L
Pct
10
16
16
18
17
East Division
GB WCGB L10
—
—
7-3
3
1
4-6
4
2
5-5
4½
2½
3-7
4½
2½
5-5
Central Division
Pct WCGB
GB WCGB
L10
GB
L10
Str
.643
—
—
6-4
.621
½
—
5-5
.552 2½
—
8-2
.400 6½
4
4-6
.370 7½
5
4-6
West Division
Pct WCGB
GB WCGB
L10
GB
L10
Str
.655
—
—
7-3
.448
6
3
4-6
.429 6½
3½
5-5
.400 7½
4½
4-6
.393 7½
4½
4-6
Pct
.621
.517
.483
.464
.462
Str
W-1
L-1
W-1
L-1
L-3
Home
7-6
7-9
7-6
7-9
6-4
Away
11-5
8-5
7-9
6-6
6-10
Str
Home
Home
Away
W-1
11-5
W-1
8-5
W-2
12-5
L-1
8-4
L-1
4-8
Away
7-5
10-6
4-8
2-11
6-9
Str
Home
Home
Away
W-1
8-8
L-1
6-8
W-4
3-9
L-2
4-9
L-2
5-7
Away
11-2
7-8
9-7
8-9
6-10
:::
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W
L
W
New York
18
Atlanta
14
Miami
14
Washington
14
Philadelphia
10
Central Division
W
W
L
St. Louis
21
Chicago
14
Cincinnati
14
Pittsburgh
13
Milwaukee
9
West Division
W
W
L
Los Angeles
18
San Diego
15
San Francisco
14
Arizona
13
Colorado
11
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Pct
L
10
14
15
15
19
L
Pct
7
13
14
15
20
L
Pct
10
15
15
14
15
East Division
GB
L10
Str
Pct WCGB
GB WCGB
L10
.643
—
—
4-6
.500
4
—
5-5
.483 4½
½
6-4
.483 4½
½
7-3
.345 8½
4½
3-7
Central Division
Pct WCGB
GB WCGB
L10
GB
L10
Str
.750
—
—
9-1
.519 6½
—
4-6
.500
7
—
6-4
.464
8
1
3-7
.310 12½ 5½
5-5
West Division
Pct WCGB
GB WCGB
L10
GB
L10
Str
.643
—
—
7-3
.500
4
—
4-6
.483 4½
½
6-4
.481 4½
½
5-5
.423
6
2
2-8
Home
Away
Str
Home
W-2
13-3
W-2
8-8
W-1
8-7
W-1
7-6
L-2
6-6
Away
5-7
6-6
6-8
7-9
4-13
Str
Home
Home
Away
W-1
14-3
L-1
7-7
L-1
6-5
W-1
7-6
L-1
5-12
Away
7-4
7-6
8-9
6-9
4-8
Str
Home
Home
Away
W-1
13-2
L-1
9-7
L-2
9-8
W-3
7-8
L-7
4-7
Away
5-8
6-8
5-7
6-6
7-8
MLB SCHEDULE
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Thursday’s Games
Minnesota 6, Oakland 5
Kansas City 7, Cleveland 4
Detroit 4, Chicago White Sox 1
N.Y. Yankees 4, Baltimore 3
Texas 5, Tampa Bay 4
Houston 3, L.A. Angels 2
Friday’s Games
Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Kansas City at Detroit, 7:08 p.m.
Minnesota at Cleveland, 7:10 p.m.
Texas at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Houston at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Oakland at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Baltimore (Chen 0-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Whitley
1-0), 1:05 p.m.
Boston (J.Kelly 1-1) at Toronto (Hutchison 20), 1:07 p.m.
Kansas City (Guthrie 1-2) at Detroit
(An.Sanchez 2-3), 1:08 p.m.
Minnesota (P.Hughes 1-4) at Cleveland
(B.Chen 0-0), 4:10 p.m.
Texas (Detwiler 0-3) at Tampa Bay (Odorizzi 32), 6:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 2-3) at Chicago White Sox
(Rodon 0-0), 7:10 p.m.
Houston (Keuchel 3-0) at L.A. Angels
(Shoemaker 2-2), 9:05 p.m.
Oakland (Hahn 1-2) at Seattle (Happ 2-1),
9:10 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Minnesota at Cleveland, 1:10 p.m.
Texas at Tampa Bay, 1:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Houston at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Oakland at Seattle, 4:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Detroit, 8:05 p.m.
Monday’s Games
Toronto at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Milwaukee, 7:20 p.m.
Kansas City at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Boston at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Thursday’s Games
L.A. Dodgers 14, Milwaukee 4
St. Louis 5, Chicago Cubs 1
Pittsburgh 7, Cincinnati 2
Arizona 11, San Diego 0
Miami 7, San Francisco 2
Friday’s Games
Atlanta at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Miami at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Atlanta (Teheran 3-1) at Washington (Fister 21), 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Niese 2-2) at Philadelphia (Harang
3-2), 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (C.Martinez 3-0) at Pittsburgh
(Worley 2-2), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 2-1) at Milwaukee
(Lohse 1-4), 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 2-3) at Chicago White Sox
(Rodon 0-0), 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 1-2) at Colorado
(J.De La Rosa 0-2), 8:10 p.m.
San Diego (T.Ross 1-3) at Arizona
(C.Anderson 0-1), 8:10 p.m.
Miami (Phelps 1-0) at San Francisco
(Bumgarner 3-1), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Atlanta at Washington, 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Miami at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 4:10 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 4:10 p.m.
Monday’s Games
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Milwaukee, 7:20 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Washington at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Miami at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
Boys’ Tennis
NORTH SMITHFIELD –
The threesome of Alex
Bourque, Adam Destefano
and Zach Racine collected
rather elementary straight-set
wins in the opening three singles spots, propelling North
Smithfield High to a 7-0 pasting of Division II/Suburban B
foe Tolman on Friday.
For the Tigers (0-13), Jared
Paquin battled Luke Marcotte
at No. 4 singles before dropping a tough 7-6 (4), 6-2 decision; and the No. 1 tandem of
Joe Groves and Gabe
Cumplido played rather well
in a 6-1, 6-4 loss to Pat
Guertin and Alex Lachance.
The Northmen closed in on
the .500 mark (6-7) with the
triumph.
CBS — Junior welterweights, Omar
Figueroa Jr. (24-0-1) vs. Ricky Burns (37-41), at Hidalgo, Texas
HBO — Super lightweights, Humberto Soto
(65-8-2) vs. Frankie Gomez (18-0-0); super
welterweights, Canelo Alvarez (44-1-1) vs.
James Kirkland (32-1-0), at Houston
LINCOLN – Greg Johanning produced two goals and two assists and Tom
McKinnon a pair of tallies to lift the
Tiverton/Rogers Co-op club to an 8-3
Division III crossover triumph over
Lincoln at Tiberii Field on Friday.
Paul Gomes added a goal and five
feeds for the Tigers (6-3).
Justin Palumbo notched a tally and an
assist for the Lions (6-5), with Kyle
Bettencourt and Trent Tougas both delivering goals. Ross Magliocco contributed
seven stops.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
TODAY
NBA
Softball
PROVIDENCE – Tolman
High jumped out to a immediate 1-0 lead after the top of
the first inning, but Moses
Brown erupted for three in the
third inning, then rallied for
eight more in the next two to
earn an 11-1 non-league
blowout on Friday.
Freshman Janel Gamache
whirled a stellar one-hitter
with 14 strikeouts, and
Catalina Mazo went 3-for-3
battled Hendricken tooth-and-nail
through the next two but eventually
suffered a tough 3-0 Division I loss at
the James W. Donaldson Gymnasium
on Friday evening.
Nate Gyampo and R.J. Barton
came together to record 16 kills and
five blocks for the Hawks (6-6 overall, 5-6 league).
During the 25-12, 25-23, 30-28
defeat, Cia-ron Hodgkinson managed
nine spikes and eight digs and Jason
Soares eight kills for the Tigers (110).
SPORTS ON THE AIR
Baseball
Islanders sink Saints, 9-2
Saturday, May 9, 2015
of three straight-set singles
victories to land a 6-1
Division II/Suburban A decision over Woonsocket at the
Aylsworth Avenue courts on
Friday afternoon.
At the top spot, Eric
O’Neill posted a 3-0 win over
Andy Ratsapho, who had
default the match due to
injury, but Mike Crowley,
Nico Ferretti and Alex Kwarta
all steamrolled their opponents in the final three singles
spots.
The lone triumph for the
Villa Novans (0-12) came at
third doubles, when the partnership of Brian Flores and
Austin Rodrigues outlasted
Jesus Garcia and Hungston
Tran, 6-4, 1-6, 13-11, the final
set a super tiebreaker.
Lincoln 6, Woonsocket 1
Singles: Eric O’Neill (L) def. Andy
Ratsapho, 3-0 (injury default); Mike
Crowley (L) def. Ben Rickson, 6-1,
6-0; Nico Ferretti (L) def. Timmy
Prithitch, 6-1, 6-0; Alex Kwarta (L)
def. Timmy Tanakhone. 6-2, 6-3.
Doubles: Andy Pan-Jose Garcia (L)
def. Tom Daosang-Tommy
Phimmasene, 6-4, 6-1; James
Heinemann-Jake Burlingame (L)
def. Kevin Au-Joe Labreche, 6-1, 60; Brian Flores-Austin Rodrigues
(W) def. Jesus Garcia-Hungston
Tran, 6-4, 1-6, 13-11 (supertiebreaker).
Friday’s Sports Transactions
The Associated Press
BASEBALL
Major League Baseball
MLB — Suspended Cincinnati 1B Joey Votto
one game suspension and fined him an
undisclosed amount for making contact with
umpire Chris Conroy during a May 6 game
at Pittsburgh.
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS — Placed INF Mike
Aviles on the family medical emergency list.
Recalled INF/OF Zach Walters from
Columbus (IL).
KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Reinstated SS
Alcides Escobar from the 7-day DL. Placed
3B Mike Moustakas on the
bereavement/family emergency list and LHP
Jason Vargas on the 15-day DL, retroactive
to May 6. Activated C Drew Butera.
Optioned C Francisco Pena to Omaha
(PCL). Recalled RHP Yohan Pino from
Omaha.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Optioned RHP
Chad Jenkins to Buffalo (IL). Recalled RHP
Ryan Tepera from Buffalo.
Atlantic League
LONG ISLAND DUCKS — Signed C Dillon
Haupt and RHP Nick Struck. Placed OF
Anthony Vega on the inactive list.
Can-Am League
ROCKLAND BOULDERS — Signed LHP
Shawn Gilblair.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BALTIMORE RAVENS — LB Darius Allen, OT
Darryl Baldwin, LB Brennen Beyer, WR
Deandre Carter, OT Blaine Clausell, LB Trey
Depriest, OT Nick Easton, G Kaleb
Johnson, QB Jerry Lovelocke, RB Terrence
Magee, P Justin Manton, S Nick Perry, OT
De’Ondre Wesley, CB Julian Wilson and WR
Cam Worthy.
CHICAGO BEARS — Signed C Hroniss
Grasu to a four-year contract.
CINCINNATI BENGALS — Signed CB Troy
Hill, C-G Chris Jasperse, WR Jake
Kumerow, TE Matt Lengel, K Tom Obarski,
S Floyd Raven, LB Trevor Roach, C Jake
Smith, HB Terrell Watson, FB Mark Weisman
and DT DeShawn Williams.
CLEVELAND BROWNS — Signed OL Tyler
Loos, OL Darrian Miller, De’Ante Saunders
and DL Dylan Wynn.
DALLAS COWBOYS — Waived LB Troy
Davis and OT Donald Hawkins. Released LB
Dekoda Watson. Announced the retirement
of DT Josh Brent. Signed RB Synjyn Days,
WR George Farmer, WR Antwan Goodley,
WR Deontay Greenberry, TE Ray Hamilton,
WR Nick Harwell, C Shane McDermott, G
Daniel Quave, CB Joel Ross, S Tim Scott,
QB Jameill Shower, S Ray Vinopal, WR
Lucky Whitehead and CB Jason Wilson.
GREEN BAY PACKERS — Signed CB
Bernard Blake, WR Javess Blue, WR Ricky
Collins, WR Adrian Coxson, RB John
Crockett, LB Tavarus Dantzler, OT Fabbians
Ebbele, CB LaDarius Gunter, RB Alonzo
Harris, TE Mitchell Henry, DT Lavon Hooks,
WR Jimmie Hunt, WR Larry Pinkard, LB
Jermauria Rasco, G Marcus Reed, G Matt
Rotheram and LB James Vaughters.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Signed TE AJ
Derby, DL Xzavier Dickson, DL Trey
Flowers, OL Tre’ Jackson, OL Shaq Mason,
DB Jordan Richards, DB Darryl Roberts, LB
Matthew Wells, C David Andrews, WR Devin
Gardner, WR Chris Harper, DB Jimmy Jean,
DB Brandon King, DB Eric Patterson and
DL Vince Taylor.
NEW YORK JETS — Released TE Chris
Pantale and LB Chris Young. Announced
the retirement of OL Corey Hilliard. Signed
DE Deion Barnes, DE Jordan Williams, S
Durell Eskridge, S Demarkus Perkins, LB
Julian Howsare, LB Taiwan Jones, TE Wes
Saxton and DL Davon Walls.
OAKLAND RAIDERS — CB Rob Daniel, OTG Quinterrius Eatmon, QB Cody Fajardo,
LB Jacoby Hale, S Jimmy Hall, WR Josh
Harper, TE Gabe Holmes, RB Gus
Johnson, S Tevin McDonald, LB Braylon
Mitchell, DT Leon Orr, S Terrell Pinson, LB
Josh Shirley and WR Milton Williams.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS — Signed DE L.T.
Walton.
TENNESSEE TITANS — Waived-injured TE
Brett Brackett.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Signed OL
Takoby Cofield. Waived OT Xavier Nixon.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
LA GALAXY — Signed MF Sebastian
Lletget.
COLLEGE
CALIFORNIA — Named interim athletic
director Michael Williams athletic director.
HOLY CROSS — Named Joe Kennedy and
Freddie Owens men’s assistant basketball
coach.
UCONN — Announced men’s junior G
Terrence Samuel was granted his release
from the basketball team and plans to transfer.
WAGNER — Announces the retirement softball coach Glen Payne.
WICHITA STATE — Announced graduatesenior F Anton Grady has transferred from
Cleveland State.
North Division
W L
Pawtucket (Red Sox)
18 10
Rochester (Twins)
15 11
Buffalo (Blue Jays)
15 12
Scranton/WB (Yankees) 13 15
Syracuse (Nationals)
11 16
Lehigh Valley (Phillies)
8 20
South Division
W L
Durham (Rays)
17 11
Charlotte (White Sox)
14 12
Norfolk (Orioles)
14 13
Gwinnett (Braves)
13 14
West Division
W L
Indianapolis (Pirates)
17 11
Columbus (Indians)
14 13
Louisville (Reds)
11 16
Toledo (Tigers)
10 16
Pct. GB
.643
—
.577
2
.556 2½
.464
5
.407 6½
.286 10
Pct. GB
.607
—
.538
2
.519 2½
.481 3½
Pct. GB
.607
—
.519 2½
.407 5½
.385
6
Thursday’s Games
Pawtucket 6, Toledo 5
Columbus 5, Charlotte 2
Durham 4, Buffalo 2
Indianapolis 6, Rochester 5
Gwinnett 5, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 0
Friday’s Games
Charlotte at Toledo, 7 p.m.
Rochester at Louisville, 7:05 p.m.
Gwinnett at Lehigh Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Buffalo at Norfolk, 7:05 p.m.
Durham at Syracuse, 7:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, 7:05
p.m.
Pawtucket at Columbus, 7:15 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Durham at Syracuse, 1:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, 4:05
p.m.
Rochester at Louisville, 6:05 p.m.
Gwinnett at Lehigh Valley, 6:35 p.m.
Charlotte at Toledo, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Norfolk, 7:05 p.m.
Pawtucket at Columbus, 7:15 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Pawtucket at Columbus, 1:05 p.m.
Buffalo at Norfolk, 1:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, 1:05
p.m.
Durham at Syracuse, 1:05 p.m.
Gwinnett at Lehigh Valley, 1:35 p.m.
Charlotte at Toledo, 2 p.m.
Rochester at Louisville, 2:05 p.m.
MLS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts
New England
5 2 2 17
D.C. United
5 1 2 17
New York
3 1 4 13
Columbus
3 3 2 11
Toronto FC
3 4 0 9
Chicago
3 4 0 9
Orlando City
2 4 2 8
New York City FC 1 5 3 6
Philadelphia
1 6 3 6
Montreal
0 2 2 2
GF
12
10
12
12
11
6
6
6
10
2
GA
8
6
8
8
11
8
10
10
18
6
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
FC Dallas
5 2 2 17 15 12
Vancouver
5 3 2 17 11
9
Seattle
5 2 1 16 13
6
Los Angeles
3 2 5 14 10
9
San Jose
4 4 1 13 9
10
Kansas City
3 2 4 13 12 12
Real Salt Lake
2 2 5 11 7
10
Portland
2 3 4 10 7
8
Houston
2 4 4 10 11 13
Colorado
1 2 6 9
8
8
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for
tie.
Tuesday’s Games
San Jose 1, Houston 0
Wednesday’s Games
Real Salt Lake 0, Los Angeles 0, tie
Friday’s Games
New England at Orlando City, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Colorado, 10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Real Salt Lake at Chicago, 3 p.m.
Portland at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at D.C. United, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
Seattle at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at FC Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Houston at Toronto FC, 5 p.m.
New York City FC at New York, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, May 13
Orlando City at D.C. United, 8 p.m.
Friday, May 15
Chicago at New York City FC, 7 p.m.
New York at FC Dallas, 9 p.m.
Saturday, May 16
Real Salt Lake at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Seattle at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
Toronto FC at New England, 7:30 p.m.
Portland at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Colorado at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
Columbus at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 17
Los Angeles at Orlando City, 5 p.m.
D.C. United at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
SPORTS
Saturday, May 9, 2015
THE TIMES C5
PGA Tour
PGA TOUR
Na, Kelly share lead at Players
DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer
PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. —
Jerry Kelly and Kevin Na headed into
the weekend at The Players
Championship with another chance at
winning the PGA Tour’s biggest and
richest event.
Thanks to a clutch putt by Tiger
Woods rarely seen of late, he made the
cut on the number and gets to keep
playing.
Na, the 54-hole leader three years
ago until he faded under intense scrutiny of serious swing issues, settled
down after a wild start for a 3-under
69. He shared the lead with Kelly, a
48-year-old from Wisconsin who has
even stronger memories of the TPC
Sawgrass.
Kelly had a two-shot lead over
Woods in 2001 going into a final
round that took two days to complete
because of storms. Woods went on to
win, and two weeks later he completed
his grand sweep of the majors at
Augusta National.
Fourteen years later, Kelly and
Woods are in different roles.
“I figured I would have another
chance at this golf course,” Kelly said.
“I didn’t think it would be that long,
but it’s just strange. This whole career
has gone by in the blink of an eye.”
Kelly and Na were at 8-under 136,
two shots clear of Rickie Fowler (69),
Chris Kirk (68), David Hearn (71) and
Branden Grace (67).
Not much is left from all that star
power on both ends of the draw at the
start of the week.
Rory McIlroy held up his end. He
had a 71 and was only four shots back
going into the weekend. The other two
guys in his group, Masters champion
Jordan Spieth and Jason Day of
Australia, won’t be around for the last
36 holes.
Spieth spent too
much time trying to
save par and finished with a meaningless bogey for a
72 to miss by three
shots. Day started
the second round
tied with McIlroy
Kevin Na
and had two 7s on
his card within four
holes. He closed
with a double bogey
for an 81.
Phil Mickelson,
who played in the
group ahead of
Woods, had two 6s
and a 7 on his way
to a 76 to miss the
Jerry Kelly
cut for the third
straight year.
“I was thinking to myself as I was
walking around, ‘I can’t believe I’ve
actually won here,’ you know?”
Mickelson said.
Woods, in his first start since he
showed a remarkable short-game
recovery at the Masters, hovered
around the cut line most of the day
until he got to the par-5 ninth for his
last hole. He choked up for a soft
pitching wedge to 10 feet, made the
birdie and showed the kind of emotion
he once reserved for big shots and big
moments.
That gave him a 71 for even-par
144, making the cut on the number.
Given the nature of the Stadium
Course, and the quality of the field,
making the cut on the number means
he was only eight shots out of the lead.
“I feel like I’m playing well enough
to get myself up there,” Woods said. “I
just need one good round and narrow
up that gap between myself and the
lead, and I feel like I can do that.”
Na was a different player in 2012.
He was vilified for his slow play,
which he attributed to having the yips
with his swing. He simply couldn’t
take the club back, and there times that
when he did, he would purposely
swing over the ball so he could start
over. It was difficult to watch. It was
even harder on Na.
But he has battled through it and
came into The Players at No. 22 in the
world ranking.
“I think I’m mentally tougher
because I had gone through that, and
I’m a lot more happier,” Na said.
Such is the nature of the TPC
Sawgrass that no one ever felt safe.
Defending champion Martin
Kaymer made two quick birdies and
was one shot out of the lead. When he
finished the back nine, he was in danger of missing the cut after a tee shot
into the water on the 18th and a double bogey. Kaymer slowed his swing,
hit some fairways and recovered with
three birdies for a 72.
Fowler was poised to close in on
the lead until his approach on the par-5
16th drifted too far right and went into
the water for a bogey. Fowler bounced
back with a birdie on the island green
at the par-3 17th, and he had a 3-foot
birdie attempt that fooled him on the
18th.
Even so, he was two shots behind
and brings a little extra motivation
with him. In a magazine survey of
players, in which they didn’t have to
give their names, Fowler and Ian
Poulter tied with 24 percent of the
vote for the most overrated on tour.
Fowler has won twice worldwide and
is No. 13 in the world, mainly on the
strength of his four top-5 finishes in
the majors last year.
“If there’s a time where I need
something to kind of give me a kick in
the butt, then I can think of that and it
will put me in the right frame of mind
to go out there and take care of business,” Fowler said.
NHL
Lightning look to close out Canadiens in Montreal
JAY COHEN
AP Sports Writer
of the series.
“We get as much pressure
as we can on him and go to
the net, score some goals,
shoot a lot of pucks at him
and it will pay off eventually,” center Tomas Plekanec
said.
Tampa Bay coach Jon
Cooper lifted Bishop after
David Desharnais’ shot
skipped off the goaltender’s
glove and into the net for the
5-7 forward’s first goal of the
playoffs. Bishop finished
with 11 saves.
The Lightning still have a
commanding 3-1 lead in the
series, but a couple of the
games could have gone
either way. They won 2-1 in
double-overtime in Game 1,
and grabbed another 2-1 victory on Tyler Johnson’s goal
with 1.1 seconds remaining
Wednesday night.
Sample ad, actual size.
2015
Canelo, Kirkland promise action in Houston
AP Sports Writer
Although Floyd Mayweather Jr.’s showdown with Manny Pacquiao last week probably didn’t convert many new fans to boxing,
the sport has much more to offer after that
unsatisfying meeting between its two biggest
stars.
Saul “Canelo” Alvarez and James Kirkland
get the first chance to put on a show.
The crowd-pleasing punchers both return
from lengthy ring absences for a 154-pound
meeting Saturday night at Houston’s Minute
Maid Park, where 40,000 eager fans and an
HBO audience will watch the Mexican champion and his Texan challenger.
“The fans want to go see action, and these
are the kind of fights where the people will
leave happy,” Alvarez said through a translator.
The 24-year-old Alvarez (44-1-1, 31 KOs)
already is among the biggest stars in boxing
for his skills and fearless style, and his return
from a 10-month break pits him against one of
the biggest sluggers in the sport. The matchup
appears to be tailor-made for entertainment,
and neither fighter has avoided those expectations during the week after Mayweather’s
defensive dominance of an injured Pacquiao.
“This is one of the opportunities I’ve been
wanting,” Kirkland said. “This is a fight that I
know the fans want to see, a fight that I’m
truly prepared for.”
Canelo hasn’t fought since winning an
awkward decision over Erislandy Lara in July.
An ankle injury sidelined him in the winter,
but Alvarez kept training in his new home in
San Diego until he inked a meeting with
Kirkland, whose legal troubles and training
upheaval have overshadowed his once-promising career.
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LAURA L. DECESARE
Cumberland High School
May 25, 2015
Congratulations from: Mom, Dad, Diane, David, Sue, Norm, Bob &
Camilla... We are so proud of you and wish you the best of luck!
Plans after graduation: Laura will attend Rhode Island College to
pursue a degree in Business Economics
Attention parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles,
etc.: The Times will publish Congrats ads
throughout the months of May & June.
Simply stop in with or mail your photos (up to 3)
and your messages to honor your special graduate.
$
2500 for this 2x3 ad
Student Name:
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Mail or drop off complete
form with photo(s) to:
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23 Exchange St.
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02861
CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF 2015!!!
The Tampa Bay Lightning
are 5 for 5 this year in
Montreal. Now they need
one more road win against
the Canadiens.
The Lightning had a
chance to sweep the
Canadiens on Thursday
night, but goaltender Ben
Bishop was pulled in the second period of Montreal’s 6-2
victory. Now the secondround series is headed back
to Canada for Game 5 on
Saturday night (NBCSN, 7
p.m. EDT).
Tampa Bay has won each
of its five games in Montreal
in 2015, outscoring the
Canadiens 18-8 in Bell
Centre. It scored eight of the
11 goals in the first two
games of the series at
Montreal.
“We’ve had some success
in their building and we
played well there in the regular season, too,” Lightning
forward Ryan Callahan said
Friday. “I think we’re comfortable going in there.”
Montreal had six different
goal scorers in its first win in
nine games this season
against Tampa Bay. It had
struggled to score against the
6-foot-7 Bishop, who
stopped 100 of 104 shots
through the first three games
Players Championship Par Scores
The Associated Press
Friday
At TPC Sawgrass, The Players
Stadium Course
Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla.
Purse: $10 million
Yardage: 7,215; Par: 72
SPORTS
C6 THE TIMES
Northmen
Continued from page C1
“We have a tough week coming
up,” Berthelette said. “We have
Hope on Tuesday and Thursday, and
it’s 5-6. We also have Davies on
Wednesday. If we win two out of
three, we’ll be in pretty good shape
(to claim a post-season bid), and – if
we sweep – we’ll be in great shape.
“Hope, Mount Hope and us are
all bunched together, but Division
III is serving a great purpose,” he
said. “A lot of teams are still in the
running, and it’s been very competitive baseball.”
For the victors, senior Brad
Shatraw finished 2-for-3 with a double, two RBI and two runs scored;
classmate Nick Cicerone 2-for-3
with a walk, stolen base and two
runs; junior Riley Boucher 1-for-5
with a run and three robbed bags;
fellow 11th-grader Josh Labonte 2for-4 with a pair of RBI and a run;
senior Ian Pascoe 1-for-3 with a sacrifice fly and two RBI; and senior
Eric Ethier 2-for-4 with a run.
Ethier also gained the win, as the
righthander scattered five hits and a
walk while fanning a pair through
the initial four frames. He yielded
two wild offerings and five runs, but
only two were earned.
After the Broncos stranded sophomore Sam Hetu at third in the top
of the first, North Smithfield rallied
for three in the bottom half.
Sophomore lefty Mike Keable
struck Shatraw with a pitch, then
took third on Boucher’s perfect hitand-run hit before scoring when
Hetu’s toss to second couldn’t keep
Cicerone from stealing.
Labonte followed with an RBI
single to plate Boucher, and Ian
Pascoe’s sacrifice fly to center
pushed in Cicerone.
Burrillville, however, immediately responded with a trio in the second to knot it. Duquette ripped a
one-out double down the right-field
line and scored on senior Nick
Keans’ first-pitch single off of shortstop Cicerone’s glove. Classmate
Tyler Savastano then reached on a
fielder’s choice, and junior Mark
Stead did the same.
Savastano hustled across on
Dearden’s hit to center, but Stead
scored as well, that after first baseman Matt Ethier’s relay throw to the
plate sailed past the backstop.
The Northmen more or less
broke it open with six in the back
half while sending 10 to the plate.
Senior Andrew Matulaitis singled to
center and stole second before junior
Matt Barrette (0-for-2, two walks,
stolen base) walked. That’s when
the hosts got lucky.
Shatraw rapped a ground double
off first base to knock in
Mandeville, and Barrette scored
McGair
Continued from page C1
Brown’s Pro Football Day.
He is coming off a stellar college career where as a defensive back he set a Sacred
Heart record with 17 career
interceptions.
• Former Lincoln High
after Boucher beat out an infield
miscue. Cicerone then struck out but
reached first on Hetu’s mental error,
and robbed second.
Boucher raced in on Labonte’s
single up the middle, and Cicerone
scored after he stole third, but
Hetu’s toss flew into left field.
Pascoe’s hit to left-center plated
Labonte, and the Northmen held a
9-3 advantage.
Burrillville sliced into that in the
third, Hetu reaching and scoring on
two consecutive errors, and senior
Justin Deschamps did the same
when Keans delivered a grounderturned-infield miscue.
Berthelette’s bunch tacked on
another run in the fourth in more
conventional style; Stead walked,
stole second and sprinted home on
Hetu’s one-out single to make it 9-6,
but that would be the closest the
Broncos would come on this day.
North Smithfield posted two
more in the fourth, courtesy of backto-back hits by brothers Matt and
Eric Ethier. Both came around when
Matulaitis gained first on an infield
error. Deschamps came on to shut
the door.
Sophomore righty Trevor Pascoe
pitched brilliantly in relief, allowing
just a BHS hit and whiffing two
over the final three innings. He also
retired the last seven in order.
For Burrillville, Keable lasted
just two frames, yielding seven hits,
nine runs (three earned) and a pair
of “freebies” with a strikeout.
Neither Deschamps or junior Slade
Sylvestre allowed a run in the last 2
1/3 innings.
“We knew North Smithfield
could hit with authority, so we had
to make the plays behind the pitchers, and we didn’t,” Berthelette said.
“That’s OK, though. We’re looking
forward to next week.”
Said Leddy: “I can live a little
with some physical errors, but it’s
more the mental breakdowns we’re
committing that I have the issue
with. We had 11 hits, and we have
been hitting it well, no doubt. That’s
the one relative constant, but we’ve
had some fundamental breakdowns
in the field, and I think it’s all
between the kids’ ears.
“We’re not executing easy
plays,” he said, “and it’s the veteran
guy that we need to step up. There’s
a fine line between strictly a physical error and one that occurs due to
a mental lapse. We have to play
cleaner.
“We’re 4-6 in II-North (5-6 overall), and we’re in the thick of it. We
were playing Burrillville, which is a
D-III team but one that easily could
be here in D-II. The guys may have
thought this was a team we should
beat, but there are no gimmes in
baseball. We have a lot of games
left, so there’s still hope to turn it
around.”
School baseball standout Jad
Prachniak was recently
named the Pennsylvania State
Athletic Conference (PSAC)
Baseball East Coach of the
Year for the second time in
his four-year tenure as the
skipper of the West Chester
University team. He previously won the honor in 2012
when he guided the Golden
Saturday, May 9, 2015
Photos by Ernest A. Brown
Above, North
Smithfield senior
pitcher Matt Ethier
throws against
Burrillville in the top
of the second inning
Friday.
Left, North
Smithfield senior
shortstop Nick
Cicerone (4) slips by
Burrillville third baseman Justin
Deschamps (41) on
the steal at third
base in the bottom
of the first inning at
North Smithfield
Friday.
Burrillville
N Smithfield
032 100 0 -- 6 – 6 – 10
360 200 x -- 11 – 11 – 5
(4) and Sam Hetu, Greg Carlson (5). Eric Ethier,
Trevor Pascoe (5) and Josh Labonte. 2B – Trevor
Duquette, Brad Shatraw.
Mike Keable, Justin Deschamps (3), Slate Sylvestre
Rams to the NCAA Division
II National Championship.
Prachniak is the first WCU
coach to win this award
twice. His career coaching
record is record 119-63-1.
• On the subject of artificial turf being installed at
Lincoln High’s Ferguson
Field, Lincoln School
Superintendent Georgia
Free Pic of the Day
Photo Give-A-Way
If your child’s name appears in the Pic of the Day you are welcome to receive
FREE photo reproductions of the Pic of the Day. Call Diane Ames at 401-7678505 to request your Pic of the Day photo set and you will receive one 8”x10”
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the date that your Pic of the Day ran in the paper.
Additional photos can be ordered at a cost of
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Fortunato said “that this will
be a reality on September 1
of 2015.”
The field, which is located
behind the school, has already
been shut down. Smithfieldbased DiGregorio
Corporation “will be starting
very soon,” says Fortunato.
Fortunato also said a resolution will be presented at this
Monday’s Financial Town
Meeting for new bleachers
and a press box.
• Cumberland High football coach Josh Lima passed
along the names of four seniors who will be competing in
the college ranks this fall:
Mike Stock (Springfield),
Nick Giorgio (Springfield),
Jared Talbert (UMass
Dartmouth) and Pat Canavan
(Western New England).
• A few area-related softball-recruiting notes: Megan
Klemanchuck, a senior and
the starting catcher at Tolman,
is off to Worcester’s Becker
College; and St. Raphael
pitcher Kaylee Sylvestre has
chosen Fitchburg State
University while her teammate, third baseman Alexis
Vieira, is heading to
Newberry (S.C.) College.
Hockey
MSC athletic director, “We
are certainly open to those
discussions.”
Lincoln joined the girls’
hockey ranks as a solo operation in 2011. The arrangement
with Cumberland took effect
in 2012-13, with Lincoln
serving as the base school,
and lasted for three seasons.
The 2014-15 campaign
almost didn’t happen due to a
delay in Lincoln’s receiving
payment from Cumberland
for its portion of the team’s
expenses.
With Cumberland dropping out next year, Lincoln is
left with just two returning
players, but wants to continue
the program.
“We want these ladies to
have an opportunity to play
on another team,” said
Fortunato. “We want to reach
out to another school.”
Mount isn’t in quite the
same straits, but they could
certainly use a participation
infusion. At the start of last
season, head coach Tony
DiLorenzo counted 16 players. That’s up from the 11
young ladies he had in each
of the previous two campaigns.
Mount won just four regular-season games last season,
though they did get hot at the
right time and swept their
semifinal-round playoff series
against Lincoln/Cumberland,
before falling in the DeCosta
Division finals to Warwick
Co-op in a series that went
three games.
“Our numbers have been
hovering on the low end and
we’ve struggled to compete
against teams that have twice
the number of players,” said
Lawrence. “We’re always
looking to do something that
would enhance our program.”
If this marriage between
the Mounties and Lions heads
to the altar, MSC would probably be the host school. Both
sides have until Aug. 1 to
work out something before
presenting a plan to the RIIL’s
Principals’ Committee on
Athletics.
Continued from page C1
“We’re optimistic that we
can create another co-op team
with another school,” said
Lincoln Superintendent
Georgia Fortunato. “We were
so delighted when we were
able to create this program
just a few years back and it
would be a shame if we lost
it.”
Said Richard Lawrence,
Follow Brendan McGair
on Twitter @BWMcGair
HOME&GARDEN D
Blackstone Valley
Think pink & orange
THE TIMES — Saturday, May 9, 2015
Pairing of pink and orange can bring cheer and a modern look to any room.
By ELIZABETH MAYHEW
Special to The Washington Post
Lately, I have been obsessed with
a particular color combination: pink
and orange. The origin of my color
romance could come from several
subliminal sources: the Dunkin'
Donuts that I pass every morning on
my way to work, my local liquor
store's newly installed Veuve
Clicquot Rosé window display,
Anjelica Huston's incredibly chic
pale pink suit and orange Hermes
bag in a scene in "The Royal
Tenenbaums" (which I just
rewatched on a Wes Anderson
binge) or the jacket designs of several books (and rooms!) by the legendary 1960s British decorator
David Hicks who I recently rediscovered after organizing a bookcase.
Whatever the inspiration, the fact
remains: The perky color duo is a
panacea for this past winter.
Pink and orange are a happy, likable combination, at least to me. To
understand the root of my sudden
obsession, I contacted Bevil
Conway, an artist and associate professor of neuroscience at Wellesley
College who studies how color is
processed in the brain. Conway,
while skeptical of claims that any
color — or combination of colors —
has universal appeal, says that
"color is powerful, and it has special
access to the parts of our brain that
care about what other people think
and how we feel." He explains that
color preferences are largely tied to
our associations with those colors.
Thus my current craving for pink
and orange has more to do with the
things and experiences that I associate the colors with (doughnuts +
champagne = happiness) than to the
colors themselves.
One would need to go far back in
time to trace the origin of this merry
color — way before Dunkin's 1976
pink-and-orange logo makeover. The
pairing of the two colors has a long
history in both indigenous South
American and Mexican cultures;
why those cultures would have chosen the pairing is a larger question,
but there are two attributes that
make these two colors stand out.
Pink and orange are similar; they
sit near each other on the color
wheel, so when paired together they
can appear aggressive and, to some,
even jarring. Conway explains that
when two very similar things are put
in front of us, our visual systems are
wired to enhance the differences
between them, which makes for a
more dynamic visual experience.
Pink and orange also cover a
wide spectrum of shades. This adds
to the versatility of the color combo.
Take, for example, the pink that
Dunkin' Donuts uses vs. the one that
Veuve Clicquot does; Dunkin's is
bolder and more vibrant, while the
champagne company's is paler and
more sophisticated.
Both of these factors need to be
taken into consideration if you
choose to use these two colors for
your interior. When I recently
pitched my pink-and-orange scheme
to 8-year-old Roan Roth and her
mother, Meg, I was careful to consider not only the shades of colors,
but also the amount of color I would
use. My goal was to make the room
fun and lively but not so vibrant that
little Roan couldn't concentrate on
her homework. I borrowed my
palette more from Veuve Clicquot
than from Dunkin' and covered only
one wall in a pale pink (Benjamin
Moore's Ballet Slippers), and then
— inspired by German-born
American artist Josef Albers —
painted a cube in shades of orange
over it (Benjamin Moore's Butterfly
Wings, Tangerine Fusion and
Habanero). The rest of the room I
kept white — white slipcovered bed,
Add planters to spruce up a deck
Home decorating budgets
are often quickly spent on
the interior, with nary a
penny left for decks, patios
and back yards.
"People sometimes neglect the outdoors," says
Dahlia Mahmood, a
Virginia- and Californiabased interior designer. "But
the outdoors is just as
important and essential."
One often-overlooked
piece worth investing in is a
pot or planter. Debra
Prinzing, a garden expert
based in Seattle and author
of the book "Slow Flowers,"
says that when shopping for
planters, think big.
"When the sky is your
ceiling, you can go really
big," she says. "It's not like
an indoor container, like a
vase." She recommends
finding planters with mouths
no smaller than 30 inches in
diameter, because "the larger
scale is so dramatic." (But a
word to the wise: Large pots
can be expensive to ship, so
if that's turning out to be an
obstacle, check out a local
nursery, home-improvement
store or even pottery studio.)
The one decision to be
more conservative with is
color. "If you want pops of
color, do that in your plantings and the flowers that
you choose," Mahmood
says. "Keep your planters
timeless." Once the pot is
obtained, Prinzing has a few
more practical pointers:
If the pot doesn't have
enough drainage holes, drill
a few more. The kind of
drill bit you need will
depend on the material of
the pot (for instance, a
masonry bit for a ceramic
pot).
— Invest in organic potting soil.
— Make sure to check
about proper care; pots
made of certain materials
might need to be taken
inside during the winter.
Got all that? Now check
out some of our favorite
planters:
— "Window-box
planters are more popular
on the West Coast,"
Mahmood says. "On the
East Coast, I see more
hanging planters." For window boxes, Mahmood recommends the California
garden store Hooks &
Lattice. For a hanging
planter design that lets the
plants shine, there's the minimal Zinc Sphere Hanging
Basket ($38-$148,
www.shopterrain.com).
— Prinzing recommends
checking with the seller
about ideal weather conditions for planters before
buying. The ceramic Case
Study Planter with Walnut
Stand, for example, should
be taken indoors during
winter to prevent freezing
and cracking ($149-$189,
www.roomandboard.com).
Terra cotta also should be
brought inside before the
first frost.
white flokati rug — with the exception of a strong color-blocked fabric
shade (Christopher Farr's Untitled)
and an orange leather chair and
ottoman to anchor and balance the
room.
Although neither Roan nor her
mother had any idea that the room
was inspired by doughnuts and
champagne, Roan likened lying in
her bed to sitting at the beach and
watching the sun go down.
Conway would appreciate her
assessment. He points out, "Pink
and orange are ancient colors that
we have lived with for a long time;
after all, they are the colors of a sunset."
— A pot's style should
complement the house and
garden. Mahmood says that
concrete and cast stone are
good for traditional styles,
terra cotta for a more earthy
feel. Plow and Hearth's
Colorful Steel Garden
Trolley Planter would fit
nicely on a patio with a
modern style ($200,
www.plowhearth.com).
— The Dolga Hover Dish
is sold by Vancouver company Pot Inc., one of
Prinzing's favorite sources
for great containers ($95,
www.potinc.ca). Some of
her other favorite retailers:
Flora Grubb Gardens in San
Francisco, Potted in Los
Angeles and Sprout Home
in New York.
—The Washington Post
(401) 762-5461
139 Hamlet Avenue
Woonsocket, RI 02895
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FAITH
D2 THE TIMES
Saturday, May 9, 2015
Coat of arms carries a rich history for parishes, families
I have always been fascinated
when looking at someone’s coat of
arms. The image is supposed to be a
short biography composed of symbols. Kings have had coats of arms,
countries have had coats of arms,
and bishops have had coast of arms.
In the case of Roman Catholic bishops, the coat of arms of the bishop
are placed alongside the diocese’s
coat of arms. For instance, in the
Diocese of Providence, Bishop
Tobin’s coat of arms features what is
called on the Dexter (which means
right side, but to the person viewing
the coat of arms it would be the left
side), where we see three Moline
crosses (two above one). These are
the symbols of the Diocese of
Providence as well as the symbol of
the trinity. A Moline cross ends in
the shape of an anchor. The anchor,
of course, is the symbol of hope as
well as the symbol of the state of
Rhode Island.
Speaking of Rhode Island, the
Episcopal Church
follows in the
same direction.
The coat of arms
bears a large
anchor and features the corpus
of Christ impaled
on a cross as part
of the anchor.
REV. EDWARD
Getting back to
ST-GODARD
the Diocese of
Providence, the
coat of arms is on a bed of silver
and blue symbolizing the Atlantic
Ocean, which englobes the state.
There are many symbols that are
used to tell the story of the person
honored in the coat of arms. For
instance, a lion symbolizes courage,
whereas a lamb symbolizes gentleness and a dove symbolizes peace.
A crown symbolizes royalty, whereas a crosier symbolizes pastoral
authority. An arm symbolizes an
industrious person, whereas a leg
symbolizes stability. A snake symbolizes wisdom, and a heart stands
for charity.
In the sanctuary of our church of
the Holy Family, we have the coat
of arms of Bishop Harkins on one
side, since he was the bishop of the
diocese at that time. On the other
side we have the coat of arms of St.
Pius X, since he was the pope at the
time. Under the coat of arms we
usually find a motto of the person.
For instance Bishop Gelineau chose
the words of St. Paul, “Rejoice in
Hope,” in his motto to symbolize
both the need for the virtue of hope
and to honor our state. His successor, Bishop Robert Mulvee, chose
the words “As one who serves” for
his Episcopal motto. Bishop Thomas
Tobin chose “Strong, loving, wise”.
If you would permit me to be a
bit personal, I would like to say a
few words about my made-up coat
of arms. Certainly, I’m not important enough to have an official coat
of arms. But I did have a wonderful
friend named Betty Bertini, the wife
of Dr. Armand Bertini of Pawtucket.
She was excellent at needlepoint
work. She offered to make me a
coat of arms based on her knowl-
edge of me. At the time I was chairman of Anglican-Catholic relations,
and so she incorporated the coat of
arms of the Vatican as well as that
of the Episcopal Church. Since I am
a priest, she stitched a gold chalice
in the center of a red cross. At the
bottom of the image she stitched a
crown with the letter “E” symbolizing St. Edward, King of England.
On the other side of the cross she
stitched a crosier ending in a “G”
symbolizing St. Godard, who was
the Archbishop of Rouen in France.
As a motto Betty stitched what I
thought were the two most important qualities of life “Veritas et
armor,” which means truth and love.
Rev. Edward G. St-Godard is a
weekly faith columnist for The Call
and Times.
Think yourself healthful, joyful and victorious, then go make it so
“It isn’t what you have or
who you are or where you
are or what you are doing
that makes you happy or
unhappy. It is what you think
about it.” Dale Carnegie.
It was a chilly, overcast
afternoon. Storm clouds
gathered in the west, and a
mother and her grown
daughter were walking on
the beach along the shoreline.
As they walked further, a
blustery wind began sweeping over the ocean. The
waves rose higher and higher, crashing on the sandy
beach.
After some time, the
mother stopped. She looked
at the waves before her.
Then, she asked her daughter, “Does the choppy ocean
remind you of anything?”
Contemplating the question for a moment, the
daughter answered, “It
reminds me of my mind.
Sometimes, I have rushing
and negative thoughts.”
Speaking very slowly and
carefully, the mother
responded, “Thoughts of all
kinds can come and go
incessantly. Our thoughts can
be quite restless, agitating
the mind similar to the
ocean’s waves.” Nodding in
agreement, the daughter lift-
m
ed her eyes toward her mother and asked, “But how do
we calm the waves of our
mind?”
Affectionately, the wise
mother replied, “You learn to
control the wind, by first
controlling your thoughts.
Thereafter, the ocean of your
mind can become calm. Your
life will follow your
thoughts, and your thoughts
and attitude will affect all
aspects of your future.”
With each step they took
alongside the water’s edge,
the daughter listened intently,
as the mother gave her an
example, “Your thoughts are
like a magnet. So, if you
complain, more situations
may come to you with which
to find fault. If you mull over
past problems, you may be
bringing more difficulties
into your present life. And if
you think you can’t realize a
dream, surely you won’t.
Unconstructive thoughts can
to lead to negative feelings,
which may prompt destructive behavior. This will prevent you from achieving
your goals, your Godinspired destiny and living a
joy-filled life.”
Together, the mother and
daughter gazed out into the
vast ocean. And the mother
tenderly put her arm around
her daughter’s shoulder and
whispered, “I love you, and I
want you to be happy.”
The daughter smiled. And
she uttered, “I love you, too,
mom.”
Next, the mother encouraged, “God intends for you
to do amazing things. He has
given you a generous heart
and extraordinary gifts, and
He has wonderful plans for
you. There will always be
challenges in one form or
another. But you can choose
the thoughts you think
regarding each circumstance
and, thus, determine the outcome.”
With that, the wind subsided a bit. The daughter
bent down and picked up a
seashell. Kneeling on the
beach, she drew a line in the
sand with the edge of the
shell and declared, “Negative
thoughts are not going to
hold me captive anymore.
Today is a new day, and I am
going to fill my mind with
optimistic, hopeful, uplifting
thoughts of love, faith and
gratitude, for I want to
become all that God intends
for me to be.” With that, the
mother and daughter left the
beach that day thinking
about the bright side of life.
Like this daughter, I wonder, how much more could
we accomplish if we banished unconstructive
thoughts, feelings of inadequacy, or a limited mindset.
Your thoughts create realities. For as you think, you
will become. What you focus
upon the most can appear in
your life. Hence, just by
thinking yourself joyful,
healthy and victorious, you
can help to make it so.
“You
are where
you are
today
where
your
thoughts
have
brought
you; you
will be
tomorrow
where
your
CATHERINE
thoughts
GALASSO-VIGORITO
take you.”
— James
Allen
A new
You
There is great potential,
courage and strength within
you. So continually look at
all of the positive aspects of
your life and send forth kind
thoughts onto others. Use
positive words in your inner
dialogues. If an unconstruc-
tive thought comes into your
mind, imagine you are putting that negativity on a conveyor belt. Let it go by.
Then, make a conscious
effort to choose to think on
thankfulness, focusing on the
good you intend to manifest.
When you wake up each
morning, dwell on your top
five blessings. Write them on
a sheet of paper and thank
God for each one. And
throughout the day ponder
on thoughts such as:
• “Something wonderful is
going to happen.”
• “I’m strong and in perfect health.”
• “I will accomplish my
goals.
• “God is on my side.”
• “There are abundant
blessings to come.”
Always be optimistic
about your future. Expect
that your dreams will come
true. If you expect little, you
will not be motivated enough
to even put forth the effort
and try. But the joyful expectation of success will cause
you to work harder and more
fully enjoy your life.
Scripture says, “According
to your faith, it will be done
unto you.” (Matthew 9:29)
Thus, see the possibilities.
Visualize only favorable and
beneficial situations. And
believe you can overcome
any obstacle. God has built
into you greater capacities
than you realize. I once read
about a young mountain
climber whose career was
abruptly brought to a halt
when his right foot had to be
amputated. After being fitted
with an artificial limb, he
went back to scaling heights
he had never yet achieved.
When asked how he managed it, he simply said,
“When your mind is focused
on the positive, nothing can
stop you.”
So turn your mind to positive ways and focus on the
good things for which you
aspire. Smile more. As, very
soon, the right opportunities,
the right people and the right
circumstances will unfold
before you. And your life
will be so rewarding and
blessed. For God is saying to
you today what the mother
at the beach said to her
daughter, “I love you, and I
want you to be happy.”
There is a bright future
ahead, and you’ll live a better than imagined life.
Catherine GalassoVigorito is a syndicated faith
columnist. Her column runs
in the Call and Times every
Saturday.
Embrace
Faith
EPWORTH UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
915 NEWPORT AVENUE
PAWTUCKET, RI 02861
(401) 722-0816
http://epworthri.org
Pastor Jeffrey Thomas
Sunday Worship: 9:30 AM
Handicap accessible
THRIFT SHOP
Wednesday 10:00am-1:00pm
First Baptist Church
401-725-7225 • 91 Cottage St., Pawtucket
Parking in rear of building at 45 Lyon Street
SUNDAY SCHOOL: 9:30am
Contemporary Praise & Worship: 10:30am-10:45am
Worship Service 10:45am
Rev. Linda Watkins, Pastor
Smithfield Avenue Congregational Church
514 Smithfield Avenue • Pawtucket, RI 02860
web page: http://www.sacchurch.net • Tel/fax: 401-725-5153
Pastor: Rev. David Goodfellow
Sunday Worship Services
9:30 AM - Morning Worship Service & Nursery provided
Bible study and Prayer. Wednesday at 7:30 PM
Nursery School & Kindergarten 728-4470 Ask for Diane
Come and be a part of a growing and changing church.
A Conservative Baptist Church
337 Lonsdale Avenue - Pawtucket, RI 02860
phone: (401) 724-6390 fax: (401) 724-1925
Reverend Terrence J. Morgan
Sunday Services
10:30 am
morning worship
9:00-10:00 am
Sunday School
6:00 pm
evening worship
Wednesday
7:00 pm
prayer meeting
110 years of faithful gospel ministry
These area houses of worship
invite you to join them soon.
It could be the start of a
beautiful relationship.
Bethany Baptist Church
178 Sayles Avenue, Pawtucket, RI • 724-5520
REV. NIKITA McCALISTER
Sunday School 9:30am • Morning Worship 11:00am
Call 722-5619 for Van Pick-Up
Register for Enrollment Nursery School
Call June 724-5520
American Baptist Church
Contemporary & Traditional Music
St. Matthew-Trinity
Lutheran Church
690 Newport Avenue, Pawtucket, RI 02861
Call for more information
723-5632
Worship Service 9:00
Sunday School 10:00
All Welcome
www.stmatthew-trinitylutheranchurch.org
To advertise in this
directory,
please contact us
at
401-365-1438
or
[email protected]
Saturday, May 9, 2015
THE TIMES D3
Blackstone Valley
CLASSIFIEDS
Four easy ways to place your classified ad
in print AND online for one low price:
• Online at www.pawtuckettimes.com
24 hours a day, 7 days a week
• E-mail classifi[email protected]
• Call (401) 767-8503 Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
• Fax (401) 767-8509 Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Discounts available to subscribers!
Legals
100 Legals
Annoucements
Complete instructions
should include:
105 Announcments
Publication dates,
Billing information and
CREDIT
the Name and Phone
FOR ERRORS
number of individual to
contact if necessary.
Each advertiser is asked
100 Legals
to check his/her advertisement on the first
day of publication and
to report any error to
the Times classified
department (3651438) as soon as possible for correction.
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICE
MUST BE RECEIVED
INFORMATION
Legal Notices may be 3 BUSINESS DAYS
PRIOR TO
mailed to:
PUBLICATION
The Times,
For further information
P.O. Box 307,
Call 365-1438
Pawtucket, RI 02860
Monday thru Friday;
Faxed to:
8:30 a.m. To 4:30 p.m.
(401) 767-8509
or Emailed to:
No adjustment will be
given for typographical
errors, which do not
change the meaning or
lessen the value of the
advertisement.
Credit will be allowed
only to that portion of
the advertisement
where the error occurred.
[email protected]
continued next column
Vehicles
STATE OF RHODE ISLAND
PROBATE COURT OF THE
CITY OF CENTRAL FALLS
NOTICE
ESTATE OF BRAYAN ARNULFO
RODRIGUEZ SOLIS
PETITION FOR ADMINISTRATION; FOR HEAR- 123 Autos For Sale
ING 5/18/2015.
ESTATE OF MINDY HERNANDEZ
PETITION FOR NAME CHANGE; FOR HEARING
5/18/2015.
ESTATE OF EDWARD I. MORGAN
ALLISON ONYSKO OF CRANSTON, RI HAS
QUALIFIED AS ADMISTRATRIX; CREDITORS
MUST FILE THEIR CLAIMS IN THE OFFICE OF
THE PROBATE CLERK WITHIN THE TIME REQUIRED BY LAW BEGINNING 5/2/2015.
ESTATE OF JORGE L. MUNOZ
CONCEICAO NOBRE OF CENTRAL FALLS, RI
HAS QUALIFIED AS ADMINISTRATRIX; CREDITORS MUST FILE THEIR CLAIMS IN THE OFFICE OF THE PROBATE CLERK WITHIN THE
TIME REQUIRED BY LAW BEGINNING 5/2/2015.
ESTATE OF CYNTHIA MAYLOR
RJ CONNELLY LAW OF PAWTUCKET, RI HAS
QUALIFIED AS GUARDIAN; CREDITORS MUST
FILE THEIR CLAIMS IN THE OFFICE OF THE
PROBATE CLERK WITHIN THE TIME REQUIRED
BY LAW BEGINNING 5/2/2015.
ESTATE OF LUZ MARINA ACOSTA
PETITION FOR NAME CHANGE; FOR HEARING
5/18/2015.
ESTATE OF HAROLD T. HIMEON JR.
PETITION FOR SALE OF REAL ESTATE; FOR
HEARING 5/18/2015.
SONIA GRACE
CITY CLERK
2001 Ford Explorer Ltd.
4dr SUV, loaded, 3rd rear
seat, auto, low miles, 1
owner. Mint. Priced to
sell $1850 401-649-5775
2001 Oldsmobile Alero.
110K miles, good shape.
Body good, interior excellent. $1500. Call 401359-6102
2002 Chevy 2500 ¾ ton
pickup, auto, V8, loaded,
white, runs & drives new,
1 owner trade, $1950.
Call 401-241-0413
2002 Suzuki. 4Cyl., all new
brakes all around, runs
great. $1295. 401-4474451 or 401-769-0095
2004 Jeep Cherokee Laredo. 4WD, 6 cyl., auto.,
electric
seats/windows,
very clean, runs excellent,
$5800. 401-769-8739
2008 TOYOTA COROLLA
CLEAN. MANY EXTRAS.
TINT. SPOILER. $6,800
[email protected]
com
2009 Chevy Malibu LS Edition, 4 dr., loaded, auto,
4cyl., 32MPG, white, like
new, 1 owner, must see.
$3,000. 401-649-5775
SELL YOUR CAR, VAN OR
TRUCK THE EASY WAY.
Call the classified team at
The Times today. Tell
more than 40,000 adult
readers in the are about
your vehicle. It's easy to
do, just dial 401-3651438 or visit us at www.pawtuckettimes.com
126 Trucks
2002 Chevy 3500 1 ton,
16ft box truck, loaded,
auto, V8, rear door, dual
wheels, like new. 1 owner. $3000. 401-301-0056
126 Trucks
204 General Help
Wanted
Merchandise
Real Estate-Sale
“There’s More $$$ In That Old Car, Truck,
Van or Motorcycle That You Thought.”
You’ll fill up when you sell that old set of wheels through
the Classifieds and this offer available only to subscribers.
RNs, LPN and CNAs
All shifts FT/PT
Countryside Health Care of Milford, a
non-profit nursing and rehab
facility with an impeccable reputation,
seeks staff for its new Memory Care
Unit. Interested applicants should
send resume to [email protected], or call 508-473-0435 to
set up an appointment.
Activities Director
Countryside Health Care of Milford, a
non-profit nursing and rehab facility
with an impeccable reputation, seeks
an Activities Director for its new
Memory Care Unit. Experience with
dementia care will be a great plus.
Interested applicants should send
resume to [email protected], or call 508-473-0435 to set
up an appointment.
Licensed & Insured
Rug. 8 x 10 from Lowe's.
Quality
multicolored
squares. $50. 401-6170483
ad appears up to 60 days
(No Dealers)
Call one of our Classified
Customer Service Reps
The Call - 767-8503
or The Times - 365-1438
273 Miscellaneous
Merchandise
For sale: Baseball cards
and other sport cards.
Call after 3pm. 766-0325
Hamilton Beach drink master, 7.5 qt. Crockpot, sunbeam food processor &
Braun hand blender in
box. All for $30. 617-0483
Free Estimates
Reaching Over 120,000 Homes
(401) 725-6854
(401) 434-0095
(401) 334-1357
100’ Crane • Bucket Truck • Back Hoe & Bobcat Work
Storm Damage • Tree Climbing • Stump Grounding
Tree Trimming/Pruning • Firewood/Log Loads
www.timbertreeserviceri.com
Free Estimates
QUALITY
EXTERIORS
FOR OVER
60 YEARS!
(401) 573-6543
“NO Job Too Small”
All Your Property Needs!
Tel. 401-282-9900 [email protected]
General Contractor JOSÉ DaSILVA
Financing Available ~ 0% Interest
www.RIPROPERTYMGT.com
VINNIE SOUCAR CARPETS
Est. 1986
wood vinyl carpet laminate repairs serging
168 ARMISTICE BLVD., PAWTUCKET, RI 02860
[email protected] • By Appointments
DUMPSTERS
$250 / 15 C.Y.
SPRING CLEANUP
HOUSE CLEANOUTS
FIRE DAMAGE
401-438-3000
JUNK CARS
WE PICK UP
CALL FOR INFO
401-438-3000
H
JO
N THE ROOFER C
“FO
RO
RI LIC #258
VER 60 YEAR
O.
S”
Fully Insured
MASTER
INSTALLERS
OF ROOFING,
SIDING &
WINDOW
PRODUCTS
RI COMM. #44R
www.johntheroofer.com • 401-769-8145
ALL YOUR REPAIR NEEDS!
• Gutters & Downspouts
• Facia & Soffits
• Finishing
• Chimney Flashing & Ridge Vents
All jobs written guarantee • We aluminum roof coat
Licensed & Insured
all our tar work
FREE
Estimates
Licensed & insured in RI & MA
In Business Over 40 Years
ACTION ROOFING!
401.644.3930
401 725 9307
19.95
GOT LEAKS?
10% DISCOUNT WITH THIS AD
www.bonafideforyou.com
& FLOOR COVERING
$
Sliding glass door shower
enclosure with hardware.
$75. Call 401-480-1974
or 508-928-1738
401-572-8311 • LYNCHFENCECO.COM
DONNY
LAMBERT
5 LINES ONLY
Pawtucket. Twin size mattress & box spring with
metal back board &
frame all in good condition. $25obo. 728-9699
~
Serving
RI & MA
Since 2001
~
FREE Termite Inspection Report
301 Room – No
Board
Employment
FOR $2.00 A DAY ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS HERE
CALL FOR DETAILS 401-767-8503
• A+ Rating with Better Business Bureau
• Easy to read reports with digital pics
• R.I. General Contractor # 34474
Real Estate-Rent
2002 CHEVY Impala LS 4
door, loaded, auto, V-6,
NEW TODAY
LOOKING FOR SOMEPAWTUCKET: Near center,
all power. Inspected runs
THING HARD TO FIND?
laundry facilities, wall to
new. One owner. $1450. DUNKIN DONUTS TEAM
Be
sure
to
look
in
the
wall carpets. $100 & up
401-442-3678
MEMBERS Counter Help,
classified
pages
of
The
401-726-0995.
2004 Hyundai Santa Fe Shift leaders. Now hiring
TImes
every
day.
Surely
for
all
positions
all
shifts.
SUV 4 door, loaded, auto,
you'll find interesting
be dependable,
304 Apartments
V-6, 28mpg. Black, alloy, Must
things that you may want
rear hatch. Nice. 2 owner. Friendly, people person
or need. The Times is the
Unfurnished
for
Dunkin
Donuts,
expe251
Appliances
300
Rental
Agencies
$1850. 401-649-3251
perfect marketplace you
rience preferred, or will
can enjoy in the comfort
st
Chevy dump truck, 92K, train. Good wages plus
1 floor, large 3 bed, comof your own home. There
4x4, 6.5 diesel, green. tips, health insurance and Digitel 6000 BTU Air Con- is something for everypletely renovated, new
Selling for $7,000. Call vacation, benefits avail- ditioner. 1 year old. Runs one in The Times classi- Readers of The Times are kitchen & bathroom, new
able. Apply in person 29 new. $45. 769-1899
401-636-2269
advised
The
Times
does
appliances, nice landfieds!
Franklin St. Wrentham
not knowingly accept ad- scaped yard, hardwoods,
MA RT 140 (15 minutes Gas range, white, in good
vertisements that are in All utilities, gated, off st.
condition.
Like
new
$150.
129 Motorcycles - from Providence) 508violation of the Federal parking included $1275
Call 401-447-4451 or
384-9801
Fair Housing Law and the mo. Woonsocket. 401Mopeds - ATVs
401-769-0095
Rhode Island Fair Hous- 269-9191
Field technician wanted
ing Practices Act. The
Refrigerator, side by side
2002 Honda Elite motor for emergency restora- with ice maker. $300. Call Princess
Federal Fair Housing Law
House
glass.
company.
Backscooter. Auto., excellent tion
305 Apartments
401-447-4451 or 401- Dark blood red. Named and Rhode Island Fair
condition.
Only
600 ground check and drivers 769-0095
Housing Practices Act are
Fantasia.
Made
in
France.
Furnished
miles. $1275. Call 401- license required. Must be
designed to prevent disable to work on call. Call Washing machine. Maytag Large framed oil painting crimination in the pur568-1966
of France. $40. 617-0483
Dave 722-9595
Centennial. Excellent conchase and rental of hous- 1 BED apt, all clean, ready
ing. Refusal to rent, to move in Woonsocket.
Grade Foreman - Provide dition. $150 or best. Call
401-480-1974
or
508lease, or sell property to 401-447-4451 or 769-0095
const. layout for utility
anyone due to age, race,
road & building projects. 928-1738
color, religion, sex, sexuMin 5 yrs surveying/ Whirlpool 10,000 BTU air
al orientation, marital staconst.
exp.
Resume, conditioner.
Excellent
tus, disability, familial
salary req, references to condition. $80. Call 401status, or country of [email protected]
277 Toys –
585-2584
cestral origin is in violation of the Fair Housing
Plasterers needed, regisChildren's Items
Law. If you have a comtered and insured. Call
254
Building
plaint, contact the Rhode
401-568-9725
Island Commission for
Materials
Project Manager for 300
Human Rights. They will
200 Employment
unit apartment job. Good
help any person that has
Rubber
roofing,
self
adhesalary,
tremendous
inbeen
discriminated
Services
centive bonuses. Reply sive, 12 rolls, 100 sq. c
against in the rental of
pet roll. $249.00 Call Greco carriage and basket, housing, the sale of 330 Brokers - Agents
[email protected]
The Times does not know774-462-2191
tan and pink. $15. Call housing, home financing
ingly accept advertiseNEW TODAY
or public accommoda- FIND A HOME. Sell a
401-585-2584
ments in the Employment
tions. Call the Rhode Is- home. Find a tenant. Call
classifications that are Roofer and side waller ap- 261 Coins & Stamps
land Commission for Hu- the classified team at The
Experienced
not bona fide job offers. plicators.
man Rights, 401-222- Times to place your adClassification 200 is pro- preferred. Call Russ 508- 1883 Morgan Silver Dollar,
2661.
vertisement. Call 401vided for Employment In- 883-7912
fine-very fine, $30.00.
365-1438.
formation, Services and Roofer wanted. Residential 401-597-6426
Referrals. This newspa- experience & drivers li- Woonsocket
per does not knowingly cense required. Call 508123 Autos For Sale 123 Autos For Sale 123 Autos For Sale
accept Employment ads 429-2947
Buying US coins dated bethat indicate a preference
fore 1965: dimes $1.15,
bases on age from em- Shingle roofers. Steady quarters $2.87, halves
ployees covered be Age work on the books. “no $5.75.
401-597-6426
Discrimination In Em- Subs” 401-862-5849
Woonsocket
ployment Act. Nor do we
in any way condone em- Supply New England is Buying US coins dated beployment based solely looking for an experi- fore 1965: dimes $1.18,
upon discrimination prac- enced CDL Driver for dai- quarters $2.95, halves
ly deliveries. Heavy lift- $5.90.
401-597-6426
tices.
ing/loading min 60lbs. Woonsocket
Excellent driving record.
204 General Help
Pre-employ drug & DOT
physical required. Bene265 Furniture Wanted
fits. Apply in person: 582
Household
Quaker
Highway,
S.
Uxbridge.
NEW TODAY
EXPERIENCE
CARPEN- Wanted. Experienced auto Heater by Comfort Zone.
TERS wanted for com- body repair man. Min. 3 Glass top table & lamp.
mercial work. Must have years. Competitive wages Sacrifice. $50. 401-617reliable
transportation based on experience. 0483
and be willing to travel. Contact Tom at 508-226- MATTRESS SET. Queen
Please call 769-4285.
6557.
PillowTop mattress set,
never used still in plastic.
$150. Call or text 401237-0340
SERVICE DIRECTORY
BONA FIDE HOME INSPECTIONS
273 Miscellaneous
Merchandise
Gino
401-692-1868
Mowing • Fertilization
Sod & Seed • Weeding
Trimming • Edging
Mulching
General Clean-Up
Jeff
Fall Clean-Up
401-390-5921
Snow Removal
[email protected]
Custom Made
Fabric
Awnings
Since 1926
FULLY Insured • FREE Estimates
“Let’s Cover You in Style”
Residential
Specialty for
Windows &
Decks
Free Estimates • 401-769-4195 • www.woonsocketawning.com
68 S. Main St. Bldg. 2, Woonsocket, RI 02895
RAY’S HOME REPAIRS
Roofing • Vinyl Siding • Windows • Porch Work
Gutters Cleaned • Chimney Work
In & Out Painting • Cement Work
Awnings & Shutters • Home Power Washing
FREE ESTIMATES
Call Ray 401-722-5647
Toll Free 855-400-0729
Contractor #35155 • Lincensed & Insured
D4 THE TIMES
Saturday, May 9, 2015