SWING AND A MISS - The Pawtucket Times

Transcription

SWING AND A MISS - The Pawtucket Times
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Thursday, May 14, 2015
EP man
reported
missing
WEATHER
TODAY
High:
68
Low:
46
WHAT A
W RLD
By THE TIMES STAFF
EAST PROVIDENCE –
Police have issued a missing
person alert for
a man who has
been missing
since 4 p.m.
Tuesday.
Police are
searching for
Lotellio St.
Clermont, who
was last seen St. Clermont
in the area of
7th Street, off of Warren
Avenue.
St. Clermont is 74 years
old with significant health
concerns. He was last
known to be wearing a
black long sleeve shirt,
khaki pants, and black
See MISSING, Page A2
Local and wire reports
JUST LION
AROUND
SAN DIEGO (AP) — A
surprising stowaway startled a
man out on his boat in San
Diego: A sea lion pup who
decided to crash in a bunk,
waking the owner with his
snoring.
Michael Duffy, 48, said he
was on his 41-foot Kettenburg
boat "Elixir" at the San Diego
Yacht Club when he awoke at
2:30 a.m. Sunday to sneezing
and snoring.
He thought it might be a
friend, crashing from a night
out, but couldn't find anyone.
Once it got light a few hours
later, however, he heard it
again.
That's when Duffy saw a
35-pound sea lion pup on
another bunk, curled up like a
dog on top of his board
shorts.
"It was a tiny little guy,
and I was kind of shocked,
but he was basically asleep,"
Duffy said.
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An artist’s rendering of the area outside the proposed Pawtucket Red Sox stadium in Providence along the river.
SWING AND A MISS
Expert: Original PawSox stadium
plan ‘outrageously unacceptable’
By JONATHAN BISSONNETTE
[email protected]
PAWTUCKET – A professor from
the College of the Holy Cross on
Wednesday addressed the economic
impact of investing in baseball stadiums, noting that he believes the original proposal from the Pawtucket
Red Sox' ownership group that
would move the team to a brand-new
riverfront ballpark in Providence was
“completely and outrageously unacceptable.”
Victor Matheson, a nationally-recognized sports economist, addressed
a standing-room only crowd which
included city and state officials in
the theater at the Blackstone Valley
Tourism Council Visitors' Center.
“I would say that there's probably
going to be a stadium in Providence,
because it sounds like the owners
really want something nice and shiny
and new, but I suspect the subsidy
will be way, way less. I both suspect
and hope that the subsidy will be
way, way less than the original
offer,” Matheson said. “There's no
right number, except for zero is certainly acceptable.”
Matheson said that
while he believed
the proposed
ballpark would
be “fantastic …
for the owners
to spend their
money on,” he
wondered if it
was worth taxpayer
money.
The team's ownership group originally planned to ask the legislature
to authorize the state to lease the
ballpark for 30 years for an annual
rental of approximately $5 million,
with a sublease from the team to the
state for $1 million. The net $4 million annual rent would then have
been reduced by $2.4 million in new
tax revenue.
The owners would have “carte
blanche” to spend their money to fit
their needs, but Matheson said “I
shouldn't expect someone else's cred-
it card to renovate my house.”
“The basic idea here is if they had
just asked for a property tax exemption and a sweetheart lease deal on
the property, I don't think anyone
would be going crazy about this,” he
said.
Matheson said that economists
who look at cities where franchises
have recently departed or recently
arrived do not find “huge economic
impacts” when teams come or go.
A spokeswoman for the
Providence ballpark project has said
that it would cost $65 million to
bring McCoy Stadium to league
standards, with various repairs
including a new field, entryway,
parking, site improvements, suite
upgrades, terrace grass seating, new
parking lots, and administration
offices; among other renovations.
Matheson said he would “almost
certainly” be against investing $65
million into renovating McCoy
Stadium, noting that he would rather
see $80 million in downtown
Providence than $65 million at
McCoy.
“The reason for that is $65 million here is unlikely to be transformative because the neighborhood is
See PAWSOX, Page A2
Man guilty
in attack on
Samaritan
By THE CALL STAFF
SCITUATE — A 43year-old Scituate man was
found guilty Monday of
assaulting a 70-year-old
man who had attempted to
stop him while he was beating a woman two years ago
in Warwick.
David Lee Waters, 43,
with a last known address of
57 Jackson Flat Road,
Scituate, was found guilty
by Superior Court Justice
Allen P. Rubine after a jury
waived trial of assault on a
person over 60 years of age.
Waters is free on $10,000
personal recognizance bail
See ATTACK, Page A2
INDEX
Amusements........................A7
Comics................................B5
Obituaries............................A5
Opinion................................A4
Sports..................................B1
Television...........................A7
CONTACT US:
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Vol. CXXVIIl
No.115
Please
recycle
this paper
Proposed budget could Police arrest two
mean tax hike for CF
teens in stolen car
By JONATHAN BISSONNETTE
[email protected]
CENTRAL FALLS – Mayor
James A. Diossa on Wednesday
introduced to the City Council a proposed $18.1 million budget for the
2015-16 fiscal year, which includes a
3.9 percent increase in the tax levy.
The budget proposal is $1.2 million less than the $19.3 million budget called for in the six-year financial
projection and thus it is in material
conformity with the Fourth Amended
Debt Adjustment Plan ordered by the
bankruptcy court, Diossa said.
The budget also represents an
increase of $800,000 over the current
spending plan. Diossa said that while
much of the increase is in contractual
obligations, other expenses provide
“important investments” for the city.
Diossa's budget calls for a proposal to increase the required pension
contribution 50 percent over what the
bankruptcy plan requires, which he
said doubles down on the commitment to reduce unfunded liabilities in
the pension and OPEB plans.
The budget proposal also calls for
additional investments in city infrastructure, the revival of the Central
See BUDGET, Page A2
By RUSS OLIVO
[email protected]
PAWTUCKET – Two
teenage males were arrested on
numerous charges after police
stopped a stolen motor vehicle
at Sayles and Pawtucket
avenues Tuesday night.
The driver of the silver
Honda Accord was a 17-yearold from Central Falls. Police
aren’t releasing his identity
because he’s a minor, but
Detective Sgt. Paul Brandley
said he was charged with pos-
session of a stolen motor vehicle, receiving stolen goods and
driving without a license.
He was ordered detained at
the Rhode Island Training
School following an appearance
before a Family Court magistrate, Brandley said.
The passenger was identified
as Aaron Dias, 19, of
Pawtucket. He was arraigned in
District Court Wednesday on
charges of possessing a prohibited weapon, a knife, and
receiving stolen goods.
See CAR, Page A2
7 dead, some missing in train crash
Amtrak engineer lawyers up
By GEOFF MULVIHILL
The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA —
The engineer at the controls of an Amtrak train
that hurtled off the tracks
while rounding a sharp
curve refused to talk to
police Wednesday as the
death toll climbed to seven
with the discovery of
another body in the wreckage, authorities said.
More than 200 people
were injured in the derailment that plunged screaming passengers into darkness and chaos Tuesday
night.
Investigators recovered
the locomotive's data
recorder and said they
expected it to yield crucial
information, including how
fast the train was going
when it jumped the tracks
in an old industrial neighborhood not far from the
Delaware River shortly
after 9 p.m.
The engineer, who has
not been identified,
declined to provide a statement to authorities and left
a meeting with an attorney,
Philadelphia police said.
Mayor Michael Nutter
said some people remained
unaccounted for, though he
cautioned that some passengers listed on the
Photo via ABC
A passenger photo of the inside of the Amtrak train after it
derailed in Philadelphia Tuesday night.
Amtrak manifest might not
have boarded the train,
while others might not
have checked in with
See TRAIN, Page A2
FROM PAGE ONE
A2 THE TIMES
Car
Train
Brandley said Officer
Andrew Torres was on
routine patrol about 11:30
p.m. when he stopped the
car for speeding after
observing the vehicle commit a number of other traffic offenses.
Brandley said Torres
found a backpack in the
vehicle containing a number of items of stolen
property.
authorities.
"It's a devastating scene.
There are many first responders out there. They are
working. They are examining the equipment, seeing if
there are any more people in
the rail cars," Robert
Sumwalt of the National
Transportation Safety Board
said.
The dead included an
employee of The Associated
Press and a midshipman at
the U.S. Naval Academy.
"We are heartbroken by
what has happened here,"
Nutter said.
The train was en route
from Washington to New
York with 238 passengers
and five crew members listed aboard when it lurched to
the side and flew off the
tracks at a notorious curve
not far from the scene of
one of the nation's deadliest
train wrecks more than 70
years ago.
The speed limit is 70 mph
just before the curve and 50
mph along the curve itself,
the Federal Railroad
Administration said.
Passengers scrambled
through the windows of toppled cars to escape. One of
the seven cars was severely
Follow Russ Olivo on
Twitter @russolivo.
Missing
sneakers. He is 5'4" tall,
130 pounds, with tight
curly salt and pepper hair.
St. Clermont is of
Haitian descent and speaks
limited English.
Anyone with information about the exact whereabouts of Bell is asked to
contact the Police
Department at (401) 4357600.
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of note to
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Attack
pending a sentencing hearing on June 22.
During the course of the
trial, the state proved that on
the evening of Oct. 26,
2013, Warwick Police
responded to a call at the
intersection of Bald Hill
Road and Tollgate Road.
Upon arrival, officers met
PawSox
well developed already, “
Matheson said. “And even a
beautiful, nice, new stadium
probably won't do a ton to
change the character of the
neighborhood in any significant way for any spillovers
that we've been talking
about. You at least have that
chance for that to occur in
Providence.”
In his presentation,
Matheson explained that
McCoy Stadium is the oldest ballpark in Double-A or
Triple-A baseball, and that
the only two active stadiums
in the country older than
McCoy are Fenway Park in
Boston and Wrigley Field in
Chicago.
He added that “it's not
just that old is bad,” noting
that attendance figures provide a sense that both newer
and older stadiums draw
higher-than-average atten-
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Thursday, May 14, 2015
mangled. Hospitals treated
more than 200 people for
injuries that included burns
and broken bones. At least
10 were hospitalized in critical condition.
The accident closed the
nation's busiest rail corridor
between New York and
Washington — snarling the
morning commute and forcing thousands of travelers to
find some other way to
reach their destination — as
federal investigators arrived
to begin examining the
twisted wreckage, the tracks
and the signals.
Amtrak inspected the
stretch of track on Tuesday,
just hours before the accident, and found no defects,
according to the Federal
Railroad Administration. In
addition to the data recorder,
the train had a video camera
in its front end that could
yield clues to what happened, Sumwalt said.
Passenger Jillian
Jorgensen, 27, was seated in
the quiet car — the second
passenger car — and said
the train was going "fast
enough for me to be worried" when it began to lurch
to the right.
The train derailed, the
lights went out and
Jorgensen was thrown from
her seat. She said she "flew
across the train" and landed
under some seats that had
apparently broken loose
from the floor.
Jorgensen, a reporter for
The New York Observer
who lives in Jersey City,
New Jersey, said she wriggled free as fellow passengers screamed. She saw one
man lying still, his face covered in blood, and a woman
with a broken leg.
She climbed out an emergency exit window, and a
firefighter helped her down
a ladder to safety.
"It was terrifying and
awful, and as it was happening it just did not feel like
the kind of thing you could
walk away from, so I feel
very lucky," Jorgensen said
in an email to the AP. "The
scene in the car I was in was
total disarray, and people
were clearly in a great deal
of pain."
Award-winning AP video
software architect Jim
Gaines was among those
killed. Gaines, a 48-year-old
father of two who joined the
news agency in 1998, had
attended meetings in
Washington and was returning home to Plainsboro, New
Jersey.
Also killed was Justin
Zemser, a 20-year-old Naval
Academy midshipman from
New York City, according to
Navy Secretary Ray Mabus.
All seven train cars,
including the engine, were in
"various stages of disarray,"
Nutter said. He said there
were cars that were "completely overturned, on their
side, ripped apart."
An AP manager, Paul
Cheung, was on the train and
said he was watching a video
on his laptop when "the train
started to decelerate, like
someone had slammed the
brake."
"Then suddenly you could
see everything starting to
shake," he said. "You could
see people's stuff flying over
me."
Cheung said another passenger urged him to escape
from the back of his car,
which he did. He said he
saw passengers trying to get
out through the windows of
cars tipped on their sides.
"The front of the train is
really mangled," he said.
"It's a complete wreck. The
whole thing is like a pile of
metal."
Another passenger, Daniel
Wetrin, was among more
than a dozen people taken to
a nearby elementary school.
"I think the fact that I
walked off kind of made it
even more surreal because a
lot of people didn't walk
off," he said. "I walked off
as if, like, I was in a movie.
There were people standing
around, people with bloody
faces.
There were people, chairs,
tables mangled about in the
compartment ... power
cables all buckled down as
you stepped off the train."
Several people, including
one man complaining of
neck pain, were rolled away
on stretchers. Others wobbled as they walked away or
were put on buses. An elderly woman was given oxygen.
The area where the wreck
happened is known as
Frankford Junction, situated
in a neighborhood of warehouses, industrial buildings
and homes.
It is not far from the site
of the 1943 derailment of the
Congressional Limited, from
Washington to New York,
which killed 79 people.
Amtrak carries 11.6 million passengers a year along
its busy Northeast Corridor,
which runs between
Washington and Boston.
The mayor, citing the
mangled tracks and downed
wires, said: "There's no circumstance under which there
would be any Amtrak service this week through
Philadelphia."
with the 70 year old victim,
Donald Gibson, who was
working that evening as a
driver for a private tour bus
company.
When Gibson turned his
bus on Tollgate Road, he
witnessed Waters assaulting
a woman on the side of the
road. Gibson stopped the
bus and beeped the horn in
an attempt to get Waters to
stop. When Waters failed to
respond, Gibson parked and
exited the bus and verbally
told him to stop.
Waters did not respond
again and continued to
assault the woman. Gibson
approached Waters and
physically pulled him off the
woman.
Waters and Gibson both
fell to the ground. Waters
then got up and struck
Gibson once in the face with
a closed fist. Gibson suffered a nasal fracture and
two black eyes.
Waters fled the scene
prior to officer's arrival. The
woman involved in the incident did not suffer any
injuries and declined to
press charges. An arrest warrant was issued for Waters,
who was apprehended on
Dec. 19, 2013.
"Mr. Gibson put himself
in harm's way to help a
complete stranger in need
when many people would
have looked the other way
in the same situation. His
actions were brave and I
hope encourage others to do
what they can to help others
in need," said Attorney
General Peter Kilmartin.
Special Assistant
Attorney General Timothy
Healy prosecuted the case.
dance, with the cache of
older stadiums being the history involved.
There is “remarkable
agreement” among economists, finding that spectator
sports result in little or no
measurable economic benefits on their host cities, he
said.
Matheson added that he
believed that surges in attendance at new ballparks do
exist, but added that he felt
it was a “novelty effect,”
which does not seem to last
very long. He said that new
Triple-A stadiums raise
attendance by 2,200 people
per game in the first year,
but by year 10, that increase
is down to 250 per game.
“A new stadium would
fill 10,000 for several years
without being under serious
question, but that is likely to
trail off after a decade,” he
said.
Matheson also noted that
the total attendance for
PawSox home games in
2014 – around 540,000 –
was similar to the average
16-screen Regal Cinemas
Megaplex movie theater,
which drew around 478,000
in 2014. He noted that few,
if any, are clamoring for
public funds to finance
movie theaters.
Matheson noted that ballparks surrounded by restaurants and bars, in which
patrons grab a drink or a bite
to eat before the game and
then again after attending the
game are seen as “the exception to the rule rather than
what we see typically happening in these developments.”
He cited the recentlydemolished Hubert H.
Humphrey Metrodome in
downtown Minneapolis, a
stadium that had a 30-year
life and 100 million attendees, with one sports bar in
walking distance.
“It's easy to build the stadium, it's hard to build the
neighborhood,” he said.
If the PawSox were to
altogether leave Rhode
Island, the state would lose
about $12 million of economic activity, Matheson
surmised. However, he
believed that restaurants,
movie theaters, minor league
hockey, and college athletics
would “roughly” make up
that figure.
“People have entertainment dollars and entertainment dollars that aren't spent
here would go elsewhere,”
he said.
Patti Doyle, spokeswoman for the Providence
ballpark project, said that
she did not have a specific
reaction to people's opinions
and respects Matheson's
point of view.
What matters to the ownership group is to come up
with a partnership that works
for Rhode Islanders and the
owners, she said, adding that
while the group's initial proposal was not well received,
they are “working diligently”
to come up with another
approach.
She also said that when
looking at Triple-A ballparks
around the country and the
relationships that teams have
with their host cities, the
PawSox proposal would not
be “all that dissimilar” and
could be “more generous”
than other public-private
partnerships.
Doyle said that while the
Budget
Falls Redevelopment
Agency “to help stir economic development,” and
investments in the city's
youth by including funding
for youth fellowships, the
mayor said.
However, he was quick
to note that the proposed
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Victor Matheson, a nationally-recognized sports economist
speaks about the impact of the proposed PawSox stadium in
Providence at the Blackstone Valley Tourism Council in
Pawtucket on Wednesday.
owners are mindful and
respectful of McCoy and its
memories, the ballpark is “in
need of a complete refurbishment,” and the stadium
still has limited offerings in
the way of public transportation, ease of access, restaurants and bars, and a walkable fan experience.
“Ownership absolutely
treasures and knows McCoy
holds a tender place in a lot
of our hearts,” Doyle said,
adding that the “reality is
that you have to look at what
the players and fans are
deserving of.”
She also said that while
the owners are mindful of
trends within the industry,
there is “an allure and
magic” to the Red Sox that –
combined with an urban
ballpark – could deliver “a
uniquely Rhode Island positive fan experience at a new
downtown location.”
Bob Billington, president
of the Blackstone Valley
Tourism Council, said that
for several months, he has
been “wrestling with the
thought” of the PawSox
leaving the city. He said it is
“painful to think about” losing the team and the “asset”
that McCoy Stadium is,
bringing thousands to the
city.
He said Wednesday's
presentation was the “best
thing to do to learn, for our
own edification,” and that it
would “help us understand”
the impact of investing in
ballparks.
tax increase was “very
tough to understand.” For a
home valued at $100,000,
this would represent an
approximate increase of
$83 in the 2015-16 fiscal
year.
The bankruptcy plan
requires in the 2016-17 fiscal year that the city begin
repayment of the receivership's bills and legal fees in
the amount of $600,000
annually until about $3.2
million has been repaid to
the state.
Diossa said that his
administration - along with
the City Council, and the
city's legislative delegation
– are “fighting hard” to
address this, noting that he
is hopeful that their efforts
can result in legislative
action to prevent “a doubledose of a bitter pill that we
have barely survived.”
If the legislation is successful and the bill is
waived, Diossa said he is
confident that the city's
budget choices could result
in significantly lower tax
increases, with a goal of no
increase.
No reductions in services
or layoffs to city employees
are proposed in the mayor's
budget.
With Diossa presenting
his budget proposal
Wednesday night, the next
step is to schedule workshops in which department
directors will have the
opportunity to address what
is included in the budget.
Turn to Page A4 and
read Billington’s guest
commentary on tourism.
Follow Jonathan
Bissonnette on Twitter
@J_Bissonnette.
Follow Jonathan
Bissonnette on Twitter
@J_Bissonnette.
LOCAL
Thursday, May 14, 2015
THE TIMES
Because Rehoboth police warn of break-ins
one shred
wasn’t
enough
After success,
second paper
event added
PAWTUCKET – The Rehoboth Police
Department would like to continue to warn
residents that the house breaks in Town are
continuing.
Fifteen house breaks and/or attempted
breaks have occurred throughout Town in the
past month.
A majority of the break-ins have occurred
during the daytime hours and the suspect(s)
are targeting jewelry and electronics includ-
ing computers and TV's. The Rehoboth
Police ask that residents remain vigilant and
report any suspicious person(s) or activity to
the police immediately.
Residents should also secure their homes
and vehicles when left unattended and utilize
an alarm system if available.
Anyone with possible information regarding these recent incidents can contact Sgt.
Brian Ramos 508-252-3722 ext. 1120.
CASTING AND RELAXING
BY JOSEPH B. NADEAU
[email protected]
LINCOLN – After the
overwhelming success of
this week's consumer
"shred-a-thon" in Lincoln,
Attorney General Peter F.
Kilmartin has scheduled
another shredding event
at the Lincoln Senior
Center to ensure that all
Northern Rhode Islanders
are able to take advantage of this free and easy
way to prevent identity
theft.
The shred-a-thon will
take place on Tuesday,
May 19 from noon until 2
p.m. at the Lincoln Senior
Center, located at 150
Jenckes Hill Road.
The shred-a-thon is
free and open to the public. All consumers are
invited to drop off up to
two "banker boxes" of
confidential documents
for shredding.
"We are thrilled that so
many Rhode Islanders
have gotten the message
that shredding confidential documents is one of
the easiest ways to fight
ID theft,” Kilmartin said
in a statement announcing
the new shredding event.
“The event at the
Lincoln Senior Center
was by far our most popular shredding event to
date, and we quickly
reached capacity.
Although we have multiple other shredding events
scheduled for the week,
we want to make sure that
everyone is accommodated," Kilmartin.
“Along with our partner, Doc Shredding Corp.,
we will return to Lincoln
so that all those interested
can take advantage of this
free event.”
In prior years, Attorney
General Kilmartin's
shred-a-thons were held
during National
Consumer Protection
Week in March. However,
this year due to the
extreme inclement weather, the shred-a-thons are
being held during the
week of May 11-16,
2015.
Holding the shred-athons after Tax Season
also gives consumers the
opportunity to dispose of
unneeded financial documents.
The U.S. Department
of Justice has estimated
that approximately 16.6
million people nationwide
experience identity theft
each year. Shredding documents that contain personal information is one
of the best ways to protect against identity theft.
Recognizing the
increased demand on food
banks across the state, the
Attorney General is asking participants to once
again consider bringing a
non-perishable food item
for the Rhode Island
Community Food Bank.
The Times/Joseph B. Nadeau
Amie Nickerson, of Wrentham, and her boyfriend, Cory Bosko, of Lincoln, enjoy a sunny early
evening fishing at Evans Park on Old River Road in Lincoln. Bosko said he liked to “just getaway
after work, relax and unwind,” while making a few casts for the bass and other fish in the small
pond. Nickerson said she likes to fish, too, but usually not from the shore. “We do a lot of fishing
from the kayak,” she said of the couple's use of small boats for fishing trips. Evans Park is
named in the memory of David Paul Evans, a member of Lincoln High School’s first graduating
class in 1966 and the first town resident killed in the Republic of Vietnam on April 19, 1970.
Lincoln voters say ‘yes’ to budget
Open space purchase passes
BY JOSEPH B. NADEAU
[email protected]
LINCOLN – Town voters approved an
overall spending plan of $78,579,351 for
Fiscal 2016 Monday night while also allowing a Town Council resolution for the acquisition of a parcel of open space land abutting
the Handy Pond Conservation Area.
The approval of the open space purchase
with a combination of a $400,000
Department of Environmental Management
grant and $600,000 in available funds in
town accounts came under a nearly split vote
of 94-93, according to Town Solicitor
Mass Cash 5/12
1-3-8-15-32
Check tomorrow’s
paper for late lotteries.
See YES, page A5
Arrest leads to temple teacher’s firing
Education Director charged following child porn sweep
By RUSS OLIVO
[email protected]
EAST PROVIDENCE – The director of
education for a Hebrew worship center in
Barrington has been terminated from his
position following his arrest for possession
and transfer of child pornography.
“Temple Habonim is shocked and saddened to be informed by the Rhode Island
State Police that our Temple Education
Director, Gary Kabler, was arrested on
Tuesday morning,” Temple Habonim said in
a statement signed by Rabbi Andrew Klein
and Lisa Shea, president of the board of
trustees.
The temple leaders said Kabler was fired
as soon as they were informed of his arrest.
“Protecting our community is our first
priority, and toward that end an immediate
No Trespass Order has been issued against
Gary Kabler,” they said. “He is not allowed
to enter or be near the premises.
Kabler’s arrest was “painful news” for the
congregation, they said.
Kabler, 51, of 244 Beacon Park Drive,
was one of 11 Rhode Island residents arrested on child pornography charges by the state
police Tuesday after a three-month investigation.
Second Annual
AFib
Symposium
LOTTERY
RI Daily
mid-day
5-6-9-0
evening
3-1-6-5
Mass. Daily
mid-day
8-7-5-8
evening
4-9-6-7
Mega Millions 5/12
14-30-33-36-44
MB: 2; MP: 5
Anthony DeSisto.
The open space purchase was approved
while the meeting had 187 residents present,
more than the required quorum of 100.
Although not included in the Budget
Board’s recommended articles for the warrant, DeSisto said the Council’s resolution
allowed the residents present to consider the
land acquisition and express their views for
and against. The purchase was decided by a
tally of the votes placed in the meeting ballot
box, he noted.
Town Councilman Bruce Ogni said the
one-vote passage of the land purchase was a
reflection of the democratic nature of the
Town Meeting process. “This is what you
May 28, 2015
This educational symposium for patients with AFib is being sponsored by Care New England and
Brigham and Women’s Cardiovascular Associates at Care New England. This symposium is free,
includes dinner and will be held at The Crowne Plaza Hotel in Warwick, RI, from 5 to 8 p.m. on
May 28, 2015. You are welcome to bring a guest.
Bruce A. Koplan, MD, MPH, director of the cardiac arrhythmia service for Care New England
and a member of Brigham and Women’s Cardiovascular Associates at Care New England, will
address these topics together with other professional colleagues.
Symposium topics will include:
Recognizing atrial fibrillation (AFib); What is atrial fibrillation; Medications for rate and rhythm
control; Electrical cardioversion for atrial fibrillation; Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation;
Stroke prevention and Atrial fibrillation in women.
For more information or to register, please contact:
Sue Bartos at [email protected] or call 401.737.7000, x31650.
To learn more log on to: carenewengland.org/cardiology
A3
In brief
Saint Raphael Academy
golf tournament, May 15
PAWTUCKET – Saint
Raphael Academy is hosting its 25th annual golf
tournament this Friday,
May 15, at the Pawtucket
Country Club. Registration
begins at 7 a.m. and tee-off
is at 8 a.m. Walk-on golfers
are welcome the morning
of the tournament.
Pawtucket Country Club
was founded in 1902 and
designed by Willie Park, Jr.,
considered one of the best
golf course architects of his
time.
The $145 registration
includes continental breakfast, 18 holes of golf on the
picturesque course, golf
cart, sit-down lunch at the
Pawtucket Country Club,
and an early afternoon
Happy Hour reception. A
raffle and auction will also
round out the festivities.
Proceeds from the tournament will benefit the
financial aid program at
Saint Raphael Academy.
More than three-quarters of
our students receive financial aid that enables them to
continue their education at
the Academy.
To register, contact our
Director of Advancement,
Denny Majewski, at 401723-8100 ext. 120 or [email protected]
Mount Saint Charles to
celebrate 50th annual
pops concert on weekend
WOONSOCKET –
Mount Saint Charles
Academy will be celebrating its 50th annual pops
concert this Saturday, May
16, and Sunday, May 17.
Mount’s bands and jazz
bands will be featured during this special event. Both
performances will be held
in the Academy’s gymnasium and will be in the style
of a traditional MSC pops
concert. Guests will be
seated at round tables with
waiters and waitresses serving food and beverages
throughout the evening.
“It’s very exciting to be
celebrating our 50th
anniversary pops,” Marc
Blanchette, Mount’s music
director said. “I remember
it seemed like just a few
years ago when we did the
25th anniversary pops concert in Chapel Hall. Even
though we don’t have any
special guests joining us
this year, one of the big
highlights will be a continuation of celebrating our
trip to the FCJ Secondary
School in Bunclody,
Ireland, during April vacation, where we commemorated 20 years of musical
friendship with them.”
Showtimes are Saturday,
May 16, at 7:30 p.m. and
Sunday, May 17, at 2 p.m.
Tickets are free, but neces-
sary for a reservation. Call
401-769-0310 for more
information.
Scouts raising money
with giant yard sale
ATTLEBORO – Troop
15 Attleboro will be hosting
a yard sale at Knights of
Columbus 304 Highland
Avenue, South Attleboro on
Saturday, June 13, from 8
a.m. until 1 p.m.
Spots will be sold to
help raise funds for camping, hiking and other troop
activities. Spots (10 feet, by
10 feet) cost $10. For more
information on the yard
sale or to sign up please
contact Robert Schwab at
[email protected]
or Barbara Winkler at
[email protected]
Pawtucket Arts
Collaborative running
through June 11
PAWTUCKET – This
year’s Pawtucket
Foundation Prize exhibit at
the Pawtucket Arts
Collaborative, the eighth
annual, is one of the
strongest yet: colorful,
provocative, mysterious,
and diverse. With far more
artist interest and entries
than ever before, the jurors
had a challenging task.
Selected artists include
Irene Allen, Karen Rand
Anderson, Dan BairdMiller, Joshua Baptista
Jillian Barber, Deborah
Baronas, Sandra Basile,
Jane Bassman, Robin
Beckwith Jill Brody, Lisa
Champagne Morgan, Peter
Croteau, David DeMelim,
Donald Brown John
Fazzino, Ashley
Fontecchio, Ricky Gagnon,
B.L. Green, Haley Teale,
Marjorie Hellman, Brett
Henrikson, Paul Hitchen,
Marc Jaffe, Bonnie Jaffe,
Dave Kendrick Steve
Mason, Eileen McMarney
Muldoon, Paul M. Murray,
David S Pinkham, Maira
Reinbergs, Betsy Ritz,
Hiroko Shikashio ,Lucy
Stevens and Cindy Wilson.
Aaron Hertzberg,
Executive Director of the
Pawtucket Foundation, says
this about supporting the
annual event at the
Pawtucket Arts
Collaborative:
"Events like the
Pawtucket Foundation Prize
Exhibition showcase the
very best our arts community has to offer and helps
demonstrate our support
and appreciation for their
work. Arts and the creative
sector are at the core of our
efforts, as the Pawtucket
Foundation works to revitalize the downtown, riverfront and transportation
gateway of the City."
The exhibition runs
through June 11 at 560
Mineral Spring Ave.,
Pawtucket, RI.
OPINION
Page A4
Regional Publisher: Jody Boucher
General Manager/Advertising Director: Paul Palange
Regional Controller: Kathleen Needham
Executive Editor: Bianca Pavoncello
Managing Editor: David Pepin
Sports Editor: Seth Bromley
Assistant Editor News: Russ Olivo
Distribution Manager: Jorge Londono
THE TIMES — Thursday, May 14, 2015
Tourism should fit with
Raimondo’s marketing effort
In 1986, Rhode Island Legislators designated regional tourism agencies to represent the state. They also created a special
lodging tax with the intent to grow tourism
using community-based, tourism development strategies. When the state stepped
away from its charge to oversee a statewide tourism program, the regional tourism
districts increased their efforts to ensure
Rhode Island's tourism economy grew.
Our success is documented.
The Blackstone Valley's tourism growth
has been 33 percent over the last decade,
according to Commerce RI. Funds
received from lodging taxes are leveraged
three-fold each year. For 30 years, the
Blackstone Valley Tourism Council has
practiced grassroots tourism development
and marketing. With calls for regionalization to better leverage city's resources, it’s
questionable why Gov. Gina Raimondo
does not support regional tourism as viable.
The Blackstone Valley Tourism Council
supports the governor's proposal to get
back into tourism promotion to make
Rhode Island a premiere destination.
Currently, 21 percent of funds generated
from the Blackstone Valley’s lodging tax
are sent to the state’s General Fund, another 7 percent are used to support the tourism
programs in Providence, which has three
tourism agencies working for it.
We strongly oppose Raimondo's
approach to take 47 percent of our funds
from the Blackstone Valley, the funds generated by guests staying in our Valley
hotels. Our post-industrial communities,
equaling two-fifths of the state’s population, will not be adequately served or marketed if the Governor’s proposal is supported by the General Assembly.
Redirecting these funds halts the steady
momentum we have gained as a region.
The Raimondo budget proposal would cut
approximately $190,000 from Blackstone
Valley Tourism Council's budget, disabling
the development and promotion of our nine
communities, three of them being the poorest in our state.
The slashing of the Council's funds this
year, with the certain possibility of the
same amount next year, would kill tourism
in Blackstone Valley. Reassigning hotel-tax
revenue from the RI General Fund back
into tourism would provide $3.5 million for
a state-wide campaign. This would eliminate the need to un-fund the tourism districts.
The governor's proposal would be equitable if each tourism district were asked to
support a campaign based on the amount of
the hotel-tax revenues allocated by the
state. However, according to the Secretary
of Commerce, "Providence and Newport
will be unharmed" with the new funding
formula. Providence will gain $100,000 at
the expense of the Blackstone Valley communities.
Blackstone Valley Tourism Council's
efforts created the nation's 402nd National
Park. Visitors throughout this Valley will
hear the stories of America’s industrialization and the immigrants who came to
achieve their American dream. This is not
the time for the state to decrease support of
the Blackstone Valley. It’s time to invest
more.
Our work has been recognized internationally. The United Nations World
Tourism Organization presented us with the
Ulysses Prize for Innovation in Public
Policy and Governance, recognizing our
GUEST COMMENTARY
By Robert D. Billington
work in sustainable tourism development.
We are the only US agency to achieve this
status. The Council also received the
Tourism for Tomorrow Award for
Destination Management by the World
Travel and Tourism Council. No other
American agency has received this recognition.
Our agency supports two Visitor
Centers, one in Pawtucket along Interstate
95, and one in Lincoln along Interstate
295. We operate two educational boats on
the Blackstone River. We launched the
Pawtucket Arts Festival, one of the state’s
largest Art Festivals. We produce The
Polar Express Train Ride, which last year
brought 15,000 people to Main Street,
Woonsocket. Our robust public relations
and marketing campaign promotes every
attraction and event in the Blackstone
Valley.
The Tourism Council is the advocate for
construction of the Blackstone River
Bikeway. We have constructed a public
campground for Central Falls and created
the Chocolate Mill Overlook at the location
of the earliest chocolate mill in North
America. We founded the Blackstone River
Watershed Council, the RI Music Hall of
Fame, and State Society of RI. On the
international level we have promotional
relationships with Japan, Taiwan, China
and England which bring foreign visitors to
Rhode Island.
It is erroneous to believe that a statewide marketing campaign can be easily
traded for the work done in our nine communities to create "reasons for people to
travel." A state campaign cannot replace,
but it can enhance, the work that is needed
to make the Blackstone Valley "tourismready" and an even higher revenue-producing region for our state.
If Rhode Island is going to have an
identity, it should reflect the values of heritage, independence, and diversity upon
which our state was founded. This is what
makes Rhode Island great.
That is what will bring visitors to our
state. The economic injustice of this proposal is blatant. Blackstone Valley
deserves to grow economically and the
governor's proposal should be rejected.
Robert D. Billington, is president and
founder of Blackstone Valley Tourism
Council, Inc. The 501 (C) 3 educational
organization serving as the state-designated tourism development agency for
Pawtucket, Central Falls, Woonsocket,
Cumberland, Lincoln, Burrillville,
Glocester, Smithfield and North Smithfield.
As others see it: Middle class debt
The following editorial appears on
Bloomberg View:
Of all the burdens weighing on the
American middle class, one has grown
immensely in recent years: debt. Absent
reform, it presents one of the gravest
threats to the prosperity of the typical family.
For much of the past century, easier
access to credit benefited most Americans.
It helped them buy what many see as the
necessities of a middle-class life -- a home,
a car, an education. Those assets, in turn,
gave them the stability and earning power
they needed to build wealth. Regular mortgage payments acted as a form of saving,
making home ownership almost synonymous with financial security.
More recently, though, borrowing has
taken on a very different character. During
the housing boom of the early 2000s, it
became a way to bet on house prices, or to
turn home equity into the spending money
needed to compensate for stagnant
incomes. After the housing bust, the
excesses shifted into other areas, such as
auto loans designed to end in repossession,
and student loans that leave graduates too
indebted to move out of their parents'
home.
As of 2013, the average debt of middleclass families — those that fall within the
middle three-fifths of the population by
earnings — amounted to an estimated 122
percent of annual income, according to the
Federal Reserve. That's down a bit from
before the 2008 crisis, but still nearly double the level of 1989.
It's hard to say exactly how much debt is
too much, but research and the lasting
repercussions of the subprime mortgage
crisis suggest the U.S. is pushing the limit.
When consumers — and the financial institutions that provide them with credit —
borrow too much against their assets, a
market slump can easily leave them owing
more than they own. The consequence is
banking crises and long, slow recoveries as
people try to rebuild their wealth instead of
spending.
This financial fragility undermines the
long-term growth in jobs and incomes
that's needed to support a prosperous middle class.
What to do? First, stop subsidizing debt.
Believe it or not, the government actually
encourages excessive borrowing at taxpayer expense. The income-tax deduction for
interest paid on mortgage debt, for example, costs an estimated$75 billion a year.
The so-called too-big-to-fail subsidy — the
break on borrowing costs that the largest
banks enjoy because creditors assume the
government will bail them out — costs
tens of billions more. Reducing such handouts will be politically difficult, but must
be done to improve incentives and make
the financial system more resilient.
Letters to the editor policy
The newspaper welcomes letters to the
editor and guest commentaries.
Letters should be no longer than 500
words and should be typed.
Letters must include the writer’s name,
hometown and a phone number. The
newspaper will verify all letters before
publication.
Jeb Bush’s eloquent
defense of Christianity
It is nearly axiomatic that presidential
contests tend to shine a harsh light on conservative Christians — inasmuch as they are
viewed as the Republican Party’s base and
are, therefore, deemed fair game.
Of course, religious folks come in a variety of stripes, checks and polka dots. Many
are Democrats. But it is
the members of the
Christian right — evangelicals and Catholics, especially — who are treated
every four years to the
sneers of lefties, academics, proud atheists (allow
me to quote myself:
“There’s no dogma like no
dogma”) and certain but
Kathleen Parker
not all media.
Fortunately for Western
civilization, Christianity has survived worse
insults. Lately, conservative Christians in
the country that codified freedom of religion
have been placed on the defensive. Often
viewed as obstructionists to progress, a secular world wonders: What’s wrong with
those people? Why can’t they just get with
the program?
Why can’t the Little Sisters of the Poor
suck it up and sign off on the Affordable
Care Act’s demand that their insurance policy include contraception funding? Ditto
Hobby Lobby, the family-owned craft business that prevailed in its Supreme Court
fight to not fund insurance covering contraception that destroys embryos.
Hobby Lobby detractors argued that the
company was trying to impose its religious
beliefs on others. In fact, the family was
resisting the government’s insistence that
they render those beliefs unto Caesar. (The
Supreme Court granted the Little Sisters an
injunction pending their appeal in the 10th
Circuit that protects them from enforcement.)
These issues, I’ll admit, can seem arcane
and are tiresome at times. But I’m convinced, as Alan Dershowitz and Ken Starr
agreed during a debate last year on these
two cases, that the state should always go to
extra lengths to protect religious liberty
whenever possible.
If only more Democrats and Republicans
were as agreeable.
Recent history and more recent comments by the likeliest presidential candidates
make it clear, however, that Democrats and
Republicans will take very different
approaches in future state/religion entanglements.
If Hillary Clinton becomes president, she
has more or less promised that the state’s
interests will crush the individual’s as necessary to advance women’s rights. Giving a
fiery speech last month at Tina Brown’s
“Women in the World Summit,” Clinton
plainly said: “Deep-seated cultural codes,
religious beliefs and structural biases have
to be changed” so that women can have
unfettered access to “reproductive health
care and safe childbirth.”
One would like to imagine that Clinton
was speaking only about primitive cultures
where children are forced into marriage and
childbearing, or where genital cutting is
common. But we know that she also meant
religious conservatives closer to home
whose beliefs get in the way. She explicitly
criticized Hobby Lobby for not paying for
its employees’ contraception.
By contrast, Jeb Bush, who will become
the GOP nominee if Republicans are smart,
assumed a much different tone and direction
in his recent commencement address at
Liberty University.
“How strange, in our own time, to hear
Christianity spoken of as some sort of backward and oppressive force,” he said. “It’s a
depressing fact that when some people think
of Christianity and of Judeo-Christian values, they think of something static, narrow
and outdated. ... I cannot think of any more
subversive moral idea ever loosed on the
world than ‘the last shall be first, and the
first last.’”
He also spoke of what our world would
have been like without the “unalloyed compassion, such genuine love, such thorough
altruism,” as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
described Christianity.
It would be defined, Bush said, by
“power without restraint, conflict without
reconciliation, oppression without deliverance, corruption without reformation,
tragedy without renewal.”
In a culture more attuned to the grits-’n’gravy style of a Mike Huckabee, it is rare to
hear Christianity discussed in such elevated
terms. Indeed, Huckabee can be expected to
go after Bush as a blue-blooded elite who
can’t relate to everyday Americans. Well,
yee-haw, one can hardly wait. But I suspect
that even conservative Southern Christians,
who can absorb more than one-syllable
words, might appreciate hearing their beliefs
so eloquently described as by Bush.
To be fair, Clinton likely would have
reframed her comments — and maybe even
her beliefs and accent — had she been
speaking to a Christian audience. But her
spoken words can’t be deleted and her
thinking is clear: Religious beliefs have to
be changed.
Or else what, pray tell?
Read more from Kathleen Parker’s
archive, follow her on Twitter or find her on
Facebook.
WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU:
BY MAIL:
Send letters to the editor to:
Editor/The Times, 23 Exchange
St., Pawtucket, R.I. 02860
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St., Pawtucket, R.I. 02860
BY EMAIL:
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[email protected]
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Website: pawtuckettimes.com
OBITUARIES/REGION
Thursday, May 14, 2015
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... MAKING AN IMPACT
Yes
The Call/Joseph B. Nadeau
Rep. Teresa A. Tanzi (D-Dist.34, Narragansett, South Kingstown) was looking for support
from her House peers on Tuesday while showing a display related to her bill H-5655 that
would prohibit those convicted of domestic abuse from possessing firearms. The bill and
its companion, Senate bill S 0505 by Sen. Cynthia A. Coyne, have been heard in committee but not yet considered by either full body. “I think it depends on how much our leadership hears from their constituents in the state,” Tanzi said. The Representative said the
silouettes on display represented four residents of South County, India Quinn, Tammy
Chan, Donald Costa and Michele Prescott, who all died in domestic violence incidents.
Lawsuit: Pedophile New England
priest transferred to New Mexico
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A
Roman Catholic priest who was repeatedly sent for counseling decades ago over
claims he raped boys and stole parish
money was kept in ministry then sent to
New Mexico where he molested a boy,
according to a lawsuit.
Brad Hall, a lawyer for the boy, now
58, said in the lawsuit that leaders of the
priest's Massachusetts-based religious
order had sought permission from a
Vatican office to bar the priest from any
public ministry, including celebrating
Mass, but Vatican officials instructed the
order to instead provide more treatment
for the accused cleric.
The Rev. George Weisenborn was sent
in 1966 to a Servants of the Paraclete
facility in Jemez Springs, New Mexico,
and later hired as a full-time priest by the
Archdiocese of Santa Fe, which assigned
him to a parish where he abused the
plaintiff multiple times, according to the
lawsuit.
Weisenborn died in 1991.
The suit, filed April 29 in Albuquerque
District Court, names the Archdiocese of
Santa Fe, St. Francis Xavier in
Albuquerque and the now closed Servants
of the Paraclete as defendants. It seeks the
disclosure of more documents related to
Weisenborn and other cases.
THE TIMES
Weisenborn was sent to the Servants of
Paraclete facility, known as Via Coeli, in
1964 after being detained three times in
Washington, D.C., for having sex with
boys, according to court documents
obtained from the Congregation of the
Sacred Heart.
The Servants of the Paraclete opened
Via Coeli in 1947 to treat priests with
alcohol and emotional problems. But
almost immediately, the center began
receiving priests who had sexually abused
children.
The Congregation of the Sacred Heart
wrote Vatican officials after Weisenborn
spent a year at the New Mexico treatment
facility and said after "great sums of
money spent" for his treatment and "great
hardships," the order was "entirely incapable of receiving Rev. Father
Weisenborn among themselves ever
again..."
Weisenborn requested that he be transferred to the New Mexico treatment center to help other priests with their problems, according a letter written by
Weisenborn in 1966 and submitted in the
lawsuit as evidence.
The Archdiocese of Santa Fe later
hired Weisenborn and assigned him to
parishes in Albuquerque and other parts
of the state.
would expect and want from
the Financial Town
Meeting,” he said. “It was a
good debate, a lively discussion and a good decision,”
he added.
The approved budget
includes $19,589,871 for
municipal operations, an
increase of $515,523 over
current spending, and a
school budget of
$52,092,668, an increase of
$982,153 or 1.9 percent over
current spending. Both figures were recommended by
the Budget Board.
The budget as approved is
expected to result in approximately a 1 percent increase
in the town tax levy but as a
result of town growth, no
increase in the tax rate.
Town Administrator T.
Joseph Almond said the open
space land approved for purchase is a 50-acre parcel
owned by the Jergensen
Family off Albion Road that
abuts the town’s 271-acre
Handy Pond Preserve off
Old River Road.
The town meeting action
authorizes the town to proceed with negotiations on
the purchase after setting
aside the funding needed to
match an already approved
state Open Space grant
award of $400,000. The
town would be able to use
$400,000 in prior open
space funding and another
$200,000 in gaming revenues from Twin River to
move forward on a purchase.
If the sale were to be
negotiated for a final price of
$600,000, $300,000 of the
state grant funding and
$300,000 of town funding
would be combined to complete the purchase, he noted.
“There would be no use
of tax money and this would
have no impact on the tax
rate,” Almond said of the
proposed open space purchase.
In other action by the
Town Meeting, Almond said
A5
all 15 of the Budget Boardrecommended capital resolutions were approved, including a proposal to add another
$550,000 to the high
school’s Ferguson Field
improvement project. The
town awarded $1.5 million
in capital reserve funds for
the proposed improvements
last year and the additional
funding will allow the school
department to proceed with
the project—installation artificial turf, a new scoreboard,
track, press box and bleachers for 500 people, he said.
A total of $175,000 was
set aside to add 50 parking
spaces at the Senior Center,
and another $16,000 to be
combined with a $99,000
Champlin Grant received by
the Public Library to repave
its parking lot. Almond said
the Library was also awarded $179,000 in reserve funding to install a new roof on
the original portion of the
recently expanded building.
Town voters also
approved the spending of
$52,500 in reserve funding
for the installation of new
LED lighting at Town Hall
that is expected to save the
Town $1,000 in electricity
costs on an annual basis, and
another $66,000 to install
new computer terminals in
local police cruisers.
The voters also approved
a resolution awarding
$239,000 for repairs to the
dam at Butterfly Pond and
$200,000 for a pedestrian
walkway over the dam under
another reserve funded capital improvement project,
Almond noted.
“I feel really good about
the Town Meeting’s action,”
Almond said of this year’s
financial work by the voters.
Like last year, Almond
said the town will be taking
on a list of capital improvement projects making use of
gaming and reserve funds
that will avoid any impact
from those projects on the
town’s tax rate.
“This budget allows us to
do all that and not increase
taxes,” he said
Historic home near Brown University to get makeover
PROVIDENCE (AP) — An historic
home near the Brown University campus
is set to get a makeover this summer.
The school announced Wednesday that
Bannister House, built in 1854, will be
fully renovated and returned to its original
wood exterior. The home will be sold to a
Brown faculty or staff member after renovations are complete through the Brownto-Brown program. The school says it has
successfully renovated and sold 12 homes
through this program.
Celebrated African American painter
Edward Mitchell Bannister and his wife,
Christiana, rented the home from 1884 to
1899. The home's namesakes were its
most famous residents.
The house was remodeled in 1930,
when its original wood shingles were
replaced with brick. The school says the
home has been vacant and in disrepair for
two decades.
Ed Fouhy, Boston newsman and promoter of Civic Journalism, dies at 80
BOSTON — Ed Fouhy, a
television news executive
who won five Emmy
Awards, worked at all three
major broadcast networks
and produced two presidential debates during a 35-year
career in Washington, died
on Wednesday in Chatham,
Mass. He was 80.
The cause was cancer, his
daughter, Beth, said.
He joined the “CBS
Morning News” in 1966 as a
field producer covering the
civil rights movement and
later served as bureau chief
on the West Coast and in
Saigon during the Vietnam
War. He was the Washington
producer for the “CBS
Evening News With Walter
Cronkite” from 1969 to
1974, when President
Richard M. Nixon stunned
the nation with his historic
visit to China, fended off
congressional challenges
after Watergate and finally
resigned.
Mr. Fouhy later served as
Washington bureau chief
and vice president for news
at CBS, as a producer and
deputy Washington bureau
chief at NBC News and as
Washington bureau chief
and vice president for news
at ABC, before returning to
NBC in 1985 to start the
newsmagazine program
“American Almanac.”
After his network career,
the Commission on
Presidential Debates recruited him to produce the two
debates between Michael S.
Dukakis and George H. W.
Bush in 1988 and the three
among Bill Clinton, Mr.
Bush and Ross Perot four
years later. He was also the
founding director of the Pew
Center for Civic Journalism
and the executive director of
the Pew Center on the
States, as well as the
founder of Stateline.org, an
online news service.
Edward Michael Fouhy
was born in Boston on Nov.
30, 1934, and grew up in
nearby Milton.
His father, Joseph, was a
payroll clerk at a shipyard.
His mother, the former Mary
Herlihy, was a medical secretary.
He graduated from the
University of Massachusetts
Amherst, where he began
his journalism career filing
sports articles for The
Boston Globe. While earning a master’s degree from
Boston University, he
switched to broadcasting
and became news director of
WBZ-TV.
Besides his daughter, he
is survived by his wife, the
former Barbara Mahoney;
his son, Mark; one grandson; and his sister, Nan.
Thank You Novenas
For Favors or Prayers Answered
(Sample ads.
Many others to
choose from)
PRAYER
0 TO THE
0
.
BLESSED
VIRGIN
20
Oh$Most Beautiful Flower of Mt.
ST. JUDE’S
0 NOVENACarmel,
fruitful vine, splendor of
0 Sacred Heart ofHeaven, Blessed Mother of the Son
May5.the
God, Immaculate Virgin, assist
$1 be adored, glorified,of
Jesus
me in this, my necessity. Oh Star of
loved
and
preservedthe Sea, help me and show me here
throughout the world nowyou are my Mother, Oh Holy Mary,
and forever. Sacred Heart ofMother of God, Queen of Heaven
and Earth, I humbly beseech you
0
Jesus, pray for us.
0
.
the bottom of my heart to
0
St. Jude, help of thefrom
1
secure me in my necessity (make
$
hopeless pray for us. St. Juderequest). There are none that can
worker of miracles pray forwithstand your power. Oh Mary,
us.
conceived without sin, pray for us
N.M. & R.B. Thank You St. Jude.
who have recourse to thee (3 times).
Thank You Blessed
Virgin Mary for
favor granted.
Mary, I place this prayer in
B.Z.Holy
your hands (3 times). Say this prayer
Call 401-365-1438
To place your ad in this publication
for three consecutive days and then
you must publish it and it will be
granted to you.
L.L.
Funeral Home Directory
Charles Coelho Funeral Home
151 Cross Street,
Central Falls, RI 02863
401-724-9440
Cook-Hathaway Funeral Home
160 Park St., Attleboro, MA 02703
508-222-7700
Foley-Hathaway Funeral Home
126 South Main St.,
Attleboro, MA 02703
508-222-0498
Duffy-Poule Funeral Home
20 Peck Street,
Attleboro, MA 02703
508-222-0193
Diamond Funeral Home
180 N. Washington Street,
North Attleboro, MA 02760
508-695-5931
Dyer-Lake Funeral Home
161 Commonwealth Avenue,
North Attleboro, MA 02763
508-695-0200
Sperry & McHoul Funeral Home
15 Grove Street,
N. Attleboro, MA 02760
508-695-5651
Darlington Mortuary of
L. Heroux & Sons, Inc.
1042 Newport Avenue,
Pawtucket, RI 02861
401-722-4376
Keefe Funeral Home
5 Higginson Avenue,
Lincoln, RI 02865
401-725-4253
Lincoln Funeral Home
1501 Lonsdale Ave.,
Lincoln, RI 02865
401-726-4117
Karol A. Romenski Funeral Home
342 High Street,
Central Falls, RI 02863
401-722-7250
R.W. Chatigny Funeral Home
151 Cross Street,
Central Falls, RI 02863
401-725-7756
J.J. Duffy Funeral Home
757 Mendon Road,
Cumberland, RI 02864
401-334-2300
Perry-McStay Funeral Home
2555 Pawtucket Avenue,
E. Providence, RI 02914
401-434-3885
Rebello Funeral Home
901 Broadway,
E. Providence, RI 02914
401-434-7744
Raymond Watson Funeral Home
350 Willett Avenue,
E. Providence, RI 02915
401-433-4400
J.H. Williams Funeral Home
210 Taunton Avenue,
E. Providence, RI 02915
401-434-2600
Bellows Funeral Chapel
160 River Road,
Lincoln, RI 02865
401-723-9792
Cheetham Funeral Home
1012 Newport Avenue,
Pawtucket, RI 02861
401-725-4525
Costigan-O’Neill Funeral Home
220 Cottage Street,
Pawtucket, RI 02860
401-723-4035
Lachapelle Funeral Home
1012 Newport Avenue,
Pawtucket, RI 02860
401-724-2226
Manning-Heffern Funeral Home
68 Broadway,
Pawtucket, RI 02860
401-723-1312
Merrick Williams Funeral Home
530 Smithfield Avenue,
Pawtucket, RI 02860
401-723-2042
Prata Funeral Home
220 Cottage Street,
Pawtucket, RI 02860
401-722-8324
William Tripp Funeral Home
1008 Newport Avenue,
Pawtucket, RI 02861
401-722-2140
Russell Boyle Funeral Home
331 Smith Street,
Providence, RI 02908
401-272-3100
Mariani & Son Funeral Home
200 Hawkins Street,
Providence, RI 02904
401-861-5432
O’Neill Funeral Home
3102 Mendon Road,
Cumberland, RI 02864
401-658-1155
A6
THE TIMES
Thursday, May 14, 2015
ALLIANCE
BLACKSTONE VALLEY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
594 Central Avenue, Pawtucket, RI • 401-722-8236 • www.ABVFCU.com
Mon. 9-5pm, Tues. & Wed. 9-4:30pm, Thur. & Fri. 9-6pm, Sat. 9-12pm
PRESENTS YOUR COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Sunday
10 May
11
12
13
14
15
16
North Kingstown
Cumberland
Cumberland
Burrillville
Woonsocket
North Smithfield
Lincoln
• Mother’s Day Road Race to
raise awareness and money for
migraine research featuring a
10-mile race and a 5k race starting at 9 p.m. Event takes place
rain or shine at the North
Kingstown Golf Club in Quonset
Business Park. Those interested
should register at mothersdayrace.com or register at 7
a.m. on race day.
• The Cumberland Public
Library will have its starlight story
time for children of all ages and
their families Monday evenings
at 6:30 p.m. This is a chance to
put on pajamas and participate
in reading, singing and fun.
• Hypnosis for Health at
Cumberland Public Library, featuring Patrick Bowe, 6 p.m.
• The Cumberland Public
Library is having its Tales for
Threes on Tuesdays at 10 a.m.
This is a chance to interact with
your three-year old through fun
stories and singing. No registration needed.
• The Commissioners of the
Burrillville Housing Authority will
meet in regular session at the
Burrillville Housing Authority community room, Ashton Court,
Harrisville, Rhode Island at 6:30
p.m.
Providence
Cranston
• The 2015 American Cancer
Society Cancer Action Network
(ACS CAN) Day at the State
House will take place in the
Governor’s State Room at the
Rhode Island State House in
Providence. Cancer advocates,
survivors, and members of the
legislature are invited to attend
starting at 2 p.m. This is an
important day for those living
with cancer and their family
members and friends to come
to the State House to tell their
personal stories to their
Legislators. Register by contacting Todd Ellison at [email protected] or (401) 2432622. Training will be provided
in advance for advocates.
•The American Lung
Association’s Better Breathers
Support Group for sufferers of
chronic obstructive pulmonary
disease (COPD) is scheduled to
meet May 13 and June 10 from
1 to 2 p.m. at VASA Hall, 43
Bald Hill Road. The first meeting
will be an interactive session to
discuss how to best educate
people in Rhode Island about
COPD. The main topic for the
second meeting will be medications used to treat the disease
and new delivery devices for
those medications. Attendees
are requested to refrain from
wearing scented personal care
products.
• Thursday Night Live, 6-11p.m.
Whether you like to experience
our local Stadium Theater, enjoy
a concert and dinning, you'll find
this event a Thursday nightlife a
great night out. If nightlife means
enjoying your favorite beverage
and food, with an energetic and
friendly crowd of locals with the
love for music, you will not want
to miss Thursday Night Live!
Located: Parking Lots of the
Legendary Chan’s Jazz Club &
The Historic Ciro’s Tavern.
Woonsocket
• Hearts With Hope is holding a
Mother's Day brunch at St.
Joseph's Veteran's association
on from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.;
Proceeds will go to the Rachel
Autiello 5K, hosted by the RI
Athletic Club, which is also
being held simultaneously that
morning in her honor in
Woonsocket. Menu includes
eggs, sausage, bacon, pancakes, hash browns, juice, coffee, cinnamon rolls, beans and
toast. Cost is $12 per adult, $7
per child under 10 and kids 3
and under eat free. For more,
call 401-742-9278
Monday
Woonsocket
• The Woonsocket Knights of
Columbus will host an Open
Meeting at 7 p.m. at All Saints
Church Hall for members and
guests.
North Smithfield
• The Garden Club of North
Smithfield will be meeting at
6:30 p.m. at the Little Red
Schoolhouse in Forestdale to
make teacup flower arrangements. Participants will need to
bring their own supplies. New
members welcome. Call Jo-Ann
767-6889 for a detailed list of
supplies if you plan to attend.
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Central Falls
•Election of officers for the
Korean War Veterans
Association, Ocean State
Chapter 1, is scheduled to be
held Thursday, May 14, at a
meeting that will start at 3 p.m.
at American Legion Post 79, 44
Central St. For more information, call Antero “Ted” Martins,
chapter commander, at (401)
724-4664 or (401) 864-5507.
Friday
• CrAfternoons are back at the
North Smithfield Public Library,
Fridays from 2-4 p.m. (or until
materials run out), drop-in when
you can, no registration necessary. Each Friday there will be
set out in the children’s room a
simple craft that can be completed by kids of all ages.
Saturday
• The Lincoln Garden Club will
hold its annual plant sale from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Chapel St.
Congregational Church, 185
Chapel Street. (Rain date, May
23.) The sale will feature
perennials, herbs and vegetables. For more information call
333-2199.
Woonsocket
Woonsocket
• “Dancing into Summer” 4:308:30 p.m.; located at River
Island Park. A celebration featuring many forms of dancing
such as: breakdancing, salsa,
belly dancing and ballroom.Plus
exhibits and refreshments.
• “Salute to Veterans” 10 a.m.-5
p.m.; located at the Armed
Forces Park on Davidson Street.
We honor those that have served
our country. This event will feature live entertainment and there
will also be a display of military
vehicles and a military museum
exhibit.
•Buy Local Maker’s Fair and
Festival, River Island Park, 10
a.m. to 4 p.m.; Blackstone Valley
Independent Business Alliance
will feature local artisans and
their goods; Finest Quality catering truck.
Cranston
• The Champlin Scout
Reservation at 233 Scituate
Ave in Cranston will be holding
the annual Envirothon
Competition from 8:30 a.m.
until noon.
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
Greenville
Cumberland
Cumberland
Pawtucket
Woonsocket
Pawtucket
North Smithfield
• The Village at Waterman Lake
welcomes veterans to attend
their Veterans Appreciation
Celebration to show thanks for
their service. Veterans and their
guests will enjoy a complimentary prime rib luncheon beginning
at 1:15 p.m. and entertainment
by local singer Chris Jason.
Note that seating will be limited,
so call 949-1333 for reservations. At 2:30 p.m., an outdoor
concert open to all, guests and
the public, will feature a performance by the Reggie
Centracchio Quintet, specializing in the sounds of big band
classics. Coffee and desserts
will be offered. For more information visit
villageretirement.com or call
949-1333.
• The Cumberland Public
Library will have its Babies and
Books storytime, for birth to 23
months, on Mondays at 10 a.m.
Connect with your baby through
stories, rhymes and songs. A
play time will follow. .
• The Cumberland Public
Library will have its starlight story
time for children of all ages and
their families Monday evenings
at 6:30 p.m. This is a chance to
put on pajamas and participate
in reading, singing and fun.
• The Cumberland Public
Library is having its Tales for
Threes on Tuesdays at 10 a.m.
This is a chance to interact with
your three-year old through fun
stories and singing.
•Fogarty Manor Tenant
Association BINGO is open
Monday and Wednesday Nights,
doors open at 4 p.m.; game
runs from 6:30-8 p.m. (214
Roosevelt Ave.)
Pawtucket
Woonsocket
• The Leon Mathieu Senior
Center and Shri Studio have
partnered to offer a “Yoga for
Seniors” on Tuesday mornings
from 9:30-10:30 a.m. at Shri
Studio, 21 Broad St. This class
is designed to introduce seniors
to gentle yoga postures and
meditation techniques from their
chairs, helping them reduce
stress, improve focus, build
strength, and increase flexibility.
The fee for Leon Mathieu Senior
Center members is $5 per person per month. Transportation is
available from the Senior Center
to the Studio for those who
need it. For more information
and/or to register for the class
contact the Senior Center at
728-7582.
• Creative Writing Group,
Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m.;Local
writers meet weekly to share
support, suggestions and criticism. An informal gathering of
both published and unpublished
writers who find a group useful
for incentive and inspiration.
There is no charge to join.
Meetings are held Wednesday
evenings 7:30-9 p.m.
• Adult Knitting Circle, hursdays, 7-8:30 p.m., knitters and
crocheters of all levels of experience are invited to attend this
crafting circle. Led by experienced knitter and crocheter, Jen
Grover. Donations of yarn are
appreciated. Woonsocket Harris
Public Library, 303 Clinton St.,
401-769-9044. woonsocketlibrary.org
• An evening of ghost stories
and New England legends.
Contact: Russell Gusetti at
401-725-9272 or [email protected] From the leading
authorities on spooks & legends, witness a night of haunted history and eerie tales from
across New England featuring
Jeff Belanger, Emmy-nominated host, writer and producer of
the New England Legends
series on PBS, writer and
researcher for the Ghost
Adventures series on the Travel
Channel, founder of
Ghostvillage.com, and a noted
speaker and media personality.
He'll be joined by Carl L.
Johnson, Tim Weisberg,
Andrew Lake and Frank Grace
for this production which is
being filmed as part of a PBS
documentary that will air this
fall. Tickets: $15 adv./$20 day
of show via the website listed
below. Tickets can be purchased at
www.legendtrips.com/new_en
gland_legends_ghosts.shtml
• The North Smithfield Library
presents storybook yoga at 11
a.m. This is for children ages 3 to
9. Direction will be given by
Debbie Quinn of Color Me Yoga.
This will include simple yoga and
a storybook read aloud.
Registration requested by dropins welcome. Call 767-2780.
25
26
27
28
29
30
Cumberland
Woonsocket
Cumberland
Cumberland
Pascoag
West Warwick
• The Cumberland Public
Library will have its Babies and
Books storytime, for birth to 23
months, on Mondays at 10 a.m.
Connect with your baby through
stories, rhymes and songs. A
play time will follow. No registration needed.
• The Cumberland Public
Library will have its starlight story
time for children of all ages and
their families Monday evenings
at 6:30 p.m. This is a chance to
put on pajamas and participate
in reading, singing and fun.
• The Woonsocket Knights of
Columbus Council 113 will hold
it's regular business meeting at
7 p.m.at All Saints Church on
Rathbun Street. All members
are encouraged to attend as
this will include the election of
officers.
• The Cumberland Public Library
is having its Tales for Fours and
Fives on Wednesdays at 10 a.m.
This is a chance for parents and
preschoolers to interact through
stories, movement activities and
songs.
• The Cumberland Public
Library will have its Tales for
Twos on Thursdays at 10 a.m.
This is a time for parents to
encourage their two-year-old’s
emerging language skills with
stories and songs. No registration is needed.
• Father Holland Catholic
School (formerly St. Joseph's
School) Teacher Appreciation
Pasta Dinner/Silent and Live
Auction. May 29 at St.
Joseph's Church Hall. Silent
auction 5:30-7:00 p.m.; dinner
7 p.m.; live auction (including a
trip to Africa) to follow dinner.
Auction items generously
donated by over 120 local businesses and national companies. All are invited: parishioners, the current school community, alumni, and townsfolk.
Come enjoy an adults-only
evening of fellowship, a delicious meal, and exciting auction. Tickets $10 each. Contact
St. Joseph's Church (401-5682411) or Fr. Holland Catholic
School (401-569-4589) for
tickets.
• The Pawtuxet Valley
Community Chorus proudly
presents ‘Lifting Our Voices in
Song’ on Saturday, May 30, 7
p.m. and Sunday, May 31, 2
p.m.; West Warwick High
School auditorium. Tickets:
Adults: $12 in advance, $15 at
the door; children 10 and under,
$5; For tickets contact any chorus member or call 401-8623105; also visit pvchorus.com.
Pawtucket
•Fogarty Manor Tenant
Association BINGO is open
Monday and Wednesday Nights,
doors open at 4 p.m.; game
runs from 6:30-8 p.m. (214
Roosevelt Ave.)
Woonsocket
•Cash Mob gathers at 6 p.m. in
parking lot across from
Landmark Medical Center, 186
Cass Ave. Two local businesses
will be announced by Buy Local
at 6:15 as the evening’s targets.
24
Pawtucket
Cumberland
• The Cumberland Public
Library is having its Tales for
Threes on Tuesdays at 10 a.m.
This is a chance to interact with
your three-year old through fun
stories and singing.
•Fogarty Manor Tenant
Association BINGO is open
Monday and Wednesday Nights,
doors open at 4 p.m.; game
runs from 6:30-8 p.m. (214
Roosevelt Ave.)
Woonsocket
• The 118th and 1118th
Engineer Companies formerly
stationed at the South Main
Street Armory in Woonsocket will
hold their sixth annual reunion at
St. Joseph Veterans Association,
99 Louise St. Social hour from 6
p.m., pictures at 6:30 and dinner at 7. For more, contact Tom
Dunayeski at 508-883-4567 or
Sonny Vadeboncoeur at 401766-7953.
Pawtucket
•Fogarty Manor Tenant
Association BINGO is open
Monday and Wednesday Nights,
doors open at 4 p.m.; game
runs from 6:30-8 p.m. (214
Roosevelt Ave.)
1
31
June
Lincoln
• Vietnam Veterans of America,
James Michael Ray Memorial
Chapter #818 at 7 p.m. at the
Lincoln SeniorCenter, 150
Jenckes Hill Road in Lincoln.
Come at 6 p.m. and have dinner
with us. All Vietnam Veterans
welcome. Formore information
call Joe Gamache at 401-6516060.
Woonsocket
• Adult Knitting Circle, hursdays, 7-8:30 p.m., knitters and
crocheters of all levels of experience are invited to attend this
crafting circle. Led by experienced knitter and crocheter, Jen
Grover. Donations of yarn are
appreciated. Woonsocket Harris
Public Library, 303 Clinton St.,
401-769-9044. woonsocketlibrary.org
Pawtucket
• The Major Walter G. Gatchell
V.F.W. Post 306, 171 Fountain
St., is holding a spaghetti and
meatball dinner from 4 to 7 p.m.
Tickets are $8 and can be purchased at the door. For more ,
call the post after 4 p.m. at
(401) 722-7146.
2
3
4
5
Woonsocket
• WOON 1240 AM will air the
42nd annual St. Jude Children’s
Hospital Radiothon from 10:30
a.m. to 3 p.m.
6
West Warwick
Lincoln
Pawtucket
Pawtucket
Woonsocket
• Watercolors With Jerry: The
Lincoln Public Library will host a
4-week watercolor class taught
by local artist Jerry Aissis,
Mondays June 1, 8, 15, and 22
from 6-7:45 p.m. $100 plus
supplies. Fee may be paid in
cash or in check to Jerry Aissis.
(Payment expected at time of
registration) Supplies list is available for pickup. Class size is limited to (10) students. No waiting
lists; no phone registrations. If
interested, register at the reference desk in the library. Check
Events at lincolnlibrary.com
• The Leon Mathieu Senior
Center and Shri Studio have
partnered to offer a “Yoga for
Seniors” on Tuesday mornings
from 9:30-10:30 a.m. at Shri
Studio, 21 Broad St. This class
is designed to introduce seniors
to gentle yoga postures and
meditation techniques from their
chairs, helping them reduce
stress, improve focus, build
strength, and increase flexibility.
The fee for Leon Mathieu Senior
Center members is $5 per person per month. Transportation is
available from the Senior Center
to the Studio for those who
need it. For more information
and/or to register for the class
contact the Senior Center at
728-7582.
•Fogarty Manor Tenant
Association BINGO is open
Monday and Wednesday Nights,
doors open at 4 p.m. and the
game goes from 6:30-8 p.m.
(214 Roosevelt Ave, Pawtucket)
North Smithfield
• The Pawtuxet Valley Community
Chorus proudly presents ‘LIFTING
OUR VOICES IN SONG’ on
Saturday, May 30, 7 p.m. and
Sunday, May 31, 2 p.m.; West
Warwick High School auditorium.
Tickets: Adults: $12 in advance,
$15 at the door; children 10 and
under, $5; For tickets contact any
chorus member or call 401-8623105; also visit pvchorus.com.
• The Woonsocket Harris
Public (303 Clinton St.) hosts
Adult Knitting Circle on
Thursdays from 7-8:30 p.m.;
Knitters and crocheters of all
levels of experience are invited
to attend this crafting circle. Led
by experienced knitter and crocheter, Jen Grover. Donations of
yarn are appreciated. For more
call 401-769-9044 or visit
woonsocketlibrary.org
• The North Smithfield Library
presents storybook yoga at 11
a.m. This is for children ages 3 to
9. Direction will be given by
Debbie Quinn of Color Me Yoga.
This will include simple yoga and
a storybook read aloud.
Registration requested by dropins welcome. Call 767-2780.
Woonsocket
• Come support the Woonsocket
Lady Novans Middle School softball team. Join us for an all-youcan eat breakfast of homefries,
eggs, ham, beans, toast, coffee,
tea and juice. The breakfast will
take place from 8 a.m. until noon
at Ciro’s Tavern, 42 Cherry
Street, Woonsocket. Cost is $8
for adults and for kids 10-andunder, $6. A 50-50 raffle will be
held too. Tickets are available at
Ciro’s.
Cumberland
• The Cumberland Public
Library will have its Tales for
Twos on Thursdays at 10 a.m.
This is a time for parents to
encourage their two-year-old’s
emerging language skills with
stories and songs. No registration needed.
Woonsocket
• Protect your home and help to
create a safer Rhode Island for
all residents by attending the
Woonsocket Eco-Depot collection – hosted by Rhode Island
Resource Recovery Corporation
– from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the
Woonsocket Parks and
Recreation Department at 1117
River Street, Woonsocket. Free
of charge to Rhode Island residents only,available free of
charge to Rhode Island residents
only. For an appointment, visit
codepotri.org or call 401-9421430 x241.
Send your community events to [email protected] or woonsocketcall.com
AMUSEMENTS
Thursday, May 14, 2015
THE TIMES A7
No words can heal the pain
family endures after a rape
DEAR ABBY:
What do you say when
someone has been raped?
I have a friend whose
granddaughter was brutally
raped and left for dead. I have
asked a few questions about
how she is doing and receive
only cursory answers in
response.
I know this incident has
caused great sadness within
this family. What do I say?
What do I do? I am at a loss
for words, and don't know
how to help. Any advice you
can offer would be greatly
appreciated.
— STYMIED IN ARIZONA
DEAR STYMIED: You
have shown your concern by
asking. It should be clear to
you that your friend is not
comfortable discussing the
family tragedy in detail.
Now drop the subject,
because sometimes being at a
loss for words is a GOOD
thing. When your friend is
comfortable talking about it,
he/she will do it without
prompting.
DEAR ABBY:
I recently took two days off
from work to stay home with a
cold. When I returned to
work, a co-worker started commenting on how I might be
contagious. Then during our
lunch break, she commented
that she didn't want me to sit
next to her “because she didn’t
want to get sick.” I told her
there were plenty of other
seats if she preferred to sit
elsewhere, and sarcastically
thanked her for making me
feel “welcomed.”
She continues to bring it up
and is now pushing everyone
to use hand sanitizer and sanitize their work areas. I’m
offended. I think it's rude. A
couple of co-workers are now
sick with similar symptoms. Is
she being rude, or am I oversensitive? And how should I
respond?
— OFFENDED IN
THE MIDWEST
DEAR ABBY
Jeanne Phillips
tions about the stories.
The teachers, on the other
hand, were a disappointment.
They dressed the way I dress
when I work in the yard —
jeans and T-shirts. What an
unprofessional image they presented to these youngsters!
They missed a wonderful
opportunity to be a positive
example of women in the
workforce by displaying a total
disregard for their appearance
or the impact they have on
young minds.
— SAD TO SEE IN NEVADA
DEAR SAD: I, too, remember when teachers dressed
more formally in the classroom. But that was then and
this is now. On the bright side,
one would hope that teachers
gain the respect and affection
of their students less on how
Horoscope
A - Cox B - Uxbridge, Millville Comcast
C - Blackstone, Franklin Comcast D - Bellingham Comcast
By HOLIDAY MATHIS
TAURUS (April 20-May
20). Strategy will be better than
impulse. Plan your attack, and
at least three people around
you will support you. Earth
signs will be especially helpful -that's Virgo, Capricorn or a fellow Taurus.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
First you'll ask without much
luck in the way of a response. "I
don't know" will quickly change
to "I know" when you ask a different question. Prod if you
must to get to the root of your
problem.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
Many sales techniques hinge on
the belief that the things that are
most desirable are in limited
supply. Think twice when you're
urged to "buy now because there
are only three left." There are
many more than three left.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You
have a talent for levity and an
instinct for fun -- lead with laughter today. There is no need to be
self-conscious and overly concerned about what others think.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
People who feel pressured are
likely to act out of fear, and the
result will lead to regret. How
can you take the pressure off?
How can you make it fun?
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
You value honesty, but do be
gentle, because the people
around you are more sensitive
than usual. Much will be accomplished with a compassionate
tone of voice.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
You seek the kind of understanding that can only come
from putting yourself in another
person's position. You don't
mind walking a mile in another
person's moccasins as long as
that person's shoe size is similar
to yours.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21). You approach the day
as if it were an experiment, and
your curious, playful mindset
will keep you from getting frustrated. Whether it goes right or
wrong, you learn.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). On the subject of personal
and emotional space, everyone
has a certain comfort zone. You
need a bigger buffer than usual
today, and you'll favor those
who understand and respect
your boundaries.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). You may be building an
event up to be much bigger than
it needs to be. Try hard, but
don't worry if it doesn't work
out. There will be more and better opportunities in your future.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
Small issues can escalate quickly. If you run into a problem,
meet with the others involved
straight away and face-to-face for
speedy resolution. Lose old baggage. It's not relevant to you.
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
You are open to unusual, original and novel ideas, so open, in
fact, that sometimes you miss
the obvious success key. That's
why it helps to have a very pragmatic friend in your mix.
^ WGBH
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TVL
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USA
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6:30
PBS NewsHour (N) Å
7 PM
For an excellent guide to
becoming a better conversationalist and a more sociable
person, order “How to Be
Popular.” Send your name and
mailing address, plus check or
money order for $7 (U.S.
funds) to: Dear Abby,
Popularity Booklet, P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 610540447. (Shipping and handling
are included in the price.)
Sudoku solution
THURSDAY EVENING MAY 14, 2015
7:30
Greater BosRick Steves’
ton Å
Europe Å
WBZ News
CBS Evening
Wheel of For- Jeopardy!
(N) Å
News/Pelley
tune (N)
(N) Å
NewsCenter 5 ABC World
Inside Edition Chronicle Å
at 6:00 (N)
News
(N) Å
ABC6 News at ABC World
The Insider
Inside Edition
6pm (N)
News
(N) Å
(N) Å
7 News at 6PM NBC Nightly
Access HolExtra (N) Å
(N)
News (N)
lywood (N)
NBC 10 News at NBC Nightly
NBC 10 News at Extra (N) Å
6pm (N)
News (N)
7pm (N)
12 News at 6 CBS Evening
Wheel of For- Jeopardy!
News/Pelley
tune (N)
(N) Å
Dish Nation
Fox 25 News at 6 (N) Å
TMZ (N) Å
(N) Å
Modern Fam- Modern Fam- The Big Bang The Big Bang
ily Å
ily Å
Theory Å
Theory Å
World News
Nightly BusiCook’s Coun- Are You Being
America
ness Report
try Å
Served?
Two and a Half Two and a Half The Big Bang The Big Bang
Men
Men
Theory Å
Theory Å
Curious George Curious George America’s Test Antiques RoadKitchen
show
Modern Fam- Modern FamThe Middle Å The Middle
“Siblings”
ily Å
ily Å
Entertainment Eyewitness
Access HolTMZ (N) Å
Tonight (N)
News
lywood (N)
Blue Bloods A man is thrown
Blue Bloods A Grand Rebbe and
from a moving vehicle. Å
his new appointee die.
Blue Bloods A man is thrown
Blue Bloods A Grand Rebbe and
from a moving vehicle. Å
his new appointee die.
6 PM
A&E
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also known
as Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother,
Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear
Abby at www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069.
DEAR OFFENDED: Your
co-worker isn’t rude; she’s a
germaphobe and with good
reason. If everyone was careful
to use hand sanitizer and sanitize their workstations and
shared surfaces — door knobs,
light switches, lunchroom
equipment — there would be
fewer individuals taking sick
days. In a case like this, you
DEAR ABBY:
This past week I read to the
students at a local grammar
school. I read to kindergarteners, second- and fourthgraders. The children were
great, quiet and attentive.
They asked insightful ques-
should stop being defensive.
The best way to respond to
the woman is not to respond
at all.
they look and more on the
love of learning they are able
to instill.
6:30
7 PM
7:30
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
9:30
The This Old House Hour (N) Å Chasing Shackleton Journey
across Southern Ocean.
The Big Bang (:31) The Odd (:01) The Big The Big Bang
Theory
Couple Å
Bang Theory
Theory Å
Grey’s Anatomy The doctors deal Scandal Olivia’s team moves to
with a crisis. Å
topple Command. Å
Grey’s Anatomy The doctors deal Scandal Olivia’s team moves to
with a crisis. Å
topple Command. Å
Law & Order: Special Victims
The Blacklist Liz is framed by
Unit “Undercover Mother”
The Cabal. Å
Law & Order: Special Victims
The Blacklist Liz is framed by
Unit “Undercover Mother”
The Cabal. Å
The Big Bang (:31) The Odd (:01) The Big The Big Bang
Theory
Couple Å
Bang Theory
Theory Å
Bones Arastoo is kidnapped. (N) Wayward Pines “Where Paradise
Å (DVS)
Is Home” Å (DVS)
The Vampire Diaries Damon
Reign “Burn” Catherine meets
must make a difficult decision. with Queen Elizabeth.
(7:59) The Best of the Boston
(8:56) Queen Victoria’s Children
Pops Å
Victoria’s daughters.
The Mentalist A man’s body is The Mentalist Investigating two
found in the marina. Å
botched robberies. Å
Father Brown Sir Raleigh’s new Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries
bride is found dead.
“Death Comes Knocking”
The Vampire Diaries Damon
Reign “Burn” Catherine meets
must make a difficult decision. with Queen Elizabeth.
Bones Arastoo is kidnapped. (N) Wayward Pines “Where Paradise
Å (DVS)
Is Home” Å (DVS)
Blue Bloods Frank helps a young Blue Bloods Danny and Erin
Turkish woman. Å
investigate a cold case. Å
Blue Bloods Frank helps a young Blue Bloods Danny and Erin
Turkish woman. Å
investigate a cold case. Å
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
9:30
10 PM
10:30
Nazi Mega Weapons Construction of a defensive wall.
Elementary Watson and Holmes
search for Alfredo.
(:01) American Crime The case
comes to a close. Å
(:01) American Crime The case
comes to a close. Å
(:01) Dateline NBC (N) Å
11 PM
Charlie Rose (N) Å
11:30
2
WBZ News
Late Show W/
(N) Å
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at 11:00 (N)
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ABC6 News at (:35) Jimmy
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NBC
10
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at
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(:01) Dateline NBC (N) Å
11pm (N)
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Late Show W/
search for Alfredo.
Letterman
Fox 25 News at TMZ Å
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11 (N)
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Cougar Town Å
Men
Men
“Finding Out”
(9:58) Queen Victoria’s ChilBBC World
(Off Air)
dren Å
News Å
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Slicer” Å
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lene Å
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(N) Å
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Seinfeld “The Family Guy
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arm an off-duty cop. Å
multiple people. Å
Blue Bloods Bank robbers dis- Blue Bloods A tragedy occurs to
arm an off-duty cop. Å
multiple people. Å
10 PM
10:30
11 PM
11:30
The First 48 An unarmed man is The First 48 Masked gunmen
The First 48 A man is shot in
The First 48 An Atlanta murder is (:01) The First 48 Gun violence (:02) The First 48 Murder of a
gunned down. Å
terrorize a family. Å
front of his family. Å
captured on video. (N)
in the Big Easy. Å
beloved neighbor; robbery.
To Be Announced
Alaska: The Last Frontier
Alaskan Bush People “Pile It On” Railroad Alaska “Train From
Ice Cold Gold Arctic winter pre- 100 Miles From Nowhere The
“Father-Son Ingenuity” Å
Hell” Å
pares to pounce. (N)
trio heads to Arizona. Å
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(:19) Mad Men Don meets up
(:25) Mad Men The office
(:31) Mad Men “Out of Town”
(:36) Mad
Betty visits her father.
new friends. Å
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(5:00) Movie
Nellyville “Steppin’ to the
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Housewives/
Atl.
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the therapy session.
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Business
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hand degreaser.
a family feud.
Business
(5:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N)
Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å
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CNN Tonight
Anderson Cooper 360 Å
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(N)
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Ally Å
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cover Å
die Å
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dashians
ans “Lip Service”
lips.
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(N)
Game 6. (If necessary). (N) Å
Clippers. (N) Å
(3:00) 2015 NBA Draft Combine Highly QuesSportsCenter
30 for 30 The rise to prominence of the college football program at Baseball Tonight (N) Å
SportsCenter (N) Å
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(N) Å
the University of Miami. Å
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Nov. 26, 2011.
pressure Brian. Å
pares for college tryouts.
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tor Elizondo. A grandmother teaches etiquette to an heir apparent.
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& cinnamon rolls.
usually thrown out.
grease; meatloaf.
with airy cookie.
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} Men in Black 3 (2012, Action) Will Smith, Tommy Lee Jones, Josh Brolin. The Comedians Louie
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Smith, Charlize Theron, Jason Bateman.
Agent J must go back to the past to save mankind’s future.
(N)
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House HuntHunters Int’l
Where?
Where?
home in Waco, Texas. Å
neighborhood. Å
in Woodway, Texas.
(N) Å
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(:32) Pawn
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Stars Å
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(:02) Hoarders A former hoarder (:02) Hoarders “June; Doug” A
hoards garbage. Å
out of his home. Å
take out the trash. Å
damages her daughter.
suffers a relapse. Å
woman may lose her home.
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breakfast for Kate. Å
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Castle Investigating a murder
Beckett pursue a killer.
events that could lead to war.
Fairytale-themed murders.
gate a murder.
is found dead. Å
from 1947. Å (DVS)
Teen Titans
Teen Titans Go! World of Gum- Adventure Time King of the
King of the
The Cleveland Bob’s BurgAmerican
American
Family Guy Å Family Guy Å
Go! (N)
ball
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Law & Order: Special Victims
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Oz the Great and PowUnit “Blood Brothers” Å
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Unit “Amaro’s One-Eighty”
Unit “Gambler’s Fallacy”
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Beard” Å
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6 PM
6:30
7 PM
7:30
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
9:30
10 PM
10:30
11 PM
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(:15) } 102 Dalmatians (2000) Glenn Close. Cruella De Vil } Frozen (2013, Musical Comedy) Voices (:45) } Valkyrie (2008, Historical Drama) Tom Cruise, Kenneth Branagh. Col.
resumes her quest for a Dalmatian coat. ‘G’ Å
of Kristen Bell. ‘PG’ Å
Claus von Stauffenberg attempts to assassinate Hitler. ‘PG-13’ Å
} The Devil Wears Prada (2006) Meryl Streep. A recent
} Thought
The Casual Vacancy Election
Veep “Conven- Silicon ValGame of Thrones Daenerys
Cathouse:
results are revealed. Å
college graduate lands a job at a fashion magazine. ‘PG-13’
tion”
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makes a difficult decision.
Come, Party
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(:15) } Blended (2014) Adam Sandler. Two single-parent fami- (:15) } Calvary (2014, Drama) Brendan Gleeson. A priest } J. Edgar (2011, Biography) Leonardo DiCaprio. J. Edgar
lies are stuck together at a resort. ‘PG-13’ Å
receives a death threat during confession. ‘R’ Å
Hoover becomes the first director of the FBI. ‘R’ Å
} The Railway Man (2013) Colin Firth. A former POW and
(4:15) } (:25) } Age of Heroes (2011) Sean Bean. Ian
Penny Dreadful Verbis Diablo’s Sex With Sunny Happyish
Elizabethtown Fleming forms the 30 Commando Unit. ‘NR’
his wife seek out his Japanese torturer. ‘R’ Å
disturbing backstory.
(5:20) } Blue Jasmine } Stomp the Yard (2007, Drama) Columbus Short, Meagan } Planes: Fire & Rescue (2014, Comedy) } Magic in the Moonlight (2014, Romance(2013) Alec Baldwin. ‘PG-13’
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Comedy) Colin Firth. ‘PG-13’ Å
} The Tempest (2010) Helen Mirren. A vengeful sorceress
} Ask Me Anything (2014, Drama) Britt Robert- (:40) } The Discoverers (2012) Griffin Dunne, Devon Graye. A
} Finding Vivunleashes her powers against shipwrecked enemies.
son, Justin Long, Martin Sheen. ‘NR’ Å
history professor takes his offspring on a road trip. ‘NR’ Å
ian Maier (2013)
6
6
6
2
2
4
4
5
5
6
7
10
10
10
10
12
12
12
12
7
8
28
28
9
9
36
36
8
8
18
3
3
44
26
64
64
11
11
15
15
12
15
CABLE
265 118 181 181 181
282 184 130 130 130
254 130 231 231 231
329 124 270 270 270
273 129 185 185 185
355 208 102 102 102
202 200 100 100 100
249 107 190 190 190
77
77
77
278 182 120 120 120
290 172 250 250 250
236 114 196 196 196
206 140
70
70
70
209 144
74
74
74
208 143
71
71
71
422 261 285 285 285
311 180 199 199 199
231 110 164 164 164
248 137
53
53
53
229 112 165 165 165
269 120 128 128 128
252 108 140 140 140
331 160 210 210 210
623 434
76
76
76
299 170 252 252 252
244 122 180 180 180
262 168
54
54
54
280 183 139 139 139
245 138
51
51
51
296 176 257 257 257
301 106 244 244 244
242 105
50
50
50
247 139
52
52
52
PREMIUM
526 340 350 350 350
501 300 400 400 400
512 310 420 420 420
537 318 365 365 365
520 350 340 340 340
544 327 385 385 385
A8 THE TIMES
WEATHER/ENTERTAINMENT
Thursday, May 14, 2015
igh pressure sits to our west
through early Friday keeping the
sky clear and the wind light. Today
will be sunny and will turn milder after
that chilly start. Another cool, dry night is
likely into Friday morning then as this
high pressure slips farther to our south
the cloud cover will increase through
Friday afternoon. Showers could be in
store for Saturday, though the timing is
tricky.
H
TODAY: Mostly sunny. HIGH: 67-70
FRIDAY: Increasing clouds. HIGH: 71
SATURDAY: Mostly cloudy, chance of
showers. HIGH: 68
SUNDAY: Partly sunny. HIGH: 71
MONDAY: Partly sunny. HIGH: 67
TUESDAY: Mostly cloudy, chance of a
shower. HIGH: 68
WEDNESDAY: Partly sunny. HIGH: 66
— StormTeam10
‘Marie’ goes beyond the heroine
Adjmi’s play shows
Antoinette was
more complex than
‘let them eat cake’
Traveling Theatre presents
‘No Strings Attached’
LINCOLN – The Traveling Theatre presents ‘No Strings Attached,’ featuring the
Youth of Central Elementary School.
The performances will be held at Lincoln
High School (135 Old River Road, Lincoln)
on Friday, May 29 at 7 p.m. and Saturday,
May 30 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $6 for general
admission/adults and $4 for students/seniors,
children under three are free.
For ticket reservations and more information, contact Karen Boucher, Executive
Assistant at 401-461-1813.
‘No Strings Attached’ – by Mary
Donnelly and George L.O. Strid; a musical
adaptation of the adventures of Pinocchio,
everyone’s favorite knothead gets an
extreme makeover in this hip and hilarious
adaptation of the classic tale of a talking
puppet who gets into all kinds of trouble
before learning what it truly means to be
human. This adaptation puts a fresh and
contemporary spin on the scenes and characters from the original classic with lots of
slapstick humor, clever wordplay and a wide
range of musical styles including hip-hop,
gypsy swing, bluegrass and good ol’ rock
’n’ roll. The performance is co-directed by
Ben Stanfield and Kelly McCabe.
By KATHIE RALEIGH
Special to The Times
PAWTUCKET – No matter
what else the Austrian-born last
queen of France might have
done or said, she became iconic
for her alleged put-down of
starving peasants: “Let them eat
cake.”
But maybe there is more to
her than just a haughty attitude,
and that’s what playwright
David Adjmi explores in “Marie
Antoinette,” now in a polished
production at the Sandra
Feinstein Gamm Theatre.
In his play, Adjmi speculates
that Marie’s problem wasn’t
shallowness so much as her
youth – married off at age 14 to
an equally young Louis XVI –
and lack of education, the norm
for girls at the time. Both mistakenly led her to believe her
only roles as queen were to bear
a successor to the throne and to
act as an ornament for the country.
We know how that works out
for Marie. While the play follows historical events, however,
it’s not a history lesson. It is a
theatrical story about an infamous personality, told with
drama and loads of satirical
humor.
Maybe Marie didn’t enjoy her
life of luxury. Adjmi’s heroine
admits to her ladies in waiting,
“I feel so hemmed in,” and says
of the opulence of Versailles,
“All those mirrors, those gilded
things. I’m done.”
This Marie often speaks like a
Valley Girl, which brings the
18th-century tale into the 21st,
along with some inevitable parallels with the current economic
climate.
The Gamm’s production is
impeccably acted throughout,
but it really is Marie’s show, and
actor Madeleine Lambert is
In brief
Submitted photos by Peter Goldberg
wonderful. She’s charming and
guileless at one moment, imperious and demanding at the next,
as when she impatiently knocks
away a servant’s hand or
screams in frustration at her
feckless husband. It’s easy to
believe this is what the real
Marie was like, right to the sympathy Lambert engenders at the
end.
Other characters are there
basically to reveal something
about Marie – and for laughs.
Jed Hancock Brainerd plays
Louis XVI as an incapable child,
more interested in taking apart
clocks than ruling. As clueless as
she is, Marie comes across as the
brains of the operation.
Casey Seymour Kim and
Amanda Ruggiero are Marie’s
sycophantic female companions
whose courtly manners are
humorously exaggerated, and
Tony Estrella plays Marie’s
lover, Axel Ferson, who had a
hand in misguiding the queen
about her responsibilities. A
handful of additional characters
– including a poetry-writing,
Above, from left, Casey Seymour
Kim portrays Yolande De
Polignac, while Madeleine
Lambert listens attentively as
Marie Antoinette. At left, Lambert
delivers a soliloquy as Antoinette.
prophecy-making sheep who visits Marie like one of Scrooge’s
ghosts – move the story along.
Alec Thibodeau is appropriately
weird as the sheep.
A set that literally sparkles
with light-reflecting materials
and the bright lighting itself suggest, with minimal fuss, the glitter and ornamentation of Marie’s
life at Versailles. Marilyn
Salvatore’s costumes add to that
setting – and the satire: Marie
and her entourage wear gowns
and wigs as was the 18th century style, but at The Gamm,
those wigs are the ultimate in
“big hair” and dyed neon bright.
When Marie’s position falls, so
does her haute couture as she is
transformed on stage with a
stained robe and shorn hair.
Director Rachel Walshe handles Adjmi’s century-straddling
production with clarity, bringing
a sense of history as well as
contemporary humor to the
show. Adjmi has invented an
interesting take on Marie
Antoinette, and Walshe turns it
into a vivid production.
Performances of “Marie
Antoinette” continue through
May 31 at The Gamm Theatre,
172 Exchange St. Tickets are
$41 and $49; call (401) 7234266 or order online at
gammtheatre.org.
‘Books Are Wings’ coming
to the Woonsocket Library
PAWTUCKET – Local non-profit ‘Books
Are Wings’ is bringing one of its signature
book parties to the Woonsocket Library on
Saturday, May 16.
The ‘Books Are Wings’ mission is to put
books in the hands of children. With that in
mind, families are encouraged to stop by
between 1 and 2 p.m. to pick up a book that
they can take home.
“We want to keep kids reading and the
book parties are a fun way to do that as the
summer approaches,” says Jocelyn White,
Director of Books Are Wings. “It makes for
a great afternoon. In addition to a picking up
a book or two, kids can enjoy storytelling,
crafts and face painting.”
This event is made possible with the support of the Woonsocket Rotary.
Founded in 1998 by Elizabeth M.
Dennigan as a way to collect and distribute
gently used books to day care and community centers, ‘Books Are Wings’ has grown
into a into a non-profit organization. Today
it offers book parties at local libraries,
schools and parks, giving children the
opportunity to experience the joy of reading
by choosing their own books, engaging in
literacy activities and discovering that reading is fun.
SPORTS
Blackstone Valley
THE TIMES, Thursday, May 14, 2015 — B1
Softball
Girl’s Track
Error-prone
Tolman drops
9-4 D-I verdict
to La Salle
By JON BAKER
[email protected]
Photo by Jerry Silberman | RISportsphoto.com
Cumberland junior Meaghan Scullin racked up first-place finishes in the high jump, pictured above, along with the 400-meter run and the triple jump, and
took home a second place finish in the long jump at the Northern Division Championships held Wednesday at Cranston West.
SCULLIN SOARS
Clippers Scullin, Souliere
and Barger; Woonsocket’s
Harlan shine at Northern
Division Championships
By BRENDAN McGAIR
[email protected]
CRANSTON – Despite a dominant
showing from Smithfield, several area athletes successfully turned in noteworthy performances at the Girls’ Northern Division
Championships, held Wednesday at
Cranston West High.
Smithfield ran away with the team title
as the Sentinels’ 197 points was 52 more
than runner-up Cumberland. Woonsocket
came in fourth place (44) followed by
Mount St. Charles (26), Lincoln (23.5) and
Burrillville (13).
As usual, Cumberland junior Meaghan
Scullin left her imprint all over the meet.
Scullin racked up first-place finishes in the
400-meter run, the triple jump and the high
jump. She placed second in the long jump.
Scullin was the only Northern Division
competitor to post a sub-one-minute finish
in the 400 (59.70).
Several of Scullin’s Clipper teammates
also shined. Senior Nichole Barger topped
See MEET, page B3
PROVIDENCE –
Following what became a
sound 9-4 Division I crossover
beating by La Salle Academy
on Wednesday afternoon,
Tolman High head coach
Craig Giarrusso was naturally
disgruntled by the verdict and
how it came about, but also
took it for what it was.
He seemed remarkably
calm – for him – as he
explained his club’s continued
defensive woes, but also indicated there was time to
rebound.
“We knew coming in La
Salle was going to hit, and
they did; that’s because it’s a
very good team,” said
Giarrusso, whose Tigers fell to
9-3 overall and 9-2 in
Division I-North. “We played
great defense for three
innings, but finished with four
errors, and that’s been a telltale sign of our season, like,
‘How many errors are we
going to make?’
“If we don’t tighten up our
defense, we’re certainly not
going to go very far in the
state tournament,” he added.
“Still, we’ve got seven games
left, and a lot can happen.
We’re still in good shape to
win I-North, but – with this –
we lost the opportunity to be
the top seed in the playoffs.
“Somebody’s going to have
to help us, because North
Kingstown only has one loss
in I-South. Somebody’s got to
beat them.”
The last team to do so:
Tolman earlier this spring.
The Rams took advantage
of junior Ann-Marie
Mitchell’s phenomenal performance at the plate (4-for-4,
three RBI, two runs scored) to
improve to 9-3 overall and 9-2
in I-Central.
Other key offensive contributors included senior
Brenna DuPerry (2-for-4, double, RBI, two runs); classmate
Kendall Jackson (1-for-4,
homer); junior Ainsley Burns
(1-for-3, RBI); sophomore
Gabby Conca (1-for-2); and
See TOLMAN, page B3
MLB
Photo by Jerry Silberman | RISportsphoto.com
Woonsocket star sprinter Quinn Harlan took home golds in the 100- and 200-meter dashes, and placed third
in the long jump on Wednesday.
Miley outduels
Gray, Boston
beats A’s 2-0
JANIE McCAULEY
PawSox
AP Baseball Writer
Rodriguez to the rescue?
PawSox lefty could
be called to shore
up Fenway rotation
By BRENDAN McGAIR
[email protected]
PAWTUCKET – Given the
news that the Red Sox are placing Justin Masterson on the disabled list coupled with the fact
that it’s far too early in the season for teams to talk trade, much
of the discussion about potential
reinforcements has focused on
those currently inhabiting the
PawSox’ clubhouse.
At the top everyone’s wish
list is Eduardo Rodriguez, a talented but not quite completely
polished left-hander. Rodriguez
pitched to mixed results at best
Wednesday at McCoy Stadium,
allowing three runs (two earned)
in five innings as Pawtucket fell
to Indianapolis, 6-0.
“If they call me, I’m ready.
You always have to be ready,”
said Rodriguez, who has a 2.86
ERA through six starts.
There’s a lot to like about
Rodriguez, who against the
Indians featured a fastball that
sat between 92-94 miles per
hour and topped out at 95. He
produced seven swings-andmisses along with five strikeouts
and just one walk.
“It’s a live fastball,” said
PawSox manager Kevin Boles.
“There’s definitely some swing
and miss potential there.”
Rodriguez has now allowed
eight runs (seven earned) over
his last two starts, spanning 10
innings. That’s a sharp contrast
from the two runs he permitted
over 13 frames between his
April 25 and May 2 mound
assignments.
“I wouldn’t read too much
into that,” said Boles. “I thought
his stuff played up pretty well
today. His delivery got out of
sync a little bit in his last outing
but I definitely we saw some
improvements today.”
The only true ringing hit that
the Indians mustered against
Rodriguez came with two down
See PAWSOX, page B2
Photo by Louriann Mardo-Zayat | lmzartworks.com
Eduardo Rodriguez could be on the radar for a Boston call-up if he continues his
solid pitching for the PawSox.
OAKLAND, Calif. —
Somehow, Wade Miley
pulled off escape acts all
afternoon.
“Houdini,” the Red Sox
starter said with a smile.
Miley dueled with
Athletics ace Sonny Gray
and worked out of jams to
end a three-start skid thanks
to some sparkling defense,
and the Boston beat Oakland
2-0 Wednesday to take two
of three in the series.
Miley knew he had little
margin opposing a guy like
Gray.
Facing the A’s for the first
time in his five-year career,
Miley (2-4) allowed the leadoff batter to reach in four of
his first six innings. The lefthander won for the first time
since April 21 at Tampa Bay,
allowing four walks and five
hits in 6 2-3 innings.
“He was outstanding,”
manager John Farrell said.
“He was resilient with three
innings they were getting a
number of guys in scoring
position with less than two
outs. He never gave in.”
Gray (4-1) struck out nine
and didn’t walk a batter for
the first time all season. But
See RED SOX, page B2
SPORTS
B2 THE TIMES
HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS SCHEDULE
THURSDAY
BOYS
Baseball
3:45 p.m. Middletown at Lincoln
Scituate at Shea
4 p.m. Burrillville at Hope
St. Raphael at Cranston West
Barrington at Cumberland
Tennis
3 p.m. Classical at Mount St. Charles
3:30 p.m. St. Raphael at East
Providence
Tolman at Woonsocket
Shea at Tiverton
3:45 p.m. Burrillville at Coventry
4 p.m. Cumberland at East
Greenwich
Toll Gate at North Smithfield
Volleyball
6:30 p.m. Barrington at Tolman
Lacrosse
4 p.m. Mount St. Charles at Coventry
7 p.m. Cumberland at Portsmouth
GIRLS
Softball
3:30 p.m. Burrillville at Woonsocket
4 p.m. St. Raphael at Tiverton
Lincoln at Johnston
4:15 p.m. Shea at Paul Cuffee
4:30 p.m. Tolman at Cumberland
Lacrosse
6:30 p.m. Portsmouth at Cumberland
CO-ED
Golf
3 p.m.
Ponaganset vs. Cumberland,
North Smithfield (Kirkbrae Country Club)
3:30 p.m. Shea vs. Classical, Moses
Brown (Pawtucket Country Club)
FRIDAY
BOYS
Baseball
4 p.m. Shea at Exeter/West Greenwich
Tolman at Mount Pleasant
Ponaganset at North Smithfield
Davies Tech at Paul Cuffee
Volleyball
5:30 p.m. St. Raphael at North
Smithfield
6:30 p.m. Tolman at Cranston East
Lacrosse
4 p.m.
Scituate at PCD/St. Raphael
GIRLS
Softball
3 p.m. Block Island at Shea
6 p.m.
1 p.m.
9 a.m.
Noon
1 p.m.
Noon
10 a.m.
SATURDAY
BOYS
Baseball
Mount St. Charles at W. Warwick
Lacrosse
Mt. Hope at Mount St. Charles
Outdoor Track
Classical Classic (Conley Stadium)
GIRLS
Softball
Cumberland at Coventry
Mount St. Charles at Westerly
Lacrosse
Chariho at Burrillville/North
Smithfield
Outdoor Track
Cumberland Invitational (Tucker
Field)
AREA ROAD RACE SCHEDULE
Monday, May 25
WOONSOCKET — George Nasuti
Novans Pride 5K, 8:30 a.m. The Gym,
LLC, 2168 Diamond Hill Road. Third
annual event begins with a kids fun run.
Contact Michael Debroisse at (401)
475-6000 or [email protected]
for more information.
Saturday, May 30
NORTH SMITHFIELD —
Northmen/Navigant 5k Run/Walk
Challenge, 9 a.m. North Smithfield
Athletic Complex, 1850 Providence
Pike. 5k course starts on the
Providence Pike with an Olympic style
finish on the track. T-shirts to the first
300 entries.
Parking at the Middle School Parking
lot. Entertainment: live music along the
route. Food Court. Awards to top 3
male and female overall. Awards to the
top 2 in each age division: 18 & under,
19-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69,
70 & over. Contact Paul Nordstrom at
(401) 641-3206 or visit
[email protected] for more
information.
GLOCESTER — Chieftain Challenge
5K, 10 a.m. Ponaganset High School,
91 Anan Wade Road. Registration
through May 28 8 p.m. - $20 per person. Registration on day of race - $25
per person. The Ponaganset Middle
School Physical Education and Health
Department invite you to join in on a run
along the 3.1 mile course on Anan
Wade Road, and Route 102 to show
your support for lifelong fitness. Our
Middle School Student Running Club is
training to compete, and raise funds for
the construction of cross-country trails
at our new campus. Post-race festivities
will feature: Awards presentation,
Wellness Fair attractions, Food & more.
For more information, email
[email protected]
On The Banner
PHOTO FEATURED IN PIC OF THE DAY LAST WEEK
April 15, 2015 - Cumberland sophomore Emily
Anderson connects for a base hit against Westerly
in the bottom of the sixth inning at Tucker Field
Wednesday. Ernest A. Brown/RIMG photo
PawSox
Continued from page B1
in the second inning when Gorkys
Hernandez smoked a shot into the leftcenter field gap. An ill-advised dive by
PawSox center fielder Rusey Castillo –
the same player who missed time with a
shoulder injury earlier this season –
resulted in a triple for Hernandez.
Perhaps what is holding Rodriguez
back from being a can’t-miss option for
Boston’s rotation is that his off-speed
pitches are still in the process of being
refined. Boles spoke earlier in the week
about the need for Rodriguez to create
more separation between his fastball and
changeup. On Wednesday, the skipper
counted a handful of examples of
Rodriguez’ ability to subtract velocity
between the two aforementioned pitches.
The first few innings saw Rodriguez
go to great lengths to establish his slider,
a pitch that a year was “terrible” in his
estimation.
“Way important,” said Rodriguez
when asked about the importance of the
slider emerging as a third pitch in his
repertoire. “Last year I threw fastballs
and changeups. Now I can throw backdoor sliders.”
PawSox catcher Matt Spring says the
slider for Rodriguez “is really developing.” Spring noted that he successfully
navigated the pitch in and out of the
strike zone against right-handed hitters –
the Indians had just one lefty in the starting lineup.
Red Sox
Continued from page B1
the A’s dropped to 1-11 in the daytime
with their seventh loss in eight games.
Daniel Nava hit an RBI bloop single in the second to snap an 0-for-20
slide and drive in the first run. The
Red Sox won on the road for just the
fourth time in their last 11 away from
Fenway Park.
“It doesn’t matter how it falls, as
long as it falls,” Nava said.
Thursday, May 14, 2015
“He’s doing a lot better job of not
throwing with his body and that’s
allowed (the slider) to turn into a quality
pitch,” said Spring.
steps but then you have to make sure
you get back if you’re not going to go.”
Castillo did collect a hit and a stolen
base.
It was a day of adventures for
Castillo, most of them of the no-so
memorable variety.
The outfielder left the game in the
third inning after tweaking his left ankle
on an awkward slide during a steal of
second base. Boles said Castillo was
removed for precautionary reasons –
Castillo did walk off the field under own
power.
“He came in afterwards and said he
was ready to go,” said Boles about
Castillo, no doubt encouraging news
considering Castillo’s injury history.
“Given the history and the slide, it
seemed a scary thing. We wanted to err
on the side of caution.”
Castillo departed McCoy Stadium
with neither a noticeable limp or with a
bandage on his ankle.
Besides the defensive misplay that
led to the Indians’ first run of the day,
Castillo got erased off the base paths
after attempting to score on a sacrifice
fly in the first inning. He hesitated on a
shallow fly ball to left field and paid the
price as he was tagged out before he
could return to the third-base bag.
“He decided to do a fake break but I
think he got off just a little too aggressive. (Indianapolis) redirected and they
made a nice play,” said Boles. “You
make a read and take a couple of hard
EXTRA BASES: The PawSox are
now hitting a league-worst .235. They
produced 12 baserunners against the
Indians but bounced into four double
plays. Pawtucket is now hitting .213 in
its last 24 games. … Humberto Quintero
told a reporter that he felt fine after getting hit in the helmet with a pitch on
Tuesday night. Given the magnitude of
what was a scary situation coupled with
Wednesday’s day game, Quintero was
held out of the starting lineup. “I think
he got pretty lucky,” said Boles. … The
paid attendance for Wednesday’s businessman’s special was 4,676. Students
made up a vast majority of the crowd
with many of them arriving two hours
before first pitch and departing McCoy
long before the final out was recorded.
… Speaking of attendance, the PawSox
entered Wednesday averaging 5,015
paying customers through 15 openings.
That equates to 10th-best in the 14-team
International League. … Reliever Noe
Ramirez was placed on the disabled list
right before gametime with a right forearm strain. … Brian Johnson (3-2, 3.03)
will get the nod when Pawtucket opens
a four-game series against Columbus on
Thursday night.
Boston added an unearned run on
shortstop Marcus Semien’s wild throw
to first in the eighth. Oakland has
made errors in 11 straight games and a
majors-high 36 in all.
Koji Uehara pitched the ninth for
his seventh save. Boston won this
series without big contributions from
the middle of the batting order. Nos.
3-4-5 hitters David Ortiz, Hanley
Ramirez and Pablo Sandoval went a
combined 5 for 36.
Sandoval hit a winning home run in
the 11th inning Monday night but
wrapped up his Bay Area return 1 for
12 and was booed whenever he
stepped in the batter’s box. He
received his World Series ring from
Giants manager Bruce Bochy on
Sunday night.
Ortiz went 2 for 13 this series and
is 3 of 20 on the trip. Ramirez singled
in the second and ninth for his only
hits in a 2-for-11 Oakland stop.
He is beginning to feel right at the
plate again after missing three games
last week with a sprained left shoulder.
BLACKSTONE VALLEY MEMORIES
May 14
Dave Berthel paced
Pawtucket Vocational’s 12hit attack by ripping a single, double
and triple in five trips, good for three
RBI, as coach Ted McConnon’s Vokes
moved into undisputed possession of
second place in the Northern Division
by defeating Central Falls 8-4. Chet
Bobola, Tom Campbell and Jim Kelley,
who drove in three runs, had two hits
each for the victors. Joe Nield was the
only one of Omer Landry’s boys to
have more than one hit.
1955
Lenny Rao fired a one-hitter,
whiffed 13, walked two and
clouted his fourth and fifth home runs
of the week as he led the Cardinal A.
C. to a 10-1 win over Albo’s in the
Pawtucket Little League. Frank Mattera
drilled two doubles and a single, good
for six RBI, and Ray McConaghy
added a two-bagger for the winners.
Lance Shaw’s second inning single was
the lone hit allowed by Rao.
1965
May 14
May 16
May 25
Woonsocket Senior Bocce season begins
Cumberland-area Upper Deck Legion
Baseball holds tryouts
Registrations being accepted for
Pawtucket Boys & Girls Club RBI Baseball
LINCOLN — American Legion Post 14/86 Upper
Deck will hold junior and senior division tryouts on
Saturday May 16 at Lincoln High School at 3 p.m.
PAWTUCKET — The Boys & Girls Club of
Pawtucket will be offering RBI Baseball, a competitive amateur summer league for boys and girls ages
13-15 year olds; all participants must be in this age
range as of May 1, 2015.
RBI League play begins on June 15. Tryouts for
the Summer League will take place on June 7, with
time and location to be announced. The RBI registration form is online at bgcpawt.org.
The registration fee for the 2015 RBI Baseball
Season is $60, additionally, all participants must
have a current Boys & Girls Club of Pawtucket membership ($40 per year for residents of Pawtucket and
Central Falls and $60 per year for non-residents). All
returning players will remain on the same team
unless they are traded. All players must pay registration fees in full at the time of sign-up and provide a
copy of their birth certificate for age verification.
Registration will be accepted through May 25, or
until the maximum of 120 players has been reached.
You can register in person at the Boys & Girls Club
of Pawtucket’s Elson Clubhouse at One Moeller
Place, Pawtucket RI (off School Street) or mail completed forms to the Boys & Girls Club of Pawtucket.
Players receive Major League Uniforms, games
are played under the lights Monday through
Thursday at 8 pm and teams play twice a week.
Game times and dates are subject to change.
Experienced baseball managers, chosen to provide
baseball leadership, and who have knowledge of
baseball and game competition, are assigned to
coach all teams. All games will be played at baseball
fields in the City of Pawtucket. Interscholastic and
experienced umpires will officiate all games.
For more information about the RBI Baseball
Program contact Matt Bergeron, RBI Director at
(401)722-8840 or [email protected] or visit
www.bgcpawt.org.
WOONSOCKET — The Woonsocket Senior Bocce
League will begin its season on Thursday, May 14,
at 8:30 a.m. at Bouley Field.
The league is open to anyone over age 50 from
any community. For more information call David
Mencarini at 762-3145 or Armand Renaud at 7668438.
May 15
Pawtucket Youth Summer Basketball
League schedules sign-ups
PAWTUCKET — The Pawtucket Youth Summer
Basketball League has will hold registrations for the
coming season Friday, May 15, from 5 to 6 p.m. at
the Smithfield Avenue basketball courts, located at
500 Smithfield Ave.
The league is open to boys and girls from the ages
of 8 to 22. Teams play one game per week on
evenings from June 15 to July 31 at the Smithfield
Avenue courts.
Registration fees are $25 per player for Pawtucket
residents, and $30 per player for non-residents.
For more information, contact Larry Holloway at
(401) 359-0635.
May 17, 24
Woonsocket-area Post 85 Legion Baseball
holds tryouts
WOONSOCKET — The Woonsocket-area
American Legion Post 85 baseball team is holding
tryouts on Sundays, May 17 and 24 from noon to 3
p.m. at Renaud Field.
The program includes players from Woonsocket,
North Smithfield, Burrillville and students of Mount
St. Charles, who are age 14 to 19 years old.
A junior Legion player cannot turn 18 at any point
in 2015 calendar year; a senior player who is 19
must have been on a Legion roster in 2014. Senior
Legion players who turn 20 at any point during 2015
calendar year are not eligible to play.
Please bring birth certificate to tryouts.
For more informtation contact Steve Girard at
[email protected] or call (401) 309-7993.
May 16, 17
May 28
Pineview Big League seeks sign-ups
New England Patriots to host free Moms
Football Safety Clinic at Gillette
PAWTUCKET — Pineview LL/RI District 2 Big
League will be chasing its fourth straight state title
and trip to the East Regions in Dover Delaware this
summer.
The team will be holding sign ups for the 2015
season on the following dates and times: Saturday
and Sunday, May 16 and 17 from noon to 2 p.m. at
Doreen Tomilson field on Daggett Avenue.
Eligible to play are players league age 15 through
18 who reside in the boundaries of Rhode Island
Little League District 2, which includes: Pawtucket,
East Providence, Barrington, Bristol, Warren,
Newport, Portsmouth, Middleton and Tiverton.
Sign up fee is $100 per player, which pays for jersey, hat, and all regular season fees. For more information attend sign-ups or contact manager Joe
Clark by e-mail at [email protected] or coach
Norm Clark at [email protected]
Follow Brendan McGair on Twitter
@BWMcGair03
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — The New England
Patriots, in partnership with USA Football, will host a
free Moms Football Safety Clinic on Thursday, May 28.
The event will take place from 6 to 8:30 p.m. in the
Dana-Farber Field House at Gillette Stadium.
The clinic is designed for moms who have a son or
daughter playing youth football or who are thinking
about playing. The goal of this clinic is to provide moms
with the latest information about the safety of the game
through USA Football’s “Heads Up Football” program.
The clinic will feature presentations on concussion
awareness, heat and hydration, proper equipment fitting and strength and conditioning. This event will also
consist of interactive on-field drills to teach moms some
of the proper techniques of blocking and tackling.
Women interested in participating are required to
sign up for the event by Wednesday, May 27.
Participation will be based on a first come, first served
basis as space is limited. To learn more or to register,
visit www.patriots.com/momsclinic.
June 8
10th annual Blackstone Valley Heritage
Golf Tournament slated
BURRILLVILLE — The 10th annual Blackstone
Valley Heritage Golf Tournament will take place on
Monday, June 8 at the Crystal Lake Golf Course on
Bronco Highway.
The fee to play is $125 per person and includes
lunch, dinner, the golf tournament (an 18-hole
scramble format), and a goodie bag. Registration
and lunch will begin at 11:30 a.m., with a 1 p.m.
shotgun start. The dinner, auction, and awards ceremony is expected to start at 6 p.m. The proceeds
will benefit the tourism-based environmental pro-
Marc Sawyer and freshman
Ernie Desautel clouted home
runs to lead Central Falls to an 8-2
Metro Division win over Davies.
Desautel added a two-run double for
four RBI, while Sawyer’s blast and a
run-scoring single accounted for two
runs. Jack Lavoie pounded a solo
dinger and Bob Hymers an RBI double
for two of the six hits off Jimmy Siwy
who struck out 11 and did not issue a
walk in his first varsity start.
1975
– By Bill Mulholland
grams that protect and promote the Blackstone
Valley.
Visit www.golfblackstone.com to sign up, become
a tournament sponsor, or for more information.
June 23-30
Cumberland Parks & Recreation holds
beginner golf clinics for kids, adults
CUMBERLAND — The Cumberland Parks &
Recreation Department will conduct beginner golf
clinics for children ages 6-15 and adults at
Wentworth Hills Country Club in Plainville, Mass.
The children’s clinics consist of four one-hour lessons, held Tuesday through Friday, June 23-26.
Each lesson will focus on a different swing skill.
Children will also learn the basics of golf safety, golf
etiquette, and respect for the game. The cost of
each children’s clinic is $109.
The adult clinics also consist of four one-hour lessons, each spaced one week apart (the same day
and time for four weeks), that will start on Tuesday,
June 30.
Each lesson will focus on a specific part of the
game, and at the end of each clinic, adults will have
knowledge of the basic fundamentals, such as how
to use a full swing with irons and woods, and “short
game” skills (pitching, chipping and putting). The
cost of each adult clinic is $159.
The instructor for the clinics is Barrie Bruce, a
PGA teaching professional from the Barrie Bruce
Golf Schools.
Equipment and practice balls will be provided. All
participants need are a pair of sneakers and a good
attitude.
Call the Parks and Recreation Department at (401)
334-9996 for more details or to reserve your space
in any of the clinics.
Spring/Ongoing
Cumberland has openings for fall coaches
at high school, middle school levels
CUMBERLAND — The Cumberland School
Department is looking to fill six head coaching
vacancies (five high school and one middle school)
for the 2015 fall season.
Cumberland High is in need of coaches for its varsity and junior varsity field hockey, varsity and junior
girls’ varsity tennis, and varsity cheerleading teams.
McCourt Middle School is in search of a boys’ soccer coach.
Those interested should visit
www.schoolspring.com to apply for these positions.
For additional information on any of the positions,
contact Cumberland High athletic director Chris
Tashjian via email at [email protected] or call 401-658-1600, ext. 343.
SPORTS
Thursday, May 14, 2015
THE TIMES B3
Photos by Jerry Silberman | RISportsphoto.com
Cumberland’s Nichole Barger, above, won the
800 and the 1,500 meters, and Madison
Soullier, right, captured both hurdling events
at the Northern Division Championships on
Wednesday at Cranston West.
Meet
Continued from page B1
the field in the 800 (2:27.50)
and the 1,500 (5:00.10).
Heading to URI in the fall to
run track and cross country,
Barger was also part of the
winning 4x400-meter relay.
Cumberland junior
Madison Soullier ruled both
hurdle events, winning the
100 by exactly a full second
while her time in the 300 was
more than two seconds better
than her closest rival. Like
Barger, Soullier was also on
the 4x400.
Cumberland junior Amy
Tolman
Continued from page B1
junior Gabby Gallone (1-for4, two runs).
The righty Conca also
earned the triumph in relief,
yielding five hits and a run
(earned) while whiffing one
in 2 1/3 frames.
Sophomore righthander
Hannah Caliri accepted the
loss, despite not feeling well
since Tuesday afternoon. She
went 3 2/3, allowing seven
hits, six runs (three earned)
with a two “freebies” and a
strikeout.
Caliri had opened the
game with three straight outs,
but Jackson led the second
with a walloped dinger over
the center-field fence.
Mitchell immediately ripped
an opposite-field hit to right,
took second on Swanholm’s
sacrifice bunt and scored on
Ainsley Burns’ ground single
to center to gain a 2-0 lead.
La Salle added another in
the third after DuPerry
whacked a double down the
left-field stripe, tagged to
third on Jackson’s foul out
and scored on Mitchell’s hit
up the middle.
Swanholm, the senior
starter in the circle, had
retired nine of 10 through the
first three frames, but the
Tigers roared back to knot it
at 3-3 in the fourth. With one
out, senior Cristin Chiaverini
delivered a single to center,
classmate Megan
Klemanchuck (2-for-3) roped
another to left and both
moved up on a wild pitch.
Chiaverini scored on junior
Kaitlyn Clement’s sacrifice
fly, and after Caliri was hit by
a pitch, classmate Kaylee
Moline-Vaz hammered a
ground single to left. On the
hit, Klemanchuck scored with
ease, but outfielder Jess
Howkins over threw home
plate, allowing Caliri to scamper to third.
Hope Caliri then knocked
a grounder to third, one that
went for an infield miscue,
and her sister scored to enact
the tie.
The Tigers nevertheless
stranded a pair in scoring
position. That would come
back to haunt them.
The Rams didn’t take long
to answer with three of their
own in the fourth. Senior
Ariana Wells drew a one-out
walk, and courtesy runner
Allie Forand moved to second
on Burns’ groundout. Gallone
followed with a hit to left,
and Moretti crushed a liner to
right.
It had appeared sophomore
Jessica Potter had a beat on it,
Laverty won the 3,000 by
nearly three minutes and also
came in second in the 1,500.
Woonsocket’s top performer was Quinn Harlan.
The speedy sophomore took
home gold honors in the 100and 200-meter dashes. Harlan
also placed third in the long
jump.
Villa Novan senior Tara
Rochefort earned secondplace finishes in the discus
and the hammer. Lincoln
sophomore Samantha
Andrews was the only person
to break 100 feet in the discus
as her throw of 108 feet, 10
inches was more than good
but it clipped off her glove,
and the two-base error plated
both Forand and Gallone.
DuPerry’s single to left
pushed across Moretti for the
6-3 advantage.
Larson opened the top of
the fifth with a stroked hit to
left and hustled to third on
Wilson’s opposite-field single
down the right-field line.
Larson, though, tried to score
on it, and was thrown out at
the plate as Wilson galloped
into second. She eventually
scored on Klemanchuck’s hit
up the middle to cut it to 6-4.
The hosts had another
opportunity to extend the lead
in the back half, after
Mitchell singled and Conca
reached on sophomore pitcher
Megan Salzillo’s throwing
miscue. Immediately after,
Howkins drilled a grounder to
third, but Clement stepped on
the bag, then threw to first to
pull off the twin-killing.
Wells then walked, and
Burns whistled a sinking
drive to the left-center hole,
but Hope Caliri made a spectacular diving snag to end the
possible flurry.
It looked as if Tolman
would manufacture one of its
own in the sixth, but only
controversy ensued. Salzillo
beat out an infield hit, and
took second after Hope Caliri
reached on an outfield
dropped fly.
Junior Emily Truesdale
then lofted a bunt to Conca in
the circle, one she dropped,
but Conca recovered and
enough to collect top honors.
Follow Brendan McGair
on Twitter @BWMcGair03
NORTHERN DIVISION CHAMPIONSHIPS
GIRLS
Wednesday – At Cranston West
High School
Team scores
1, Smithfield 197; 2, Cumberland
145; 3, Cranston West 91.5; 4,
Woonsocket 44; 5, Mount St.
Charles 26; 6, Lincoln 23.5; 7,
Burrillville 13; Cranston East 11; 9,
Ponaganset 5; 10, Scituate 2.
Local placements
100: 1, Quinn Harlan (Woonsocket)
12.10
200: 1, Harlan 26.30
400: 1, Meaghan Scullin
(Cumberland 59.70
800: 1, Nichole Barger
threw out Salzillo at third.
Giarrusso quickly argued that
the call should’ve fallen
under the “infield fly rule,” as
the Tigers had runners at first
and second, but that went for
naught.
Larson later singled to load
the bags, but Wilson popped
out to second to end it.
“The home-plate ump
called for the infield fly rule,
but the base umpire didn’t
hear him – and didn’t think it
merited the infield fly,”
Giarrusso sighed. “They said
that was one of irreversible
calls according to the rule
book, meaning – instead of
having runners at second and
third – we had to go back to
having Hope at second and
Emily at first.
“The next kid (Larson) singled, but we got nothing out
of it,” he added. “We
could’ve had at least two
more.”
The Rams managed three
more in the bottom of the
sixth on Mitchell’s two-run
single, and she came in when
Howkins reached on a
dropped fly in left.
“I don’t feel like we got
robbed,” Giarrusso said afterward. “Like I said, La Salle’s
a really good team. We have
to do a better job in the field.”
Tolman
000 310
0
-- 4 – 8 – 4
La Salle
021 303
x
-- 9 – 10 – 4
Hannah Caliri, Megan Salzillo (4)
and Megan Klemanchuck. Brianna
Swanholm, Gabby Conca (4) and
River Glenn. 2B – Brenna DuPerry.
HR – Kendall Jackson.
(Cumberland) 2:27.50; 2, Colleen
Enestvedt (Cumberland) 2:31.20.
1,500: 1, Barger 5:00.10; 2, Amy
Laverty (Cumberland) 5:00.90.
3,000: 1, Amy Laverty 11:00.70.
100 hurdles: 1, Madison Soullier
(Cumberland) 15.80.
300 hurdles: 1, Soullier 49.10.
4x100 relay: 3, Lincoln (Emily
Jacobson, Brianna Walters, Christin
Redding, Nicole Carpenter) 52.60.
4x400: 1, Cumberland (Barger,
Enestvedt, Soullier, Rebecca
Khimation) 4:18.90; 3, Mount St.
Charles (Marina Schmid, Caroline
Adler, Faye Cournoyer, Claire
Albright) 4:31.30.
4x800: 2, Mount St. Charles (Stella
Noecker, Cournoyer, Sidney
Mackinnon, Albright) 10:29.00.
High jump: 1, Scullin 5-1; 3,
Carpenter 4-7.
Long jump: 2, Scullin 16-10 ¾; 3,
Harlan 16-8 ¼.
Triple jump: 1, Scullin 35-05.25.
Discus: 1, Samantha Andrews
(Lincoln) 108-10; 2, Tara Rochefort
(Woonsocket) 99-10.
Hammer: 2, Rochefort 135-6; 3,
Amanda Taft (Woonsocket) 123-1.
READER’S REWARDS
GET YOUR NAME IN THE HAT
Enter to win 4 tickets to:
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2015 General Admission
Ticket Vouchers
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ENTRY FORM: Pawsox
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City:_______________________________________State:______
Phone Number:_________________________________________
Must be 18 years old to enter.
Entries must be received by
Wednesday, June 10, 2015 at
noon. Winners will be posted
in The Call & The Times on
Thursday, June 11, 2015.
No Purchase Necessary. Employees of The
Call & The Times and their families are
not eligible.
Please mail or drop off entry form or 3x5 index card to:
The Call - Reader’s Rewards
75 Main St., Woon., RI 02895
OR
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23 Exchange St., Pawt., RI 02860
Visit www.pawsox.com for more information
Free Pic of the Day
Photo Give-A-Way
If your child’s name appears in the Pic of the Day you are welcome to receive
FREE photo reproductions of the Pic of the Day. Call Diane Ames at 401-7678505 to request your Pic of the Day photo set and you will receive one 8”x10”
and two 5”x7” photos as a free gift from Navigant Credit Union. Please give us
the date that your Pic of the Day ran in the paper.
Additional photos can be ordered at a cost of
$8.00 each for one 8”x10” or two 5”x7”
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Please leave your order quantities and contact information when you call. You will be called when your
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B4 THE TIMES
SPORTS
Baseball
SPORTS ON THE AIR
Mount’s Seaver earns
300th coaching victory
WOONSOCKET – Mount
St. Charles Academy head
coach Tom Seaver hit a
once-in-a-lifetime milestone
on Wednesday with win
number 300 of his varsity
baseball coaching career, as
the Mounties easily handled
North Smithfield 10-1.
Seaver has coached the
varsity at Mount for 23
years, the better part of his
36 years as a high school
baseball coach.
“If you hang around long
enough and get some great
players, then good things
happen,” he said of the milestone.
And his players this year
have been as successful as
any in recent years, as they
earned their 12th win on the
season, powered by a superb
mound outing by Alex
Lataille, who threw six
innings, giving up just one
run and four hits, with two
walks and three strikeouts.
The Mountie offense was
on their game as well, with
15 hits on the day. Leading
the attack were Kevin
Valentine, with three hits,
including a double and three
runs, and Lataille, who went
3-for-4 with a triple, two
runs and two RBI.
John Montani went 2-for3 with a triple and an RBI,
while Tate Laquerre was 2for-3 with a double, run
scored and an RBI.
The Mounties will look to
bring Seaver win number
301 when they play at
Scituate next Tuesday. North
Smithfield fell to 4-7 on the
season.
N Smithfield
000 001 0 1-4-0
Mount St.
005 104 x 10-15-1
Ian Pascoe (6), Matt Ethier and
Josh Labonte; Alex Lataille (7)
Kevin Valentine and Justin
D’Abrosca
Narragansett 000 000 0 0-6-1
Tolman 012 301 0 7-13-0
Max Laurie, (4) London Sudduth
(6) Connor Barry and Austin Butler;
Peter Microulis and Ricky
Bourdeau
RICHARD ROSENBLATT
AP Racing Writer
BALTIMORE (AP) —
Bob Baffert can only hope the
finish of the Preakness Stakes
turns out better than the postposition draw.
The trainer watched in disbelief Wednesday as his
Kentucky Derby winner
American Pharoah drew the
dreaded No. 1 post position
for Saturday's second leg of
the Triple Crown. A moment
later, his other entry,
Dortmund, was saddled with
the No. 2 post.
A 1-2 punch he could do
without after American
Pharoah was made the 4-5
morning-line favorite and
Dortmund the 7-2 second
choice in an eight-horse field.
It's the smallest field for the 1
3/16-mile Preakness since
2000, when Red Bullet upset
Derby winner Fusaichi
Pegasus.
"I can't believe I drew the
1-2 of all draws," a somewhat
disappointed Baffert said, noting that if American Pharoah
is the best horse, "we're going
to find out.
"It's the luck of the draw. I
don't love it, but it will be
easy to watch."
Justin Zayat, the son of
American Pharoah owner
Ahmed Zayat and general
manager of Zayat Stables,
chimed in on Twitter: "The
champ will just have to work
for it from the rail. I have
faith in AP."
Baffert has never liked the
No. 1 post, and history backs
him up. The last horse to win
the Preakness from the inside
post was Tabasco Cat in
1994; the last to win it from
the No. 2 post was Snow
Chief in 1986.
Baffert has 10 wins in
Triple Crown races, and none
started from the rail. Two
weeks ago at the Derby draw,
Baffert clapped his hands to
his mouth after waiting until
near the end of the draw
before avoiding the No. 1 post
for American Pharoah and
having him draw No. 18.
Dortmund wound up with the
No. 8 post.
"It's kind of a different
vibe here," Baffert said, referring to a field less than half
the size of the 18-horse Derby
and a track that tends to be
AUTO RACING
3 p.m.
7 p.m.
FS1 — NASCAR, Truck Series, practice for
NC Education Lottery 200, at Concord,
N.C.
FS1 — NASCAR, Truck Series, final practice for NC Education Lottery 200, at
Concord, N.C.
CYCLING
5 p.m.
NBCSN — Tour of California, Stage 5,
Santa Barbara to Santa Clarita
GOLF
5:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Spanish
Open, first round, part I, at Girona, Spain
9:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Spanish
Open, first round, part II, at Girona, Spain
12:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, The Tradition,
first round, at Birmingham, Ala.
3 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, Wells Fargo
Championship, first round, at Charlotte,
N.C.
7 p.m.
TGC — Web.com Tour, BMW Charity ProAm, first round, at Greer, S.C. (same-day
tape)
9 p.m.
TGC — LPGA, Kingsmill Championship,
first round, at Williamsburg, Va. (same-day
tape)
HOCKEY
9 a.m.
NBCSN — IIHF, World Championship,
quarterfinals, at Prague or Ostrava, Czech
Republic
11:30 a.m. NBCSN — IIHF, World Championship,
quarterfinals, at Prague or Ostrava, Czech
Republic
11:30 p.m. NBCSN — IIHF, World Championship,
quarterfinals, at Prague or Ostrava, Czech
Republic (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
MLB — Regional coverage, Minnesota at
Detroit or Pittsburgh at Philadelphia
7 p.m.
MLB — Regional coverage, San Francisco
at Cincinnati or N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay
10:10 p.m. NESN, WEEI (103.7 FM) — Boston at
Seattle
MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7:05 p.m. WHJJ (920 AM) — Columbus at Pawtucket
NBA
8 p.m.
ESPN — Playoffs, conference semifinals,
Game 6, Cleveland at Chicago
10:30 p.m. ESPN — Playoffs, conference semifinals,
Game 6, Houston at L.A. Clippers
TRANSACTIONS
Derby winner American Pharoah
has dreaded rail for Preakness
quicker than Churchill
Downs. "But unless they redraw it, we'll have to live with
it."
If American Pharoah wins,
it would set up Baffert for an
unprecedented fourth Triple
Crown try. The last Triple
Crown winner was Affirmed
in 1978.
Derby runner-up Firing
Line was the third choice at
4-1, followed by Divining
Rod (12-1), Danzig Moon
(15-1), Mr. Z (20-1),
Bodhisattva (20-1) and Tale
of Verve (30-1).
"We've got options from
out there," Firing Line's trainer Simon Callaghan said. "It's
perfect. We're happy."
The first three Derby finishers arrived at Pimlico Race
Course about 2 1/2 hours
before the post-position draw.
After Baffert walked his horses around the stakes barn,
they settled down in stalls 29
and 30. Traditionally, the
Derby winner is housed in
stall No. 40.
Baffert had his reasons for
the switch.
"There's a crowd at the end
there," he said of the stall
where media tend to gather
and the horse can be clearly
viewed. "The noise sort of
gets to them a little bit, so I'm
just trying to keep him and
Dortmund together."
He said the horses shipped
well from Louisville,
Kentucky.
"He was revved up,"
Baffert said of American
Pharoah. "His motor I can just
feel, shut down. He's a very
intelligent horse. This was
just a routine walk, a new
place and he settled in well."
American Pharoah, to be
ridden again by Victor
Espinoza, comes into the
Preakness with five impressive wins in a row, two last
year to be voted 2-year-old
champion and three this year,
in the Rebel, the Arkansas
Derby and then the Kentucky
Derby.
Dortmund, with Martin
Garcia aboard, is looking to
avenge the only defeat of his
career. He won his first six
races before the Derby. Firing
Line, with Gary Stevens looking for his second Preakness
win in three years, has finished first or second in all six
of his races.
More SPORTS, Page B7
TODAY
Tolman shuts out
Narragansett
PAWTUCKET –
Tolman’s pitching and
defense led them to their
second straight shutout victory on Wednesday, as they
defeated Narragansett 7-0 at
home.
Tigers starter Peter
Microulis went seven
innings, scattering six hits,
walked three and struck out
one. Head coach Theo
Murray praised his team’s
glovework in keeping the
Mariners off the scoreboard,
especially the left side of his
infield – senior shortstop
Steve Otis and freshman
Kyle Depatie, who manned
the hot corner.
“The defense today was
fantastic,” said Murray.
“Peter is a contact pitcher
who gets ground balls and
we made all the plays
today.”
Tolman was also effective
at the plate, led by Ricky
Bourdeau’s three hits, two
RBI and one run scored.
Depatie also notched three
hits and drove in one. Also
hitting safely twice were
Otis amd Jeremy Medina.
Medina also scored twice
and drove in a run.
The Tigers improved to
10-3 in league play, one
game behind second-place
Mount St. Charles in the loss
column. On Friday they’ll
face Mt. Pleasant at Slater
Park.
Thursday, May 14, 2015
Wednesday’s Sports Transactions
The Associated Press
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Placed RHP
Jason Garcia on the 15-day DL, retroactive
to Monday. Recalled RHP Mike Wright from
Norfolk (IL).
HOUSTON ASTROS — Optioned LHP Kevin
Chapman and OF Robbie Grossman to
Fresno (PCL). Reinstated OF George
Springer from the 7-day DL and LHP Brett
Oberholtzer from the 15-day DL.
MINNESOTA TWINS — Sent RHP Tim
Stauffer to Rochester (IL) for a rehab assignment.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES — Agreed to terms with C
Wil Nieves on a minor league contract and
assigned him to Gwinnett (IL).
CINCINNATI REDS — Optioned RHP Carlos
Contreras to Louisville (IL). Recalled RHP
Raisel Iglesias from Louisville. Claimed RHP
Ryan Mattheus off waivers from the L.A.
Angels.
MIAMI MARLINS — Sent RHP Henderson
Alvarez to Jupiter (FSL) for a rehab assignment.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Reinstated RHP
Sean O’Sullivan from the 15-day DL.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Sent RHP
Casey Janssen to Harrisburg (EL) for a
rehab assignment.
American Association
AMARILLO THUNDERHEADS — Signed
LHP Clayton Tanner.
LAREDO LEMURS — Released LHP Dayne
Quist and LHP Luke Goodgion.
Can-Am League
ROCKLAND BOULDERS — Signed OF Bill
Miller.
TROIS-RIVIERES AIGLES — Signed INF
Danny Mateo and RHP David Leblanc.
Frontier League
SCHAUMBURG BOOMERS — Traded RHP
Anthony Smith to Winnipeg (AA) for a player
to be named.
BASKETBALL
Women’s National Basketball Association
CONNECTICUT SUN — Traded exclusive
negotiating rights to F Asjha Jones to
Minnesota for a 2016 second-round draft
pick.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS — Released FB Corey
Knox. Signed FB John Conner.
DETROIT LIONS — Signed RB Ameer
Abdullah to a four-year contract and CB
Chris Owens and WR Greg Salas. Released
WR Skye Dawson.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Signed WR
Neal Sterling.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Named Dwayne
Joseph director of pro personnel.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS — Signed LBs
Denzel Perryman and Kyle Emanuel, CB
Craig Mager and DL Darius Philon.
TENNESSEE TITANS — Agreed to terms
with DT Angelo Blackson, LB Deiontrez
Mount, C Andy Gallik and WR Tre McBride.
Canadian Football League
TORONTO ARGONAUTS — Signed LB
Brandon Isaac, WR Jarvis West, DL Martez
Wilson and RBs Akeem Daniels and Lyle
McCombs. Released DB David Sims and
WRs Mike Davis, Mike Thomas, Anthony
McClung and Darryl Surgent.
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS — Signed OL
Sukh Chungh.
MOTORSPORTS
INDYCAR — Docked driver Helio
Castroneves eight points for causing a wreck
during the opening lap of last weekend’s
Grand Prix of Indianapolis.
OLYMPIC SPORTS
USA GYMNASTICS — Named Luan Peszek
vice president of program development.
SOCCER
FIFA — Banned former vice president
Reynald Temarii eight years for ethical violations.
COLLEGE
FLORIDA — Announced QB Skyler
Mornhinweg has left the program and will
transfer to Columbia. Announced CB J.C.
Jackson is no longer enrolled in school following an arrest charging him with three
counts of armed robbery stemming from an
April 18 incident in Gainesville.
LE MOYNE — Promoted men’s basketball
coach Steve Evans to associate director of
athletics.
OKLAHOMA — Announced RB Keith Ford is
transferring.
SIENA — Announced the retirement of men’s
tennis coach Jim Serbalik.
TEXAS TECH — Named Neil Payne assistant
soccer coach. Promoted Gibbs Keeton to
soccer recruiting coordinator.
MLS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts
New England
5 2 3 18
D.C. United
5 1 3 18
New York
4 1 4 16
Columbus
4 3 2 14
Toronto FC
3 5 0 9
Chicago
3 5 0 9
Orlando City
2 4 3 9
New York City FC 1 6 3 6
Philadelphia
1 7 3 6
Montreal
0 3 2 2
GF
14
11
14
15
12
7
8
7
10
3
GA
10
7
9
10
13
10
12
12
21
8
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Vancouver
6 3 2 20 14
9
FC Dallas
6 2 2 20 17 13
Seattle
5 3 1 16 15
9
San Jose
4 4 2 14 10 11
Kansas City
3 2 5 14 13 13
Los Angeles
3 3 5 14 11 11
Real Salt Lake
3 2 5 14 9
11
Portland
3 3 4 13 9
9
Houston
3 4 4 13 13 14
Colorado
1 2 7 10 9
9NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for
tie.
Wednesday’s Games
Orlando City at D.C. United, 8 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Chicago at New York City FC, 7 p.m.
New York at FC Dallas, 9 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Real Salt Lake at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Seattle at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
Toronto FC at New England, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
Portland at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Columbus at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Los Angeles at Orlando City, 5 p.m.
D.C. United at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, May 20
New England at Sporting Kansas City, 8 p.m.
Friday, May 22
Chicago at Columbus, 8 p.m.
Houston at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 23
Portland at Toronto FC, 5 p.m.
D.C. United at New England, 7:30 p.m.
FC Dallas at Montreal, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Seattle, 10 p.m.
New York City FC at Real Salt Lake, 10 p.m.
Sunday, May 24
Philadelphia at New York, 5 p.m.
Orlando City at San Jose, 7 p.m.
THIS DAY IN SPORTS
The Associated Press
Compiled By PAUL MONTELLA
May 14
1913 — Washington’s Walter Johnson gives
up a run in the fourth inning against the St.
Louis Browns to end his streak of 56 scoreless innings. The Senators win 10-5.
1919 — Four days after his Kentucky Derby
victory, Sir Barton, ridden by Johnny Loftus,
wins the Preakness Stakes by four lengths
over Eternal.
1920 — Walter Johnson of the Washington
Senators records his 300th victory with a 9-8
win over the Detroit Tigers.
1967 — Mickey Mantle’s 500th home run, off
Stu Miller, lifts the New York Yankees to a 6-5
victory over the Baltimore Orioles.
1977 — The Montreal Canadiens edge the
Boston Bruins 2-1 to win the Stanley Cup in
four games.
1981 — The Boston Celtics win the NBA
championship with a 102-91 victory over the
Houston Rockets in Game 6.
1993 — Billy Mayfair shoots a 61, the 11thbest score in PGA Tour history, in the Byron
Nelson Classic.
1995 — Kelly Robbins overcomes a threeshot deficit in the final seven holes to win the
LPGA Championship by a stroke over defending champion Laura Davies.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
New York
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Boston
Baltimore
Central Division
W
Kansas City
Detroit
Minnesota
Chicago
Cleveland
West Division
W
Houston
Los Angeles
Seattle
Texas
Oakland
W
21
18
17
15
14
L
13
16
17
18
17
W
L
21
20
18
13
11
L
Pct
12
13
15
17
20
W
L
20
16
15
14
13
L
Pct
13
17
17
19
22
East Division
GB WCGB L10
—
—
6-4
3
½
5-5
4
1½
6-4
5½
3
3-7
5½
3
4-6
Central Division
Pct WCGB
GB WCGB
L10
GB
L10
Str
.636
—
—
5-5
.606
1
—
5-5
.545
3
—
7-3
.433 6½
3½
5-5
.355
9
6
4-6
West Division
Pct WCGB
GB WCGB
L10
GB
L10
Str
.606
—
—
4-6
.485
4
2
5-5
.469 4½
2½
5-5
.424
6
4
6-4
.371
8
6
3-7
Pct
.618
.529
.500
.455
.452
Str
L-1
W-1
W-1
L-1
L-1
Home
9-7
10-11
9-7
7-9
7-5
Away
12-6
8-5
8-10
8-9
7-12
Str
Home
Home
Away
W-1
11-5
W-1
10-7
L-2
12-5
W-1
10-5
L-1
5-11
Away
10-7
10-6
6-10
3-12
6-9
Str
Home
Home
Away
L-2
8-9
W-2
9-9
W-4
9-7
L-1
4-10
W-1
5-10
Away
12-4
7-8
6-10
10-9
8-12
:::
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W
L
W
New York
20
Washington
18
Atlanta
15
Miami
15
Philadelphia
11
Central Division
W
W
L
St. Louis
23
Chicago
17
Pittsburgh
17
Cincinnati
16
Milwaukee
12
West Division
W
W
L
Los Angeles
22
San Francisco
17
San Diego
17
Arizona
15
Colorado
11
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Pct
L
13
16
18
19
23
L
Pct
9
15
16
17
22
L
Pct
10
16
17
17
18
East Division
GB
L10
Pct WCGB
GB WCGB
.606
—
—
.529 2½
—
.455
5
2½
.441 5½
3
.324 9½
7
Central Division
Pct WCGB
GB WCGB
GB
L10
.719
—
—
.531
6
—
.515 6½
½
.485 7½
1½
.353
12
6
West Division
Pct
GB
WCGB
GB WCGB L10
.688
—
—
.515 5½
½
.500
6
1
.469
7
2
.379 9½
4½
Str
L10
5-5
8-2
4-6
3-7
3-7
Home
Away
Str
Home
L-2
13-3
L-1
10-6
L-1
8-8
L-3
8-7
L-4
7-10
Away
7-10
8-10
7-10
7-12
4-13
L10
Str
7-3
4-6
5-5
5-5
6-4
Str
Home
Home
Away
W-1
14-3
W-2
9-7
W-4
9-7
W-1
7-6
L-1
8-14
Away
9-6
8-8
8-9
9-11
4-8
L10
Str
Home
Str Home
Away
8-2
W-5
15-2
7-3
W-2
11-9
5-5
L-2
9-7
5-5
W-1
9-11
0-10 L-10
4-9
Away
7-8
6-7
8-10
6-6
7-9
MLB SCHEDULE
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Tuesday’s Games
St. Louis 8, Cleveland 3
Toronto 10, Baltimore 2
Detroit 2, Minnesota 1, 10 innings
Tampa Bay 4, N.Y. Yankees 2
Kansas City 7, Texas 6, 10 innings
Chicago White Sox 4, Milwaukee 2
San Francisco 8, Houston 1
Oakland 9, Boston 2
L.A. Angels 5, Colorado 2
Seattle 11, San Diego 4
Wednesday’s Games
Boston at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
St. Louis at Cleveland, 6:10 p.m.
Toronto at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 7:08 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Houston, 8:10 p.m.
Colorado at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
San Diego at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
St. Louis (Wacha 5-0) at Cleveland (Bauer 21), 12:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Pelfrey 3-0) at Detroit (An.Sanchez
2-4), 1:08 p.m.
Kansas City (Guthrie 2-2) at Texas (Detwiler 04), 2:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Whitley 1-1) at Tampa Bay
(E.Ramirez 0-1), 7:10 p.m.
Toronto (Hutchison 3-0) at Houston
(R.Hernandez 1-3), 8:10 p.m.
Boston (J.Kelly 1-2) at Seattle (Elias 0-1),
10:10 p.m.
Friday’s Games
L.A. Angels at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Toronto at Houston, 8:10 p.m.
Detroit at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Boston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Tuesday’s Games
St. Louis 8, Cleveland 3
Pittsburgh 7, Philadelphia 2
Cincinnati 4, Atlanta 3
Chicago Cubs 6, N.Y. Mets 1
Chicago White Sox 4, Milwaukee 2
San Francisco 8, Houston 1
Arizona 14, Washington 6
L.A. Angels 5, Colorado 2
L.A. Dodgers 11, Miami 1
Seattle 11, San Diego 4
Wednesday’s Games
Washington at Arizona, 3:40 p.m.
St. Louis at Cleveland, 6:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Miami at L.A. Dodgers, 7:50 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Houston, 8:10 p.m.
Colorado at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
San Diego at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
St. Louis (Wacha 5-0) at Cleveland (Bauer 21), 12:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Worley 2-2) at Philadelphia
(Harang 3-3), 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Niese 3-2) at Chicago Cubs
(T.Wood 2-2), 2:20 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 3-2) at Cincinnati
(Cueto 3-3), 7:10 p.m.
Colorado (E.Butler 2-3) at L.A. Dodgers
(B.Anderson 2-1), 10:10 p.m.
Washington (Fister 2-1) at San Diego (T.Ross
1-3), 10:10 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Arizona at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Detroit at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Washington at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.
AL LEADERS
By The Associated Press
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Through May 12
BATTING: NCruz, Seattle, .349; AJones,
Baltimore, .347; Brantley, Cleveland, .347;
Ellsbury, New York, .346; Reddick, Oakland,
.346; Vogt, Oakland, .337; Fielder, Texas,
.333.
RUNS: Donaldson, Toronto, 27; Ellsbury,
New York, 26; KMorales, Kansas City, 26;
Trout, Los Angeles, 26; Dozier, Minnesota,
25; Gardner, New York, 24; Travis, Toronto,
24.
RBI: Vogt, Oakland, 30; NCruz, Seattle, 29;
Hosmer, Kansas City, 27; Teixeira, New York,
27; KMorales, Kansas City, 25; Reddick,
Oakland, 25; Travis, Toronto, 25.
HITS: Altuve, Houston, 45; Ellsbury, New
York, 45; NCruz, Seattle, 44; Fielder, Texas,
44; Donaldson, Toronto, 43; Hosmer, Kansas
City, 42; Semien, Oakland, 42.
DOUBLES: Cespedes, Detroit, 12; Cano,
Seattle, 11; KMorales, Kansas City, 11;
Dozier, Minnesota, 10; Pillar, Toronto, 10; 11
tied at 9.
TRIPLES: Orlando, Kansas City, 5; Fuld,
Oakland, 3; 16 tied at 2.
HOME RUNS: NCruz, Seattle, 15; Teixeira,
New York, 11; HRamirez, Boston, 10; Trout,
Los Angeles, 9; Vogt, Oakland, 9; CDavis,
Baltimore, 8; Donaldson, Toronto, 8;
ARodriguez, New York, 8.
STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 11;
Ellsbury, New York, 11; Gardner, New York,
10; Springer, Houston, 10; DeShields, Texas,
9; Marisnick, Houston, 9; RDavis, Detroit, 8.
PITCHING: FHernandez, Seattle, 6-0;
Pineda, New York, 5-0; Buehrle, Toronto, 52; Gray, Oakland, 4-0; Betances, New York,
4-0; Keuchel, Houston, 4-0; Simon, Detroit,
4-1; McHugh, Houston, 4-1; Salazar,
Cleveland, 4-1; Carrasco, Cleveland, 4-3.
ERA: Keuchel, Houston, 1.39; Gray,
Oakland, 1.65; FHernandez, Seattle, 1.85;
NMartinez, Texas, 1.88; Odorizzi, Tampa Bay,
2.09; Lewis, Texas, 2.40; UJimenez,
Baltimore, 2.41.
STRIKEOUTS: Archer, Tampa Bay, 58;
Pineda, New York, 54; FHernandez, Seattle,
50; Salazar, Cleveland, 48; Kluber,
Cleveland, 46; Gray, Oakland, 44; Kazmir,
Oakland, 43; Buchholz, Boston, 43.
SAVES: AMiller, New York, 13; Perkins,
Minnesota, 11; Soria, Detroit, 11; Street, Los
Angeles, 11; Rodney, Seattle, 9; Boxberger,
Tampa Bay, 9; Britton, Baltimore, 7;
Gregerson, Houston, 7.
NL LEADERS
By The Associated Press
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Through May 12
BATTING: DGordon, Miami, .412; AGonzalez,
Los Angeles, .372; Holliday, St. Louis, .346;
LeMahieu, Colorado, .340; MCarpenter, St.
Louis, .336; YEscobar, Washington, .336;
Pagan, San Francisco, .333; Freeman,
Atlanta, .333; Goldschmidt, Arizona, .333.
RUNS: Harper, Washington, 29; Myers, San
Diego, 28; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 26;
AGonzalez, Los Angeles, 26; MCarpenter, St.
Louis, 25; Simmons, Atlanta, 25; Freeman,
Atlanta, 24; Rizzo, Chicago, 24.
RBI: Harper, Washington, 31; AGonzalez, Los
Angeles, 30; Stanton, Miami, 30;
Goldschmidt, Arizona, 27; Zimmerman,
Washington, 25; Marte, Pittsburgh, 24;
Upton, San Diego, 24.
HITS: DGordon, Miami, 54; AGonzalez, Los
Angeles, 45; Freeman, Atlanta, 42; Pagan,
San Francisco, 42; YEscobar, Washington,
39; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 39; Myers, San
Diego, 39.
DOUBLES: MCarpenter, St. Louis, 15;
AGonzalez, Los Angeles, 15; Freeman,
Atlanta, 14; DeNorris, San Diego, 14;
Tulowitzki, Colorado, 13; 7 tied at 10.
TRIPLES: Revere, Philadelphia, 3; Trumbo,
Arizona, 3; 19 tied at 2.
HOME RUNS: Harper, Washington, 12;
Frazier, Cincinnati, 11; Goldschmidt, Arizona,
9; AGonzalez, Los Angeles, 9; Pederson, Los
Angeles, 9; Marte, Pittsburgh, 8; Stanton,
Miami, 8; Upton, San Diego, 8.
STOLEN BASES: Hamilton, Cincinnati, 17;
DGordon, Miami, 12; Polanco, Pittsburgh,
10; Aoki, San Francisco, 9; Fowler, Chicago,
8; Rizzo, Chicago, 7; Upton, San Diego, 7.
PITCHING: BColon, New York, 6-1; Greinke,
Los Angeles, 5-0; Wacha, St. Louis, 5-0;
GCole, Pittsburgh, 5-1; Harvey, New York, 51; 6 tied at 4.
ERA: Greinke, Los Angeles, 1.52; SMiller,
Atlanta, 1.60; Burnett, Pittsburgh, 1.60;
Niese, New York, 1.95; Scherzer,
Washington, 1.99; Lincecum, San Francisco,
2.00; Wacha, St. Louis, 2.09.
STRIKEOUTS: Kershaw, Los Angeles, 56;
Scherzer, Washington, 55; Shields, San
Diego, 55; Lynn, St. Louis, 51; Fiers,
Milwaukee, 49; Arrieta, Chicago, 48; TRoss,
San Diego, 48.
SAVES: Familia, New York, 13; Rosenthal, St.
Louis, 11; Grilli, Atlanta, 9; Kimbrel, San
Diego, 9; Storen, Washington, 9; Melancon,
Pittsburgh, 8; Casilla, San Francisco, 8.
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
North Division
W L
Pawtucket (Red Sox)
20 14
Rochester (Twins)
18 14
Buffalo (Blue Jays)
17 15
Scranton/WB (Yankees) 16 18
Syracuse (Nationals)
14 18
Lehigh Valley (Phillies) 10 24
Pct. GB
.588
—
.563
1
.531
2
.471
4
.438
5
.294 10
South Division
W L
Charlotte (White Sox)
19 13
Durham (Rays)
19 14
Norfolk (Orioles)
19 14
Gwinnett (Braves)
15 17
Pct. GB
.594
—
.576
½
.576
½
.469
4
West Division
W L
Columbus (Indians)
19 14
Indianapolis (Pirates)
19 15
Louisville (Reds)
13 20
Toledo (Tigers)
12 20
Pct. GB
.576
—
.559 ½
.394
6
.375 6½
Wednesday’s Games
Columbus 3, Lehigh Valley 2, 12 innings
Charlotte 5, Louisville 4, 10 innings
Norfolk 3, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 1
Indianapolis 6, Pawtucket 0
Rochester 1, Toledo 0
Durham at Buffalo, 6:05 p.m.
Syracuse at Gwinnett, 6:35 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Syracuse at Gwinnett, 10:35 a.m.
Toledo at Buffalo, 6:05 p.m.
Norfolk at Indianapolis, 7:05 p.m.
Louisville at Charlotte, 7:05 p.m.
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre at Durham, 7:05 p.m.
Columbus at Pawtucket, 7:05 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Louisville at Gwinnett, 7:05 p.m.
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre at Durham, 7:05 p.m.
Syracuse at Charlotte, 7:05 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Toledo at Buffalo, 7:05 p.m.
Columbus at Pawtucket, 7:05 p.m.
Norfolk at Indianapolis, 7:15 p.m.
COMICS
B5 THE TIMES
Retail
For Better or Worse
Blondie
By Norm Feuti
By Lynn Johnston
By Dean Young & Denis Lebrun
Mother Goose & Grimm
Baby Blues
By Mike Peters
By Rick Kirkman & Jerry Scott
By Pat Brady
Rose Is Rose
Funky Winkerbean
By Tom Batiuk
By Johnny Hart
B.C.
Cryptoquote
Thursday, May 14, 2015
Lio
By Mark Tatulli
Crankshaft
By Tom Batiuk
Garfield
By Jim Davis
Gasoline Alley
By Jim Scancarelli
By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
Zits
Marvin
By Tom Armstrong
Pearls Before Swine
By Stephan Pastis
Get Fuzzy
By Darby Conley
Su Do Ku
For the solution to today’s puzzle,
see Amusements — page A7
A7
© Puzzles by Pappocom
B6 THE TIMES
Friday, May 14, 2015
Blackstone Valley
CLASSIFIEDS
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in print AND online for one low price:
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100 Legals
100 Legals
100 Legals
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
5 Ridge View Court Smithfield, RI
100 Legals
100 Legals
The premises described in the mortgage will be
sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens
on June 4, 2015 at 3:00 p.m. on the premises,
by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
mortgage by Anthony Bettencourt a/k/a Anthony
M. Bettencourt dated December 28, 2007 and
recorded in the Smithfield Land Evidence
Records in Book 614, Page 129, the conditions
of said mortgage having been broken.
The premises described in the mortgage will be
sold, subject to all encumbrances, prior liens
and such matters which may constitute valid
liens or encumbrances after sale, at public auction on June 4, 2015 at 4:00p.m.,on the premises by virtue of the power of sale in said mortgage made by Kenneth R. McGill and Kristen A.
McGill, dated August 7, 2006, and recorded in
the Pawtucket, RI Land Evidence Records in
Please note that said mortgage encumbers Lot 6. Book 2708 at Page 19, the conditions of said
mortgage having been broken. $5,000.00 in
$10,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is re- cash, certified or bank check required to bid.
quired to bid. Other terms will be announced at Other terms to be announced at the sale.
the sale.
SHECHTMAN HALPERIN SAVAGE, LLP
HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C.
1080 Main Street
Attorney for the Holder of the Mortgage
Pawtucket, Rhode Island
150 California Street
Attorney for the present
Newton, MA 02458
Holder of the Mortgage
(617) 558-0500
201007-1989 - PRP
NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE'S SALE
17 Rose Street
North Providence, Rhode Island
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
The premises described in the mortgage will be
893-897 Smithfield Avenue
sold, subject to all encumbrances, prior liens
Lincoln, RI 02865
and such matters which may constitute valid
The premises described in the mortgage will be liens or encumbrances after sale, at public aucsold subject to all prior encumbrances on June tion on May 28th, 2015 at 11:00 a.m., on the
5, 2015, at 10:30 AM on the premises, by virtue premises by virtue of the power of sale in said
of the power of sale in the mortgage granted by mortgage made by John P. Corse, dated April 5,
DAVART, INC., dated May 7, 2014, and recorded 2005, and recorded in the North Providence, RI
in the Lincoln Land Records Book 1891 Page Land Evidence Records in Book 2074 at Page
260, the conditions of the mortgage having been 113, the conditions of said mortgage having
broken. $10,000.00 in cash, certified or bank been broken. $5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank
check required to bid. Other terms to be an- check required to bid. Other terms to be announced at the sale.
nounced at the sale.
James A. Iacoi, Esq.
CALENDA & IACOI, LTD.
171 Broadway
Providence, RI 02903
Attorney for the Present
Holder of the Mortgage
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
3 Sherman Avenue
Lincoln, RI 02865
The premises described in the mortgage will be
sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens
on May 21, 2015 at 11:00 a.m. on the premises,
by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
mortgage by Laura R. Coulombe dated February
28, 2005 and recorded in the North Smithfield
Land Evidence Records in Book 281, Page 759,
the conditions of said mortgage having been
broken.
$5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is required to bid. Other terms will be announced at
the sale.
HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C.
Attorney for the Holder of the Mortgage
150 California Street
Newton, MA 02458
(617) 558-0500
201204-0117 - TEA
HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C.
Attorney for the Holder of the Mortgage
150 California Street
Newton, MA 02458
(617) 558-0500
201201-0724 - TEA
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
27 Lantern Road f/k/a Lot 2
Lantern Road Lincoln, RI
The premises described in the mortgage will be
sold subject to all prior encumbrances on June
5, 2015, at 10:00 AM on the premises, by virtue
of the power of sale in the mortgage granted by
FAIRLAWN OIL SERVICE, INC., dated June 1,
2012, and recorded in the Lincoln Land Records
Book 1768 Page 195, the conditions of the mort- $15,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is regage having been broken. $10,000.00 in cash, quired to bid. Other terms will be announced at
certified or bank check required to bid. Other the sale.
terms to be announced at the sale.
HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C.
Attorney for the Holder of the Mortgage
ALEXANDER J. RAHEB
150 California Street
Attorney for the Mortgagee
Newton, MA 02458
650 George Washington Hwy.
(617) 558-0500
Lincoln, RI 02865
201202-0264 - PRP
401-333-3377
ALEXANDER J. RAHEB
Attorney for the Mortgagee
650 George Washington Hwy.
Lincoln, RI 02865
401-333-3377
Vehicles
Employment
100 Legals
123 Autos For Sale
200 Employment
Services
2001 Ford Explorer Ltd.
4dr SUV, loaded, 3rd rear
seat, auto, low miles, 1 The Times does not knowowner. Mint. Priced to ingly accept advertiseLEGAL NOTICE
ments in the Employment
sell $1850 401-649-5775
INFORMATION
classifications that are
2001
Jeep
Grand
Cherokee
bona fide job offers.
Legal Notices may be Laredo LT, 4 dr., loaded, not
Classification 200 is promailed to:
auto, 6 cyl., 4.0, black, vided for Employment Innice, 24 MPG, 1 owner. formation, Services and
The Times,
$1700. 401-241-0354
Referrals. This newspaP.O. Box 307,
per does not knowingly
2001 Oldsmobile Alero. accept Employment ads
Pawtucket, RI 02860 110K miles, good shape.
that indicate a preference
Body good, interior excel- bases on age from emFaxed to:
lent. $1500. Call 401- ployees covered be Age
(401) 767-8509
359-6102
Discrimination In Emor Emailed to:
2002 Chevy 2500 ¾ ton ployment Act. Nor do we
[email protected] pickup, auto, V8, loaded, in any way condone emwhite, runs & drives new, ployment based solely
Complete instructions 1 owner trade, $1950. upon discrimination practices.
Call 401-241-0413
should include:
Publication dates,
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
Billing information and
9 Plantation Drive Cumberland, RI
the Name and Phone
number of individual to
The premises described in the mortgage will be contact if necessary.
sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens
LEGAL NOTICES
on May 21, 2015 at 10:00 a.m. on the premises,
by virtue of the power of sale contained in a MUST BE RECEIVED
mortgage by Santina A. Potter and Glendon J. 3 BUSINESS DAYS
PRIOR TO
Potter dated November 17, 2010 and recorded in
PUBLICATION
the Cumberland Land Evidence Records in Book
1516, Page 665, the conditions of said mortgage For further information
Call 365-1438
having been broken.
Monday thru Friday;
$10,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is re- 8:30 a.m. To 4:30 p.m.
quired to bid. Other terms will be announced at
the sale.
The premises described in the mortgage will be
sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens
on May 28, 2015 at 10:00 a.m. on the premises,
by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
mortgage by Henry A. Silva dated November 3,
2005 and recorded in the LINCOLN Land Evidence Records in Book 1300, Page 44, as affected by Loan Modification Agreement recorded
with said records at Book 1451, Page 253, the
conditions of said mortgage having been broken.
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
935 Smithfield Avenue
Lincoln, RI 02865
The premises described in the mortgage will be
sold subject to all prior encumbrances on June
5, 2015, at 11:30 AM on the premises, by virtue
of the power of sale in the mortgage granted by
FAIRLAWN OIL SERVICE, INC., dated July 12,
2007, and recorded in the Lincoln Land Records
Book 1467 Page 23, the conditions of the mortgage having been broken. $10,000.00 in cash,
certified or bank check required to bid. Other
terms to be announced at the sale.
Legals
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
115 Great Road North Smithfield, RI
NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE'S SALE
74-76 Sterling Street
Pawtucket, Rhode Island
ALEXANDER J. RAHEB
Attorney for the Mortgagee
650 George Washington Hwy.
Lincoln, RI 02865
401-333-3377
100 Legals
Annoucements
105 Announcments
CREDIT
FOR ERRORS
Each advertiser is asked
to check his/her advertisement on the first
day of publication and
to report any error to
the Times classified
department (3651438) as soon as possible for correction.
No adjustment will be
given for typographical
errors, which do not
change the meaning or
lessen the value of the
advertisement.
Credit will be allowed
only to that portion of
the advertisement
where the error occurred.
2002 Suzuki. 4Cyl., all new
brakes all around, runs
great. $1295. 401-4474451 or 401-769-0095
204 General Help
Wanted
2004 Jeep Cherokee Lare- Drivers needed to transdo. 4WD, 6 cyl., auto., port students to school in
electric
seats/windows, mini vans or sedans. 10
very clean, runs excellent, positions available. Must
$5800. 401-769-8739
be 21 years old and have
2008 TOYOTA COROLLA a valid drivers license for
CLEAN. MANY EXTRAS. 3 years. 7D drivers liTINT. SPOILER. $6,800 cense a plus. Call Mark's
at 508-473-3600 ([email protected]
my, Jan or Rene) or stop
com
in at 51 East Main St.,
SELL YOUR CAR, VAN OR Milford.
TRUCK THE EASY WAY.
Call the classified team at DUNKIN DONUTS TEAM
The Times today. Tell MEMBERS Counter Help,
more than 40,000 adult Shift leaders. Now hiring
readers in the are about for all positions all shifts.
your vehicle. It's easy to Must
be dependable,
do, just dial 401-365- Friendly, people person
1438 or visit us at www.- for Dunkin Donuts, expepawtuckettimes.com
rience preferred, or will
train. Good wages plus
tips, health insurance and
126 Trucks
vacation, benefits available. Apply in person 29
2000 Ford Ranger X Cab, Franklin St. Wrentham
4x4 pickup, stepside, MA RT 140 (15 minutes
auto, V6, 4.0, air, like from Providence) 508new, inspected. Must see. 384-9801
$1850. 401-545-9317
EXPERIENCE
CARPEN2002 Chevy 3500 1 ton, TERS wanted for com16ft box truck, loaded, mercial work. Must have
transportation
auto, V8, rear door, dual reliable
wheels, like new. 1 own- and be willing to travel.
Please call 769-4285.
er. $3000. 401-301-0056
2002 CHEVY Impala LS 4 FACILITIES CUSTODIAN
door, loaded, auto, V-6, Part time days (15 hours
all power. Inspected runs per week). Requires basic
new. One owner. $1450. handyman skills. Able to
401-442-3678
perform neat, clean, well2004 Hyundai Santa Fe done work with little suSUV 4 door, loaded, auto, pervision. Some lifting inV-6, 28mpg. Black, alloy, volved. Valid driver's lirear hatch. Nice. 2 owner. cense required.
Apply online at
$1850. 401-649-3251
www.pcu.org.
AA/Veterans/Disabled
Chevy dump truck, 92K,
4x4, 6.5 diesel, green.
Selling for $7,000. Call General Laborer. Needed
a multi talented individual
401-636-2269
to do a multitude of jobs.
General landscapers for
129 Motorcycles - mulching, mowing, gardening and yard clean up.
Mopeds - ATVs
Some vehicle cleaning
and
house
painting.
2002 Honda Elite motor Knowledge of carpentry a
scooter. Auto., excellent plus. Must have a valid
condition.
Only
600 drivers license and a
miles. $1275. Call 401- clean driving record. Call
Mark's at 508-473-3600
568-1966
(Jeremy, Jan or Rene)
2002 HONDA SHADOW
1100cc, 1 owner, wind- Plasterers needed, regisshield, saddlebags, cover tered and insured. Call
$2,800 401-658-3063
401-568-9725
SERVICE DIRECTORY
FOR $2.00 A DAY ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS HERE
CALL FOR DETAILS 401-767-8503
Free Estimates
QUALITY
EXTERIORS
FOR OVER
60 YEARS!
RI LIC #258
H
JO
N THE ROOFER C
“FO
RO
VER 60 YEAR
O.
S”
Fully Insured
MASTER
INSTALLERS
OF ROOFING,
SIDING &
WINDOW
PRODUCTS
RI COMM. #44R
www.johntheroofer.com • 401-769-8145
20 Years
Experience
INSURED
“Professional
Service,
Affordable Price”
Gino
401-692-1868
Jeff
401-390-5921
[email protected]
Mowing • Fertilization • Sod & Seed • Weeding • Trimming
Edging • Mulching • General Clean-Up • Fall Clean-Up • Snow Removal
FULLY Insured • FREE Estimates
“NO Job Too Small”
All Your Property Needs!
Tel. 401-282-9900 [email protected]
General Contractor JOSÉ DaSILVA
Financing Available ~ 0% Interest
www.RIPROPERTYMGT.com
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
Roofing • Vinyl Siding • Windows • Porch Work
Gutters Cleaned • Chimney Work
In & Out Painting • Cement Work
Awnings & Shutters • Home Power Washing
~
Serving
RI & MA
Since 2001
~
FREE ESTIMATES
401-572-8311 • LYNCHFENCECO.COM
(401) 725-6854
(401) 434-0095
(401) 334-1357
Licensed & insured in RI & MA
In Business Over 40 Years
CALL FOR INFO
401-438-3000
Call Ray 401-722-5647
Toll Free 855-400-0729
Contractor #35155 • Lincensed & Insured
GOT LEAKS?
FREE
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ACTION ROOFING!
ALL YOUR REPAIR NEEDS!
• Gutters & Downspouts
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All jobs written guarantee • We aluminum roof coat
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all our tar work
100’ Crane • Bucket Truck • Back Hoe & Bobcat Work
Storm Damage • Tree Climbing • Stump Grounding
Tree Trimming/Pruning • Firewood/Log Loads
www.timbertreeserviceri.com
(401) 573-6543
BONA FIDE HOME INSPECTIONS
VINNIE SOUCAR CARPETS
HOME & APARTMENT HANDYMAN SERVICES
& FLOOR COVERING
• A+ Rating with Better Business Bureau
• Easy to read reports with digital pics
• R.I. General Contractor # 34474
• Free Termite Inspection
10% DISCOUNT WITH THIS AD
www.bonafideforyou.com
401.644.3930
Est. 1986
wood vinyl carpet laminate repairs serging
401 725 9307
DONNY
LAMBERT
JUNK CARS DUMPSTERS
$250 / 15 C.Y.
WE PICK UP
RAY’S HOME REPAIRS
SPRING CLEANUP
HOUSE CLEANOUTS
FIRE DAMAGE
401-438-3000
168 ARMISTICE BLVD., PAWTUCKET, RI 02860
[email protected] • By Appointments
Thursday, May 14, 2015
204 General Help
Wanted
Grade Foreman - Provide
const. layout for utility
road & building projects.
Min 5 yrs surveying/
const.
exp.
Resume,
salary req, references to
[email protected]
Merchandise
THE TIMES B7
265 Furniture Household
Real Estate-Rent
MATTRESS SET
Queen size Pillow Top
brand new, still in plastic
and never used. $150 Call
or text 401-237-0340
Yachting
Sliding glass door shower
251 Appliances
enclosure with hardware. 300 Rental Agencies
Project Manager for 300
$75. Call 401-480-1974
unit apartment job. Good
or 508-928-1738
salary, tremendous incentive bonuses. Reply Digitel 6000 BTU Air ConReaders of The Times are
[email protected]
advised The Times does
ditioner. 1 year old. Runs
not knowingly accept adnew. $45. 769-1899
273
Miscellaneous
vertisements that are in
Roofer and side waller apviolation of the Federal
plicators.
Experienced
Merchandise
Fair Housing Law and the
preferred. Call Russ 508- GE 6,000 BTU air conditioner.
Ice
cold
air.
Like
Rhode Island Fair Hous883-7912
new. $25. 769-1899
ing Practices Act. The
Brand new, never used Federal Fair Housing Law
Roofer wanted. Residential
and Rhode Island Fair
deep
frying
cooker.
experience & drivers li- Washing machine. Maytag
cense required. Call 508- Centennial. Excellent con- Cooks meals and snacks Housing Practices Act are
in minutes, boils also. designed to prevent dis429-2947
dition. $150 or best. Call $35. 401-632-0138
crimination in the pur401-480-1974 or 508chase and rental of housShingle roofers. Steady 928-1738
ing. Refusal to rent,
work on the books. “no
lease, or sell property to
Hamilton
Beach
drink
masSubs” 401-862-5849
anyone due to age, race,
Whirlpool 10,000 BTU air ter, 7.5 qt. Crockpot, sun- color, religion, sex, sexubeam
food
processor
&
conditioner.
Excellent
Tow Truck Drivers. Posial orientation, marital staBraun hand blender in
tions available for EXPE- condition. $60. Call 401- box. All for $30. 617-0483
tus, disability, familial
RIENCED
tow
truck 585-2584
status, or country of andrivers living ONLY in
cestral origin is in violaLOOKING FOR SOME- tion of the Fair Housing
the towns of Hopedale,
THING HARD TO FIND? Law. If you have a comMilford and Mendon. Full
253
Bicycles
For
Be sure to look in the plaint, contact the Rhode
and part time positions
Sale
classified pages of The Island Commission for
available. Must have a
good driving record. Call
TImes every day. Surely Human Rights. They will
Mark's
508-473-3600
you'll find interesting help any person that has
(Jeremy, Jan or Rene)
things that you may want been
discriminated
26” Schwinn girls bike. Ex- or need. The Times is the against in the rental of
cellent condition. $30. perfect marketplace you housing, the sale of
Wanted. Experienced auto 401-585-2584
can enjoy in the comfort housing, home financing
body repair man. Min. 3
of your own home. There or public accommodayears. Competitive wages
is something for every- tions. Call the Rhode Isbased on experience.
Contact Tom at 508-226- 261 Coins & Stamps one in The Times classi- land Commission for Hufieds!
man Rights, 401-2226557.
2661.
WRENTHAM HOUSE OF
PIZZA - P/T KITCHEN
HELP NIGHTS Contact
George: 508-243-4077
House
glass.
Buying US coins dated be- Princess
fore 1965: dimes $1.18, Dark blood red. Named
quarters $2.95, halves Fantasia. Made in France.
$5.90.
401-597-6426 Large framed oil painting
of France. $40. 617-0483
Woonsocket
301 Room – No
Board
PAWTUCKET: Near center,
laundry facilities, wall to
wall carpets. $100 & up
401-726-0995.
304 Apartments
Unfurnished
1 BED efficiency, S.
Main St. Woonsocket.
$160 wk. w/all utilities.
No
pets.
Security
$320. 568-3478
305 Apartments
Furnished
1 BED apt, all clean, ready
to move in Woonsocket.
401-447-4451 or 769-0095
Real Estate-Sale
Place your ad at 401-766-3400 or
www.oceanstatemarketplace.com
The Times Classifieds
SPORTS
330 Brokers - Agents
FIND A HOME. Sell a
home. Find a tenant. Call
the classified team at The
Times to place your advertisement. Call 401365-1438.
New app going through sea trials
Live-streaming app
Periscope tested at
Volvo Ocean Race
JIMMY GOLEN
AP Sports Writer
NEWPORT — A baseball
game lasts a few hours, and a
golf tournament can run a long
weekend. But sailors in the
Volvo Ocean Race are at sea for
nine months, enough time for
entire technologies to come and
go.
So when Amory Ross heard
about Periscope, a live-streaming app that didn’t exist when
he left Spain in October, he was
eager to give it a try.
“That’s part of the fun,”
Ross, an onboard reporter for
Team Alvimedica, said at Fort
Adams State Park here for the
only United States port in the
four-ocean, 38,739 nautical mile
race. “Sailing is always looking
for new platforms. In a lot of
ways, it’s a tough sport to relate
to. And a cellphone camera is as
good a bridge as you can find.”
In the town where Bob Dylan
went electric, tradition and technology are coming together
again.
Periscope, which allows
users to livestream video, was
introduced to many sports fans
when it was used to pirate
broadcasts of this month’s fight
between Floyd Mayweather and
Manny Pacquiao. But the Volvo
Ocean Race is embracing the
app, which was launched by
Twitter in March.
Each boat already has a
reporter embedded with the
crew, and to his usual routine of
blogging and Tweeting and
posting photos and video on the
team’s website Ross can now
add Periscope.
“I have all these different
tools to use at my disposal,”
Ross said. “Video, audio, it
sheds a whole new component
of the sailing that would be hard
to show otherwise.”
Photo by Stefan Coppers / Team Brunel / Volvo Ocean Race via Getty Images
Team Brunel is pictured during Leg 6 of the Volvo Ocean Race from
Itajai to Newport. Each boat crew has a reporter on board to write
blog entries, take photos and post them to the Web. Teams are also
now using the new Periscope app to post live video.
Named for the device that
helped submarines extend their
range of vision, Periscope will
have the reverse effect for the
Volvo Ocean Race. Ross will
use an iPhone to livestream
Saturday’s in-port race, showing
followers what’s happening on
the boat during the competition.
Unlike the long stretches of
sailing between continents, the
in-port race in Narragansett Bay
— like a sprint in the middle of
the around-the-world marathon
— lends itself to live video
because there is constant action.
Jonno Turner, the Volvo Ocean
Race’s digital project manager,
said Periscope will also followers to chat with the crew.
“It’s an amazing dynamic,”
he said. “You are actually interacting with the sports star during the event.
Alex Trickett, who works in
sports partnerships at Twitter,
said Periscope will “bring fans
closer to the action than ever
before, officially live streaming
a high-profile race from one of
the competing boats. This brings
a unique perspective and live
content that only they can
offer.”
Ross, who also served as an
onboard reporter in the last race,
in 2011-12, knew that he would
have to adjust during the race to
being away from his family and
friends — along with the usual
comforts of living on land. But
last time, he started using
Instagram midway through the
race.
“The race before that, it was
probably more like Twitter and
hashtags,” Ross said. “This race
always has some sort of a tie-in
with social media. We’re always
producing something.”
If the live-stream of
Saturday’s in-port race goes
well, Turner said, the use of
Periscope could expand before
this edition of the race ends in
Gothenbug, Sweden, in June.
And who knows what the hot
app will be for the next edition,
three years from now?
“The technology’s going to
come so far between now and
then,” Turner said.
Sample ad, actual size.
2015
LAURA L. DECESARE
Cumberland High School
May 25, 2015
Congratulations from: Mom, Dad, Diane, David, Sue, Norm, Bob &
Camilla... We are so proud of you and wish you the best of luck!
Plans after graduation: Laura will attend Rhode Island College to
pursue a degree in Business Economics
Attention parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles,
etc.: The Times will publish Congrats ads
throughout the months of May & June.
Simply stop in with or mail your photos (up to 3)
and your messages to honor your special graduate.
$
2500 for this 2x3 ad
Student Name:
Graduating from:
Graduation Date:
Congratulations from:
Plans after graduation:
Mail or drop off complete
form with photo(s) to:
The Times
23 Exchange St.
Pawtucket, RI
02861
CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF 2015!!!
Hats Off
To Our
2015 Graduates!
B8 THE TIMES
Thursday, May 14, 2015

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