INSPIRING CHILDREN TO SHARE & RECEIVE

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INSPIRING CHILDREN TO SHARE & RECEIVE
INSPIRING CHILDREN TO SHARE & RECEIVE FEEDBACK ON THEIR WORK
1. At the beginning or end of center time, ask children to share work with
their peers to get feedback and to inspire ideas. One sequence for this is:
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Looking (quiet looking at a child’s work)
Noticing (I notice that…I see…)
Listening (the presenting child speaks)
Wondering (How did you…What did you…I wonder why…)
Inspiring (Friendly ideas to help improve or finish work)
2. Begin a routine of ongoing informal opportunities for kids to give and
receive feedback.
“Are you sure the work is finished? Go ask ______ what s/he thinks about what you just did.”
3. Hold work-share meetings once or twice a week. (Record some of the
conversation and take a picture and bring it to the next meeting. 1-1 ½ pp. of conversation is
plenty!) NOTE: The purpose of these meetings is to improve the work, not just say “I like…”
This can happen in whole or small groups (small groups may be easier; you can ask children
to choose a couple of friends to look at one another’s work together). Ideally, the group can
look at unfinished work so children can use the feedback to revise what they have done.
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One way to begin the conversation is to ask a child to comment on his/her own work.
“Let’s look at one picture/building/etc. at a time. The artist/builder/etc. can talk first.
Then other people can say what they think.” Children can identify particular things they
would like feedback on. Adults can participate in the conversation and model helpful
feedback.
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Another way to begin is to ask the group:
• Look carefully at the work with a focus on describing, not judging or interpreting
(What do you see in this drawing? What do you notice about this block structure?). If
children do make a judgment or interpretation, ask what in the work makes them say
that.
• What questions do you have for the creator of the work? (Why did you use blue for
the face? How did you get the tower to stay up? Why is that number there?)
• What suggestions do you have for what to do next? (What might make this tower
even stronger? What might help this look even more like a dog? Is there something in
someone else’s work that you wish ____ had included on his/her own?)
4. Post comments in the classroom made by children and adults as a reference for
all to support learning with and from one another (share the list with parents). E.g.,
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I was inspired by…
Maybe…
I notice…
Another way you could do it is…
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What if…
I wonder…
How could you…
I could…
5. Have a critique center as a choice during center time with the following
routine:
1. Ask three friends for suggestions about your work.
2. 3 Rules: The suggestions have to be specific, kind, and helpful.
3. You don’t have to follow the advice.
© 2007 Making Learning Visible Project at the Harvard Graduate School of Education