RELI3251 - University of Newcastle

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RELI3251 - University of Newcastle
Faculty of Education and Arts
School of Humanities & Social Science
http://www.newcastle.edu.au/school/hss/
Newcastle Campus
University Drive,
Callaghan 2308
Room: MC127 McMullin Building
Phone: +61 2 4921 5213
Office hours: 9:00am – 5:00pm
Fax: +61 2 4921 6933
Email: [email protected]
Web: http://www.newcastle.edu.au/school/hss/
RELI3251 - Islam in Modern Society
Course Outline
Course Coordinator: Colin Wilks
Semester: Semester 1 - 2010
Unit Weighting: 10
Teaching Methods: Seminar
Brief Course Description
Provides students with an understanding of Islam (its history, beliefs and values) and modern society (its
history, philosophical foundations and values) and the relationship which has existed between them, and, in
the process, dispels some common misconceptions which many westerners (and some Muslims) have about
Islam and which many Muslims (and some Westerners) have about modern society. Students are introduced
to the different versions of Islam which have been practised at various times and in various cultures
throughout history, and to the differing manifestations of modern society. There is a particular focus on the
relationship between Western Imperialism and modern Islamist movements, and the extent to which this
relationship can be understood as a Clash of Civilisations; the role of women in Islam, and the development
of Islamic communities within the Western world.
Contact Hours
Seminar for 2 Hours per Week for Full Term
Course Objectives
1. To provide students with an understanding of Islam (its history, beliefs and values, and some common
misconceptions about its history, beliefs and values) and modern society (its history, values and philosophical foundations, and some common misconceptions about its history, values and philosophical foundations).
2. To provide students with an understanding of the history and reasons for conflict between Islam (or parts
thereof) and modern society (or parts thereof), and to enable them to distinguish between the dimensions of
this conflict which stem from actual or perceived religious differences and those which actually stem from
non-religious factors but are fuelled by the political manipulation of actual or perceived religious differences.
3. To enable students to distinguish between (i) the religion of Islam and the body of tradition and custom
with which it has become historically associated in some Islamic societies (eg. the veiling of women, honour
killings, female circumcision), and (ii) the philosophy of modern western society and the body of tradition
and custom with which it has become historically associated (eg. Christianity, Imperialism).
4. To enable students to distinguish between (i) the theory of Islam and Islam as actually practised in various
historical periods and in different contemporary cultures, and (ii) the theory of modern western society and
Course Outline Issued and Correct as at: Week 1, Semester 1 - 2010
CTS Download Date: 15.2.10
2
the way it has actually been practised in various historical periods in different western nations.
5. To enable students to contextualise the situation of Muslim women in different Islamic and western
cultures, and to understand how the situations of Islamic women and Western women have been exploited
for political propaganda purposes by Islam and the West.
6. To familiarise students with (i) the approaches and responses of various Islamic societies to the modern
world, and (ii) the various approaches and responses of the modern world to Islam.
Course Content
1. The religion of Islam (its history, beliefs and values, and common misconceptions about its history beliefs
and values) and modern society (its history, values and philosophical foundations, and common
misconceptions about its history, values and philosophical foundations).
2. The history and reasons for conflict between Islam (or parts thereof) and modern society (or parts thereof);
the dimensions of this conflict which stem from actual or perceived religious differences, as opposed to those
which actually stem from non-religious factors but are fuelled by the political manipulation of actual or
perceived religious differences.
3. The distinction between (i) the religion of Islam and the body of tradition and custom with which it has
become historically associated in some Islamic societies (eg. the veiling of women, honour killings, female
circumcision), and (ii) modern western society and the body of tradition and custom with which it has
become historically associated (eg. Christianity, Imperialism).
4. The distinction between (i) the theory of Islam and Islam as it is and has actually been practised in various
historical periods and in different contemporary cultures, and (ii) the theory of modern western society and
the way it has actually been practised in various historical periods in different western nations.
5. The situation of Muslim women in different Islamic and western cultures, and how the situations of both
Islamic and Western women have been exploited for political propaganda purposes by Islam and the West.
6. The approaches and responses of various Islamic societies to the modern world; and the approaches and
responses of the modern world to Islam.
Assessment Items
Essays / Written
Assignments
Examination:
Take Home
Group/tutorial
participation and
contribution
40%; 2,000 words; due week 9.
50%; 1,000 words; requiring two out of several short questions to be
answered. Distributed in Week 13, to be returned in Week 14.
10%; This mark will be based upon a systematic and ongoing
evaluation of the quality and quantity of the student's contributions to
seminar discussion. Procedures involved will be clearly explained.
Assumed Knowledge
20 units at 1000 level
Callaghan Campus Timetable
RELI3251: Islam in Modern Society
Enquiries: School of Humanities and Social Science
Semester 1 – 2010
Seminar
Thursday
16:00 - 18:00
[HE10]
IMPORTANT UNIVERSITY INFORMATION
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
Academic integrity, honesty, and a respect for knowledge, truth and ethical practices are fundamental to the
business of the University. These principles are at the core of all academic endeavour in teaching, learning
and research. Dishonest practices contravene academic values, compromise the integrity of research and
devalue the quality of learning. To preserve the quality of learning for the individual and others, the
University may impose severe sanctions on activities that undermine academic integrity. There are two
major categories of academic dishonesty:
School of Humanities and Social Science
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Academic fraud is a form of academic dishonesty that involves making a false representation to gain an
unjust advantage. Without limiting the generality of this definition, it can include:
a) falsification of data;
b) using a substitute person to undertake, in full or part, an exam or other assessment item;
c) reusing one's own work, or part thereof, that has been submitted previously and counted towards
another course (without permission);
d) making contact or colluding with another person, contrary to instructions, during an examination or
other assessment item;
e) bringing material or device(s) into an examination or other assessment item other than such as may
be specified for that assessment item; and
f) making use of computer software or other material and device(s) during an examination or other
assessment item other than such as may be specified for that assessment item.
g) contract cheating or having another writer compete for tender to produce an essay or assignment and
then submitting the work as one's own.
Plagiarism is the presentation of the thoughts or works of another as one's own. University policy prohibits
students plagiarising any material under any circumstances. Without limiting the generality of this definition,
it may include:
a) copying or paraphrasing material from any source without due acknowledgment;
b) using another person's ideas without due acknowledgment;
c) collusion or working with others without permission, and presenting the resulting work as though it
were completed independently.
Turnitin is an electronic text matching system. During assessing any assessment item the University may ·
Reproduce this assessment item and provide a copy to another member of the University; and/or
·
Communicate a copy of this assessment item to a text matching service (which may then retain a
copy of the item on its database for the purpose of future checking).
·
Submit the assessment item to other forms of plagiarism checking
RE-MARKS AND MODERATIONS
Students can access the University's policy at: http://www.newcastle.edu.au/policylibrary/000769.html
MARKS AND GRADES RELEASED DURING TERM
All marks/grades released during term are indicative only until formally approved by the Head of School.
SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES AFFECTING ASSESSMENT ITEMS
Extension of Time for Assessment Items, Deferred Assessment and Special Consideration for Assessment
Items or Formal Written Examinations items must be submitted by the due date in the Course Outline unless
the Course Coordinator approves an extension. Unapproved late submissions will be penalised in line with
the University policy specified in Late Penalty (under student) at the link above.
Requests for Extensions of Time must be lodged no later than the due date of item. This applies to students:
·
applying for an extension of time for submission of an assessment item on the basis of medical,
compassionate, hardship/trauma or unavoidable commitment; or
·
whose attendance at or performance in an assessment item or formal written examination has been
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or will be affected by medical, compassionate, hardship/trauma or unavoidable commitment.
Students must report the circumstances, with supporting documentation, as outlined in the Special
Circumstances Affecting Assessment Items Procedure at:
http://www.newcastle.edu.au/policylibrary/000641.html
Note: different procedures apply for minor and major assessment tasks.
Students should be aware of the following important deadlines:
·
Special Consideration Requests must be lodged no later than 3 working days after the due date of
submission or examination.
·
Rescheduling Exam requests must be received no later than 10 working days prior the first date of
the examination period.
Late applications may not be accepted. Students who cannot meet these deadlines due to extenuating
circumstances should speak first to their Program Officer or Program Executive if studying in Singapore.
STUDENTS WITH A DISABILITY OR CHRONIC ILLNESS
University is committed to providing a range of support services for students with a disability or chronic
illness. If you have a disability or chronic illness which you feel may impact on your studies please feel free
to discuss your support needs with your lecturer or course coordinator.
Disability Support may also be provided by the Student Support Service (Disability). Students must be
registered to receive this type of support. To register contact the Disability Liaison Officer on 02 4921 5766,
email at: [email protected] . As some forms of support can take a few weeks to
implement it is extremely important that you discuss your needs with your lecturer, course coordinator or
Student Support Service staff at the beginning of each semester. For more information on confidentiality and
documentation visit the Student Support Service (Disability) website:
www.newcastle.edu.au/services/disability .
CHANGING YOUR ENROLMENT
Students enrolled after the census dates listed in link below are liable for full cost of their student
contribution or fees for that term: http://www.newcastle.edu.au/study/fees/censusdates.html
Students may withdraw from a course without academic penalty on or before the last day of term. Any
withdrawal from a course after the last day of term will result in a fail grade.
Students cannot enrol in a new course after the second week of term, except under exceptional
circumstances. Any application to add a course after the second week of term must be on the appropriate
form, and should be discussed with staff in the Student Hubs or with your Program Executive at PSB if you
are a Singapore student.
To check or change your enrolment online go to myHub: https://myhub.newcastle.edu.au
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STUDENT INFORMATION & CONTACTS
Various services are offered by the Student Support Unit: www.newcastle.edu.au/service/studentsupport/
The Student Hubs are a one-stop shop for the delivery of student related services and are the first point of
contact for students studying in Australia. Student Hubs are located at:
Callaghan Campus
Shortland Hub: Level 3, Shortland Building
Hunter Hub: Level 2, Student Services Centre
City Precinct
City Hub & Information Common, University
House
Port Macquarie students
contact your program officer or
[email protected]
Phone 4921 5000
Singapore students
contact your PSB Program Executive
Central Coast Campus (Ourimbah)
Student Hub: Opposite the Main Cafeteria
OTHER CONTACT INFORMATION
Faculty Websites
www.newcastle.edu.au/faculty/educationarts/
Rules Governing Undergraduate
Academic Awards
www.newcastle.edu.au/policylibrary/000311
.html
Rules Governing Postgraduate Academic
Awards
www.newcastle.edu.au/policylibrary/000306
.html
Rules Governing Professional Doctorate
Awards
www.newcastle.edu.au/policylibrary/000580
.html
General enquiries
Callaghan, City and Port Macquarie
Phone: 02 4921 5000
Email:
[email protected]
Ourimbah
Phone: 02 4348 4030
Email:
[email protected]
Dean of Students Office
The Dean of Students and Deputy Dean of Students
work to ensure that all students receive fair and
equitable treatment at the University. In doing this
they provide information and advice and help
students resolve problems of an academic nature.
http://www.newcastle.edu.au/service/dean-ofstudents/
Phone:02 4921 5806
Fax: 02 4921 7151
Email: [email protected]
University Complaints Managers Office
The University is committed to maintaining and
enhancing fair, equitable and safe work practices and
promoting positive relationships with its staff and
students. There is a single system to deal with all
types of complaints, ranging from minor
administrative matters to more serious deeply held
grievances concerning unfair, unjust or unreasonable
behaviour.
http://www.newcastle.edu.au/service/complaints/
Phone:02 4921 5806
Fax: 02 4921 7151
Email: [email protected]
Campus Care
The Campus Care program has been set up as a
central point of enquiry for information, advice and
support in managing inappropriate, concerning or
threatening behaviour.
http://www.newcastle.edu.au/service/campus-care/
Phone:02 4921 8600
Fax: 02 4921 7151
Email: [email protected]
This course outline will not be altered after the second week of the term except under extenuating circumstances with
Head of School approval. Students will be notified in advance of the change.
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Assessment Details
Seminar Paper
20%
800-1000 words. Due March 26
Essay
40%
2000 words. Due April 30
Take Home Exam
40%
2000 words. Distributed in Week 13 and due in Week 14
Seminar Paper
Students will submit a seminar paper at the end of week 4 based on class discussion for weeks 1-3.
As with all assessment tasks for this course, grades received for seminar papers will not be based
simply on the student‟s ability to provide a competent summary of the topics discussed (Pass), but
on the student‟s abilities to:
1. distinguish between those aspects of classroom discussion which are more directly relevant
to the course and those which are not (Pass – Credit).
2. critically engage with the relevant subject matter discussed in class (Credit – Distinction).
3. to make relevant points and draw relevant conclusions beyond those which have been
discussed in class (Distinction – High Distinction).
Seminar Paper Question:
Part A: What is it about modern society that makes it modern?
Part B: On what points of religious belief do Jews, Christians and Muslims agree and on what
points do they differ?
Essay Questions
The essay questions relate to the course content for weeks 4-7.
Question 1
Can the uneasy relationship that exists between Islam and the Western world [or certain
elements therein] be understood purely in terms of religion, or are there non-religious
factors that also need to be taken into account?
Question 2
To what extent have the psycho-social phenomenon of „narcissistic compassion‟ and
„othering‟ contributed to the uneasy relationship that exists between Islam and the
Western world?
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Question 3
Is the conflict between Islam and the Western world an actual conflict or a conflict that
exists only in the minds of an extremist minority?
Question 4
What grounds, if any, did the September 11 jihadies have for „hating‟ America, and
what grounds, if any, did they have for venting their hatred in the way they did?
Question 5
When the September 11 jihadies hijacked their weapons of mass destruction, were they
also hijacking Islam?
Question 6
How did Afghanistan come to be the initial target in the war on terror?
Take-Home Exam
The Take-Home Exam requires students to answer 2 of 8 questions, all of which relate to the course
content for weeks 8-12.
More specific details relating to the style in which these questions are to be answered will be made
available in Week 12 of semester.
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Schedule of Weekly Seminar Topics and Recommended Readings
Week
Begin
1
Mar 4
Topic & Recommended Readings/Documentaries
Introduction to Course - Modern Society
Video: The Power of Nightmares
2
Mar 11
Modern Society
Islam: Origins, Beliefs and Development
Ahmed, Akhbar (1995) Living Islam: From Samarkand to Stornoway, Penguin Books, Chs 1-2, pp. 155 (or any section of any text provides an outline of Islam‟s origins, development and basic beliefs).
Video: Children of Abraham
3
Mar 18
(a) Judaism, Christianity and Islam
(b) The Golden Age of Islam and its Decline
4
Mar 25
Islam: European Colonialism and the Rise of Islamic „Fundamentalism‟
Esposito, John L. (1995) The Islamic Threat: Myth or Reality? , “Contemporary Islam: Reformation or
Revolution?”, pp.7-12
Esposito, J. op cit, Ch.3: “The West Triumphant: Muslim Responses”, pp.47-76
(or any section of any text/video/DVD which deals with the impact of European colonialism)
5
April 1
The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
Al-Sowayegh, Abdulaziz (1984) Arab Petro-Politics, Part II: Arab Oil and Palestine Conflict”, Chs 5
and 6, pp.51-82
Rubin, Barry (2002) The Tragedy of the Middle East, Ch. 8. “The Arab-Israeli Conflict: Foundation Stone
or Millstone?”, pp.193-226
Videos: Promises and Betrayals and In Search of Peace
Mid-Semester break: Friday 2
6
April 15
nd
th
April to Friday 9 April
Afghanistan
Mackenzie, Richard (2001) “The United States and the Taliban” in Maley (ed) Fundamentalism
Reborn? Afghanistan and the Taliban, pp.90-103.
Rubin, Michael (2002) “Who Is responsible for the Taliban?” Middle East Review of International Affairs
(MERIA), 6/1 (March 2002), pp.1-16.
Ahady, Anwar-ul-haq (2001) “Saudi Arabia, Iran and the conflict in Afghanistan” in Maley (ed)
Fundamentalism Reborn? Afghanistan and the Taliban, pp.117-134
Video: Beneath the Veil
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7
April 22
The September 11th Attack on America
Achar, Gilbert (2002) “After September 11: The Clash of Barbarians.” Monthly Review 54/4
(September 2002), pp.17-30
Mamdani, Mahmood (2002) “Good Muslim, Bad Muslim: A Political Perspective on Culture and
Terrorism.” American Anthropologist 104: 766-775.
Video: A Mission to Die For
8
April 29
The War on Terror: Iraq
Research Unit for Political Economy (2003) “Behind the War on Iraq.” Monthly Review 55/1 (May,
2003), pp.20-49
Ali, Tariq (2003) “Re-Colonizing Iraq.” New Left Review, pp.5-20.
Post-Saddam Iraq (2003 to the present)
The Shia-Sunni Conflict and Global Jihad - What is at Stake in Iraq and for who?
Video: Al Zarqawi: The Face of Terror
9
May 6
(a) Muslim Women under “Islamic fundamentalism” and Islamic Law?
Abu-Lughod, Lila (2003) “Do Muslim Women Really Need Saving? ” American Anthrop 104.
Dupree, Nancy Hatch (2001) “Afghan Women under Taliban” in Maley (ed) Fundamentalism Reborn?
Afghanistan and the Taliban, pp.145-166.
(b) Islam, Politics and Women
Nader, L. (1989) “Orientalism, Occidentalism and the Control of Women.‟ Cult Dynamics 23.
Azzam, M. (1996) “Gender and Politics of Religion in the Middle East” in Mai Yamani (ed).
Mir-Hosseini, Ziba (1996) “Stretching the Limits: A Feminist Reading of Sharia” in Yamani (ed)
10
May 13
Islam in the West
Kepel, G (1997) Allah in the West: Islamic Movements in America and Europe, Part II, Ch 3: “The
Rushdie Affair”, pp.126-146 and Part III, Ch 2: “Behind the Veil”, pp. 174-203.
Documentary: Tomorrow’s Islam
Rozario, Santi (1998) “On Being Australian and Muslim: Muslim Women as Defenders of Islamic
Heritage” in Women’s Studies International Forum Vol. 21, No. 6:649-61
Humphrey, Michael (2001) “An Australian Islam? Religion in the Multicultural City” in Abdullah
Saeed & Shahram Akbarzadeh (eds), pp.33-52.
11
May 20
The West in Islam
Documentaries: Dinner with the President and Islam in Indonesia
12
May 27
Review: Islam and Modern Society – Hopes for the Future
School of Humanities and Social Science