Activity 8.5b Part Drawings (Arbor Press)

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Activity 8.5b Part Drawings (Arbor Press)
Activity 8.4b Part Drawings (Arbor
Press)
Introduction
Take a good look around you and notice all of the consumer products that you
interact with on a daily basis. A quick visual analysis will tell you that the number of
components in many of these designs is quite large. For example, imagine the
number of detail drawings that must be involved with the creation and manufacture
of all the components in an automobile. Each of the components in the consumer
products that you interact with were designed, and it is reasonable to assume that
each has some sort of technical drawing somewhere on record.
One aspect of product documentation is the creation of detail drawings. Parts do not
appear out of thin air; they must be manufactured. Manufacturers need drawings to
make parts. Therefore, documentation is a necessary component of an engineering
design process. When compared to the centuries-old practice of technical board
drafting, computer aided design (CAD) programs make the creation of technical
drawings considerably easier and more efficient.
In this activity you will apply your knowledge of technical drawing and dimensioning
standards by creating detail CAD drawings of your Arbor Press components. Each
drawing must fit within a standard A-Size drawing sheet. Use the title block that is
typical in your classroom.
Equipment


Engineering notebook
Pencil
Procedure
1. Place the Column component into the assembly. This component will be
grounded and therefore locked in space. Place the other 16 components into the
assembly. This will include Part_12a and Part_12b which are the pneumatic
Rotary Actuator and the Rotary Actuator Shaft, respectively. These components
are separate for the purpose of assembly animation, which will be done in a
subsequent activity. Use the parts list below to check off the components as you
add them to the assembly.
Item
1
2
3
Quantity
1
1
1
Name
Column
Base
Table
Description
Material
AL 6061
AL 6061
AL 6061
Project Lead The Way, Inc. ● Copyright 2012 ● IED – Activity 8.5b Part Drawings (Arbor Press) – Page 1
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
1
1
1
1
7
1
1
2
Table Pin
Rack
Cover Plate
Rack Pad
Cover Plate Screw
Column Screw
Punch Holder
Punch Holder Screw
12
13
14
15
1
1
1
2
Rotary Actuator
Gear
Gear Plate
Actuator Screw
16
1
Key
8-32 UNC x .50 cap screw
3/8-16 UNC x 1.00 cap screw
8-32 UNC x 1.25 flat
countersunk head cap screw
Bimba PT-006360-A1DV
8-32 UNC x 1.25 cap screw
ground to 1.1 length
Woodruff Key # 202.5
AL 6061
AL 6061
AL 6061
AL 6061
STL
STL
AL 6061
STL
-AL 6061
AL 6061
STL
STL
2. Use assembly constraints to model the Arbor Press components. Perform
interference analyses on the components to determine if unnecessary overlaps
occur. Save the assembly file when complete.
Project Lead The Way, Inc. ● Copyright 2012 ● IED – Activity 8.5b Part Drawings (Arbor Press) – Page 2
3. Components that require section or auxiliary views must have the views within
their CAD drawings. You will also provide an exploded view of your assembly
with balloons and a parts list on a drawing sheet. Unmodified off-the-shelf
components, such as the 3/8-16 UNC x 1.00 cap screw (Part #9), do not require
dimensioned drawings. Only modified off-the-shelf components require technical
drawings. Such drawings will include only the dimensions required to perform the
modification.
4. Assist classmates by exchanging your CAD drawing printouts and checking the
drawings for errors. Place a revision block on each drawing to track changes
made before drawings are submitted for final evaluation.
Conclusion
1. Under what circumstances would it be advantageous to pattern a component?
2. What is an offset and how is it used?
3. What is the difference between a mate and flush constraint?
4. What constraint would you use to place a pin inside a hole?
Project Lead The Way, Inc. ● Copyright 2012 ● IED – Activity 8.5b Part Drawings (Arbor Press) – Page 3
5. What is a subassembly?
6. What advantages does CAD have over technical sketching?
7. If dimensional information can be retrieved from CAD part models, then why do
engineers create detail drawings of parts?
Project Lead The Way, Inc. ● Copyright 2012 ● IED – Activity 8.5b Part Drawings (Arbor Press) – Page 4

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