GARF Evaluation 2009 - Curry School of Education

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GARF Evaluation 2009 - Curry School of Education
Sharon Walpole
University of Delaware
Michael C. McKenna
University of Virginia
Our goals were to:
 Compare achievement growth from 2008 to
2009;
 Compare achievement between cohorts;
 See if quality of coaching was related to
implementation of last year’s instructional
targets (interactive read-alouds and smallgroup differentiated instruction).
GARF Demographics
Number of
Schools
Average
Enrollment
Average %
White
Average %
ELLs
(sd)
Average %
African
American
(sd)
(sd)
(sd)
All
109
226.5
(98.2)
20.4
(26.6)
64.2
(29.2)
6.3
(11.5)
Cohort 1
73
224
(99.8)
25.0
(29.6)
62.2
(32.0)
9.5
(3.5)
Cohort 2
36
231
(96.0)
11.1
(19.4)
68.2
(25.3)
7.2
(3.5)
Achievement
We used:
 ITBS Vocabulary, Comprehension and
Reading Total at grades 1-3
 DIBELS PSF, NWF, and ORF at grades
K-3
Kindergarten
B
Grade 1
Grade 2
M
E
B
M
E
PSF
√
√
√
√
√
NWF
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
ORF
B
Grade 3
M
E
B
M
E
√
√
√
√
√
ITBS Comprehension
Students at or above 50th percentile rank
ITBS Vocabulary
Students at or above 50th percentile rank
There were no ITBS differences
between the two cohorts
ITBS Total Reading
Variance in Grade 1 Pass Rates between Schools
ITBS Total Reading
Variance in Grade 2 Pass Rates between Schools
ITBS Total Reading
Variance in Grade 3 Pass Rates between Schools
Implementation of read-alouds and
differentiation did not differ between
the two cohorts at grades K-2. There
were differences at grade 3.
1
2
Read-Alouds
2
1
Differentiation
Coaching
7 Key Assumptions in ReformOriented Coaching
1. The type and quality of basic classroom
instruction was the most powerful
influence on student achievement.
2. Teachers entered GARF with vastly
different sets of background knowledge.
3. Teachers’ low expectations contributed to
low levels of achievement, especially for
poor and minority children.
7 Key Assumptions in ReformOriented Coaching
4. Meaningful instructional change proceeds
from overt changes in teacher practices, to
measurement of student achievement
associated with those practices, and
eventually to changes in beliefs about
students.
Altered
Practice
Increased
Achievement
Altered
Beliefs about
Students
7 Key Assumptions in ReformOriented Coaching
5. In GARF, site-based coaches were in the
best position to provide differentiated
professional support to teachers, support
that was both consistent with research and
adapted to the needs of the setting.
6. Coaching must involve cycles of theory,
demonstration, practice, and feedback.
A professional support system
Theory
Feedback
Demonstration
Practice
Joyce, B., & Showers, B. (2002). Student achievement through staff development.
Alexandria, VA: ASCD.
7 Key Assumptions in ReformOriented Coaching
7. In GARF schools, student and teacher
needs were real, principals were committed
to a new instructional model, and coaches
were ready to begin their work
We used:
 Coaching Survey (completed by
Regional Specialists)
 Read-Aloud Survey (completed by
Regionals Specialists for grade-level
teams)
 Differentiation Survey (completed by
Regional Specialists for grade-level
teams)
A chance for self assessment?
 Take the coaching survey to rate yourself
 Think about the grade-level teams. How would they
score on the Differentiation Survey and the ReadAloud Survey?
Coaching and Read-Alouds
How important are these findings?
Grade
K
1
2
3
Effect Size
Small
Moderate
Moderate
Moderate
Read-Alouds and Achievement
How important are these findings?
Vocabulary
Grade
Effect Size
1
Moderate
2
Small
3
Moderate
How important are these findings?
Comprehension
Grade
Effect Size
1
Moderate
2
Moderate
3
Moderate
DIBELS between Years
DIBELS between Cohorts
Fluency between Schools: Grade 1
Fluency between Schools: Grade 2
Fluency between Schools: Grade 3
Fluency Pass Rates by Grade
Grade
1
2
3
Percent
Passing at
End of Year
74.0
62.4
56.6
Coaching and Differentiation
Differentiation and Achievement
From Coaching to Achievement:
Lower-Order Skills
.507 to .592
Quality of
Coaching
.178 to .313
Level of
Implementation
Student
Achievement
From Coaching to Achievement:
Higher-Order Skills
.230 to .458
Quality of
Coaching
.206 to .379
Level of
Implementation
Student
Achievement
Summary of Key Findings
 Achievement trends in all of the five key
dimensions of Reading First instruction are
generally positive.
 Differences favoring schools in the first
cohort are slight, and the newer schools are
producing comparable results.
 Achievement in all of the five key
dimensions of Reading First instruction
varies among schools.
Summary of Key Findings
 Achievement gains in comprehension and
vocabulary are related to implementation of
interactive read-alouds.
 Achievement gains in phonemic awareness,
decoding, and oral reading fluency are
related to implementation of differentiated
instruction.
Summary of Key Findings
 Successful implementation of differentiated
instruction and read-alouds is related to the
quality of the coaching teachers receive.
 These findings support the Cognitive Model
of Reading Assessment.
Support for the Cognitive
Model
.513
PSF
.644
NWF
.400
.625
ORF
.321
ITBS
Comp

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