Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop

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Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Second Grade
Launching the Reading Workshop
06/5/2014
6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
Page 1
Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Table of Contents
Background Section
Abstract
Background Information
Sample Unit Section
Resources and Materials Needed
Why a script?
Overview of Sessions – Teaching and Learning Points
Routines and Rituals
Read Aloud
Lesson Plans
3
4
5
6
7
8
10
13
Resource Materials Section
See Separate Packet
Please note: A unit may have additional information under the background section.
6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
Page 2
Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Background Section
Abstract
Second graders are welcomed into the world of BIG TIME READERS. Most of these readers are reading I/J/K (Fountas
and Pinnell) reading levels or higher and will have to make decisions for problem solving while using speeded action.
They will learn that some of the strategies they once used in kindergarten and first grade aren’t as well suited for their
reading growth at current text levels.
Concept 1 will ask second grade readers to think of themselves as BIG TIME READERS who make their own decisions. It
may feel odd to invite readers on the first day of school to show what they already know about workshop and reading,
but the rewards of this invitation will be plentiful. Plan to watch and listen for the kinds of readers in the group. Take
notes as readers settle in, read, flag, and jot based on previous experience. They will begin logging reading and setting
goals for reading more pages across days and weeks.
Concept 2 asks readers to step into thinking about text from the minute the text is picked up and into conversations long
after the book is put down. Readers learn to use what is already known about books and texts to make BIG predictions
about the way text will go. Readers learn that revisiting text by rereading entire books can aide in making more
meaningful connections to how all the pieces of the text fit together, which will offer greater ease when thinking about
author's purpose or message.
Concept 3 organizes readers into like-level partnerships. Readers reading the same, or about the same, level will be
paired for thinking and conversation. Readers learn to care for their partner by coming prepared to partnerships,
listening well, and helping problem solve. They will come to see that a reading partner is an important person, as
partners help each other gain reading stamina and focus. Partners will not read aloud to each other, except to reread
for fluency, to prove a point, or to act out character voices. They certainly can read a favorite part or a part that is
important but choral, echo, and reading page by page aloud are pushed aside to allow readers more time for thinking
and talking. At these levels, it is more important that readers learn to read silently to themselves and read aloud when
needed in partnership, given their conversation or plans.
Concept 4 shows readers that they can take speeded action to solve problems. Teachers may want to review first grade
strategy charts for alignment but also cross out and revise those strategies that are no longer useful (always pointing to
words, reading out loud). Readers will delight in the idea that they are more grown up readers and are using the
strategies of BIG TIME READERS. The problem solving lessons emphasize stopping in the midst of text when stuck, being
your own problem solver, rereading word parts, and thinking about the meaning of text. Jotting and flagging notes, in
the midst of independent reading, where problems aren't solved, gives an authentic strategy and elevates the need for
partners to help.
The unit, like all units, ends with a celebration. Empowering readers to see how far they have come is the theme.
Suggestions are listed in session 19.
6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Background Section
Background Information
This unit assumes that second graders have prepared bags of books near the end of first grade to use in their first unit of
study in second grade. This can be set up with your first grade teaching team. It is nice if readers themselves think about
who they are as readers and prepare their own bags of “just right” reading materials. If this was not done, teachers can
still prepare bags based on the levels of text the first grade team assessed in May/June. Bags of books with mixed
genres, lengths, and levels of books, should be prepared for readers for the very first lesson in this unit.
Books are critical to the reading workshop. Readers may start the first week with bags from first grade, but as reading
levels are learned, teachers will want to use leveled table top crates or leveled libraries to help point readers in new
directions. Readers’ bags of books will change weekly during several times across the unit of study. Although there is not
a mini-lesson on how to shop for books, as teachers find that they know their readers’ level of text and readers shopped
in first grade, there is no reason to keep the library closed. It is suggested to teach a “just right” book lesson coupled
with shopping procedures and then open the library. Remind readers of what they already know about shopping for
their own books. Teacher guidance can still play a role here, as readers learn the books of their new library and grow
accustom to reading for long stretches each and every day.
Crates of books, matching your second grade reader’s levels that are prepared and available on table tops for quick
shopping, should be present. If readers have made jumps in levels over the summer or experienced summer slide, to
lower levels these crates of books will make for easy shopping. These crates represent a leveled classroom library, but
until the teacher has the time to assess current levels and teach a bit on shopping procedures, it is helpful to work from
a makeshift library of sorts. Readers can simply exchange books read from crates you have prepared.
Readers have had two years of reading workshop structures and units of study as foundations stepping into this year.
Teachers may want to take the time to review the Kindergarten and First Grade units for their own professional
knowledge and use what they know and move forward. It is helpful to have in mind what was accomplished across past
units as teachers plan ahead for their second graders. Most likely, there will be readers below and above grade level
thus looking into units of study below and above grade level is always a smart idea for differentiating instructional
moves and setting individual goals.
Partnership work should follow the work of the unit of study. Partnerships at this time should be focused on talking
about books rather than reading books to each other. This work is meant to support the needs of the students
and moves from what readers notice, to what they wonder, to thoughtful theories supported by text, to revised and/or
confirmed theories supported by text, to connecting themes around social issues. Learning is evident in the talk.
A note about texts suggested throughout the unit: When planning your mini lessons there are thousands of text choices
that might make more sense for your readers depending on the level of readers, their prior knowledge, and interests.
The suggestions aim to show mini-lesson texts that are either at or above grade level, knowing you have both kinds of
readers in your class. Of course, there will also be readers below grade level, too. Differentiating by reviewing the
kindergarten and first grade units may be helpful.
6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Book Buzz
Knowing a little about a book a friend has read is a lot like taking the advice from the same friend to see a new movie,
try a new restaurant or travel to a new location. Children, too, make recommendations on all kinds of things they love;
songs, food, movies, and games. The "Book Buzz" hopes to expand this natural act of recommendations to include
books, too! Teachers should model book recommendations in whole class gatherings. Teachers can also call attention to
www.kidsbookshelf.com to showcase book recommendations and reviews from around the world. The work with a book
buzz will serve many purposes. When readers take on the responsibility to suggest books to each other their opportunity
to use the skills and strategies aligned to the CCSS Speaking and Listening standards and their knowledge of literary
elements is put into play.
6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Sample Unit Section
Resources and Materials Needed
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Gallon size plastic bag for every reader and the teacher or book boxes, individual book containers, etc.
Plastic bag for every reader filled with books from first grade reading May-June: Leveled books, classics,
favorites, series, read alouds, informational titles, shared reading poems, songs
Teacher’s demonstration texts in baggie: Leveled books, classics, favorites, series, read alouds, informational
titles, shared reading poems, songs, from first grade libraries May-June (matches readers’ baggies)
Many books mixed genre that match the books students were reading in first grade May-June: Leveled books,
classics, favorites, series, read alouds, informational titles, shared reading poems, songs stored in crates
organized by type of text. Essentially, a classroom library in crate form. (Helps with movement of books to
readers and teacher guidance with selection of books) Large crates to hold individual bags after workshop
(makes for easy cleanup and distribution)
Abundance of chart paper
Abundance of post-it/sticky notes in all kinds of shapes and sizes
Easel
Meeting area
Markers
Timer
Pens or pencils for readers stored in baggies
Post-its/sticky notes stored in baggies
Notebook (not part of unit 1 but for differentiated small groups of conference work.)
Read Aloud books for use in demonstrations
Old charts from grade one if possible
Professional Resources:
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Calkins, L. (2001). The Art of Teaching Reading. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
Calkins, L. (2011-2012). A Curricular Plan for Reading Workshop, Second Grade. Portsmouth, NH:
Heinemann.
Collins, K. (2004). Growing Readers: Units of Study in the Primary Classroom. Portland, MA: Stenhouse
Fountas, I. & Pinnell, G.S. (2005). Leveled Books, K-8: Matching Text to Readers for Effective Teaching.
Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
Goldberg, G. & Serravallo, J. (2007). Conferring with Readers: Supporting Each Student’s Growth &
Independence. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
Serravallo, J. (2010). Teaching Reading in Small Groups: Differentiated Instruction for Building Strategic,
Independent Readers. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Sample Unit Section
Why a script?
The following unit has been written in script form to help guide and support teachers in implementing effective reading
instruction; routines, procedures, strategies and specific instructional vocabulary. In other words, the script serves as a
“reading coach” for teachers. Teachers, whether new to the teaching profession, new to reading workshop, or new to
some common core standards, may benefit from having detailed lesson plans. The goal is that in time teachers will no
longer need a script because they will have had time to study and gain procedural knowledge for many of the common
core units of study. Also, many teachers feel a script serves as a guide for guest/substitute teachers or student teachers.
Please view these scripts as a framework from which to work – rewrite, revise, and reshape them to fit your teaching
style, your students, and your needs.
Additional lesson information:
Balanced Literacy Program (BLP) - A Balanced Literacy Program which is necessary to support literacy acquisition
includes: reading and writing workshop, word study, read-aloud with accountable talk, small group, shared reading and
writing, and interactive writing. Teachers should make every effort to include all components of a balanced literacy
program into their language arts block. Reading and Writing workshop are only one part of a balanced literacy program.
The MAISA unit framework is based on a workshop approach. Therefore, at other times teachers will need to include the
other components to support student learning.
Reading Workshop Components:
Mini-lesson- A mini-lesson is a short (5-10 minute) focused lesson where the teacher directly instructs on a skill,
strategy, or habit that students will need to use during independent work. A mini-lesson has a set architecture.
Independent Reading, Conferring, and Small Group Work - Following the mini-lesson, students will be sent off to read
independently. During independent reading time teachers will confer with individuals or small groups of students.
Mid-workshop Teaching Point –
The purpose of a mid-workshop teaching point is to speak to the whole class, often halfway into the work time.
Teachers may relay an observation from a conference, extend or reinforce the teaching point, highlight a particular
example of good work, or steer children around a peer problem. Add or modify mid-workshop teaching points based on
students’ needs.
Partnership WorkPartnership work is an essential component of the reading workshop structure. Partnerships allow time each day for
students to read and talk together, as well as provide support for stamina. Each session includes suggestions for possible
partnership work. Add or modify based on students’ needs.
6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Share Component –
Each lesson includes a possible share option. Teachers may modify based on students’ needs. Other share options may
include: follow-up on a mini-lesson to reinforce and/or clarify the teaching point; problem solve to build community;
review to recall prior learning and build repertoire of strategies; preview tomorrow’s mini lesson; or celebrate learning
via the work of a few students or partner/whole class share (source: Teachers College Reading and Writing Project).
6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Sample Unit Section
Overview of Sessions – Teaching and Learning Points
Alter this unit based on student needs, resources available, and your teaching style. Add and subtract according to
what works for you and your students.
Concept I:
Session 1
Session 2
Session 3
Session 4
Session 5
Session 6
Concept II:
Session 7
Session 8
Session 9
Session 10
Concept III:
Session 11
Session 12
Session 13
Session 14
Session 15
Concept IV:
Session 16
Session 17
Session 18
Session 19
Readers make decisions.
Readers show all that they know about being in charge of their reading by settling in, reading, jotting if
necessary, and talking to partners.
Readers decide if a book is just right for them by reading a page and counting on fingers trouble spots
and by listening to whether their reading is smooth.
Readers use bookmarks to keep their reading place and reread portions near the bookmark to resume
reading with understanding.
Readers decide to reread to figure out characters.
Readers keep logs and use them to set goals.
Readers make plans to meet their reading goals.
Readers think before, in the midst of and after reading text.
Readers think big thoughts about their books before even starting the first page by keeping in mind
what they know about the way books go.
Readers get themselves ready to read by asking, “What kind of book is this, what do I have to do when I
read books that go like this?
Readers think the whole way through their story to fit the pieces of the story
togetherhttp://www.oaklandschoolsliteracy.org/professional-learning/grades-k-5/writing-pathwaysassessment-grades-3-5/
After finishing books, readers reread them over and over, gaining more understanding.
Readers care about talking with others, in order to grow their reading and thinking.
Readers use their partners to celebrate, solve tricky parts, and do things for each other.
Readers react and respond to each other.
Partners help to grow reading and thinking.
Readers recommend books to each other by including the title, a bit about the characters or topic and
why they think their partner would like it.
Readers invent new ways to talk about their books by deciding what they will do when they get together
next time.
Readers take action to solve problems
Readers stop in the midst of reading if something doesn't make sense and ask, “What can I do to fix this
part?”
Readers take speeded action to solve a word by choosing strategies to try and rereading.
Readers use speeded action to reread, look at word parts and think “what would make sense?” to solve
word problems.
Readers celebrate after a lot of hard work and growth.
6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Routines and Rituals: Building a Community of Independent Readers
Reading workshops are structured in predictable, consistent ways so that the infrastructure of any one workshop is almost the same
throughout the year and throughout a child’s elementary school experience (Calkins, 2005). One means of developing a community
of independent readers is to implement routines and rituals that are consistent within and across grade levels.
A few lessons in each launching unit are devoted to the management of a reading classroom. However, depending on student need
and experience, additional lessons on management may be needed. Also, it is assumed that many of these routines and rituals go
across curricular areas so they will be addressed and taught throughout the school day and not just in reading workshop. This shift
in focus allows more mini lessons to be devoted to supporting students in cycling through the reading process and acquiring a
toolbox of reading strategies.
The following are a collection of routines and rituals teachers may want to review. Select based on students’ needs.
Routines
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Opening Routine
Mini-Lessons
Sending children off to work
Independent work time
Closing Routine or Share
Partnerships
Opening Routine – Beginning Each Day’s Reading Instruction
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Meeting area/ Room arrangement
Signal for students to meet for reading workshop
What to bring to meeting area
Partnerships at meeting area
Mini-lessons – The Fuel for Continued Growth
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Student expectations as they participate in a mini lesson
Partnership guidelines
How students sit during a mini-lesson and share
Sending Children Off to Work – Transition from Mini-lesson to Work Time
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Expectation to “go off” and get started working
Dismissal options
6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Routines and Rituals: Building a Community of Independent Readers, Continued
Independent work time – Students working on their own
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Assigned reading spots
Getting started
Students work initially without teacher guidance and/or conference
Nature of Children’s Work – Reading focus
Role of Mini-lesson
Conversations in Reading Workshop: productive talk, silent reading time & whole-class intervals for partnership talks
Signal for noise volume
Mid-Workshop Teaching Point
Flexible reading groups (strategy or guided reading)
Teacher conferences
Productivity – early in the year, later in the year (expectations)
What to do if you need assistance – Example: “Three before me” (Students must ask three students before asking the teacher.)
Closing Routine – Managing the Share Session
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Signal to meet
Share session at meeting Area
Celebration of Growth
Partnership Routine – Being an Effective Partner
It is recommended that several mid-workshop teaching points focus on teaching students how to build effective
partnerships.
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Turning and Talking – discussing something with a partner per teacher’s guidance
Who goes first?
Compliments can be helpful when they are specific
Constructive suggestions – people can be sensitive about their work, so it’s best to ask questions or give suggestions in a gentle
way
One helpful way to listen (or read) a partner’s work is to see if everything is clear and makes sense
How partners can help us when we are stuck
Effective questions to ask partners
If your partner has a suggestion, it may be worth trying (value the input/role of partnerships)
Appropriate times to meet with your partner, where to meet with your partner, why to meet with your partner
6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Read Aloud with Accountable Talk
Read-aloud with accountable talk is a critical component of a balanced literacy program. The purpose of read-aloud with
accountable talk is to model the work that readers do to comprehend books and to nurture ideas and theories about
stories, characters, and text. During this interactive demonstration, the teacher has purposely selected text and flagged
pages with the intention to teach a specific skill or strategy. The teacher is reading so children can concentrate on using
strategies for comprehension and having accountable conversation about the text. Students are asked to engage with
the text by responding to one another or through jotting notes about their thinking. The teacher scaffolds children with
the kinds of conversation they are expected to have with their partner during independent reading. This demonstration
foreshadows the reading work that will be done in future mini-lessons and units of study.
Since read-aloud is done outside of Readers Workshop the following planning continuum provides teachers with a map
to possible foci within read -aloud. This planning continuum aims to support teachers with upcoming strategies that will
be taught in mini-lessons and future units of study.
Read Aloud with Accountable Talk Planning Continuum
September
October
November
Launching the Reading
Workshop
Character Unit
Informational
Read Aloud
Books
Utilize Narrative and
Informational Text
Equally, initially. Turn to
narrative strong character text
final week.
Utilize Narrative strong
character books, initially.
Turn to informational
text final week.
Utilize Informational text
initially. Turn to series reading or
varied genre narrative the last
week.
Read Aloud
Focus
Readers think about how the
title, chapter titles, the blurb
on the back and the story fit
together
Readers pay attention to
characters wants and
troubles
Readers bring more to the text
than just the words and pictures
informational text. (prior
knowledge, inference,
visualization, connections)
Unit of Study
Talk about different genreswhat they are
Readers think about
character traits and
feelings
Readers have big thoughts
Readers think about
about books before they begin what their character is
reading the first page. They
trying to tell them
Readers have ways of finding
meanings to unknown words by
thinking about the topic and
using the words around it.
Readers think about other words
like the tricky word and connect
6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
say how the book may go and
think about authors intent or
message
Readers pay attention to the
pieces of text and how they fit
together, like a puzzle.
Readers, stop to think, making
their picture clear, checking
whether the pieces of text fit
together, and revise thinking if
needed.
Readers finish books and then
stop to think about the BIG
IDEAS. Author’s message or
intent.
Readers reread books,
noticing new thoughts
because of smooth reading
and clearer pictures in mind,
leading them to better
understanding.
Readers make notes and
charts to help keep track
of character actions,
dialogue and feelings
and what these say
about their character
Readers know characters
can lead them to bigger
thinking about author’s
message
Readers follow
characters actions
dialogue and feelings
through the entire story.
that knowledge to unlock
meaning.
Readers can read more than one
book on a topic and compare and
contrast the information.
Readers know jotting and talking
about informational reading adds
more understanding.
Readers can use gestures and
their voice to teach others about
their informational reading.
Readers know characters
typically struggle or have
a problem, and they read
forward with that in
mind.
Readers, ask, “Has this
character changed?
Why?”
Readers think about the
words they are reading and let
the words create more
Readers know
meaning by visualizing and
informational text is
inferring.
read with a different
voice that conveys the
Readers stop to talk to
meaning of the text.
themselves or jot about tricky (Sound like a scientist or
parts before reading on.
news reporter)
Readers have lots of ways to
solve tricky words, including
drawing on word meanings
Readers know that they
can become smarter by
reading informational
text.
6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Readers are always asking,
“Does this make sense?” and
holding what they already
know as they read forward.
Readers weave text
features into their
reading to learn more.
Readers pay attention to
characters wants and troubles
Readers read and then
retell what the text is
about.
Readers think about character
traits and feelings
Readers bring more to
the text than just the
words and pictures
informational text. (prior
knowledge, inference,
visualization,
connections)
Readers think about what
their character is trying to tell
them
6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plan
Session
1
Concept
Readers make decisions
Teaching Point
Readers show all that they know about being in charge of their reading by settling in, reading, jotting
if necessary, and talking to partners.
Materials
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Prepared bags of books from first grade May-June levels
passed up to second grade class.
Post-its in every bag
Pen or pencil in every bag
Teacher’s own baggie of books matching levels and
varied genre in readers bags to be used for mini-lesson
demonstrations for modeling the mini-lesson
Tips
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Optional: Crate of books on every table matching the levels
of readers coming to you. Varied genre: Chapter long and
short, series, favorite picture books, poetry, leveled
readers, informational text of all kinds. (Talk with first
grade teachers or devise a way to communicate May-June
reading levels of readers).
Please see the Resource Material Packet for Assessment Checklist to be used during the unit
Please see background section for what partnerships should look like in Reading Workshop.
You are leaning on the fact that readers have two years of Reading Workshop structures and
procedures behind them. Remind them quickly of their work previously. Plan to look for them to
show, on this first day, all that they know already. Take notes/ watch and listen for “What is
known?”
A few lessons in each launching unit are devoted to the management of a reading classroom.
However, depending on student need and experience, additional lessons on management may
be needed. Also, it is assumed that many of these routines and rituals go across curricular areas
so they will be addressed and taught throughout the school day and not just in reading
workshop. See section on Routines and Rituals for possible teaching points.
This lesson is more “Explanation and Examples” with a bit of demonstration as you explain. The
rationale is that readers know that the explaining and showing is review from first grade.
“Explanation with Examples” is an instructional strategy useful for reviewing skills or strategies.
“Demonstration” is for new and/or complex skills or strategies.
The crate of books on tables is for convenience today. If teachers notice a readers’ bag of books
is off in levels because of tremendous growth, they can dip into the crates prepared for this
situation.
Send letter for end of unit celebration if celebration involving community is utilized.(Lesson 19)
Send Letter and Contract for take home reading log and books (Lesson 6)
Letters and contracts not provided in unit or resources.
You may choose to use your own leveled library if you do not have the opportunity to gather
bags of books from first grade. The point of this lesson is to observe and gather information
6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
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Connection
about the routines they know.
Based on the information gleaned from this lesson regarding student knowledge of routines an
additional session on routines may be needed following this session.
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Teach
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Readers, welcome to second grade reading workshop! This is really a big deal...you may not
have known it before you sat down, but second grade reading workshop is really a workshop
for big time readers. Readers who already know so much about reading, thinking about their
reading, and talking about their reading. Some of the things we do this year will feel a little
like last year. For example, we are gathered together for our mini lesson, right? But there are
so many new and exciting things we “BIG TIME READERS” are going to tackle because we are
not beginning readers anymore.
I spoke with your first grade teachers. They shared charts with me. They showed me logs you
were keeping, and levels you were reading. In fact, that baggie of books you put together last
year is here waiting for you to open and begin your second grade reading journey.
So today, I really only have one tiny thing to teach you. I want to teach you that a big part of
being in second grade is that you get to make a lot of decisions for yourself as a reader. You
already know how to pick just right books, you know how to pick a quiet place to work, and
you know that once you get to that spot you read, read, and read! You also may stop to jot an
idea about some bit of thinking. You have post-its already ready and a pen in your bag, too. So
that you can decide right away if you need to jot down an idea to share with a partner, OHHH!
And you know so much about talking with other readers, how to sit close and talk quietly, how
to talk from post-its, how to reread parts to show where your thinking came from. Whewww!
That is a lot of skill and strategy you already know.
So today, let me teach you about the decisions you will make for yourself so that you can get
going as “Big Time Readers” in second grade!
Readers, you are going to show me today all that you know about being in charge of your own
reading by settling in, reading and jotting if necessary. I have a baggie of books that looks just
like yours, here in my lap... Do you remember making these baggies at the end of first grade?
You did that so that you could step right into second grade and become that BIG TIME
READER.
So, today, you will gather your baggie and then select a place to read. This is your decision.
You may walk the room for a few seconds but I’m counting on you to use what you know
about good places to read and think and make a responsible decision for yourself. Maybe you
will sit here on the carpet, maybe by the door or windows. If someone is already in a spot you
were considering, you will have to make a decision for yourself, where else could you sit and
read? You might even decide that you’d like to sit in your own seat! Once you are sitting, I’d
like to see you settle in. You know how to settle in (demonstrate sequence a bit by taking our
books, post-its, pen when you get to that part).
You might look at the books in your bag, read the blurb on the back, or flip through a few
pages of each. Maybe you decide to read a little of each book, a page or two, to get a feel for
the writing. Take your time to settle in, I’ll be watching how you do this. Then, I’m watching for
you to decide on one of your books to read. You may decide as you are reading that you should
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
jot a note about the main character or some thinking you’ve had. I’m hoping you will show me,
if you decide to jot your thinking on post-its. Each bag has a pen ready to jot your thinking,
should you decide to show me you know this is part of reading work.
Active
Engagement



Link


Mid-Workshop
Teaching Point


Partnerships


Readers, you have just listened and watched a bit for the expectation for today’s reading
workshop. I am counting on you to be the “BIG TIME READERS” I have heard so much about
from your first grade teachers.
I want you to think for a moment about what I am asking you to do. You have a lot of decisions
to make how do you see yourself moving in our classroom...quietly? Do you see yourself
looking quickly for a place to sit and read? Do you like to sit in a chair, by our door, on the
carpet? Picture yourself moving, deciding on a spot. What are you going to do if someone is
there, too close to you....huh? I wonder if you remember what readers look like during
independent reading time.
I’ll be watching and taking notes. This is your chance to show me! Now close your eyes. You
are holding your bag, you take out your books, you spend a few minutes settling in…think
about what you will do first, second, and then you decide to read...and you may decide to jot...
and read, read, read. Do you picture yourself? Do you remember what it takes to focus in and
settle and get your mind on your print and your mind thinking?
Readers, the decisions today are all yours because you are already BIG TIME READERS. This is a
year you will see that you have lots of decisions to make for yourself as a reader. When you
were in younger grades, teachers or people might have told you where to sit, what to read,
how to jot. This year is different. Because you are a second grade reader, you will be making
so many decisions for yourself.
Now, I’d like you to gather your bags and show me what you already know about making
decisions that help you do your very best reading. I’m going to set our timer for 30 minutes I
know you were reading even longer last year but I want to make sure that we save time for
partnerships, today. If you decide to jot as you read, you will have notes to share with a
partner, should you decide to use them.
Readers, I knew I would not be disappointed. It is as if we have been in our reading workshop
for weeks and weeks. You have shown me that you know to move quietly from the mini-lesson,
to a reading spot. Once you are seated, you stay right in that spot without moving, except to
turn pages, adjust a bit and jot. So many of you have already started reading that very first
book...which is really making me think about tomorrow’s lesson. I better be ready for you
because I see that you really are already BIG TIME READERS! If you can explicitly name readers
showing the objectives of this day’s lesson, do so. Have readers look over and see that they
look like readers who know what independent reading time looks like.
This time could also be used to teach a procedure, routine or expectation
Readers, our timer has rung. And it is time for partnerships. Today, I am going to ask you to
make a decision about who to talk to based on where you are sitting. We want to move
quickly into our talking time, so it wouldn’t make a lot of sense to walk all the way across the
room to partner up quickly, just look for someone who is nearby.
I will help a bit to make some connections. But I am looking to you to show me that you know
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
the way readers partner up to talk about their books and jots. Once you get with your partner,
decide again...who will go first, what will you talk about, will you do any rereading? It’s all
your decision...Let’s partner up. You may need to help readers who seem lost, maybe because
they are new to your school or have fear of approaching others this first day. (A group of
three is fine, if you have odd numbers. Like leveled readers is not a need today).
After the
Workshop Share


Readers, wow! What BIG TIME READERS YOU ARE! I am really going to have to get my act
together to keep up with your reading and thinking. We are going to be able to do so many
neat and challenging studies with our reading because of how prepared and knowledgeable
you are about what reading looks like and what a reader does with thinking and talking.
Please shake the hands of a few readers beside you and tell them, “I really like how we….” But
know... this is only the beginning of greatness!
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plan
Session
2
Concept
Readers make decisions.
Teaching Point
Readers decide if a book is “just right” for them by reading a page, counting trouble spots and
listening to whether their reading is smooth.
Materials
●
Could borrow a chart from first grade teachers
“Choosing Just Right Text” as a reminder that this is
already known.
Tips
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
Connection
●
Hard to read book or magazine and “just right” piece
of text for you: Scientific Suggestion:
1. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/21/science/spac
e/small-wheels-play-big-role-on-keplerspacecraft.html?ref=nationalaeronauticsandspacea
dministration
2. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/08/science/spac
e/martian-rock-another-clue-to-a-once-water-richplanet.html?ref=nationalaeronauticsandspaceadmi
nistration
If links do not open, try and cut and paste into browser or using a different browser.
Additional lessons may be added on choosing just right books if needed.
Remind students that tricky parts might also be parts they do not understand, not just parts they
cannot decode.
Readers have had lessons choosing just right books in previous grades. Again this is a bit of
review but important groundwork for establishing readers who make responsible decisions with
book choices.
It is better if you can show the text you are reading on smart board, document camera, or
overhead.
The use of repeated gestures can increase the chances of mini-lessons sticking.
If needed practice “turn and talk” at other times throughout the day. Also come up with a signal
to end conversations.
Be thinking about assigning reading partners

Readers, when I was a second grade reader myself, my teacher told me what books and stories
to read. In fact, all the way from kindergarten to high school, every teacher I had, told me
what books or stories or articles to read. I never made choices or decisions for my reading
unless my mom or dad took me to the library or the bookstore. I don’t think I made many
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1



Teach



Active
Engagement



decisions at all as a reader...believe me... I wish I could have. Now, that I’m all grown-up I
make all of my own reading decisions.
Sometimes, I’m asked to read something to learn more about teaching or to stay connected
with my staff. But most of the time, I make my own decisions. I choose things I want to read
and things I know I can read well -- I can read the words and understand them. It might be
really hard for me to read a doctor’s book with all the long names for medicine and body parts.
So...I don’t read doctor's books. I read books where I know most of the words and understand
what I am reading. I can picture it in my mind.
Your reading life is going to be a lot like my reading life now, not like the one I lived in second
grade. You are going to make many of your own decisions.
Today I want to teach you that readers choose “just right” books by reading a portion and
counting on their fingers trouble spots. (5 finger test) They also watch and listen to themselves
to make sure the reading they are trying out is smooth. If readers count too many trouble
spots --5 or more--or our reading isn’t smooth, or we don’t understand what is happening, we
make a decision to select a different book or text. Watch me as I show you how this might look
for you.
I have this piece from the NY Times, called Flywheel; I want you to listen to me read it. It is a
piece of text about machinery useful to outer space travel. I really am not well read on space
travel, I don’t read a lot about this topic. I’m already uncertain about what a Flywheel is? I
think I will already count on one finger that I don’t have a picture of a Flywheel in my mind as
one trouble spot; I can’t do any thinking about what I might already know... (Show one finger
from fist extended).
I’ll read and see if this is a “just right” piece. Read your piece enough to show that it is tricky
and is going to take a lot of rereading, research and maybe even conversation to understand.
Be sure to show that there were 5 trouble spots. This piece really is not “just right” for
independent reading. I need to talk to someone about what this article means. And as I
watched myself and listened to myself, I found that I was not reading in a smooth way like I
do when I read aloud to you or read to myself.
Many teachers have a “just right” book chart. This may be used here, a new chart may be
created if needed. See Resource Materials Section for a sample chart.
I’m going to read another piece called, Martian Rock another Clue to a Once Water-Rich
Planet. This time as I read, pay attention to my fingers and whether I use 5 fingers for trouble
spots and listen for smoothness. I’ll share my thinking with you, too so you can judge whether
I understand the text. When I’m finished reading, I’m going to ask you to talk with a shoulder
buddy about my reading and whether you felt this piece was “just right” or too easy or too
hard.
Read piece, showing that there are a couple trouble spots but many more smooth and
understandable ideas right from the beginning. Share your thinking before and during the
read. Do not read the entire piece, for it will take too long. Ask readers to turn to a close by
shoulder buddy (no movement) and talk about their observations.
Get off your teacher chair and listen into the conversation briefly. Just enough to capture
those readers who understand this piece was “just right”.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Link

Readers, I was listening to Ellie and Evan. I heard them say that even though I counted a
couple fingers, my reading was much smoother. Just about every time I stopped to think, I
had a picture in my mind so I could make sense of what I was reading. Thumbs up if you were
thinking the same things, that this was more of a “just right” text for me than the first.

Today, I want you to pay close attention to your reading. You will, again, choose a reading
spot, settle in, read, think, and jot about your thinking. But I want you to try out your books in
a way that has you spying on yourself.
Make sure you get that free hand out, make a fist. If you have a trouble spot that you can’t
solve, put one finger out and so on. If you're reading doesn’t sound smooth, pay attention to
that. Your reading should sound like yourself when you are talking and what you read should
make sense to you.
If you find that you have books in your bag that are too hard, (demonstrate) please use a postit and write the letter H or Hard. I will be conferring and meeting with small groups, so you
may make some new decisions as we consider whether the books we chose last year are just
right for us. I’ll still take my notes as I did yesterday. I’m still very interested in learning what
you already know about being a reader.


Mid-Workshop
Teaching Point


Readers, I just want to stop you a minute. I was reading with Ethan, and he told me before he
even began reading that he felt like everything in his bag was too easy! He shared with me
that we practiced reading a lot this summer and that his mom took him to the library and even
let him buy new books online. When I listened to him read, I couldn’t count any trouble spots.
He could retell all the parts. He read smoothly. Books can be too easy, too. Then we have to
make new decisions for books to read.
I’ve placed Ethan by a crate of books where he is making some new decisions for books in his
bag. If you find that you have books that are too easy, use a post-it note and write the letter E
or EASY on it. As I come to meet with you this week, we will take a look at those books that are
too easy and too hard.
Partnerships

Readers, I would like you to again, meet with that same person(s) as yesterday. In time I will
match you with a partner that you will work with for a long time. But for now, just for ease,
take out partner with that person close by. Please spend some time talking with that partner
about what you found as you tried out your books. Share with them whether books were too
hard or too easy. Certainly share with them those books that were” just right”. I will continue
to partner conference and pull a couple partnerships together for small group work as you
talk.
After the
Workshop Share

Readers, sometimes, it is hard to deal with the feelings you might have when you realize a
book is too hard for you. You might feel sad or angry. You see your friends reading it or your
brother, and you think “I can read that book, if they can.” But we all very different people. We
all learn in different ways at different times.
I remember when my son learned to ride his two wheel bike with no training wheels. He was
3. Our neighbor was 8, and she still was using her training wheels. I know she felt sad and a
little angry that my son was so young and could ride a bike without training wheels. But when

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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1

she realized he could, she asked her dad if he would help her every single night to ride that
bike without the training wheels. And guess what? All that practice paid off. It was just a short
few days and she was riding her bike without the training wheels.
I promise you that if you have books in mind that you want to read, that are too hard, if you let
me teach you, show you, I will do my very best to help you reach your goals. I want you to be
able to make your own decisions as BIG TIME READERS. But our decisions have to be good
ones for us. Reading books that are just too easy or too hard are not going to help us reach
those new challenges. So try not to get sad or angry with books that are too hard right now.
My guess is if you practice reading a lot at home and at school you will change those books
from too hard to “just right”.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plans
Session
3
Concept
Readers make decisions.
Teaching Point
Readers use bookmarks to keep their reading place and reread portions near the bookmark to resume
reading with understanding.
Materials
●
●
Prepared post-it “reread back from bookmark”
Readers Reread To- Anchor chart –See tips
below(Resource Materials Packet)
Tips
●
●
●
●
Connection
Procedures and processes should be consistent from year to year. The Readers Reread anchor
should have begun in Kindergarten and First Grade. If teachers in previous grades have not used
a Rereading anchor chart, it is recommended that these skills be reviewed and a chart created.
See below for a sample of possible strategies that could be on the anchor chart.
Simply using a post-it for a bookmark is fine. Some teachers create bookmarks with strategies
already learned from first grade, as a refresher.
Any time you can notice a reader in your class acting in strategic way, that you have not taught,
use these opportunities to teach the class or other readers close to that reader’s reading level
the same behaviors. Give credit to your readers! Our readers can showcase much more than we
can dream up at times, pay attention to the way they work and problem solve. Their successes
become our content for mini-lessons, conferences, and small group work.
The use of repeated gestures can increase the chances of mini-lessons sticking.


Teach
Teacher book for demonstration of bookmark. Paintball
Blast by Jake Maddox was used for demonstration.

Readers, yesterday I noticed Anna reading and when it was time to partner up I saw her put a
post-it note in her book to keep the place where she stopped reading so that she could begin
reading there again, where her bookmark was, when she had time to read it again. This is
something most readers do, and maybe, you, too have already started to put a post-it note in
your book to keep your place in a book that is longer.
Today, I want to teach you that it is not enough to put your bookmark in and then begin
reading again from the spot that you left off. It is important that readers spend time rereading
before starting on new parts and pages. This way your mind is really thinking about the text
you read before the bookmark and you can carry that thinking with you as you read forward.
I want you to really listen to what I say because I will ask you to explain what you see to a
partner when I am finished. Let’s say that I am a second grader and I’m reading Jake Maddox’s
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1

Paintball Blast. I’ve never read this book before, so I read the blurb and I read over the chapter
titles, look at a few of the pages, I begin reading on page 5 where chapter 1 begins. Chapter 1
is called, Center Station hmm? (Read first 3 paragraphs)
OH, independent reading is over, I must place my bookmark here on page 6. This story is really
action filled. I will continue reading it tomorrow, for sure. So now it is tomorrow...did everyone
get a good night’s sleep? : ) It’s reading time. Oh, my Jake Maddox book...my bookmark...I
didn’t get very far...where did I leave off...oh yeah, right here after this first paragraph on page
6. (Begin reading without rereading) oh, wait, what are they talking about? “Nothing, Max
was free and clear and he was at Center Station.” I think I better reread a bit and think about
what was happening. I’m going to go back, actually, to the beginning of this chapter because I
didn’t get very far. I need to get back in the action of the story (pretend to read quietly to
yourself but loud enough for readers to hear you, with the rereading part). Oh yeah, Max was
playing paintball, and he was running for Center Station...that must be a safe zone or
something, now when I read on (read forward) I totally get it...it’s not a safe zone, he was
running for the hidden shelter...where he can really see where everyone else is. He’s in the best
spot now, he can probably get people without them even knowing...I’ll have to read on and
see...
Active
Engagement

Readers, did you see how marking my place helped, but rereading before the bookmarked
place even helped me more? As you read longer and longer texts with bigger and bigger
words, it is going to be important that you reread a portion back from where your bookmark
is. This is true in storybooks and informational text. Will you please turn and tell a shoulder
partner first what you saw me do and then talk about why it is important? I’ll listen into your
conversations so that I can share some of your ideas.
Link

Readers, I heard Jack and Karin say that they first saw me reading. Then reading time was over
so I put in my post-it bookmark. Then it was the next day. I first just started to read without
any rereading, but then I really didn’t know what was going on and I remembered that it was
important to read back from the bookmark and think about what had already happened.
This is what I want you to make sure you do if you are using a bookmark to keep your place. If
you are not reading longer books just yet, you can still reread the blurb or the beginning
portion of the book before you reread the entire book again. Rereading can help us a lot with
understanding but also with making our reading sound better, which also helps with
understanding.

Mid-Workshop
Teaching Point

Use this time to highlight what is working within your reading workshop or support what
needs tweaking. You can use this time to help with routines and procedures or to reinforce
the teaching objective.
Partnerships

Ok, readers, it is time to move to partnerships. Our timer has sounded and that tells me that
we have been reading for 30 straight minutes! Please mark your page where you are leaving
off for today. (Wait) Now, when you get together with your partner, the same one, show them
where your bookmark went in, tell them what was happening at the point and then talk a little
bit about where you think you’ll begin reading tomorrow. Remember, you plan to back up and
reread.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Teaching Share


Readers, rereading is so important to reading and understanding. We reread for SO many
purposes. I thought I would share the chart you may remember from past years. See, you
learned about rereading in kindergarten and in first grade.
We will add our new idea of rereading back from bookmark on this chart. I have a feeling this
rereading chart will grow. In fact, if you see yourself rereading, let me know. I’d like to see if
rereading helped you in different ways than the ones we already have charted. (Add lesson
idea to rereading chart).
Note: Anchor charts should be co-constructed with students. Icons are important to add to every chart. Please see
resource material packet for possible icons.
Sample Anchor Chart
Readers Reread To…






Sound like a storyteller
To find our place and thinking when we’ve been distracted
To teach you to remember that readers reread to use a better storytelling voice
To think a little more
To learn something new
To understand what we read before starting a new part or page
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plan
Session
4
Concept
Readers make decisions.
Teaching Point
Readers decide to reread to figure out characters.
Materials
●
Book for demonstration that is similar to what most of ●
the students are reading. Paintball Blast, by Jake
Maddox is used for the demonstration. Have book
flagged in places to demonstrate teaching point.
Tips
Connection
●
Prepare large post-its with three reasons to reread and add to first grade rereading chart. Saves
time and reminds readers they have been rereading for years.


Teach
Prepared Post-its to add to Readers Reread To…
Anchor Chart (Resource Packet)

Readers, yesterday we were working with the idea that rereading is important from day to
day. That when we’ve put in our bookmark and are moving on to another part of our day, we
know in time we will come back to that bookmark and reread a bit to make sure we
understand, again how our text is going (this is a little unclear). There are so many reasons
readers reread. We even pulled out that old first grade rereading chart and looked at the
reasons you were rereading last year. Rereading is one of the most helpful acts a reader can
put into action. Seeing that you are BIG TIME READERS this year in second grade I decided that
it would help us if we added a few tips for you to decide upon, with regards to rereading.
Meaning, you will need to decide if you need to reread, and I’m hoping you choose to do so
frequently, depending on YOUR need.
Today I want to teach you that readers can reread to help figure out characters especially in a
new book.
Yesterday, I used Paintball Blast during the demonstration. It really is a new book to me. I was
so into all the action that I read a bit more of the book last night before I left for home. You
can see that I flagged four places in my book. I flagged every time a new character came
along. At first, it was just Max, but then his friend Jay entered the story and in chapter 2 two
more boys entered the story. I was having a hard time keeping track of who was Max’s friend
and who was new to paintball and who played all the time. I was really confused. So I went
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
back and reread and flagged each time a character entered the story. I also jotted their name
and something about them that I would remember. See I wrote Max, main character; Tyler
Max’s paintball friend; Ryan-boy who hits Max new to paintball; Jay- Ryan’s friend. So what I
determined from my rereading is that Max and Tyler are friends and Ryan and Jay are friends.
They are entering a paintball challenge with a six-member team. That means I may have 12
people to keep track of! So rereading and jotting is going to help.
Active
Engagement

Readers, as I was talking and demonstrating I was thinking that it would be wise to list these
new tips for rereading on our Rereading Chart from last year. I’m going to quickly put up the
new reasons for rereading, and then I’d like you to take a minute and read our chart to
yourself. Remind yourself of many of the important reasons we reread.
Link

Today, readers, I’m hoping I will catch you rereading. If you do decide that rereading is needed
or will make your reading time more enjoyable, than reread and mark the pages where you
reread. You can even jot a little RR on the post-it, which will stand for reread.
This way I will be able to tour your post-it and see the kind of thinking work you are doing
inside of your books. Remember, you can also be flagging and post-it noting characters,
changes in characters, what your informational text is about and reasons you think so.

Mid-Workshop
Teaching Point


Use this time to highlight readers who have coded text with RR or have used other
jotting/flagging methods from the lesson or demonstrate what jotting may look like.
Encourage all readers to try before their reading time is over.
Another option is to review that rereading also makes our reading sound smoother.
Partnerships

Readers please gather your books and settle in with your partner. Spend some time today
showing them, where you reread and why. I hope I will even hear some rereading.
After-theWorkshop Share

I’m going to keep our rereading chart out and visible for all of us to see. Rereading can help
us…review chart and add figure out characters. I’m hopeful that my BIG TIME READERS will
take action to reread for themselves to help solve troubles and also find enjoyment in your
reading.
Note: Anchor charts should be co-constructed with students. Icons are important to add to every chart. Please see
resource material packet for possible icons.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Sample Anchor Chart
We Reread To…







Sound like a storyteller
To find our place and thinking when we’ve been distracted
To teach you to remember that readers reread to use a better storytelling voice
To think a little more
To learn something new
To understand what we read before starting a new part or page
To figure out characters
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plan
Session
5
Concept
Readers make decisions.
Teaching Point
Readers keep logs and use them to set goals.
Materials
●
Log/Folder for keeping log
Tips




Connection


Utilizing a log is most appropriate for readers reading levels J+. See First Grade Unit 1
resource packet for alternate way to track reading volume with a modified log, tallies for
rereading, or visual sorting piles. Meet with these readers after the mini lesson to show them
a more appropriate way to track volume given reading level and length of text. Make sure
readers still feel encouraged and proud to be tracking volume of reading and looking to
increase goals. An alternate could be to start the whole class with a simplified version of a log
and meet with small groups of students as they are ready for one with more writing.
Teachers will announce the minutes read at the end of each reading workshop independent
reading session, each day, following this lesson.
Teachers may want to differentiate how much of the log is utilized at this point of the year.
Perhaps start with just date and title, and then add the time and pages.
It is possible to have children that see reading as a race, you may have to conduct a strategy
group or mid-workshop teach to reiterate that the real purpose is to read for meaning.
Readers I want to remind you that when you were first grade readers, you and your class spent
a lot time stretching to read for long bits of time. You might have come into first grade only
able to read 15 minutes or so, but by the end of your first or second unit of study you had
doubled that and read for 30 minutes. Readers are always trying to stretch themselves to read
more and more. It seems like it’s a never ending goal. I know I keep a whole stack of books at
home just waiting for me to read them. Most nights I have 30 minutes to read but some nights
I have a whole hour! I’m always striving to spend more time with my books. Something that is
going to help us see how much we are able to read now and how much more we are able to
read after some stretching is a reading log. You might have kept one last year, too.
I want to show you today that by keeping a log of everything we read we can see how all our
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
hard work helps us reach our goals.
Teach



Readers, here is the log. You will see that it has a place for the date, a book title, the page you
started on and the page you ended on. It also has a place for minutes read and the genre of
the book you are reading. Seems like a lot of information doesn’t it? But we are not going to
spend a lot of time filling in these spaces, making it look perfect. This is really only for you and
sometimes for me to see how we can help you stretch your reading and grow in your reading.
Watch me as I fill out a few lines from my reading of Paintball Blast. I’ve been reading that
book now for three days. So if I start my log on the date three days back, here is what I would
do (Actually, attach a log to your easel or use your document camera). Talk aloud as to how
each section is filled in, based on the pages and minutes read for that day. Use codes for genre
(RF=Realistic Fiction) and only fill the title in one time. Teach readers how to make short
double slashes (quotes) on the date lines following for titles that are read more than one day
in a row. Also, show them how to fill in lines on the same date when shorter texts are read like
poetry or a short picture book. You are demonstrating keeping track of all the reading they do
during independent reading.
Readers, do you see how I actually had to cross out that date, because I was wrong and I also
drew and arrow here showing I read the poetry first. I even used a 2X to tell myself I read that
poem 2 times to make it smoother. This paper doesn’t look pretty, it’s still neat and tidy
though, and it has a lot of information on it about my reading life in school.
Active
Engagement

I’m going to quickly pass out your log and when you get a page, I’d like you to look it over and
talk to the people next to you about what you will need to do today to make sure you are
logging your reading. Quickly distribute logs. Then listen to conversations support as needed.
Link

Readers, I gave each of you a log today. However, since we are all different readers, I may
meet with you today and ask you to do something a little different than this log. This certainly
is not the only way to keep track of your reading. There are other ways that may be more
helpful to different readers.
For now, though, take it back with you and feel free to begin logging. The date is on the board
and you can copy your title right from your book. If it is a long title, remember, you don’t need
to write all of it, just enough so you will remember the book. These logs will help you decide
new goals for your reading time.

Mid-Workshop
Teaching Point

Readers, I just would like to show you a few logs from today’s work during conferences and
small groups collect a few logs to showcase). Highlight how readers are using logs in different
ways with different genres, if possible. Readers, I also asked you to take out one of your
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
folders before we began our workshop. Your log will stay in your folder after independent
reading time is over.
Partnerships


After-theWorkshop Share

OK. We read for 35 minutes today, so please write 35 in your minute’s box on your log. Now I
want you to count how many pages you read in those 35 minutes. It can be a little off,
especially if you read poetry, we might count that as 1 page. Just see about how many pages
you read in those 35 minutes. (Wait, help as needed).
Readers using first grade tallies will count how many tallies they have or number books read) I
bet you guessed what we will be talking about today with our partners? Yes, our logs. Share
with your partner how many pages you read in 35 minutes and show them some of your
thinking work. So carry your log with you in your folder, but feel free to take it out during your
partnership.
Readers, I want you to think about whether you think you could read more pages tomorrow
than you did today. Do you think you could if you settled in quicker, if you kept from getting
distracted, if you didn’t look at the clock, if you jotted quickly, and if you really tried to stretch
yourself, you could read more? I’m thinking you probably can! Show me thumbs up if you think
you might be able to read even one page more. See, you are already deciding that you can
read more than the day before.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plan
Session
6
Concept
Readers make decisions.
Teaching Point
Readers make plans to meet their reading goals.
Materials
●
Log/Folder for keeping log
●
Students need pens/pencil and post-it notes for
active engagement
● This would be a great time to start an at home reading log. Many teachers use the same log
Tips
for home and school and actually have students put an H or S for the place where the reading
was completed. Other teachers see having two logs, one to keep at home and one to keep at
school easier with the paper chase that homework brings. Either way, instituting 30 minutes
of nightly reading and logging, as simply as the school log, is recommended. Readers can still
bring home logs to school at week or months end and analyze time spent reading.
● The connection is a story-connection. Create your own stories so that your readers get to
know you.
● The teach portion leans a little into inquiry teaching. We are not asking for a rising of hands
and single responses. We will ask readers to inquire into their own minds and talk with others
listening for varied responses.
● Teach readers how to look to the clock when they start reading at different times in the
day to gauge how many minutes they read additional. This teaching could take place in this
mini lesson or in small group meetings.
● Don’t forget to be shopping for new books weekly.
Connection

Readers, today is the day that we think a bit more about the kind of reader we’d like to be. I
remember wanting to be the very best piano player. I would practice for hours every day, set
my metronome to help me keep the timing of songs, I would practice scales, where you
crisscross your fingers up and down the keys as fast as I could. Every day, I would write in a
little notebook, the time I spent practicing and the songs and scales I worked on. My piano
teacher would ask me to keep the notebook for two reasons. One reason was so that she could
see how much I had practiced a song and based on how I played it, she could decide what to
teach me next. And the second reason was so that I could see how many songs and hours I had
put into my piano playing each week. When I was ready to leave my lesson, she would always
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1

Teach


say, this song I’m giving you is going to require a little more time and practice. Do you think
you can add 30 or 60 minutes of playing time to your week? The fact that she told me the song
needed more time made me aware that I was playing harder and harder pieces of music. I
could see if I had added time, because it was in my notebook.
Our logs are going to work for us in a very similar way. The only difference is that you are
going to decide how many more pages you can read each day by making a plan to spend more
time reading.
So you need more time for reading? Where oh where are you going to get it? Well, I am going
to set the timer for 5 minutes more today. I’d love to see us grow our reading from 25-30
minutes to 35 minutes consistently as a class. But where else can reading take place? Think for
a minute, see if you can think about three other times in your day where you might read and
log your pages read? I’ll know you’ve thought of three other times to read when I see three
fingers held up high. Will you share what you were thinking with your partners? Listen in. Even
write what you hear in your notes. Share your findings with the class.
Readers, I sent you for a little search inside your head for where more time could come from
for reading each day. Bobby said… Jenny said…Rachel said…. These are all great ideas. We can
use these ideas to spend more time reading. Betsy said that reading once she’s finished with a
quiz or math work could still be logged if she kept her log on her desk all day. She said she use
to do that in first grade, too, read after finishing with something. What a great idea, too, to
leave the log out on your desk. I think we all should try that Betsy. Then everyone can always
log in quickly whenever they catch time to read.
Active
Engagement

Readers, I need you to make a plan for yourself, how are you going to read more? I asked you
to bring your pens and a little stack of post-it’s because I want you to jot a note. My plan to
read more is to read…see if you can finish that idea. Are you going to list your three ideas you
had? Are you going to list an idea you heard from someone else? Take a minute and jot a plan
for reading more.
Link

Today and always as you read, notice what you are reading and how much time you spent
reading. Push yourself to keep improving.
Mid-Workshop
Teaching Point

Utilize this time to showcase successes within your workshop setting or to reinforce needed
management or procedures. Also, highlight plans that might add value to others thinking by
adding…Readers can find really good ideas for becoming better readers by listening to other
readers’ ideas.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Partnerships

I’d like you to share your thinking with your partner…what is your plan for reading more?
Share together, if you have time, spend some minutes sharing your thinking within your books,
what you’ve been reading and thinking and jotting.
After-theWorkshop Share

Use this time to introduce your home reading assignment. Second graders should read a
minimum of 30 minutes, nightly. Many schools allow books from school to go home by
creating a contract with parents to pay the cost of unreturned books. If books do not come
back, new books do not go home.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plan
Session
7
Concept
Readers think before, in the midst of, and after reading text.
Teaching Point
Readers think about the way books go before they read.
Materials
●
●
Log/Folder for keeping log
●
Two books for demonstration that have chapters with
titles that help readers understand what the chapter
will be about. Paintball Blast, by Jake Maddox and Mr.
Putter Tabby Walks the Dog by Cynthia Rylant were
used for the demonstration.
Tips
●
●
Connection
Teachers will need a gesture for think. If you have one that you use for the rehearsal process and
writing you should use the same gesture.
Read aloud Henry and Mudge and the Wild Wind before lesson 9, (not during reading
workshop). Any other Henry and Mudge book or chapter book that has a blurb on the back of
the book, title and chapters that support how the story will go, would work, too. Think aloud by
reading blurb, title and fitting chapter titles into how the story is going to go. (See Lesson 9
TEACH)


Teach
Informational book for demonstration. Tennis, Wonder
Books, Sundance was used for the demonstration

Readers, seeing that you are all BIG TIME READERS, you are ready to do some really grown-up
thinking about your reading. Adults think about their books before reading while they are
reading, and when they are finished reading. Thinking before, during and after reading is a
really grown-up thing to do. It means that you are reading with your mind awake to what is
happening in your story and awake to what the author is trying to say to you.
Today, I want to show you how BIG TIME READERS, grown-up readers, begin thinking really
big thoughts about their books before they even start the first page by keeping in mind what
they know about the way books go.
You know I’ve been carrying around Paintball Blast and I’ve read a little already. But I had a
pretty good idea of how the story was going to go before I ever read the first page. First, I
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1


looked at the cover, and I noticed that it looked action filled. There’s paint smashed on the wall
the guy on the cover is dressed in army colors, and he’s wearing a tool belt filled with items
he’ll need for paintball. I then read the blurb on the back (Read Blurb).
After reading this blurb, I was already thinking…two good friends, something is wrong on their
field, there is a new player who's winning. In my mind I was putting the story together. My
idea was that the new player Ryan is cheating or tricking kids into thinking he’s the best player
and winning, when really he isn’t playing fair to win. I’ve read all kinds of stories where the
new kid is the bad kid. Just the way the author said, “A new player in town…,”made me think
uh’oh! Then I read that there is a tournament so I was thinking maybe they will all be in the
tournament together and they know this new kid is cheating and they will try to beat him
anyway, without cheating.
Next, I read the Chapter titles (Read Chapter titles). And after reading them I thought, OK…in
chapter two “something isn’t right” that’s when they realize this new kid is doing something
wrong. ”Face to Face” must be when they confront him. “Getting ready” might be the part
where they are getting ready for the tournament. “Opening Round” has to be the start of the
tournament. “Triple Blast” might be the part of the tournament where someone really gets
blasted-I’m betting it’s the new kid. “Evidence” must mean that they found something to prove
he’s a cheater and “Looking for help” might be that they can’t seem to get the evidence to
prove he’s a trickster. The last chapter, ‘Showdown’ makes me think they take this kid down
and win the tournament. I think this story is going to be about not cheating even though
others are cheating and winning, and about not giving up even though you feel defeated.
Active
Engagement

Readers, I hope you were listening as I did all of that thinking. I was thinking before I ever read
the book. Now, I want you to try this big thinking with a book I’ll introduce to you. I will show
you the cover, read the blurb, I’ll read the chapter titles, and then I’ll ask you to think about
the story in big ways. Think about how you think the story will go and what it might even teach
you or be trying to say to you, this book is called, Mr. Putter Tabby Walks the Dog, by Cynthia
Rylant. (Read the title, show the cover, read the blurb, read the chapter titles then allow
readers to think about how the story might go in big ways). Listen in, coach and support.
Link

Share a reader’s idea as to how they see the story unfolding. Share a possible lesson or
author’s message. Share readers’ big thinking.
Readers, you are ready to do this for yourself. Many of you have finished books over the last
week and are choosing new books from our leveled crates. Before you begin reading your new
choice, see if you can make yourself think big thoughts about the book. Even in informational
text, I can make myself say what the text is about and think about what the author might tell
me. I can even think about why the author wrote the text in the first place. We will do some of
this thinking with informational text during our share time.

Mid-Workshop
Teaching Point

Share a conference highlight where a reader was able to do some big thinking about their
book either before they read it or early in the text. Even if you had to coach or demonstrate
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
again for the reader, let the class know readers are doing this work.
Partnerships

Share with partner their big thoughts about their books
After-theWorkshop Share

Share may take a bit longer to practice with informational text or this could be an additional
lesson.
Readers, I wanted us to spend a little time thinking big thoughts with informational text. I just
grabbed this book titled, Tennis, from a crate. If we look at the cover, we see the title and the
photograph. I also see this subtitle at the top WONDER BOOKS, huh? If I look for the blurb on
the back, I don’t really see a blurb, but I do see a list of topics and SPORTS is highlighted in
RED. This must be from the SPORTS collection of WONDER BOOKS. Think to yourself, how do
you see this book going? Let’s see if there is a Table of Contents. No...we can look at some of
the photographs, though…OH! it does have an index...I see “doubles matches”, “four players”
“net” “racket” and then the page where I can find those words...
Turn and talk about how this book might go and also, why did the author write it? Listen in,
share highlights from conversations with readers. If time permits, try another informational
text with a little different set up (blurb, table of contents).


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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plan
Session
8
Concept
Readers think before, in the midst of and after reading text
Teaching Point
Readers get themselves ready to read by asking, “What kind of book is this, what do I have to do when
I read books that go like this?
Materials
●
●
Paintball Blast, Jake Maddox or similar book
●
Tennis, Wonder Books, Sundance, Level I informational
or similar book
Tips
●
●
●
●
●
Connection
4-6 books of different genre matching reading levels of
class, see connection, teach, and active engagement
We try not to read too much, especially new text, in the mini-lesson. These books will be shared
quickly making the work look thoughtful but uncomplicated.
Have a copy of each book you plan to name and plan to hold it up as you talk about it. Lessons
like this create great buzz around books, readers might not have picked up without your
conversation.
You may want a visual of “WHAT KIND” and “WHAT TO DO” so that the questions linger with
readers as they work on answering the questions for themselves. Not an entire chart, but similar
to word cards or written on your whiteboard.
Types of genres should have been taught prior however students may need a quick reminder.
Read aloud Henry and Mudge and the Wild Wind in your day today, (not during reading
workshop) if you plan to use it in tomorrow’s lesson. Any other Henry and Mudge book or
chapter book that has a blurb on the back of the book, title and chapters that support how the
story will go, would work, too. Think aloud by reading blurb, title and fitting chapter titles into
how the story is going to go. (See Lesson 9 TEACH)

Readers, our classroom library and your bags of books are filled with all different kinds of
books. We have realistic fiction, where there are real people doing real things with real
problems. These stories could actually happen. There are no magic unreal creatures. They are
crafted by an author and not a factual account of actual events. It could be a story like
Paintball Blast, Junie B. Jones, or Ramona books. You also have mystery books, like The
Magic Tree House series or Nate the Great books, where the characters are trying to find
clues to solve a problem or an unanswered question. We have adventure stories like Stone
Fox, where the main character, a boy, is trying to survive wilderness alone. We have our
fantasy books, like fairytales and Captain Underpants, where weird things happen that could
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1

Teach


never happen, like magic wands changing pumpkins into carriages and supersonic-robots
take over schools. And we have all of our informational text and books that want to teach us
or make us think about a real world issue or topic. OH! And we have our poetry, which wants
us to read and reread it and think about the why of its words. All of these books are different,
but they all have something in common. These books, need for us, from the very moment we
pick them up to ask, “What kind of book is this and what do I have to do to read a book like
this?”
That’s what I want to show you today. I want to show you how I might think about that
question, “What kind of book is this?” based on what I know already about books and then
think about what I’m going to have to do to read a book like this.
I have this pile of books in my lap. I’m going to quickly tell you the title, show you the cover,
read a little of the blurb, if it exists, and then share my thinking on what kind of book I think it
is and how I think it may go. Then I’m going to tell you what I might have to do inside the
book in order to read it well. Use 4 -5 different genre to think aloud given this suggested
process. Your goal is to show readers how you unlock the text a bit. You will share with them
that you may be right, or that you may be wrong. That’s why it is important to continue
thinking in the midst of reading.
For now, only showcase how you unlock the story. Focus on what you will be watching out
for or be prepared to do before you even begin reading. (I.e. Keep track of characters, look
out for clues, watch out for a problem, the story might be a series of little problems around
one big problem).
Active
Engagement

Now, I have a different pile for you to try this work. I will read the title, show you the cover,
read the blurb, if it is there. Then I’m going to ask you to do what I did, think about WHAT
kind of book it is, and THEN, WHAT are you going to have to do inside this book? Allow
readers at least 3 different genre to think about. Listen in as they share their thinking with a
partner. Do not feel as though you have to give them enough time to roll through every
action start to finish. If readers sound as if they are on the right track, feel free to switch to
the next book to try. Interrupt if needed to remind them of the two steps. WHAT KIND and
WHAT TO DO?
Link

Now, readers, as you set off to read, I want you to think about how you are going to step into
books by thinking about WHAT KIND and WHAT TO DO. Even if you are in the middle of a
book now, you can stop where you are and ask these questions. Just think about how the rest
of the book might go and what you will have to do to understand it as you read.
I’ll be meeting in conferences and in small groups and watching and listening for you to talk
with me and your partners during partner time about the questions of WHAT KIND and
WHAT WILL YOU HAVE TO DO?

Mid-Workshop
Teaching Point


Readers, I want to stop you and talk with you about a type of book I didn’t have in my pile
during our lesson, but Eli had it in his bag and he is reading it now. It is a graphic novel,
where the pictures are like comics and the words are written really tiny.
Pictures and words show up all over the place and you really have to be watching for how the
pictures and words work together. This style of book, can be realistic fiction, fantasy,
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
adventure, historical fiction, or really any kind of story or informational text could be written
in this style of text, so Eli can still name WHAT kind of book it is and WHAT he will have to do.
Partnerships

Readers, you are so lucky to have someone to talk to. I’d like you to tell your partner today
the kind of book you were reading and how you are thinking about the way it will go.
Readers, make sure you listen to your partners. You may learn about a book you would like
to read next. I also want you thinking about whether you agree with their thinking. You
might want to read the blurb to your partner, show them the cover and title, and let them
think about your book, too.
After-theWorkshop Share

Readers, I brought you a couple more books to think about. Let’s think about WHAT kind of
book they are and WHAT we have to do inside them. Use this time to highlight genres you
didn’t have time for in the mini-lesson, while allowing readers to go through the same
thinking work of answering their WHAT KIND and WHAT TO DO questions. OR…

Have readers bring a book to share time. Have them take the role of the teacher by reading
the title, blurb and showing the cover. Let them listen to their partner answer the WHAT
KIND and WHAT TO DO and then switch roles, so both partners get to practice this.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plan
Session
9
Concept
Readers think before, in the midst of and after reading text
Teaching Point
Readers think the whole way through their story to fit the pieces of the story together.
Materials
●
Henry and Mudge and the Wild Wind, Cynthia Rylant
●
book or chapter book that has a blurb on the back of
the book, title and chapters that support how the story
will go
●
Tips
●
●
●
●
●
Connection
Henry and Mudge and the Bedtime Thumps, Cynthia
Rylant book or chapter book that has a blurb on the
back of the book, title and chapters that support how
the story will go
Puzzle with box- optional
The analogy of a puzzle piece is used here to demonstrate how readers are always thinking about
their story and how this thinking connects the whole story, just like a puzzle piece connects to a
bigger picture.
Could put a tiny puzzle together online/smartboard or with document camera for connection.
At the very least, have a puzzle with pieces and the box that shows what the picture is when it is
together.
Plan to read Henry and Mudge and the Bedtime Thumps, after this workshop session but before
Lesson 10. The first time you read it, leave it without thinking clearly about author’s message.
Read it again before lesson 10, inside the Read Aloud block. This time, think aloud as to how
having read the story for the second time, a little quicker, smoother, and seeing the pieces more
clearly, you are able to see the big picture or author’s message.
This lesson may be done over several days.


Readers, have you ever built a puzzle? If you have, you know that a puzzle is a picture of
something, maybe a panda, or a frog, or even Mickey Mouse and the picture has been cut
into tiny pieces that are broken apart. If you are working on a puzzle your job is to put all the
pieces TOGETHER in the right spots. They fit together perfectly to make the picture. Reading
a story is a lot like putting the pieces together to a puzzle.
When you are reading a story, you have to fit the pieces together to get the real picture of
what is happening. Remember the other day when I was rereading because I was so
confused about the characters in Paintball Blast, I was actually taking extra time to fit the
pieces together: Which boys were friends? Who was the new boy? And who was his friend?
When I had fit the pieces together, I realized that the picture in my mind was two sets of
friends preparing to enter a paintball challenge against each other. I needed those pieces to
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1

Teach




Active
Engagement

fit together in my mind before I read on; otherwise I wouldn’t have a clear picture of what
was going on in the story. Just like in a puzzle, if the pieces don’t fit together right, your
panda might have a nose where his ear should be! Right?
So, today I want to show you how to be the kind of reader who thinks like a puzzle builder, a
reader who thinks the whole way through their story to fit the pieces of the story together.
Yesterday I read aloud, Henry and Mudge and the Wild Wind. Remember when I was trying
to fit the chapter titles together with the title I had the picture of a wild wind in mind. Then I
read the chapter titles and my picture changed a bit. The title POWS and BOOMS made me
think of a storm wind, so the pieces when fit together made me think the story was going to
be about a storm. I wasn’t sure about the piece THE ENEMY COUCH. Then the title ABOVE
THEIR HEADS, I thought might be rain or maybe sunshine, seeing it was the end of the story
and I know Henry and Mudge books usually end on a happy note. Readers, as I read the story,
do you remember how I kept stopping to put the pieces together?
When I got to the page that said, “must be a thunderstorm.” I knew that the pieces I had fit
together did make the right picture, right. It was the same with POWS and BOOMS, I had
predicted that it was going to be about thunder and lightning and it was, except, there were
many more details about how Mudge hid from the loud noise and circled the table because
he was nervous. I added those pieces to my reading and realized that this was a story of how
the storm made Mudge feel and act. Going into Chapter 3 I had no idea what to think so I
said to myself, I really have to pay attention here to how the pieces fit together. I couldn’t just
slide past this tricky part. That’s like putting the panda ear where the nose piece should be!
As I read, thinking how this chapter fits, I realized the couch was another hiding place for
Mudge and Henry’s dad made up the Enemy couch, like Mudge had been captured by the
enemy and Henry had to rescue him. That part was kind of funny, but in my mind, the pieces
fit now, I didn’t lose a piece to my puzzle, I actually found the piece that fit. In the end, ABOVE
THEIR HEADS I was surprised by the rainbow, but the clear sky and no more rain, fit with my
picture I had been making. I just needed to add the rainbow piece to my puzzle. Their storm
ended on a good note, with a rainbow. When I fit all the pieces of this story together I see a
family waiting out a scary, loud storm and in the end the day returns peaceful.
It makes me think it’s a story of how families can help each other through scary or hard
times....that’s the BIG picture I have now. Fitting the pieces together, I could see the author’s
message.
Readers, do you see all that thinking, all the fitting together like puzzle pieces. I’m just going
to read to you a bit from another Henry and Mudge book. I want you to do what I did
yesterday during read aloud and today with the demonstration. Listen to the pieces and then
fit them together in your mind. I won’t read the entire story now but part of Henry and
Mudge and the Bedtime Thumps. Let’s really look at the cover, just look and think what
pieces will make up this story? Let’s read the chapter titles, (Read titles). Think about those
titles. How do they fit with the title? How are you thinking these chapter pieces are going to
fit together? Do you have any pieces where you’re not sure how they will
fit? Turn and
talk.
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Reading Unit of Study
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Unit 1
Link

I heard Belinda say that she thinks it’s a story of Henry and Mudge going to their grandma’s
but they are afraid to sleep because they keep hearing weird noises. Paul said, he wasn’t sure
about the “A lot of looks” title piece He would have to be really ready to do some thinking
there to see how that piece fit with the rest of his puzzle building. He’s certainly not going to
just slide by it because it takes more thinking.

Readers listen to the first few pages; see if your pieces fit within the story as we read on...
(Read a few pages.) So far are your pieces fitting? This is the work we need to do in our own
books. We have to think about the pieces, the title, the chapter titles, the characters, the
setting, the problems, and fit it all together until we have the whole picture. This is hard work
for me to see you doing because it is work done all in your head. I can really only tell if you
are fitting the pieces together if you jot or talk with me, so I will be looking for both. Think the
whole way through your story as to how the pieces fit together and we will also share this
thinking with our partners in a little bit.
(Plan to have partners talk about how their pieces fit together with you listening in. This can
be a form of small group work during independent reading and carry over into partnership
time).

Mid-Workshop
Teaching Point

Utilize this time to highlight conversations or actions that show readers are thoughtfully
fitting the pieces together as they read throughout their text.
Partnerships

Readers, please remember we are meeting with partners to talk about how our pieces fit
together. How does the title fit with the chapter titles? How do the character’s actions fit
with the chapter titles? How does the character’s relationships fit with what is happening in
the story? Pay attention, also, to pieces you haven’t found yet. Sometimes, that happens in
puzzles, you have a harder time fitting one piece into the larger picture.
It just may take some rereading or reading forward before you actually see how it fits.

After-theWorkshop Share


Readers, this work is work for BIG TIME READERS! This isn’t the work of kindergarten and first
grade but of second grade. As your stories become longer and longer, you are going to have
more and more pieces to fit together. Just like there are puzzles with 12 pieces and puzzles
with 1,000 pieces, this work becomes more time consuming and just plain trickier.
But if you know that you are building a puzzle as you read, if you know that your job is to
have a picture in the end of what the whole story is actually about, then you will make sure
you read with your mind looking for the right pieces, and you will take the time to fit them
together. You will ask, “How does this piece, maybe a new character, fit here?” And this, BIG
TIME READERS, is the kind of thinking that only BIG TIME READERS can do!
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plan
Session
10
Concept
Readers think before, in the midst of and after reading text.
Teaching Point
After finishing books, readers reread them over and over, gaining more understanding.
Materials
●
●
Henry and Mudge and the Wild Wind or other chapter ●
book that has a blurb on the back of the book, title and ●
chapters that support how the story will go, by Cynthia
Rylant
Henry and Mudge and the Bedtime Thumps, by Cynthia
Rylant or other chapter book that has a blurb on the
back of the book, a title and chapters that support how
the story will go
Tips
Teachers have already read Henry and Mudge and the Bedtime Thumps by Cynthia Rylant two
times before this session.
To use upper grade reading partners (grades 3-5) for your demonstration in Lesson 12, set
that up with them today. Read Lesson 12.
●
●
Connection



Teach
Readers Re-read To… anchor chart
Prepare teaching point on post-it note to add to
Readers Re-read To… anchor chart.

Readers, I want you to think about the reading of The Bedtime Thumps during read aloud we
did. The first time I read it, I wasn’t sure how all the pieces fit together to create the author’s
message, I decided to put it down and come back to it at another time. The second time I
read it, I found that I could read it faster, smoother, I had a real picture of the pieces, and in
that second read I found that I could come up with a big picture for the whole story, or the
author's intent or message. Remember, I was thinking it was about how the message was
that family or friends care about each other and do kind things for each other.
After finishing the book, I knew that readers reread books gaining more understanding. It
would be just like putting a puzzle together for a second time. If I did, I would probably put
the puzzle together more quickly. I would have a better picture in my mind for how the pieces
fit together.
Rereading our books can really help us understand the big picture and how the pieces all fit
together.
So, today, I just want to give you a quick tip. I want you to know that rereading your book,
even if it’s a chapter book, can be a way to really understand how the pieces of the puzzle or
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Reading Unit of Study
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Unit 1

the pieces of your story fit together. If you are a reader who is rereading your book for the
second time, I want you to place a post-it note on the cover, with the number 2 on it. Just like
this. (Place post-it note with # 2 on The Bedtime Thumps).
Do you see how now I have made a little sign that tells me and other readers that you are
either reading that book for the second time or have already read it twice? This will help me
see the kind of thinking you are doing during conferences and small group work. This lesson
doesn’t mean that you have to read every book twice. I want you to try this strategy with at
least one of your books today. This means, that even if you have started a new book, I’d like
you to take out a book already read at least once or plan to read it twice today.
Active
Engagement

Readers, think about what I am asking you to do today with a book and a post-it, Turn and
tell your partner what your job is today for reading workshop.
Link

Readers, I heard Megan say that she was going to read her Magic Tree House book she
finished yesterday again today. She is going to put a post-it on the cover with a number 2 on
it. Megan, you will also, log in today by writing the title and pages read, just like you already
did. You might notice at the end of reading time that you were actually able to read the book
faster than the first time by looking at your log.
And, I’m hoping your reading will be smoother and you will have clearer understanding all
the way through the book. Let’s get ourselves going then and be the kind of readers who
read for the greatest understanding by rereading an entire book and thinking about how ALL
the pieces fit together.

Mid-Workshop
Teaching Point

If needed utilize this time to highlight the work of the mini-lesson teaching over the last few
days.
Partnerships

Readers, as you meet with your partners today, share with them the book you chose to read
a second time and tell them how the second reading is going. If you notice that you are
reading it faster by looking at your log, pull out your logs and share them with your partners.
You can certainly also tell them about the pieces of your story, how they are fitting together,
and whether you are able to see the BIG picture or the author’s message.
After-theWorkshop Share

Readers, if you were able to read your book a little faster and smoother with the second
read, move to this side of the carpet. OK...that’s quite a few people. If you were able to
picture the pieces fitting together with more ease, move to this corner of the carpet.
OK...what about if you were able to see the BIG picture taking shape, with this second
read...you may not be finished reading it, but if you think you have a better idea of the
author’s message, move to this corner of the carpet. I can see that by using this strategy of
rereading a book we already finished, many of us gained improvements in our thinking and
reading. This is a strategy we can fall back on each and every day. Rereading a finished book,
looking out for better reading and more understanding.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plan
Session
11
Concept
Readers care about talking with others, in order to grow their reading and thinking.
Teaching Point
Readers react and respond to each other.
Materials
●
Chart paper- Partners Care for Partners anchor chart
Tips
●
●
●
●
●
●
Connection
●
Prepare for Partners Care for Partner Chart on large
post-its: By listening well, reacting and responding
Ask an upper grade partnership to come demonstrate listening well, with reaction and response
for the Teach portion. Set the older readers up for your lesson by telling them exactly what you
would like to see around a book conversation.
Ask a colleague or an adult to be your partner to demonstrate listening well, reacting and
responding.
Film partnerships in action in the upper grades to use to build partnerships across your year.
This is a great teaching point to practice during other times of the day as well as class meetings,
math discussions, social studies, science, etc.
Reading partnerships should be established with like readers by now. You have had time to
conduct formal or informal assessments shining light on the levels of readers you have in your
class. If you haven’t already, plan to pair readers with like level readers from this point on. If
partners work well together and grow at a similar pace, they could be partner across the year or
at least across numerous units.
Ask partners to come to the mini lesson and sit next to each other, always. It is helpful to tell
partners if they are an “A” partner or a “B” partner. If you want turn taking quickly during active
engagement or share, you can say “A” partners...then “B” partners...if you don’t like A and B,
could be 1 and 2, or orange and blue....completely up to YOU!


Readers, we are going to start a chart called Partners Care for Partners. I’m adding here, by
listening well, reacting and responding. It seems like a fairly easy thing to do is to listen. But
by being a good listener, one has to react and respond to what is said and that is harder than
it sounds. To listen well, means you have to turn off everything else that is going on around
you, inside your head, in your hands, and give all your attention to the person talking. When
we do that as partners, we can show that we are listening well, by reacting and responding
to what our partner has said.
Today, I asked 2 reading partners from the fourth grade to come and demonstrate what
listening well looks like. I want you to listen to them talk about the book they are reading,
watch their faces, hands, and bodies for how they respond and react to what is said. We will
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
talk about what you notice after your fourth grade reading friends are finished being
partners.
Teach


Ask upper grade readers to showcase listening well with reaction and response. Reaction is
all of those silent and almost silent body movements we make while listening, nodding our
heads, lifting our eyebrows, smiling, moving mouth, looking at the person, looking in their
book or at their post-its, moving out hands, saying things like, “oh yeah, uh-huh, yes, hmmm,
well…” You will want your demonstrators to be prepared to showcase active listening and
appropriate response given their book conversation.
I’m going to ask you now, BIG TIME SECOND GRADE READERS, to think about what you saw
these upper grade readers do that told you they were listening well.
Active
Engagement




What did you see on their faces? Turn and talk
What did you see in their eyes doing? Turn and talk
What did you see their hands doing? Turn and talk
What kinds of things did you hear them say? Turn and talk
Link

Readers, I am going to ask my fourth grade friends to stay for a little while. They are going to
help me look around the room as you meet with your partners. We are actually going to
meet in partnerships first today so that we can make ourselves listen well and show how we
can react and respond like caring partners. Don’t be surprised if a fourth grade friend decides
to sit with you and just listen. They are going to watch you listen well, just as I am.
Partnerships

Switch the order of independent reading and partnerships today so that readers have a
chance to practice listening well, right after the demonstration. Confer, demonstrate, and
meet with small groups.
Mid-Workshop
Teaching Point

Use this time to highlight partnerships that are showing listening well with reactions and
response. Remind readers to move to independent reading and to be thinking about their
partner for conversation tomorrow.
After-theWorkshop Share

This time can be used to debrief, demonstrate again, highlight, or build upon what you have
taught today.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plan
Session
12
Concept
Readers care about talking with others in order to grow their reading and thinking.
Teaching Point
Readers use their partners to celebrate, solve tricky parts, and do things for each other.
Materials
●
●
Partners Care for Partners- Anchor Chart-See Resource ●
Materials Packet
Prepare large post-its with the following: By
celebrating, BY solving tricky parts together, By doing
things for each other
Tips
Connection
●
Teachers may want to film their own second graders to use for future teaching of this session.


Teach

Readers, the partners you are sitting by now, may be your partners for a long time. At least
through the rest of this unit and maybe even longer. In life, everyone deserves to have good
partners. I have a good partner in my husband; sometimes I have a good partner in mom,
dad and sister. I have good partners who are neighbors and friends from my childhood and
college. A partner is really a good friend who will celebrate with you when you are
successful, will work with you when you need extra help, and there are even times when a
good partner will do things for you because they know you need the help.
Can you think of people in your life that are like that? Probably, mom and dad, maybe
grandma, grandpa, maybe even a brother or sister or neighborhood friend. Well, now I want
you to add your reading partner to that list of people who celebrate with you, help you
through tricky times and even do things for you when you need help. Look at your reading
partner. This is the person you are going to care for during reading time and you are going
to be there for each other through the good times in reading and the tricky times in reading.
Your reading partner is going to be the person that you can ask for help, if you’ve really lost
your way and you’re having a hard time fitting the pieces of the puzzle together in your
story. Your reading partner might be the person who can help you build the puzzle, help you
find the missing pieces. You really are so lucky to have each other in your lives!
Today, I want to show you three ways you and your reading partner can be a great support
to each other. The first way, is by celebrating together. Let’s say that you reread a book for
the second time and you share your log with your partner, which shows that you read the
book in half the amount of time. You might say, “Look at my log. I read this book a few days
ago in 30 minutes but today I read it in 15 mins.” Your reading partner can celebrate with
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
you. They can say, “Wow, that is really great. You increased your speed a lot rereading that
book!” So, you see, the two of you can celebrate together.
 The second way you can support each other is by helping each other with tricky parts. You
might have tricky words that you jotted on a post-it. You might have tricky names of
characters you jotted on a post-it. You might have tricky talking pages that you have flagged,
where you are really not sure who is talking to whom. If you jot or flag these pages always
then you can come to your partnership and see if you and your partner can figure out the
tricky parts together.
 The third way you might support each other is by actually doing something for your partner.
Let’s say your partner just can’t pick out a new book, you can say, “Read this one” and you have
made a decision for them. Or let’s say your partner has lost track of the dates on their log and
you realize your partner hasn’t written the dates in for four days. You can get your log out and
tell them the correct dates to write. Let’s say that your reading partner has read the first page of
his book and he is thinking about putting it back because he doesn’t get it. You might say, “Let
me read it to you, and you listen, see if you like it any better.” Do you see how partners can do
things for their partners?
Active
Engagement


Link



I’ve started a chart titled, “Partners Care for Partners.” I’m going to add these three points to
our chart: By celebrating, BY solving tricky parts together, By doing things for each other.
Now, I’m going to give you a partner issue, and I want you to talk together as to how you
would be a caring partner, if this is what was happening in your partnership.
Make up real life issues with partners where partners would be moved to celebrate, help
with a tricky part, or actually do something for their partner. Explain the scenario to your
readers and then let them talk about how they would handle it in their partnership.
(Examples: Your partner has lost a book. Your partner has found an eleven letter word in
their book that they don’t know and they flagged it. Your partner isn’t sure if their main
character is a boy or a girl and there are no pictures in their chapter book. The character’s
name is Cameron, etc...) Listen in to how the partners will assist and care for each other.
Share some of what you heard with regards to all three points.
Readers, as we begin independent reading, keep in mind that your partner is caring for you
and you for them as you read. Your partner wants you to come to the partnership with either
something to celebrate, solve, or do for you.
So as you read today, be thinking, how can I ask my partner to care for me? And be thinking
how will I care for my partner? When you find a good partner in life, you want to keep them
and never let them go. I’m hoping you will find that you have a good partner like that as you
start to work with each other.
Mid-Workshop
Teaching Point

Utilize this time to highlight flagged pages or issues that partners can work on together.
Name readers and their partners specifically, setting them up for the job they may have once
they are together.
Partnerships

Remind readers of the chart and the roles they can play in their partnerships. Watch for
partners who are really taking the work seriously, you might have them demonstrate during
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
the share time by asking readers to create a circle around them and then ask the partnership
to reenact their partnership time. Make sure to ask if they wouldn’t mind and prepare them
to talk loudly and replay the smart care they gave each other. You could also capture video
footage of a partnership and show it for share.
After-theWorkshop Share
Use this time to either:
1. Highlight the success of caring for partners and refer back to the chart
2. Watch a partnership in action and ask readers to name and notice what they saw in the
partnership. What was working?
3. Show a film clip of a partnership you caught as you conferred. Debrief by noticing and naming
what was working connecting to the chart.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plan
Session
13
Concept
Partners help to grow reading and thinking.
Teaching Point
Readers plan and prepare for meeting with partners by reading, jotting, and flagging.
Materials
●
Partners Care for Partners – Anchor Chart
Prepare for Partners Care for Partners Chart on large postit: By preparing and planning for partner time
Tips
●
●
●
●
●
Connection

Student book with jotted notes- See tips below
Plan to use a student’s book, where the reader has jotted notes in preparation for meeting with
their partner. Look to higher level readers, thinkers and talkers, if necessary, but certainly any
level will work.
If students need more work on jotting or this is new work for them consider doing a mini-lesson
on jotting. If only a handful of students need support on jotting a strategy group may be needed.
A sample of a jotting rubric can be found at http://chartchums.wordpress.com/?s=jotting
Partnerships at this time are reading the same book.
If teachers don’t have an example from the class, make one up and tell readers it was kept from
last year’s second graders to share with them. Don’t be surprised when they spend lots of time
trying to figure out whose work it is. Front load that chatter, with, “I’m not going to tell you
which second grader from last year is helping me today.”


Readers, today I want to teach you that another way readers show they care for their
partners is by planning and preparing for your partner meeting. When I’m getting together
with friends, say at my house. I do a lot of planning. I plan to clean the house, make a menu
of what to serve, grocery shop, I plan to clean up the yard if I think it’s going to be a nice
day. I then spend a lot of time preparing. I prepare all kinds of food to eat, things to eat
before dinner, things to eat for dinner, and things to eat after dinner (my favorites,
desserts). I prepare my boys by reminding them who is coming and of their best behavior. I
plan and prepare for days, sometimes. OH...I almost forgot...I always have to plan and
prepare what to wear. Sometimes those plans take me all the way over to Nordstrom!
Well...back to partnerships, right? See, just like I prepare for meeting with friends and
family, it is your job to prepare to meet with your partner. Now, you don’t have to worry
about cleaning, and cooking, and WHAT TO WEAR, but you do have to worry about having
your reading done, having some jots to talk from and possibly some flagged pages to talk
about. Readers plan and prepare for meeting with their partners by reading, jotting and
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Reading Unit of Study
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Unit 1
flagging.
Teach


Active Engagement


Link


Readers, I asked Reagan if I could borrow her book for today’s lesson. She agreed to let me
share it with you. Thank you, Regan. I needed Regan’s book because as I met with her
yesterday, I could tell that she really cared about her reading partner, Andy. See, Regan, has
all these flags and post-its in her book, The Best Teacher in Second Grade, by Katharine
Kenah. Here on the chapter list, she has written “I think the teacher lets the class put on a
circus.” And here, she jotted, “Luna is the main character”. If I keep looking, at Regan’s postits I find one with just words (say each letter) “G-e-o-r-g-e- W-a-s-h-i-n-g-t-o-n”.
As I looked over Regan’s post-its I realized she was planning and preparing for meeting with
her partner. She jotted some post-its with big ideas. She had post-its with character
information, and she had a post-it where I bet she would like help with the long name she
printed. Reagan cares enough about her partner to use her independent reading time
reading and thinking about ways they can work together. She read, jotted, and flagged
parts of her book.
Readers, I want you to think about the books you are reading at the moment from your bag.
Think, have you been reading them in a way that is helping you plan your reading
partnership? (Allow think time).Think, are you preparing jots and post-its so that you can
talk with your partner (Allow think time). Think, are you reading, and thinking, I’m going to
talk with my partner about this. (Allow think time). See readers, if you would have answered
NO to any of my questions, then you are not caring enough about your partnership.
I want you to think one more time about what could you do to plan or prepare a little better
today for your partner? Talk to your partner about what you plan to do better.
Readers, some of the get-togethers I have are so-so, and some are out of this world, where
people are talking about the food and the fun for days. When I spend a lot of time planning
and preparing for my family and friends, I have better gatherings. It’s the same with your
partnership. If you only spend a few seconds jotting a note right at the end of reading time,
just so you’ll have a post-it, your partnership will be so-so it will just be OK. But if you spend
all our minutes reading and thinking with your partner in mind then your partnership will be
amazing! Your partner will be talking about you for days, about what a fantastic partner
they have. Do you want to be a so-so partner or a fantastic-out -of-this-world-partner?
Let’s read today, caring for our partner, by reading, jotting, and flagging with them in mind.
Remember, you are fitting the pieces together, looking for the big picture. This work
certainly takes a lot of thinking and jotting.
Mid-Workshop
Teaching Point

Use this time to highlight reader(s) that really are caring for their partner and it is evident
from their reading, flagging, and jotting.
Partnerships

Students share their reading, flagging and jotting.
After-theWorkshop Share

Readers, today we are going to show our partners we appreciate all the work they did
during independent reading. Think of something your partner brought to your partnership
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1

today to talk about. It could have been an idea, a flag, and a post-it. You are going to turn to
your partner, take a turn and say, “Thank you for caring to bring...”
Listen into thank yous. Share some with the class.
6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plan
Session
14
Concept
Readers care about talking with others, in order to grow their reading and thinking.
Teaching Point
Readers recommend books to each other by including the title, a bit about the characters or topic,
and why they think their partner would like it.
Materials
●
●
Partners Care for Partners- Anchor chart
Prepare for Partners Care for Partners Chart on large
post-it: By recommending books
Tips
●
●
Connection
A narrative story that’s been read aloud and an
informational book that’s been read aloud for active
engagement.
After this lesson, we recommend teachers set a signup sheet in the classroom for readers to
“BUZZ” about a book they read using this recommendation structure. This helps with showcasing
books in the classroom and the world. Can be a nice way to end an afternoon or start a morning,
once in a while. Only 1 or 2 buzzes per seating, please. See background section for more
information on Book Buzz.
A sheet on “Books I’d Like to Read” could be placed in students’ book bins to record books after a
book buzz.


Teach
●

Readers…have you ever gone to see a movie and the movie was so good, so funny, soo
hilarious, that you find that you are asking everyone if they saw it? And if they didn’t see it,
you start telling them what it was about, the characters names, and some of the funny
parts? You never give the whole movie away, like tell the ending because that would just ruin
the movie if your friend actually went to see it, right?
Well, we can do the same thing with books we read. If you read a book, and you really enjoy
it, because it is funny, or just a really good story, or because the topic was really fascinating,
then we can offer a book recommendation to our friends and most important to our reading
partner during partner time. So, today, I want to teach you that readers recommend books
to each other by telling the title, a bit about the characters or the topic and why they liked it.
Watch me as I recommend this book to you called, The Doodles of Sam Dibble, written by J.
Press and illustrated by Michael Kline. You would really love reading The Doodles of Sam
Dibble. It is a story about a boy named Sam, who is in the third grade, who really likes to
doodle more than anything. He is always doodling little pictures. You can see them all over
6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1

Active Engagement


Link


the pages and in the words of the story. In this story, it’s 2 days from Sam’s birthday and he
wants to have a super birthday party. What he thinks will make it super is if he can get the
world’s greatest wrestler, Demo Dan , to come to his birthday party, but he only has 2 days
to get him and he doesn’t even know him. I found out that this first book is one of three in
the series. I plan to read #2 next called Double Trouble. I’ll let you know how it is once I read
it. Readers, did you see how I told you the title and a little about the character, I told you the
problem, but I didn’t tell you what happens in the story around that problem, did I? I left that
part out, so that you could find out for yourself.
Did you also notice that my face was lit up, and I used a voice with some joy and excitement?
People usually don’t take recommendations that sound flat and boring.
Now is your turn to try a recommendation. Everyone knows the book, Henry and Mudge and
the Wild Wind, because I have read it aloud to you. Partner A I would like you to recommend
this book to your partner B, just like I did. Go!
Listen in and coach if needed. Now, Partner B. Everyone knows, Tennis, because I read it
aloud to you. Partner B, please recommend Tennis to Partner A. Listen and coach.
Readers, it’s fun to talk about a book you really loved. Another added bonus to this is that if
you and your partner both have read the same book, you can plan to talk about it in the
same ways you might talk about a popular movie with someone. You can turn to your
favorite parts and talk about the details of the characters and debate the author’s big ideas!
So, today, I’m going to ask you to meet in your partnerships first, I’d like you to think about a
book in your bag that you have read or are reading. Take turns making a recommendation
for those books. I’m going to travel with my clipboard watching for listening well, with
reaction and response and listening for book recommendations.
Partnerships

Readers will meet in partnerships today, before independent reading, to practice
recommending a book. Watch for listening well.
Mid-Workshop
Teaching Point

Utilize this time to highlight partners listening well and making recommendations that
sound engaging. Also, anything else that requires tweaking in your workshop could also be a
priority for teaching or reinforcing. Just be clear by only picking one or two items to teach or
reinforce.
After-theWorkshop Share

Readers, our Partners Care for Partners chart is really growing. Today we will add Partners
care for partners by recommending books. I’m also going to place a list that has a place for
the date, your name and a book title by our library shelves on this clipboard. If you have
read a book and you feel like the entire class should hear your recommendation, not just
your partner, then when we have a free minute, before school starts, or right before lunch
when we are washing up and getting ready, feel free to sign your name , the date and your
book title.
Then, when we have time, I will ask you to share your recommendation with all of us. Please
remember, you never want to give away the good parts, the surprises and the endings, even
though you might say there are some surprises and a really good ending.

6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plan
Session
15
Concept
Readers care about talking with others, in order to grow their reading and thinking.
Teaching Point
Readers invent future plans with their partners.
Materials
●
●
Partners Care for Partners- Anchor Chart
Prepare for partners care on large post-its: By
inventing new ways to work together
Tips
Connection
●
●
●
You could watch for an inventive partnership meeting and showcase it during the share time.
You could have readers confirm their plans for their next partner meeting during the share time.
A strategy group for students that need to lift their thinking about making reading plans may be
beneficial for some students.



Teach

Readers, I hope you remember when we started our reading lives together this year I talked
about how now that you are BIG TIME READERS, you would have a lot of your own decisions
to make. This decision making flows right into your partnerships. You’ve been creating a
chart of ways partners show they care for each other, but it really becomes a list of choices
you have for working with your partner. I want to add one more way you can show your
partner you care about them and their reading.
Readers can invent new ways to work together by discussing what they want to talk about
the next time they are together. It’s a little like, when you have a friend over, and you have
done a lot of stuff together. You’ve played your video games, rode bikes, had a snack, played
outside, and walked your dog. Now it’s time to go and you realize you didn’t do one thing
you really wanted to do, you didn’t play with Legos. And now you're bummed! Your friend’s
mom is already in the driveway and you are wishing you had more time together but you
don’t so you say, “Next time, let’s play with Legos, first!” Just like that, you and your friend
make a plan for what you will do next time.
Reading partners can do that, too. Let me show you.
As I look at our chart for Partners Care for Partners, I see this like a list of possibilities for
working together. If I’m your partner, I could say to you. “Next time, let’s think of something
we are doing really well in our reading so we can celebrate. We didn’t get to celebrate
today”. Or I could say, “Tomorrow, while we are reading to ourselves, lets flag pages where
our characters do something surprising, then we can talk about it.” Or I could say,
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1

“Remember when we were in kindergarten and first grade and we would act out our
characters? Let’s find a spot in our books and act like the character. Mark the page that you
will act out, OK?” Do you see, readers, how my first example came from “by celebrating” on
our list.
My second example came from “by planning and preparing” on our list. And my third
example came from “by inventing new ways to work together”. I was remembering what we
used to do but still really fit with what we are doing now. I’m really looking for you to make
your partnership time the way you would like it, and make it so you and your partner have
plans for next time.
Active
Engagement

Readers, you are sitting by your partner right now. And after independent reading you will
meet with your partner. So, I’d like you to turn to each other and talk a minute about what
you’d like to do next time, meaning today during partnerships. Make a plan, so that you can
both work on getting ready during independent reading. Circulate; listening, coaching,
helping readers invent the way their partnership will go.
Link

Readers’, working with you BIG TIME READERS is a dream come true. I heard Evan and
Greyson say that they were going to... and I heard Ellie and Sammie say they were going to
work on...See, you are inventing your own way to work together. Now each day, when you
hear that partnership time only has a few minutes left, I’d like you to turn to each other and
say, “What do you want to work on next time, first?” That way you will have plans to think
about while you are reading to yourself. Now, you all have plans; because you just invented
them. Go off to your reading places to get busy for your partner.
Mid-Workshop
Teaching Point

Readers, you only have a few minutes more to prepare for your partnership. I hope your
plans and preparation are going well. Share a couple examples of student work that shows
inventive thinking and planning and preparation for a partnership.
Partnerships

Readers share their work from their plans.
After-theWorkshop Share

Readers, wow! Let’s gather to think about this inventive work we are doing. See suggestions
in the Tips box, above.
6/5/14 mlf. Copyright © 2010-2014 by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and Oakland Schools.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plan
Session
16
Concept
Readers take action to solve problems
Teaching Point
Readers stop in the midst of reading if something doesn’t make sense and ask, “What can I do to fix
this part?”
Materials
●
●
First Grade Strategy Chart
Texts to show on document camera as you
demonstrate speeded action to problem solve using
meaning, structure and visual cues.
Tips
●
●
Connection
Talk with first grade teachers about strategy charts used previous year. If you can use the same
chart and language, readers will be reminded that they already know how to solve many
problems.
The main focus of this lesson is how to tackle unknown words.


Teach

Readers, as BIG TIME READERS, your job is to solve problems on your own. Your job is to
think about all that you know how to do and then, take action to solve your problems in the
midst of reading and thinking. Last year, your teachers shared many strategies for solving
problems in the midst of reading. I have a chart here that lists the strategies you practiced.
Today I want to remind you of these strategies but also show you how I stop in the midst of
reading, if I have a problem, and jump into action until my problem is solved. I may solve my
problem on my first try, or it could take several attempts. There are even times when we as
readers realize we have to go for help for someone else. We talked about that with using
your reading partner.
But for today, let me show you some problem solving in action as if I was a second grade
reader. I have put my text I’m reading on the document camera so that you can see what I
am reading and follow along. Please don’t solve my problems for me.I want you to watch as I
solve them myself and ask, “What can I do to fix this part?”.
Readers, watch me closely. When you see me try something from the chart, count that on
your finger, if I try something else; count that on a second finger. I want you to keep track of
how many times I try to solve my problem in different ways. I’m going to ask, “What can I do
to fix this part?”
*DO NOT DEMONSTRATE LOOKING AT FIRST LETTER LAST LETTER MIDDLE LETTERS SEE LESSON 18
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1

Use this time to demonstrate the strategies listed from the first grade problem solving chart,
except ones pertaining to bold above. Do not feel that you have to hit every point on the
chart, but instead demonstrate thinking aloud being stuck and trying multiple strategies in
quick time to solve your problems. Problems should occur with meaning, structure and
visual cues. Show how you try two or three times in different ways to make sense of your
trouble spots, while asking, “What can I do to fix this part?”

After each problem is solved you can have readers show their fingers to see how many
different attempts you made to solve your problems. In this way, your TEACH will be one of
guided practice.
Active
Engagement

Readers, I want you to think about what you saw me do to fix my problems and how many
fingers you put up each time I was stuck. What number do you think you used the most? Did
you hold 2 fingers up the most or 3 or 4? Show me with your fingers, how many fingers you
used most of the time, with my problems. (Hoping readers will show average about 3
fingers).
Link

Readers, we all have our own way of solving problems. Some of us may lean more toward
stretching and blending sounds where others of us look for word parts or parts of words we
know. Some of us will reread at the start of the paragraph while others of us will read
forward thinking about how the piece of the text fits with what’s coming next. You are a BIG
TIME READER and must stop in the midst of reading and take action to solve your problems.
You have decisions for what to try and those decisions are yours to make. Today, if you find a
trouble spot, please flag that page and really try to take action to solve it. If you solve it on
your own, put a smiley face or a star on that post-it like this (Demo). That way as I tour your
post-its I can talk with you about the strategies you are using. If you were unable to solve it,
you will have your partner and maybe together you will figure it out.

Mid-Workshop
Teaching Point

Plan to show post-its with a smiley face or star and explain what the readers did to solve
their problems. Emphasis is on stopping, number of trials to solve, speeded action, and
these are strategies you already know.
Partnerships

Readers, in partnerships, make sure you talk a bit about your plans you made from
yesterday. Complete that reading and talking work first, then help each other solve any
problems that you weren’t able to solve on your own. If you solve something together, mark
your post-it with two smiles or 2 stars. That way I will know you were working together
during your partnership solving problems.
After-theWorkshop Share

Showcase some of the problem solving from independent reading and/or partnerships.
Actually, show the books and where the post-its were and talk about what readers did to be
problem solvers. Refer to the anchor chart as you explain the examples.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plan
Session
17
Concept
Readers take action to solve problems.
Teaching Point
Readers take speeded action to solve a word by choosing strategies to try and rereading.
Materials
●
●
First Grade Strategy Chart
Texts to show on document camera as you
demonstrate speeded action to problem solve using
meaning, structure and visual cues.
Tips
●
●
Post-it with REREAD to add to Strategy chart
Practice demonstrating this to yourself or to a friend. You need to be prepared with the right
words to allow you to work within, what is happening and word parts you can stretch and blend.
Connection

Readers, there are times when we are reading and we come across just one word that is
unfamiliar to us. When this happens we stop and quickly think, “What could I do to figure out
this word? As BIG TIME READERS you have choices and decisions to make. Today, I want to
give you a couple suggestions to try when this happens. No matter what you try, you are
going to take action quickly and reread with your try in mind.
Teach

Watch me carefully and listen as I think and do because I’m going to have you explain what
you saw when I am finished.

My first suggestion is to think about what is happening in the text at that point, go back and
reread all the time thinking about what is happening in the story. Watch me as I show you
how this looks. (DEMONSTRATE PROCESS)
My second suggestion is to start with the letters in the word. I would look for word parts I
know, I would slowly stretch and blend the word parts together, then reread with those word
parts blended in my head, thinking what would make sense. (DEMONSTRATE PROCESS)

Active
Engagement

Readers, did you see how with my first suggestion, I didn’t use the letters; I used what was
happening in the text and reread. And with my second suggestion, I did use the letters, but
really the parts of language I knew, not individual letters, and then I reread. These are two
strategies you can try when you find that one word on the page that is so unfamiliar.

Partner A tell your partner what you saw me do with suggestion 1. Partner B tell your
partner what you saw me do with suggestion 2. Listen in and coach-up off your teacher
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
chair.
Link

Readers, your job today will be the same as yesterday. We are working on speeded action to
problem solve on your own. Remember to include a smiley face or star if you solve a problem
and you’ll use two smiles or two stars if you and your partner solve together. Let’s set our
timer and get reading.
Mid-Workshop
Teaching Point

Try to showcase readers who are working with the teaching point of solving and rereading.
Even if you must nudge the rereading, give credit to help influence readers that they can do
as others can do.
Partnerships

Readers, in partnerships, make sure you talk a bit about your plans you made from
yesterday. Complete that reading and talking work first, then help each other solve any
problems that you weren’t able to solve on your own. If you solve something together, mark
your post-it with two smiles or 2 stars. That way I will know you were working together
during your partnership solving problems.
After-theWorkshop Share

Add REREAD to chart. Showcase some of the problem solving from independent reading
and/or partnerships. Actually, show the books and where the post-its were and talk about
what readers did to be problem solvers. Refer to the anchor chart as you explain the
examples.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plan
Session
18
Concept
Readers take action to solve problems.
Teaching Point
Readers use speeded action to reread, look at word parts, and think “What would make sense?” to
solve word problems.
Materials
●
●
First Grade Strategy Chart
●
Text to show on document camera as you demonstrate
Tips
●
●
Connection
Teach
3 Post-it notes: REREAD, LOOK FOR PARTS, WHAT
MAKES SENSE
You actually may revise the chart that has been familiar from grades below. Today we will ask
second graders to stop looking letter by letter and follow the process demonstrated.
Our hope is that this lesson will leave readers laughing with joy at who they once were and now,
who they can be.

Readers when you were itty-bitty babies your parents carried you everywhere. As you grew,
you got heavier and maybe they used a little body sling to carry you around. You continued
to grow so they probably pushed you along in a stroller and then maybe a wagon at times,
because you just got too big to be carried, go in the body sling, or the stroller. As kids, you
grow and you OUTGREW things. You outgrew being carried, you outgrew the body sling, you
outgrew your stroller and quite possibly you’ve outgrown a wagon. I bet you walk yourself
most everywhere you go, unless you are in a vehicle.

Well, you’ve outgrown something else that has to do with your reading life. When you were
in kindergarten and first grade you were ready to look at letters in words, like you were
ready for a stroller so your teachers and parents taught you to look at letters, the first ones,
the last ones, the ones in between to solve words in a book. BUT today, you are outgrowing
that strategy. In fact, I see it here on our chart and I’m going to cross it off! YOU ARE BIG
TIME READERS NOW and you have outgrown looking at words by each little letter. So, you
must use the strategies that grown readers use. Readers, who are grown, use speeded action
to reread, look for word parts and think “What would make sense?” They do not point letter
to letter.

Watch me as I show you how you might have previously tried to solve words, and then I’ll
show you how you will solve them from now on.

First, I’m going to be you in kindergarten or first grade. Try to stop at words that aren’t easy
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
to solve phonetically. Make the letter by letter exaggerated and incomprehensible. Bring out
your inner drama king or queen. Kids love to think of the little kid things they’ve done and
how they will no longer be that person. Demonstrate your typical K/1 reader who relies
heavily on sounding every letter to solve an unknown word or words as you read along.

Now, watch the difference. Now, I’m going to be you, second grade BIG TIME READER See if
this looks or sounds any different. You could very well use the same part of text if you never
solved the words. This time, take the role of sophistication. Get stuck, stop, pause, reread,
look for word parts and ask what would make sense. Reread with the word solved.
Active
Engagement

Readers, nod your head if you saw a difference in my two demonstrations. Turn and talk to
your partner as to why you think, I’m recommending that you use my second demonstration
instead of my first one. Why is my second demonstration more helpful to you to be speedy
and solve? Listen so that you can share some of the rational readers have made for
demonstration two being better now.
Link

Readers, as you grow, you OUTGROW. I have talked with so many of you about NOT using
that reading finger unless you are stuck. Instead as you grow, you use your eyes to keep
track of print, I have also talked with many of you about reading inside your head. As you
grow, you OUTGROW reading out loud. We start asking readers to grow into silent, in your
head reading.
That is why here in second grade we do not spend time reading to our partners. This lesson is
just like these other lessons I’ve had in conferences and small groups. Yes, you were taught
to do something that helped you for a little while, and now, there is a more grown up way to
do the same thing. Right? Just like your stroller you are too grown now to solve words letter
by letter. Let’s continue to be problem solvers with speeded action. Remember to put a postit where you stop to solve. Use your stars or smiles to keep track and I will be around to see
how hard you are working.

Mid-Workshop
Teaching Point

Watch for problem solvers to highlight. Reteach or demonstrate process if needed.
Partnerships

Readers, in partnerships, make sure you talk a bit about your plans you made from
yesterday. Complete that reading and talking work first, then help each other solve any
problems that you weren’t able to solve on your own. If you solve something together, mark
your post-it with two smiles or 2 stars. That way I will know you were working together
during your partnership solving problems.
After-theWorkshop Share

Readers, should we giggle and laugh at our younger brothers and sisters, our younger
friends in kindergarten and first grade because they point to letters and words, and they say
every letter sound while they are reading out loud? Would that make us kind and
understanding BIG TIME READERS? OF course not, you were once them. You were once
doing those very same things. In fact, maybe you were doing them yesterday.
We all grow. As we grow, we learn new ways. Readers are in different places with their
reading and it’s important we remember that as we share what we are learning with others.

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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
I want you to be proud that you are a BIG TIME READER, but I want you to carry your pride
with kindness and understanding of other’s needs.
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Reading Unit of Study
Second Grade: Launching the Reading Workshop
Unit 1
Lesson Plan – Session 19
This isn’t so much a lesson as it is a celebration. A mini-lesson structure could be used to teach readers to celebrate after
a lot of hard work and growth. It is suggested that each unit conclude with a form of celebration. These celebrations can
be formal, informal, large, small, and inclusive to the teacher’s class, shared with the community. It is really up to you.
Suggestions for second grade celebrations:
● Create a book timeline where readers set-up desks with books they read in kindergarten, first grade and now
second grade. Let half the class browse and talk to readers about their book timeline while the other half stands
beside their display, then switch. Families and school staff could be invited.
● Visit a kindergarten or first grade class and let readers tell about themselves as readers as they listen to the
younger ones tell about themselves as readers.
● Keep it simple, and have readers look over their pages of logs collected across the month. Have them count
books read, look at speed of pages read increases etc. Have them make a statement to the class “I’m a BIG TIME
READER because now I...” Again, families or school staff could be invited to see and hear readers’ growth.
● Seeing that the unit lingers on the notion that these readers are their own decision makers, you could offer
suggestions earlier in the unit, to your readers, and allow them to list their first choice for celebrating and their
second choice and then carry out the collective decision of the class.
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