ILO OSH tools

Comments

Transcription

ILO OSH tools
ILO instruments on OSH
Dr. Yuka Ujita
Programme on Safety and Health at Work
and the Environment
(SafeWork)
1. International Labour
Standards
Fundamental Conventions on OSH
C155
+ protocol
C161
C187
Others
Systems approach for strengthening
national OSH System
Promotion of safety & health culture
Application of ILO tools
Time-bound
Targeted action:
Construction, SMEs..…
National OSH System
Promotion &
Advocacy
Legislation
Inspection
Knowledge
management
National tripartite advisory body
National OSH Programme
Occupational Safety and Health
Convention, No. 155 (1981)
1. Principles of National Policy
• Participation of employers & workers
• Periodical review of the policy
–
–
–
–
Material element of work
Training
Communication and cooperation at all
levels
Protection of workers from disciplinary
measures
C155
2. Action at the National Level
•
•
•
•
•
•
Inspection system
Guidance to employers & workers
OSH measures
Notification system
Statistics
Coordination mechanism
C155
3. Action at the Level of the Enterprises
•
Employers’ duties
– Safety and health measures
– Personal protective equipment
– Preparedness for emergency & accident
• Workers’ rights and duties
– Information and training
– Report to supervisor
– Protection from undue consequences
– No expenditure on OSH for the workers
Protocol of 2002 to the OSH
Convention, 1981
• Establishment and review of the
recording and notification system of
–
–
–
Occupational accidents
Occupational diseases and
Dangerous occurrences
• Publication of annual statistics
Occupational Health Services
convention, 1985 No. 161
• Risk assessment of health hazards
• Surveillance: working environment,
practices and workers’ health
• Advice on occupational health
• Vocational rehabilitation
• Information and training
• First aid and emergency treatment
2. Codes of Practice and
Guidelines
ILO Codes of Practice
• Practical recommendations intended for all
those with a responsibility for OSH
• Over 50 Codes in the area of OSH have been
published.
http://www.ilo.org/safework/normative/codes/lang-en/index.htm
ILO Guidelines on
OSH management systems
(ILO-OSH 2001)
• Adopted at a
tripartite Meeting of
Experts held in
April, 2001
• Published in
December, 2001
Continual
improvement
(PDCA cycle)
3. Training materials
Keys for successful OSH activities
at grass-roots level
1.
2.
3.
Realistic goal setting in achieving
“good practice”
Self-help stepwise action aiming at
low-cost solutions
Consistent encouragement
by trained facilitators
Participatory approach
Action-oriented group-work steps
used in participatory approach
1. Learn local good
practices
2. Check multiple
areas jointly
3. Implement simple
improvements
4. Confirm benefits and
follow-up
Flow of PAOT programme
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Orientation
Check-list exercise
Small group discussion/Presentation
Technical presentations
Small group discussion/Presentation
Development of action plans
Follow-up activities
Action-checklist
exercise
Small group
discussion
Presentation
of idea
Follow-up visits to support
improvement actions
Targets of participatory
approach
• Small-sized enterprise workers
• Home-based workers
• Workers in agriculture
• Small construction sites workers
• Child workers……..
OSH programmes using PAOT
Programme
Target
WISE
Small enterprises
WIND
Farmers
Work Improvement in Small
Enterprises
Work Improvement in
Neighbourhood Development
WISH
Work Improvement in Safe
Home
WISCON
Home-based workers
Work Improvement in
Small Construction Sites
Small construction
workers
POSITIVE
Workers and trade unions
Participation-Oriented
Safety Improvement by Trade Union
Before
After
After
Before
4. New instruments
A New List of Occupational Diseases
1. Established through regular review and update by
tripartite meetings of experts
2. Submitted by the Meeting of Experts in October
2009
3. Approved by the ILO Governing Body in March
2010
4. An outcome of careful technical preparation and
political negotiation
5. The only list of occupational diseases at
international level
Developments of the new list of
occupational diseases
1. Mental and behavioural disorders have for the
first time, been specifically included
2. Open items in all the sections
3. More specific identification of biological
agents
– Brucellosis, hepatitis viruses, HIV, tetanus,
tuberculosis, bacterial and fungal
contaminants, Anthrax, and Leptospirosis
4. More specification of musculoskeletal
disorders
35
HIV/AIDS as occupational disease
High risk occupations:
– Health care provider;
Nurse, Physician, Therapist, Technician,
etc
– Laboratory worker/technician;
– Waste collection worker (medical
waste); and
– Housekeeper/maintenance worker
36
Documented HIV infection after
occupational exposure
(1984-2002)
USA
Europe
(UK)
Rest of
World
Total
57
35 (5)
14
106
Data: Occupational transmission of HIV, Summary of
reports to December 2002, Health Protection
Agency Centre for Infections, 2005
37
Surveillance of Occupationally
Acquired HIV/AIDS in Healthcare
Worker in US
• Investigation is coordinated by the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and
state health department since 1981
• Voluntary reporting
• 57 confirmed cases (as of December 2006):
– 48 percutaneous (puncture/cut injury), 5
mucoctaneous;
– 24 nurses, 19 lab workers/technician, 6 physicians
• No new documented case since 2001
38

Similar documents