Minnesota Department of Corrections

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Minnesota Department of Corrections
MN DOC Reentry and Recidivism Reduction Programs
Presenters:
Lino Lakes Warden
Vicki Janssen
Community Reentry Director
Kelley Heifort
Minnesota Department of Corrections
Agency • More than 4,300 employees
• 10 prisons • Over 10,000 adults and 120 juveniles incarcerated • Over 17,000 offenders served each year through the cycle of intake and release
• 14 statewide district field supervision offices
• About 20,000 offenders on DOC community supervision 2
Community‐Based Corrections
Department of Corrections:
– 18,063 offenders on probation
– 2,355 offenders on supervised release/parole
Community Corrections Act: – 72,703 offenders on probation
– 3,945 offenders on supervised release/parole
County Probation Officers: – 13,731 offenders on probation
Total Probation – 104,537
Total Supervised Release/Parole – 6,300
Source: 2014 Probation Survey; Snapshot of population 12/31/2014
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Minnesota Has a Low Imprisonment Rate
2014 Imprisonment Rate
(Sentenced prisoners per 100,000 population)
U.S. Total Imprisonment Rate
471
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, Prisoners in 2014.
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Prison Population by Offense 2000‐2015
PRISON POPULATION (EXCLUDES PSI HOLDS) 10,000
Other Offenses
Weapons Offenses
8,000
683
454 683
DWI Offenses
1,144
Property Offenses
6,000
5,215 Person Offenses
4,000
2,000
Drug Offenses
1,911 ‐
2000
2001
Source: MN DOC Profile Cards
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
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DOC Reentry Programming
• Goal is to start planning for an offender’s release from the day he/she enters prison
• Connect offenders to programs that have been proven to reduce offenders’ chance of returning to prison
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Facility Transition Centers
• Each prison facility has a resource transition center where offenders preparing for release can:
– Receive help with job and education searches
– Connect to community resources for housing, veterans’ benefits, health, etc.
• 15 transition coordinators oversee the resource centers and reentry programming in DOC facilities
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Pre‐release Classes
• Offenders are required to attend a DOC pre‐release class 4‐6 months before release
• Topics covered include:
– Financial literacy
– Employment and job seeking skills
– Identification acquisition
– Housing
– Living under supervision
– Family reunification and child support
• 4,979 offenders completed pre‐release in FY15
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Transition Resource Fairs
• Allows offenders to connect with community organizations prior to release
– Offenders within one year of release are eligible to attend
– 50‐70 community organizations are at each resource fair
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Personal ID Documents
• Transition staff work to ensure offenders have an ID, birth certificate and/or Social Security Card at release
• Personal documents are necessary for offenders to obtain jobs, housing and other services
• 3,206 state ID/drivers license applications processed in FY15
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Case Management
• 100+ case managers
• Intake and release assessments
• General planning for confinement
• Facility adjustment issues
• Release planning and conditions of release
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Behavioral Health Release Planners
• Additional release planning services for offenders with mental health and acute or chronic medical conditions
– Assess and review client management needs
– Create individualized discharge plans aimed at successful reintegration into the community
– Increase access to community supports
– 3 medical release planners 12
Effective Programs and Services
– Chemical dependency treatment
– Sex offender treatment
– InnerChange Freedom Initiative (IFI)
– MINNCOR EMPLOY Program
– Challenge Incarceration Program (CIP)
– Work Release
– Institution Community Work Crews
– Cognitive behavioral programming (T4C)
– Mentoring
– Educational/vocational 13
Chemical Dependency Programming
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Provided by licensed DOC staff
Cognitive behavioral‐based
Targeting high risk offenders
6‐9 months in duration
Recidivism reductions upwards of 20% for program completers
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Sex Offender Treatment
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Cognitive behavioral‐based treatment
18‐24 months in duration
Targets high‐risk sex offenders
Recidivism Reductions of 12‐25% 15
InnerChange Freedom Initiative (IFI)
• Intensive, faith‐based reentry program
• 30 months in duration
• Open to any interested offender who is at medium or lesser custody level
• Recidivism reductions of 26‐40%
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Minnesota Circles of Support and Accountability
Targets Level 2 sex offenders – Engages community members in providing social support and accountability
– Significantly reduces 3 of the 5 measures of recidivism
– 82% return on investment (ROI) – Reduces recidivism over 60% 17
Work Release
• Early release program allowing select offenders to obtain employment as they transition from prison to the community
• Offenders live in halfway houses or county jails
Average
Daily Population
FY13
203
• Offenders are required to pay toward room & board and restitution
FY14
193
• About 600 offenders are served each year
FY15
200
• 75‐80% of offenders successfully complete the program
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Educational/Vocational Minnesota DOC ranks #1 nationally in GED passing rate – 2,400 offenders are enrolled in education on any given day
– Approximately 73% of offenders have a GED or high school diploma
– 613 career technical certificates were awarded in FY 15
– Minnesota Correctional Education Center (MCEC) is the second largest ABE consortium in the state with students receiving about 1 million hours of instruction annually
– Post‐secondary degree completion contributes to a 14‐24% recidivism reduction
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EMPLOY Program
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Open to offenders working MINNCOR jobs or those who complete vocational certifications
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Reduces recidivism by 32‐63%
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Increases odds of post‐release employment by 72%
•
Increases participants’ wages in the community
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Transition from Prison to Community (TPC) • Department of Justice and National Institute of Corrections offender reentry initiative established in 2001.
• The TPC model encourages strategic system changes to reduce recidivism and future victimization, to enhance public safety, and to improve the lives of communities, victims, and offenders.
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• Brings together stakeholders across MN
• Leverages momentum across the state to drive greater change
• Develops and implements policy recommendations to break down barriers to reentry in Minnesota communities • Develops and implements solutions focused on evidence‐based corrections practices 22
MNSIRR Collaborative Partners
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For more information
• MN DOC public website http://www.doc.state.mn.us/PAGES/
• What Works with Minnesota Prisoners, Dr. Grant Duwe, July 2013 http://www.doc.state.mn.us/PAGES/files/6213/9206/238
4/What_Works_with_MN_Prisoners_July_2013.pdf
Vicki Janssen [email protected]
Kelley Heifort [email protected]
The MNSIRR project is supported by Grant No. 2014‐CZ‐BX‐0023, awarded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance. The Bureau of Justice Assistance is a component of the Department of Justice's Office of Justice Programs, which also includes the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, the Office for Victims of Crime, and the SMART Office. Points of view or opinions in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.
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