Program Review - Marshall University

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Program Review - Marshall University
Program Review
Bachelor of Science in Medical Imaging
College of Health Professions
October 2014
MARSHALL UNIVERSITY
Program Review
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College/School Dean’s Recommendation
Deans, please indicate your recommendation and submit the rationale.
Recommendation: Continuation of the program at the current level of activity
Rationale:
(If you recommend a program for resource development identify all areas for specific development)
This is the first program review for this program since it was converted from an
associate degree program to a baccalaureate level program. The date of the last onsite visit by the Joint Review Commission on Education in Radiologic Technology was
November, 2013. Following the visit the program was awarded full accreditation
through 2021.
This is a collaborative program between the College of Health Professions and the St.
Mary’s Medical Center – Center for Education, whereby the faculty are employed by St.
Mary’s and the degree is awarded by Marshall University.
This program has been characterized as a rigorous program with extremely qualified
faculty and excellent students. Entering student GPAs have ranged from 3.28-3.55 over
the past four years. The pass rate on the American registry of Radiologic Technologist
exams are 95%. All faculty are active in either state or national societies. Placement of
graduates following graduation is exceptional and the national outlook for employment
remains very strong.
Michael Prewitt
_______________________________________
10/16/14
________________________
Signature of the Dean
Date
4
Marshall University
Program Review
For purposes of program review, the academic year will begin in summer and end in spring.
Program: Medical Imaging - BS___________________________________
College: Health Professions______________________________________
Date of Last Review: This is the program’s first review_________________
I.
CONSISTENCY WITH UNIVERSITY MISSION
The Mission statements of Marshall University, St. Mary’s Medical Center and the
St. Mary’s School of Medical Imaging emphasize support for quality education, the
expansion of knowledge through research and creative activities, the provision of
service to society, to diversity, and finally, to academic freedom. The Mission Statement
for the School of Medical Imaging follows. Key phrases from the Marshall University and
School of Medical Imaging Mission Statements are abstracted from the original
documents and appear in Table I to demonstrate the consistency.
School of Medical Imaging Mission Statement
The mission of St. Mary’s School of Medical Imaging is to prepare qualified
graduates in the area of imaging sciences through current educational methodologies.
The faculty, in collaboration with internal and external groups, will foster the
development of a learning environment that is responsive to local and national trends in
health care to produce multi-competent radiology professionals.
To accomplish this mission, Medical Imaging:
Ensures the integrity of the programs through maintenance of rigorous professional
educational standards and through high expectation of student learning and
performance;
Encourages involvement of faculty in service to society and the profession and
promotes lifelong learning in our students;
Supports the engagement of faculty in research and scholarly activities;
Provides an environment that is sensitive to a culturally, racially, and ethnically diverse
student body, faculty, and staff; and
Maintains an environment that provides for academic freedom and shared governance.
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. Table 1: Comparison of Marshall University and St. Mary’s SOMI Mission Statement
Marshall University Mission Statement St. Mary’s School of Medical Imaging
Provide affordable, high quality
Prepare qualified graduates in imaging
undergraduate education appropriate
sciences. The BS program prepares
for the state and the region.
students to practice as both the entry
level radiographer/sonographer and the
advanced practitioner.
Improve instruction through the use of
The role of faculty in imaging education
innovative teaching methods that
is to facilitate the students’ learning
require students to become actively
experience through systematic
involved in the learning process and
guidance in their endeavors to acquire
develop critical thinking skills
those knowledge, skills and judgments
necessary for life-long learning
necessary for competence in the
practice of medical imaging.
Enhance the quality of health care in
A key component of medical imaging is
the region
to promote safe radiation practices for
both the public and occupational
worker.
Educate a citizenry capable of living
Each person is a unique individual,
and working effectively in a global
capable of rational thoughts and selfenvironment.
directed behaviors, with physiological,
psychosocial and spiritual needs
II.
Accreditation Information
1. Name of Accrediting Organization: Joint Review Commission on Education in
Radiologic Technology
2. Date of Most Recent Self-Study and Accreditation visit: November 2013
3. Accreditation Status: Full 8 year accreditation status
4. Accrediting Organization’s Report: available at www.jrcert.org
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III.
Adequacy of the Program
1. Faculty:
School of Medical Imaging (SOMI) faculty are employed by St. Mary’s Medical
Center-Center for Education (SMMC-CFE). They are not subject to Marshall
University’s tenure process. SOMI faculty must meet faculty Standards
established by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic
Technology (JRCERT), Joint Review Committee on Diagnostic Medical
Sonography and St. Mary’s Medical Center-Center for Education. JRCERT
Standards require a Program Director (Dr. Rita Fisher), Clinical Coordinator
(Karen Foster-Radiography and Nancy MacClellan-Sonography) and didactic
and clinical faculty as needed. JRCERT Standards mandate a minimum of a
baccalaureate degree for didactic faculty and the clinical coordinator, and
master’s for the program director as well as published criteria for clinical and/or
teaching experience. JRCERT Standards are available for review at
www.jrcert.org.
In addition to the minimum Standards set by JRCERT, The St. Mary’s Medical
Center-Center for Education requires a minimum of a master’s degree for all
faculty members. All current faculty have a master’s degree or higher with the
exception of one faculty who is expected to complete a master’s program within
two years. SOMI full time faculty include the director, two clinical coordinators
(one each for the radiography and sonography tracks), and three didactic faculty
for radiography. An additional didactic faculty in sonography will be added in
August 2014.
All radiography faculty are professionally licensed by the West Virginia Board of
Examiners of Radiologic Technologists, and credentialed by the American
Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). Sonography faculty are
credentialed by the American Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonography
(ARDMS). Most faculty carry one or more advanced credentials in addition to the
entry level. Credentialing by the ARRT or ARDMS is through national
examination and evidence of clinical competence in the field. The SOMI has one
or more faculty members credentialed in Radiography, Computed Tomography,
Mammography, Cardiovascular Interventional Technology, Quality Management,
Obstetrics/Gynecology/General Sonography, Vascular Sonography and
Echocardiography.
All faculty are expected to be active in professional organizations. All radiography
faculty currently hold office in either state (West Virginia Society for Radiologic
Technologists) or national (American Society of Radiologic Technologists)
professional organizations. Dr. Rita Fisher sits on the Editorial Review Board for
the American Society of Radiologic Technologists professional journal Radiologic
Technology. Dr. Fisher has multiple peer reviewed publications and conference
presentations on her vita. As an ERB member, she will continue to contribute
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publications to Radiologic Technology. Unlike Europe, within the United States,
original research is not common in the field even among educators. Radiologic
technology is still widely viewed as a clinical field. In fact, there are very few
master’s level and only two doctoral level programs in medical imaging within the
US. This is changing, albeit, slowly.
The SOMI is unique compared to all the radiography educational programs in the
US in that Dr. Fisher’s doctorate is in anthropology and she teaches a full course
in transcultural healthcare which is both a writing intensive and multicultural
course for Marshall. No other radiography program has a similar course. While
production of quality clinically trained radiographers to meet the needs of the
local community is a primary goal, the goals of the SOMI also include producing
well rounded radiographers who will demonstrate a set of cognitive, affective,
and behavioral skills and characteristics that support effective and appropriate
interaction in a variety of cultural contexts.
2. Students:
a. Entrance Standards Entrance Standards:
Admission to the SMMC SOMI is made by application. The SOMI accepts up
to twenty-four sophomore level students each year. The number of students
is determined by clinical availability. Within that cohort, students who wish to
pursue the sonography track make an internal application at the conclusion of
the sophomore year. The current number of students accepted into the
sonography track is six based on clinical rotation availability. The program
also accepts credentialed radiographers (RTs) into the senior year. These
students may wish to complete an advanced area of emphasis in order to sit
for a post-primary certification exam, or may just wish to complete the
bachelor’s degree requirements if they already have an advanced
certification. Numbers again are limited by clinical availability. There are no
limits on RTs with advanced certificates who wish to complete the degree
requirements. The number of students wishing to do so continues to increase
each year.
Sophomore admission: Applications as well as the Technical Standards and
Technical Standards declaration form can be obtained through the Program
web site at www.st-marys.org Admission to the SMMC SOMI is separate
from admission to MU. Admission into MU does not guarantee admission into
the SOMI. There is a $30 application fee for the SMMC SOMI. All application
materials, including college and high school transcripts/GED, must be
received by April 1. Any application received after April 1 may be placed on
the alternate list.
Along with the application and fee, a signed copy of the technical standards
declaration form and evidence of a minimum of eight (8) hours of observation
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must be submitted. At least four (4) hours of observation must be diagnostic
radiography preferably in a hospital radiography department.
Applicants must show proof of high school graduation or successful
completion of the GED exam. Program admission requires a minimum GPA
of 2.50 and at least 15 college credit hours that must include the following
prerequisites:
1.
2.
3.
4.
coursework in college algebra (MU Math 121, 127, 130)
coursework in human anatomy (MU BSC 227)
coursework in introductory physics (MU PHY 101)
coursework in human physiology (MU BSC 228)
Course work submitted for admission criteria from colleges or universities
apart from Marshall University (MU) must be equivalent (acceptable in
transfer) to those offered at Marshall. Applicants should contact the
registrar’s office at MU if they have questions about the transfer of
coursework. Applicants must take both semesters of any human anatomy and
physiology course taught in two separate terms. Applicants will receive points
for human anatomy and physiology in such instances. Any variation from the
prerequisite coursework requirement requires direct permission from the
Program Director.
Applicants are scored and ranked based on overall college GPA, course
grades in prerequisite courses, and high school GPA or GED scores.
Applicants who submit ACT scores will receive extra points for scores of 19 or
greater on the composite, math and/or science components. Provisional
admission will be offered to the top 24 applicants based on total points. All
other completed applications will be ranked for the alternate list. The alternate
list is maintained until the program begins in August. A new application must
be submitted for the next year.
The program reserves the right to conduct personal interviews to aid in
applicant selection. All offers of admission are contingent upon a background
check and drug screening.
RT admission: RTs must be admitted into Marshall University. Applicants
submit the SOMI application and fee, a copy of their professional credentials,
and all college transcripts including prior radiography program transcripts.
Applicants must have successfully completed an accredited program in
radiography, sonography, nuclear medicine, or radiation therapy. Some
applicants may be required to complete any general education deficits prior to
enrolling in any medical imaging coursework.
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b. Entrance and Exit Abilities of past five years of graduates:
Appendix II shows that our last four years of graduates entered the program
with mean yearly high school GPAs that ranged from 3.28 to 3.55 and yearly
mean ACT scores that ranged from 21.2 to 22.4. Appendix III shows that
these graduates also compiled respectable GPAs during their undergraduate
program, with yearly means ranging from 3.16 to 3.26.
The five year (2009-2013) American Registry of Radiologic Technologist pass
rate is 95% (See Appendix III). The ARRT does not identify individual
student’s scores by name, so it is not an easy manner to do statistical
correlations between ACT, GPA or ARRT pass rates.
3. Assessment Information:
a. Please see Appendix IV for detailed information regarding assessment of
student learning in the program.
b. Other Learning and Service Activities: SOMI courses are not classified as
service learning courses; however, the SMMC-CFE mandates all students
complete a minimum of eight hours of medically related community service
each semester. Community service is not tied to specific courses, but is a
program (SOMI) mandate. Students and faculty contribute to a variety of
health related community service projects throughout the tri-state region.
c. Plans for Program Improvement: Please refer to weakness 2a on page 12
for a complete description of our plans to improve the program’s assessment
of student learning.
d. Graduate Satisfaction:
Table 2: Program Satisfaction School of Medical Imaging
Year
Average Score
Number of surveys
requested
2010 graduates
3.33/4.00
16
2011 graduates
NO DATA
(included with 2012)
(survey submitted
post-graduation)
2012 graduates
4.33/5.00
12
(survey submitted
post-graduation)
2013 graduates
4.71/5.00
16
(survey submitted
Outstanding N=5
prior to graduation)
Good N = 2
2014 graduates
3.5/5.00
19
(survey submitted
Outstanding N = 6
prior to graduation)
Very good N = 3
Good N = 2
Fair N = 2
Poor N = 1
Number of surveys
completed
3
Response
percentage
19%
3
25%
7
44%
14
74%
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As these data indicate, although the response rate is greater when surveys
are requested prior to graduation, the results may vary compared to alumni
six months post-graduation.
e. The previous five years of evaluations of assessment reports for the BS in
Medical Imaging are provided in Appendix VIII.
4. Previous Reviews: The BS in Medical Imaging was approved by the Marshall
University Board of Governors in 2009; this is the program’s first review.
5. Identify weaknesses and deficiencies noted in the last program review and
provide information regarding the status of improvements implemented or
accomplished.
This is the program’s first review.
6. Current Strengths/Weaknesses:
1. Strengths
a. The program’s greatest strength lies in the clinical portion of the
program. Graduates have an excellent clinical education. The program
is one of the few programs in the entire United States to offer the
curriculum we are able to offer in no small part due to the extensive
faculty credentials. The program has done a good job of anticipating
national trends in medical imaging and adjusting the program
curriculum to meet those trends. Beginning in 2016, all candidates who
apply to the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists to sit for
and advanced imaging exam will have to document a minimum of 16
hours of advanced education equivalent to college coursework. Our
senior level tracks more than meet those requirements for students
who track through the program from freshmen to seniors, but it also will
provide an avenue for the professional radiographer who wishes to
either complete a higher degree and/or obtain the didactic and clinical
requirements to sit for an advanced Board exam.
b. The Program has added sonography to the curriculum and the first
graduates of the three sonography tracks will graduate in May. These
students have, in fact, already successfully completed one of the
required national Board exams. The sonography faculty are looking for
ways to forge stronger ties to Marshall University Medical School as a
teaching option for residents in various programs as well as faculty
within other departments in the College of Health Professions. The
faculty also stays abreast of the latest trends in sonography and will
continue to develop the curriculum in order to incorporate new
developments. The sonography program will apply for a self-study and
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begin the process of full accreditation this year for at least two of the
three tracks. See below regarding potential issues with the third.
2. Weaknesses:
a. The principal weakness within the program is getting the faculty to view
the program as a full baccalaureate program whereby the graduate
meets the goals of a degree seeking student and not just a clinical
program producing quality medical professionals. The two are not
mutually exclusive and should be integrated throughout the program.
This weakness becomes apparent when attempting to do a meaningful
program assessment. Some of the assessment measurements and
Standards do not align across the program. Senior students are often
not meeting the standards; however, a review of some of the
assessment data from lower level classes indicates that there are
issues with both data collection and assessment. Moreover, very
different standards and rubrics were being used across the program for
the same trait making any meaningful analysis difficult if not impossible
for some assessments. The program is going to begin with focusing on
the assessment tools being used for each trait; use of the same rubrics
across all courses being used to assess a trait and closer scrutiny into
how individual instructors are using the rubrics. The program has to
standardize the data collection methodology first before it can
accurately assess the data and determine if and where students are
failing to meet the benchmarks. Then we can scrutinize the
benchmarks and evaluate their validity. Only then can we really
analyze the results and determine what programmatic curricular
changes, if any, need to be made in order to meet both the University
goals for any degree seeking student and the professional goals of a
clinically based curriculum including developing critical thinkers and
instilling the concepts of life-long learning.
b. The program is still attempting to obtain additional clinical rotations for
sonography. These are the limiting factors in both the number of
students we can accept and in obtaining ARDMS accreditation for all
three sonography tracks, in particular OB/GYN. Graduates are able to
sit for the ARDMS credentialing exams as they will graduate from the
university with a B.S. degree, but the Program wants to achieve
accreditation as well as it strengthens the overall Program. We are
working diligently to solve this issue but are in competition with
students from Morehead state from KY, University of Rio Grande and
Collins Career Center in OH who also have sonography programs and
have students in many of the same clinical sites we are seeking to
access. The program will continue to explore these options as well as
seek distant clinic sites if it proves necessary.
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IV.
Viability of the Program:
1. Articulation Agreements: Marshall University has an articulation agreement
with St. Mary’s Medical Center School of Medical Imaging (which is solely owned
and operated by St. Mary’s Medical Center) to provide all program specific
didactic and clinical coursework. Marshall University awards the BS in Medical
Imaging degree upon completion of all imaging coursework (MI designation) and
general education requirements have been met. Graduates of the program are
eligible to sit for professional credentialing exams only after completing all
aspects of the program. The SMMC SOMI maintains all clinical affiliations and
assures they meet JRCERT and JRC-DMS Standards including providing
professional liability insurance.
2. Off-Campus Classes: All didactic medical imaging coursework is taught at the
SMMC Center for Education in Huntington, WV.
3. Online Courses: Not applicable.
4. Service Courses: Not applicable.
5. Program Course Enrollment: The SOMI offers two primary imaging tracks:
radiography and sonography. Each of these specialties offers major areas of
interest, each of which is related to specific professional credentialing. Students
in the radiography track will complete the didactic and clinical requirements
necessary to sit for the entry level or primary exam in Radiography administered
by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). Students will also
select an advanced level track in the senior year making them eligible to sit for a
specific post-primary certification exam offered by the ARRT or the Association
for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA). Advanced level tracks include:
mammography, cardiovascular or interventional radiography, computed
tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, management and advanced
diagnostic radiography. The advanced diagnostic radiography track is intended
for the student who does not wish to sit for one of the subspecialty boards, but
intends to practice in general radiography. The emphasis of this track is
advanced preparation in surgical, trauma, geriatric and pediatric radiography
beyond the entry-level of instruction. Students who select the sonography track
(at the junior year) also have multiple options including obstetrical/general
sonography, vascular sonography and echocardiac sonography. Each option has
a separate credentialing examination administered by the American Registry of
Diagnostic Medical Sonography (ARDMS). All sonography students are prepared
to sit for the general physics exam administered by the ARDMS. The physics
exam is required for each subspecialty within sonography. The sonography
program was first instituted in the 2013-2014 academic year. The number of
students admitted into the sonography track is currently limited to six due to
clinical restrictions. Specific course enrollments will be provided to you in
Appendix V.
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6. Program Enrollment: The SOMI does not have minors and all majors are
enrolled in the College of Health Professions. Enrollment is limited by clinical
availability so our numbers essentially remain the same from year to year. The
only variation is the number of registered technologists who enroll to complete
the degree requirements or to obtain required didactic coursework for advanced
certifications required by professional credentialing agencies. See Appendix VI
and Figure 1
7. The trend line for program enrollment and graduation numbers is provided in
Figure 1, which follows Appendix VI. Employment data, is provided in
Appendix VII.
8. Enrollment Projections: Entry level enrollment in the School of Medical Imaging
is limited by availability of clinical rotations. JRCERT requires a 1:1 ratio of
students to clinical practitioners. All clinical rotations for the SOMI are within one
hour drive of Huntington. The SOMI has to compete for clinical placement with
other regional imaging programs. Enrollment is expected to remain stable for
entry level positions, but the admission of professional radiographers into the
senior advanced level courses is expected to continue to grow. As of 2016 all
radiographers who wish to sit for an advanced level certification examination
must submit evidence of at least 16 hours of college level coursework in the
specific discipline. We expect more RTs who wish to become certified in any
advanced level imaging modality to enter the program in order to obtain the
necessary coursework.
IV.
Necessity of the Program:
1. Advisory Committee: The SOMI has an advisory committee comprised of its
communities of interest which include students, faculty, Center for Education
faculty from the Schools of Nursing and Respiratory Therapy, St. Mary’s Medical
Center Administration, all clinical instructors and clinical rotation supervisors and
a representative from Marshall University College of Health Professions. The
Advisory Committee meets twice a year. The SOMI Program Director presents
and annual report that includes all program professional outcomes as well as
student learning outcomes.
2. Graduates: Appendix VII.
3. Job Placement: The SOMI does not do direct job placement as that is
considered a conflict of interest by St. Mary’s Medical Center. However, regional
employers frequently contact the Program and any and all information is passed
along to both current students and graduates. We also educate students
regarding job resources such as the American Society of Radiologic Technologist
Job Bank. We send out an alumni survey approximately six months postgraduation along with employer surveys to track graduates. According to the
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American Society for Radiologic Technologist most recent surveys (www.asrt.org
), the national job placement data for radiology is 85% so the SOMI data are
actually equal to or greater than the national trend even in a limited market such
as the tri-state area. Bureau of Labor Statistics for Radiography and Sonography
project job growth through 2022 for radiography/MRI and sonography to be 21%
and 39% respectively. http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/diagnostic-medicalsonographers.htm
V.
RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT (If applicable)
Not applicable. School of Medical Imaging resources are provided by St. Mary’s
Medical Center.
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Appendix I
Faculty Data Sheet
Name: Rita Fisher (Program Director)
Rank: Not applicable
Status (Check one): Full-time
Adjunct Clinical
Current MU Faculty: Yes __X__ No __
Highest Degree Earned: PhD
Date Degree Received: May 2001
Conferring Institution: University of Arkansas
Area of Degree Specialization: Anthropology
Professional Registration/Licensure: Radiography (ARRT),
Field of Registration/Licensure: Radiography, Computed Tomography, CardiovascularInterventional Technology
Agency: American Registry of Radiologic Technology, WV Board of Examiners of
Radiologic Technologists.
Number of years at Marshall (can be in either teaching or administration) NA
(Expand the table as necessary)
Year/Semester
2012/Fall
2013/Spring
2013/Fall
2014/Spring
Alpha Des. &
No.
MI 302
MI 306
MI 403
MI 407
MI 211
MI 307
MI 401
MI 406
MI 408
MI 411
MI 211
MI 302
MI 306
MI 403
MI 407
MI 212
Title
Princ of Radiation Physics
Seminar in Imaging Sciences
Adv Practice in Med Img
Cardiovascular Anatomy
Seminar in Imaging Science
Rad Protection
Seminar in Imaging Science
MRI Equip and Proc
Cardiovascular Imaging
Transcultural Healthcare
Seminar in Imaging Science
Princ of Radiation Physics
Seminar in Imaging Sciences
Adv Practice in Med Img
Cardiovascular Anatomy
Seminar in Imaging Science
Enrollment
22
22
20
3
22
22
20
7
3
20
24
18
24
28
3
24
17
MI 307
MI 311
MI 401
MI 406
MI 408
MI 411
Rad Protection
Seminar in Imaging Science
Seminar in Imaging Science
MRI Equip and Proc
Cardiovascular Imaging
Transcultural Healthcare
18
24
20
3
3
24
18
Faculty Data Sheet
Name: Mindy Combs (didactic faculty)
Rank: Not applicable
Status (Check one): Full-time ______
Adjunct Clinical
Current MU Faculty: Yes _X_ No _X_
Highest Degree Earned: M.S
Date Degree Received: 5/5/2007
Conferring Institution: Marshall University
Area of Degree Specialization: Adult Education
Professional Registration/Licensure: Radiography (ARRT)
Field of Registration/Licensure: Radiography, Mammography, Quality Management
Agency: American Registry of Radiologic Technology, WV Board of Examiners of
Radiologic Technologists.
Number of years at Marshall (can be in either teaching or administration) NA
Year/Semester
2012/ Fall
2013/Spring
2013/ Fall
2014/ Spring
Alpha Des. &
No.
MI 205 414
MI 402
MI 414
MI 207 (45%)
MI 208
MI 209
MI 202
MI 205 (45%)
MI 402
MI 414
MI 208
MI 209
MI 401 (17%)
MI 415
Title
Imaging Procedures I
Quality Management
Mammography I
Imaging Procedures II
Pharmacology for Imaging Sciences
Intro to Imaging Equipment
Patient Care in Imaging Sciences
Imaging Procedures I
Quality Management
Mammography I
Pharmacology for Imaging Sciences
Into to Imaging Equipment
Seminar in Imaging Sci
RIS and PACS Technology
Enrollment
21
18
1
21
21
21
23
23
27
4
23
23
22
3
19
Faculty Data Sheet
Name: Karen J. Foster
(didactic faculty)
Rank: Not applicable
Status (Check one): Full-time
Adjunct: Clinical
Current MU Faculty: Yes __X_ No ____
Highest Degree Earned: MS
Date Degree Received: May 7, 2011
Conferring Institution: Marshall University
Area of Degree Specialization: Adult Education
Professional Registration/Licensure: Radiography (ARRT)
Field of Registration/Licensure: Radiography
Agency: American Registry of Radiologic Technologists, WV Board of Examiners of
Radiologic Technologists
Number of years at Marshall (can be in either teaching or administration) NA
Year/Semester
2014/SPRING
2014/SPRING
2014/SPRING
2014/SPRING
2014/SPRING
2013/FALL
2013/FALL
2013/FALL
2013/FALL
2013/SPRING
2013/SPRING
2013/SPRING
2013/SPRING
2013/SPRING
2012/FALL
2012/FALL
2012/FALL
Alpha Des. &
No.
MI210
MI309
MI310
MI485
MI410
MI206
MI303
MI305
MI409
MI210
MI309
MI310
MI409
MI410
MI303
MI206
MI305
Title
Clinical Practice II
Digital Image Acquisition and Display
Clinical Practice V
Advanced Clinical Practice II
Research Methods
Clinical Practice I
Image Acquisition and Processing
Clinical Practice IV
Advanced Clinical Practice
Clinical Practice II
Digital Image Acquisition and Display
Clinical Practice V
Advanced Clinical Practice
Research Methods
Image Acquisition and Processing
Clinical Practice I
Clinical Practice IV
Enrollment
23
16
16
20
23
23
16
16
18
23
21
21
17
18
22
23
22
20
Faculty Data Sheet
Name: Jeffrey Jobe (didactic faculty)
Rank: not applicable
Status (Check one): Full-time ______
Adjunct clinical
Current MU Faculty: Yes __X_ No __
Highest Degree Earned: RBA
Date Degree Received: May 2013
Conferring Institution: Marshall University
Area of Degree Specialization: Regents Bachelor of Arts
Professional Registration/Licensure: Radiography (ARRT)
Field of Registration/Licensure: Radiography
Agency: American Registry of Radiologic Technology, WV Board of Examiners of
Radiologic Technologists.
Number of years at Marshall (can be in either teaching or administration) NA
Year/Semester
Spring 2014
Fall 2013
Spring 2013
Fall 2012
Alpha Des. &
No.
MI 208 (50%)
MI 205 (50%)
MI 208 (50%)
MI 205 (50%)
Title
Imaging Procedures II
Imaging Procedures I
Imaging Procedures II
Imaging Procedures I
Enrollment
23
24
23
23
21
Faculty Data Sheet
Name: Nancy J. MacClellan,
(sonography faculty)
Rank: Not applicable
Status (Check one): Full-time ______
Adjunct: Clinical
Current MU Faculty: Yes __X__ No __
Highest Degree Earned: ______MS
Date Degree Received: 2009
Conferring Institution: Marshall University
Area of Degree Specialization: Adult Education
Professional Registration/Licensure: Sonography (ARDMS)
Field of Registration/Licensure: Abdomen; OB/GYN; Adult Echocardiography, Vascular
Technology
Agency: American Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonography
Number of years at Marshall (can be in either teaching or administration) NA
Year/Semester
2013/Fall
2014/Spring
Alpha Des. &
No.
MI 312
MI 313
MI 315
MI 316
MI 317
MI 318
Title
Abdominal Sonography 1
Ultrasound Physics I
Small Parts Sonography
Abdominal Sonography II
Ultrasound Physics II
Vascular Sonography I
Enrollment
7
7
7
7
7
7
22
Faculty Data Sheet
Name: Deborah Moore (didactic faculty)
Status (Check one): Full-time ______
Rank: not applicable
Adjunct clinical
Current MU Faculty: Yes __x__ No ___
Highest Degree Earned: MS
Date Degree Received: May 2011
Conferring Institution: Marshall University
Area of Degree Specialization: Adult Education
Professional Registration/Licensure: Radiography (ARRT)
Field of Registration/Licensure: Radiography, Computed Tomography
Agency: American Registry of Radiologic Technology, WV Board of Examiners of
Radiologic Technologists.
Number of years at Marshall (can be in either teaching or administration) NA
Year/Semester
Spring 2014
Spring 2014
Spring 2014
Fall 2013
Fall 2013
Fall 2013
Fall 2013
Fall 2013
Fall 2013
Spring 2013
Spring 2013
Fall 2012
Fall 2012
Fall 2012
Fall 2012
Alpha Des. &
No.
MI 207
MI 308
MI 405
MI 201
MI 204
MI 205
MI 201
MI 304
MI 404
MI 308
MI 405
MI 201
MI 204
MI 304
MI 404
Title
Imaging Procedures II
Radiographic Image Analysis
CT Procedures and Equipment
Into to Imaging Sciences
Radiographic Anatomy
Imaging Procedures I
Advanced Sectional Anatomy
Radiographic Pathology
Advanced Sectional Anatomy
Radiographic Image Analysis
CT Procedures and Equipment
Intro to Radiographic Science
Radiographic Anatomy
Radiographic Pathology
Advanced Sectional Anatomy
Enrollment
24
16
3
24
24
24
24
17
11
16
11
23
23
19
14
23
Appendix II
Students’ Entrance Abilities for Past Five Years of Graduates: BS in Medical Imaging
Mean High School GPA
Mean ACT
Mean SAT
Verbal
Mean SAT
Quantitative
Mean SAT
Writing
11
3.28 (n = 5)
21.4 (n = 5)
--
--
--
2011-2012
14
3.35 (n = 14)
21.2 (n = 13)
--
--
--
2012-2013
19
3.47 (n = 19)
21.2 (n = 16)
--
--
--
2013-2014
19
3.55 (n = 19)
22.4 (n = 18)
440 (n = 2)
480 (n = 2)
430 (n = 2)
Year
N
2009-2010
0
2010-2011
24
Appendix III
Exit Abilities for Past Five Years of Graduates: BS in Medical Imaging
Mean GPA
Licensure Exam
Results
Certification Test
Results
Year
N
2009-2010
0
2010-2011
11
3.26
93%
2011-2012
14
3.16
100%
2012-2013
19
3.19
82%
2013-2014
19
3.26
92%
100%
Other Standardized
Exam Results
25
Appendix IV: Assessment Summary
Assessment Summary
Component Area/Program/Discipline: BS in Medical Imaging_________________________________________
Program’s Student
Learning Outcomes
Students will demonstrate
clinical proficiency
Program Level
Standards/Benc
Assessment Measures (Tools)
hmark
Assessment Point 1
Milestone (85% of
MI 210: Terminal Competency
students will meet
Exam
this Standard)
Assessment Point 2
Capstone (90% of
MI 310: Terminal Competency
students will meet
Exam
this Standard)
Results/Analysis
96% of students met the
benchmark level.
81% of students met the
benchmark level. Students
are losing certain skills as
they move away from core
courses MI 205 and 210.
We actually added a 3rd
terminal competency
assessment point, MI 401,
for the senior students and
only 42% met the capstone
benchmark.
Students will synthesize
and practice radiation
safety
Assessment Point 1
MI 210 Clinical competency: Task
18-20 (averaged)
Milestone (95% of
students will meet
the Standard)
100% of students met or
exceeded the benchmark.
Capstone (95% of
students will meet
the standard)
Milestone (85% of
students will meet
the Standard)
100% of students met the
benchmark
Students will integrate
critical analysis and
problem solving skills into
Assessment Point 2
MI 310 Clinical competency: Task
18-20 (averaged)
Assessment Point 1
MI 210: Terminal Competency
Exam
100% of students met this
benchmark
Action Taken to improve
the program
See below
We are redoing the
terminal competency
process and making it
much more rigorous. We
hope to see dramatic
improvements in this
assessment point for the
2014-2015 year. Students
should retain the core
teaching and improve upon
them in the clinical
courses; therefore, we are
systematically examining
our assessments and then
will critically evaluate the
clinical requirements.
None needed at this time.
The SOMI takes radiation
safety very seriously and
the students practice due
diligence in the clinical
aspect of the program
See above
Although students met the
Standard/benchmark, the
terminal competency
26
their clinical practice.
Students will communicate
effectively in a variety of
formats.
Students will appraise
cultural competence as it
relates to professional
growth and development.
Students will critically
evaluate complex issues
relating to the field.
Assessment Point 2
MI 310: Terminal Competency
Exam
Assessment Point 1
MI 201: Power Point Presentation
Capstone (90% of
students will meet
the Standard)
Milestone
100% of students met this
benchmark
Assessment Point 2
MI 403: Communication Paper
Capstone (90% of
students will meet
the Standard)
90% of students met the
capstone benchmark for
the assignment. 10% of
students were at the
milestone benchmark.
Assessment Point 1
MI 201: Written Assignment
Milestone
Assessment Point 2
MI 411: Research Paper
Capstone
Assessment Point 1
MI 202: Ethics Paper
Milestone
90% of students met the
capstone benchmark for
the assignment. 10% of
students were at the
milestone benchmark.
process is being reworked
to provide a better
assessment for this trait
See above
This course was not a
good assessment point
and we are reconsidering
what course will best meet
the assessment
This course is a good
assessment point. The
course is a WAC approved
course. Students met the
benchmark for this
assignment. The problem
is we cannot compare
progression of the trait
over the curriculum.
This course was not a
good assessment point
and we are reconsidering
what course will best meet
the assessment
This course is a good
assessment point. The
course is both a
multicultural and WAC
approved course. Students
met the benchmark for this
assignment. The problem
is we cannot compare
progression of the trait
over the curriculum.
This course was not a
good assessment point
and we are reconsidering
what course will best meet
the assessment
27
Assessment Point 2
MI 403: Ethics and Law Paper
Capstone
90% of students met the
capstone benchmark for
the assignment. 10% of
students were at the
milestone benchmark.
This course is a good
assessment point. The
course is a WAC approved
course. Students met the
benchmark for this
assignment. The problem
is we cannot compare
progression of the trait
over the curriculum.
28
Program Assessment Rubrics: BS in Medical Imaging
Program Learning Outcome 1: Students will demonstrate clinical proficiency.
Traits
Performance Levels
Introductory
Milestone
Capstone
Image Assessment
Students are able to
Students are able to
Students are able to
correctly identify most
identify most radiographic
identify radiographic
radiographic anatomy
anatomy and pathology
anatomy, pathology and
needed compensatory
technical changes
Technical skills
Student may make major
Student selects
Student selects
mistakes selecting
Appropriate exposure
appropriate
appropriate exposure
factors with minor
exposure factors
factors and/or requires
Errors, but is able to make with no errors and requires
direct intervention from a
corrections with hints from
no hints from a supervisor
supervisor
a supervisor
Procedural skills
Student makes major
Student makes 1-2 minor
Student makes no
mistakes in imaging
mistakes in imaging
mistakes and requires no
procedures and/or requires procedures, but is able to
hints from a supervisor. Is
direct intervention from a
correct them with hints
able to work independently
supervisor
from a supervisor
without supervision.
Advanced
N/A
N/A
N/A
29
Program Learning Outcome 2: Students will synthesize and practice radiation safety.
Traits
Performance Levels
Introductory
Milestone
Capstone
Practice
Utilizes shielding for both
Provides shielding and
Provides shielding, uses
patient and operator to
uses appropriate
appropriate collimation,
reduce radiation dose
collimation to reduce
and adjusts technical
radiation dose
factors to provide the
lowest dose
Synthesis
Is able to explain the
Is able to describe the type Is able to synthesize
fundamental principles of
of shielding required for
biological impacts of
ALARA
specific situations
ionizing radiation and
describe means of
reducing exposure
Advanced
N/A
N/A
Program Learning Outcome 3: Students will integrate critical analysis and problem solving skills into their clinical practice.
Traits
Performance Levels
Introductory
Milestone
Capstone
Conclusions and
Conclusion is logically tied
Conclusion is logically tied
Conclusions and related
N/A
Outcomes
to information (because
to a range of information,
outcomes (consequences
information is chosen to fit
related outcomes
and implications) are
the desired conclusion);
(consequences and
logical and reflect student's
some related outcomes
implications) are identified
informed evaluation and
(consequences and
clearly
ability to place evidence
implications) are identified
and perspectives
clearly
discussed in priority order
Advanced
30
Program Learning Outcome 4: Students will communicate effectively in a variety of formats.
Traits
Performance Levels
Introductory
Milestone
Capstone
Context/Audience
Identifies potential
Selects a specific
Appraises audience and
contexts/audiences for
context/audience for
tailors the communication
communication
communication
with their needs/culture in
mind
Mechanics/Style
Writing has only a few (but Writing is virtually free of
Writing uses complex and
noticeable) errors in
mechanics/stylistic errors
varied sentence style to
mechanics/style
express the relationship
among ideas
Diction
Chooses commonplace
Chooses vocabulary that
With the audience in mind,
vocabulary that conveys
conveys the intended
chooses a varied
intended meaning of
meaning of communication vocabulary that conveys
communication
the intended meaning of
communication
Advanced
N/A
N/A
N/A
Program Learning Outcome 5: Students will appraise cultural competence as it relates to professional growth and development.
Traits
Performance Levels
Introductory
Milestone
Capstone
Advanced
Integrative Learning
Identifies different
Compares and contrasts
Develops a comparative
N/A
ethnographic approaches
different ethnographic
ethnographic framework
to health but does not
approaches to health
for organizing and
relate them to each other.
interpreting information
about health including
cultural competence,
cultural systems analysis
and their relation to
healthcare
31
Program Learning Outcome 6: Students will critically evaluate complex issues relating to the field.
Traits
Performance Levels
Introductory
Milestone
Capstone
Evidence
Issue/problem to be
Issue/problems to be
Issue/problem to be
considered critically is
considered is stated,
considered critically is
stated without clarification
described, and clarified so
stated clearly and
or description
that understanding is not
described
seriously impeded by
comprehensively,
omissions
delivering all relevant
information necessary for
full understanding.
Advanced
N/A
32
Appendix V
Program Course Enrollment: BS in Medical Imaging
33
34
Appendix VI
Program Course Enrollment: BS in Medical Imaging
Table 2: Program Enrollment: BS in Medical Imaging
Students
Principal Majors Enrolled: BS in Medical
Imaging
No Area of Emphasis (sophomore and
junior students)
Principal Majors Enrolled: BS in Medical
Imaging
Area of Emphasis: Cardiovascular Inter
Advanced Practice
Principal Majors Enrolled: BS in Medical
Imaging
Area of Emphasis: CT
Advanced Practice Track
Principal Majors Enrolled: BS in Medical
Imaging
Area of Emphasis: MRI
Advanced Practice Track
Principal Majors Enrolled: BS in Medical
Imaging
Area of Emphasis: RT Completion
Principal Majors Enrolled: BS in Medical
Imaging
Area of Emphasis: Mammography
Principal Majors Enrolled: BS in Medical
Imaging
Area of Emphasis: MI Management
Advanced Practice Track
Year 1
2009-2010
Year 2
2010-2011
Year 3
2011-2012
Year 4
2012-2013
Year 5
2013-2014
17
34
38
45
40
3
3
3
8
7
1
3
3
2
2
6
7
1
4
2
35
Principal Majors Enrolled: BS in Medical
Imaging
Area of Emphasis: Sonography
Advanced Practice Track
6
Second Major
Third Major
Minors
Grand Total of Students Enrolled in the
Program
17
34
51
65
71
Graduates of the program
0
11
14
19
19
36
Figure 1. Trend Line for Total Enrollment and Program Graduates:
BS in Medical Imaging
80
70
60
50
Graduates
40
Total Enrollment
30
20
10
0
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
37
Appendix VII
Job and Graduate School Placement Rates: BS in Medical Imaging
# of graduates
accepted to
Graduate
Programs
# of
graduates
not
accounted
for
Year
2009-2010
16 (100%)
1
2010-2011
9 (100%)
2
2011-2012
13 (100%)
2
2012-2013
11 (85%)
1(many graduates
have yet to sit for
their ARRT exam)
50
2013-2014
Five –Year Total
# of graduates
employed in
related fields
# of
graduates
employed
outside field
# of graduates
employed in major
field
2
2
2
3
1
12
5
3
20
38
Appendix VIII: Assessment Letters: Medical Imaging – BS
39
40
41
42

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