Papers - Tribler

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Papers - Tribler
Papers
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/P2P%20Sharing%20of%20Web%20
Applications.pdf
Peer-to-Peer Sharing of Web Applications
Roberto J. Bayardo Jr.*, Adina Crainiceanu+, Rakesh
Author:
Agrawal*
Abstract:
We describe a novel plugin architecture for securely extending
personal webserver functionality and supporting development and
deployment of meta p2p networks.
Distribution of plugins
Relevant for:
Cooperation between plugins
Security (Digital signature & sandboxing)
Comments:
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/spamato_plugin_report.pdf
Spamato Plug-In Architecture
Remo Meier
Author:
Abstract:
A plugin architecture for Spamato (Java) is discussed, which is a lightweight plugin
architecture independent of Spamato. It has a nice way of restricting plugin code by
letting them explicitly list required permissions. It could also be combined with a trust
system.
Relevant for:
General properties of plugin systems
Security for plugins
Comments:
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/p2pddos.pdf
Exploiting P2P Systems for DDoS Attacks
Naoum Naoumov and Keith Ross
Author:
Abstract:
In this paper we describe two approaches to creating a DDoS engine out of a P2P system:
the first involves poisoning the distributed index in the peers; the second involves
poisoning the routing tables in the peers. For both approaches, the targeted host does not
have to be a participant in the P2P system, and could be a web server, a mail server, or a
user’s desktop.
Security, know which kind of P2P DDoS attacks there are at
Relevant for:
the moment.
Someone could easily write a widget that performs a DDoS
Comments:
attack, spreading as a virus through the P2P system but now
made easier because one only needs to write a script.
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/p2pddos2.pdf
DDoS Attacks using P2P Networks
Pankaj
Kohli and Umadevi Ganugula
Author:
Abstract:
We then propose a simple yet effective
solution to defend against the routing table poisoning in the P2P file sharing networks.
Security
Relevant for:
Solution is using authentication, which is already used in
Comments:
Tribler
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/ChristinWeigendChuang2005.pdf
Content Availability, Pollution and Poisoning in Peer-to-Peer File
Sharing Networks
Nicolas Christina, Andreas S. Weigendb and John
Author:
Chuanga
Abstract:
In this paper, we attempt to provide a first step toward understanding the differences
between pollution and poisoning, and their respective impact on content availability in
peer-to-peer file sharing networks. To that effect, we conduct a measurement study of
content availability in four of the most popular peer-to-peer file sharing networks,
in the absence of poisoning, and then simulate different poisoning strategies on the
measured data to evaluate their potential impact. We exhibit a strong correlation between
content availability and topological properties of the underlying peer-to-peer network,
and show that the injection of a small number of decoys can seriously impact the users’
perception of content availability.
Security
Relevant for:
Comments:
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/maliciouscode.pdf
Attacking Malicious Code:
A report to the Infosec Research Council*
Nicolas Christina, Andreas S. Weigendb and John Chuanga
Author:
Abstract:
The study is intended to identify promising
new approaches to dealing with the problems posed by malicious code. In this
report, we discuss the key trends that are making malicious code a critical national
problem. We then survey existing techniques for preventing attacks, pointing out
their limitations, and discuss some promising new approaches that may address
these limitations
Security
Relevant for:
Comments:
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/MaliciousFirefoxExtensions.pdf
Malicious Firefox Extensions
Philippe Beaucamps, Daniel Reynaud
Author:
Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is to warn Mozilla Firefox users about the risk
associated with browser extensions, especially the fact that Firefox extensions
are more dangerous than ActiveX controls in Internet Explorer. Interestingly,
the lack of security of ActiveX controls is well known whereas the security of
Firefox extensions seems to be ignored. This danger is platform-independant,
Microsoft Windows as well as Mac OS and Linux are vulnerable as long as
Firefox is used. Finally, we only consider Firefox but virtually every Mozilla
application implementing an extension mechanism is subject to this threat, such
as Thunderbird.
Security
Relevant for:
Seems like security is often left to the user, by
Comments:
showing a warning message before installing.
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/ProofCarryingCode.ps
Proof Carrying code: Design, Implementation and Applications
George Necula
Author:
Abstract:
Slides about Proof Carrying Code.
Security
Relevant for:
Seems to me like this isn’t ready to be used yet
Comments:
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/ProofCarryingCode_Mobilecode.pdf
Trust Management and Proof Carrying Code in
Secure Mobile Code Applications
Joan Feigenbaum, Peter Lee
Author:
Abstract:
In this essay, we describe how the
concepts of trust management and proof-carrying code might be used in mobilecode applications to provide greater security than is afforded by Java and other
current technologies. We begin by giving our view of what the mobile-code
security problem is and how it both resembles and differs from security problems
that existed in the pre-Java world. We then briefy explain two approaches
to mobile-code security: trust management and proof-carrying code.
Security
Relevant for:
Comments:
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/Sandbox%20model.pdf
Specifying Runtime Environments and Functionalities
of Downloadable Components under the Sandbox Model
Haruhiko Kaiya, Kenji Kaijiri
Author:
Abstract:
In this paper, we propose a specijication of both runtime
environments and software components which can be
loaded not only from your local system but also from the
other systems over the computer network. Because components
from the other system are not always enough reliable
or safe to act freely in your own system, you should
limit their activities to a certain context. Such assuniption
is based on the sandbox security model. Because such coniponents
are largely influenced by the runtime environments,
users sometimes lose sight of the abilities and limitations of
such components. Therefore, they fail to reuse the components
in the right way. We provide a way to specifj, such
properties, so that component users can precisely understand
the abilities and limitations.
Security
Relevant for:
Comments:
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/Sandbox%20model.pdf
Usable Security Policies for Runtime Environments
Almut Herzog
Author:
Abstract:
Our work addresses two important security issues in runtime environments. The first issue
concerns resource or release control. While many virtual machines provide runtime access control
to resources, they do not provide any means of limiting the use of a resource once access is
granted; they do not provide so-called resource control. We have addressed the issue of resource
control in the example of the Java Virtual Machine. In contrast to others’ work, our solution
builds on an enhancement to the existing security architecture. We demonstrate that resource
control permissions for Java-mediated resources can be integrated into the regular Java security
architecture, thus leading to a clean design and a single external security policy.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Security, Resource Control
Includes a paper on resource control using Java Security
Manager
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/edutella_cn03_submission.pdf
EDUTELLA: P2P Networking for the Semantic Web
Wolfgang Nejdla, Boris Wolfa, Wolf Siberskia, Changtao Qua,
Author:
Stefan Deckerb, Michael Sintekc,
Ambj¨orn Naeved, Mikael Nilssond, Matthias Palm´erd, Tore
Rische
Abstract:
Metadata for the World Wide Web is important, but metadata for Peer-to-Peer (P2P) networks is
absolutely crucial. In this paper we discuss the open source project Edutella which builds upon
metadata standards defined for the WWW and aims to provide an RDF-based metadata
infrastructure for P2P applications. Edutella is the first system which brings together RDF and
P2P concepts and exploits their strengths in a common framework, suitable for building general
schema-based P2P networks for distributed and dynamic information providers. We describe the
goals and main services this infrastructure will provide and the architecture to connect Edutella
Peers based on exchange of RDF metadata.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Widget Metadata
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/Kademlia.pdf
Kademlia: A Peer-to-peer Information System
Based on the XOR Metric
Petar Maymounkov and David Mazi`eres
Author:
Abstract:
We describe a peer-to-peer distributed hash table with provable consistency and performance in a fault-prone environment. Our
system routes queries and locates nodes using a novel XOR-based metric topology that simplifies the algorithm and facilitates our proof. The
topology has the property that every message exchanged conveys or reinforces useful contact information. The system exploits this information
to send parallel, asynchronous query messages that tolerate node failures
without imposing timeout delays on users.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Distributed storage for widgets & its metadata
Most current BitTorrent clients use a DHT based on Kademlia.
(Azureus, BitTorrent, Tribler (Khashmir is based on
Kademlia))
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/JXTAsearch.pdf
JXTA Search: Distributed Search for Distributed Networks
Steve Waterhouse
Author:
Abstract:
--
Relevant for:
Comments:
Searching in P2P systems
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/Scalable%20contentaddressable%20network.pdf
A Scalable Content-Addressable Network
Sylvia Ratnasamy1;2 Paul Francis2 Mark Handley2 Richard
Author:
Karp1;2 Scott Shenker
Abstract:
Hash tables – which map “keys” onto “values” – are an essential building
block in modern software systems. We believe a similar functionality would
be equally valuable to large distributed systems. In this paper, we introduce
the concept of a Content-Addressable Network (CAN) as a distributed
infrastructure that provides hash table-like functionality on Internet-like
scales. The CAN is scalable, fault-tolerant and completely self-organizing,
and we demonstrate its scalability, robustness and low-latency properties
through simulation.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Storageand searching
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/PeerSearch.pdf
PeerSearch: Efficient Information Retrieval in
Peer-to-Peer Networks
Chunqiang Tang1, Zhichen Xu, Mallik Mahalingam
Author:
Abstract:
In this paper, we propose an efficient peer-to-peer information
retrieval system PeerSearch that supports state-of-the-art content
and semantic searches. PeerSearch avoids the scalability problem of
existing systems that employ centralized indexing, index flooding,
or query flooding. It also avoids the non-determinism that exhibited
by heuristic-based approaches. PeerSearch achieves both efficiency
and determinism through an elegant combination of index
placement and query routing. Given a query, PeerSearch only needs
to search a small number of nodes to identify matching documents.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Information Retrieval, resource discovery
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/ProbYP.Paper.pdf
A Scalable, Non-Hierarchical
Resource Discovery Mechanism
Based on Probabilistic Protocols†
Michael F. Schwartz
Author:
Abstract:
Computer network interconnection provides access to a bewildering array of resources, including
databases, network services, and people in various capacities. We consider the problem of
allowing users to discover the existence of such resources in a large scale, administratively
decentralized environment. While hierarchically organized resource registries have good
scalability properties, they provide poor support for resource discovery, because users must
understand how the nested components are arranged. In this paper we present a probabilistic
approach that supports non-hierarchical, attribute based "yellow pages" searches. The protocols
support locating a small number of instances of moderately large classes of objects. The resource
graph evolves over time in accordance with what resources exist and the types of searches that
users make. Simulation results indicate that the approach can support scalable and flexible
resource discovery for an environment roughly the size of a large country, with several thousand
administrative domains participating in resource registration and searches. Moreover, the
probabilistic search strategy naturally supports fair access among competing information
providers.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Information Retrieval, resource discovery
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/P-Trees.pdf
Querying PeertoPeer
Networks Using PTrees
Adina Crainiceanu, Prakash Linga, Johannes Gehrke, Jayavel
Author:
Shanmugasundaram
Abstract:
Peer-to-peer (P2P) systems provide a robust, scalable and
decentralized way to share and publish data. However, most
existing P2P systems only provide a very rudimentary query
facility; they only support equality or keyword search queries
over files. We believe that future P2P applications, such
as resource discovery on a grid, will require more complex
query functionality. As a first step towards this goal, we propose
a new distributed, fault-tolerant P2P index structure
for resource discovery applications called the P-tree. Ptrees
efficiently evaluate range queries in addition to equality
queries. We describe algorithms to maintain a P-tree under
insertions and deletions of data items/peers, and evaluate its
performance using both a simulation and a real distributed
implementation. Our results show the efficacy of our approach.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Information Retrieval, resource discovery
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/Prefix%20Hash%20Tree.pdf
Prefix Hash Tree
An Indexing Data Structure over Distributed Hash Tables
Sriram Ramabhadran, Sylvia Ratnasamy
Author:
Abstract:
Distributed Hash Tables are scalable, robust, and
self-organizing peer-to-peer systems that support
exact match lookups. This paper describes the design
and implementation of a Prefix Hash Tree -
a distributed data structure that enables more sophisticated
queries over a DHT. The Prefix Hash
Tree uses the lookup interface of a DHT to construct
a tree-based structure that is both efficient
(updates are doubly logarithmic in the size of the
domain being indexed), and resilient (the failure
of any given node in the Prefix Hash Tree does
not affect the availability of data stored at other
nodes).
Relevant for:
Comments:
Information Retrieval, resource discovery
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/mobile%20code%20security.pdf
Mobile Code Security
Author:
Abstract:
AVIEL D. RUBIN
Summarizes the merits of security measures for mobile code: Sandboxing, PCC, firewalls, code
signing.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Security
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/pollution.pdf
Pollution in P2P File Sharing Systems
Author:
Jian Liang, Rakesh Kumar, Yongjian Xi, Keith W.
Ross
Abstract:
Measures pollution in KaZaa using a crawler and discusses some anti pollution techniques
Relevant for:
Comments:
Preventing pollution (for widgets probably pollution with
malicious widgets)
Anti pollution techniques also consists of reputation systems,
which might work well with widget systems
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/120_wang_y.pdf
Trust and Reputation Model in Peer-to-Peer Networks
Author:
Abstract:
Yao Wang, Julita Vassileva
In this paper, we propose a
Bayesian network-based trust model and a method for
building reputation based on recommendations in peer-topeer
networks. Since trust is multi-faceted, peers need to
develop differentiated trust in different aspects of other
peers’ capability. The peer’s needs are different in
different situations. Depending on the situation, a peer
may need to consider its trust in a specific aspect of
another peer’s capability or in multiple aspects. Bayesian
networks provide a flexible method to present
differentiated trust and combine different aspects of trust.
The evaluation of the model using a simulation shows that
the system where peers communicate their experiences
(recommendations) outperforms the system where peers
do not share recommendations with each other and that a
differentiated trust adds to the performance in terms of
percentage of successful interactions.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Trust & Reputation to prevent malicious widgets
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/rep.pdf
A Reputation System for Peer-to-Peer Networks
Author:
Abstract:
Minaxi Gupta, Paul Judge, Mostafa Ammar
We investigate the design of a reputation system for decentralized
unstructured P2P networks like Gnutella. Having
reliable reputation information about peers can form
the basis of an incentive system and can guide peers in
their decision making (e.g., who to download a file from).
The reputation system uses objective criteria to track each
peer’s contribution in the system and allows peers to store
their reputations locally. Reputation are computed using either
of the two schemes, debit-credit reputation computation
(DCRC) and credit-only reputation computation (CORC).
Using a reputation computation agent (RCA), we design a
public key based mechanism that periodically updates the
peer reputations in a secure, light-weight, and partially distributed
manner. We evaluate using simulations the performance
tradeoffs inherent in the design of our system.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Trust & Reputation to prevent malicious widgets
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/rep.pdf
A Reputation System for Peer-to-Peer Networks
Author:
Abstract:
Minaxi Gupta, Paul Judge, Mostafa Ammar
We investigate the design of a reputation system for decentralized
unstructured P2P networks like Gnutella. Having
reliable reputation information about peers can form
the basis of an incentive system and can guide peers in
their decision making (e.g., who to download a file from).
The reputation system uses objective criteria to track each
peer’s contribution in the system and allows peers to store
their reputations locally. Reputation are computed using either
of the two schemes, debit-credit reputation computation
(DCRC) and credit-only reputation computation (CORC).
Using a reputation computation agent (RCA), we design a
public key based mechanism that periodically updates the
peer reputations in a secure, light-weight, and partially distributed
manner. We evaluate using simulations the performance
tradeoffs inherent in the design of our system.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Trust & Reputation to prevent malicious widgets
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/rep-anon.pdf
Reputation in P2P Anonymity Systems
Author:
Abstract:
Roger Dingledine, Nick Mathewson
Decentralized anonymity systems tend to be unreliable,
because users must choose nodes in the network
without knowing the entire state of the network. Reputation
systems promise to improve reliability by predicting
network state. In this paper we focus on anonymous
remailers and anonymous publishing, explain why
the systems can benefit from reputation, and describe
our experiences designing reputation systems for them
while still ensuring anonymity. We find that in each example
we first must redesign the underlying anonymity
system to support verifiable transactions.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Trust & Reputation to prevent malicious widgets
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/eigentrustalgorithm.pdf
The EigenTrust Algorithm for Reputation Management in
P2P Networks
Sepandar D. Kamvar, Mario T. Schlosser, Hector GarciaMolina
Author:
Abstract:
Peer-to-peer file-sharing networks are currently receiving much attention
as a means of sharing and distributing information. However,
as recent experience with P2P networks such as Gnutella shows,
the anonymous, open nature of these networks offers an almost
ideal environment for the spread of self-replicating inauthentic files.
We describe an algorithm to decrease the number of downloads
of inauthentic files in a peer-to-peer file-sharing network that assigns
each peer a unique global trust value, based on the peer’s
history of uploads. We present a distributed and secure method to
compute global trust values, based on Power iteration. By having
peers use these global trust values to choose the peers from whom
they download, the network effectively identifies malicious peers
and isolates them from the network.
In simulations, this reputation system, called EigenTrust, has
been shown to significantly decrease the number of inauthentic files
on the network, even under a variety of conditions where malicious
peers cooperate in an attempt to deliberately subvert the system.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Trust & Reputation to prevent malicious widgets
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/robust%20vote%20sampling.pdf
Robust Vote Sampling in a P2P Media Distribution System
Author:
Rameez Rahman, David Hales, Michel Meulpolder,
Maarten Clements, Vincent Heinink, Johan Pouwelse
and Henk Sips
Abstract:
The explosion of freely available media content through BitTorrent file-sharing networks over the
Internet means that users need guides or recommendations to find the right, high quality, content.
Current systems rely on centralized servers to aggregate, rate and moderate metadata for this
purpose. We present the design and simulations, using real BitTorrent traces, for a method
combining fully decentralized metadata dissemination, vote sampling and ranking
for deployment in the Tribler.org BitTorrent media client. Our design provides robustness to
spam attacks, where metadata does not reflect the content it is attached to, by controlling
metadata spreading and by vote sampling based on a collusion proof experience function. Our
design is light-weight, fully decentralized and offers good performance and robustness under
realistic conditions.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Distributed metadata for widget portal.
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/Social%2520Mechanism%2520of%
2520Reputation.pdf
A Social Mechanism of Reputation Management
in Electronic Communities
Bin Yu and Munindar P. Singh
Author:
Abstract:
Trust is important wherever agents must interact We consider the important case of interactions
in electronic communities, where the agents assist and represent principal entities, such as people
and businesses We propose a social mechanism of reputation management, which
aims at avoiding interaction with undesirable participants. Social mechanisms complement hard
security techniques
such as passwords and digital certifates, which only guarantee that a party is authenticated and
authorized, but do not ensure that it exercises its authorization in a way
that is desirable to others. Social mechanisms are even more important
when trusted third parties are not available. Our specific approach to
reputation management leads to a decentralized society in which agents
help each other weed out undesirable players
Relevant for:
Comments:
Reputation & Trust
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/p2pSec.pdf
Security Considerations for Peer-to-Peer Distributed Hash Tables
Author:
Abstract:
Emil Sit and Robert Morris
Recent peer-to-peer research has focused on providing
efficient hash lookup systems that can be used
to build more complex systems. These systems have
good properties when their algorithms are executed
correctly but have not generally considered how to
handle misbehaving nodes. This paper looks at what
sorts of security problems are inherent in large peer-topeer systems based on distributed hash lookup
systems. We examine the types of problems that such
systems might face, drawing examples from existing
systems, and propose some design principles for detecting
and preventing these problems.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Security
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/p2pSec.pdf
Tapestry: An Infrastructure for Fault-tolerant
Wide-area Location and Routing
Ben Y. Zhao, John Kubiatowicz, and Anthony D. Joseph
Author:
Abstract:
In today’s chaotic network, data and services are mobile and replicated widely for availability,
durability, and locality. Components within this infrastructure interact in rich and complex ways, greatly
stressing traditional approaches to name service and routing. This paper explores an alternative to
traditional approaches called Tapestry. Tapestry is an overlay location and routing infrastructure that
provides location-independent routing of messages directly to the closest copy of an object or service
using only point-to-point links and without centralized resources. The routing and directory information
within this infrastructure is purely soft state and easily repaired. Tapestry is self-administering,
faulttolerant,
and resilient under load. This paper presents the architecture and algorithms of Tapestry and
explores their advantages through a number of experiments.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Content location and finding
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/oceanstore-asplos00.pdf
OceanStore: An Architecture for Global-Scale Persistent Storage
Author:
John Kubiatowicz, David Bindel, Yan Chen, Steven
Czerwinski, Patrick Eaton, Dennis Geels, Ramakrishna
Gummadi, Sean Rhea, Hakim Weatherspoon, Westley Weimer,
Chris Wells, and Ben Zhao
Abstract:
OceanStore is a utility infrastructure designed to span the globe
and provide continuous access to persistent information. Since
this infrastructure is comprised of untrusted servers, data is protected
through redundancy and cryptographic techniques. To improve
performance, data is allowed to be cached anywhere, anytime.
Additionally, monitoring of usage patterns allows adaptation
to regional outages and denial of service attacks; monitoring
also enhances performance through pro-active movement of data.
A prototype implementation is currently under development.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Content location and finding
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/planetp.pdf
PlanetP: Using Gossiping to Build Content Addressable Peer-to-Peer
Information Sharing Communities
John Kubiatowicz, David Bindel, Yan Chen, Steven
Author:
Czerwinski, Patrick Eaton, Dennis Geels, Ramakrishna
Gummadi, Sean Rhea, Hakim Weatherspoon, Westley Weimer,
Chris Wells, and Ben Zhao
Abstract:
As communities
grow, however, a key challenge becomes finding relevant
information. To address this challenge, our design centers
around indexing, content search, and retrieval rather than
scalable name-based object location, which has been the focus
of recent P2P systems. PlanetP takes the novel approach
of replicating the global directory and a compact summary
index at every peer using gossiping. PlanetP then leverages
this information to approximate a state-of-the-art document
ranking algorithm to help users locate relevant information
within the large communal data set. Using a prototype implementation
together with simulation, we show: (i) it is possible
to design a gossiping algorithm that reliably maintains a
copy of communal state at each peer yet requires only a modest
amount of bandwidth, (ii) our content search and retrieval
algorithm tracks the performance of the original ranking algorithm
very closely, giving P2P communities a search and
retrieval algorithm as good as that possible assuming a centralized
server, and (iii) PlanetP’s gossiping and search and
retrieval algorithms both scale well to communities of at
least several thousand peers.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Content location and finding
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/Seke-DeiseSaccol.pdf
Managing XML Versions and Replicas in a P2P Context
Author:
Deise de Brum Saccol11,2, Nina Edelweiss2, Renata de Matos
Galante2,4, Carlo Zaniolo3
Abstract:
Peer-to-Peer (P2P) systems seek to provide sharing of
computational resources, which may be duplicated or versioned
over several peers. Duplicate resources (i.e. replicas) are the key
to better query performance and availability. On the other hand,
multiple versions can be used to support queries on the lineage
of resources and the evolution of history. However, traditional
P2P systems are not aware of replicas and versions, which cause
complexity at the logical level and inefficiency at the physical
level. To solve these problems, we propose an environment for
detecting, managing and querying replicas and versions of XML
documents in a P2P context. We also show that the proposed
environment can also be used for plagiarism detection, web page
ranking, and software clone identification.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Versioning of widgets in P2P
http://www.tribler.org/attachment/wiki/P2PWidgets/DistrDocumentRetrieval.pdf
DL meets P2P – Distributed Document Retrieval based
on Classification and Content
Wolf-Tilo Balke, Wolfgang Nejdl, Wolf Siberski and Uwe
Author:
Thaden
Abstract:
Peer-to-peer architectures are a potentially powerful paradigm for retrieving
documents over networks of digital libraries avoiding single points of
failure by massive federation of (independent) information sources. Today sharing
files over P2P infrastructures is already immensely successful, but restricted
to simple metadata matching. But when it comes to the retrieval of complex
documents, capabilities as provided by digital libraries are needed. Digital libraries
have to cope with compound documents. Though some document parts
(like embedded images) can efficiently be retrieved using metadata matching,
the text-based information needs different methods like full text search. However,
for effective querying of texts, also information like inverted document frequencies
are essential. But due to the distributed characteristics of P2P networks
such ’collection-wide’ information poses severe problems, e.g. that central updates
whenever changes in any document collection occur use up valuable bandwidth.
We will present a novel indexing technique that allows to query using
collection-wide information with respect to different classifications and show the
effectiveness of our scheme for practical applications. We will in detail discuss
our findings and present simulations for the scheme’s efficiency and scalability.
Relevant for:
Comments:
Widget location and retrieval

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