Relevance of the Oily Cart performance to their audiences

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Relevance of the Oily Cart performance to their audiences
TUBE:
An evaluation report
for
Oily Cart
Dr Andrea Creech
Institute of Education, University of London
April 2014
1
Contents
List of Tables and Charts .................................................................................... 3
Executive Summary............................................................................................ 4
Introduction ....................................................................................................... 9
Aims of the evaluation .................................................................................... 9
Background ...................................................................................................... 10
About Oily Cart ............................................................................................. 10
Beneficiaries ................................................................................................. 10
Oily Cart’s aims and objectives ..................................................................... 11
Methods .......................................................................................................... 11
Findings ........................................................................................................... 13
Four key questions: quantitative results ....................................................... 14
Differences between PMLD TUBE and ASD TUBE.......................................... 15
Differences between schools ........................................................................ 18
General feedback .......................................................................................... 20
Relevance of the Oily Cart performance to their audiences .......................... 23
Engagement in the Oily Cart performance .................................................... 27
Children’s responses to the TUBE ................................................................. 30
The influence of Oily Cart on day-to-day practice ......................................... 35
Summary ......................................................................................................... 39
Appendix 1: Draft questionnaire for future evaluation exercises ..................... 40
2
List of Tables and Charts
Table 1: Number of questionnaires received ................................................... 13
Table 2: Sources of questionnaire responses ................................................... 13
Table 3: Classes that experienced the performance......................................... 14
Table 4: Overall responses ............................................................................... 15
Table 5: Mean scores and standard deviation for PMLD TUBE and ASD TUBE
responses......................................................................................................... 16
Table 6: Overall responses according to type of show (numbers and
percentages representing type of show: PMLD TUBE; ASD TUBE) ................... 17
Table 7: Differences between schools for perceived relevance of TUBE .......... 19
Table 8: General feedback - examples ............................................................. 21
Table 9: The TUBE met our needs - examples .................................................. 24
Table 10: Sustaining the children's interest - examples.................................... 28
Table 11: Children's varied responses to the TUBE - examples ........................ 32
Table 12: Changes to practice .......................................................................... 37
Figure 1: General feedback from adults in the audience .................................. 21
Figure 2: The TUBE met our needs ................................................................... 24
Figure 3: The TUBE sustained the children’s interest ....................................... 28
Figure 4: Children's varied responses to the TUBE ........................................... 31
Figure 5: The TUBE provided teachers, carers and parents with new ideas ..... 36
3
Executive Summary
Aims: This report focuses on an evaluation of Oily Cart ‘TUBE’ performances,
drawing on audience feedback to explore the relevance of the performances; the
extent to which young people with special needs engage with the performances; and
the extent to which the performances foster beneficial change amongst young
people and their teachers, carers and parents.
The specific aims of this evaluation were to:





Ascertain the extent to which TUBE was relevant, engaging and beneficial for
children with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD) as well as
children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD);
Understand the ways in which TUBE had been perceived as being relevant
and engaging;
Understand the specific ways in which TUBE had fostered beneficial changes
in young people’s behaviour, mood, or general responses;
Ascertain the extent to which TUBE had influenced the practice of teachers,
carers and parents, in the classroom and/or at home;
Understand the specific ways in which TUBE had been perceived as
beneficial to the practice of teachers, carers and parents.
Background: Oily Cart, established 32 years ago, creates highly interactive and
multi-sensory theatre for very young children under six and young people with
Profound and Multiple Learning Disabilities (PMLD) and/or an Autistic Spectrum
Disorder (ASD). Oily Cart is funded by the Arts Council of England, Wandsworth
Council, Boshier Hinton Foundation, BBC Children in Need, the Esmee Fairbairn
Foundation, Genetic Disorders UK, Goldsmiths’ Company Charity, Gordon Fraser
Charitable Trust, Henry Smith Charity, John Ellerman Foundation, John Thaw
Foundation, Mercers’ Charitable Foundation, Taurus Foundation, Tesco Community
Awards, the True Colours Trust and the Wates Foundation.
Methods: An audience feedback questionnaire was developed, comprising four key
questions relating to 1) the relevance of the show; 2) the extent to which children had
been engaged in the show; 3) the extent to which the show had provoked beneficial
change amongst the children who attended; and 4) the extent to which the show had
been beneficial for practice in the classroom and at home. The four key questions
were framed as Likert scales, with five response categories ranging from negative to
positive.
In addition to the Likert scales, each question had a space where questionnaire
respondents were encouraged to elaborate on their answers, providing examples
and detail that would help Oily Cart to understand the processes by which TUBE had
or had not been effective in achieving the company’s aims and objectives. There was
also a space for general feedback.
4
All of the quantitative data were entered into SPSS version 20. Descriptive statistics
were produced, including comparisons of responses from the PMLD and ASD
groups, well as comparisons amongst schools. The qualitative data were entered
into NVivo, a qualitative analysis software tool. A framework of themes was
developed, emerging from the qualitative responses.
Findings: Overall, 171 questionnaires were returned, with 118 (69%) from PMLD
TUBE and 53 (31%) from ASD TUBE.
One hundred thirty-nine questionnaires
were collected from 16 schools and
from 32 additional respondents who
had attended shows in theatre venues.
Overall, the responses were very
positive, with mean scores ranging
from 4.68 to 4.85 (where the most
positive response was represented as
‘5’).
Relevance: One hundred and forty-eight respondents (87.1% of those who
responded to this question) indicated that the show was completely relevant to the
needs of their children, with a further 18 (10.6%) responding in the ‘quite relevant’
category. No responses to this question were negative.
Engagement: One hundred and twenty-seven (77% of those who responded to this
question) respondents indicated that their students had been very engaged by the
performance, with a further 31 (18.8%) responding with ‘quite engaged’ and just
seven responding in the neutral or ‘a little bit engaged’ categories.
Beneficial change: One hundred and thirty-two respondents (77.2% of those who
responded to this question) indicated that they had observed a very beneficial
change, with a further 19 (11.1%) indicating that there had been a ‘quite beneficial’
change. Seven responses (4.3%) to this question were neutral. Four respondents
(2.4%) indicated that they had observed a small beneficial change and just two
responded that there had been no beneficial change at all.
Influence on practice in the classroom and home: Finally, 102 respondents (79%
of those who responded to this question) indicated that the performance had been
very beneficial for their practice, with a further 19 (14.7%) agreeing that it had been
quite beneficial in this regard. Six (4.7%) answered with a neutral response, while
just two (1.6%) indicated that the performance had not been beneficial for their
practice.
Differences between PMLD TUBE and ASD TUBE: There were no statistically
significant differences between the two groups of responses.
5
Differences between schools: A statistical test (analysis of variance) revealed that
the differences between schools were statistically significant with regard to questions
one, three and four. These differences can be attributed to school 11, where there
was, overall, the greatest variation amongst the responses. However, whilst
acknowledging the differences it is important to note that the responses were all very
positive, with no mean scores below 3, the neutral point on the response scale, and
the large majority of mean scores above 4.
General feedback: The majority of additional general feedback reinforced the
positive feedback in other sections of the questionnaire, with many superlatives that
included: ‘it was beyond doubt the best show we have ever had in school’ ,
‘massively impressed’, ‘amazing’, ‘faultless’, ‘100% effective’, ‘fantastic’, ‘high
quality’, ‘excellent’, ‘wonderful’, ‘super special’ and ‘beautifully performed’.
Eighteen respondents provided ideas relating to how the show could have been
improved, with reference to the needs of specific children regarding the structure and
strategies adopted.
Other general feedback focused on the excellent information that had been received,
the appropriate venues and the cost (just two mentioned this, with one indicating it
was affordable while the other indicated that if it were less more children would be
able to access the show).
Relevance of the performance: A total of 162 responses were coded under the
overarching theme of ‘meeting needs’. Amongst these responses there were 26
explicit references to ‘meeting our needs’. Other comments elaborated on this,
specifying the particular ways in which was evidenced. Forty-three commented on
the effectiveness of the individual attention that each child had received. This was
perceived to have been a crucial factor in establishing trust and encouraging the
young people to interact and engage with the performance. Thirty-five responses
focused on the appropriate pace of the performance, commenting specifically on the
effectiveness of short bursts of activity interspersed with pauses and moments of
calm. The same number of respondents (35) commented on the multi-sensory
resources and props, which ‘transfixed’ the children and helped to sustain interest.
Several respondents mentioned the specific qualities of the Oily Cart staff – friendly,
patient and helpful. Finally, nine respondents focused on the effective use of
language, where ‘less is more’.
Engagement in the performance: In total, 275 comments were coded under the
overarching theme of ‘sustaining interest’. Amongst these, 98 responses were
explicit comments that noted sustained interest, with comments describing how
children stayed alert, focused and concentrated for extended periods of time. In
many cases this was described as unusual and remarkable behaviour. Several
respondents elaborated on specific ways in which the show supported children in
6
this sustained focus. The key areas that were identified included its engaging music,
multi-sensory range of activities, visual interest and fun, interactive characters.
Young people’s responses to TUBE: A total of 337 comments were coded under
the overarching theme of ‘diverse responses to TUBE’. Amongst these, just seven
indicated that the experience had been difficult for a child, while a further four
reported that they had not observed any noticeable change. A large majority of these
qualitative responses provided details of positive changes in behaviour and mood.
These included: ‘a calming effect’ (73); participating, focusing and engaging much
more than was usual (70); ‘very happy children’ (68); ‘excitement’ (13); and
‘enjoyment’; (38); increase in vocalising (28); beneficial changes in physical
responses (26) and good eye contact (10).
Influence on practice in the classroom and at home: A total of 155 comments
were coded under the overarching theme of ‘influence on practice’.
Three Head Teachers made it explicit that the experience had functioned as valuable
Continuing Professional Development for their TAs in particular. The performance
had provided a space where the TAs could observe the use of multi-sensory stimuli
and reflect upon the responses amongst the children that could otherwise have been
missed in the context of a busy classroom.
Seventy-five responses related to new ideas for the creative use of multi-sensory
objects, highlighting how the show had demonstrated how simple objects could be
used in such a way as to foster a ‘sense of wonder and intrigue’ amongst the
children.
Twenty-four respondents identified specific communication strategies that they
planned to incorporate in to their practice. These included mimicking, use of
repetition, varying the tone and dynamic range of their voices, as well as using multisensory stimuli to support speech and language development. In addition, twelve
respondents reported that they had gained new ideas for strategies for calming the
children, including adjusting the pace of their lessons and incorporating planned
pauses and ‘built in stillness’.
Sixteen responses focused on the use of music, with indications that the teachers
intended to make more use of music in the classroom, after having observed how
engaging simple musical techniques had been.
Summary: Overall, TUBE was perceived as an exceptionally positive experience for
children and their teachers, carers and parents. The performance was child-centred
and interactive. The performance was structured and paced appropriately and made
expert use of appropriate resources. Children engaged with the performers and
demonstrated higher than usual levels of focus, concentration and sustained interest.
The children also demonstrated high levels of enjoyment, happiness and responses
that included vocalising, reaching out, movement to music and eye contact.
7
Alongside this, TUBE was structured in such a way as to ensure that a safe, calming
and trusting environment was established, with space for calm and quiet. Key facets
that supported the engagement of children were the visual interest, the use of music,
the multi-sensory activities and resources and the fun, responsive characters. TUBE
had a high level of positive impact with regard to its influence on the practice of
teachers, carers and parents, offering many ideas for the creative use of multisensory objects in the classroom and the home. Most significantly, the experience
provided adults with a space where they could observe the responses of the children
and reflect upon the different strategies that were employed in fostering such
responses.
8
TUBE:
An evaluation report for Oily Cart
Introduction
This report focuses on an evaluation of Oily Cart ‘TUBE’ performances, drawing on
audience feedback to explore the relevance of the performances; the extent to which
young people with special needs engage with the performances; and the extent to
which the performances foster beneficial change amongst young people and their
teachers, carers and parents.
This report summarises audience feedback collected from adults who accompanied
young people who attended Oily Cart’s production of ‘TUBE’, in 2013. During that
year, Oily Cart undertook a total of 117 performances of TUBE. Two versions of the
show were offered, one specifically designed around the needs children with
Profound and Multiple Learning Disabilities (PMLD) and the other designed to meet
the specific needs of children with an Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Ninety-five
PMLD TUBE performances and 22 ASD performances were given. Six children
attended each show. TUBE reached a total of 702 children in 21 Special Schools
and five theatre venues across the UK.
Aims of the evaluation
The specific aims of this evaluation were to:





Ascertain the extent to which TUBE was relevant, engaging and beneficial for
children with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD) as well as
children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD);
Understand the ways in which TUBE had been perceived as being relevant
and engaging;
Understand the specific ways in which TUBE had fostered beneficial changes
in young people’s behaviour, mood, or general responses;
Ascertain the extent to which TUBE had influenced the practice of teachers,
carers and parents, in the classroom and/or at home;
Understand the specific ways in which TUBE had been perceived as
beneficial to the practice of teachers, carers and parents.
9
Background
About Oily Cart
Oily Cart was established 32 years ago and has achieved some renown for creating
theatre for two audiences who are often under provided for in terms of cultural
activity:
 Very young children under six;
 Young people with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD) and/or
an autistic spectrum disorder (ASD)
Oily Cart states that their mission is to explore new approaches to performance and
to engage with and extend reach these culturally neglected audiences.
Oily Cart’s unique form of theatre is highly interactive and multi-sensory. Challenging
accepted definitions of theatre and audience, they create innovative, multi-sensory
and highly participatory productions by transforming everyday environments into
colourful, tactile ‘wonderlands’. Using hydro-therapy pools and trampolines,
aromatherapy and puppetry together with a vast array of multi-sensory techniques,
they create original and highly specialised theatre for our young audiences.
The founding Creative Team lead the company, with Tim Webb the Artistic Director
and Chief Executive, Amanda Webb, Head of Design and Max Reinhardt the Musical
Director. Oily Cart is funded by the Arts Council of England, Wandsworth Council,
Boshier Hinton Foundation, BBC Children in Need, the Esmee Fairbairn Foundation,
Genetic Disorders UK, Goldsmiths’ Company Charity, Gordon Fraser Charitable
Trust, Henry Smith Charity, John Ellerman Foundation, John Thaw Foundation,
Mercers’ Charitable Foundation, Taurus Foundation, Tesco Community Awards, the
True Colours Trust and the Wates Foundation.
Beneficiaries
Oily Cart performs in theatre venues and Special Schools across the UK. Each year
they work with over 6000 young people aged 6 months to 19 years old, plus their
teachers, carers, parents and siblings. Two thousand of these are young people with
severe learning disabilities, people who require individual care, often on a 24 hour
basis.
Oily Cart tours three original shows for a total of 30 weeks in each year, with a
combination of long-term residencies and two-day visits. Their aim is to make a
positive difference to the lives of young people and their families, who can be
excluded from cultural activity because of the barriers they face through disability.
Oily Cart is one of the very few theatre companies making work for audiences of
young people with PMLD and/or ASD in the UK.
10
Oily Cart’s aims and objectives
Oily Cart aims are:
 To create high quality, interactive, mult-sensory performances for young
audiences, using original live music, writing and design.
 To provide these audiences with access to arts activities to which they would
otherwise be denied.
 To make a positive difference to the lives of young people and their families,
who can be excluded from cultural activity because of the barriers they face
through disability.
 To provide a rare opportunity for families to participate in a shared experience
where the child with the disability is the focus.
 To promote and encourage models of best practice through raising the public
and cultural profile of these audiences and the importance of cultural provision
for them.
 To provide training opportunities for the families, teachers and carers who
work with these young people, and
 To celebrate the diversity of cultures in our society by producing theatrical
performances including artists of different cultural backgrounds.
Methods
An audience feedback questionnaire was developed that comprised four key
questions relating to 1) the relevance of the show; 2) the extent to which children had
been engaged in the show; 3) the extent to which the show had provoked beneficial
change amongst the children who attended; and 4) the extent to which the show had
been beneficial for practice in the classroom and at home. The four key questions
were framed as Likert scales, with five response categories ranging from negative to
positive.
In addition to the Likert scales, each question had a space where questionnaire
respondents were encouraged to elaborate on their answers, providing examples
and detail that would help Oily Cart to understand the processes by which TUBE had
or had not been effective in achieving the company’s aims and objectives. There was
also a space for general feedback, where respondents were asked to provide any
additional comments relating to their experience of TUBE. The questionnaires were
anonymous, although respondents were asked to indicate which school they were
from and which year group of children had attended the performance.
All of the quantitative data were entered into SPSS (Statistical Package for the
Social Sciences) version 20. Descriptive statistics were produced. Some
comparisons of groups were undertaken, with comparisons of responses from the
PMLD and ASD groups, well as comparisons amongst schools.
The qualitative data were entered into NVivo, a qualitative analysis software tool. A
framework of themes was developed, emerging from the qualitative responses. Each
11
response was coded and grouped in an appropriate theme. The themes were
organised around the four key questions. Some additional themes emerged under
the heading of ‘general feedback’.
12
Findings
Overall, 171 questionnaires were returned, with 118 (69%) from PMLD TUBE and 53
(31%) from ASD TUBE (Table 1).
Table 1: Number of questionnaires received
Type of show
Number of responses
PMLD TUBE
118
69.0
53
31.0
171
100.0
ASD TUBE
Total
Percent
Questionnaires were collected from 16 schools and from 32 additional respondents
who had attended shows in theatre venues. A total of 139 responses were received
from schools, with the number received from individual schools ranging from one to
twenty-three. The mean (average) number of responses from individual schools was
8.69.
Table 2: Sources of questionnaire responses
School
% of total responses
questionnaires
received
1.
2
1.2
2.
23
13.5
3.
8
4.7
4.
6
3.5
5.
3
1.8
6.
7
4.1
7.
4
2.3
8.
2
1.2
9.
10
5.8
10.
12
7.0
11.
14
8.2
12.
1
.6
13.
5
2.9
14.
6
3.5
15.
23
13.5
16.
13
7.6
32
18.7
171
100
Responses from theatre venues
Total
Number of
Respondents from seven schools reported which year group they had accompanied.
These ranged from Nursery classes to Year 7 (Table 3).
13
Table 3: Classes that experienced the performance
Class the respondent accompanied
Nursery
1
2
2
3
4
4
1
1
Number of
respondents
in each
5
3
Total
6
1
7
11
3
22
1
3
3
2
school
1
3
2
2
1
1
5
Total number of
respondents
6
5
7
7
5
8
12
6
1
11
4
48
Four key questions: quantitative results
Questionnaire respondents were asked to indicate their answers to four questions
relating to the relevance of the show, the extent the show had engaged their
children, the extent to which the show had fostered beneficial change amongst the
children and the extent to which the show had impacted upon their practice at school
or in the home. The responses were on a five point Likert scale, as illustrated in
Table 4. The most positive response (for example, ‘completely relevant’, ‘very
engaged’ or ‘very beneficial) was represented as ‘5’ on the scale, while the least
positive response (‘not relevant at all’, ‘not engaged at all’, ‘not beneficial at all’) was
represented as ‘1’ on the scale.
Overall, the responses were very positive, with mean scores ranging from 4.68 to
4.85 (where the most positive response was represented as ‘5’). One hundred and
forty-eight respondents (87.1% of those who responded to this question) indicated
that the show was completely relevant to the needs of their children, with a further 18
(10.6%) responding in the ‘quite relevant’ category. No responses to this question
were negative. Similarly, 127 (77% of those who responded to this question)
respondents indicated that their students had been very engaged by the
performance, with a further 31 (18.8%) responding with ‘quite engaged’ and just
seven responding in the neutral or ‘a little bit engaged’ categories (Table 4).
The greatest amount of variation and the ‘lowest’ mean score (albeit still
exceptionally high at 4.68) was found in response to the question of whether the
performance had provoked a beneficial change amongst the students. One hundred
and thirty-two respondents (77.2% of those who responded to this question)
indicated that they had observed a very beneficial change, with a further 19 (11.1%)
indicating that there had been a ‘quite beneficial’ change. Seven responses (4.3%) to
this question were neutral. Four respondents (2.4%) indicated that they had
14
observed a small beneficial change and just two responded that there had been no
beneficial change at all (Table 4).
Finally, 102 respondents (79% of those who responded to this question) indicated
that the performance had been very beneficial for their practice, with a further 19
(14.7%) agreeing that it had been quite beneficial in this regard. Six (4.7%)
answered with a neutral response, while just two (1.6%) indicated that the
performance had not been beneficial for their practice (Table 4).
Table 4: Overall responses
Do you think this show was
relevant to the needs of your
children?
Do you think this performance
engaged your students?
N
Mean
170
4.85
Completely
Relevant
148
(87.1%)
Quite
Neutral
relevant
18
4
(10.6%) (2.4%)
Very engaged
Quite Neutral
engaged
165
4.72
Do you think this performance
provoked a beneficial change in
your students?
164
127
(77%)
Very
beneficial
31
5
(18.8%)
(3%)
Quite Neutral
beneficial
4.68
132
(77.2%)
Very
beneficial
19
7
(11.1%) (4.3%)
Quite Neutral
beneficial
4.70
102
(79.1%)
19
6
(14.7%) (4.7%)
How beneficial did you find the
performance to your practice?
129
A little
relevant
Not relevant
at all
0
0
A little bit
engaged
Not
engaged at
all
0
2
(1.2%)
A little bit
Not
beneficial beneficial at
all
4
2
(2.4%)
(1.2%)
A little bit
Not
beneficial beneficial at
all
0
2
(1.6%)
Differences between PMLD TUBE and ASD TUBE
The responses from PMLD and ASD versions of ‘TUBE’ (the show) were compared.
Table 5 sets out the mean scores and standard deviations (an indication of the range
of scores) for the four questions. All of the standard deviations are fairly small,
indicating little variation in the responses. The largest variation was found amongst
PMLD TUBE responses to the questions relating to a) beneficial change amongst
the students and b) beneficial change to practice. The least amount of variation
amongst responses was found amongst ASD TUBE responses to the question
regarding the relevance of the show. The highest mean scores (most positive
responses) amongst both groups were with regard to relevance of the show. The
lowest mean score (least positive response) amongst the PMLD group was
regarding beneficial change to the students, while the lowest mean score amongst
the ASD group was regarding the engagement of the students. There were no
statistically significant differences between the two groups of responses.
15
Table 5: Mean scores and standard deviation for PMLD TUBE and ASD TUBE responses
Questionnaire version
Number of
Mean
Std. Deviation
responses
Do you think this show was
118
4.85
.45
52
4.85
.36
117
4.76
.54
48
4.63
.67
114
4.64
.84
ASD TUBE
50
4.76
.59
How beneficial did you find the
PMLD TUBE
87
4.70
.76
performance to your practice?
ASD TUBE
42
4.69
.56
relevant to the needs of your
children
PMLD TUBE
ASD TUBE
Do you think this performance
PMLD TUBE
engaged your students
ASD TUBE
Do you think this performance
PMLD TUBE
provoked a beneficial change in
your students
Table 6 shows that amongst those who had attended PMLD TUBE, 88.1% rated the
show as ‘completely relevant and 8.5% rated it as ‘quite relevant’. The responses to
ASD TUBE were similar, with 84.6% rating it as completely relevant and 15.4%
rating it as ‘quite relevant’. In response to the question of whether the show had
engaged the students, one respondent in each group indicated that students had
been ‘a little bit’ engaged, while 79.5% of those in the PMLD group and 70.8% of
those in the ASD group indicated that the students had been very engaged. Amongst
the PMLD respondents there were two who indicated that the show had been not
beneficial at all with regard to fostering beneficial change amongst the students,
compared with none in this category amongst the ASD group. The majority (79.8%)
of those in the PMLD group and 82% of those in the ASD group indicated that the
show had provoked very beneficial changes in their students. Similarly, there were
two PMLD respondents who indicated the show had not been beneficial for their
practice, compared with none in this category amongst the ASD respondents.
Amongst both groups the large majority gave positive responses to this question
(81.6% PMLD; 73.8% ASD).
16
Table 6: Overall responses according to type of show (numbers and percentages representing type
of show: PMLD TUBE; ASD TUBE)
Number and percentage of responses
(Column %)
PMLD TUBE
Not relevant
A little bit
Do you think this
relevant
show was relevant
Neutral
to the needs of your
Quite relevant
children?
Completely
relevant
Do you think this
performance
engaged your
students?
performance
provoked a
beneficial change in
your students?
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
2.4%
4
3.4%
0
10
8.5%
8
15.4%
18
10.6%
104
88.1%
44
84.6%
148
87.1%
118
52
170
Not engaged
0
0
0
A little bit
1
0.9%
1
2.1%
2
1.2%
3
2.6%
2
4.2%
5
3.0%
Quite engaged
20
17.1%
11
22.9%
31
18.8%
Very engaged
93
79.5%
34
70.8%
127
77.0%
Total (100%)
117
engaged
Neutral
all
A little bit
beneficial
Neutral
48
165
2
1.2%
4
2.4%
2
1.8%
0
3
2.6%
1
2%
6
5.3%
1
2%
7
4.3%
11.6%
80.5%
Quite beneficial
12
10.5%
7
14.0%
19
Very beneficial
91
79.8%
41
82.0%
132
Total (100%)
Not beneficial at
all
How beneficial did
A little bit
you find the
beneficial
performance to your Neutral
practice?
Total
Total (100%)
Not beneficial at
Do you think this
ASD TUBE
114
2
2.3%
0
50
164
0
2
1.6%
0
0
0.0%
4
4.6%
2
4.8%
6
4.7%
Quite beneficial
10
11.5%
9
21.4%
19
14.7%
Very beneficial
71
81.6%
31
73.8%
102
79.1%
Total (100%)
87
42
129
17
Differences between schools
The questionnaire responses were interrogated for any differences between schools.
Table 7 sets out the mean scores and standard deviations (a measure of the
variation in responses) for each school, in relation to each question.
With regard to the perceived relevance of TUBE, mean scores ranged from 4.14 to
5. The greatest variation in responses and ‘lowest’ mean score (but still very high,
being above 4, where 5 = the most positive response possible) was found in school
11, where 14 individuals completed the questionnaire. In the two schools with the
greatest number of questionnaire respondents (23 in each) there were high mean
scores (4.91 and 4.96) and little variation in responses.
With regard to the perceptions of the extent to which TUBE had engaged students,
the mean scores ranged from 4.21 to 5. Again, the lowest mean score and highest
variability in responses was found in school 11. Similarly, the lowest mean score
(3.43) and greatest variability in responses was found in this same school in the
responses to the question of whether TUBE had provoked beneficial change
amongst students. For this third question the mean responses ranged from 3.43 to 5.
Finally, for question four, concerned with impact upon practice in the classroom and
home, the mean scores ranged from 3.79 to 5 and again the lowest mean score and
greatest variability was found in the responses from school 11.
A statistical test (analysis of variance) revealed that the differences between schools
were statistically significant with regard to questions one, three and four. These
differences can be attributed to school 11, where there was, overall, the greatest
variation amongst the responses. However, whilst acknowledging the differences it is
important to note that the responses were all very positive, with no mean scores
below 3, the neutral point on the response scale, and the large majority of mean
scores above 4.
18
Table 7: Differences between schools for perceived relevance of TUBE
School
N
1
2
2
23
3
8
4
6
5
3
6
7
7
4
8
2
9
10
10
12
11
14
12
1
13
5
14
6
15
23
16
13
Total
Do you think this
Do you think this
Do you think this
How beneficial did
show was relevant
performance
performance provoked
you find the
to the needs of your
engaged your
a beneficial change in
performance to your
children?
students?
your students?
practice?
Mean*
5.00
SD
0.00
Mean*
5.00
SD
0.00
4.91
0.29
4.91
4.75
0.46
5.00
Mean*
5.00
SD
0.00
0.29
4.91
4.50
0.84
0.00
4.67
5.00
0.00
5.00
Mean*
5.00
SD
0.00
0.29
4.91
0.29
4.57
0.53
4.57
0.53
0.82
4.67
0.82
4.50
0.84
4.67
0.58
4.67
0.58
4.67
0.58
0.00
4.86
0.38
4.67
0.82
5.00
0.00
5.00
0.00
4.75
0.50
4.50
0.58
5.00
0.00
5.00
0.00
5.00
0.00
4.00
1.41
5.00
0.00
5.00
0.00
5.00
0.00
5.00
0.00
4.80
0.63
4.67
0.49
4.58
0.67
4.50
0.80
4.73
0.47
4.14
0.86
4.21
0.97
3.43
1.60
3.79
1.42
5.00
0.00
5.00
0.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5.00
0.00
4.60
0.55
4.80
0.45
5.00
0.00
4.67
0.52
4.83
0.41
4.67
0.52
4.50
0.55
4.96
0.21
4.82
0.39
4.91
0.29
4.82
0.50
5.00
0.00
4.85
0.38
5.00
0.00
5.00
0.00
4.83
0.44
4.74
0.56
4.65
0.80
4.70
0.71
139
*5=most positive response; 1=least positive response
19
General feedback
Respondents were asked to provide any additional general feedback relating to
issues that had not been covered in the questionnaire (Figure 1). The majority of this
additional feedback reinforced
the positive feedback in other
sections of the questionnaire,
with
many
additional
superlatives that included: ‘it
was beyond doubt the best
show we have ever had in
school’
,
‘massively
impressed’,
‘amazing’,
‘faultless’, ‘100% effective’,
‘fantastic’,
‘high
quality’,
‘excellent’, ‘wonderful’, ‘super
special’
and
‘beautifully
performed’ (Table 8).
Eighteen
(11%)
of
respondents provided ideas
relating to how the show could have been improved. The majority of these were with
reference to the needs of specific children, for example highlighting some children
who would have been better off in a different position, or others who found specific
strategies or the structure of the performance difficult.
One Head Teacher explained that she felt she could have made better choices about
which children should attend the performance had she had more detailed information
in advance. Nevertheless, others (5; 3%) highlighted that they had valued the
excellent information that Oily Cart had provided. Eight (5%) responses praised the
venue specifically, pointing out features of the venue that had been particularly
appropriate in meeting their needs. Just two mentioned cost, with one indicating that
if the show were less expensive more pupils would be able to access it, while the
other indicated that the show was affordable and reasonably priced, particularly
bearing in mind its specialist expertise.
20
Figure 1: General feedback from adults in the audience
Generally positive feedback
Ideas for improvement
Good venue
Excellent information
Cost
0
10
20
30
40
50
Table 8: General feedback - examples
Number of
references
Generally positive
feedback
47
Percentage
of total
respondents
27
Example
The performance was really
thought out and beautifully
performed.
Another wonderful, outstanding
performance. I feel privileged
that I got to go along with my
student again.
A fantastic show for all.
Fantastic performance, very high
quality.
Ideas for
improvement
18
11
We needed to have our child
sitting up more rather than lying
back in the hanging chair. This
would have allowed him to
anticipate better the next
movement from your actors.
Some used far too much language
for our non verbal autistic
21
children but otherwise brilliant.
It was up too close too quickly
…He would have enjoyed it more if
they had sung/performed at a
distance for 5-10 minutes first
before coming up close to him.
But lots of great singing and
stimulation - a brilliant
performance.
Had we known the content and
level of performance, we would
have chosen children wisely.
Some students found the waiting
before the show a bit too long.
They started throwing the tubes,
hurting themselves.
Good venue
8
5
Venue brilliant for access.
Venue was great, the room a good
size for the size of group.
The venue is well catered to
provide for disabled children.
Excellent
information
5
3
Great to have such detailed email
prior to show so we knew what to
expect.
Excellent liaison and information
given from the office and the
stage manager.
All other aspects of liaison were
very well managed … professional,
kind, patient, wonderful.
Cost
2
1
If only this was cheaper more
students would be able to benefit
from your wonderful work!
22
Very affordable for such a
unique, tailored event. Cannot
speak highly enough of the show,
so nice to have PMLD catered for.
Relevance of the Oily Cart performance to their audiences
As noted above, 87% of questionnaire
respondents indicated that the Oily
Cart performance was ‘completely
relevant’ to their children’s needs. In a
follow-up open question, the
respondents were asked to comment
on the ways in which the Oily Cart
performance achieved this relevance.
A total of 162 responses were coded
under the overarching theme of
‘meeting needs’. Amongst these
responses there were 26 explicit
references (15% of total 171
respondents) to ‘meeting our needs’,
with comments that praised the
performers for their understanding of
the children’s special needs. Many
other comments elaborated on this,
specifying the particular ways in which
this understanding was evidenced
(Figure 2; Table 9). Forty-three (25%)
commented on the effectiveness of
the individual attention that each child
received, which helped to establish trust and encouraged the young people to
interact and engage with the performance. Individual responses to each child’s
sounds, actions and movements helped to make the performance a child-centred
experience, where as one parent put it, each child was ‘present, engaged and
interested’. Thirty-five (20%) responses focused on the appropriate pace of the
performance, commenting specifically on the effectiveness of short bursts of activity
interspersed with pauses and moments of calm. Others highlighted that they had
been impressed by the absence of any sense of ‘rush’, with time given to the
23
children for exploration of the sensory props, yet framed
within an overall structure where activities were highly
‘The characters
engaging. The same number of respondents (35; 20%)
were fantastic
commented on the multi-sensory resources and props,
which ‘transfixed’ the children and helped to sustain
and great with
interest. Several respondents mentioned the specific
the children and
qualities of the Oily Cart staff – friendly, patient and
understanding
helpful, remarking that they had been impressed by the
priority given to using the children’s names in their
their needs.’
interactions. Finally, nine respondents focused on the
effective use of language, where ‘less is more’,
highlighting that this was a specific way in which children were supported in
engaging with the performance without having to rely on verbal processing.
Figure 2: The TUBE met our needs
Individual attention was valuable
Pace was appropriate
Appropriate props and resources
Staff were friendly and helpful
Used language appropriately for the
children
Met our needs
0
10
20
30
40
50
Table 9: The TUBE met our needs - examples
Theme
Met our needs
Number of
references
26
% of total
respondents
15
Example
I cannot praise the Oily Cart team
highly enough: their understanding of
the needs of our children was
impressive and they are obviously well
practised at putting children at their
ease and engaging with them before
the show begins. Our carers also loved
it.
All children engaged to a greater or
24
lesser extent relative to their
particular needs.
The characters were fantastic and
great with the children and
understanding their needs.
Individual
attention was
valuable
43
25
The kids received a lot of 1 to 1 and
this helped them with singing and
joining in.
The actors were brilliant at engaging
with each of the children. It was
fantastic that they remembered the
names of each of the children (not
always the case with some theatre
groups).
The characters engaged with each
child on a level that was just right.
They responded immediately to the
child's sounds, actions, movements,
and so built up a warm and fun filled
relationship throughout the
performance.
Pace was
appropriate
35
20
The short bursts of activity were
great and kept the children's focus
and attention.
Every activity had pace and was not
rushed, new ideas were introduced as
simply as possible with relevance to
the senses.
Lots of excellent pauses and moments
of quiet and calm. The activities were
highly engaging - opportunity to
explore. Time was given - no rush.
Appropriate
props and
resources
35
20
Props used were key ones that
interest the children - use of water;
sounds; movement in chairs;
instruments; straws in lanterns.
25
Props used were key ones that
interest the children - use of water;
sounds; movement in chairs;
instruments; straws in lanterns.
The child I worked with focused on
the props and faces of the
performers. She was transfixed at
times. The props interested her and
she reached out and up towards them.
Staff were
friendly and
helpful
14
8
The characters were very friendly and
really interacted with the children.
The staff were patient, friendly and
helpful throughout.
The staff were very friendly and
remembered each child by name, even
the following day.
Used language
appropriately
for the children
9
5
Lots of repetition on key words but
not too much language used.
It was great to see my son enjoy
something that did not rely on a lot of
verbal processing. I cannot fault it.
Thank you so much.
I was massively impressed by the
sparse, effective use of language. For
our children less is definitely more,
and I have never seen a show where
the temptation to over talk is reigned
in like this one. All the more engaging
because of it.
Total
162
26
Engagement in the Oily Cart performance
As noted above, 77% of respondents indicated that their children had been
‘completely engaged’ in the performance, with a further 18.8% indicating that the
performance had been ‘quite’ engaging. Respondents were asked to elaborate on
their responses, in open questions (Figure 3; Table 10).
‘It was a
In total, 275 comments were coded under the
overarching theme of ‘sustaining interest’. Amongst fantastic
these, 98 responses (57% of total 171 respondents) experience for
were explicit comments that noted sustained interest,
with comments describing how children stayed alert, our class. All the
focused and concentrated for extended periods of time. children were
In many cases this was described as unusual and
engaged, alert.
remarkable behaviour. Several respondents elaborated
andsustained
absorbed.’
on specific ways in which the show supported children in this
focus. The
key areas that were identified
included its engaging music,
multi-sensory range of activities,
visual
interest
and
fun,
interactive characters.
Sixtyfour
respondents
(37%)
highlighted
their
children’s
engagement in the music,
referring to the dynamic range,
‘beautiful
voices’,
‘soothing
rhythms’ and repetitive lyrics as
being particularly effective. Fiftynine (35%) of respondents
made explicit references to the
effectiveness of multi-sensory
activities. The range of activities
had stimulated and sustained
interest through touch, smell,
visual and aural senses. The
bold, bright and engaging visual display was identified by 46 (27%) of respondents
as being particularly important in sustaining the children’s interest. Some also
commented on the effective use of the ‘visual schedule’ which helped the children to
understand what was going to happen next. Others commented particularly on how
much their children had responded to the use of projected images, particularly in the
good-bye sequence. Eight (5%) also attributed sustained interest and engagement to
the ‘fun’ and inspirational characters.
27
Figure 3: The TUBE sustained the children’s interest
Engaged in the music
Multi-sensory
Visual interest
Fun characters
Sustained the children's interest
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
Table 10: Sustaining the children's interest - examples
Theme
Sustained
the
children's
interest
Number of % of total
references respondents
98
57
Example
A usually placid and hard to engage child
stayed alert and awake for whole session (60
minutes - wow!). One child, who finds it hard
to sit still, stayed sitting in leaf chair for
whole session.
One child in particular focused for several
minutes during the performance, something
which we continually work towards in her
targets.
The child I worked with finds it difficult to
react to anything and will often fall asleep
during lessons but he remained focused during
the whole performance.
Engaged in
the music
64
37
D responded to the music most of all.
My child listened throughout. Gentle sounds
engaged him. Turned to listen to different
sounds, stopped rocking to listen, wide awake
and alert to the show.
Music (tempo and sound) was very engaging
28
and different.
Multisensory
59
35
Definitely ignited all their senses and the
length of time they engaged for was what
amazed me.
Given our child has hearing and vision
impairments we are of the view that most
sensory experiences are beneficial in
broadening his understanding of the world.
Children were able to interact with the
performance and able to enjoy the different
sensory experiences from touch, looking,
listening, smelling.
Visual
interest
46
27
Some of the children were very focused on
the costumes.
Particularly relevant, due to visual stimuli as
main communication.
The children laughed a lot. The characters
were bright and engaging …The bold colours
were eye catching and easy for children with
visual impairment to track, but there were not
too many colours.
Fun
8
characters
5
The performers were full of fun and dressed
very colourfully.
The characters were fun, colourful and
included staff as well as children.
You guys were wonderful, fun and inspirational.
Thank you. Excellent, vibrant, engaging.
Total
275
29
Children’s responses to the TUBE
Questionnaire respondents were asked to indicate whether the Oily Cart
performance had provoked a beneficial change amongst the students. As noted
above, 80.5% indicated that they had noticed a very beneficial change, while a
further 11.6% indicated that the change had been ‘quite beneficial. In an open
question respondents were asked to elaborate on these responses, providing detail
of the kinds of changes they had noticed.
A total of 337 comments were coded under the overarching theme of ‘diverse
responses
to
TUBE’.
Amongst these, just seven
indicated
that
the
experience
had
been
difficult for a child, while a
further four reported that
they had not observed any
noticeable change. A large
majority of these qualitative
responses provided details
of positive changes in
behaviour
and
mood
(Figure 4; Table 11).
Seventy-three (43% of total
171
respondents)
respondents observed that
overall the show had had a
calming effect on the
children. In some cases
calmer behaviour throughout the remainder of the day of the performance had been
noted. According to some reports, being calm and relaxed helped the children to
engage in high levels of interaction. Many respondents (70; 41%) noted that they
had observed children participating, focusing and engaging much more than was
usual. ‘Very happy children’ were described by 68 (40%) respondents, with many
highlighting the laughter, smiles and giggling that they had noted amongst both the
children and the carers. Thirteen (8%) respondents described ‘excitement’ and an
increase in general alertness amongst the children, while 38 (22%) used the word
‘enjoyment’ to describe their children’s responses. Some respondents (28; 16%)
noted an increase in vocalising amongst their children and others (26; 15%) noted
beneficial changes in physical responses, noting more reaching out, turning heads
and better gross and fine motor skills. Ten (6%) respondents noted specifically that
their children had demonstrated good eye contact during the show.
A few (7; 4%) indicated that the experience had in fact been a difficult one for their
child, with one describing how the child had become ‘scared’ - this was in reference
30
to a child specifically identified as ‘SLD’ who had attended the PMLD TUBE. Others
reported that the child had become ‘upset’. In one case (PMLD TUBE) the adult
reported that despite this there had been many positive ideas that would be adopted
into daily practice and that, for the carer at least, the performance had been both
inspiring and enjoyable. Another respondent who reported the child had been ‘very
upset’ (ASD TUBE) again emphasised that despite this she had gained new ideas
for her practice and ‘loved the resources and songs’. Three respondents (two PMLD
TUBE and one ASD TUBE) noted that their children had attention spans that lasted
just a few seconds and that despite a higher level of engagement than usual; they
had nonetheless found it difficult to sit through the show. One respondent, who had
accompanied a child at the ASD TUBE, noted that the child had found ‘the
environment difficult to cope with’, although he had engaged with the good-bye song.
Finally, four respondents said that they had not noticed a particular change that
could be attributed to the show, but emphasised that nonetheless the performance
had been a positive experience for the children.
Figure 4: Children's varied responses to the TUBE
The show was calming and relaxing
Children interacted and were engaged…
Very happy children
The children were excited and alert
Enjoyment
Vocalising
Physical response
Eye contact
Difficult for some children
No change in responses
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
31
Table 11: Children's varied responses to the TUBE - examples
Theme
The show was
calming and
relaxing
Number of
references
73
% of total
respondents
43
Example
Very lively group but there were
definite moments of calmness shown by
all children.
One of our boys doesn't respond well
due to how special he is and he was just
so happy, engaged and relaxed.
He does not often sit for a long period
of time, but he sat all the way through
the performance. He has been very calm
throughout the afternoon, after the
performance.
Children
interacted and
were engaged
with the
performers
70
41
The children were laughing, smiling and
totally engaged with each of the actors.
Some pupils came out of their own world
to participate, engage, interact.
I spoke to the actors at the start of
the second day ... I wanted them to
know how extraordinarily will the
children had behaved, how much more
focused many of them had been than
usual and how surprised we had been at
the level of participation. This may not
have been obvious to the inexperienced
observer or indeed to the actors. But we
saw it, and marvelled throughout the
three days.
Very happy
children
68
40
I was sitting next to K, who doesn't
usually exhaust himself with laughter.
Thank you.
Simply, one very happy student.
If by beneficial you mean giving my child
and myself a happy unique experience
then absolutely.
32
Enjoyment
38
22
D really enjoyed it. He sat in the chair
for a full hour which is amazing for him.
Happy and excited and enjoying.
The children enjoyed the whole
spectacle as evidenced by lots of
laughter and giggling!
Vocalising
28
16
Child smiling, vocalising, moving arms up
to touch lights.
Very vocal, lots of smiling, very
enjoyable. Four our children lots of nice
responses.
Student really showed she enjoyed it by
vocalising and turning her head.
Physical
response
26
15
Increased gross or fine motorreaching/holding.
Some of the children were reaching out
for visual items far more and were
responding a lot more than they usually
would.
The leaf chairs helped the children to
experience a range of movements they
do not normally experience.
The children
were excited
and alert
13
8
He was more alert and interested in his
surroundings with his head control being
outstanding for him throughout the
performance due to the interest,
excitement of what was going on around
him.
The little boy who was so excited and
alert during your performance continued
to be as alert through the rest of the
afternoon … we were able to encourage
him to walk in the afternoon which for
most days he finds very difficult.
33
He was excited throughout, laughing,
but you contained him. He really had a
great time, all the time, without being so
excited he missed things.
Eye contact
10
6
Responses from all the pupils included
vocalising, eye contact, smiling, using
their senses.
The SLD children were very focused and
maintained good eye contact with the
adults.
Lots of laughter, eye contact, attention.
Difficult for
some children
7
4
SLD child - did not provoke any
beneficial change. More than anything
she was scared of performers.
My child occasionally awoke, had a look
around, usually he would become upset.
The pupils are not developmentally
ready to share attention for more than
a few seconds, in some cases.
No change in
responses
4
2
I'm not sure exactly if there has been a
change. I am sure my students enjoyed
the experience but I can't say it's
brought any change. Significant or
otherwise, to them.
Hard to see the impact of Oily Cart on
PMLD children as some are non
responsive.
I did not particularly notice any changes
in behaviour, but with my son I wouldn't
especially expect to see any. However, I
feel that the whole experience was
beneficial for him.
Total
337
34
The influence of Oily Cart on day-to-day practice
Questionnaire respondents were asked how beneficial they
had found the Oily Cart performance to be, for their practice.
As noted earlier, 79.1% of respondents indicated that the
performance had been very beneficial for their practice, with
another 14.7% indicating it had been quite beneficial. The
respondents were asked to elaborate, specifying where there
were any useful techniques that they would take from the
performance and adapt to home or school settings. A total of
155 comments were coded under the overarching theme of
‘influence on practice’.
‘Cannot speak
highly enough
of the show,
so nice to
have PMLD
catered for.’
Three Head Teachers made it explicit that the experience had functioned as valuable
Continuing Professional Development for their TAs in particular. The performance
had provided a space where the TAs could observe the use of multi-sensory stimuli
and reflect upon the responses amongst the children that could otherwise have been
missed in the context of a busy classroom. For some (7; 4%) of the teachers, the
experience had reinforced their existing practice, providing and opportunity to
observe the children’s responses to communication strategies that the teachers
themselves were familiar with.
A large number of responses related to new ideas for the creative use of multisensory objects. Seventy-five (44% of total 171 respondents) provided answers that
were coded in this
category. The adults
highlighted how the
show had helped them
to see how simple
objects could be used in
such a way as to foster
a ‘sense of wonder and
intrigue’ amongst the
children. Many teachers
planned to add tubes to
their resources, with at
least one seeing the
possibilities
for
an
‘orchestra’
in
her
classroom.
Some
respondents (18; 11%)
indicated
that
they
hoped to purchase similar resources to the ones they had seen in the performance.
In particular, many coveted the chairs, reporting that the special ‘leaf chairs’ had
35
been a very effective part of the experience that had helped to engage the children
and sustain their focus.
Twenty-four (14%) respondents identified specific communication strategies that
they planned to incorporate in to their practice. These included mimicking, use of
repetition, varying the tone and dynamic range of their voices, as well as using multisensory stimuli to support speech and language development. In addition, twelve
respondents (7%) reported that they had gained new ideas for strategies for calming
the children, including adjusting the pace of their lessons and incorporating planned
pauses and ‘built in stillness’.
Sixteen responses (9%) focused on the use of music, with indications that the
teachers intended to make more use of music in the classroom, after having
observed how engaging simple musical techniques had been.
Figure 5: The TUBE provided teachers, carers and parents with new ideas
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
36
Table 12: Changes to practice
Theme
New ideas for
creative use of
everyday multisensory objects in
the classroom
Number of
references
75
% of total
respondents
44
Example
It makes me think that there are so
many other everyday objects that
could be used creatively and
engagingly that we have not yet
thought of.
Gave me new ideas for future
sensory sessions.
I am going straight to nearest
building site to beg for tubes. We
can use these for smells, listening,
vibration. Hopefully an orchestra!
Ideas for
communication
strategies
24
14
Communication strategies:
mimicking, musical, repetitive
sounds.
As a speech and language therapist,
it has made me reflect on sensory
stimulation using smell, touch, light
and sound as part of sessions in
class and in 1:1 situations to support
speech and language development.
Using different tones in your voice.
Interested in
buying similar
resources
18
11
I will ask the school if we can have
some wonderful hammocks like
yours.
We are now looking at buying one of
the swing chairs so we can do
mini/individual performances.
Percussion instruments would be a
wonderful addition at home or
school.
Will bring more
music to classroom
16
9
S really responds well to music and
singing so to bring more music in to
the classroom would be fun and
37
beneficial.
More music and simple session...
The performance showed that you
can use very simple resources and
make them very effective for our
children by adding music.
New ideas for
calming techniques
12
7
We loved the breathing technique at
the end of each section. The
children quietened and calmed every
time. I think this could be adapted
for use in the classrooms.
Planned pauses - built in stillness …
Chairs kept children calm and alert.
Building in whole class pause and
still, to refocus.
Reinforced
existing practice
7
4
We use lots of techniques that we
saw today - but it's nice to see them
so professionally done.
A lot of it is similar to our sensory
journeys. Will use simple material,
e.g. tubes. Loved the chairs and the
singing. Will definitely come again!
Music and sounds are already used
with this student. She loves to sing
and dance and it seems to increase
her concentration levels for a short
period.
CPD for TAs
3
2
This enabled staff to find out what
sensory approaches stimulate
children and gain responses not
normally expressed.
I'm glad I sent my TAs to support
as it gave them the opportunity to
watch and observe a pupil's
responses. They told me they saw
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reactions that they wouldn't
normally see in our busy classroom
settings. They were able to support
the pupils but also watch how pupils
reacted to the performers and their
clever props!
It was an amazing experience for all
of the children and excellent CPD
for staff and professionals who
supported each child.
Total
155
Summary
Overall, TUBE was perceived as an exceptionally positive experience for children
and their teachers, carers and parents. Overall, the show was a highly valued
experience that met the needs of the children in several ways. The performance was
child-centred and interactive. The performance was structured and paced
appropriately and made expert use of appropriate resources. Children engaged with
the performers and demonstrated higher than usual levels of focus, concentration
and sustained interest. The children also demonstrated high levels of enjoyment,
happiness and responses that included vocalising, reaching out, movement to music
and eye contact. Alongside this, TUBE was structured in such a way as to ensure
that a safe, calming and trusting environment was established, with space for calm
and quiet. Key facets that supported the engagement of children were the visual
interest, the use of music, the multi-sensory activities and resources and the fun,
responsive characters. TUBE had a high level of positive impact with regard to its
influence on the practice of teachers, carers and parents, offering many ideas for the
creative use of multi-sensory objects in the classroom and the home. Most
significantly, the experience provided adults with a space where they could observe
the responses of the children and reflect upon the different strategies that were
employed in fostering such responses.
Some constructive suggestions were provided for improving the experience. Most of
these related to specific needs of individual children. Perhaps the most salient
suggestion was that schools be further supported in their selection of children who
attend the show, so as to ensure that those who would benefit most have access to
the experience.
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Appendix 1: Draft questionnaire for future evaluation exercises
This questionnaire was developed, drawing upon the language used by the
respondents to the original questionnaire. The rationale behind this approach is that
the qualitative data from the initial questionnaire represents the authentic voice of a
range of Oily Cart audiences. By using their ideas and specific language as the basis
for a quantitative rating scale questionnaire, Oily Cart will be able to gather a large
amount of comparable data across diverse performance contexts, ‘testing’ the extent
to which the responses to TUBE are replicated amongst wider audiences as well as
allowing space for individual views to be expressed.
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Feedback form
We very much hope you enjoyed the show. Feedback from our audience is
essential as it enables us to record and respond to your reactions. Please help
us by completing this form as soon as you can – we are very interested in your
response to the show.
Name of show: _____________________________
Number of children you accompanied to the show________________________
Number of PMLD ________
Number of ASD ___________
School or venue: ____________________________________________________
1. Please tell us about the extent to which the show met the needs of the
children you accompanied to the show.
This show was relevant to
the needs of the children I
accompanied.
The characters engaged with
each child on a level that was
just right.
The actors responded
immediately to the child's
sounds, actions and
movements.
Every activity had an
appropriate pace
The staff were very friendly.
Props interested the
children.
Language was used
effectively.
Strongly
agree
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Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly
disagree
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2. Please tell us about whether you think the children you accompanied
engaged with the show.
The children I accompanied:
Were engaged in this
performance.
Showed sustained interest in
this show.
Remained focused during the
whole performance.
Responded to the music.
Showed that the show ignited
all their senses.
Were able to interact with
the performance and able to
enjoy the different sensory
experiences.
Found the characters bright
and engaging.
Found the performers to be
full of fun.
Strongly
agree
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Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly
disagree
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3. Please tell us about responses that you observed amongst the children
you accompanied to the show.
The children I accompanied:
Showed beneficial changes,
during this performance.
Showed beneficial changes,
after this performance.
Showed definite moments of
calmness.
Were laughing and smiling.
Were totally engaged with
each of the actors.
Were excited and alert
during the show.
Responded a lot more than
they usually would.
Were very vocal.
Experienced a range of
movements they do not
Strongly
agree
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Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly
disagree
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42
normally experience.
Maintained good eye contact
with the adults.
Became upset.
Were scared of the
performers.
Are not developmentally
ready to share attention for
more than a few seconds.
Did not show any changes in
behaviour.
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4. Please tell us about the extent to which the performance was beneficial
for your practice in the classroom or the home.
The show:
Was beneficial for my
practice.
Gave me new ideas for future
sensory sessions.
Gave me new ideas for
communication strategies.
Gave me ideas for helping
children to become calm.
Gave me ideas about use of
repetition in communication.
Reinforced my existing
practice.
Showed that you can use very
simple resources and make
them very effective for our
children
Was a space for me to
observe the responses of the
children that I might have
otherwise missed.
Strongly
agree
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Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly
disagree
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5. Please use this space to comment on any other aspect of the show:
44

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