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File - RSW WORLD
IMDG
What is the purpose of IMDG code
The Code lays down basic principles; detailed recommendations for individual substances, materials and
articles, and a number of recommendations for good operational practice including advice on terminology,
packing, labeling, stowage, segregation and handling, and emergency response action.
The two-volume Code is divided into seven parts
IMDG Code or International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code is accepted as an international guideline to
the safe transportation or shipment of dangerous goods or hazardous materials by water on vessel. IMDG
Code is intended to protect crew members and to prevent marine pollution in the safe transportation of
hazardous materials by vessel. It is recommended to governments for adoption or for use as the basis for
national regulations.
The implementation of the Code is mandatory in conjunction with the obligations of the members of
united nation government under the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) and the
International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL 73/78). It is intended for use
not only by the mariner but also by all those involved in industries and services connected with shipping.
Contains advice on terminology, packaging, labeling, placarding, markings, stowage, segregation, handling,
and emergency response.
The code is updated and maintained by the DSC Sub-Committee of the International Maritime Organization
every 2 years.
What are the contents of the IMDG code
Volume 1 (parts 1, 2 and 4-7
of the Code)
Volume 2
The Supplement contains
the following texts related to
the IMDG Code:
general provisions, definitions, training
classification
packing and tank provisions
consignment procedures
construction and testing of packagings, IBCs, large packagings, portable
tanks and road tank vehicles
transport operations
the Dangerous Goods List (equivalent to the schedules in previous
editions of the Code), presented in tabular format
limited quantities exceptions
the Index and appendices
EMS Guide
Medical First Aid Guide
Reporting Procedures
Packing Cargo Transport Units
Safe Use of Pesticides
INF Code
How do you load a IMDG container
What are the documents supplied by the shipper
with regard to IMDG cargo
1. Check for proper documentation
2. Refer to segregation tables for any segregation required
3. Check IMDG code supplementary for required details
4. Receive IMDG Declaration & manifest
The legislation requires a declaration from the consignor (shipper) stating that the goods declared are
classified and packed correctly and also a declaration from the person packing the container that it has
been done so correctly, these are Dangerous Goods Declaration and the Container Packing Certificate
These declarations may be in any format, but must be in accordance with the regulations of the IMDG
code, Chapter 5.4 refers (an example is given below)
Often, the Dangerous Goods Declaration is combined with the Container Packing Certificate into one
document, generally known as the Multimodal Dangerous Goods Form
These documents can also known as Dangerous Goods Note (DGN), Dangerous Goods Declaration (DGD),
Multimodal Dangerous Goods Form (MDGF), Shippers Declaration, and Dangerous Cargo Declaration (DCD)
The information required on the documents is as follows:
1. Shipper - full name and address
2. Consignee – full name and address
3. Description of goods in sequence
a) UN number (preceded by UN)
b) Proper Shipping Name including technical name (if required)
c) Primary IMO class, secondary, tertiary
d) Packing Group
4. Information which supplements the Proper Shipping Name in the dangerous goods description
(If applicable)
 Technical names for "n.o.s." and other generic descriptions
 Empty un cleaned packagings, bulk containers and tanks
 Wastes
 Elevated temperature substances
 Marine Pollutants
 Flashpoint
5. In addition to the dangerous goods description the following information shall be included after
the dangerous goods description on the dangerous goods transport document.
 Total quantity of dangerous goods
 This includes the weight in Kilos of each substance, as well as the number and type of packaging
Also to be included if applicable;
 Limited quantities
 Salvage packagings
 Substances stabilized by temperature control
 Control and Emergency temperature: ....° C
 Aerosols - If the capacity of an aerosol is above 1000ml, this shall be declared.
6. Both the Shippers declaration and the container packing declaration must be signed and dated.
7. There are also national and local regulations to be considered when preparing the Dangerous
Goods Documentation, including but not limited to
 24Hr emergency telephone number and contact for shipments to / from the USA, Canada,
Thailand, China and
 Australia, these are mandatory, however, where possible it is always useful to include for other
destinations.
 For USA and Canada it is also necessary to include if applicable Reportable Quantity (RQ) and if
poisonous by
 inhalation (PIH) the zone should also be included
8. There may be other documentation required at time of booking, these will normally be documents
as prescribed by the IMDG code, but may also include specific documents required by a local
authority, e.g. weathering certificate, Competent Authority Approval, Certificate of Analysis or a
gas free certificate to name a few.
What are the contents in the “container packing
certificate”
CONTAINER/VEHICLE PACKING CERTIFICATE comes in the same document of DG declaration
“I hereby declare that the goods described above have been packed/ loaded into the container/vehicle
identified above in accordance with the applicable provisions.”
MUST BE COMPLETED AND SIGNED FOR ALLCONTAINER/VEHICLE LOADS BY PERSON
RESPONSIBLE FOR PACKING/LOADING.
In which sides placards has to be pasted
Two proper shipping names were given and asked
to segregate them
*
X
1 = AWAY FROM
2 = SEPARATED
FROM
3 = SEPERATED
BY A COMPLETE
COMPARTMENT
OR HOLD FROM
Refer to special provisions for Explosives ( Clause 7.2.7.2 of the IMDG Code )
No segregation required except if specifically indicated in the Dangerous Goods List
Effectively segregated so that the incompatible goods cannot interact dangerously in
the event of an accident but may be transported in the same compartment or hold
or on deck , provided a minimum horizontal separation of 3 metres , projected
vertically is obtained
In different compartments or holds when stowed under deck. Provided the
intervening deck is resistant to fire and liquid, a vertical separation, i.e. in different
compartments, may be accepted as equivalent to this segregation. For “ on deck ”
stowage , this segregation means a separation by a distance of at least 6 metres
horizontally
Either a vertical or a horizontal separation. If the intervening decks are not resistant
to fire and liquid, then only a longitudinal separation, i.e. by an intervening complete
compartment or hold, is acceptable. For “on deck” stowage, this segregation means
a separation by a distance of at least 12 metres horizontally. The same distance has
to be applied if one package is stowed “ on deck “ , and the other one in an upper
compartment
4 = SEPERATED
Vertical separation alone does not meet this requirement. Between a package “
LONGITUDINALLY under deck “ and one “ on deck “ a minimum distance of 24 metres, including
BY AN
a complete compartment, must be maintained longitudinally. For “ on deck “
INTERVENING
stowage , this segregation means a separation by a distance of at least 24 metres
COMPLETE
longitudinally.
COMPARTMENT
OR HOLD FROM
If placards are missing in one visible side would you
accept IMDG container
Would you accept IMDG container if supplied with
one only one document
What are the contents in the shippers declaration in Basic details
the IMDG declaration
No. and type of packages: 80 x 200 litre steel drums + net and gross mass
Proper Shipping Name: Trichlorobutene
Class: 6.1 Toxic
Sub-risk: N/A
UN Number: UN 2322
-Packing Group: II
Marine Pollutant: Yes.
IMDG Declaration as it would appear on the shipper’s declaration:
80 x 200 litre steel drums + net and gross mass
TRICHLOROBUTENE
Class 6.1
UN 2322
PG II
Marine pollutant.
What will be your action if there is visible leakage in
IMDG container after several days of loading
In a piece of paper he wrote UN number ask how to
load this cargo. And ask to explain what are the
risks involved and how they are marked
Refer to the supplementary of the code and fin out following
1. EMS Guide
2. Medical First Aid Guide
3. Reporting Procedures
What is subsidiary risk
If a DG has more than one risk it is said to have subsidiary risk. Details of this risk can be found by referring
to the column 4 of the DG list
What is “limited Quantity”
It is the maximum quantity permitted in an inner packing container when transporting IMDG without
applying to IMDG code. Only applied to the rules of 3.4 of the code
Intermediate bulk containers (IBCs) means rigid or flexible portable packagings, other than specified in
chapter 6.1 of IMDG Code (2004 Edition), that:
What is IBC in the IMDG code
?
1. have a capacity of:
?
A. not more than 3.0 m3 (3,000 litres) for solids and liquids of packing groups II and III;
B. not more than 1.5 m3 for solids of packing group I when packed in flexible, rigid plastics, composite,
fibreboard or ?wooden IBCs;
C. not more than 3.0 m3 for solids of packing group I when packed in metal IBCs;
D. not more than 3.0 m3 for radioactive material of class 7;
?
2. are designed for mechanical handling; and
?
3. are resistant to the stresses produced in handling and transport, as determined by tests.
What is the difference between main risk and
subsidiary risk
UN
Class
Dangerous Goods
Division(s)
Classification
1
Explosives
1.1 - 1.6
Explosive
2
Gases
2.1
Flammable gas
2.2
Non-flammable, non-toxic gas
2.3
Toxic gas
3
Flammable liquid
4
Flammable solids
Flammable liquid
4.1
Flammable solid
5
6
What are The objective of the International
Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code
Updating the IMDG Code
Oxidising substances
Toxic substances
4.2
Spontaneously combustible substance
4.3
Substance which in contact with water emits
flammable gas
5.1
Oxidising substance
5.2
Organic peroxide
6.1
Toxic substance
6.2
Infectious substance
7
Radioactive material
Radioactive material
8
Corrosive substances
Corrosive substance
9
Miscellaneous dangerous
goods
Miscellaneous dangerous goods
Enhance the safe transport of dangerous goods
Protect the marine environment
Facilitate the free unrestricted movement of dangerous goods
Each version of the Code is given an Amendment
number to signify how many times it has been updated. This number appears at the bottom of each page
together with the year of the Amendment.
The current Amendment is 33-06 which is valid until 31st December 2009.
However, from 1st January 2009 Amendment 34-08 can also be used because 2009 is a transition year
which allows the use of both Amendments in tandem.
For full details and a tour of Amendment 34-08 please see
Each Amendment is valid for
two years.
There are alternating years for
implementation.
In January of the yellow years,
a new Amendment is published
and can be used immediately,
subject to the timing of National
Competent Authority adoption.
During the yellow years, the
preceding Amendment can also
be used, so it is a transition year.
In the green years, only the
current Amendment may be
used.
When two labels are pasted referring to two risks
how you are going to identify which is major risk
Explain how to refer IMDG code
1. Go to DG list in the volume 2 with the given UN number
2. The DGL is presented across 2 pages of the IMDG Code and is divided into 18 columns for each
individual dangerous good listed.
Much of the information contained in the DGL is coded to make it easier to present in a table.
The DGL is arranged in UN Number order; column 1 and column 18 contains the UN Number.
To look up an entry, you just need the UN Number.
Dangerous goods can also be searched using the PSN.
Therefore, if you do not have the UN Number but have the
PSN, you can find its associated UN Number by looking at
the alphabetical index at the back of Volume 2.
Column 1 – UN Number
Contains the United Nations Number assigned by the United Nations Committee of Experts on the
Transport of Dangerous Goods (UN List).
Column 2 – Proper Shipping Name (PSN)
Contains the Proper Shipping Names in upper case characters which may have to be followed by additional
descriptive text in lower-case characters.
Column 3 – Class or Division
Contains the class and, in the case of class 1, the division and compatibility group.
Column 4 – Subsidiary Risk(s)
Contains the class number(s) of any subsidiary risk(s). This column also identifies a dangerous goods as a
marine pollutant or a severe marine pollutant as follows:
P
Marine pollutant
PP
Severe marine pollutant
●
Marine pollutant only when containing 10% or more
substance(s) identified with ‘P’ or 1% or
more substance(s)
identified with ‘PP’ in this column or in the Index.
Column 5 – Packing Group
Contains the packing group number (i.e. I, II or III) where assigned to the substance or article.
Column 6 – Special Provisions
Contains a number referring to any special provision(s) indicated in chapter 3.3.
Column 7 – Limited Quantities
Provides the maximum quantity per inner packaging.
Column 8 – Packing Instructions
Contains packing instructions for the transport of substances and articles.
Column 9 – Special Packing Provisions
Contains special packing provisions.
Column 10 – IBC Packing Instructions
Contains IBC instructions which indicate the type of IBC that can be used for the transport. A code
including the letters ‘IBC’ refers to packing instructions for the use of IBCs described in chapter 6.5.
Column 11 – IBC Special Provisions
Refers to special packing provisions applicable to the use of packing instructions bearing the code ‘IBC’ in
4.1.4.2.
Column 12 – IMO Tank Instructions
This column only applies to IMO portable tanks and road tank vehicles.
Column 13 – UN Tank and Bulk Container Instructions
Contains T codes (see 4.2.5.2.6) applicable to the transport of dangerous goods in portable tanks and road
tank vehicles.
Column 14 – Tank Special Provisions
Contains TP notes (see 4.2.5.3) applicable to the transport of dangerous goods in portable tanks and road
road tank vehicles. The TP notes specified in this column apply to the portable tanks specified in both
columns 12 and 13.
Column 15 – EmS
Refers to the relevant emergency schedules for FIRE and SPILLAGE in ‘The EmS Guide – Emergency
Response Procedures for Ships Carrying Dangerous Goods’.
Column 16 – Stowage and Segregation
Contains the stowage and segregation provisions as prescribed in part 7.
Column 17 – Properties and Observations
Contains properties and observations on the dangerous goods listed.
Column 18 – UN Number
Contains the United Nations Number assigned to a dangerous good by the United Nations Committee of
Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (UN List).
1. The hazard presented by each class is identified by an internationally accepted hazard warning
label (diamond). This appears on the outer packaging of the dangerous goods when they are being
transported as a warning to all those working within the transport chain or coming into contact
with them. These hazard warning labels are pictured inside the front cover of Volume 1 of the
IMDG Code.
2. Within each of the 9 hazard classes dangerous goods are uniquely identified by two pieces of
information:
A four-digit number known as the UN Number which is
preceded by the letters UN.
The corresponding Proper Shipping Name (PSN).
For example, kerosene is identified in the IMDG Code by its UN Number UN 1223 and the PSN Kerosene.
3.
Packing groups are used for the purpose of determining the degree of protective packaging required for
Dangerous Goods during transportation.
Group I: great danger, and most protective packaging required
Group II: medium danger
Group III: least danger among regulated goods, and least protective packaging within the transportation
requirements
What are the new amendments to the IMDG code
Summary of changes in Amendment 34-08
Amendment 34-08 becomes mandatory on 01 January 2010.
There are many detailed changes throughout the text of amendment 34, but for information the main
changes are:Additional items in the Dangerous Goods List
i) There are 12 new UN numbers going up to 3481, with explosives going up to 0508.
New UN numbers added in Amendment 34-08
0506 SIGNALS, DISTRESS, ship
0506 SIGNALS, DISTRESS, ship
0507 SIGNALS, SMOKE
0508 1-HYDROXYBENZOTRIAZOLE, ANHYDROUS
3474 1-HYDROXYBENZOTRIAZOLE, ANHYDROUS, WETTED with not less than 20% water, by
mass
3475 ETHANOL AND GASOLINE MIXTURE or ETHANOL AND MOTOR SPIRIT MIXTURE or
ETHANOL AND PETROL MIXTURE, with more than 10% ethanol
3476 FUEL CELL CARTRIDGES or FUEL CELL CARTRIDGES CONTAINED IN EQUIPMENT or FUEL
CELL CARTRIDGES PACKED WITH EQUIPMENT, containing water-reactive substances
3477 FUEL CELL CARTRIDGES or FUEL CELL CARTRIDGES CONTAINED IN EQUIPMENT or FUEL
CELL CARTRIDGES PACKED WITH EQUIPMENT, containing corrosive substances
3478 FUEL CELL CARTRIDGES or FUEL CELL CARTRIDGES CONTAINED IN EQUIPMENT or FUEL
CELL CARTRIDGES PACKED WITH EQUIPMENT, containing liquefied flammable gas
3479 FUEL CELL CARTRIDGES or FUEL CELL CARTRIDGES CONTAINED IN EQUIPMENT or FUEL
CELL CARTRIDGES PACKED WITH EQUIPMENT, containing hydrogen in metal hydride
3480 LITHIUM ION BATTERIES
3481 LITHIUM ION BATTERIES CONTAINED IN EQUIPMENT or LITHIUM ION BATTERIES PACKED
WITH EQUIPMENT
ii) There are also 5 UN numbers which were previously not listed in the IMDG Code because they were not
regulated under it, but are now shown with the observation "Not subject to the provisions of this Code but
may be subject to provisions governing the transport of dangerous goods by other modes.". This could be
useful when a shipment needs to be labelled as hazardous at some other stage of its journey.
UN Numbers not previously listed in IMDG but have been included in Amendment 34-08
1910 CALCIUM OXIDE
2807 MAGNETIZED MATERIAL
2812 SODIUM ALUMINATE, SOLID
3166 ENGINE, INTERNAL COMBUSTION or VEHICLE, FLAMMABLE GAS POWERED or VEHICLE,
FLAMMABLE LIQUID POWERED
3171 BATTERY-POWERED VEHICLE or BATTERY-POWERED EQUIPMENT
Training
Appropriate training for shore-side staff involved with dangerous goods is now mandatory instead of just
recommended, and may be audited by the competent authority. Persons not yet trained may only operate
under the direct supervision of a trained person. See 1.3.1.1. IMDG Code e-learning is a new training tool
for shore-side staff involved in Dangerous Goods handling and transport. It is designed to support costeffective compliance for all shore-side sectors.
Marine pollutant
The concept of a severe marine pollutant PP is deleted; they are just designated as P. The marine pollutant
'bullet' symbol is also deleted, but a shipper will still need to declare any consignment as being a marine
pollutant if it meets the criteria. There is a new section 2.9.3 describing these, and chapter 2.10 is
rewritten. The new marine pollutant label is a dead tree and dead fish.
IMO tank instructions
The IMO tank instruction column disappears from the Dangerous Goods List because the transitional
provisions on their use will have expired by the time this amendment becomes mandatory on 1/1/2010.
Excepted quantities
There is a new column 7b in the Dangerous Goods List for excepted quantities. These are small amounts,
up to 30g or 30ml per inner package, 1kg per outer package. These are subject only to the rules of the new
chapter 3.5, part 2 (classification) and some sections of 4.1 (packing) and 5.4 (documentation). They will be
labelled with an 'excepted quantity' label and the class number. The dangerous goods form shall state the
words "dangerous goods in excepted quantities" together with the description of the shipment. An entry
E0 in column 7b indicates that a substance may not be transported in excepted quantities. Codes E1 to E5
indicate different quantity limits according to a table in chapter 3.5. The total number of excepted quantity
packages in a CTU shall not exceed 1000.
Limited quantities
For a substance not permitted in limited quantities, the column 7a entry "None" becomes "0".
Radioactive materials of class 7
For class 7 radioactives, chapter 2.7 is completely rewritten, and there is a new chapter 1.5, 'general
provisions concerning class 7'.
Aerosols or aerosol dispensers means non-refillable receptacles meeting the provisions of 6.2.2 of IMDG
Code (2004 Edition), made of metal, glass or plastics and containing a gas compressed, liquefied or
dissolved under pressure, with or without a liquid, paste or powder, and fitted with a release device
allowing the contents to be ejected as solid or liquid particles in suspension in a gas, as a foam, paste or
powder or in a gaseous state.
?
Bags means flexible packagings made of paper, plastic film, textiles, woven material, or other suitable
materials.
?
Barge-carrying ship means a ship specially designed and equipped to transport shipborne barges.
?
Barge feeder vessel means a vessel specially designed and equipped to transport shipborne barges to or
from a barge-carrying ship.
?
Boxes means packagings with complete rectangular or polygonal faces made of metal, wood, plywood,
reconstituted wood, fibreboard, plastics, or other suitable material. Small holes for purposes such as ease
of the handling or opening of the box or to meet classification provisions are permitted as long as they do
not compromise the integrity of the packaging during transport.
?
Bulk packagings means cargo transport units loaded with solid dangerous goods without any intermediate
form of containment.
?
Cargo transport unit means a road freight vehicle, a railway freight wagon, a freight container, a road tank
vehicle, a railway tank wagon or a portable tank.
?
Carrier means any person, organization or Government undertaking the transport of dangerous goods by
any means of transport. The term includes both carriers for hire or reward (known as common or contract
carriers in some countries) and carriers on own account (known as private carriers in some countries).
?
Cellular ship means a ship in which containers are loaded under desk into specially designed slots giving a
permanent stowage of the container during sea transport. Containers loaded on deck in such a ship are
specially stacked and secured on fittings.
?
Closed cargo transport unit, with the exception of class 1, means a unit which totally encloses the contents
by permanent structures. Cargo transport units with fabric sides or tops are not closed cargo transport
units; for definition of class 1 cargo transport unit see 7.1.7.1.1 of IMDG Code (2004 Edition).
?
Closed ro-ro cargo space means a ro-ro cargo space which is neither an open ro-ro cargo space nor a
weather deck.
?
Closure means a device which closes an opening in a receptacle.
?
Combination packagings means a combination of packagings for transport purposes, consisting of one or
more inner packagings secured in an outer packaging in accordance with 4.1.1.5 of IMDG Code (2004
Edition).
?
Competent authority means any national regulatory body or authority designated or otherwise recognized
as such for any purpose in connection with IMDG Code (2004 Edition).
?
Compliance assurance means a systematic programme of measures applied by a competent authority
which is aimed at ensuring that the provisions of IMDG Code (2004 Edition) concerning the transport of
radioactive material are met in practice; see paragraph 1.1.3.3.2 of IMDG Code (2004 Edition).
?
Composite packagings means packagings consisting of an outer packaging and an inner receptacle so
constructed that the inner receptacle and the outer packaging form an integral packaging. Once
assembled, it remains thereafter an integrated single unit; it is filled, stored, transported and emptied as
such.
?
Consignee means any person, organization or Government which is entitled to take delivery of a
consignment.
?
Consignment means any package or packages, or load of dangerous goods, presented by a consignor for
transport.
?
Consignor means any person, organization or Government which prepares a consignment for transport.
?
Control temperature means the maximum temperature at which certain substances (such as organic
peroxides and self-reactive and related substances) can be safely transported during a prolonged period of
time.
?
Conveyance means:
?
1. for transport by road or rail: any vehicle,
?
2. for transport by water: any ship, or any cargo space or defined deck area of a ship,
?
3. for transport by air: any aircraft.
?
Crates are outer packagings with incompletes surfaces.
?
Defined deck area means the area, or the weather deck of a ship, or of a vehicle deck of a roll-on/roll-off
ship, which is allocated for the stowage of dangerous goods.
?
Drums means flat-ended or convex-ended cylindrical packagings made of metal, fibreboard, plastics,
plywood or other suitable materials. This definition also includes packagings of other shapes, such as round
taper-necked packagings, or pail-shaped packagings. Wooden barrels and jerricans are not covered by this
definition.
?
Emergency temperature means the temperature at which emergency procedures should be implemented.
?
Flashpoint means the lowest temperature of a liquid at which its vapour forms an ignitable mixture with
air.
?
Freight container means an article of transport equipment that is of a permanent character and
accordingly strong enough to be suitable for repeated use; specially designed to facilitate the transport of
goods, by one or more modes of transport, without intermediate reloading; designed to be secured and/or
readily handled, having fittings for these purposes, and approved in accordance with the International
Convention for Safe Containers (CSC), 1972, as amended. The term “freight container” includes neither
vehicle nor packaging. However, a freight container that is carried on a chassis is included. For freight
containers for radioactive material, see 2.7.2 of IMDG Code (2004 Edition).
?
IMO type 4 tank means a road tank vehicle for the transport of dangerous goods of classes 3 to 9 and
includes a semi-trailer with a permanently attached tank or a tank attached to a chassis, with at least four
twist locks that account of ISO standards, (i.e. ISO International Standard 1161:1984).
?
IMO type 6 tank means a road tank vehicle for the transport of non-refrigerated liquefied gases of class 2
and includes a semi-trailer with a permanently attached tank or a tank attached to a chassis which is fitted
with items of service equipment and structural equipment necessary for the transport of gases.
?
IMO type 8 tank means a road tank vehicle for the transport of refrigerated liquefied gases of class 2 and
includes a semi-trailer with a permanently attached thermally insulated tank fitted with items of service
equipment and structural equipment necessary for the transport of refrigerated liquefied gases.
?
Inner packagings means packagings for which an outer packaging is required for transport.
?
Inner receptacles means receptacles which require an outer packaging in order to perform their
containment function.
?
Intermediate bulk containers (IBCs) means rigid or flexible portable packagings, other than specified in
chapter 6.1 of IMDG Code (2004 Edition), that:
?
1. have a capacity of:
?
A. not more than 3.0 m3 (3,000 litres) for solids and liquids of packing groups II and III;
B. not more than 1.5 m3 for solids of packing group I when packed in flexible, rigid plastics, composite,
fibreboard or
??wooden IBCs;
C. not more than 3.0 m3 for solids of packing group I when packed in metal IBCs;
D. not more than 3.0 m3 for radioactive material of class 7;
?
2. are designed for mechanical handling; and
?
3. are resistant to the stresses produced in handling and transport, as determined by tests.
?
Intermediate packagings means packagings placed between inner packagings, or articles, and an outer
packaging.
?
Jerricans means metal or plastics packagings of rectangular of polygonal cross-section.
?
Large packagings means packagings consisting of an outer packaging which contains articles of inner
packagings and which:
?
1. are designed for mechanical handling; and
?
2. exceed 400 kg net mass or 450l capacity but have a volume of not more than 3 m3.
?
Liner means a separate tube or bag inserted into a packaging (including IBCs and large packagings), but not
forming an integral part of it, including the closures of its openings.
?
Liquids means, unless there is an explicit or implicit indication to the contrary, dangerous goods with a
melting point or initial melting point of 20 ℃ or lower at a pressure of 101.3 kPa. A viscous
substance for which a specific melting point cannot be determined should be subjected to the
ASTM D 4359-90 test, or to the test for determining fluidity (penetrometer test) prescribed in
Appendix A.3 of Annex A of the European Agreement concerning the International Transport of Dangerous
Goods by Road (ADR) with the modifications that the penetrometer should conform to ISO 2137:1985 and
that the test should be used for viscous substances of any class.
?
Long international voyage means an international voyage that is not a short international voyage.
?
Manual of Tests and Criteria means the United Nations publication entitled “Recommendations of the
Transport of Dangerous Goods, Manual of Tests and Criteria” as amended.
?
Maximum capacity as used in 6.1.4 of IMDG Code (2004 Edition) means the maximum inner volume of
receptacles or packagings expressed in litres.
?
Maximum net mass as used in 6.1.4 of IMDG Code (2004 Edition) means the maximum net mass of
contents in a single packaging or maximum combined mass of inner packagings and the contents thereof
and is expressed in kilograms.
?
Open cargo transport unit means a unit which is not a closed cargo transport unit.
?
Open ro-ro cargo space means a ro-ro cargo space either opens at both ends, or opens at one end and
provided with adequate natural ventilation effective over its entire length through permanent openings in
the side plating or deckhead to the satisfaction of the Administration.
?
Outer packaging means the outer protection of a composite or combination packaging together with any
absorbent materials, cushioning and any other components necessary to contain and protect inner
receptacles or inner packagings.
?
Overpack means an enclosure used by a single consignor to contain one or more packagings and to form
one unit for the convenience of handling and stowage during transport. Examples of overpacks are a
number of packages either:
?
1. placed or stacked on to a load board, such as a pallet, and secured by strapping, shring-wrapping,
stretch-wrapping,
??or other suitable means; or
?
2. placed in a protective outer packaging, such as a box or crate.
?
Overstowed means that a package or container is directly stowed on top of another.
?
Packages means the complete product of the packing operation, consisting of the packaging and its
contents prepared for transport. For packages for radioactive material, see 2.7.2 of IMDG Code (2004
Edition).
?
Packaging means receptacles and any other components or materials necessary for the receptacle to
perform its containment function. For packagings for radioactive material, see 2.7.2 of IMDG Code (2004
Edition).
?
Quality assurance means a systematic programme of controls and inspections applied by any organization
or body which is aimed at providing adequate confidence that the standard of safety prescribed in IMDG
Code (2004 Edition) is achieved in practice. For radioactive material, see 1.1.3.3.1 of IMDG Code (2004
Edition).
?
Reconditioned packagings include:
?
1. metal drums that:
?
A. are cleaned to original materials of construction, with all former contents, internal and external
corrosion, and external
??coatings and labels removed;
B. are restored to original shape and contour, with chimes (if any) straightened and sealed, and all nonintegral gaskets
??replaced; and
C. are inspected after cleaning but before painting, with rejection of packagings with visible pitting,
significant reduction in
??material thickness, metal fatigue, damaged threads or closures, or other significant defects;
?
2. plastic drums and jerricans that:
?
A. are cleaned to original materials of construction, with all former contents, external coatings and labels
removed;
B. have all non-integral gaskets replaced; and
C. are inspected after cleaning, with rejection of packagings with visible damage such as tears, creases or
cracks, or
??damaged threads or closures, or other significant defects.
?
Recycled plastics material means material recovered from used industrial packagings that has been
cleaned and prepared for processing into new packagings. The specific properties of the recycled material
used for production of new packagings should be assured and documented regularly as part of a quality
assurance programme recognized by the competent authority. The quality assurance programme should
include a record of proper pre-sorting and verification that each batch of recycled plastics material has the
proper melt flow rate, density, and tensile yield strength, consistent with that of the design type
manufactured from such recycled material. This necessarily includes knowledge about the packaging
material from which the recycled plastics have been derived, as well as awareness of the prior contents of
those packagings if those prior contents might reduce the capability of new packagings produced using
that material. In addition, the packaging manufacturer's quality assurance programme under 6.1.1.4 of
IMDG Code (2004 Edition) should include performance of the mechanical design type test in 6.1.5 of IMDG
Code (2004 Edition) on packagings manufactured from each batch of recycled plastics material. In this
testing, stacking performance may be verified by appropriate dynamic compression testing rather than
static load testing.
?
Remanufactured packagings include:
?
1. metal drums:
?
A. are produced as a UN type from a non-UN type;
B. are converted from one UN type to another UN type; or
C. undergo the replacement of integral structural components (such as non-removable heads); or
?
2. plastic drums that:
?
A. are converted form one UN type to another UN type (such as 1H1 to1H2); or
B. undergo the replacement or integral structural components.
?
Remanufactured drums are subject to the same provisions of IMDG Code (2004 Edition) that apply to a
new drum of the same type.
?
Re-used packagings means packagings to be refilled which have been examined and found free of defects
affecting the ability to withstand the performance tests; the term includes those which are refilled with the
same or similar compatible contents and are transported within distribution chains controlled by the
consignor of the product.
?
Road tank vehicle means a vehicle equipped with a tank with a capacity of more than 450 litres, fitted with
pressure-relief devices. The tank of a road tank vehicle is attached to the vehicle during normal operations
of filling, discharge and transport and is neither filled nor discharged on board. A road tank vehicle is driven
on board on its own wheels and is fitted with permanent tie-down attachments for securement on board
the ship. Road tank vehicles should comply with the provisions of chapter 6.8 of IMDG Code (2004 Edition).
?
Ro-ro cargo space means spaces not normally subdivided in any way and extending to either a substantial
length or the entire length of the ship in which goods (packaged or in bulk, in or on rail or road cars,
vehicles (including road or rail tankers), trailers, containers, pallets, demountable tanks or in or on similar
stowage units or other receptacles) can be loaded and unloaded normally in a horizontal direction.
?
Ro-ro ship (roll-on/roll-off ship) means a ship which has one or more decks, either closed or open, not
normally subdivided in any way and generally running the entire length of the ship, carrying goods which
are normally loaded and unloaded in a horizontal direction.
?
Salvage packagings means special packagings conforming to the applicable provisions of IMDG Code (2004
Edition) into which damaged, defective or leaking dangerous goods packages, or dangerous goods that
have spilled or leaked are placed, for the purposes of transport, recovery or disposal.
?
Self-accelerating decomposition temperature (SADT) means the lowest temperature at which selfaccelerating decomposition may occur for a substance in the packaging as used in transport. The selfaccelerating decomposition temperature (SADT) should be determined in accordance with the latest
version of the United Nations Manual of Tests and Criteria.
?
Shipborne barge or barge means an independent, non-self propelled vessel, specially designed and
equipped to be lifted in a loaded condition and stowed aboard a barge-carrying ship or barge feeder vessel.
?
Shipment means the specific movement of a consignment from origin to destination.
?
Shipper, for the purpose of IMDG Code (2004 Edition), has the same meaning as consignor.
?
Short international voyage means an international voyage in the course of which a ship is not more than
200 miles from a port or place in which the passengers and crew could be placed in safety. Neither the
distance between the last port of call in the country in which the voyage begins and final port of
destination nor the return voyage should exceed 600 miles. The final port of destination is the last port of
call in the scheduled voyage at which the ship commences its return voyage to the country in which the
voyage began.
?
Sift-proof packagings are packagings impermeable to dry contents, including fine solid material produced
during transport.
?
Solid bulk cargo means any material, other than liquid or gas, consisting of a combination of particles,
granules or any lager pieces of material, generally uniform in composition, which is loaded directly into the
cargo spaces of a ship without any intermediate form of containment (this includes a material loaded in a
barge o a barge-carrying ship).
?
Solids are dangerous goods, other than gases, that do not meet the definition of liquids in IMDG Code
(2004 Edition).
?
Special category space means an enclosed space, above or below deck, intended for the transport of
motor vehicles with fuel in their tanks of their own propulsion, into and from which such vehicles can be
driven and to which passengers have access.
?
Tank means a portable tank (including a tank-container), a road tank vehicle, a rail tank wagon or a
receptacle with a capacity of not less than 450 litres to contain solids, liquids, or liquefied gases.
?
Transboundary movement of wastes means any shipment of wastes from an area under the national
jurisdiction of one country to or through an area under the national jurisdiction of any country, or to or
through an area not under the national jurisdiction of any country, provided at least two countries are
concerned by the movement.
?
Unit load means that a number of packages are either:
?
1. placed or stacked on and secured by strapping, shrink-wrapping, or other suitable means to a load
board, such as a
??pallet;
?
2. placed in a protective outer enclosure, such as a pallet box;
?
3. Permanently secured together in a sling.
?
Vehicle means a road vehicle (including an articulated vehicle, i.e. a tractor and semi-trailer combination)
or railroad car or railway wagon. Each trailer should be considered as separate vehicle.
?
Wastes means substances, solutions, mixtures, or articles containing or contaminated with one or more
constituents which are subject to the provisions of IMDG Code (2004 Edition) and for which no direct use is
envisaged but which are transported for dumping, incineration, or other methods of disposal.
?
Water-reactive means a substance which, in contact with water, emits flammable gas.
?
Weather deck means a deck which is completely exposed to the weather from above and from at least two
sides.
?
Wooden barrels means packagings made of natural wood, of round cross-section, having convex walls,
consisting of stave and heads and fitted with hoops.

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