course outline - Department of Peace and Conflict

Comments

Transcription

course outline - Department of Peace and Conflict
PACS 407: War Studies 1
PACS 407: War Studies
2nd Batch, 2nd Semester, Session 2013-2014
Department of Peace and Conflict Studies
University of Dhaka
Course Duration: January –June
Course Teacher: Ziaul Haque
E-mail: [email protected]
Contact No: 01710955365 (Official Hours)
Class Schedule: Tuesday 10a.m-11 a.m., Thursday 11a.m.-12 p.m. (Room No. 5002)
Course Objectives:
War Studies comparatively is a recent development though its origin dates back to the history of
mankind. The course undertakes meaningful discussion about the origin of war from diverse
points of view. It adopts an interdisciplinary approach to understand the causes and conduct of
war employing element from history, philosophy and literature. It orients students to the modern
nature of warfare and its global implications. It presents students with lifelong learning about the
role of warfare in the rise and fall of civilization. Adopting no common template, it brings in
fruition many cutting-edge issues of modern warfare aiming at developing student’s critical
understanding of many phenomena which impact life from micro to macro level. Assuming that
War Studies is not synonymous with military history, this particular course has been tailored to
reasonably fit in the larger domain of peace studies.
Major Textbooks:
Quincy Wright, The Study of War, abridged by Louise Leonard Wright, Chicago: the University
of Chicago Press, 1964.
John A. Vasquez, (ed.), What Do We Know About War? Maryland: Rowman and Littlefield
Publishers Inc, 2012
Sinisa Malesevic, The Sociology of War and Violence, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,
2010
Lawrence Freedman (ed.), War, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 1994
Yoram Dinstein, War, Aggression and Self-Defense, Cambridge University Press,
edition), 2001
(Third
PACS 407: War Studies 2
Richard K. Betts, (ed.), Conflict After the Cold War: Arguments on Causes of War and Peace,
updated 2nd edition, New York: Longman, 2005
Carl Von Clausewitz, On War, edited and translated by Michael Howard and Peter Paret,
Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1976
Sun Tzu, The Art of Warfare, translated by Roger T. Ames, New York: Ballantine, 1993
Bramson Leon and George Goethals, (eds.), War: Studies from Psychology, Sociology and
Anthropology, New York: Basic Books, 1964
Paul F. Diehl and Gary Goertz, War and Peace in International Rivalry, Ann Arbor: University
of Michigan Press, 2000
David W. Ziegler, War, Peace, and International Politics, Longman Publishing Group, 2009
Morton Herbert Fried, Marvin Harris, Robert Francis Murphy, (eds.) War: The Anthropology of
Armed Conflict and Aggression, US: American Museum of Natural History, 1967
Course Requirements:
Mid-term Exam
As per academic guideline of the faculty a mid-term exam is scheduled for this course. Course
Coordinator of the respective batch will fix the date of the exam and will bring it to your notice.
Exam questions will be drawn from major texts usually from the course readings provided with
each lectures. As prescribed by the semester guideline to get out of conventionality and to
promote students’ creative thinking, question format could be a blend mix of both short and long
questions. However, this pattern of questions will be confirmed in consultation with the class.
After the exam declared, the course teacher will select key articles or book chapters which
students will collect from available sources or repository at their own. Sometimes, content
covered on the exam may not exactly match what is projected on the syllabus. Students will have
one week reading time to prepare for the exam. More information on the exam requirements will
be provided in class. The exam is worth 20% of the total grade. Bring a pen, laptop, mobile
device, notes and aids are not allowed in the exam hall.
Research Paper/Assignment/Practicum
A final paper/assignment is due at the end of the semester, during the final week (exact date
TBA). The topic of the paper must be drawn from the course readings and lectures and must be
germane to the focus of the course. Submitted assignment/research paper must be typed ranging
approximately 2500-3000 words (excluding references), 1.5 spaced, and 12 -point Times New
Roman. Paper must be typed within a page layout uniform in each edge (prescribed 1” margin)
with a portrait view. Do not fudge the measurements. The paper should be properly formatted
using the Chicago style manual. All academic rules of writing a paper apply. More information
on the paper writing will be provided in class. The paper is worth 10% of the total grade. Be
stylistic and concise in selecting research problem with clear outline of your research questions
and contribution–do not just pick a line. Staple your essay in the upper left-hand corner. Don’t
PACS 407: War Studies 3
bind. It is unnecessary. Brief and concise response is encouraged, but matches your response
according to the worth of the response value. Your paper will be graded for the structure and
quality of the content: clarity of the research questions, logical consistency, ability to synthesize
material and relevance of analysis.
Student Group Presentations
The class will be divided to six to eight groups. Each group will demonstrate within the
scheduled presentation weeks. Groups will prepare power point and handout and will be required
to mail a soft copy to their course teacher prior to their demonstration in the class. Pass out
summaries of your presentations within an agreed time period. A dress code will apply for the
presentation (official dress with tie, no flashy dress and shorts, clean shaved and good look). The
presentation topic will be drawn from the course readings subject to the approval of the course
teacher. In their presentations, groups must demonstrate their command on the assigned material
and will lead the ensued discussion. This exercise is worth 5% of the total grade.
Class Participation/Attendance
Students are expected to come with preparation for the class and make significant contribution in
class discussion. Class participation is crucial to the success of this course. Your questions,
comments, and analysis are a vital part of the learning experience. This course will combine
lectures with seminar style discussions, in which the instructor guides the class’s discussion of
the readings. You are expected to read the assigned articles/chapters of the week and critically
think/evaluate/frame your logic and engage emphatically in the class. Quality of your
contribution will matter to rate your performance in the class. We will also set aside some time to
talk about cutting edge issues. Class participation/attendance is worth 5% percent. If it becomes
clear that students are not doing the assigned reading, and are not prepared for class discussion,
then the instructor will have to institute pop quizzes. These pop quizzes will count toward your
participation grade. Please help the instructor avoid having to resort to punitive measures to
encourage class discussion.
Grading
Midterm Exam =20%, Assignment/Practicum = 10%, Class Test=10%, Student group
presentations=5%, Class Participation and Attendance = 5%. Final Examinations = 50%.
The grading scale is:
80 and above
70 to less then 75
65 to less then 70
60 to less then 65
55 to less then 60
50 to less then 55
45 to less then 55
40 to less then 45
Below 40
………
A+
A
AB+
B
BC
D
F
I
(4.00)
(3.75)
(3.50)
(3.25)
(3.00)
(2.75)
(2.50)
(2.25)
(0.00)
Incomplete
PACS 407: War Studies 4
Course Outline:
This is a projected outline of the readings throughout the semester, though the instructor may
alter it as needed.
Week-1
Lecture-1: Definition and Concepts of War
Reading List:
1. Quincy Wright, ‘Concepts of War,’ The Study of War, (Chapter 1) abridged by Louise
Leonard Wright, Chicago: the University of Chicago Press, 1964. pp.3-19.
2. Yoram Dinstein, ‘What is War?,’ War, Aggression and Self-Defense, Cambridge
University Press, (Third edition), 2001, pp.1-13.
3. Lawrence Freedman (ed.), War, (Part B), Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 1994,
p.69.
Lecture-2: Origin and History of Warfare
Reading List:
1. Quincy Wright, The Study of War, (Chapter 2) abridged by Louise Leonard Wright,
Chicago: the University of Chicago Press, 1964. pp.20-42.
2. Raymond Aron, ‘Biological and Psychological Roots’, in Lawrence Freedman (ed.), War,
(Part B), Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 1994, p.77.
3. Sinisa Malesevic, ‘The Contemporary Sociology of Organized Violence,’ The Sociology
of War and Violence, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010, pp.50-63.
Week-2
Lecture-3: Theories about the Origin of War
Reading List:
1. Doyne Dawson, The Origins of War: Biological and Anthropological Theories, History
and Theory, Vol. 35, No. 1 (Feb., 1996), Blackwell Publishing, Wesleyan University, pp.
1-28.
2. Martin Van Creveld, ‘Why Man Fight,’ Lawrence Freedman (ed.), War, (Part B), Oxford
University Press, Oxford, UK, 1994, p.85.
PACS 407: War Studies 5
Week 3:
Lecture-4: Approaches to War (Non-Marxist)
Reading List:
1. Julian Lidar, ‘The Non-Marxist Analysis of War’ (part 1), On the Nature of War, Gower
Publishing Limited, England, pp. 6-26.
Lecture-5: General Theory of Hegemonic War
Reading List:
1. Jack S. Levy, Theories of General War, World Politics, Vol. 37, No. 3 (Apr. 1985),
Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, pp. 344-374.
2. Robert Gilpin, ‘Hegemonic War and International Change,’ in Lawrence Freedman
(ed.), War, (Part B), Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 1994, p.94.
Week-4
Lecture-6: Causes of War: Territory and Geography
Reading List:
1. Paul R. Hensel, ‘Territory: Theory and Evidence on Geography and Conflict,’ in John A.
Vasquez, (ed.), What Do We Know About War? Maryland: Rowman and Littlefield
Publishers Inc, 2012, pp.57-72.
Lecture-7: The Political System and War
Reading List:
1. Robert Hinde and Joseph Rotblat, ‘The Political System and its Leaders,’ War No More,
Viva Books Private Limited, New Delhi, 2007, pp.52-61.
Week-5:
Lecture-8: Alliances and War
Reading List:
1. Douglas M. Gibler, ‘Alliances: Why Some Cause War and Why Other Cause Peace,’ in
John A. Vasquez, (ed.), What Do We Know About War? Maryland: Rowman and
Littlefield Publishers Inc, 2012, pp.145-164.
PACS 407: War Studies 6
Lecture-9: Arms Building and War
Reading List:
1. Susan G. Sample, ‘Military Buildups: Arming and War,’ in John A. Vasquez, (ed.), What
Do We Know About War? Maryland: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers Inc, 2012,
pp.165-190.
Week-6
Lecture-10: Nationalism and War
Reading List:
1. Sinisa Malesevic, ‘Nationalism and War,’ The Sociology of War and Violence,
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010, pp.179-99.
2. Quincy Wright, ‘Nationalism and War,’ The Study of War, (Chapter 2) abridged by
Louise Leonard Wright, Chicago: the University of Chicago Press, 1964. pp.212-219.
Lecture-11: Cultural Tradition and War
Reading List:
1. Robert Hinde and Joseph Rotblat, ‘Culture and Tradition ,’ War No More, Viva re Private
Limited, New Delhi, 2007, pp.68-80.
2. Quincy Wright, ‘Human Nature and War,’ The Study of War, (Chapter 2) abridged by
Louise Leonard Wright, Chicago: the University of Chicago Press, 1964. pp.319-25.
Week-7
Lecture-12: Material Capability, Power and War
Reading List:
1. Daniel S. Geller, ‘Material Capabilities: Power and International Conflict,’ in John A.
Vasquez, (ed.), What Do We Know About War? Maryland: Rowman and Littlefield
Publishers Inc, 2012, pp.-259-280.
Lecture-13: Public Opinion and War
Reading List:
1. Quincy Wright, ‘Public Opinion and War,’ The Study of War, (Chapter 2) abridged by
Louise Leonard Wright, Chicago: the University of Chicago Press, 1964. pp.257-75.
PACS 407: War Studies 7
Week-8
Lecture-14: International Rivalry and War
Reading List:
1.
Frank Whelon Wayman, ‘Rivalries: Recurrent Disputes and Explaining War,’ in John A.
Vasquez, (ed.), What Do We Know About War? Maryland: Rowman and Littlefield
Publishers Inc, 2012, pp.219-234.
Lecture-15: Structural Factors of War
Reading List:
1. Seyom Brown, ‘Structural Factors,’ Lawrence Freedman (ed.), War, (Part B), Oxford
University Press, Oxford, UK, 1994, p.99-104.
Week-9
Lecture-16: Ideology and War: Conservative Ideology
Reading List:
1. Keith L. Nelson and Spencer C. Olin. Jr., ‘Conservative Ideology and Theory about the
Causes of War,’ Why War?: Ideology, Theory and History, University of California
Press, Berkeley, USA, 1979, p.8-28..
Lecture-17: Liberal Ideology and War
Reading List:
1. Keith L. Nelson and Spencer C. Olin. Jr., ‘Liberal Ideology and Theory about the Causes
of War,’ Why War?: Ideology, Theory and History, University of California Press,
Berkeley, USA, 1979, p.34-59.
Week-10
Lecture-18: Class Conflict Theory and Radical Ideology
Reading List:
1. Keith L. Nelson and Spencer C. Olin. Jr., ‘Radical Ideology and Theory about the Causes
of War,’ Why War?: Ideology, Theory and History, University of California Press,
Berkeley, USA, 1979, p.59-90.
PACS 407: War Studies 8
2. Vladimir Lenin, Socialism and War, Seyom Brown, ‘Structural Factors,’ Lawrence
Freedman (ed.), War, (Part B), Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 1994, p.95.
Lecture-19: Just War and the Legality of War
Reading List:
4. Yoram Dinstein, ‘The Illegality of War?’ War, Aggression and Self-Defense, Cambridge
University Press, (Third edition), 2001, pp.59-75.
Week-11
Lecture-20: Criminality of War Aggression
Reading List:
1. Yoram Dinstein, ‘The Criminality of War Aggression,’ War, Aggression and SelfDefense, Cambridge University Press, (Third edition), 2001, pp.106-132.
Lecture-21: The Right to Self-Defence
Reading List:
1. Yoram Dinstein, ‘The Concept of Self-Defence,’ War, Aggression and Self-Defense,
Cambridge University Press, (Third edition), 2001, pp.159-181.
Week-12
Lecture-22: War Propaganda
Reading List:
3. Sinisa Malesevic, ‘War Propaganda and Solidarity,’ The Sociology of War and Violence,
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010, pp.202-27.
Lecture-23: The Ethics of War
Reading List:
1. John Yoder, ‘The Pacifism of Absolute Principles’, Lawrence Freedman (ed.), War, (Part
D), Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 1994, p.156.
2. Hans Morgenthau, ‘ Six Principles of Political Realism’ in Lawrence Freedman (ed.),
War, (Part D), Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 1994, p.159.
3. Barrie Paskins, ‘The Responsibility of Defense Scientists’, Lawrence Freedman (ed.),
War, (Part B), Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 1994, p.177.
PACS 407: War Studies 9
Week-13
Lecture-24: US-China Relations (Liberal and Realist Optimists)
Reading List:
1. Aarong L Friedberg, ‘The Future of US –China Relations: Is Conflict Inevitable’
International Security, Vol. 30, No. 2 (Fall 2005), pp.7-16; 24-29
Lecture-25: US-China Relations (Liberal and Realist Pessimists)
Reading List:
1. Aarong L Friedberg, ‘The Future of US –China Relations: Is Conflict Inevitable’
International Security, Vol. 30, No. 2 (Fall 2005), pp.16-24; 29-34.
Week-14
Presentation 1: Group Presentation A, B, C, D,
Presentation 2: Group Presentation E, F, G, H,
Week-15:
Lecture-26: Israel and US Foreign Policy
Reading List:
1. John J Mearsheimer and Stephen M Walt, ‘The Israel Lobby and US Foreign Policy’
Middle East Policy, Vol. XIII, No. 3, (Fall 2006), pp.30-40.
Lecture-27: Israel and US Foreign Policy (Israel Lobby)
Reading List:
1. John J Mearsheimer and Stephen M Walt, ‘The Israel Lobby and US Foreign Policy’
Middle East Policy, Vol. XIII, No. 3, (Fall 2006), pp.40-60.
Week-16:
Lecture-28: The Politics of Lying
Reading List:
1. Douglas Kellner, ‘Bushspeak and the Politics of Lying: Presidential Rhetoric in the "War
on Terror’, Presidential Studies Quarterly, Vol. 37, No. 4, Shadows of Democracy in
PresidentialRhetoric (Dec., 2007), pp. 622-645

Similar documents