4`:``, CANADA JUNE, 1941,

Comments

Transcription

4`:``, CANADA JUNE, 1941,
ir
•
•'"
4':'',
'ie Hon.1 James A. MacKINNON,, M.P.,
lrade and Commerce.
CANADA
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND COMMERCE
DOMINION BUREAU OF STATiSTICS
N
e
4
11
THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION
Al the Biginning of
JUNE, 1941,
TOGETHER WITH PAYROLLS
For the Last Week in May
(As reported by employers having 15 or more employees)
Note:- Statements relating to unemployment as reported by
trade unions, and to the operations of the Employment Service of Canada, together with the statistics
of the present Bulletin, are published in the Labour
Gazette, the official journal of the Department of
Labour, Canada.
I
/
OT' FA\VA•• ••.
'August 18, 11 94 11
Price $1 a year
.f
4
1
1
DEPARTi1ENT TRADE AD COMERCE
D0ILEON LHEAU OF STATISTICS
GENERAL STATISTICS BRANCH
OTTAWA - CANADA
THE JUNE E?PLOYfENT SITUATION.
Dominion Statistician: R. H. Coats, LL.D., F.R.S.C., F.S.S.(Hon.)
In Charge Erriployment Statistics: M. E.C. Roughsedge.
GENERAL SUMfiARY Emp1pnt.
For the fifth consecutive month, the trend of employment in Canada was
upward at June 1. The incree in the reported staffs ) though seasonal in
character, was decidedly above the average for that date in the years since 1320,
being, in fact, the largest advance recorded in any month in this period of over
twenty years0 Returns were received by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics fron.
12,555 establishments whose employees aggregated 1,58,334 at the beginning of June,
as compared with 1,451,322 at May 1. This gain of over 77,500 workers, or 5.3 p.c.,
reflected the establishment of a new a.1—time high in industrial activity in the
Dominion
Ordinarily, the expansion between May 1 and June 1 is greater than that
between any other two consecutive months in the year. The general movement usually
continues favourable until the autumn, but the improvement shown in succeeding
months in the last twenty years has almost invariably been loss extensive than at
the beginning of June.
Based on the 1326 average as 100, the index of employment stood at 13.0
at June 1, 1941, compared with 145.5 in the preceding month, and 120.9 at June 1,
1940; the previous high figure for June 1 had been 122.2 in 1929. The seasonally
corrected index, standing at 151.1 at May 1, rose to 153.0 at the date under review;
this adjusted figure, (which coincided with the crude index), was the highest in
the record.
As was explained in the last two bulletins on employment, the genuinely
large increases iridicat-ed in recent reports may to some extent be exaggerated by
the use of the new questionnaire. The present form, in calling for statistics
of payrolls, reuires a statement of the number employed in the pay period fulling
nearest to the last day in the month, sinca the employees and the earnings must
be related; the questionnaire formerly used had asked only for the number at work
on the single day. The number employed during the pay period very frequently
exceeds the number employed at a single date, for one reason, because it involves
a larger coverage of casually employed workers. Their irc1us1n to a 1reiter extent
•than in the former record produces the most serious danger to the comrabi1ity of
the indexes, and results in discrepancies which are more difficult to rectify
than inconsistencies due to any other factor. Consequently, the industries
ordinarily employing a considerable proportion of casual labour are chiefly
responsible for any loss of comparability between the pre;ent and the former
statistics of emp1oyment
Cnc,t /
1
1
EMPLOYMENT IN CANADA
AS RE
ORTED S ''
-
140
EMPLOYERS IN !NDUSTr:Es
/1
[
OTHER THAN
AGRICULTURE
-
/30
/20
1926
1930
1935
1940
Tnheavy curve is based upon the number of persons employed at the first day of the month by the Firms reporting, compared with the average
employment, they afiorded in the calendar year 1926 as 100. The broken curve shows this crude curve corrected For seasonal variation as determined
by the experèence of lhe1ears 1929 —1937.
'4 .
The number of persons added to the reported working; forces at the date
under review was exceptionally large, as already stated. However, the percentae
increase, (b3), has been exceeded on several occasions, notably by that indicated
at June 1 in 1939, 1937 and 1928, as well as in a few earlier years. The percentage
gain at June 1, 1940, was also fractionally higher0 Thile this 1oering in the
latest percentage of increase is, of course, partly due to the growth in the figure
on which the percentage is based, it may neverthe1esw imp 1 that the most serious
loss in the comparability of the current statitics with those for earlier periods,
as a result of the new questionnaire, took place at April 1 with the initial
tabulation on the new basis. If this inference is correct, any such loss, whose
extent necessarily cannot be determined, may perhaps be of:; importance than was
feared.
There was very general improvement in industrial employment at the beginning
of June, 1341, increased activity, on the whole, being recorded by establishments in
all provinces, in each of the eight cities for which statistics are segregated, and
in most industries.
The largest gains reported in the various industrial groups were those of
29,230 employees in manufacturing, and 26..532 employees in construction and
maintenance.. Vithiri the former, there was widespread activity; the additions to the
staffs were most pronounced in the pulp and paper, food, chemical, non-ferrous metal,
lumber and iron and steel divisinbut the movement was also decidedly upward in
many other branches of manuracturing. The only exception was the tobacco group, which
was seasonally inactive. The increase in iron and steel, (in which the co-operating
establishments absorbed nearly 8,900 additional workers) raised the index for that
group to 273.9 p.c of the 1326 average, an all-time maximum. In many other .Lndus.,
tries, new highs were established by the latest figures.
The non-rnanufacturing groups also reported substantial gains; these were
mainly of a seasonal character, but in most cases they exceeded the increase
indicated as normal at June 1 in the period, 1921 1.940. As already stated,
construction provided work for a large number of additional ewployees, while logging,
mining, cornnunicaions, services and trade were also much more active.
A review of the situation in the various industries is given in greater
detail following the analyses for the provinces and the leading cities.
Important im1jrovement had been indicated at June 1, 1340. The 12,091
employerl then making returns had employed 1483,210 men and women, compared with
1 9 118 2 232 at May 1 This was an increase of o 8 pc.
The indexes for June 1 in recent years of the record, based on the 1326
average as 100, are as follows: 1941. ) 153 0; 1940, 1200; 1939, 113.1; 1903, 111.9;
193 7 114.3; 1936, 102.0; 1335, 9 7 .6; 1934, 96.6; 1933, 807; 1932, 83.1; 1931, 103.6;
1930, 116,.'; 1323, 1222; 1928, 115,8 and 1927, 107.2.
EMPLOYMENT IN FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS.
Statistics collected from banks, trust companies and stock market
operators show that at June 1. 901 firms and branches in these lines of business
employed 59,960 persons, compared with 59,861 in the preceding month. The
addition of these figures to the returns furnished in the manufacturing, 1oggin,
I
—P
Chart 2
EMPWYMENT IN CANADA AS REPORTED BY EMPLOYERS IN INDUSTRIES OTHER THAN AGRICIJUURE
929
I92I00
AN933 AND
935
TO
94
I")
140
1l
120
120
-
_________
'933
90
___
___
80
____--
______-
90
_
_______
_____-
80
70
-
70
60
JAN.FEB.MAR.APR.MAYJUNEJULYAUG.SEPT.OCT.NOV.DIC.JAN.
r'e curve is based upoi the rturnber oF emp!oyees ab w3rk ab the Firsb day oF the month as indca.ed y the Firms ror'tn, in cornparson with the
average empkyrent they aFForded during tie calendar' yea 926 as tOO.Curves are pofted For 192. tF.e year oF rarn,rr,r.duatnal acti'ty, for 1933,
w'icn.1rre': waa:.5 mln:murnn the record since 1920, rd F:th5' .e 1934
5 mining, trarisortation, cocimunicatiom, onstruction, services and trade industries
brings the total number of employees inciuded in the June 1 survey of enployTnent to
1,588794 in 13,456 establishments, and 1overs the index of 15.0 in the industries
above enumerated, to 151.2; the May 1 index of 145.5 was lowered by the inclusion
of the data from financial institutions to 1438, while that for June, 140, stood
at 120.6 when such returns were included, as compared with 120.9 for the industries
enumerated in the third sentence of this paragraph.
STATISTICS OF EARNINGS
The payroll data 1/ given in this bulJçetin result from the third tabulation
of statistics of current earnings, and, ii&e those obtained in the first two
tabulations on this subject, must be regarded as subject to revision.
In the last v:eek in May, the earrii1:s of the 1,528,834 employees for whom
statistics are available amounted to 0622,30. In the period of observation in
April, the same establishments reported that 1,4 1 ,322 workers had been paid
36,593,65. The May figure was higher by 14,028.675 or 56 p.c., than that for
April. The nunbcr of employees showed a rather sller proportionate gain, (5.3 p.c.);
accordingly, the average per capita earrins also s1Lhtly advanced, rising from
25.21 in the one week in April, to $226 in the corresponding week in May. The
general increase would probably have been rather larger had it not been for the
observance of Victoria Day in many establishments, with consequent loss of earnings.
i77rhe following briefly explains the statistics requested on the 4ue3tionnaire,
and their treatment in the Bureau,
IndustriaL establishments are asked to furnish data showing the aggregate earnings
of their employees in the last pay periods in the month, the employees and their
earnings to be grouped according to the duration for which they are paid. This
usually results in sttemcnts of amounts eaed .morithly, semi-monthly, fortnightly
and weekly pay periods; occasionally data for chr pei'iods are given. Many firms
furnish information for different categories of empl:yees who are paid at each of
these intervals while others habitually use only one or two pay periods in their
time keeping organiiation..
In the Bureau the statistics of earnings reported for the various periods exceeding
a week are reduced to the proportions which would be earned in one week, the
numerator of the fractions used for this purpose being six days, the standard working
week; the denominators of the fractions are the number of working days covered by
the different payrolls.. In the case of those salaried employees whose earnings are
calculated on an annual or monthly basis so that they are not affected by the
number of working days in the period, fixed proportions are used to reduce the
earnings to a weekly basis, and these proportions are not varied with the length
of the calendar month..
The sums resulting from these calculations are then agregated to give the total
amounts which would be paid for services rendered in one week by the persons on
the payrolls of the cooperating establishments. The employees reported are not
in all cases necessarily employed for a period of six days by one emp1oyer. AS
already stated in connection with the figures of employment, the inclusin of
casual workers to a greater extent than in the former surveys of cmplo. -rcn,
necessitated by the new cuesUonnaire, constitutes the greatest danger to the
compaxabllity of the present and the former statistics of employment.
.
•.
PLh. wID . • ABNING3
Number. of Persons Empiq,red at May I and at June I. 1941.) by Et.ah'tirthnents
furnishjn statistics; and Earningof these Employees in Ono Veek in
April and One IVoek in May..
(The prrofl fires are preliminary and are subject to revIiou
.LrIdujtr:L,i1.
and
Unit
P1'OJU.J'$
:
Noa
rn EiqrZ1
:c.iid
101,20
1.I.5,,2i
2 ,079
hh ,iii.
1,880
96
N.w Bruidwj. k
PraitProyincs
Mioha
Sa3kat.hwan
Bfi0.3riCC'J.'UjnDi.0.
CANADA
Ttjctnto
Number of Ernpioys
Reported fo(7
May 1
June 1
Ctcy
Ottawa
3'644
Vancou'v.sr
2 ,43309
3' ,.33
1.,5O..3f1
84.i.'•iS
:1-1ti 6 ,50
9 ,913,4&
'.•368 J.92474
11,09 ,:l in
i..''--''i9 .,o91
2 .030 .040
82' .1133
2 ,. 3J 0~i '
'ii
,dUl
4573
id', 134
?9.,002
33828
1 '5 633
81, 1 55
3i,308
122,106
5o..2o
121.5
1 ,52 H6
208 s4
2t 6 ..52
22,:l.3
21,1363
191 ,j5,7
i9.33
19.233
51,342
19 .1334
52.82K
3:,. ,i's
50,993
3:1'1.
illrlipeg
2,381.,06
42019
1336 •134
1.451.322
49 .720
49 750
Agt'ee ek1,j
Earninds Rt.J
t'uc Ona We..k in
April
May
49,913'(
4,210 ,64j
90t M12
1 180
I
Average Per
Capita Earn
Iin One
April
$
26 93
2 2
23 44
21,i'i.
233
jim
M
2:1
21
2.i.
2U
23
2e
it)
2
80
W.
'
31
•
d
5.5',34
1,46.,114
6 34u,754
2 b0
2-45
2.3
2o -5
3o'i9.5
3i ,'2.330
25.i
25 2
5-l11 J.,
-13±.0M I
5 ...co:ii 49
4593
1.4]]. .213ti
:i e3s4
J.. 23.,919
s.. 2iJ.'95
468,434
5 21 ,
456. 921
I4iii.1)3'
2J 13
.L296.,596
24
201313
2b 30
2o 135
2''19
24 '1
20
2D
s
26 04
2'
..
:
i ,264 ,'!(4
M bts,i23
.
3'45
2 ,1iO
2b i.b
24 i
2t, 02
2o 40
3'
1 ,279.,885
242
2. 'iS
2:. 0
22,5213,809
885.291
2621 ,321
704,770
3 :,34b,'t'45
2s2
20
29 9 18
26 131
29 .10
2.5 82
18
31 23
2" .J.3
29 .43
3,985,850
22 34
6013 478
35 98
-
(.)idutie
Man ufacturing
Login
Cnitntion
Trazmpo'tation
Cont.rutio.n and
Maintnane
Serviu
Tradt3
EIGII'P LEAi)iN'
1NI)tJSTRTES
04.3Y125
8(2.,655 2J .?UO.,9'5
4o 96'i
b3.i L'
83 ,92C-J 2 41/826
25.974
1364, 393
125 ) 921 3.621.978
150,21'
36.9]
13,743
31 .403
82 ) 012
24.) '78
124 , 470
3340,001
3,542418
3 ) 641,0135
22 'a
22 55
15 98
22 SS
1.,451.,322 \.j528.1334 36.,593.,5
38.,622.330
25 21
2;
158108
,i13O73
7
I
:ftu,S'14
J89
95
7The ar:aLe and Ujt per c: fiLures for Arii ottaineti in the
t,buLt.ion of the returrm for nay, difier from those rubli}ed in the 1a.t i;sue of
this bulJc-tin. This is r.ainly clue to the fact that rrrc coiiplcte pyro1i data re
availub3e than when the original com!lation vas nade for Arii, Lut is also partly
due to revisions in the fiures j.reviously thbulated. In some cases, thc:e rev;ion
conic from corrctj.ons made by employers in their ori!;inal returns in response to
reçuesi.s for clarification, and in others, to differences in the interpretation of
the data which became ossibie only when comparison could be made wi tli subequcnt
rc.orts from individual est.ablishments0 Further revisions of this bort will no doubt
be requirc for some months to come. N.
As stalUed in the last bulletin on this subject, the Bureau, to eruure
aecn'acy and comparability in the payroll statistics. is calulatirig for of'fie use
a figure of per capita earnings for each establishr.cnt. This permits the chc:kjng
and v-rification of any une,plained variations from precedjzi months and enalle 5 the
detection of inconsistenejes in the figures furnished before the st.tisLics are
t'biltcd. In view of the many thousands of returns received, the process is
l.onthy and laborious and inevitably delays the preparation of the current st.atistis
of ernploym.nt and earnings Hoever,these calculations seem necessaiy for the present0
The table on page 6 shows for the provinces, the eight leading cities and
the rr.ain industrial grous, the number of employees reported at May 1 and June 1.
together with their earnings in the last week in April and the last week in May,
In the manufacturing industries, the 372,655 men and women employed at June 1
by the 6,9()c' co operating manufacturing establishments were reported to have earne1
.22,23,30J in the final week in May. The same firms had 34,425 employees in their
Jast report, and the earnings of such workers in one week in April were stated as
'21, 78096The number of employees and the aggregate ceckly payroll both rose
by approxiiae.1y 3.5 p..cThere was accordingly no change in the per capita earnings,
v.ihich were 25,,82 in the one week in both April and nay.. There vould undoubtedly
have been an increase in the l ter perioc of observaticn had no. et Lii r -mt
closed over the Victoria Day holiday 'v.ith coneiuent reductions in thc v.ges paid0
The flIit11 of persons emjioyed in Jogging showed it substantial increase,
).argily us a rezui.t of river driving operati ori, while there as an irrcne of
39 .2 pc. in the aggregate earnin. However, the per capita fiurc declined from
2O26 in the last week in April, to l8.85 in the J.ast week in Aay. The .atter
figure .as higher than that indicated in t a
he last week in trs
ch for thoe eT.loyed
at Apr.i.l 1, when the nurber of workers reported approximated the number employed
at the firt. of June; the large decrease noted in the mt rvciiri; report in
eipJ.oymcnt and in aggregate earnings was due to seasonai causes0
In mining, the aggi'cgate and the per capita carnin0s were Loth higher in
the last r.'oek in 1.lsy than in the i;eriod of oLservation in April; these increases
accomiian:ted a considcrald.e expansion of e-mloysient in rrctal mining and in cuaxring
and the extraction of non--metallic minerals, while there was a moderate, casona:I
eelinc in coal mining. The fiures of earnings in all three branches of mining
higher in May. In coal mining, this was partly due to more continuous
o.eratious in certain areas in vhic1i an iridustriv.i dispute Lad been reported in the
j.iicd for which information was furnished in April.
The communications group showea improvement in erployment, and in aggrcj.;ate
payrolls and per capita figures, there being a gain of 4.8 p.c. in the nurbr
e1oyed, together with an increa;e of 6.1 p.c. in the total earnings. The per
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lie ____
140
/
E1PLOYMENT
/30
EROTED
EMPLOYERS IN MANUFACTURING i
INDUSTRIES
I
/
1926-1941
1926
1930
1935
1940
The heay curve is based upon the number oF p'5cr'5 errpoyed a:he Frsnay oF the month by the firms reporLi.. ::np--ed with the average
employmenh they afforded in the calendar year 1926 as 100 The broken curve shows this crude curve correcled for seasonal var-13601) as detcrmnerl
by the experience o'theyears 1929 -1937.
Apt
T
9:
capita average rose by 32 cents, to IZ in the last. week in May.
The moderate falling-off in employment in transportation indi:ttted at Juno 1
was accompanied by an increase in the aggregate and the per capita earnings in the
final week in May. The total figure amounted to,C46,745, compared with 3,C21,978
in the period of observation in April, while the per capita figure rose from $29.10
in t.hat week to $29.45 in the last week in May.
There was increased activity in construction, in which the co-operating
employers reported 17.7 p.c. more workers, and the total weekly earnings rose by
19.3 p.c., to $3,985,860 in the period in May for which data are available. The per
capita figure was also rather higher, standint $ 212.53, compared with $22.34 in
Apr!]..
EinpJ.oyment in the service division increased by just over 3 p.c., and the
aggregate payrolls showed the same percentage of increase. Accordingly, the er
capita figure of earnings was unchanged, standing at $16.9a in the periods in May
and April for which data are available. In connection with these return:;, it should
be pointed out that the statistics of earnings are exclusive of the value of board
and lodging which in the hotel and restaurant group frequently constit.ute a part of
the remuneration of employees.
In trade, there were advances in the number of persons employed and in the
aggregate and the per capita earnings. The reported staffs rose by 1.6 P.C. and
the wage and salary disbursements by 2.8 p.c., while the average earnings increased
from $22.41 in the last week in April, to $22.68 in the same period in May.
A brief analysis of the information for the provinces shows widely distributed increases in the total weekly earnings of those on the payrolls of the co-opera-ting establishments, the gains in the one week in May over the corresponding period
in April, ranging from 2.8 p.c. in British Columbia, to 14 p.c. in Nova Scotia and
16.7 p.c. in Prince Edward Island. The per capita figures in Prince Edward ISlUfl(1,
Nova Scotia, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberth and British Columbia were also
higher in each case in May than in April. In New Brunswick and çuebec, however, the
weekly averages were lower. In the former, the difference was due to the re-employment of large numbers of bush workers, whose rates of pay are below the general
average; it should be noted in connection with earnings in logging camps, that the
value of board and 1oding is excluded from the statistics furnished, these including
only money payments. In çuebec, the average earnings, at $11 3.38, were six cents
less in the one week in May than in the same period in April. In that province,
there was a slightly larger percentage increase in employees taken on than in the
aggregate earnings disbursed, while the observance of Victoria Day also lowered wage
payments in a number of establishments in the last week in May.
In each of the eight leading cities, expansion in ernplcymertt was accompanied
by a gain in the reported aggregate of earnings for one week in May, as compared with
the period of observation in the preceding zronth. These ranged from a fractional
percentage increase in the total disbursement reported in Ottawa, to that of 4.7 p.C.
in v;innipeg. The former was the only one of these centres to show a decline in the
per capita average; this was chiefly due to the observance of the Victoria Day
holiday. No general change was shovm in the per capita figure in Montreal. In this,
as in the other centres, the individual earnings in many cases were 1oered by the
week-end holiday; otherwise, the per capita figure in Montreal for the last week in
May would have been above that for the last week in April. In the remaining centres
for which statistics are segregated, the per capita averages in the period of observation in May were higher than in April.
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EMFLOYM[NT IN 11ADING INDUSTRIES
ftL — •94I
19Z6 =10(]
1926.100
161
ISO
SC
ISO
40
40
30
30
170
lb
20
-
I
10
_
M,S.NJUFACTuRINf
100
p
00
180
180
170
170
ISO
160
MINING
150
150
95
95
1
85
- -
—__--t-- I •-135
TRANSPOR1ATION
75
75
155
145
155
-- 7
135
4fti
145
35
tTRADE
125
j N.FEB.
i •1
MAR.APR.MY
JUNE
JULY
AUG.
SEPT.X.T.NflVnFrir
25
EMPIA)ThEWi BY ECONOMIC AREAS
The trend of employment was up'.iard in each of the provinces, with firms in
uebec and Ontario showing the Createst expansion; the workers added to the staffs
of the co-operating establishments numbered 31,940 in the former and 2,24 in the
letter, while the percentage gains over the preceding month ranged from 1.7 in
british Co1un'ia, to 17.1 in New Brunswick. Employment generally was at an
exceedingly high level as compared with June 1 in earlier years of the record.
Maritime Provinces. * Considerable incrases were reported in Prince Edward
Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick., according to statistics received from 891
employers in the Maritime k'rovinccs with a combined working force of 115,291 persons,
as compared with 101,620 at May 1 This gain of 1Z5 p.c. has rarely been exceeded
in any month in the years for which data are available; to some extent, the unusually
large increase is a result of the use of the new questionnaire, which, in asking
for statistics of earnings, also requires a statement of the number employed during
the pay period, rather than the number at work at a given day. The latest index,
at 154.2, was at an all -time maximum. The figure at June 1 of last summer had been
337.0..,
Manufacturing reported decided expansion at the date under revic,
particularly in the iron and steel, lumber, pulp and paper and animal food divisions;
logging, trade and construction also afforded more employment, the advance in the
last--named being greatest. On the other hand, transportation was seasonally slacker,
ann mln:Lng shoced a slight decline.0
The 853 firms reporting for June 1, 1940, had employed 86,80 workers,
3,100 more than at the beginning of May of last year.
or
Quebec - Improvement was indicated in most industrial groups in Cuebec;
manufacturing, logging and construction recorded especially pronounced additions
to the personnel but there were also important increases in trade, services and
mining. 1ith:in the manufacturing division, pulp and paper, chemical, lumber,
iron and steel and non-ferrous metal plants reported the greatest expansion, but
the trend was also upward in the food, texti.le, leather, electrical apparatus,
clay, glass and stone and many other industries.
Statements were tabulated from 3433 firms employing 467,359 workers at
June 1. 1941, or 31,940 more than in their last monthly reort. The general
gain indicated by the employers making returns was exceptionally large, substantially exceeding the average at June 1 in the years, 11-i340; it was also
greater than that nod at the same date of last year, when the co-aperatir.g
establishments, numL ,er6 3,Q]5, had reported 3L1,9ll employees, as compared with
325,.985 in thc preceding month.
*Ontario. -' There was considerable expansion in operations in manulacturing.
logging and construction and maintenance at June 1, 1941, together with smaller
increases in enipioyinent in mining, transportation, services, communications and
trade0 Within the manufacturing division, the lumber and iron and steel and food
divisions showed the largest additions to the forces, but there was also improvemer
in the food, rubbcr, chemical,, pulp and paper, clay, glass and stone s
electric a l pp1iance. non- ferrous metal, non-mata.11i': mineral product ann other
ruups; on the other hand, tobacco works were seasonally .slackero
- 12 The staffs of the 5,419 co--operating establishments in Ontario aggregated
657,368 at the latest date; as compared with 633,844 at May 1, thiE was an increase
of 23,524 employees, an advance that was much greater-than-average in the experience
of past years. The general index of employment, at 162.1 at June 1, 1941, was
higher than at any other date in the record. A combined staff of 505,126 had been
reported by the 5,250 concerns furnishing data for the same date last spring.
Prairie Provinces, - Construction (especially highway and railroad
construction and maintenance), transportation, communications, manufacturing,
services and trade sho;eci important improvement in the Prairie Provinces, while there
was little general change in mining, and ioing was seasonally slacker. In the
group of factory employment, there was an upward movement in food, lumber, and iron
and steel0 The expansicn resulted in a generally higher level of activity than at
June 1 in any other year since 1929
The 1,789 firms whose statistics were tabulated reported 173,68 employees,
as against 167,434 in the preceding month; the situation improved at June 1 in each
of the provinces in the Prairie Area0 Larger increases had been indicated at June 1,
1940, when the 1,716 establishments making returns had employed 140,331 workers,
compared with 130,901 at May 1; employment was then, however, at a lower level.
Britith Columbia0 - An aggregate working force of 124,533 was reported by
the 13'9 co-operating employers, who had 122,405 persons on their payrolls at the
beginning of May, The latest increase, following many noteworthy gains, was not
e,ua1 to the average reported at June 1 in the years since 1920, being also
smaller than that indicated at the same date in 1940. The index of employment at
June 1, 1941, was at a new r'ximum; standing at 134.9, it was over 20 p.c. higher
than at the beginning of June of last year.
?anufacturing recorded marked improvement, that in lumber, food and iron
and steel factories being most pronounced0 Amorg the non-manufacturing groups,
logging and trade showed heightened activity, while transportation and construction
were quieter0
For June 1, 1940, statements had been received from 1,260 employers of
99,033 persons.
Table 1. gives monthly index numbers for the five economic areas since
1937, together with figures for June 1 in the years, 1927-1937; available indexes
for Prince Edward Island, Nove Scotia, New Brunswick, ?anitoLa, Saskatchewan
and Alberta are also shown0 In Table 5 are given for the economic areas index
numbers by jndutrios for May 1 and June 1, 1941, and as at June 1 in the years
since 1936.
Al
E?PLOYENT EY CITIES
The trend was favourable in each of the eight cities for which separate
'ompilations are made, Montreal, Quebec City, Toronto, Ottawa, Hamilton, Vindsor,
Vinnipeg and Vancouver showing imjrovement. The largest additions to the staffs
were reported in Montreal and Toronto, while the most pronounced percentage gains
were in Quebec City and Ottawa, being 34 p.c. and 5.1 p.c., respectively. The
index numbcr of employment in each of these centres was higher than at any other
date in this record.
-
onti - cd- - FurLher miukd vement was recorded in Montreal, where the
1.816 co- operating firms employed 21 persons, or 5,228 more than at May 1.
Manufacturing showed a large increase, most of which took place in iron and steel,
while there were also gains in textile, food, tobacco, clay, glass and stone and
electrical apparatus factories; on the other hand, the textile d.ivi2ion was seasonally
quietir. Among the non-manufacturing division, transportation, building and cervices
afforded more ernp1oyment The index, at 141.0, was 27.5 points higher than in June,
1940; a smalier advance had then been recorded in the 1,779 establishments from which
information was receivcd whose emplpyees had numbered 176,777.
P.
Quebec, - There was an important gainin industrial activity in Quebec City,
manufacturing and construction reporting greatly heightened. activity. Statements were
tubu1ated from 216 employers having 22,615 workers, as against 21,863 in the preceding
month. Expansion on a larger scale had been indicated at the beginning of June of a
a year ago, but the level of employment was then much lower, according to information
from 214 firms with a force of 17427 men and women.
Toronto. - Returns were furnished by 1,881 business houses in Toronto with
196.336 employees, compared with 191.,757 at May 1. Manufacturing as a whole was
decidedly brisker, there being gains in most of its branches, notably in iron and
steel., electrical apparatus. ) non--ferrous metals, food and printing and publishing.
Trauportati:n and construction also afforded more employment. The general index
in Toronto was over 33 points higher than at June 1, 1940, when statistics from
1,800 establishments indicated a combined staff of 154,752, or 2,544 more than at
the beginning of May o± last year.
Ottawa. - Gencrafly heightened activity was noted in manufacturing;
transportation, construction, services and trade also showed moderate improvement.
A total. working force of 19 9 834 men and woren was recorded at June 1, 1941, by the
241 co operating firrn;, who had 19,233 on their payrolls in the preceding month.
At the same date of 1.a.t year, 237 establishments had reported 15,993 mp1oyees,
a gain of 931 from their May 1., 1940, forces, while the index was then 32.7 points
lower than that of 150.6 at June 1, 1943.
Hamilton. There was a further increase in Hamilton, where data were
furnished by 338 employers who had 52.826 persons on their paylists, or 1,484 more
than at the beginning of May. This advance exceeded that indicated at June 1, 1940,
when employment was not so active.
ImprDvement was noted at the date under review in manufacturing, mainly
in iron and steel products.) while transportation, trade and construction reported
reletively sma].] gains The 333 concerns reportin( for June 1, 1940, had
eip1oyed 39.902 rorkers; the index then stood at 122.3, compared with 161.9 at
June 1, 1943
Windsor. -- Employment in Windsor showed a contra-seasonal advance at June 1,
for which statist.ics were received from 195 firms with 31,475 employees, an
increase of 277 sinee the beginning of May. There was a gain in food manufacturing,
but chemical and steel. factories were rather quieter. The non-manufacturing
divisions reported moderate improvement, mainly in quarrying and in services and
trade. At the corresponding date of last summer, a larger increase had been
indicated by the 194 co-operating establishments, whose staffs agregated 22,122;
employment then was at a much lower level than at the latest date, when the index
stood at 229.9, the highest figure in the record.
-14 -
H
II
Winnipeg. A personnel of 50,993 men and women was reported by the 553
Vinnipeg employers whose statistics were compiled, and who had 49,720 emplyees at
May lo Most of the gain took place in manufa.turing and trade, but communications,
translartatini and construction also afforded rathtr more em1oyrnent. The general
increase was slightly larger than thaL noted ot the bginnin; of June of last year,
when 537 returns had been tabalatsd, showing a combined working force of 43,51
persons as against 42,359 in the preceding month. The inde>: then stood at 33.4 5
compared v;ith 122.2 at June 1, 1941; Lhe latter is the highest so far recorded.
N
Vancouver., Manufaturing was decidedly more active, especially in plants
turn.ng out food, lumber and iron and steel products In the non-manufacturing
divi.ions.. tranportation was slacker; services and trade recorded moderate gains,
whi.1.e other lines in Vancouver shoxed little change on the whole. Statements were
tab.tlated from 52 firms with 49,937 7orlcers, as compared with 49,750 at May 1,
1941 A larger iaerease had taken place at June 1 of a year ago, according to
statistics from 550 establishments with 40,184 persons on their staffs, an increase
of 97 over the month., EmploymenL ,hen, however, was generally cjuieter, the index
being 25-3 points lower than that of 141-9 indicated at LhQ beginning of June of this
year
Index numbers for cities are given in Tables 2 and 6.
EPLOYMEIT BY INDUSTRIES O
Manuracturin.. - Manufacturing showed further wid'spread improvement at the
beginring of Ju1e., when employment ias in substantially greater volume than in any
other moath for which statistics are available. Data were received from 6,900
establishments which had enlarged their staffs from 343,45 at May 1, to 872,655
at June 1, 190; this gain of 29,230, or 3 1 p.c., raised the index from 162.3 at
the former date, to a new all--time peak of 167,9 at the latter. The ma>:imam figures
in the prewar period were those of 121.7 at Oct. 1, 1937, and 121.6 at August 1, 192.
The trend of employment in manufacturing at June 1 in the last twenty years
has almost invariably been upward. The number added to the payrolls at the date
under review was greater than in alm&mt any other month but the percentage gain was
ra..her sm-l1cr than that indicated at June 1 in three earlier years of the record,
having also been exceeded by the increase shown on four or five other occasio.is in
the period of observation. In a nunt'er of these instances, ho.7ever, the movement
was in the nature of recovery from 6avere losses in the preceding month. In the
presnt year, employment,risi.ng from an unusually high position at the beginning
of January, has increased uninLrruptd1y in the intervening months-
'1
.3.,
The index (based on 19 6100) stood at 167.9 at June 1, comu.red with the
previous high of 02,o at M.iJ 1, 190, and with 123..2 at the beginning of June
of last year. The seasonally adjust.d figure also established a new high,
advancing from 161,0 at May 1, to 164.7 at the date under review,
The gains at June 1 were widely distributed, there being advance3 in all
provinces and in practically all hranhes of manufacturin;. The only exception
was the tobacco group, which was seasonally quiet. The most marked expansion was
in lumber, food, pulp and paper, chemicals, non-ferrous metals and iron and steel,
but considerable improvement was also indicated in the fur, rubber, leather,
textile, clay, glass and stone, electrical apparatus and miscellaneous non-metallic
ier - ' products, (mainly in petroleum ref inri es.) The advauce in iron and steel
provid( , d work for nearly 6,900 men and viomer id resulted inne; high level of
activity in that industry.
The unadja.,Aed indexes at June 1 in recent yers, (based on the 1326 avirage
as 100), are no follo:- 1941, 167.9; 1940, 129.2; 19.J, 111.4; 1933, 112.3;
197, 117.9; 1336, 1034; 1935, 384; 14, 332; 193, 8 .0; 1332 1 86.0; 1931, 39.4;
1930, 113.6; 1923, 121.2; 1928, 112.6 and 1327, 106.9,
A brief review of the situation at June 1, 1940, shows that the 6,662
manufacturers then co-operating had reported 664,0.9 employees, as compared with
646 4 080 in the prece'ng month.
Login-. Emp].oyment in 1o;911 n camps substantially increased at the
beginning of June partl( as a result of river-drivtn. operations and part.ly
reflecting greatr activity in pulpwood cutting. Tkier v/as markcd expansion in
New Brunswtck Quebec. Ontario and Briti5h Columbia, whi].e moderate curtailment ;wi;
i.ndiated in the Prairie Provinces. Returns were received from 427 firms exnaoviug
46,965 workers, or some 15.000 more than in the precedin-; month. This gain was
exceptionally large for the time of year, possibly 1.girtly as a result of the new
questionnaire Pronounced improvement had also been indicated at the same date in
1340, but the index, at 105 .2,was then lower than at the beginning of June in the
present year, when it stood at 158.3, the highest on record for June in the period
since 1920..
Mining.The extraction of meal1ic ores and of non-metaLLic minorals,
except cou]., showed considerably heightened activity, while there was a1;o a
modor.te seasona] decline in c 1 minLn. The 413 operators mking returns reported
for June 1 an aggregate working force of 83,92, as against 2,012 in the.r last
return Smaller additions to staffs had been noted at the corresponding date in
1940. when employment was quieter.
Communications, . Improvement was indicated in the telephone and telegraph
divisions; 02 companies and branches in the communications group employed 25,974
workers, or 1,196 more than at May 1.. Emp1oymnt was brir:or Ihun at the bginni.ng
of June of last ye.r; the increase in personnel then recorded had not leen so
large..
Transrta ion -. The ;rend was slightly downwar.i in Lra!sporLaion.
Greater acLivity was reported in local tram;portation, but shipping and stevedorin
and steam railway operation were cuieter. Data were received from 547 firms and
djvisiMnai superthiendents in this group s with l23.92l workers on their pcyrolls,
as compared with 124,470 at May l This decline was contra-seasonal, according
to the experience of the years since 1920; the index, at 98.6, was nevertheless
the highest. for June 1 in any summner since that of 1331
ConsLrucLion and Maintenance. -. Further important addit.irms to the payroll
were shovm in building, highway and railway constraction and maint.en:ncc; 1,408
employers reported a staff of 176,743 persons, as compared with 150,211 in the
preceding month. This gain of 26532 workers was rather larder than the number
usual).y added between May .1 and June 1 in the years since 1920, but the percentae
increase was below average The index of employment in construction as a whole was
higher than at June 1 in anr since 1929. This may be partly due to the use
of the new cuestionnaire, whose effect, as already des;ribed, is particularly
marked in the construction industry. However, the latest advauce also reflects
ar undoubtedly high level of activity.
Services -. Hotels and restaara showed the customary seasonal increase,
while laundries and dry-cleaning establishments recorded moderate improvement.
Staturnents v:ere compiled from 613 Lirnis employing 33,07 persons, as compared with
,9l5 at May L. Employment in this group was brisker than at the same date of last
year, when the reported additions to stuffs had been on much the same scale.
Trade..Further expansion was indicated in retail and who1ea1e trade; the
increase on the whole was considerably greater than the average at the beginning of
June in the exprieace of the years since 1920. The 2,18 co•operating establishments
reported 160,574 employees compared with 10- 8,1in the preceding month. The
movement had also been favourable at June 1, 1'10, but the index then was many points
louer than that of 156.8 at the date under review..
Tablet, 3 and 4 give index nuub.rs by industries, while the course of employment
since 137 in several of the leading industries is depected in Chart 4; the curves
are plotted from the indexes given in Table 3-
EPLOYMENT LI THE UNITED STATES
(These notes are based on the latest official reports received )
The Department of Labor in Vlaahington reports that total civil non-agi(ultural employment reached a new all--time pe.k of 38,793,000 in June; this total
represents a gain of 484,000 workers over May, 141, and of 3,365,000 workers since
June, 1940. The latest figure was 1,900,000 above the level of June, 1929.
The greater part of the expansion over the month was in manufacturing,
particularly i those industries prirarily devoted to the defence program.
.&
substantial increase in eap1oyment also took place in trade., while all otner najor
groups, to a smaller extent, contributed to the generi.]. increase.. In construeion,
a s]iht decrease in Federaflv financed construction projects was more than offset
by a seasonal expansion in privately finaried ucrks.
All major groups showed substantial gains over June, 1940; those in
manufacturing. consLruclion.- trade, transportation and public utilities and
Government services were especially noteworthy.
Employment and weekly payrolls in manufacturing industries again advanced
contra--seasonally in June to the highest levels on record. There were gains of 4.2 P.C.
and 5.6 p.c.. in weekly payrolls. These increases raised the index of employment
for manufacturing Indusiries to 127.6 (1923-25=100) and the payroll index to 152.0.
As comjxred ;ith June of last year, there was an increase of 25.d p.c. in employment
and 52.3 p.c. in payrolls. The latter have increased more sharply during the
twelve months becauae of wage-rate increases, increased hours, ni overtime
premiums.
TA3LE I.- INIIEX 1U1ES OF.L'OThT BY PROVINC1S AND ZC0WAIC AREAS,
kR YEAR 1926100).
(AVERAGE CA
Ir
w 'd
i
n.
--
jØ
&
dl
CU
(I)
U
.0
0
p
.
-
.0
0
1.0
C.)
W Cd
108.1
115.5
126.2
117.8
1014.2
89.9
81.6
106.5
121.5
132.4
115.8
103.3
-
-
-
-
-
105.5
82.0
124.4
121.4
107.5
110.7
115.9
1114.5
1014.3
87.8
79.3
90.9
93.8
99.8
113.6
73.2
'6.o
83.6
80.0
72.6
62.0
99.2
112.7
106.6
95.0
85.14
118.3
116. 14
115.0
115.6
116.5
122.5
126.6
118.3
122.2
1214.14
123.6
121.5
115.3
109.6
101.b
90.5
98.3
98.6
105.14
106.6
102.14
102.8
100.3
97.2
119.7
114.5
110.1
107.14
112.6
120.14
119.9
117.3
118.1
121.6
119.7
121.7
117.5
116.2
113.7
109.6
109.9
112.5
1114.o
111.2
115.0
115.8
115.0
1114.14
96.2
91.7
92.2
39.4
91.5
97.0
99.8
1014.9
. 112.2
113.2
108.1
103.5
92.14
91.1
91.0
89.2
90.3
93.7
96.5
97.3
100.6
100.1
97.6
95.14
97.8
69.0
90. 14
87.14
89.2
100.2
102.9
116.1
136.2
1142.0
132.2
1114.1
100.8
94.14
95.2
91.0
95.0
100.1
102.9
109.2
114.2
1114.2
108.1
108.9
97.8
96.4
96.2
100.2
102.8
105.1
108.0
107.1
112.0
111.3
107.5
105.8
92.2
79.2
83.8
88.3
82.2
914.14
108.7
111.0
111.6
103.2
101.1
90.6
121.0
107. 3
112.6
1114.7
1114.4
120.6
129.9
124.2
125.6
130.5
126.9
132.1
95.8
9.9
86.3
82.3
814.1
914.14
121.7
123.6
122.7
109.2
100.5
101.2
99.7
100.2
108.14
115.9
115.6
116.4
117.9
117.9
123.0
99.3
105)4
105.3
103.14
108.1
113.8
114.9
113.0
112.8
109.14
111.6
121.0
1214.0
126.4
128.5
126. 14
131.5
130.3
108.8
109.2
109.1
108.0
107.9
113.6
1114.7
114.2
116.2
121.4
1214.14
124.5
97.1
93.9
9)4.3
91.7
914.5
101.0
1014.0
109. 14
1114.0
116.14
112.7
108.9
91.8
89.2
89.6
88.9
90.7
95.6
98.5
99.4
104.2
1014.9
103.1
102.2
99.2
96.0
96.9
91.9
98.2
105.1
107.5
123.5
128.9
134.7
1214.3
113.1
103.8
99.9
99.6
95.8
97.7
106.14
110.0
115.6
119.2
121.8
120.0
116.4
98.0
96.2
96.7
100.5
103.3
106.6
111.0
117.0
116.6
118.7
115.5
110.0
Jpn.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
1. 1940
1
1
1
1
1
July 1
Aug. 1
SeoL.1
Oct. 1
Nov. 1
Dec. 1
116.2
1114)4
113.5
111.9
114.3
120.9
124.7
127.9
131.6
136.2
139.2
139.1
118.9
118.14
116.0
111.6
112.3
117.0
124.0
124.5
127.3
128.2
133.8
133.2
64.3
85.1
93.3
94.O
66.4
90.7
102.2
110.6
117.0
132.5
134.0
106.1
126.6
124.9
125.5
123.7
124.0
128.8
135.3
135.5
136.7
138.8
142.14
1 142.7
111.6
112.5
105.8
98.34
100.7
104.2
111.5
111.9
1].b.4
115.2
123.4
123)4
120.7
116.0
114.3
112.2
113.9
123.0
126.6
130.6
136.14
142.8
1146.7
1149.7
120.9
120.2
120.0
113.8
121.0
126.6
129.6
132.8
134.3
140.9
142.5
1142.7
103.3
100.8
98.5
96.7
100.2
107.4
112.4
11 14.9
117.0
118.1
119.7
118.8
96.9
96.2
914.5
94.8
97.6
102.9
106.8
106.9
109.1
108.7
110.5
110.2
103.3
98.0
97.5
914.14
103.6
113.0
117.5
119.7
119.3
124.6
123.5
123.0
113.2
109.6
105.5
101.2
102.0
110.8
117.6
123.9
127.8
128.14
131.6
129.4
97.6
100.0
101.8
102.8
107.2
112.0
114.8
119.0
126.7
127. 8
126.3
123. 6
Jan. 1, 1941
Feb. 1
1
Apr. 1
May 1
June 1
134.2
135.2
135.3
141.3
145.5
130.0
135.2
135.1
135.6
136.5
112.7
130.6
i414.o
93.14
96.8
137.5
142.7
147.3
151.2
156.2
121.9
126.3
119.7
119.14
115.2
139.6
139.4
137.1
1143.1
1146.
11.1
1143.4
145.7
352.0
156.4
116.2
112.2
111.3
116.7
124.1
113 .0
107.7
107.5
113.3
120.5
113.14
108.14
107.0
122.1
1 23.1
121.7
120.0
128.5
131.1
116.O
118.0
116.8
129)4
132.7
153.0
1514.2
172.5
134.9
157.3
162.1
128.3
124.7
1 27 )4
134.5
1314.9
1927
152 3
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
19314
1935
1536
1937
107.2
113.8
122.2
116.5
10.b
89.1
80.7
96.6
97.6
102.0
114.3
103.5
107.2
112.5
122.14
105.2
96.14
82.8
98.14
101.6
103.14
122.0
Jan. 1, 1936
1 13. 14
11U.4
107.8
105.0
107. 4
111.9
113.5
112.1
115.1
116.7
1114.6
1114.0
115.8
112.3
106.3
103.6
107.3
110.9
116.7
112.6
113.2
1114.5
112.6
109.8
1o14.6
1, 1939
1
I
1
1
1
1
1
Seot.1
Oct. 1
Nov. 1
Dec. 1
l0.l
106.5
106.5
104.9
106.2
113.1
115.8
117.5
June
June
June
June
Jufle
June
June
June
June
JulIe
June
1,
1,
1,
1,
1
1,
l•
1,
1,
1,
1,
Feb. 1
Mar. 1
Apr. 1
May 1
Juno 1
July 1
Aug. 1
Sert.1
Oct. 1
May. 1
Dec. 1
Jn.
Feb.
P. ar.
Apr.
May
June
July
119.6
-
107. 1
-
1OI.6
1014.7
118.8
82.7
89.5
92.2
97.7
99.3
97.4
103.9
99.4
109.9
117.5
113.3
97•9
83.7
76.2
$9.1
96.6
102.2
112.2
104.4
89.3
io6.6
6e1tive7e1,çht of &inloyment by Provinces and Econonic Areas as atJune 1,19)41.
8.1
5.14
3.7
2.3
11)4
43.0
30.0
14.5
.1
2.9
100.0
7.5
indicated
area,
to
the
Note: The "F.elative 2eiht', rz rivenuat above, shows the proortiOn of em1oyees in the
total number of all ea1oyeee ronorted in Cauad.a by the iixins ma'.direturns at the date under review.
'1fi312 2.- IMDZX '2 F?iNJIL C1'I23 •
(av..; CALJD4YtR 192610o).
1ril
Jane 1, 19J7
June 11923
Junc 1, 129
June 1,19 3
June 1, 1931
June 1, 1 9 32
104.5
109.7
113.
116.6
107.1
1.7
110.
117.0
122.0
122.3
3.26.7
J- o.e 1,1 95 4
•Jine1,15
Jun3 1, 1935
June 1, 1937
93.7
105.2
135.o
26.3
97.
C., 5.8
96.8
131.6
Jnn. 1,1 93 9
Feb.1.
r.1
7.5
96.5
97 , 9
'1). 7
1014.5
107.3
106.14
1cL7
103.4
103.8
109.1
iO3.6
June1.,1'
Iay1
June 1
Jly 1
1
80.6
$6.3
87.2
16.6
66.14
107.0
112.(
122.1
118.5
110,
C6.3
86.5
93.3
97.9
101.1
1.08.7
1015.4
1.35.1
135.6
136.0
106.3
106.1
111.5
i1.14
1J7.S
13o.14
123.L
100.9
Al .1
102.14
103.5
Ni.2
111.3
1014.9
ioi,1+
9.7
101.7
10.0
106.3
104.8
107.7
109.0
Oct. 1
Nov. 1
Dcc. 1
103.2
107.1
106.2
1.17.1
119.1
119.2
10. 1+
I0 .6
133.1
109.14
109.6
135.3
Jan. 1, 1939
Feb. 1
Mar. 1
1
100.14
102.6
131.14
102.2
1014.5
105.7
108.3
107.6
109.3
110,2
110.7
112.7
119.7
117.0
117.9
118.1
122.8
1214.2
127.14
126.9
127.8
111.5
111.6
110,6
107.3
105.7
105.3
106.1
107.6
109.2
109.14
108.6
110.5
1114.1
117.14
117.7
1014.3
103.1
109.3
107.
106.4
309.3
111.8
110.2
108.6
111.1
113.1
109.5
June 1
July 1
A.
1
Spt.1
Oct.1
1
Dec. 1
108.0
105.7
103,1
108.5
111.3
113.5
1114,3
1114.9
117,8
122.14
1214.3
126.9
101.5
107.1
108.7
103.1
115.6
125.6
127.3
1314.9
138.9
11+4.7
1149.0
1149.0
116.6
113,9
110.6
115,9
117.9
119.9
121.14
1214.14
123.5
133.0
135.2
136.3
109.6
109.2
108.9
110.6
111.0
1 17.9
1214.0
126.1
J'n.119141
il.1
tIur.1
Apr. 1
May1
June 1
122.8
126.0
130.0
1314.0
138.1
1141.1
11414.3
11414,3.
11+5.8
151.2
158.6
163.9
137.1
136.5
139.3
1145.14
1149.7
153.3
J.ire1
J1y 1
1
Spt.1
Oct. 1
1
2cc. 1
1,19140
leb. 1
L'r.1
A-r. 1
io6,5
110.2
103.3
135.1
105.6
105.5
139.0
133.1
u1.O
133.9
814.9
..7
93.5
97.1
1114,2
107.5
106.1
106.14
107.2
ia6.6
139.0
103.3
109.2
1014.1
103.8
102.14
97.9
96.9
97.14
99.1
102.3
104,6
10 5 .7
102.1
101.8
1C8.2
112.8
116.1
1114.3
.irr
93.5
1147.3
16c.
1149.14
9.5
91.0
73,C
137.1
123.5
123.2
15.1
1147.
1514.3
153.1
1143.9
1143.
101.3
1 10 .7
111.5
107.1
98.8
85.?
106.9
1+
714
81.9
87.0
90,9
96.5
92.3
96.5
103.5
110.8
S9.3
5 9.6
104.2
9i.G
135,9
123.3
105.2
121.1
126.7
130.6
1143.2
9.2
96.5
96.3
914.7
914.6
11.1.0
112.2
1114.9
11 14.
110.14
110.6
150.2
1 1 40.5
fl9.1
139.1
114o.s
136.14
1114.7
11.2.1
115.2
1214.8
11+0.14
1147.9
90.6
8.1
35.5
85.3
50.0
92.14
914.3
95.5
98.2
36.3
99.3
100.6
1149.7
1148.6
1149.2
155.1
1 55.2
160.0
1143.1+
97.8
95.8
914.14
111.0
110.3
95,1+
111.5
115.7
118.6
122.9
127.3
128.9
129.5
127.9
129.7
126.3
128.3
129.5
139.9
11+1.3
11+1.9
14.O
89.E
92.3
127.8
131.2
129.2
116.6
117.1
116.14
120.1
122.3
1214.2
126.8
129.6
133.2
1314.14
138.1
169.1
177.6
188.5
188.8
96.6
99.14
101.3
102.8
105.6
105.3
107.5
110,2
130.5
132.7
131.14
11+2.3
1145.8
150.6
137.1
1140.6
1141.7
151.14
157.14
161.9
193.6
201.2
211.8
221.9
227.9
229.9
117.5
110.1
109.9
1114.s
119.14
122.2
1214.14
1)3.7
107. 11
1 9.2
105.3
106.3
100.7
107.14
110.3
13.9
112.6
115.1
1)7.2
115.3
1114.6
113.7
109.0
Relative Wei 1 ;ht of Employment by Cities as at June 1, 15141.
12.3
1.3
2.1
3.5
3.3
3.3
Nota- The MRelattve lYeight", as given just above, o1iove
the pronortion of emi1oyeos in the indicated city, to the
total nnber of all employees reported in Canada b1 the firTas maicin
returns at the date under review.
114.0
1.5
-19Th2L
7
3. -.: ' J.!M2S Ci PLC1 IND3TRIZS
(Ali&l2LE2.926l00).
.'.1]
7uet-teg
Jrtt1.112
Jin.1,1323
Jwo 1. 1930
.1131
I 93
Jw-I, 195
1,1j5
T'i'1,1)36
June 1, 1937
F.1
1'18
4pr. 1
!a1
Jwe 1
JI y 1
1
Sept. ).
Oct. 1
Dec. 1
J..111i
7t. 1
tr.1
3 r.1
A,
Mry1
•r..me 1
Jiy 1
.1
Sept.1
Oct. 1
.ov.1
dec.1
r.1,191+0
apr. 1
y1
JLtne 1
Jdy 1
1
cpt.1
3t. 1
Nov. 1
Dec. 1
J:in.1,19141
'c6.1
.'r.1
Ar. 1
1
Juiø 1
107.2
IlLS
122.2
116.5
103.6
si.i
50.7
96.6
97.6
112.3
1114.3
?ri.
1%.9
1i.6
121.2
113.6
99.14
96.o
30.0
36.S
85.9
92.7
90.0
r, 3 .3
.
.
lC).5
112.3
U5.8
115.6
105.3
06.6
11. 1s
16.2
119.2
132.1
151.9
103.7
106.9
120.9
1014.7
91+.)
83.2
73.0
79.2
80.0
85.6
1 55.2
5 5.1
u9.6
93.2
'40.7
75.0
103.13
117.9
914.1
109.1
105.6
110.3
110.5
1CI).9
110.5
107.1+
110.6
111.9
112.3
113.5
111.6
112.1
110.0
115. 1
113.3
116.7
112.5
1113.6
110.9
ii1+.o
110.1
323.6
250.1
212.7
115.0
7.3
93.6
S6.1
59.6
55.6
75.8
130.5
166.1+
15..3
153.9
151.3
11+9.7
153.5
14.5
153 .6
157.1+
160.8
163.1+
163.3
52.9
82.2
82.5
52.5
4.7
5 7.2
53.2
83.3
87.2
65 .5
513.0
105.1
106.5
150.6
1133.0
108.5
613.o
51.0
97.1
95.3
73.5
60.3
115.6
206. 14
263.6
163.1+
160.5
169.9
]57.I+
155.8
160.5
1613.1
165.6
1613.0
170.3
171.0
171.3
237.5
113.14
1)9.14
1013.9
106.2
113.1
115.8
117.5
119.6
121.7
123.6
122.7
1013.3
106.0
107.0
107.1
106.1+
111.1+
111.3
112.5
115.3
119.7
122.1
122.2
s.o
116.2
1114.14
113.5
111.9
1114.3
120.9
1214.7
127.9
131.6
13o.2
139.2
139.1
1143.5
11+13.6
11414.7
179.1
90.0
60.5
105.2
121.14
112.2
126.8
150.2
258.6
303.6
1313.2
135.2
1 35.3
11+1.3
1145.5
153.0
1142.5
1147.13
150.5
156.2
162.3
167.9
276.1
265.5
210.0
166.2
107.9
155.3
100.0
115.2
120.
122.6
123.13
125.7
129.2
130.3
1313.13
135.13
2 27.2
r.
106 .S
10.0
113.9
103.0
95.6
55.5
79.0
30.3
86 .7
52.0
79.6
79.0
Corgtr.
Son.
Trdo
121.3
136.
1.414.6
1 31.0
121.5
92.9
67.8
116.7
39.5
87.0
1 35.2
105.1+
118.14
1014.5
113.7
126.0
127.6
1214.0
u6.i
109.1
116.5
119.9
127.1
131+.7
125.9
i1.5
106.2
115.13
ns.
123.0
129.0
83.9
614.9
86.3
56.9
88.7
90.1.
57.9
85.0
61.9
71.6
71.1+
71.6
55.2
1113.5
1213.9
123.0
133.5
11+3.5
122.5
112.8
123.1+
127.1
129.8
131.9
135.3
1136.1
11+3.5
1136.7
136.1
132.5
131.7
63.3
51.2
80.5
51.2
52.0
83.5
136.0
57.5
87.3
87.5
86.7
85.5
79.
79.4
30.3
79.3
81.1+
s6.5
57.6
37.5
90.0
913.8
90.6
59.7
96.14
89.14
914.3
91.6
913.2
115.3
133.1
1146.3
152.2
131.5
117.6
93.8
131.7
129.5
128.5
131.13
133.2
1L1•3
11+7.6
1149.8
151.7
136.1
135.2
132.9
1613.7
168.13
167.1
1613.13
1614.5
166.7
167.2
167.1
179.2
172.3
1714.0
172.6
613.3
82.7
52.2
53.2
63.5
87.1
59.14
90.9
92.1
90.7
90.14
90.0
814.5
83.3
83.0
82.5
68.5
90.3
93.7
914.5
914.6
914.3
5s. e,
133.7
131.5
132.6
93.5
92.5
167.6
169.1
168.7
1713.1
1714.8
178.8
90.2
39.6
89.7
93.14
92.5
97.2
88.7
89.14
90.5
914.3
99.2
98.6
75.5
132.5
131.5
1141.7
127.9
126.0
127.1
131.3
131.5
;33.3
132.1
131.0
1313.5
135.5
139.7
11+13.5
131.0
125.9
131.1
135.1
136.6
137.13
135.5
1313.9
138.6
11+0.2
11314.7
90.5
105.0
1113.3
121.1
121.1
120.5
105.5
135.2
11+2.5
1149.2
155.1+
1 57.1
11+7.3
1138.8
113.9
1139.
136.
1313.9
137.6
138.3
11+0.7
1142.8
1141.14
1142.9
1'46.g
11+3.
114.
83.0
82.5
83.0
100.2
120.0
1140.7
1139.5
1145.6
150.2
158.3
165.6
170.9
16o.g
11+7.0
1135.7
113q.i
1514.5
156.5
55.1
55.4
59.6
6s.13
2(31t1vO blei6ht or lp1oyr.ent by Ir4utz-iee as
at Juno 1.191+1.
5.14
57.1
3.1
1.7
8.1
11.6
Zote:...The "Pe1ttjveejht" • as
1ven Juet aboye
the tot.1 nin1or of all etp1oees reported
131.1
133.1+
2.5
10.5
ehow theuo'ort1on o.f ep1oyecs In the
Indlcnted InctuCtrl',to
3nby the fIxn8 makin* g retarns at the
d.nte ur4er review.
In
14.. INDEX nnERs CF 1PL0J
MACT1RIN
Anin1 prodti.ctB - edIble
'ur and products
Leather and 'roducts
oot9 and shoeS
Lunber an3. products'
Roh and dressed lunber
Furniture
Other lunber productS
usica1 jnstranents
Plant products - edible
Pulp and paper prod.ucta
Pulp and paPer
Paper products
Priatizig and publis:, iry
Pbber products
Textile products
Threal, yarn and cloth
Cotton yarn and1Ot1L
Woollen yarn and cloth
Artificial sjlc nnd Bilk 3oods
Hosiery and knit 600ds
Garments and personal fiumishinCa
Otter textile products
Tobacco
Bveraes
Chemicals and allied orothicts
Clay, dlass and stone products
lectrc li,ht and pocr
E1ectric.l antratun
Iron ar.d steelroducts
Crude, r11ed and forced products
Machincry (other ttuui veaicles)
Ar1cu1tura1 implements
Land vohiciCO
Autmobils and parts
Steel stipbu.1din and repairing
Heaticg appliances
Trn and .tee1 fabrication (n.e.o.)
Foundry and mn.thine shop produci,s
nn steel products
Other ironi
Non-ferrous motal products
Mon-aetallic mineral products
Miscellaneous
LOG-DING
MINI % 3
Coal
Metalltc c.rco
Noa-.metallic ainera1(except coal)
CICI04S
eleraohc
Celeohones
RAECA210N
Street railways and. cartae
Steam railways
Shlppin.3 and etevodoring
c0;S2R3CTION AND UAINTH1)ANCE
Hi,hway
Bat1ra.
SaVICES
Hotels and restaurants
Persoi1 (chiefly laundries)
TRAM
Retail
Tholesale
r. 1Y i:'S2IE0 (7ri. 1926100).
'Tiir.e 1 jincTj.
Jluit1 91411 91401 9)9
1 9jS1n7
.1(.9
162.3
111.4
57.1
19.2
112.3
11 7.9
77
1314.8
160.7 1148.0
139.0
17.
2.2
123.6
103.6
.2
121.2 12.7
102.5
102.5
1.8
137.0
1314.8
110.1
105.3
110 . 2
117.9
1.2
11.0
113.0
109.5
112.1
120.2
129.3
106.7
86.3
83.3
14.3
120.9
97.5
95.2
79.2
dS.3
99.2
91.6
80.14
2.7
119.7
63.6
89.2
111.9
110.3
91.6
.6
79.9
1.0 :1143.5
1114.2
122.9
1141.7
120.1
117.2
914.3
145.1
.2
36.1
62.1
142.1
55.2
2.8
133.8
111.5
128 121.1
112.2
112.5
105.3
5.2
123.3
1214.8
317.6
106.2
111.7
914.14
120.5
'5.1
110.7
107.1
90.14
2.3
130.8
107.3
128.0
12.S 1141.6
133.0
.9
2.0
136.5
130. 9S
118.2
110.7
114.3
175.2
100.8
108.9
107.2
1.1 11314.6
131.0 107.5
119.3
11414.6
128.6
153.9
119.14
9.1
i0).14
1143.9
3.14
126 .1
133.8
158.2 157.6
169.9
105.1
97.8
121.6
1214.5
i.G
94 .7
125.8
3 1 19.6
1214.0
126.3
13.9 1 7 1.0
.6
l3t.3
511.0
14273
5141.14
1432.5
583.6
573.6
.i
19.14
121.3
121.2
127.14
1142.1
1.5
1i6.o
116.5
120.3
136.0
156.9
3.1
155.6
113.5
1014.2
110.3
1 53.7
1.1 :166.c
133.8
99.14
96.0
102.5
10.3
uG.
.5 :107.0
(202.2 172.9
171.8
1514.3
107.7
.1 :20, 6
191.14
161.8
lal.2
155.7
396.7
322.5
2.6
io.o
92.9
123.9
?2.6
1.0 :1.3.3
128.0
119.14
1143.1
137.9
126.9
(i14.
1.3
1143.6
116.6
1.9
201.8 1147.3
129. 1
293.9
1014.8
126.14
96.1
111.5
196.6
18.1 :203.3
lLeL..i
116.
1.8
122.
20.8 158.3
211.2
123.4
129.5
1314.0
1.6 .225.2
115.7
215.1
k7.0
56.2
81.14
75.3
.6
107.9
107.3
1014.14
9q.6
91.9
17C.9 L5.3
7.5
179.8
2.14
152.6
1b5.14
256.8 1G6.0
1 1 43.3
256.5
63.5
i14.5
71.3
396.5 206.2
1.2 '1420.6
130.0
126.14
130.3
157.6 132.7
156.14
.
7714,3
130.14
106.14
12L.2
1142.5
1.0
226.2
110.5
123.14
102.14
2714.5 1214.6
.6
232.3
101.5
111.1
101.0
132.0
3.3
2142.3
227.0
156.8
157.1
155.5
260.7 180.5
2(3.9
2.7
158.8
153.0
172.3 172.7
157.7
1 19.7
.9.
1514.2
11414.5
138.8
1142.3
195.5
205.5
.5
93.6
103.1
1513.3
105.2
3.1
97.1
107.9
100.5
155.3
151.
1714.8
5)4
166.7
178.3
85.5
O6.14
82.14
1.6
91.5
92.1
3142.7
316.5
308.14
3514.9
3.1
376.0
367.2
1143.5
139.7
129.3
1145.9
161.0
1145.9
.7
c14.7
85.6
g.i
97.2 92.5
1.7
ç.
14
94.8
98.5
109.9
93.2
97.0
115.5
31.4
614.0
80.8
62.1
1.3
92.2
1d.1
66.5
614.9
93.6'
18.11
86.7
90.3
99.2
115.6
118.1
1146.5
125.1
2.3
114+.1
133.7
14•14
714.1
7().3
65.9
77.5
73.1
35.2
94.9
91.9
93.1
98.1
91.1
1.I4
0 7.9
1114.5
105.2
115.3
120.0
90.5
11.0
1140.
514.5
56.7
6g.14
3.8
127.2
11414.3
4.1
leO.3
?3.2
1142.8
126.1
227.6
180.3
61.7
72.9
91.8
73.1
.8
10J.9
79.9
1141.3
135.3
129.0
1c5.6 1142.5
2.5
170--T
128.5
121.2
135.8
136.11
156.2
1.5
163.6
1142.1
146.1
183.6
1.0
182.0
1514.3
150.9
1514.5 1110.7
10.5
131.5
131.5
156.8
136.6
116.2
1143.1
135.6
8.0
162.14
164.6
137. 14
113.5
113.0
115.14
133.3 126.7
136.2
2.5
1
11.1
111.9
100.0
-1145.5
1O.3
ALLITRIES
15.0
1/ The relativeshows the proportion of employees re?ortod in the indicated 1$dustry L n t1
low.
employees reported In Cnnadn by the firms making returns at the &tte under rev.
Yn' 1 1°36
1 03. 14
127.2
97.2
109.5
110.9
51.1
714.7
80. 14
102.2
36.5
197.14
1(83.6
91.14
117.8
10.7
96.5
116.14
128.5
89.0
136.8
513.2
1121.2
106.8
102.0
92.7
136.8
1141.9
s6.o
113.7
123.3
90.9
1014.3
102.7
65.5
90.8
139.0
61.7
108.3
86.2
95.5
130.1
137.6
127.9
914.1
152.1
83.9
252.6
109.5
60.0
39• 5
7!. 85.
115.8
714.5
95.8
67.0
52.0
129.8
82.1
173.0
1114.7
135.3
127.1
1314.5
11 ,J.O
1114.3
total nu..ber of
•1TABLE 5.- I:xOFyjrBY
moMIc £ZLS AND INDUSTRI
(AVMCZ 1926100).
June 1 June
June 1
May 1June 1 June 1
I/Relative
Arets and Industries VTeiglit19141 - 191411940193919381937193/
•
•
•
•
•
•
111.9120.510'
MarjtLme - !aaufscturIn,- 35.8152.211+3.9129.9 109.3
1014.783.087.2105.092.3
Provlr.cesLumber products 14.3112.093.3
Pulp ami pnper 14.5187.1173.7166.8159.9138.51714.01146.8
Textile products 3,3118.5118.4110.136.180.792.383.6
Iron and steal13.3183.11714.8144.71114.1126.8129.1100.5
Other carsilactu.ree 9.91145.31141.21214.7112.2115.8115.7106.8
Ioggin
5.359.81314.7130.71140.6113.9163.396.2
15.6118.9119.1113.14111.5113.8109.1105.0
Vining
Convmuiicattonz 2.01014.7102.1491.339.1489.788.086.6
raneportntion 8.585.2102.575.061.7614.268.261.0
Construction 21.9266.1165.9116.2132.61149.0206.11147.5
Seriices 1.9258.72140 2195.3177.14177.14169.1164.8
Traja
9.0168.7163T1142.71314.1129.7127.8118.6
Mritimee - AU Induotries 100.01514.2136.5117.0103.14110.9122.0103.14
63.1173.9166.14133.9113.3115.2119.3103.7
anufacturing
ebec
Lumbar products 3.51143.9119.8101.593.799.8103.189.1
Pulp and paper 6.1214.14 119. 8115.9102.8101.7108.096.1
:extile prodcts15.81 79. 6178.9161.6133.7135.21141.141214.2
Iron and steel15.3206.71914. 14118.135.695.2102.632.9
Other manu.facturea 22.3177.0169.5137.14123,3121.2121.5107.5
4.14228.0126.3119. 6113.9132.2136.6138.6
Logging
3.02914.7236.6291.3272.92414.8260.0177.3
11atn
1.491.590.579.375.676.077.1470.8
Comrunicationa Transportation
7.596.096.287.989.990.385.889.1
10.3121.199.182.0158.91148.986.363.8
C3nstruction Ser'jcea
2.21148,5146.11214.51 23. 8121.51114.0108.0
Trade
7.7165.1161.9150.31143.11143.0139.8135.14
quebec -All Industries 100.0157.3i46.1 23. 0 121.0120)4113.699.8
0nta2j9Manufacturing 65.6171.5167.3128.8 111.7 112. 14118.71014.0
Lumber products 33100.089.285.1478.973.883.969.5
lP and paper 5.2125.7123.61114.6108.5106.3109.099.7
Textile products 8.71140.91140.1130.14107.6i06.14ii.4111.1
Iron and steel 214.2223.9219.7137.3108.2113.1121.097.0
Other manufactures 214.2175.0170.2136.14 125. 14125.7128.8116.8
Loging 1.6110.875.01O?.168.161.283.767.7
14.8321.8307. 14294.6285.2253.32149.0215.7
Mini
ng
Communications
1.589.932.882.378.280.982.876.5
Transportation 5.1405.393.788.1482.781.686.682.8
8.6168.2133.597.2914.297.6112.363.3
Construction 2.3195.7193.3165.2162.5157.31148.51146.5
Zorvcea
Trade
10.2165.1163.01146.91143.5136.9137.81314.3
Ontario - All !ndizgtriec 100.0162.1156,14126.6113.6112.5113.81014.7
31.7139.21314.9115.3105.81014.8'4 109.8 1• 101.0
PraIjMafaturIe;
ProvincesLiseber productS 2.41141.0134.0106.7110.2105.6112.590.9
Pulp and paper 2.14106.1104.1102.21014.598.1495.992.3
TxtUe products2.6196.9200.9155.8133.3129.141)43.2124.1
Iron and steel11.0110.7109.386.4714.679.1+85.079.7
OTher mnufactures 13.3176.3166.71149.5139.0133.6137.6127.14
.873.3107.136.633.626.320.917.1
Lo:g1ng Einin;
6.2121.6120.3106.6100.098.8914.795.3
Coetiunications 2.14110.5104.1494.888.191.989.9814.7
Transportation 17.3110.5106.7101.5914 • 1492.090.7
Construction 19.1130.3122.689.5814)4gi.651.593.7
Srvjce
3.6162.714.9127.6129.9116.81114.61014.5
Trade
15)4131.8130.2123.5120.31114.2115.8113.0
Prairies - All Indtietriao IM. 01128.31214.1107. 14101.097.099.397.7
4.1156.5152.71214.4107.8106.8112.3100.3
British Uoifacturing
Columbia LuAnbcr protucts14.i114.14130.14109. 1496.291.0100.388.1
PUlP'i p.P0r 5.1414g.61146.5127.5107.0100.6125.0109.1
Textllo products1.2172.14175.0137.8119.8126.14131.7125.5
Iron and steel 9.02145.7233.0123.285.1493.586.871.7
Other manufactures 114.8155.0148.91140.0127.7129.7129.14118.1
Lo;tng
7.2121.4118.798.14109.896. 14110.690.14
8.1117.7117.9111.0106.3113.6113.5914.3
11niri
Conrunications 2.6116.5113.9111.2115.5108.6110.21014,7
ransporttion 10.7101.5103.392.094.693.795.2914.3
10.11014.9106.279.381.588.7114.7115.7
-
Cor,struction 3.141143.0142.2128.5133.8118.3115.0103.6
Servceo
raje
12.8158.3157.313 3 .0137.1+132.7133.0123.1
All Industries
B.C.
102.2
_111t.3 --
IT Proportion of en"1oy'es Ili indicated industrj in an area, to the total uumbtir of employees reorted in that area
by the firtns making returns at the dnto under revie,.
3Z2S OF
-
Cities and Industrial
ntn1_n,iNtrlT/
r''iuctr-.r1 Ri..
Pulp and paper (chiefly printik;)
Textile
Tobacco and beverages
Iron and steel
Other manufactures
Coinunlcations
Transportation
Construction
Trade
Montreal - 111 !uatries
- Maafacturing
Loather productS
Other rjauufacture
Trnreportat1on
Construction
laabec - All Industries
Toronto- Manulacturin.';
Pl&nt products - edible
PrintIng and pub1tehin
Textiles
Iror. and, steel
Other m=ufactures
Ccazrmtct Ions
Tranaporttion
Construction
Trade
Toronto - All Industries
Ottea - Murafacturing
Lumber products
Pulpad paper
Other manufactures
ConstructIon
Trade
Ottawa - All IndustrIes
Hamilton -anufactu.rtng
extilee
!lectrical apparatus
Iron and steel
Other manufactures
Construction
Trade
R.mi1ton - All Industries
Wjdsor - Manufacturing
Iron and steel
Other uanu!acturae
ConstructIon
in4sor - All Industries
nr - Mnu.fecturing
Wit1?,
Animal products - edible
Printing and publishing
Textiles
Iron and steel
Other mamfacturee
TransportatIon
Construction
Trade
Wirmipog - All Industriea
Vancouver - W.anufacturiug
Lumbar prothicto
Other manutacturee
Co'iun1catIons
Transportation
ConstructIon
ServIces
Trade
Vancouver - All Industries
L0YE2 BY CI.S AND PRINCIPAL 11JUSTBI2S (Avsrae 1926Z100).
1/ Relative
71.2
3.9
3.9
J't1
May 1
June .1
Jufle 1
June 1
June I
Juno 1
159.5
155.3
1J.0
120.14
159.5
11.1.6
178.8
11.6.
65.5
96. 14
62.0
158.0
107.9
1.6
iiE.o
1.21.2
117.7
85.5
109.7
614.5
93.5
1014.3
137,14
103.7
1014.7
92.2
110.3
97.2
3114.3
103.2
122.14
107.5
121.3
118.7
111.8
112.14
107. 6
120.9
110.1.
101.1
115.7
65.14
914.6
61.9
iI14.14
1 05.2
106.1.
101l.5
107.4
87.8
77.9
101.6
107.9
1114.1
125.7
95,9
98.9
111.1
67.3
101.2
66.5
129.1
103.7
102.6
97.2
111.6
105.6
192.14
'105.2
216.9
76.3
136.9
153.6
19.7
11.3.9
1147.8
120.9
231.t
153.7
69.6
ioo.14
1014.3
11.7.2
1143.7
1145.3
57.6
1114.14
203.5
155.3
167.2
1145.8
161.3
106.0
159.9
206.2
1147.2
1141.1
1143.5
157.14
259.3
233.2
181.3
6.1
2 27.9
130.8
161.8
105.3
2')14.14
111.3
137.6
69.8
152.9
110.0
119.14
119.0
14.7
13.3
115.0
143.2
126.6
1114.1
120.8
67.5
92.1.
145.2
11.5.5
113.5
129.9
89.+
1147.5
126.0
101.7
125.6
121 ",
12c
iY!
107k
1D
122.1
69.3
102.3
65.2
133.7
119.9
10.3
54.3
102.6
1314.g
143.1
11.7.5
117.9
1214.7
103.2
123.5
133.6
131.9
76.7
136.1+
122.3
177.5
179.5
170.6
144.9
160.0
107.1
139.7
108.3
159.6
32.3
121.2
80.7
147.6
1014.2
99,1+
137.7
203.3
107.c
93.3
79.5
135.14
160.5
1141.3
151.9
111.0
92.5
52.7
10.0
142.14
118.6
1144.0
4.3
21.9
21.3
1.5
123.6
153.9
11.1.6
187.6
1.51.8
65.0
5.3
101.1
12.9
67.2
156.3
69.0
12.2
56.8
14.i
183.1
107.1.
2214.1
69.0
1.1.
5.0
100.0
8.2
100.0
63.6
5.6
7.6
10.0
18.0
27.14
1.5
3.7
14.2
18.0
100.0
50.3
3.6
14.2
32.5
12.1+
21.5
100.0
83.2
13.1
9.9
140.9
19.3
14.7
8.0
100.0
68.6
714.2
114.6
2.0
100.0
51.9
6.9
14.8
7.2
16.7
114.3
5.5
6.6
27.5
100.0
147.6
11.0
36.6
14,7
10.9
6.1
5.3
214.9
100.0
11.1.1
158.0
163.9
162.7
1149.0
149.5
120.0
23Z.7
157.2
70.9
103.9
135.5
1147.3
153.3
1149.9
60.5
116.1.
210.7
161.14
172.1+
150.5
165.6
107.5
161.5
213.2
151.14
152.9
151.8
161.9
253.6
262.3
121.3
68.3
229.
1314.4
193.5
106.9
201.0
111.2
11.0.6
72.5
1514.7
uii.6
122.2
165. 14
131.2
211.8
106.7
83.7
79.2
131.0
160.1+
11.1.9
138.1
126.1
106.0
1214.2
107.2
116.7
125.14
90.1.
96.14
112.8
67.4
99.14
56.0
132.0
109.2
101.1.
71. 1+
96.1
1114.2
116.14
1143.0
109.6
1014.5
82.5
1014.7
109.7
117.1.
56.1
11.5
1614.6
1149.2
11+14.1.
165.14
1+0.8
136)4
97.5
1314.3
107.8
136.0
69.7
116.9
76.2
32.6
102.1
92.14
116.0
36.0
129.8
114.7
97.6
142.3
133.9
139.8
109.9
95.3
106.1.
614.7
9g.1
91.0
135.1
107.3
105.6
914.7
iio.6
100.1
93.3
103.6
105. 8
11.1
12-4.1
69.1
97.5
110.7
66.1
97.1
61.1
126.3
105.7
97.3
1.9.o
914.6
116.5
121.5
139.0
106.3
103.2
65.9
120.0
1C9.6
121.14
50.6
132.0
106.6
159.9
161.9
1 53. 0
514.0
11+6.0
99.7
127.6
101.1
137.2
78.7
1114.2
77.6
142.3
96.8
92.8
111.2
69.8
130.0
107.5
99.0
51.14
116.1.
135.7
io6.14
6.14
99.5
117.6
136.0
133.8
111.8
116.1
92.0
126.0
121.14
126.5
55.5
132.0
1114.2
166.6
170.2
153.0
57.0
153.1
105.8
17.5
98.1+
1149.8
87.2
116.2
82.14
36.2
99.0
96.5
117.14
87,3
131.2
106.7
100.5
62.14
1 13.5
138.2
110.6
105.0
10'i.9
62.2
58.7
61.6
100.1
1.2.6
129.1
93.7
98.3
107.0
914.2
95.1
90.8
96.8
93.8
108.0
116.6
69.3
31.7
1014.3
614.2
95.6
3.7
125.3
101.1
95.0
14)4,1
87.7
11.8.7
114g.3
135.2
108.2
95.9
67.0
103.14
67.0
113.9
514,
130.6
97.6
132.5
132.1
1314.1
31.8
123. 2
Q8.2
121.9
96.6
132.6
80.8
110.4
714.6
140.3
97.1
90.
106.
7.7
118.6
1014.3
101.2
63.7
IOl.a
128.1
103.8
5
1/ Proportion of employees In indicated Industry within a city, to the total number of c'.1oye's reported in that
city by the firms maidng returns at the d.ate under review.
-r.
STATISTICS CANADA LIBRARY
BIBLIOTHEQUE STATISTIQUE CANADA
1 111 11 11111111111111111111
1010515108

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