Presentation-bus4301

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Presentation-bus4301
FACTBOOK STRUCTURE: CANADA &
ITALY
Presented by
Tian Luo
Michihiro Kawano
Sisi Li
Basic Information about Canada and
Italy


Geographical location: Map
Population:
Canada: 34,482,779 (World Bank, 2011)
 Italy: 60,626,442 (National Institution, 2011)


Economy:

GDP
Canada: 1.74 Trillion (World Bank, 2011)
 Italy:$2.19 Trillion (World Bank, 2011)


GNP:
$1.37 Trillion (World Bank, 2011)
 $1.97 Trillion (World Bank, 2011)

Tools

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Economist Intelligence Unit : http://www.eiu.com
Energy Information Administration:
http://www.eia.gov/countries/
Academic Articles
Statistic Websites: http://www.iea.org/
Industry Reports
Government Websites
Dimensions

Introduce the energy industry in Canada and Italy
Dimensions

Legal & political regulations in the energy industry
 Italy:
 Regulator:
AEEG, Energy and Gas Regulatory Authority
 Regulations in the electricity and gas market


Electricity market: No licence is generally required to carry out
generation, import, export, purchase, supply and metering
businesses.
Gas market: No licence is generally required for production,
import, and sales of natural gas
Dimensions

Canada: Regulators are federal government & Provincial and
Territorial Governments

Federal government

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The government seeks to achieve a balance between the environmentally
responsible production and use of energy, the growth and competitiveness of
the Canadian economy, secure and competitively priced energy, and the
protection of infrastructure.
Policies in the national interest (economic development, energy security,
federal energy R&D).
Trans-boundary environmental impacts.
Interprovincial/international trade and commerce.
Provincial and Territorial Governments:



Electricity is almost exclusively regulated by the provincial and territorial
governments, except international electricity lines that transport power from
Canada to the United States and certain designated interprovincial power
lines.
Development and management of resources within provincial boundaries.
Property and civil rights within the province, i.e. environmental, health, safety,
land use, consumer protection, etc.
Example

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