Property Condition Assessment - FINAL

Transcription

Property Condition Assessment - FINAL
Orchard Park Housing Area
UC Davis
Property Condition Assessment - FINAL
June 24, 2014
Project no.: 558-14-001
4401 Hazel Ave, Suite 135
Fair Oaks, CA
916-965-0010
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June 24, 2014
Mark Rutheiser
Assistant Director
Real Estate Services
University of California, Davis
Tel 530-752-1616
[email protected]
Project No. 558-14-001
Subject: Property Condition Assessment
Orchard Park Student Family Housing
One Shields Drive
Davis, CA
Dear Mr. Rutheiser:
4LEAF Inc. (4LEAF) has completed the contracted consulting services for the above referenced project.
We performed this investigation in accordance with the scope of services outlined in 4LEAF e-mail dated
May 21, 2014 and subsequently as authorized and accepted by you. We have also revised our PCA to
incorporate revisions and the request for a more detailed cost estimate as you requested in your email
message dated June 13, 2014.
The purpose of this study was to assess the general physical condition and maintenance status of the
Property and to recommend repair and maintenance items we consider significant for the Property to
continue in its current operation and/or to be restored to a good condition consistent with comparable
projects of similar age.
We appreciate the opportunity to work with you on this project. If you have questions, or if we may be of
further assistance, please call me at (916)965-0010.
Sincerely,
Joseph Nicolas, P.E.
Project Manager
4LEAF, Inc.
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SECTION............................................................................................................................................. PAGE
1.0
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................................................................................................................. 5
1.1
GENERAL PROPERTY DESCRIPTION ............................................................................ 5
1.2
GENERAL PHYSICAL CONDITION ................................................................................... 5
1.3
OPINION OF REMAINING USEFUL LIFE.......................................................................... 5
1.4
SUMMARY OF PROPERTY CONDITION AND COST ESTIMATES ................................ 5
2.0
PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF SERVICES ........................................................................................ 5
2.1
SCOPE OF SERVICES ...................................................................................................... 5
2.2
IMMEDIATE REPAIR AND PHYSICAL NEEDS OVER THE TERM WORK...................... 6
2.3
CONDITION EVALUATION DEFINITIONS ........................................................................ 6
2.4
OPINIONS OF COST.......................................................................................................... 6
2.5
COMMON ABBREVIATIONS ............................................................................................. 7
3.0
SYSTEM DESCRIPTION AND OBSERVATIONS .......................................................................... 7
3.1
OVERALL GENERAL DESCRIPTION................................................................................ 7
3.1.1 Property Location ................................................................................................... 7
3.1.2 Current Property Improvements............................................................................. 7
3.1.3 Visual Survey ......................................................................................................... 8
3.2
SITE CONDITIONS............................................................................................................. 8
3.2.1 Topography ............................................................................................................ 8
3.2.2 Property Drainage .................................................................................................. 8
3.2.3 Site Access and Egress ......................................................................................... 8
3.2.4 Paving, Curbing and Parking ................................................................................. 8
3.2.5 Flatwork and Walks ................................................................................................ 9
3.2.6 Landscaping and Appurtenances .......................................................................... 9
3.2.7 Utilities .................................................................................................................... 9
3.2.7.1 Water.......................................................................................................... 9
3.2.7.2 Electricity and Natural Gas ...................................................................... 10
3.2.7.3 Sanitary Sewer ......................................................................................... 10
3.2.7.4 Storm Sewer ............................................................................................ 10
3.3
STRUCTURAL FRAME AND BUILDING ENVELOPE .................................................... 10
3.3.1 Foundation ........................................................................................................... 10
3.3.2 Building Frame ..................................................................................................... 10
3.3.3 Stairs .................................................................................................................... 11
3.3.4 Exterior Doors ...................................................................................................... 11
3.3.5 Windows ............................................................................................................... 11
3.3.6 Roofing ................................................................................................................. 11
3.3.7 Exterior Decks and Posts ..................................................................................... 11
3.3.8 Exterior Stucco ..................................................................................................... 12
3.3.9 Exterior Paint........................................................................................................ 12
3.3.10 Thermal Insulation ............................................................................................... 12
3.3.11 Bathroom Fixtures ................................................................................................ 12
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3.4
3.5
3.6
LIFE SAFETY/FIRE PROTECTION.................................................................................. 13
3.4.1 Sprinklers and Suppression Systems .................................................................. 13
INTERIOR BUILDING COMPONENTS ............................................................................ 13
3.5.1 Painting ................................................................................................................ 13
3.5.2 Resilient Flooring ................................................................................................. 13
3.5.3 Kitchen Appliances .............................................................................................. 13
3.5.4 Water Heaters ...................................................................................................... 13
3.5.5 Acoustics .............................................................................................................. 14
HEATING & COOLING ..................................................................................................... 14
4.0
ADDITIONAL CONSIDERATIONS ............................................................................................... 14
4.1
ACCESSIBILITY FOR DISABLED PERSONS ................................................................. 14
4.2
TITLE 24 ENERGY STANDARDS .................................................................................... 15
5.0
DOCUMENT REVIEWS AND INTERVIEWS ................................................................................ 16
5.1
DOCUMENT REVIEW ...................................................................................................... 16
5.2
INTERVIEWS .................................................................................................................... 16
6.0
RECOMMENDATIONS AND PRELIMINARY COST ESTIMATES .............................................. 16
6.1
IMMEDIATE REPAIR NEEDS AND COST ESTIMATES ................................................. 16
6.2
REPAIR NEEDS OVER THE TERM ................................................................................. 16
7.0
LIMITATIONS AND QUALIFICATIONS ........................................................................................ 16
APPENDICES
A
Site Plan
B
Property Photographs
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1.0
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
1.1
GENERAL PROPERTY DESCRIPTION
The Orchard Park Student Family Housing (the Property) buildings were constructed in approximately
1963 and 1964. The buildings were designed by Clark, Beuttler, Rockrise and Watson, Architects
Associated of San Francisco, CA. The site contains 10 two-story 8-unit buildings, and 12 two-story 10 unit
buildings, with a total number of 200 residential units. All units are similar two-bedroom, one bath units.
The site also contains an office/laundry building, a community center with laundry, a shop building with
laundry, and two laundry/storage buildings.
1.2
GENERAL PHYSICAL CONDITION
Based on our document reviews, interviews, and field observations, it is our opinion that the Property is in
poor to fair condition for a property over fifty years old, however there are significant areas needing
repairs and reconstruction. S om e por t io ns of th e Pr o per t y c a n be c l as s if i ed in g o od
c on d it i o n, a n d wi ll be i de n tif ie d b e l o w. 4LEAF, Inc. (4LEAF) will also provide subjective comment
where appropriate that identifies differences between the complex as it exists and new construction. In
these cases, such comment will be identified as “Commentary” and provided in bold italics. Cost
estimates for the various recommendations are explained in more detail in Section 6.0.
1.3
OPINION OF REMAINING USEFUL LIFE
It is our opinion that the remaining useful life of the property is approximately 15 - 25 years, if the
recommended repairs/replacement in this report are made; the physical improvements receive continuing
maintenance; the various components are repaired or replaced on a timely basis; and no natural disaster
occurs. To achieve a good level of service, the Property will require very significant expenditures.
Commentary: If all required repairs and renovations are made, the Property cannot be expected to
achieve more than another 25 years of service, far below that of new construction, and in any case, the
required on-going maintenance and repair costs will be significant.
1.4
SUMMARY OF PROPERTY CONDITION AND COST ESTIMATES
Overall, the Property is in poor to fair physical condition. Refer to Section 6.1 for immediate repair costs.
2.0
PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF SERVICES
2.1
SCOPE OF SERVICES
4LEAF has conducted a building and property observation survey or Property Condition Assessment of
the Property. The scope of services for this assessment included visits to the Property with observations
of the Property and its improvements, reviews of available construction and maintenance documents, and
interviews with various persons. The purpose of these observations was to assess the general physical
condition and maintenance status of the Property and to recommend repair and maintenance items we
consider significant for the Property to continue in its current operation and/or to be restored to a good
condition consistent with or superior to comparable projects of similar age.
A Phase I Environmental Site Assessment was prepared by Geocon Consultants, Inc. for URL, in
February 2014. It was noted that given the project’s age, one should suspect the presence of leadcontaining paint or asbestos on the property. Geocon recommended that an asbestos and leadcontaining paint survey be performed by properly trained and certified personnel.
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2.2
IMMEDIATE REPAIR AND PHYSICAL NEEDS OVER THE TERM WORK
Immediate Repair Needs – Immediate Repair Needs are those repairs that are beyond the scope of
regular maintenance and that should be performed immediately. W ork that requires action based on its
being (i) an existing or potentially significant unsafe condition, (ii) material physical deficiency, (iii) poor or
deteriorated condition of a critical element or system, (iv) significant building code violation, or (v) a
condition that if left “as is,” with an extensive delay in remedying it, has the potential to result in or
contribute to a critical element or system failure and will probably result in a significant escalation of its
remedial costs.
Repairs Over the Term (Years 1 through 10) – Repair Needs Over the Term are items needing
repair or replacement that are beyond the scope of regular maintenance but are necessary to maintain
the overall condition of the Property. Physical Needs Over the Term are reasonably predictable both in
terms of frequency and cost, however, they may also include components or systems that have an
indeterminable life, but nonetheless have a potential liability for failure within an estimated time period.
2.3
CONDITION EVALUATION DEFINITIONS
Definitions of the terms used in this report to describe average or overall conditions include the following:
Good: Average to above-average condition for the building system or materials assessed,
with consideration of its age, design, and geographical location. Generally, other than normal
maintenance, no remedial work is recommended or required.
Fair: Average condition for the building system evaluated. System is aging and some work is
required or recommended, primarily due to normal aging and wear of the building system, to
return the system to a good condition.
Poor: Below average condition for the building system evaluated. Significant work (major
repair or replacement) should be anticipated to restore the building system or material to an
acceptable condition.
Where it seemed more appropriate, 4LEAF assigned combination assessments such as "poor to fair”
and “fair to good" in evaluating various construction components.
2.4
OPINION OF COST
The opinions of cost presented are for the repair/replacement of readily visible materials and building
system defects that might significantly affect the value of the property during the loan period. These
opinions are based on approximate quantities and values. They do not constitute a warranty that all
items, which may require repair or replacement, are included.
Estimated cost opinions presented in this report are from a combination of sources. The primary sources
are from Means Repair and Remodeling Cost Data, the ENR Square Foot Costbook 2014 Edition, data
from staff interviews, as well as 4LEAF’s and this author’s forty years experience with costs for similar
projects and city cost indexes.
Replacement and Repair Cost estimates are based on approximate quantities. Information furnished by
site personnel or the property management, if presented, is assumed by 4LEAF to be reliable. A detailed
inventory of quantities for cost estimating is not a part of the scope of this Report.
Actual costs may vary depending on such matters as type and design of remedy, quality of materials and
installation, manufacturer of the equipment or system selected, field conditions, whether a physical
deficiency is repaired or replaced in whole; phasing of the work, quality of the contractor(s), project
management exercised, and the availability of time to thoroughly solicit competitive pricing. In view of
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these limitations, the costs presented herein should be considered “order of magnitude” and used for
budgeting purposes only. Detailed design and contractor bidding is recommended to determine actual
cost.
These opinions should not be interpreted as a bid or offer to perform the work. All costs are stated in
present value. The recommendations and opinions of cost provided herein are based on the
understanding that the facility will continue operating in its present occupancy classification and general
quality level unless otherwise stated.
2.5
COMMON ABBREVIATIONS
ADA:
Americans with Disabilities Act
HID:
High-Intensity Discharge (Lighting)
AHU:
Air Handling Unit
HP:
Horsepower
BLDG:
Building
HVAC:
Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning
BOCA:
Building Officials & Code Administrators
IN:
Inches
BTU:
British Thermal Unit
KVA:
Kilovolt Ampere
CBC:
California Building Code
LF:
Linear Feet
BUR:
Built-Up Roofing
MBH:
Thousand BTUs per Hour
CF:
Cubic Feet
MEP:
Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing
CFM:
Cubic Feet per Minute
NRA:
Net Rentable Area
CIP:
Cast Iron Pipe
NO:
Number
CMP:
Corrugated Metal Pipe
OSB:
Oriented Strand Board
CMU:
Concrete Masonry Unit
PB:
Polybutylene
CY:
Cubic Yard
PSI:
Pounds per Sqaure Inch
DC:
Direct Current
PVC:
Poly Vinyl Chloride
EIFS:
Exterior Insulation Finish System
RTU:
Roof-Top Unit (HVAC)
EMT:
Electrical Metallic Tubing (Conduit)
RUL:
Remaining Useful Life
EPDM:
Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer
SBC:
Standard Building Code
EUL:
Estimated Useful Life
SD:
Smoke Detector
F:
Fahrenheit
SF:
Square Feet
FT:
Feet
SY:
Square Yard
GBA:
Gross Building Area
UL:
Underwriters Laboratory
GPM:
Gallons Per Minute
VAV:
Variable Air Volume
HC:
Handicap
VWC:
Vinyl Wall Covering
3.0
SYSTEM DESCRIPTION AND OBSERVATIONS
3.1
OVERALL GENERAL DESCRIPTION
3.1.1
Property Location
The Property is located on Orchard Park Drive, University of California Davis, CA, and is bounded on
three sides by Orchard Park Circle.
3.1.2
Current Property Improvements
The construction of all buildings typically consists of wood framing with ground level slabs on grade and
perimeter footings. Exterior finish is typically stucco over plywood; roofing is typically composition shingle
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over plywood. All design criteria were acceptable at the time of construction. Vehicle parking is provided
in various surface lots on four sides of the project perimeter. The interior of the site is well landscaped,
with two areas of children’s playground apparatus.
A consistent architectural feature of the residential buildings is exterior wooden stairs and handrails, two
story 6 X 6 wooden posts and wooden decks at the second level, and large roof overhangs on certain
exposures.
3.1.3
Visual Survey
th
th
4LEAF visited the property May 28 -30 , 2014, to make a field assessment consisting of visual
observations of the physical condition and maintenance of the property. 4LEAF visually observed the
Property systems including site, structure, building envelope, roofing, mechanical, electrical, plumbing, fire
suppression and life safety. In addition, 4LEAF reviewed accessible interior areas at the p roperty, as
well as miscellaneous construction drawings. It must be noted that access to and the ability to take
photographs was not possible in all interior portions of the structures due to occupancy.
See Appendix A for Site Map and Appendix B for various site and property photographs.
3.2
SITE CONDITIONS
3.2.1
Topography
The property is flat. No abnormal features such as ground fractures, settlement areas or areas of
ponding water were found.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: None
3.2.2
Property Drainage
All storm water from the property is delivered to the storm sewer system, which is in good condition.
Storm water does not discharge into the sanitary sewer system. It was reported that the storm drain
system functions adequately, even during heavy periods of rain; an on-site detention area serves to retain
excess runoff until discharged.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: None
3.2.3
Site Access and Egress
The property is accessed from the north off of Russell Blvd. via Orchard Park Drive, and further bound on
three sides by Orchard Park Circle. It can also be accessed from the southeast via Orchard Drive off of La
Rue Road..
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: None
3.2.4
Paving, Curbing and Parking
Asphaltic paving is pr o v i de d in automobile parking areas, of an unknown structural section. Seven
defined parking lots are provided, plus an additional seven parking areas directly off the perimeter roads.
The drives and parking areas are in fair to good condition, with no evidence of significant spalling,
fracturing or undue settlement.
Stall markings, handicapped spaces and signage in all lots are missing.
Parking areas are primarily lighted by pole mounted fixtures, all in good working condition.
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4LEAF recommends the following work this year: Reseal and stripe all parking lots. Provide curb
cuts for accessible transition from the parking areas to site pathways. Provide accessibility signage as
required.
Estimated Cost: $120,000.
3.2.5
Flatwork
Exterior flatwork consists of a mixture of concrete flatwork, asphaltic concrete pathways, and a limited
amount of brick. With one exception of bricks that have heaved due to root upheaval, and a similar unsafe
condition of an asphaltic concrete walk, the site pathways appear to be in good condition.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: Repair brick and asphaltic pathways to eliminate
tripping hazards.
Estimated Cost: $4000.
3.2.6
Landscaping and Appurtenances
The landscaping consists primarily of turf areas with some shrubs, and a large quantity of shade trees. All
of the landscaping except for some minor shrub areas appears to be in good condition, and well
maintained.
Two children’s recreation areas are on-site. These appear in good condition, including perimeter fence,
play apparatus, ground treatment, lighting, and accessibility. It was reported however that the design on
the playground perimeter fencing is such that the bottom rail and top rail, given its design to secure wire
mesh, is an inviting habitat for black widow spiders. As these fences are in close proximity to small
children, this danger should be eliminated. Black widows were observed when 4LEAF was on site; the
following morning the Housing maintenance staff was observed pressure washing the fences in an effort
to eradicate the spiders. It is our opinion that this is a temporary fix at best. Use of pesticides should also
be avoided, given the immediate proximity of small children.
Various park benches are provided along pathways, some of which are in fair condition. They do not pose
a safety hazard however, more of an aesthetic concern.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: Remove and replace the perimeter fences with a
design to eliminate nesting areas for the spiders.
Estimated Cost: $30,000.
3.2.7
Utilities
3.2.7.1 Water
The University of California, Davis supplies domestic drinking water to the subject Property. In general,
water lines can be expected to provide 40 or more years of useful life, depending on the type and quality
of materials and workmanship of the installation. The lines in this project are 50 years old at this time,
have shown evidence of corrosion and spot failures, and their remaining useful life is questionable.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: Replace domestic water supply throughout the
Property.
Estimated Cost: $6,000,000 - $9,000,000.
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3.2.7.2 Electricity & Natural Gas
Pacific Gas and Electric supplies electric and gas services to the subject Property. In general, gas and
electric services can be expected to provide 40 or more years of useful life, depending on the type and
quality of materials and workmanship of the installation. The utility services to and within this Property
have already exceeded their estimated useful life. It should also be noted that the gas meter enclosures
on the outside of each building should have vents; these were called for in the original documents, but not
installed for some reason.
Commentary: Although these utility services are approaching or exceeding their estimated useful like,
replacement would be prohibitive. This dilemma would be resolved with new construction.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: Provide vents in gas enclosures throughout the
Property.
Estimated Cost; $2,700.
3.2.7.3 Sanitary Sewer
The University of California, Davis supplies sanitary sewer service to the Property. In general, sanitary
sewer lines can be expected to provide 50 or more years of useful life, depending on the type and quality
of materials and workmanship of the installation. The waste lines at this Property have a record of failures
due to corrosion, root intrusion and occupant caused blockages. Numerous failures due to clogging have
been reported in the two story kitchen waste stacks, resulting in backup and flooding of ground floor units.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: Replace two story waste stacks at all units, replace
waste lines in all second floor apartments (see also Section 3.5.5, Acoustics), and sewer laterals to the
City collection system.
Estimate Cost: $8,000,000 - $12,000,000.
3.2.7.4 Storm Sewer
The University of California, Davis provides storm sewer service to the subject Property. In general, storm
drain lines can be expected to provide 50 or more years of useful life, depending on the type and quality
of materials and workmanship of the installation. Regular maintenance should extend the life of this
system another 15 – 25 years.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: None.
3.3
STRUCTURAL FRAME AND BUILDING ENVELOPE
3.3.1
Foundation
4LEAF did not perform destructive testing, did review partial construction documents, and was only able
to make limited observations. The foundation appeared to be in good condition, with no evidence of
concrete failure or settlement, evidenced by lack of cracks in the exterior plaster walls.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: None.
3.3.2
Building Frame
All buildings are wood framed, sheathed in plywood. Roof trusses are wood frame. There were no visible
signs of framing deficiencies. A shade trellis and fenced enclosure is located on the north side of Building
6100 (shop), and is in extremely poor condition. Individual spaced 2x members are badly rotted and the
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primary support beam is severely rotted and failing. A “fix” of this beam was attempted at some time in the
past, but is structurally unsafe.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: Replace the shade structure/enclosure in its
entirety.
Estimated Cost: $20,000
3.3.3
Stairs
Stairs and handrails observed at the Property appeared to be in poor to fair condition. Throughout the
Property, the stair handrail is noncompliant in profile and clearance (IBC 1012). Many treads and
stringers show evidence of dry rot and decay. New handrails must be configured per requirements of
CBC Chapter 11B, including extensions at the top and bottom of each flight.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: Reconstruct all handrails, numerous treads and
stringers.
Estimated Cost: $405,000 - $507,000
3.3.4
Exterior Doors
The exterior doors observed at the Property appeared to be in good condition, with the exception
accessible hardware where required (refer to Section 4.1).
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: None
3.3.5
Windows
The windows observed at the Property appeared to be in good condition. However, all windows and
sliding doors are aluminum frame and single glazed; i.e., highly thermally inefficient, and noncompliant
with current standards dictated by Title 24.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: Replace all aluminum windows and doors with
thermal glazing and efficient vinyl frames. Systems are available for the windows per se that preclude
cutting or damaging exterior plaster systems; retrofit of sliding glass doors is more complicated, but often
performed. The savings in energy costs would be significant, and recognized immediately.
Estimated Cost: $1,700,000 - $2,000,000.
3.3.6
Roofing
Roofing typically consists of composition shingle roofing, over plywood. Re-roofing has taken place on a
case by case basis over a ten year period, with the latest re-roof in approximately 2009. Portions of the
roofs are low pitch 2:12 (eaves and elevated walkways in the 8-unit buildings), and subject to accelerated
weathering. Other than a large build-up of pine needles on the roof of Buildings 6500 and 6600, the roof
shingles appear to be in good condition, with a remaining useful life of 5 – 15 years.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: None
3.3.7
Decks and Posts
The perimeter of each residential building has wooden posts extending from grade to the roof. In some
cases, these posts also support stairs and decks. Many of these posts have rotted at the base, and are in
poor to fair condition. Each building has wooden balconies and walks, in various stages of wear and
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degradation. The 2x decking is in fair condition; interior decks in the 10-unit buildings, with north
exposure, are in good condition. Decks and landings in exposed locations show greater deterioration, and
are in poor to fair condition.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: Replace exterior posts with new footings and standoff bases. Replace decking in all exposed locations.
Estimated Cost: $1,000,000 - $1,500,000
3.3.8
Exterior Stucco
All buildings are finished with exterior stucco, and all are In good condition, evidenced by lack of cracking
and exterior paint. Except as required by specific exterior reconstruction (e.g., new doors, exposure of
plumbing systems, etc), the existing stucco should expect a remaining useful life of 15 years.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: None.
3.3.9
Exterior Paint
As described above, paint on exterior stucco is in good condition. However, paint on exterior wood (e.g.,
eaves, exposed roof beams, barge boards, posts, handrails, etc.) is in poor condition, and provides a
health safety issue. There are many examples of peeling and flaking paint, much of which is immediately
accessible by children. Lead content of these exterior finishes is not a part of 4LEAF’s services, but the
flaking of paint in large pieces should be of immediate concern, and if they contain lead, they pose an
imminent danger.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: removal of exterior paint on eaves, exposed beams,
posts, stringers, and fencing. Encapsulate lead contamination, or remove as necessary. An asbestos and
lead-containing should be performed if the University decides to rehabilitate this property.
Estimated cost: $2,000,000 – 2,500,000.
3.3.10 Thermal Insulation
Attic insulation is well below current standards to comply with Title 24 Energy Conservation requirements.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: blow in approved insulation into each building attic
to achieve a R value of 38.
Estimated Cost: $200,000 - $260,000
3.3.11 Bathroom Fixtures
Toilet fixture, wall hung lavatories and bathtubs were observed to be in fair condition. Lavatory and
bathtub /shower fittings are in poor to fair shape, with many leaking, and replacement parts extremely
difficult to obtain. Ceiling exhaust fans are in poor condition, some very noisy when operating. Ceramic
tile surrounds at the tubs are in fair condition, with evidence of mold between the bottom tile and the tub.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: replace lavatory, tub and shower fittings. Replace
bathroom exhaust fans,
Estimated Cost: $650,000 - $850,000
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3.4
LIFE SAFETY/FIRE PROTECTION
3.4.1
Sprinklers and Suppression Systems
All buildings are provided with smoke and/or thermal detectors but no fire sprinkler systems Campus
Facilities/Housing checks alarms which are tied into the Fire Alarm Control Panels (FACP). Laundry
rooms are provided with alarm pull stations. Tripping of smoke detectors activates local alarms, while
thermal detectors signal the UCD Fire Department. All buildings are provided with exterior fire
extinguishers, readily visible, and all appear to be maintained with inspection cards signed off properly.
The UCD Fire Department indicates the Property has had a minimum of alarms over twenty years, with
most being small kitchen fires. Even with that record to date, having no fire sprinklers poses an immediate
hazard.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: installation of a UFC approved fire sprinkler system
throughout.
Estimated Cost: $4,000,000 - $5,000,000
3.5
INTERIOR BUILDING COMPONENTS
3.5.1
Painting
Interior walls and ceilings are all painted, smooth finish gypboard, and appear to be in good condition.
However, new gypboard work is recommended within this assessment in certain areas, and these
surfaces will require finishing to match.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: paint all new wall and ceiling surfaces, refinish
individual units showing excessive wear.
Estimated Cost:$270,000 - $330,000
3.5.2
Resilient Flooring
Interior floors consist of resilient floor, sheet goods, applied over existing 12” x 12” tile. These floors have
been replaced on a case by case basis in the 1980’s and 90’s, and are in fair to good condition.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: None
3.5.3
Kitchen Appliances
Each unit has a refrigerator and gas range/oven, The refrigerators are not energy efficient, and require
excessive and increasing maintenance. The ranges are in fair condition, the refrigerators poor to fair. The
ranges expected useful life is 5 – 10 years.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: replace all refrigerators.
Estimated Cost: $110,000 - $150,000
3.5.4
Water Heaters
Each unit has a 30 gal. gas water heater, laundries have an 84 - -90 gal gas water heater. None of the
residential heaters have required seismic straps; only one laundry (in Building 5000) has the required
straps. The unit heaters are not equipped with a cold water shut off valve, nor are they provided with
pressure relief valve piping to the exterior. Some heaters show signs of incomplete combustion, with soot
visible on the outside of the heaters. Most heaters were manufactured to 1980 era efficiency standards,
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which are well below those required now. The laundry room heaters do not have blow off to the outside,
but as these rooms have floor drains, none is required. One laundry room heater shows extensive
corrosion of piping due to dissimilar metals.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: replace all 30 gal. water heaters. Install seismic
straps on all heaters, including the laundries. Install drain blow-offs to the outside from pressure relief
valves.
Estimated Cost: $400,000 - $520,000
3.5.5
Acoustics
All tenants interviewed shared a history of unsatisfactory acoustical separation between units, both
through shared party walls, and through floor/ceiling assemblies. A review of the party wall construction
would indicate a Sound Transmission Coefficient (STC) of approximately 38-40, where an STC 50 (45 if
field tested) is required. Similarly, the ceiling/floor assembly does not indicate a construction that would
provide a compliant Impact Insulation Class (IIC) rating of 50. Both assemblies use 1/2“ gypboard, where
typically 5/8” would be used, and neither indicate use of resilient channels, rather direct fastening of
gypboard to the structure. Further, it appears that electrical boxes in party walls are not staggered
between stud spaces, and recessed soap dispensers in tub/showers provide a short cut for sound
between units. Penetrations or openings in construction assemblies; electrical devices, bathtubs, exhaust
fans, etc. must be sealed, lined, insulated or otherwise treated to maintain the required ratings.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: remove ½” gypboard at party walls, and replace
with resilient channels and 5/8” gypboard. Extend electric boxes and relocate if necessary. Remove
bathtub ceramic tile surround and recessed soap dishes, replace with fiberglass surrounds with integral
soap shelf and grab bar. Remove gypboard ceilings at ground floor units; increase acoustical insulation
within the assembly, replace with resilient channels and 5/8” gypboard. Seal all openings in the assembly.
Estimated Cost: $1,300,000 - $1,670,000
3.6 HEATING & COOLING
The residential units all have gas fired wall furnaces, and wall mounted air conditioning units. The wall
furnaces have exceeded their estimated useful life, are very inefficient, and typically are showing
thermostatic control problems. Many furnaces have problems staying lighted. They should be considered
a possible safety risk, whether by fire or carbon monoxide. The wall mounted air conditioning units are in
good condition and are highly energy inefficient.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: Replace all wall furnaces with energy efficient units
and thermostats.
Estimated Cost: $530,000 - $600,000
4.0
ADDITIONAL CONSIDERATIONS
4.1
ACCESSIBILITY FOR DISABLED PERSONS
The Fair Housing Act (Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968) and an Amended Act in 1988 prohibits
discrimination in the rental of dwellings. The design and construction requirements of the Fair Housing
Act apply to all new multi-family housing projects of four or more dwelling units. Similar to the CBC, the
design and construction requirements of the Fair Housing Act apply only to new construction for
occupancy after March 13, 1991. After January 26, 1992, American Disability Act (ADA) began requiring
that architectural and communication barriers be removed in public areas of existing facilities when their
removal is readily achievable.
14
Title II of the ADA guarantees that people with disabilities have equal access to services, programs, and
activities offered by public entities. With respect to housing, this encompasses public housing and
housing provided for state colleges and universities.
The provisions of Housing Accessibility specified in the CBC Chapter 11A do not apply to the alteration,
repair, rehabilitation or maintenance of multifamily dwellings constructed for occupancy prior to March 1,
1991. However, per Chapter 11B of the CBC, all existing public use areas must comply with the
requirements of the Division of the State Architect – Access Compliance. This would include the Office
(Building 5000) and it’s toilet facilities, and the Community Center and it’s toilet facilities and kitchen.
Access to and through exterior doors, and interior doors serving the above areas are required.
A cursory review of the Property was performed to assess its general compliance to portions of Title III of
the ADA and the accessibility provisions of the International Building Code, with California amendments.
The goal of 4LEAF’s review is to identify accessibility problems and to provide a guide for making the
facility more usable for people with disabilities. The Department of Justice recommends this be done by
the development of an implementation plan stating specifically what improvements are determined to be
readily achievable.
Some of the obvious deficiencies related to accessibility items were as follows:
The Office has service counters that exceed maximum height for accessibility, a substandard interior hall
leading to an inaccessible toilet room. The exterior door to the Office has the proper width, and a
compliant landing/threshold, but non-compliant door hardware. None of the Residential Units are
designed for or comply with accessibility requirements, including door thresholds, hardware, kitchen
counters, door clearances or bathroom fixtures. The Laundry Facilities and Tenant Storage Rooms are
not accessible, given high thresholds at the entry doors and door hardware. Certain site features project
beyond the maximum 4” into exterior pathways (e.g., a fire extinguisher at Building 7000, and sign
cabinet at Building 6600). Finally, many wall air conditioning units are a projection hazard, specifically six
air conditioning units in every 10-unit building.
Commentary: The design and construction of new housing will by law and code comply with all
accessibility provisions of applicable codes and standards, and will address accessibility to all ground
level units, adaptability of units, and accessibility of common or public access facilities. To provide the
same applicable codes and standards for the existing Orchard Park facility, the scope would be cost
prohibitive. That being said, note that the accessibility requirements are not building codes, rather federal
anti-discrimination law, and subject to severe repercussions if ignored.
4LEAF recommends the following work this year: If the Orchard Park complex is to remain in use,
retain a qualified accessibility specialist, CASp certified, and provide a detailed and thorough examination
of all aspects of the property.Provide accessible parking, entrance, counter, circulation and toilet room in
the office, accessible entrance, kitchen, circulation space and toilet room in the community building,
accessible entrances to laundry rooms at one storage unit in each of the storage buildings. Remove items
that exceed maximum projection of 4” into pathways, circulation paths, and etc. Note that conversion of
individual units is not a part of our recommendation at this time, subject to change depending on the
CASp report and recommendations.
Estimated Cost: $80,000 - $120,000
4.2
TITLE 24 - ENERGY STANDARDS
A renovation project of this magnitude will require compliance with the UCD mandate to not only comply
with Title 24 standards, but to achieve a 25% increase in compliance levels. Such a task is beyond the
scope of this report, and although included as a line item in Section 6.1, no costs associated with such
compliance are specified.
15
5.0 DOCUMENT REVIEWS AND INTERVIEWS
5.1
DOCUMENT REVIEW
Various and miscellaneous plans were made available, and consisted of incomplete collections of old
prints, as-builts and others. We selected representative samples of documents, as many as possible in
the brief amount of time allotted, and have incorporated salient information into this report. The authors of
the documents were previously identified in Section 3 above. Specific construction documents reviewed
included Sheets A1-14, S1-8, M1-3, ME1 and 2, E2 and 3, LR, L1-10, and single sheet site plan and
apartment key. No structural calculations were provided or reviewed.
5.2
INTERVIEWS
Persons interviewed for this evaluation included:
Mark Rutheiser
Assistant Director
Real Estate Services
University of California, Davis
(530) 752-1616
Doug Van Winkle
Assistant Director
Residential Facilities Maintenance
Student Housing
(530) 752-3768
Peter Menard-Warwick
Physical Plant Mechanic
UC Davis
(530) 681-7553
Captain Shawn Cullen
UC Davis Fire Department
(530) 752-1236
Various residents, anonymous
6.0
RECOMMENDATIONS AND PRELIMINARY COST ESTIMATES
6.1
IMMEDIATE REPAIR NEEDS AND COST ESTIMATES
Items of work which are beyond the scope of regular maintenance and which we feel should be
considered for immediate repair, remediation, or maintenance projects in order to continue effective use
of this facility in its current capacity. See chart page 18.
6.2
REPAIRS OVER THE TERM
Items of work which are beyond the scope of regular maintenance and which we feel should be
considered for repair, remediation, or maintenance projects within the next ten years in order to continue
effective use of this facility in its current capacity. See chart page 19.
7.0
LIMITATIONS AND QUALIFICATIONS
The information and opinions rendered in this report are exclusively for use by the University of California,
16
Davis. 4LEAF will not distribute or publish this report without consent except as required by law or court
order. The information and opinions expressed in this report are given in response to a limited
assignment and should be considered and implemented only in light of that assignment. The services
provided by 4LEAF in completing this project were consistent with normal standards of the profession. No
other warranty, expressed or implied, is made.
4LEAF has made reasonable effort to evaluate the Property conditions within the contracted scope of
services. It should be recognized that this investigation is limited in several important respects including,
but not limited to, the following:
Our findings and conclusions were based primarily on the visual appearance of the Property at the time of
our Property visit and on comparative judgments with similar properties in the 4LEAF Property observer’s
experience. Our Property observations included only areas that were readily accessible to our
representative without opening or dismantling any secured components or areas. The scope did not
include invasive investigation, component sampling, laboratory analysis, an environmental Property
assessment, or engineering evaluations of structural, mechanical, electrical, or other systems with related
calculations and review of design assumptions.
Some of our conclusions were partially based on information provided by others including representatives
of the client, the Property manager, maintenance staff, and local Fire Department officials. For the
purposes of this report, we have assumed this information to be complete and correct unless otherwise
noted. 4LEAF assumes no liability for incorrect information provided by others.
Our cost estimates represent a preliminary opinion only and are neither a quote nor a warranty or
representation as to the actual costs that may be incurred. These estimates are based on typical cost
data that may not fully characterize the scope of the Property conditions and are further limited by
possible future changes in technology, by regulatory requirements, by Property location, and by
contingencies that cannot reasonably be discovered until after commencement of on-Property
construction activities. These estimates do not address the cost impact of the possible presence of
asbestos-containing materials (ACM) or lead-based paints on renovation or demolition activities. 4LEAF
shall not be liable to the Client nor any other party for any costs or expenses that may be incurred in
excess of these estimates, for any losses that may be incurred as a result of these estimates being
different from the actual costs, nor for any damages whatsoever in connection with these estimates.
The scope-of-services performed in execution of this assessment may not be appropriate to satisfy the
needs of other users, and any use or re-use of this document or its findings, conclusions, or
recommendations is at the risk of said user. 4LEAF, Inc. is not responsible for conclusions, opinions, or
recommendations made by others based on this information.
4LEAF reserves the right to provide supplemental information or addenda within thirty calendar days at
an agreed upon cost if such information becomes available and would be determined to be of value to the
client, as determined by 4LEAF.
17
IMMEDIATE REPAIR NEEDS
NO.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
ITEM
Paving, Curbing and Parking
Includes reseal, stripe, 7 curb cuts
Interior lots
Street service
Flatwork
Landscaping & Appurtenances
Water
Includes replacement of domestic
water system throughout
Electricity and Natural Gas
Adding 12"x12" vents
Sanitary Sewer
Includes replacing two story waste
stacks, second level waste lines,
and sewer laterals
Building Frame
Demolition and reconstruction of
the shade enclosure outside of the
Shop building
Stairs
Steel frame, concrete treads, switchback, and partial deck replacement
Straight run stairs, partial deck
Handrails, guardrails, demo and new
Windows and sliding doors
Windows
Sliding glass doors
Decks and Posts
Exterior Paint
Thermal Insulation
Bathroom Fixtures
Lavatories, tub and shower fittings,
bathroom exhaust fans
Sprinklers and Suppression Systems
Interior Painting
Kitchen Appliances
Water Heaters
Acoustics
Gypbd, resilient channels
Tub surrounds
Heating and Cooling
Accessibility
Asbestos and Lead Survey
Detailed ADA survey
Title 24 uprades (not defined)
SUBTOTALS
OH&P
DESIGN, PM, ETC
TOTAL IMMEDIATE NEEDS
QUAN
UNIT
PRICE
LOW RANGE
HIGH RANGE
$
120,000.00
$
120,000.00
7
7
1
1
1
EA
EA
LS
LS
LS
$ 12,000.00
$ 5,150.00
$ 4,000.00
$ 4,000.00
NOTE 1
$
$
$
$
$
84,000.00
36,000.00
4,000.00
30,000.00
6,000,000.00
$
$
$
$
$
84,000.00
36,000.00
4,000.00
30,000.00
9,000,000.00
27
1
EA
LS
$
100.00
NOTE 2
$
$
2,700.00
8,000,000.00
$
$
2,700.00
12,000,000.00
1
LS
$ 20,000.00
$
20,000.00
$
20,000.00
NOTE 3
$
405,600.00
$
507,000.00
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
160,000.00
89,600.00
156,000.00
1,700,000.00
1,180,000.00
520,000.00
1,094,000.00
2,000,000.00
200,000.00
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
200,000.00
112,000.00
195,000.00
2,000,000.00
1,388,000.00
612,000.00
1,490,000.00
2,500,000.00
260,000.00
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
650,000.00
4,000,000.00
270,000.00
110,000.00
400,000.00
1,300,000.00
1,080,000.00
220,000.00
530,000.00
80,000.00
Not included
Not included
Not included
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
850,000.00
5,000,000.00
330,000.00
150,000.00
520,000.00
1,670,000.00
1,380,000.00
282,000.00
600,000.00
120,000.00
Not included
Not included
Not included
$
$
$
28,936,900.00
4,340,535.00
9,983,230.50
$
$
$
41,462,700.00
6,219,405.00
14,304,631.50
$
43,200,000.00
$
62,000,000.00
40
28
78
EA
EA
EA
$ 4,000.00
$ 3,200.00
$ 2,000.00
600
200
1
1
57500
NOTE 7
EA
LS
LS
SF
$ 1,960.00
$ 2,600.00
NOTE 4
NOTE 5
$
3.50
200
1
200
200
206
LS
UNITS
EA
EA
$ 3,250.00
NOTE 6
$ 1,350.00
$
550.00
$ 1,940.00
99100
200
200
1
SF
EA
EA
LS
$
10.90
$ 1,100.00
$ 2,650.00
$ 80,000.00
15%
30%
18
REPAIRS OVER THE TERM
NO.
1
2
3
ITEM
QUAN
UNIT
PRICE
LOW RANGE
HIGH RANGE
Reroof
Accessibility (10 units plus site)
Kitchen Appliances (ranges)
LS
LS
200
$
$
$
2,500,000.00 $
2,600,000.00 $
150,000.00 $
3,000,000.00
3,000,000.00
200,000.00
GRAND SUBTOTALS
OH&P
DESIGN, PM, ETC.
15%
30%
$
$
$
48,450,000.00 $
787,500.00 $
1,575,000.00 $
68,200,000.00
930,000.00
1,860,000.00
$
50,800,000.00 $
71,000,000.00
PROJECT TOTALS
NOTES
1 An allowance, based on comparable replacements performed at Regan Complex
2 An allowance, based on comparable work at Solano Park and Regan Complex
3 High range based on 1.25 multiplier
4 An allowance, based on similar work at Solano and Orchard Parks
5 No takeoff has been performed for this task, however it is noted that the level of work, beginning with
removal, safe disposal, prepping, and painting will be very extensive. Costs could run higher.
6 An allowance, based on a retrofit project at the Regan Complex
7 Includes removel, reframe, gyp and exterior finish patch
8 Where applicable, Davis-Bacon Wages have been incorporated by a 1.3 muliplier
9 Refer to Section 2.4 for scoping language regarding these estimates
19
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B
1. Parking at office, no accessible stalls or
access.
2. Off street parking, no curb cuts.
3. Perimeter fence at children’s play areas.
4. Excessive projection (>4”) into accessible
pathway
5. Excessive projection (>4”) into accessible
pathway
6. Brick upheaval at pathway
7. Inaccessible counter in office (+42”)
8. Inaccessible counter in office (+42”)
9. Exterior door into toilet, inaccessible width
and hardware
10. Door into Laundry, inaccessible
threshold, hardware
11. All exterior doors (Laundry and Storage)
inaccessible
12. Inaccessible hall and toilet room in office
13. Inaccessible kitchen facilities in
community center
14. Inaccessible toilet at Bldg 6100
16. Residential water heater, incomplete
combustion, no seismic straps
15. Inaccessible door hardware, threshold
into Laundry
17. No seismic straps
18. Compliant water heater in Bldg 5000
Laundry
19. Laundry water heater, no seismic straps
19A. Missing seismic restraints in Laundry
20. Dielectric corrosion at Laundry water
heater
21. Typical recessed soap dish in ceramic tile
22. Exposed wiring, building exterior
23. Missing courtyard fencing between units
24. Typical exterior, 8 unit building
24A.Noncompliant stair handrail, profile and
clearance
25. Second floor balcony gates (opening
hardware too high)
26. Typical exterior, 8 unit building
27. Typical use of tall posts to roof overhang,
no balcony
28. Roof eave, excessive peeling paints
29. Typical paint failures, full height posts
30. Typical paint failures, full height posts
31. Paint failure at roof eave
32. Paint failure at roof eave
33. Shade enclosure outside of Bldg 6100,
dry rot in eave
35. Extensive dry rot
34. Extensive dry rot (beam crushing)
35-A. Dry rot at second floor exterior balcony
36. Typical dry rot at stair railings
38. Dry rot at midlanding exterior stair
37. Dry rot at midlanding exterior stair
39. Dry rot under stair to second level
40. Extensive dry rot
41. Dry rot at stair landing
42. Stair tread dry rot
43. Stringer dry rot
45. Stair tread dry rot
44. Early failure of stair rail
46. Dry rot at stair handrail, early stages in
stringer
47. Stair stringer dry rot
47-A. Stair tread dry rot
48. Stair tread dry rot
49. Stair tread dry rot
50. Dry rot at stair rail
51. Dry rot at post base
52. Dry rot and paint failure
53. Dry rot at post base
54. Typical stair tread dry rot

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