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- AGCanada
For the
Bees
Customer
Service
A research project
assesses bee habitat » PG 8
Cigi hosts annual
international program » PG 3
SERVING MANITOBA FARMERS SINCE 1925 | Vol. 74, No. 33 | $1.75
August 18, 2016
manitobacooperator.ca
Reviving a symbol of
Canada’s agricultural past
CP Rail raring
to move
expected
bumper crop
A company executive
says the grain-handling
and transportation
system learned lessons
from the 2013-14
shipping backlog
Built in 1912, the Dominion Exhibition Building No. II is being
refurbished to resume its place as a host for community events
BY JENNIFER PAIGE
Co-operator staff / Brandon
O
nce a hub of agricultural activity, in
recent years Brandon’s Dominion
Exhibition Building No. II has been
left idle and close to disrepair. Fearing
loss of the valued landmark, in 2009 the
Provincial Exhibition of Manitoba took on
the challenge of restoring the building to
its former glory.
“As both an organization and a community we have a lot of history here. It would
be a shame to see this building be knocked
down,” said exhibition chair Stan Cochrane.
The building, which sits on the Keystone
Centre grounds in Brandon, is one of few
remaining buildings from Canada’s Dominion Fair era and a rare surviving example of the country’s agricultural exhibition
history.
“Back in the early 1900s the federal government designated a city to host a Dominion Exhibition Fair every year and then
money was given and buildings were built
for every fair,” Cochrane said. “This was the
last building and last fair of its kind ever
held in 1913. After that the world war broke
out and they cancelled them and never
started the program again.”
Cochrane says the Dominion Exhibition
Fairs, which were held across Canada from
1879 to 1913, were similar to events like
Manitoba Ag Days.
“That is how they spread the word. If there
were new things coming out in agriculture,
the fair is how they promoted it. The first
day of the Dominion Fair in Brandon in
BY ALLAN DAWSON
Co-operator staff
C
anadian Pacific Railway
is ready to move
W e s t e r n C a n a d a ’s
bumper 2016 crop, but is disappointed surplus system
capacity isn’t being used now.
Publication Mail Agreement 40069240
See CP Rail on page 7 »
Stan Cochrane is the chair of the Provincial Exhibition of Manitoba,
which is restoring the Dominion Exhibition Building. Photo: Jennifer Paige
1913, there were 100,000 people here. They
came on trains and lived in tents. Fairs were
a big deal back then.”
Unlike today with the convenience of
Google and Twitter, if you wanted the latest
industry news, you had best not miss the
Dominion Exhibition Fair.
“Going to the fair was how you learned
about new things and networked with
people who were trying to do similar things
that you were,” Cochrane said.
Brandon was designated to hold the
Dominion Fair in 1912, and the building
was designed by Walter H. Shillinglaw and
David Marshall, two prominent architects
from Brandon.
“It is just amazing what they did back
in those days because they never got the
money allocated or got the fair approved
until sometime in 1912 and they had this
building all built and ready to go in 1913,”
Cochrane said.
See Exhibition on page 6 »
Battling blight: Home gardeners key to late blight control » PAGE 18
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2
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
INSIDE
Did you know?
LIVESTOCK
Process extends
milk shelf life
Show skills
Young beef producers
continue to hone
their craft
12
The new technique could reduce waste and
make distribution more efficient
STAFF
R
CROPS
Test early
Soil testing right
after combining
has benefits
17
FEATURE
Low tech
Simple solutions
can change small
farmers’ lives
29
CROSSROADS
Setting
standards
Once Winnipeg was
where tractors proved
their mettle
4
5
8
10
Editorials
Comments
What’s Up
Livestock Markets
32
Grain Markets
Weather Vane
Classifieds
Sudoku
esearchers at Purdue
University say a new
process could extend
milk’s shelf life to as long as
nine weeks.
Bruce Applegate, an associate professor of food science,
says he and other researchers
rapidly heated and cooled mik,
which significantly reduced the
number of harmful bacteria.
Applegate and collaborators from Purdue and the
University of Tennessee published their findings in the
journal SpringerPlus.
They used milk inoculated
with bacteria and quickly
raised the milk’s temperature
by 10 C, then just as quickly
lowered it, without reaching
the 70 C threshold that’s considered pasteurization. They
found increasing the temperature of milk by 10° for
less than a second eliminates
more than 99 per cent of the
bacteria left behind after
pasteurization.
“It’s an add-on to pasteurization, but it can add
shelf life of up to five, six or
seven weeks to cold milk,”
Applegate said.
Purdue University researcher Bruce Applegate and other collaborating
researchers developed a process that extends the shelf life of milk. PHOTO: Purdue Agriculture Communication/Tom Campbell
The treatment lowered bacterial levels below detection
limits, and extended shelf life
to up to 63 days.
“ With the treatment,
you’re taking out almost
everything,” Applegate said.
“Whatever does survive
is at such a low level that it
takes much longer for it to
multiply.”
Phillip Myer, an assistant
professor of animal science
at the University of Tennessee
and a co-author of the paper,
said the process uses the
heat already necessary for
pasteurization.
“The process significantly
reduces the amount of bacteria present, and it doesn’t
add any extra energy to the
system,” Myer said.
Myer said the promise
of the technology is that it
could reduce waste and
allow milk to reach distant
locations.
READER’S PHOTO
11
16
20
26
ONLINE & MOBILE
Visit www.manitobacooperator.ca for daily
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on “Digital Edition” in the top right corner.) At
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at top right to find recent Co-operator articles.
Select “Manitoba Co-operator” in the pull-down
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download the Manitoba Co-operator mobile app.
PHOTO: nancy hall
www.manitobacooperator.ca
Editor / FBC Editorial Director
Laura Rance
[email protected]
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3
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
Cigi course highlights customer relations
The reliability of Canadian wheat is the theme of Cigi’s annual international program
“Sometimes you cannot go to a certain part of the
country because of the fight, sometimes roads are
closed for battles that happen suddenly.”
BY SHANNON VANRAES
Co-operator staff
T
hey come from 16 different countries, but have
one thing in common —
Canadian wheat.
Participants in the 49th annual
International Grain Industry
Program at the Canadian
International Grains Institute,
better known as Cigi, are in
Canada to learn more about
where the grain they buy comes
from, how it is grown and how it
is shipped.
“Partly we’re saying thank you
to them for being good customers, but the big piece is just reassuring them again about the
quality system in Canada,” said
Rick Morgan, special projects
adviser at Cigi. “We want to make
sure they see how government
and industry work together to
ensure that what the customer
receives is what they are expecting to receive.”
For Haitham Al-Khshali, director general of the Grain Board of
Iraq, the two-week-long program
has only helped to solidify his
appreciation of Canadian wheat.
While he would like to see more
grain harvested in his home
country, the current political situation has generated many pitfalls
for agricultural producers there.
“They have a lot of obstacles,
as you know they have a fight
against ISIS, this fight is really a
great conflict between Iraqi people and terrorists and this takes a
great effort,” Al-Khshali said.
“Sometimes you cannot go
to a certain part of the country
because of the fight, sometimes
roads are closed for battles that
happen suddenly.”
The so-called Islamic State or
Daesh has also been aggressively
targeting grain silos in the war-
Haitham Al-Khshali
Haitham Al-Khshali (l), director general of the Grain Board of Iraq and Emmanuel
Mshelia of Royal Mills and Foods Limited of Nigeria both participated in Cigi’s
annual international program. Photo: Shannon VanRaes
ravaged country, either razing
them or capturing them.
“These people are crazy and
they have destroyed everything
in the country... this is not logical
for any person,” said Al-Khshali,
adding that ongoing military
conflicts have also destroyed
generational knowledge in Iraq.
Youth may go off to fight, people are also killed at home, forced
off their land or internally displaced, he said, leaving either no
one to teach the next generation
about farming or no one to learn.
Education systems have also
been disrupted.
As a result, Iraq depends heavily on foreign imports of wheat,
particularly from Canada.
“We are really happy that we
deal with Canadian wheat, we
have dealt with it for a long time,”
he said, noting Iraq had purchased 100,000 tonnes of wheat
from Richardson only three
months earlier and had made an
order for that same amount three
months prior to that.
Canada, China canola
talks end without deal
He said that the kind of training provided by Cigi is exactly
what his country’s millers and
growers are looking for, and
that he hopes the relationship
between the institute and Iraq
continues to be a strong one.
Nigeria has also been increasingly reliant on Canadian wheat
in recent years, although for very
different reasons.
“Canadian wheat is not new
to Nigeria, but we have seen
the import of Canadian wheat
into Nigeria double in the last
couple of years, to be precise, I
think from 2008 the import value
of Canadian wheat was about
C$12.3 million, which rose to
about C$160.5 million by 2013,”
said Emmanuel Mshelia of Royal
Mills and Foods Limited in Karu
Abuja, Nigeria. “And if you look at
the figure for exports of Canadian
merchandise to Nigeria in 2015,
it stood at about C$469 million,
which is a lot of growth.”
Demand for high-protein
wheat, which is usually blended
with lower-quality wheats, has
been driven by a growing and
increasingly urban population.
That same population is also
seeking convenient foods that
require little preparation, Mshelia
added.
Instant Asian noodles are one
of the most popular choices for
consumers and the main product
produced by Royal Mills.
“Asian noodles were introduced into the Nigerian market
I think about 22, 25 years ago,
and it has gained acceptance by
almost all category of people,”
he explained. “Because of the
convenience of cooking, it’s very
fast… lifestyles have changed.”
Royal Mills plans to double
production in the next year, tripling it with the next five years,
importing more Canadian wheat
as it expands. However, due to
low oil prices and a deepening
recession, overall wheat imports
to Nigeria are expected to shrink
in 2017.
“We are aggressive as a company and we have been able to
come out with a very good product, which is very, very fast taking over the market,” Mshelia
said, adding the characteristics
of Canadian Western Red Spring
wheat is particularly well suited
to instant noodle production.
Morgan said that presentations on noodle making, milling
and baking were all a part of the
program, which allowed customers to really get to know the
Canadian system of production.
I M P O R T A N T
“There were many questions
asked and many questions
answered,” he said, adding that
the program has been adapted
many times since its inception
nearly five decades ago. The end
of the Canadian Wheat Board’s
single desk has also changed the
interactions participants have.
“We have a bit more opportunity to introduce them to some
other Canadian crops as well,
and some of their countries are
also importing other Canadian
crops, like canola and pulses and
things like that,” Morgan said. “So
we spend a little bit of time on
those kinds of crops as well, and
have presentations by groups
like Pulse Canada and the Canola
Council that didn’t happen in the
past.”
There was also a presentation
by Grain Farmers of Ontario,
before the group headed to
Vancouver to see wheat being
loaded onto ships.
“When the wheat board was
around, it was pretty focused on
western wheat and now we have
the opportunity to include something about eastern Canadian
wheat as well,” he said.
Some of the participants had
been in Canada before, but it has
been decades since a representative from Iraq has participated.
For others it was their first trip to
Canada.
“This is my first and I hope it
won’t be my last,” said Mshelia.
[email protected]
N O T I C E
Canada’s biggest canola
export market may be at risk
Grain farmers
BY ROD NICKEL
Winnipeg/Reuters
As of August 6, 2016, Milligan Biofuels Inc. of
Foam Lake, Saskatchewan is no longer licensed by
the Canadian Grain Commission.
T
alks between Canadian
and Chinese officials
ended in Beijing without
China backing down from plans
to toughen its inspection standard for canola, threatening $2
billion in Canadian exports of
the oilseed ahead of a visit by
Canada’s prime minister.
Discussions will continue
between the two governments,
and resolving the issue is a priority for Ottawa, Guy Gallant,
s p o k e s m a n f o r C a n a d a’s
Agriculture Minister Lawrence
MacAulay, said Aug. 12.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau
is expected to visit China
before September Group of 20
(G20) meetings there. Trudeau,
elected last year, pledged to
expand trade with China,
although relations between the
countries have been testy at
times.
China’s quarantine authority
AQSIQ told Ottawa in February
that it would impose a stricter
inspection standard for canola
shipments starting April 1, over
Photo: Thinkstock
concerns about the crop disease blackleg. It later postponed
the move to Sept. 1.
Canada is the world’s biggest
exporter of canola, used mainly
to produce vegetable oil.
Exporters including
R i c h a rd s o n In t e r n a t i o n a l ,
Viterra and Cargill stand to lose
sales to Canada’s biggest canola
export market, and the dispute
may also hurt China’s push for a
free trade deal with Canada.
“China and Canada have
been seeking to find a solution
to this issue through consultations,” said Yang Yundong,
spokesman for the Chinese
Embassy in Canada, referring
other questions to the Canadian
government.
If you do business with this company after August 5, 2016,
you are not protected by security under the
Canada Grain Act.
1-800-853-6705 or 204-984-0506
TTY: 1-866-317-4289
www.grainscanada.gc.ca
4
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
OPINION/EDITORIAL
Safety first
BY GORD GILMOUR
Co-operator Associate Editor
A
few years ago I had what I now
ruefully refer to as a series of
unfortunate events.
It began innocently enough with a
phone call one Saturday morning from
a friend, wondering if I could help him
Gord Gilmour
move a couch.
Associate Editor
An hour or so later, on a frosty March
morning, we were wrestling it out of the
side door of his house when I suddenly felt both feet slip out
from under me and one ankle jammed against the foundation
of his house so loudly I heard a pop.
Being a man I insisted it was just a really bad sprain and
hobbled back to my place to ice it. After a couple of days it
hadn’t got any better. In fact, the bruise was so pronounced
the whole foot was turning black. Upon seeing the damage
first hand, one friend announced, “Gord, that looks like a
corpse’s foot. I’m taking you to the hospital.” Turns out I’d
broken the ball off the big bone in my lower leg and required
surgery to repair it.
A couple of days later, I got surgery and an overnight hospital stay, and was released to the world hobbling around on my
crutches.
If the story ended there, you’d think, “so what?” But of
course there’s a punchline.
About three days later, clumsy fellow that I can be, I managed to fall off the crutches and sever the connection between
my patellar tendon and kneecap on the other leg.
Back to the hospital I went for a second, and even larger
and more invasive, surgery to fix this new problem. For
those of you keeping score at home, this left me with one
leg I couldn’t put weight on for six weeks and another that I
couldn’t bend for about the same length of time.
A good friend put it best when he came to visit me in the
hospital and inquired, “So, basically, you’re just a really
mouthy paperweight for the next while?”
All I could do was agree. I certainly couldn’t chase him
down and make him take it back.
I don’t tell this story looking to garner any sympathy. It’s
years in the rear-view mirror. I’ve made a near-total recovery
and picked up some new weather prediction skills while I was
at it. And the perspective of time has turned the whole experience into a bunch of funny stories and a few valuable life lessons on important topics like patience and empathy.
Still, if I could go back to prevent it from happening I
would. It was painful, disruptive and that knee will never
quite be the same. And doubly so because I know with crystal
clarity I could have prevented both injuries if I’d just slowed
down for a few seconds and made sure I was progressing
safely.
I saw the patch of ice I slipped on when moving the couch,
but it looked like it was well out of the way of the path. I recall
thinking, “we should put something on that,” but of course we
didn’t. Then the reality of moving an eight-foot-long piece of
furniture forced me off the path and right onto it so my friend
could clear the door frame. The rest is very painful history.
As for falling off my crutches, I knew that I was struggling to
adapt to them. I also knew there was better technology available for rent, such as knee scooters. I just hadn’t got around
to getting one yet before it all caught up with me.
I do tell this story to you as a cautionary tale. Every accident
that’s ever happened always has multiple points when the
whole chain of events could be stopped dead. It’s the reason
safety advocates and even some law enforcement and emergency responders are loath to call events “accidents,” because
baked into that wording is the assumption nothing could
have possibly prevented it — when nothing is further from
the truth.
The fact of the matter is Manitoba farms are just entering
one of their busiest seasons, as the hard work of the spring
and summer culminates in harvest.
The days will be long, the pressures high and too often
inclement weather will loom. There will be a terrible temptation to cut corners. Fatigue will catch up with you. Sometimes
risks will flat out be missed in the hustle. I know all of this
and I know little can change this reality.
But taking just a bit longer can often be the most efficient
way to accomplish your work. After all, an injury is at best a
time waster and at worst a crisis. And I suppose a fatal accident would free you from the tyranny of the calendar but I
don’t think I’m putting words in anyone’s mouth when I say
we’d all probably be happy to give that option a pass.
Accidents always spring from error of the human kind. They
can happen very quickly and are irrevocable. Once they happen, all the wishing in the world won’t take away the effects.
With harvest underway in parts of Manitoba and right on
the verge in others, I just want to wish you all the best for a
smooth, profitable and safe harvest.
You deserve it — and so do your families.
[email protected]
Consumers need to manage
food packaging waste
BY PAUL BOOTSMA
CFFO
S
ince early in May Tim Hortons has been
removing garbage bins from drivethrough lanes. Some have been placed in
less obvious locations on the store properties.
Tim Hortons is concerned customers don’t
have enough time to properly sort their garbage into bins placed alongside drive-through
lanes, so it has taken the trash cans away.
They were also finding too much trash from
other sources, which is one reason given for
the changes.
“The recent changes we’ve made to the
placement of our exterior waste and recycling
units are meant to improve the accuracy and
efficiency of our waste diversion programs,”
the company said in an emailed statement to
the Globe and Mail when the changes began
this spring. “Our goal with the new waste
and recycling unit locations is to provide our
guests with enough time to sort materials into
the appropriate compartments, which can
be difficult in a quick-moving drive-through
lane.”
I have often observed that these waste and
recycling bins are messy. It takes time for
employees to clean up and hopefully they will
not get stung by a bee in the process. This is
a cost to the franchise and therefore it makes
sense (cents) to make changes. So people will
need to go out of their way to dispose of their
garbage. This puts the responsibility of garbage disposal onto the consumer.
Because consumers purchase a good
amount of processed food as part of their
weekly diets, we end up with a significant
amount of packaging that is typically thrown
out. Throwing out this garbage is very easy
to do. It gets picked up for us and delivered
to the landfill site. We pay for the cost of this
through our taxes. If more responsibility for
garbage disposal is placed on the consumer,
would they then in turn opt for less packaging
with their purchases?
Waste is a big topic lately, and here in
Ontario, the government has upcoming
‘Waste Free Ontario’ legislation. Food waste is
certainly a big part of the equation in the food
sector, but packaging needs our attention as
well to reduce environmental pollution. As
landfills are filling up to their maximum use
and less land is available for these sites, work
needs to be done on reducing the waste that
goes to landfill sites in the first place. We need
to keep our agricultural land for food production and often landfill sites take up this asset.
What needs to be determined is the most
efficient and environmentally friendly process to dispose of garbage and then society
should encourage government to support that
process.
Perhaps Tim Hortons has it right. If you
purchase products with throw-away packaging, it’s your responsibility to dispose of it
properly. If you don’t like to, don’t purchase
it. As for coffee cups, bring your travel mug
next time you order a coffee through the
drive-through.
Paul Bootsma is the field service manager of the Christian
Farmers’ Federation of Ontario.
OUR HISTORY: August 1986
C
anadian Co-operative Implements Ltd. (CCIL) started
in 1940 as a co-op to market equipment and later
manufacture its own. In 1973, CCIL built a large
plant in Winnipeg to manufacture combines, swathers,
discers, cultivators, harrows and other equipment. The
decision turned out to be a poor one for the company, and
it struggled for several years. In 1986 it merged with Vicon
Manufacturing, keeping its former logo but renaming the
company as Cereal Implements, as seen in this ad in our
Aug. 14, 1986 issue. However, it continued to struggle and
was placed in receivership in 1991.
As a reminder of how communication has changed, the
NFU had sent a message to Prime Minister Brian Mulroney
asking him to take action against the U.S. for its grain export
subsidies. The message was sent by telegram.
Manitoba Crop Insurance had announced extension of
winter wheat coverage to the Red River Valley if growers
used Dithane (mancozeb) to control rust. Cost was said to
be expensive at $15 an acre. Meanwhile the new fungicide
Tilt was being tested in the province, and manufacturer
Ciba-Geigy hoped to have it registered in 1988.
The Winnipeg Commodity Exchange had rejected
appeals of three members who had been expelled and
fined $375,000. Two of the traders were later prosecuted
and jailed for fraud.
5
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
COMMENT/FEEDBACK
Biofuels are mankind’s greatest blunder
Proponents of biofuels are simply refusing to count their true environmental cost
By Gwyn Morgan
TroyMedia
A
re biofuels really greener
than the fossil fuels they
displace?
In a recent column I pointed out
that electric cars are only as green
as the fuel used to generate the
electricity they consume.
For internal-combustion-powered vehicles, much of the focus
has been on trying to reduce carbon emissions by adding ethanol to
gasoline and vegetable oil to diesel.
These biofuels are sourced mainly
from cereal grain and vegetable oil.
Ethanol is manufactured by fermenting and distilling grain, while
vegetable oil comes mainly from
palm trees.
Biofuel has become an enormous global industry, producing
some 100 billion litres annually.
Mandatory ethanol and vegetable
oil standards have been enacted in
64 countries.
But biofuels fail on several fronts.
First we need to correct the popular misconception that burning
biofuel produces significantly lower
emissions than gasoline or diesel.
In reality, there’s little difference.
Essentially, all of the hypothesized
emission reduction relies on the
premise that, since plants consume
carbon dioxide to grow, the carbon
they remove approximates the carbon released when burned. This is
the basis for the biofuel industry’s
claim of zero net emissions.
But just as the zero-emissions
electr ic car fallacy ignores the
environmental impacts of electricity generation, the zero-emissions
biofuel myth ignores the environmental impacts of production.
And there’s a lot of evidence that
these production impacts cause
very serious environmental damage, while exacerbating global
food shortages and creating price
escalations.
Let’s star t with ethanol fuel.
The United States and Brazil are
by far the largest producers. In the
U.S., some five billion bushels of
corn are used annually to produce
49 billion litres of ethanol fuel
through the same highly energyintensive fermentation and distillation process used to produce whiskey. That 49 billion litres of ethanol
are enough to fill 65 billion standard whiskey bottles.
Mu l t i p l e s t u d i e s , i n c l u d i n g
by the International Institute for
Sustainable Development, conclude that the fossil fuel used to
p r o d u c e c o r n e t h a n o l c re a t e s
essentially the same carbon emissions as the gasoline and diesel
displaced.
But that’s only part of the environmental impact. Rising cor n
prices have led to the draining and
tillage of ecologically important
wetlands. And increased fertilizer
use has sent nutrient-rich run-off
into streams and rivers, resulting
in weed-choked, oxygen-starved
water courses devoid of fish and
other aquatic life.
Meanwhile in Brazil, almost one
million acres a year of carbondioxide-absorbing tropical forest are clear cut and replaced by
“... the zero-emissions biofuel myth ignores the
environmental impacts of production.”
Gwyn Morgan
sugar cane for ethanol production.
Studies show that the net effect
is about 50 per cent more carbon
emissions than by fuelling automobiles with fossil fuels.
Then there’s the food-or-fuel
issue. The cereal grain required
to produce enough ethanol to fill
the fuel tank of an average-size car
would feed one person for a year.
In 2000, some 70 per cent of global
corn imports came from the U.S.,
but that important global food supply has largely been redirected to
ethanol production. So while U.S.
Corn Belt farmers buy bigger tractors and more expensive pickups,
international food-focused nongovernmental organizations such
as Oxfam cite biofuels as contributing to food supply shortages and
price increases that disproportionately hurt the world’s poor.
What about the environmental
impacts of producing palm oil for
biodiesel?
Indonesia is the world’s largest
producer of palm oil and the island
of Borneo, in particular, is a great
place to produce it, provided you
first burn one of the world’s most
important rainforests. A visit to
this land is a depressing lesson in
the unintended consequences of
actions taken by politicians half a
world away. I have witnessed the
lung-choking smoke as hundreds
of thousands of square kilometres of rainforest were burned to
create huge industrial palm tree
farms. The same scenario is playing
out in remote parts of Indonesian
Sumatra.
How ironic that decisions aimed
at environmental benefit are permanently destroying the lungs of
our planet, obliterating the way of
life of aboriginals who have lived in
harmony with nature for centuries,
and wiping out habitat for endangered species like orangutan.
A Na t u ra l G e o g ra p h i c a r t i c l e
entitled biofuels: The Original Car
Fuel, states “Gasoline and diesel are actually ancient biofuels...
made from decomposed plants and
animals that have been buried in
the ground for millions of years.”
Trying to replace these ancient biofuels with fuels made from plants
grown today is one of mankind’s
greatest environmental blunders.
Gwyn Morgan is a retired Canadian energy
industry leader and current board member and
past CEO of EnCana.
Manitoba cosmetic pesticide ban is healthy public policy
The new provincial government’s move to reopen this debate is poorly considered
By Kim Perrotta MHSc
and Dr. John Howard
Canadian Association of Physicians
for the Environment
M
a n i t o b a’s g ov e r n ment has reopened
the public debate
on cosmetic pesticides.
T h e p r ov i n c i a l re g u l a tions, which banned the use
of chemical herbicides on
lawns and public properties
used by children, came into
effect less than two years
ago.
On July 20, the province
launched a public consultation process on the ban with
a Twitter post that posed
the question, “Pesticide free
or weed free?” It seems an
unfortunate way to engage
residents in an important
discussion about a public policy that is directed
towards the protection of
public health.
Municipalities and provinces began banning the use
of cosmetic pesticides two
decades ago, in response
to concerns expressed by
their citizens about the serious health impacts that
appeared to be associated
with them. While companies do conduct laboratory
tests on active ingredients
in pesticide products in
order to get them approved
for sale, those tests are far
from perfect. They do not
always pick up on chronic
health impacts associated
with long-term exposures.
They do not pick up serious health impacts that can
result from subtle changes
in the hormone or immune
systems of humans. They
are seldom conducted on
the mixture of chemicals
contained in each pesticide
product. They do not reflect
the cumulative exposures
that humans experience
from many different sources.
For this reason, epidemiological studies, conducted
on populations of humans,
are used by health scientists
to identify health impacts
from exposures that people
experience in real life.
Thousands of epidemiological studies have been
directed at pesticides. In
2002, Toronto Public Health
conducted a systematic
review of 300 scientific studies conducted on pesticides
used on lawn and gardens.
Thousands of epidemiological studies have
been directed at pesticides.
When the reviewers examined studies of occupationally exposed workers, they
found that pesticides were
associated with moderate
increases in the risks for
some cancers, some reproductive effects, and some
neurological disorders.
When they examined the
long-term studies directed
at children, they found that
p re - c o n c e p t i o n , p re n a t a l
and postnatal exposure to
pesticides were associated
with moderate increases in
the risks from some cancers
and some birth defects.
In 2012, the Ontario
College of Family Physicians
conducted a systematic
review of pesticide studies
published after 2003. These
reviewers closely examined
142 well-designed studies and found that pesticide
exposures were associated
with adverse reproductive
effects (e.g. low birth weights
in babies), measurable deficits in the neurodevelopment
of children (e.g. deficits in
their mental and/or motor
development), and respiratory diseases (e.g. asthma).
In many of these studies, the
adverse effects observed in
children were related to the
exposure of their mothers
during pregnancy or to exposures early in life.
The reviewers concluded
that steps should be taken
by individuals and communities to minimize pesticide
exposures for all members
of society, and for pregnant
women and children in particular. They also noted that
previous bans directed at
pesticides that had heavy
health burdens were effective in reducing both, the
health risks in children, and
the frequency with which
pesticides were detected in
samples collected from children and the environment.
When health professionals look at these results, we
weigh the health risks against
the health benefits associated with their use. We recognize that there may be
times when the health benefits associated with the use
of a pesticide may outweigh
the health risks associated
with them (although even
in those cases, we would ask
ourselves if there were safer
alternatives). However, in the
case of cosmetic pesticides,
where the purpose is to guarantee a beautiful lawn or garden, we feel that the health
risks to our children must
take precedence. This is the
thinking behind municipal
and provincial bans of cosmetic pesticides. It is to apply
the precautionary principle;
to decide to act for the protection of our children in the
face of scientific uncertainty.
Dr. John Howard is a pediatric
gastroenterologist who practised
medicine in London, Ontario for
31 years. Kim Perrotta is a public
health advocate who has worked on
environmental health issues for over
30 years.
6
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
FROM PAGE ONE
Exhibition Continued from page 1
The 1913 fair opened on July
13. It was held for 10 days and saw
200,000 visitors. The Dominion
Exhibition building went on to
host community events for several decades.
“In the 1980s we stopped using
the building for fairs and started
to use it for storage. Then it began
to deteriorate and started to leak,
so we had to decide what we were
going to do with it,” Cochrane
said.
Heritage designation
In 1984, the province listed the
building as a provincial heritage
site and in 2009, the Heritage
Canada Foundation listed the
building as one of the most
endangered structures in the
country.
“Heritage Canada actually
listed the building on its top 10
endangered places list. It was
definitely in poor condition and
something needed to be done. It
was estimated to collapse within
five years at that time,” said Daryl
The Provincial Exhibition of Manitoba
began restoring the building in 2009
and hopes to complete the project in
2017. Photos: Jennifer Paige
Knight, project manager with the
Provincial Exhibition.
Parks Canada listed the building as a rare surviving example
of the late-19th- and early-20thcentury-type of exhibition halls.
By 2009, the Dominion Exhibition building was the only surviving building in Canada that had
been constructed for the Dominion Exhibition Fairs.
“At that time the building was
The Dominion Exhibition Building No. II was built in 1912 and
housed community and agriculture events until the 1980s. being maintained by the Keystone Centre, but it could not afford the necessary repairs,” Cochrane said. “And, because of the
heritage designation, it wasn’t
able to have it torn down.”
Restoration progress
With the history of the building
in mind, the exhibition began
envisioning the restored building
to be a cultural and tourism asset
for WestMan that would house an
agriculture display, contain office
space and include an outdoor
agriculture-themed park.
The restoration began in 2009
and since then sewer and water
lines have been dug in, a fire-suppression system installed, the roof
replaced, windows restored, the
perimeter foundation replaced
and interior windows added.
“There are over 100 windows
in this building. The old original
windows were really rotted and
the original glass was broken,”
Cochrane said. “So, we took them
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up to the Air Training Museum in
Brandon where they have a good
woodworking shop and they were
willing to work with us to restore
all of the windows.”
The interior posts were in great
condition with only one having
to be replaced, but the exterior
doors were a little bit more of a
challenge.
“The doors were pretty much
all gone, so we just went with pictures of what the doors are supposed to look like. We had them
installed this spring,” Cochrane
said.
Local contractors have done
more than 90 per cent of the work.
“We work through the tendering process and through that
you can really see the community support,” Knight said. “When
they submit for the tenders they
will come in with affordable rates
because they want to be a part of
the project. We have had some
very strong support that way.”
Project challenges
The project’s biggest obstacles
have been bringing the building
up to code while adhering to the
heritage designation allowances.
“The outside of the building is
100 per cent heritage and we had
to follow some very strict rules and
regulations there,” Knight said.
“With the interior we don’t have to
but we are still trying to preserve
as much of the original structure
as possible because it is the right
thing to do.”
And then of course there is acquiring funding.
“A lot of people are in favour of
heritage buildings but not a lot of
people are in favour of spending
any money and heritage buildings
are really expensive,” Cochrane
said.
The budget is $7.2 million and
so far the project has raised $3.5
million through federal and provincial cost-sharing programs,
public and private donations and
funds from the Provincial Exhibition.
Cochrane says the goal was to
have the building completed by
July of 2017 in order to take part in
Canada’s 150th anniversary.
“I feel as though we will complete it to a certain point. It may
not have the glossy finish that we
wanted it to have but we will get
there one day,” Cochrane said.
Currently, the project continues
to press forward with restoring the
exterior entranceways, the dome
towers, insulation, electrical and
communication lines as well as finalizing the interior details.
The agriculture display will include interactive displays and activities that will incorporate both
the history of the building, history
of local agriculture as well as details of modern local agriculture
activity.
The Provincial Exhibition has
plans to move its staff into the office space area and will also have
additional space for other not-forprofit agricultural groups.
Cochrane says they will continue to push forward with the
goal but have been holding back
on some work in order to have
enough funds to match a few applied-for cost-sharing programs.
“Most of the grants that we are
applying for and have applied for
are cost sharing so we need to be
cognizant of that and able to produce our portion of the funds,”
Cochrane said.
For more information on the
project or to get involved contact
Daryl Knight at 204-729-7643.
[email protected]
110202270_CLC_2016_MC-JrPg_v1.indd 1
Client: BASF
Name:CLC_2016_MC-JrPg_v1
Project: CLC 2016 Ads
2016-08-08 1:28 PM
240 ink - newsprint
Publication: Manitoba Cooperator
Page Position: Full Page
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7
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
CP Rail Continued from page 1
“We have been idle in terms
of cars in service really since
about May,” John Brooks, CP’s
vice-president of sales and
marketing for intermodal and
grain said in an interview Aug.
11. “So the network has a lot of
unused capacity that has been
‘wasted’ here the last three or
four months.”
Railways, grain companies
and farmers learned lessons after a record crop backed up on
the Prairies in 2013-14, Brooks
said. One is to move out as
much old crop as possible to
make room for the new one.
“I know it may not be optimal prices (for grain)… but use
the idle capacity when you can
because there is going to come
a day probably in the next two
weeks that there will not be
anymore,” Brooks said. “Unfortunately we have not seen that
materialize to the level that we
had hoped. But we will see.
“Our biggest issue right now
is the delay. It has been a slow
start to the harvest because of
this moisture. We are ready to
get it amped up.”
Equipment coming back
CP is bringing locomotives, cars
and staff back into service. It
had more than 700 locomotives
and 4,000 cars parked.
“So the network
has a lot of unused
capacity that has
been ‘wasted’ here
the last three or
four months.”
John Brooks
hours and then once delivered
unloaded in 24 hours. Brooks
said the round trip for a dedicated train is nine to 11 days.
The key to increasing CP’s
capacity is faster and longer
trains, Brooks said. More grain
is getting moved with fewer assets.
Buffer for problems
That’s fine on paper, Wade
Sobkowich, executive director
of the WGEA has said in previous interviews, but every business needs extra capacity for
when things go wrong, as they
did in 2013-14. Not only was
there a record crop to move,
but it was the coldest winter
in 100 years. Sobkowich, who
speaks for Western Canada’s
biggest grain companies, says
the railways need capacity for
when disaster strikes. He also
argues the railways are near
monopolies immune from normal market forces that would
normally compel a business
to have emergency capacity.
That’s why the WGEA wants
regulations penalizing the railways for failing to meet service
commitments.
Brooks said the railways do
compete, but it’s unreasonable
to expect them to move the entire crop in three or four months
during the peak demand.
“Hopefully there is an improved realization that the more
we can do to work together to
move maximum levels the better, but also be smart about how
we move that grain into different corridors, utilizing Thunder
Bay and over… a longer portion
of the crop year,” Brooks said.
“The other component I think
is we need everybody disciplined. It (system) has got to be
working 24-7 collectively.
However, Brooks is optimistic
about prospects for improved
movement.
“Based on my discussions
with the grain companies I
think we all better understand
what it is going to take. We have
learned lessons.”
[email protected]
CP Rail says it’s ready to move this year’s expected bumper crop. File PHOTO
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Brooks acknowledged it’s not
unusual for grain movement
to drop off at the end of one
crop year and start slow in the
new one, but with another big
crop expected the grain system
needs every bit of capacity.
In June the Western Grain Elevator Association (WGEA) estimated Western Canada would
produce 63 million to 72 million
tonnes of grains, oilseeds and
pulse crops. Brooks said one
grain company’s latest estimate
is 72 million tonnes — not far
off the 2013 record of 76 million
and well above the five-year average of 61 million tonnes.
CP’s network is better
equipped to handle a big crop
now than it was three years ago,
having added or extended 35
sidings, giving system operators more flexibility.
“The net result of that is we
are seeing train speeds 25 to 30
per cent faster than our historical train speeds through these
corridors,” Brooks said. “When
we look at our network we feel
good… coming into this crop
year.”
About 80 per cent of CP grain
moves is in unit trains of 112 to
134 cars, Brooks said.
Meanwhile, CP’s ‘dedicated
train’ program has increased 15
per cent this year. Grain companies book trains for the entire
crop year. The companies tell
the railways where to spot the
cars and where to deliver them.
The cars must be loaded in 24
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9117-1A_SoybeanVarietyAds_8.125x10_Working.indd 1
2016-06-06 4:45 PM
8
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
WHAT’S UP
Please forward your agricultural
events to [email protected]
com or call 204-944-5762.
Aug. 19: Manitoba Sheep
Association annual general
meeting, 6:30 p.m., Portage Fair
Grounds, Portage la Prairie. For
more info call 204-421-9434 or
email [email protected]
Aug. 23: Manitoba Pulse and
Soybean Growers pulse research
tour, 8:30 a.m. AAFC Morden
Research Station. For more info
call 204-745-6488.
Sept. 15: Free First Aid for Horses
Clinic with Dr. Dave Snell, 7 p.m.,
Poco-Razz Farm, 130 Greenview
Rd., Winnipeg. For more info or to
register (required) call 204-2554717.
Sept. 18-21: ABIC 2016:
Agricultural Bioscience
International Conference,
FargoDome, 1800 N. University
Dr., Fargo, N.D. For more info visit
abic2016.com.
Oct. 4-6: Canadian Agricultural
Safety Association annual conference, Rodd Charlottetown, 75
Kent St., Charlottetown, P.E.I. For
more info visit conference.casaacsa.ca.
Oct. 15: Manitoba Rural Women’s
Day, Rivers. Location and time
TBA. More info to come at mbwi.
ca.
Oct. 25-27: Canola Discovery
Forum, Fairmont Winnipeg, 2
Lombard Place, Winnipeg. For
more info or to register visit www.
canolacouncil.org/what-we-do/
upcoming-events/.
Oct. 29: Manitoba Rural Women’s
Day, Dugald. Location and time
TBA. More info to come at mbwi.
ca.
Oct. 27: Red River Ex/Manitoba
Agricultural Hall of Fame Harvest
Gala Dinner, Victoria Inn, 1808
Wellington Ave., Winnipeg. For
more info email [email protected]
redriverex.com or call 204-8886990.
More than just bumblebees
A new research project at AAFC is assessing habitat
for the 231 different species of native bees in Manitoba
BY JENNIFER PAIGE
Co-operator staff / Brandon
H
ow pollinator friendly is
your farm?
A new study being
conducted at Agriculture and
Agri-Food Canada’s Brandon
Research and Development
Centre is looking to gather data
on the province’s native bees
and create an on-farm habitatassessment tool.
“We don’t have a lot of information on native bees in
Manitoba but we are starting
to get better information,” said
Melanie Dubois, senior riparian and biodiversity biologist at
AAFC.
“For the first part of this
project we have 12 different
fields set up around Brandon,
generally within a 15-km radius,
and we are doing sampling in
those areas to find out which
pollinators are present.”
To get a better understanding
of which insects are populating
the area, the researchers have
placed a number of plastic cups
in field margins, which attract
the bees due to their colour.
Once the bees enter the cup
they drown in a solution of propylene glycol and dish detergent and are collected a week
later.
“We are focusing on the
native bees simply because
those are ones that do a really
good and efficient job of pollinating,” Dubois said.
Honeybees have not been
included in the study as they
are non-native and are considered to be livestock.
They live in the soil
Dubois says there are approximately 231 different species of
Manitoba has approximately 231
different species of native bees,
including 24 different species of
bumblebees. Photo: Jennifer Paige
The tool, called Pollinator
Habitat Assessment Form and
Guide for Farms and Agriculture
Landscapes, focuses on landscape features, year-round
resources, nesting habitats and
farm practices.
Dubois and her team have
been using the tool to assess
habitat within one kilometre of
their sampling sites.
The long-term goal of the
study will be to train individuals
to come onto the farm, determine which bees are in the area,
assess the local habitat and provide recommendations on ways
to bump populations.
Habitat species
bees in Manitoba, including 24
different species of bumblebees.
“About 80 per cent of the
bees in Manitoba live in the
soil, and they need undisturbed
soil,” Dubois said. “How much
undisturbed soil do you think
we have in Manitoba? Not a lot,
so when we talk about habitat
destruction for native bees it’s
not just losing the flowers and
food that they eat but it is nesting material too.”
The goal of the project is not
only to understand the current state of native bees in the
province but also to develop an
assessment tool to identify the
quality of the local habitat and
pinpoint areas of improvement.
T h e X e rc e s S o c i e t y f o r
Invertebrate Conservation in
Portland, Oregon developed the
assessment tool that Dubois is
using for the study.
“It should work well here
because it was designed for
the upper Midwest but we
are tweaking it a little bit and
adding in a few more components on the actual vegetation,”
Dubois said.
I M P O R T A N T N O T I C E
Dubois has been working
closely with her AAFC counterparts to select appropriate plant
species and establishment techniques for Manitoba.
“We are looking to determine
not only what species you put
in but what is the best way to
get them established and then
how do you maintain it so it
doesn’t turn into a mess of
weeds?” Dubois said. “There is
no point of coming up with an
expensive mix that then attracts
weeds. We are hoping to come
up with something that is practical to do on a farm scale.”
According to the Xerces
assessment tool, there are
a number of cover crops and
crops that provide pollen
and nectar for native bees.
Examples include alfalfa, alsike
clover, buckwheat, crimson clover, corn, Dutch white clover,
fababeans, red clover, sainfoin,
soybeans, sunflower and purple
vetch.
Dubois says that when looking at what is available to the
bees, it’s important to consider
how far they are likely to fly.
“When you are getting into
the mid-size bees, they can fly
about a kilometre but when you
are looking at the really small
bees, they might go 15 metres.”
The size of the bee and space
between their shoulders is what
determines how far they are
able to fly.
The bumblebee can fly up to
two kilometres, which is the farthest of all native bees.
“So that is when you start
to get an idea that if you want
to have a healthy and diverse
pollinator species, you have
to think about what habitat is
available to them because they
will only fly so far,” Dubois said.
Local producers sought
The study is slated to continue
through next year. Dubois is
currently looking for 10 to 12
Brandon-area canola producers
who would be willing to take
part.
“We would be looking to set
up a number of cups in and
around your canola fields. We
would place them at the time
of bloom, check them about
once and week and remove
them at the end of the season,”
Dubois said. “What you will
get is pictures for your bees,
maybe one or two samples and
a report that tells you all about
your habitat in the area, a list
of plants that are there that are
good for your bees and break it
all down for you.”
For more information, contact Dubois at 204-578-6646.
Fo r m o re i n f o r m a t i o n
on the Xerces assessment
v i s i t w w w. x e r c e s . o r g / w p content/uploads/2009/11/
PollinatorHabitatAssessment.
pdf.
[email protected]
FESTIVALS
Is your community hosting a farm fair, exhibition, festival or homecoming event
in 2016? Contact the Co-operator with your event, dates, location, contact
information and any updates or changes at [email protected]
Grainproducers:doyougrow
thesevarietiesofflaxseed?
The variety registration for the following Canada Western flaxseed
varieties will be cancelled by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency:
• CDCArras on August 1, 2017
• Flanders on August 1, 2017
• Somme on August 1, 2017
As of August 1, 2017, the flaxseed varieties listed above will be removed
from the Canadian Grain Commission’s variety designation list.
1-800-853-6705 or 204-984-0506
TTY: 1-866-317-4289
www.grainscanada.gc.ca
Aug. 18-21: Hanover Ag Fair,
Southwood Street and Albert
Avenue, Grunthal. Call 204-3716745 or visit www.hanoverag.com.
Sept. 9-11: Double B Agricultural
Festival, Beausejour. Call 204205-0723 or email [email protected]
highspeedcrow.ca.
Aug. 18-21: Wild West Daze,
Virden. Visit virdenindoorrodeo.ca.
Sept. 16-18: Harvest Moon
Festival, Clearwater. Visit www.
harvestmoonfestival.ca.
Aug. 19-21: Quarry
Days, Stonewall. Visit
stonewallquarrydays.ca or call
204-467-7979.
Aug. 19-21: Rainbow Trout
Music Festival, Oroseau
Campground, St. Malo. Visit www.
rainbowtroutmusicfestival.com.
Aug. 20: Kelwood Agricultural
Society Fair. Call 204-967-2830 or
visit kelwoodagsociety.webs.com.
Aug. 20-21: Logging Days,
Marchand. Visit www.facebook.
com/MarchandLoggingDays.
Aug. 26-28: Corn and Apple
Festival, Morden. Call 204-8232676 or visit cornandapple.com.
Aug. 27-28: McCreary Fair. Call
204-835-2809.
Sept. 23-25: Scarecrow Days,
Souris. Visit www.sourismanitoba.
com.
Sept. 24: Teulon Pumpkinfest.
Call 204-467-9064 or visit www.
teulonpumpkinfest.com.
Sept. 30-Oct. 1: Manitoba Fibre
Festival, Red River Exhibition Park,
3977 Portage Ave., Winnipeg.
Call 204-888-6990 or visit
manitobafibrefestival.com.
Oct. 1: Roland Pumpkin Fair. Call
204-343-2314 or email [email protected]
gmail.com.
Oct. 27-29: Manitoba Ag Ex,
Keystone Centre, Brandon. Call
204-726-3590 or visit www.
provincialexhibition.com.
Beyond the printed page.
www.manitobacooperator.ca
Your online source for the latest in ag news and information.
B:10.25”
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
9
T:10.25”
S:10.25”
EQUIPMENT FOR SALE
NORTH AMERICAN
Like New! 25’ NA swather, red with
detachable roller and guard. Used for
four seasons, no longer required b/c of
InVigor® straight cut hybrids.
20’ MARSHALL
Swather for sale. Well maintained
swather, original owner. Only growing
InVigor Pod Shatter Reduction hybrids
now and no longer need.
#SellTheSwather
#SellTheSwather
#SellTheSwather
#SellTheSwather
PROCUT 2870, 20’ SWATHER
4 Sale – Cheap. Saving money with
InVigor Pod Shatter Reduction hybrids.
InVigor L233P and InVigor L140P – so
no longer needed. Make me an offer.
Swan Hills, AB.
HILLING & SONS SWATHER
Moving to InVigor L140P and
InVigor L233P Pod Shatter Reduction
hybrids and no longer need swather.
20’ header, in excellent condition.
FERGUSON BROS. SWATHER
30’ Swather 4 Sale – Growing Pod
Shatter Reduction hybrids by InVigor
and no longer swathing.
20’ SWATHER
20’ in width, in good shape. Hyd.
Centrelink, GPS and Roller, Humbolt,
Saskatchewan. Switching to InVigor
Pod Shatter Reduction hybrids.
KOYOTA SWATHER FOR SALE
600/65 luxury cab, rear axle suspension
with an 18’ header, Navi-Pro GPS,
3 speed. Growing InVigor L140P and
InVigor L233P and will not be swathing
canola anymore.
#SellTheSwather
#SellTheSwather
#SellTheSwather
#SellTheSwather
#SellTheSwather
DREAMBUILT SWATHER
24’ header x A400 engine w/ bar
tires and 8’ grain belt, runs like new.
Hydraulic mounted roller included.
$15,000 o.b.o.
DAS ENGINEN
German-made swather with 25’
hydraulic lift header. Has been an
excellent swather, but is no longer
needed due to InVigor Pod Shatter
Reduction hybrids.
PRESTON AGRICULTURAL
With new InVigor L140P and
InVigor L233P Pod Shatter Reduction
hybrids, my 20’ PA swather is for sale.
Clear Lake, MB. Looking forward to
straight cutting my canola.
JOHNSONVILLE
ID Lights, swather with rotoshears.
Standard double knife. Bought in
2008 but now moving to straight cut
InVigor hybrids.
NORTH IMPLEMENTS
32’ swather for sale, drive tires, double
knife drive, double swath, hydraulics
fore/aft tilt, greenstart ignition and air
conditioned cab.
#SellTheSwather
#SellTheSwather
#SellTheSwather
#SellTheSwather
#SellTheSwather
Enter the #SellTheSwather Contest
New InVigor Pod Shatter Reduction hybrids are the
wave of the future, providing growers with what
they need most – more time.
Enter for your chance to WIN a new boat!
Simply tweet a picture of your InVigor Pod Shatter Reduction hybrid
crop or your retired swather using the hashtag #SellTheSwather
or email it to us at [email protected] for a chance to WIN a
Tracker Super-Guide™ v-16 boat.
Visit cropscience.bayer.ca/SellTheSwather for complete details.
WIN a Tra
cker Sup
er-Guide™
v-16 boa
t
cropscience.bayer.ca
1 888-283-6847
@Bayer4CropsCA
For terms and conditions, please visit cropscience.bayer.ca/SellTheSwather
Always read and follow label directions. InVigor ® is a registered trademark of Bayer Global.
All other products mentioned are trademarks of their respective companies. Bayer CropScience Inc. is a member of CropLife Canada.
10590093_STS_102_4C.indd
O-66-06/16-10590093-E
None
T:15.5”
AGRON 3000
2011 Agron swather for sale.
Airplane grade steel with less than
400 operating hours makes this a great
deal. Camrose, Alberta.
B:15.5”
WESTERN BUILT
Made in Canada in 1990. 18’ swather –
still runs great. Looking to grow InVigor
Pod Shatter Reduction hybrids.
S:15.5”
30’ SHELTON CANYON SERIES
Bought in 2014 and paid over $20K,
but willing to sell for $15K. Dual
track glide system with self-adjusting
suspension. Like new. Only growing
InVigor Pod Shatter Reduction hybrids
and don’t need.
#SellTheSwather
10
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
LIVESTOCK MARKETS
(Friday to Thursday)
Winnipeg
Slaughter Cattle
Steers
—
Heifers
—
D1, 2 Cows
—
D3 Cows
—
Bulls
—
Feeder Cattle (Price ranges for feeders refer to top-quality animals only)
Steers
(901+ lbs.)
—
(801-900 lbs.)
—
(701-800 lbs.)
—
(601-700 lbs.)
—
(501-600 lbs.)
—
(401-500 lbs.)
Not Available
Heifers
(901+ lbs.)
This Week
(801-900 lbs.)
—
(701-800 lbs.)
—
(601-700 lbs.)
—
(501-600 lbs.)
—
(401-500 lbs.)
—
Heifers
($/cwt)
(1,000+ lbs.)
(850+ lbs.)
Alberta South
—
—
92.00 - 110.00
80.00 - 94.00
122.75 - 122.75
$ 169.00 - 182.00
170.00 - 189.00
178.00 - 196.00
185.00 - 209.00
185.00 - 225.00
190.00 - 232.00
$ 156.00 - 170.00
160.00 - 175.00
165.00 - 178.00
168.00 - 185.00
165.00 - 200.00
170.00 - 200.00
(901+ lbs.)
(801-900 lbs.)
(701-800 lbs.)
(601-700 lbs.)
(501-600 lbs.)
(401-500 lbs.)
(901+ lbs.)
(801-900 lbs.)
(701-800 lbs.)
(601-700 lbs.)
(501-600 lbs.)
(401-500 lbs.)
Feeder Cattle
August 2016
September 2016
October 2016
Novemeber 2016
January 2017
March 2017
Cattle Slaughter
August 12, 2016
ERIN DEBOOY
Previous
Year­
45,104
9,535
35,569
NA
534,000
$
Close
148.73
146.98
144.05
141.43
137.48
135.43
Change
1.15
1.75
1.08
1.48
2.05
1.85
Week Ending
August 6, 2016
750
26,239
13,297
561
876
4,794
254
Prime
AAA
AA
A
B
D
E
Previous
Year
799
24,027
12,228
656
934
5,831
222
Hog Prices
(Friday to Thursday) ($/100 kg)
Source: Manitoba Agriculture
E - Estimation
MB. ($/hog)
MB (All wts.) (Fri-Thurs.)
MB (Index 100) (Fri-Thurs.)
ON (Index 100) (Mon.-Thurs.)
PQ (Index 100) (Mon.-Fri.)
“… if the combines are roaring
we’re probably going to stay sort
of quiet until that’s done.”
CNSC
Cattle Grades (Canada)
Week Ending
August 6, 2016
47,282
9,801
37,481
NA
579,000
Summer slowdown not over
yet for Manitoba markets
Lower feed costs are pushing feeder cattle higher
Ontario
137.67 - 151.90
132.72 - 149.46
69.81 - 97.78
69.81 - 97.78
103.07 - 131.72
$ 158.06 - 179.23
159.34 - 184.53
148.19 - 195.03
147.01 - 196.57
147.89 - 212.10
151.88 - 210.69
$ 139.35 - 151.43
148.47 - 166.56
136.72 - 171.20
142.71 - 175.76
143.17 - 185.65
141.16 - 179.78
$
Futures (August 5, 2016) in U.S.
Fed Cattle
Close
Change
August 2016
116.03
-0.30
October 2016
114.55
-0.23
December 2016
115.30
0.42
February 2017
114.65
0.58
April 2017
113.48
1.05
June 2017
106.60
0.27
Canada
East
West
Manitoba
U.S.
$1 Cdn: $0.7724 U.S.
$1 U.S: $1.2945 Cdn.
column
Cattle Prices
Slaughter Cattle
Grade A Steers
Grade A Heifers
D1, 2 Cows
D3 Cows
Bulls
Steers
EXCHANGES:
August 12, 2016
Current Week
178E
166E
161.59
Last Week
179.59
166.51
168.64
Last Year (Index 100)
194.33
180.07
185.82
168.51
175.38
190.12
T
here was a slight increase in activity at
auction marts across Manitoba for the
week ending Aug. 12, but the summer
slowdown is expected to stick around another
two to five weeks before picking up, said one
local auctioneer.
“We’re going to get started on some small
volumes of the yearlings in the next few weeks
before the big sets of yearlings come out,
but we’re still probably a month away from
the busy time,” said Robin Hill, manager of
Heartland Livestock Services at Virden.
Lower feed costs, combined with a higher
futures market and the lower U.S. dollar, are
pushing feeder cattle higher, one of the auction yards reported.
There has also been an increase on the
feeder trade as the Chicago Board of Trade
strengthened, Hill said.
“When (the CBOT) goes up it’s almost like
the Bible; it makes everyone feel comfortable
paying what they’re paying and sometimes
paying more,” he said. “We’ve definitely seen
the feeder cattle and the live cattle strengthen
these past two weeks, but that might change
by next week.”
The butcher trade has been steady all summer, with activity in the currency markets
adding some support, he said.
“The cows and bulls have been pretty full
and steady… Good cows are 92 to 98 cents
(per pound), with the odd cow bringing in a
buck a pound, which isn’t too bad for a cow
that’s done her job for many years.”
Demand from out west and down south is
very good, but smaller volume makes it harder
to build loads, Hill said.
Robin Hill
Heartland Livestock Services, Virden
“Once we get into some volume yearlings and some volume calves, Ontario and
Quebec could be big players in the game
again.”
Feed and corn crops have been doing
excellent in Manitoba, contributing to the
slow season now, but will lead to some decisions in the fall, Hill said.
“The feed situation is plentiful in
Manitoba, which is great to see; the combines just started rolling here, and if the
combines are roaring we’re probably going
to stay sort of quiet until that’s done,” he
said.
“If the (cow-calf ) producers aren’t happy
or satisfied with the cow prices, they can
grow them into next year, put some feed into
them that’s not going to cost them a whole
bunch of money.”
Pastures across Manitoba are in good condition, with abundant grass growth being
reported in some areas, according to the
province’s latest crop report. The Interlake
has experienced some flooding due to excessive rain, but otherwise water supply in pastures remains adequate.
Erin DeBooy writes for Commodity News Service Canada,
a Winnipeg company specializing in grain and commodity
market reporting.
Futures (August 12, 2016) in U.S.
Hogs
Close
Change
August 2016
October 2016
December 2016
February 2017
April 2017
67.20
58.43
54.35
58.60
64.13
- 0.50
- 0.08
- 0.02
- 0.88
- 0.78
Other Market Prices
Sheep and Lambs
Winnipeg
$/cwt
Ewes
Lambs
Wooled Fats
Choice
(110+ lb.)
(95 - 109 lb.)
(80 - 94 lb.)
(Under 80 lb.)
(New crop)
Next Sale
August 17, 2016
Chickens
Minimum broiler prices as of April 13, 2010
Under 1.2 kg..................................................$1.5130
1.2 - 1.65 kg....................................................$1.3230
1.65 - 2.1 kg....................................................$1.3830
2.1 - 2.6 kg.....................................................$1.3230
Turkeys
Minimum prices as of August 14, 2016
Broiler Turkeys
(6.2 kg or under, live weight truck load average)
Grade A ............................................... $1.990
Undergrade ....................................... $1.900
Hen Turkeys
(between 6.2 and 8.5 kg liveweight truck load average)
Grade A ............................................... $1.980
Undergrade ........................................$1.880
Light Tom/Heavy Hen Turkeys
(between 8.5 and 10.8 kg liveweight truck load average)
Grade A ............................................... $1.980
Undergrade ........................................$1.880
Tom Turkeys
(10.8 and 13.3 kg, live weight truck load average)
Grade A..................................................$1.925
Undergrade..........................................$1.840
Prices are quoted f.o.b. producers premise.
Toronto
118.20 - 147.66
208.98 - 226.93
221.94 - 237.26
224.74 - 241.91
206.72 - 278.19
—
SunGold
Specialty Meats
—
briefs
Email campaign
asks McDonald’s to
take U.S. antibiotic
curbs global
BY LISA BAERTLEIN
Reuters / Los Angeles
Eggs
Minimum prices to producers for ungraded
eggs, f.o.b. egg grading station, set by the
Manitoba Egg Producers Marketing Board
effective November 10, 2013.
New
Previous
A Extra Large
$2.00
$2.05
A Large
2.00
2.05
A Medium
1.82
1.87
A Small
1.40
1.45
A Pee Wee
0.3775
0.3775
Nest Run 24 +
1.8910
1.9390
B
0.45
0.45
C
0.15
0.15
A charity looking to fight
the rise of dangerous,
drug-resistant bacteria is
asking the public to help
convince McDonald’s restaurants around the world
to stop serving meat and
milk from animals raised
with routine use of medically important antibiotics.
A week after the world’s
biggest fast-food company
took that step with poul-
try at its U.S. restaurants,
U.K.-based ShareAction
launched an online campaign enabling people to
email McDonald’s Corp.
CEO Steve Easterbrook.
The group, which promotes socially responsible investing, wants
Easterbrook to prohibit the
use of antibiotics important to human medicine in
McDonald’s global chicken,
beef, pork and dairy supply
chains, for purposes other
than disease treatment
or non-routine control of
veterinarian-diagnosed
illness.
“We hope this action will
encourage McDonald’s to
supersize their ambition,”
ShareAction chief executive
Catherine Howarth said.
Scientists have warned
that regular use of antibiotics to promote growth
and prevent illness in
healthy farm animals
contributes to the rise of
antibiotic-resistant “superbug” infections, which kill
at least 23,000 Americans
each year and pose a significant threat to global
health.
McDonald’s referred
Reuters to an earlier statement that said it was premature to set a timeline for
curbing antibiotic use in
meats other than chicken,
due to varying agricultural
practices and regulations
around the world.
“We continue to regularly review this issue,”
that statement said.
Goats
Winnipeg
(Hd Fats)
Kids
Billys
Mature
Toronto
($/cwt)
206.76 - 293.59
—
115.75 - 257.80
Horses
<1,000 lbs.
1,000 lbs.+
Winnipeg
($/cwt)
—
—
Toronto
($/cwt)
35.00 - 63.00
50.05 - 72.23
Looking for results? Check out the market reports
from livestock auctions around the province. » PaGe 14
11
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
GRAIN MARKETS
column
Manitoba Elevator Prices
Chicago soybeans bearish
on USDA’s latest outlook
Average quotes as of August 11, 2016 ($/tonne)
Future
Basis
E. Manitoba wheat
188.77
24.95
213.73
W. Manitoba wheat
188.77
18.46
207.23
E. Manitoba canola
461.40
-37.04
424.36
W. Manitoba canola
461.40
-37.53
Canola is still seen as a bargain among oilseeds
Cash
423.87
Source: pdqinfo.ca
Port Prices
DAVE SIMS
As of Friday, August 12, 2016 ($/tonne)
CNSC
Last Week
T
he ICE Futures Canada canola market climbed to a new support level
during the week ended Aug. 12. The
front-month November contract started
the week just below the $450-per-tonne
mark. However, it wasn’t long before values
climbed by more than $10 to settle around
the $460-per-tonne level. Contracts chopped
around that mark, for the most part, with
the exception of the Thursday session,
when values temporarily plunged $5 before
recovering.
Advances in U.S. soybeans came as a
welcome surprise to many who predicted
(correctly) that the U.S. Department of
Agriculture’s monthly world agricultural
supply-and-demand estimates ( WASDE)
would paint a bearish picture of the soybean
market. USDA pegged soybean production
this year at 4.06 billion bushels, with yields
of almost 49 bushels an acre. That was above
analysts’ expectations and pushed down
soybeans and, by extension, canola.
Ca n o l a s t i l l c o n t i n u e s t o b e v i e we d
a s s o m e w h a t o f a b a r g a i n re l a t i v e t o
other oilseeds, which was bullish for values. Concern over wet weather in parts of
Western Canada was also supportive as it
has made the size of this year’s crop harder
to gauge.
However, the deadline on China’s plan
to impose stricter dockage allowances on
imports of Canadian canola is looming on
the horizon (Sept. 1). The Canadian dollar
also firmed roughly half a cent during the
week, which put a drag on the market.
In the U.S., corn futures declined slightly
during the week due to a confluence of factors. USDA predicted this year’s corn crop
would exceed an astounding 15.1 billion
bushels, which weighed on the market.
CBOT soybeans advanced despite a bearish report. Strong demand is expected to
Weekly Change
U.S. hard red winter 12% Houston
153.86
3.49
U.S. spring wheat 14% Portland
222.76
5.06
Canola Thunder Bay
457.30
15.40
Canola Vancouver
492.30
20.40
Closing Futures Prices
As of Thursday, August 11, 2016 ($/tonne)
PHOTO: Thinkstock
For three-times-daily market
reports and more from
Last Week
Weekly Change
ICE canola
462.30
15.40
ICE milling wheat
210.00
5.00
ICE barley
138.00
0.00
Mpls. HRS wheat
185.01
5.42
Chicago SRW wheat
152.95
4.78
Kansas City HRW wheat
151.48
2.39
Corn
126.37
0.10
Commodity News Service Canada,
Oats
109.58
-10.37
visit the Markets section at
Soybeans
368.08
10.38
www.manitobacooperator.ca.
Soymeal
367.96
6.50
Soyoil
700.97
25.36
Cash Prices Winnipeg
As of Thursday, August 11, 2016 ($/tonne)
Last Week
help users chew through large supplies in
the U.S. Weather problems in South America
also helped support the market.
Wheat prices chalked up modest gains
during the week, aided by wet weather
a c r o s s m u c h o f Eu r o p e t h a t h a s d i s rupted harvest efforts and cut into supply
expectations.
Dave Sims writes for Commodity News Service Canada, a
Winnipeg company specializing in grain and commodity
market reporting.
Weekly Change
Feed wheat
n/a
n/a
Feed barley
143.40
-5.97
n/a
n/a
447.22
8.66
Rye
Flaxseed
Feed peas
183.35
-9.19
Oats
165.35
-1.30
Soybeans
398.30
1.10
Sunflower (NuSun) Fargo, ND ($U.S./CWT)
17.70
0.10
Sunflower (Confection) Fargo, ND ($U.S./CWT)
Ask
Ask
Western Canadian wheat bids rise with U.S. futures
Gains in U.S. wheat futures offer up some support
BY PHIL FRANZ-WARKENTIN
CNS Canada
S
pring wheat cash bids across
Western Canada showed some
strength during the week ended
Aug. 12, with gains in U.S. futures providing some support.
Depending on the location, average
Canada Western Red Spring (CWRS)
wheat prices were up by $4-$7 per
tonne, according to price quotes from
a cross-section of delivery points
across the Prairie provinces compiled by PDQ (Price and Data Quotes).
Average prices ranged from about
$199 per tonne in Alberta’s Peace River
region, to as high as $216 in southern
parts of that province.
Quoted basis levels varied from location to location, but held steady overall
to range from about $10 to $27 per
The Canadian dollar closed… up by over a cent relative to its
U.S. counterpart on the week.
tonne above the futures when using
the grain company methodology of
quoting the basis as the difference
between U.S. dollar-denominated
futures and the Canadian dollar cash
bids.
When accounting for currency
exchange rates by adjusting Canadian
prices to U.S. dollars, CWRS bids
ranged from US$153 to US$166 per
tonne. That would put the currency
adjusted basis levels at about US$22$35 below the futures.
Looking at it the other way around, if
the Minneapolis futures are converted
to Canadian dollars, CWRS basis levels
across Western Canada range from $28
to $45 below the futures.
Bids for Canada Prairie Spring Red
(CPSR) wheat reported by PDQ were
up by anywhere from $1 to $15 per
tonne over the course of the week.
Average CPSR prices came in at about
$160-$173 per tonne in Saskatchewan
and Alberta.
Average durum prices were down
by $1-$5 per tonne, depending on the
location, with bids in Saskatchewan
ranging from roughly $239 to $244 per
tonne.
The September spring wheat contract in Minneapolis, off of which
most CWRS contracts in Canada
are based, was quoted Aug. 12 at
US$5.1375 per bushel, up 18.75 U.S.
cents per bushel from the previous
week.
Kansas City hard red winter wheat
futures, which are now traded in
Chicago, are more closely linked to
CPSR in Canada. The September
K.C. wheat contract was quoted at
US$4.1625 per bushel on Aug. 12, up
4.5 U.S. cents compared to the previous week.
The September Chicago Board of
Trade soft wheat contract settled Aug.
12 at US$4.225, up by 6.5 U.S. cents on
the week.
The Canadian dollar closed Aug. 12
at 77.15 U.S. cents, up by over a cent
relative to its U.S. counterpart on the
week.
12
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
LIVESTOCK
h u s b a n d r y — t h e s c i e n c e , S K I L L O R ART O F F AR M IN G
Six limiting factors in your soil that
will make or break your operation
Without these six key ingredients, your soil — and your farm — could be in trouble
By JENNIFER BLAIR
Staff
F
arms and grazing operations —
organic or otherwise — are only
as good as their worst resource,
according to Oregon-based grazier Abe
Collins.
“Soil is our primary infrastructure on
the farm,” said Collins, who spoke at the
recent Organic Alberta conference.
“Biologically, chemically, and physically, you need to be looking at the limiting factors in your soil.”
In the Canadian Prairies, water tends
to be a key limiting factor when it comes
to growing crops and forages — but
there are others as well, said Collins.
This checklist covers off six other
important factors that could mean the
difference between success and failure
on your farm. While Collins was speaking to an audience of organic producers,
there’s plenty of good ideas for conventional growers to borrow too.
Year-long green
The first rule, says Collins, is “100 per
cent covered soils 100 per cent of the
time — never bare soil.
“Bare soil is a burn victim,” he said.
“If we’re maintaining our land like
that, we’re maintaining our loved one in
a hospital bed with no skin.”
That means growing a variety of
crops all throughout the year, through
intercropping, incorporating winter
crops into the rotation, and exploring
cover crop mixes.
“We need to be growing during the
growing season, growing in the winter,
and growing when other people’s fields
might be sitting under standing water.”
Soils need both aerobic — or oxygen-rich — and anaerobic — or oxygen-free — conditions, but overall,
soil is an aerobic system. “It needs to
have airflow through it.”
Warmth
Physical permeability
Compacted soils are one of the biggest
barriers to crop and forage growth, so
dealing with compaction is “step one.”
“If I’m looking for the major limiting
factor, nine times out of 10 it’s compaction,” said Collins.
“Air, water, gas, roots, microbes, and
macro-organisms like worms have to
be able to move through that soil. If it’s
packed, that all shuts down.”
Minerals
Having adequate fertility in the soil is a
key factor in plant growth, and in many
cases, that simply means “unlocking”
minerals that are already there.
“It’s amazing how much lockedup minerals there are in soils,” said
Collins.
“Soil tests will come back and say
that you need a lot of fertilizer, and yet
there’s often 30,000 or 40,000 pounds of
potassium, for example, in the top six
inches, but it’s all locked up.”
Oregon-based grazier Abe Collins regularly
speaks to farmers about how to improve their soil
and productivity. PHOTO: Carbonfarmingcourse.com
But at other times, that means applying fertilizer that comes from a bag.
“When I try to turn land around that’s
severely depleted, I don’t feel embarrassed about using any kind of fertilizer
that is available and allowable to get that
system rolling.”
Air
Air is essential for all life, says Collins,
and “critical” in promoting healthy plant
growth.
“If there’s no air, there’s a critical limiting factor,” he said.
Plants need “war mth rather than
heat,” says Collins. And the amount
varies for each plant.
“We don’t need extreme heat, and
we can’t live with extreme cold,” he
said.
Soils need to be at about 70 per
cent of air temperature in hot conditions to make full use of soil moisture,
and producers can help with that by
“modifying” their microclimates.
“It’s amazing what a one-inch layer
of litter on the surface will do.”
Life in and on the soil
Diversity of life in and on the soil is “a
shortcut” to healthy crops and grazing
lands, says Collins.
“Life is the key,” he said. “We need
diverse life in and on the soil almost
year round, and really focusing too on
diversity of rooting structures — sinking as much underground as we can.”
“I’ve never gone wrong with diversity. Every time I add one species or
10 more, things get better.”
[email protected]
Junior cattle producers work on show skills
Cattle producers under the age of 25 from across Manitoba and Saskatchewan
recently came together for a weekend of education and camaraderie
BY JENNIFER PAIGE
Co-operator staff / Brandon
T
he annual Manitoba
Youth Beef Roundup
(MYBR) continues to
strengthen the skills of young
folks in the cattle industry.
“It is a great way for juniors
of all cattle breeds to work
together, learn new skills, and
meet new people,” said event
organizer Lois McRae. “Where
else can you attend an event
with 49 junior members all
working together as teams
and individual competitions,
to learn the skills needed in
the livestock industry?”
The ninth annual MYBR
was held in Neepawa on July
29 to 30. Nearly 50 junior cattle producers under the age of
25 took part with 91 head of
cattle.
The event included a
number of workshops on
photography, showmanship,
artificial insemination, farm
safety and grooming.
“This is not just a cattle show, it is an all-around
event to promote and educate youth to continue on
in the livestock industry,”
McRae said. “The weekend
started off with a clipping
and grooming workshop put
on by the Roundup weekend mentors, Laura Horner
and Jake Rawluk. Juniors
learned the importance of
proper hair care and blowing
procedures.”
Along with the cattle show,
participants also took part
in timed competitions that
included halter making, identifying parts of the animal
and identifying different agriculture items.
“One of the highlights of
Saturday was the cookoff
event, where up to six members on a team created a
theme and prepared the ultimate burger,” McRae said.
“Judges Brian Lemon, CEO of
the Manitoba Beef Producers,
Kelsey Dust, the Canadian
Simmental youth co-ordinator and Mazer Implements
representative Jake Rawluk
evaluated this competition
and were impressed with the
taste of the steaks, presentation, themes and costumes.”
The event will run again
next year in late July, cele b r a t i n g M Y B R ’s 1 0 t h
anniversary.
[email protected]
This year’s Manitoba Youth Beef Roundup saw 49 junior participants and 91 head of cattle. Photos: Manitoba Youth Beef Roundup
Mentors Laura Horner and Jake Rawluk put on a
grooming workshop for the youth participants. Junior winners from all divisions
stand with event judges, Geoff
Anderson and Michael Hunter.
13
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
SHEEP & GOAT COLUMN
Good numbers of goats attract strong interest
The feeder lamb quality was also high, attracting some active bidding
GOAT DOES
BY MARK ELLIOT
Co-operator contributor
T
here were nearly equal
numbers of sheep and
goats among the 500 animals delivered for the Winnipeg
Livestock Auction sale on
August 3. A good selection of
various classification of goats
created high interest for the
buyers, as there have been limited numbers for recent sales.
Ewes
$157.20
$120.51 - $145
$89 - $97.75
Lambs (lbs.)
animal weight
$1.16
88 lbs.
$1.58
95 lbs.
$1.39
97 lbs.
$1.77
105 lbs.
$1.50
106 lbs.
110+
n/a
$1.53
110 lbs.
95 - 110
$207.90
$1.46
130 lbs.
80 - 94
$180.60 - $189.28
$162.12 - $163.18
Sheep
The quality of the Dorper-cross
ewes that entered the arena
suggested that they might be a
herd dispersal, and the bidding
indicated special interest. The
price ranged from $1.11 to $1.16
per pound, while the average
ranged from $0.85 to $0.99 per
pound.
Ram prices ranged from $1.03
to $1.08, but two 155-pound
Dorper-crosses brought $1.55.
No heavyweight lambs were
delivered.
There was a limited selection
of market lambs for this sale.
They brought $1.89 per pound.
The feeder lamb quality
was also high, attracting some
strong bidding. There appeared
to be no price differences
between wool and hair lambs.
The top price ranged from $2.08
to $2.11 per pound. The selection of feeder lambs allowed the
buyers to fill their orders.
Generally, the lightweight
lambs attracted similar bidding to the feeder lambs. The
70-plus-pound lambs ranged
from $1.80 to $2 per pound.
Even a specialty breed ( Jacob
sheep) kept within the bidding range. The young Dorpercross lambs — a product from
the ewes — brought similar bidding, with good quality
throughout the whole herd.
The 60-pound lambs had
the buyers’ interest. Three
62-pound Cheviot-cross lambs
brought $2.10 per pound.
Nineteen 63-pound Dorpercross lambs brought $1.88.
meat
/ lb.
dairy
$152.10 - $159.08
Under 80
$1.28
195 lbs.
$2.95
50 lbs.
$2.34
80 lbs.
$1.91
88 lbs.
$1.69
93 lbs.
71 - 79
$136.80 - $149.40
$1.39
97 lbs.
62 / 83
$130.20 / $118.44
$1.37
113 lbs.
54 / 58
$108.54 / $97.44
$1.26
119 lbs.
$1.84
190 lbs.
$2.99
70 lbs.
$3.40
73 lbs.
42 - 49
$72.66 - $88.20
43
$43.86
33
$33.99
Seventeen 54-pound Dorpercross lambs brought $2.01
per pound and 15 58-pound
Dorper-cross lambs brought
$1.68.
Overall, the Dorper-cross
lambs showed quality and uniformity for each weight class.
E l e ve n 4 2 - p o u n d D o r p e rcrosses brought $1.73 per
pound and 19 45-pounders
brought $1.80 per pound.
A group of 43-pound lambs
was judged more as culls and
brought $1.02 per pound.
The lower-weight lambs were
considered as culls requiring
extra attention and the bidding
became very slow.
Goats
Past sales have had a limited
selection of the various classification of goats, but this sale had
a good selection of goat does.
There appeared to be similar
interest in the meat and dairy
goat does and buyers were
taking advantage of purchasing the various goats delivered.
The meat goat does were not as
high in quality compared to the
dairy goats. In most cases, a little extra care and management
will assist these animals.
The only goat buck delivered
was a dairy breed. A 190-pound
Alpine goat buck cross brought
$1.84 per pound.
The number of goat kids was
much higher than in the past
few sales and the various buyers
took advantage of this opportunity. The bidding remained
fairly constant in each weight
class, even with more goat kids
available. Frequently, more
animals within a class causes
lower bidding. However, goat
kid numbers have been very
limited.
The Ontario Stockyard report
showed higher bidding for
lower-than-usual numbers of
lambs and goats in all classes
available. Buyers usually determine their bidding based upon
the producers delivering the
amounts of lambs and goats for
each sale.
briefs
Olymel to pool Quebec
hog-processing partnerships
STAFF / A pair of hog-packing and -processing
plants in Quebec’s Mauricie region is set to join
forces through their common business partner for
a major expansion.
Olymel, the meat-packing and -processing arm
of Quebec’s Coop Federee, announced Aug. 9 it
has sealed a partnership deal with livestock producer and processor Groupe Robitaille.
That deal, first announced last November,
gives Olymel a 50 per cent share in family-owned
Robitaille’s hog slaughter, butchering and processing arm, Aliments Lucyporc.
The two companies have now pledged an
$80-million investment in the Lucyporc plant’s
hometown of Yamachiche, about 20 km west of
Trois-Rivieres. That investment, however, will go
mainly into expansion and upgrades at Atrahan
Transformation, another hog slaughter and porkboning and -cutting plant at Yamachiche.
Olymel and Atrahan reached a separate partnership deal in February last year. Following the
expansion and reorganization at the Atrahan
plant, expected to be complete within three years,
a second shift will be introduced, doubling the
plant’s production volume, the companies said.
On top of the 360 Atrahan staff and 430
Lucyporc staff, the expansion is expected to cre-
ate another 350 jobs, the companies said. Both
plants are also expected to keep operating over
the 36-month expansion period.
The Atrahan operation is already Quebec’s
fourth-biggest pork-packing facility, processing
almost one million hogs a year. Its expansion is to
include “redevelopment” of its hog-receiving area,
expansion of its slaughter section, cold rooms and
butchering room.
The Atrahan expansion, Olymel said, “will create ideal conditions for sharing of expertise and
maintenance and compliance with product specifications, thus enabling it to satisfy the customer
requirements, especially in Japan.”
Lucyporc, which already specializes in products such as Nagano pork and the Mugifuji brand
for the Japanese market, “will play a vital role in
meeting the standards in product specifications,”
the companies said.
The day shift at the Atrahan plant will be
“mainly devoted” to the Mugifuji and Nagano
brands after the expansion.
Olymel CEO Rejean Nadeau said Aug. 9 the
company’s “analysis of market developments and
partnerships concluded in recent years... has led
us to develop a new business model designed to
adapt to the challenges of today’s markets.”
The new model, he said, is meant “to put our
fresh pork sector in Eastern Canada back on track
to long-term profitability.”
BUCKS
dairy
KIDS - Under 80
MEAT
DAIRY
MEAT
DAIRY
$3.52
76 lbs.
$3.60 / $2.95
50 lbs.
$3.51
51 lbs.
$3.40 / $3.51
53 lbs.
$3.36
55 lbs.
$3.36
50 lbs.
$3.36 / $3.09
55 lbs.
$3.59
41 lbs.
$3.49
43 lbs.
$3.15
46 lbs.
$3.20
43 lbs.
$3
27 lbs.
14
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
LIVESTOCK AUCTION RESULTS
Weight Category
Ashern
Gladstone
Grunthal
Heartland
Heartland
Brandon
Virden
Killarney
Ste. Rose
Winnipeg
Feeder Steers
n/a
n/a
n/a
9-Aug
10-Aug
n/a
n/a
1-Aug
No. on offer
n/a
n/a
n/a
101
349*
n/a
n/a
70
over 1,000 lbs.
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
900-1,000
n/a
n/a
n/a
160.00-175.00
167.00-180.00
n/a
n/a
155.00-168.00
800-900
n/a
n/a
n/a
175.00-190.00
180.00-194.00
n/a
n/a
160.00-177.00
700-800
n/a
n/a
n/a
180.00-195.00
187.00-204.00
n/a
n/a
165.00-187.00
600-700
n/a
n/a
n/a
185.00-200.00
189.00-208.00
n/a
n/a
165.00-190.00
500-600
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
194.00-214.00
n/a
n/a
165.00-195.00
400-500
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
300-400
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Feeder heifers
n/a
900-1,000 lbs.
n/a
n/a
n/a
145.00-160.00
148.00-163.00
n/a
n/a
n/a
800-900
n/a
n/a
n/a
160.00-173.00
165.00-176.00
n/a
n/a
135.00-156.00
700-800
n/a
n/a
n/a
165.00-180.00
169.00-181.00
n/a
n/a
140.00-167.00
600-700
n/a
n/a
n/a
175.00-185.00
170.00-184.00
n/a
n/a
145.00-172.00
500-600
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
173.00-185.00
n/a
n/a
150.00-182.00
400-500
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
175.00-189.00
n/a
n/a
n/a
300-400
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Slaughter Market
n/a
No. on offer
n/a
n/a
n/a
67
n/a
n/a
n/a
125.00
D1-D2 Cows
n/a
n/a
n/a
88.00-99.50
90.00-97.00
n/a
n/a
94.00-102.50
D3-D5 Cows
n/a
n/a
n/a
78.00-88.00
85.00-90.00
n/a
n/a
84.00-92.00
Age Verified
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
93.00-100.00
n/a
n/a
n/a
Mature Bulls
n/a
n/a
n/a
112.00-122.00
115.00-125.00
n/a
n/a
116.00-122.00
Butcher Steers
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Butcher Heifers
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Feeder Cows
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
95.00-115.00
n/a
n/a
105.00-124.00
Fleshy Export Cows
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Lean Export Cows
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Heiferettes
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
105.00-130.00
n/a
n/a
n/a
* includes slaughter market
(Note all prices in CDN$ per cwt. These prices also generally represent the top one-third of sales reported by the auction yard.)
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But country stars Brad and
Curtis Rempel haven’t forgotten
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Report on grazing leases
ignites an old debate » PG 22
MObIle
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rop producers will have to
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The question of additional farm
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said Gary
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Stonewall pays tribute to
artist William Kurelek » Pg 3
serVing mAnitobA FArmers since 1925 | Vol. 73, no. 33 | $1.75
cP Rail says
it’s ready to
move this
year’s crop
to market
mAnitobAcooperAtor.cA
Researchers study how to
extend the growing season
MAFRD is looking at how well these oversize cold frames
can extend horticultural growing seasons
BY ALLAN DAWSON
Co-operator staff
A
$232,500
You don’t have to go far to find hazards on a farm, and that’s why new workplace safety regulations are inevitable, say farm
leaders. PHOTOS: COURTESY Canadian agRiCUlTURal SafETY aSSOCiaTiOn
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Mike Gait
Eugene Styba
» Pg 15
August 13, 2015
The company is
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as western Canadian
production continues
to increase
LEASE 2003 CIH 2388
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OTHER TRACTORS
Young beef
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August 3, 2015
By JenniFeR BlAiR
AF STAFF
C
hanges to farm safety
regulations are expected soon — and that
might not be a bad thing
for Alberta farmers, says the
president of the Alberta Federation of Agriculture.
“Workers’ compensation
or private insurance really
is a great risk management
tool for farms nowadays,”
said Lynn Jacobson. “That
protection against litigation
is one of the big selling fac-
tors for workers’ compensation.”
Oneil Carlier, the new NDP
agriculture minister, has
vowed to extend workplace
safety regulations to farm
workers who aren’t currently
covered by workers’ compensation or Occupational Health
and Safety regulations.
Today, only around seven
per cent of Alberta farm
employers voluntarily carry
workers’ compensation for
their operations. But offering
that protection — both for
employers and employees —
is one of the realities of farm-
ing today, said Jacobson, who
farms near Enchant.
“There’s getting to be more
and more hired help on the
farm and we’re employing
more people,” he said. “It gives
protection from litigation and
other advantages, and if you
don’t have it, there can be
some serious consequences.”
And farm workers today
“aren’t just interested in a paycheque,” he said.
“They’re starting to realize,
‘If I get hurt on this job, where’s
the protection for my family?’
When it comes down to it, a
farm that has some type of
protection for those people is
going to have a lot easier time
hiring people.”
senior executive with
CP Rail says the company is “well positioned” to move this year’s
g ra i n c r o p d e s p i t e re c e n t
cutbacks in staff and
locomotives.
Grain is, was and will continue to be Canadian Pacific
Railway’s biggest cargo, John
Brooks, vice-president of sales
and marketing for bulk commodities, said in an interview
Aug. 6.
And the historic railway
founded in 1881 is investing to
move even more in the future,
he said. “Make no bones about
it, grain is king at CP,” he said.
“It is our life-bread. There is
nothing we want to do more
than move a lot of grain.
“I think we feel pretty good
about our handling capacity…
to move this new crop.”
see CP Rail on page 7 »
High tunnel production has potential to extend the Manitoba grower’s season, says MAFRD’s fruit crops specialist Anthony Mintenko. He and the provincial
vegetable crop specialist are evaluating fruit and vegetable crops for high tunnel production at the AAFC site at Portage la Prairie. PHOTO: LORRAINE STEVENSON
BY LORRAINE STEVENSON
Cost and paperwork
Co-operator staff / Portage la Prairie
There are “some misconceptions” about workers’ compensation that have made Alberta
farmers reluctant to offer coverage to their workers, said
Jacobson.
“Some people don’t like that
administrative role and the
paperwork that is associated
with the program at this point
in time,” he said.
A
production system that extends
the growing season, offers growers a competitive edge in the
marketplace and potential to make
more money sounds mighty tempting.
That’s why fruit and vegetable growers were out in large numbers at Hort
Diagnostic Days in late July to hear
more about construction of high
tunnels.
This is the first year a variety
of fruits and vegetables has been
planted in the high tunnel built in
2014 at the Agriculture Agri-Food
Canada location in Portage la Prairie.
Growers are keen to hear what
Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural
Development (MAFRD) specialists are
learning.
High tunnel production is commonplace in other parts of Canada and
in northern and central U.S. where
nearly every type of fruit and vegetable is now grown, even tree fruits.
MAFRD staff are researching how high
tunnels work in Manitoba growing
conditions.
“We have a lot of recommendations
from other places like Minnesota
and Ontario about what to grow in
a high tunnel but nothing for under
Manitoba conditions,” said fruit
crop specialist Anthony Mintenko,
who is evaluating day-neutral strawberries, early-season June-bearing
strawberries, fall-bearing raspberries
and blackberries at one end of the
100x15x7.5-foot tunnel. Provincial
vegetable specialist Tom Gonsalves is
experimenting with vegetables such
as tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers
at the other.
High tunnels are like greenhouses,
except they don’t have a double layer
of poly, and no permanent heat or
electricity. But they have a similar
function — they keep cold out and,
conversely, heat in.
SPACE & MATERIAL
DEADLINE:
see COVeRAGe } page 7
Publication Mail Agreement 40069240
• Unbeatable value - about 2 cents per contact for a full page ad.
see ReseaRCheRs on page 6 »
COOL: U.S. challengeS canada’S claim» PAGE 3
Friday September 9th
15
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
YOUR CANADIAN BEEF
Brand MATTERS
The Canadian beef brand is proven to have meaning with consumers worldwide.
More than a logo, it is a powerful story that reflects all that is good about our beef:
We put the best of Canada into our beef.
SO WHAT IS THE BRAND, EXACTLY?
When people see Canadian Beef, they think of our beautiful landscapes, the friendly, honest
nature of Canadians and our commitment to do what is right. The brand represents our
beef, the people that raise it and our reputation as a whole. It is what we stand for, based
on this Promise: Each and every day, Canadian beef is produced and delivered with pride
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without compromise. Consumers understand that Canada is the world’s perfect place
for raising beef.
WHAT DOES YOUR BRAND MEAN?
Consumers recognize these 4 basic good things about Canadian beef:
PRODUCER
PRODUCT
STANDARDS
SUSTAINABILITY
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community of ranchers and farmers
who tend to the cattle and land with
care, hard work and resourcefulness.
Our quality beef is shaped
by our nature: Canadian
landscapes, climate and
our ingenuity.
The world-class safety and
quality standards we set and
follow are a reflection of what
we value as Canadians.
We take on the responsibility
for the resources in our care.
Stewardship is the mindset,
sustainability the practice.
Consumers
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Verified by global research, the Canadian Beef brand makes consumers feel good about the
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Canada Beef is committed to increasing global demand for our beef.
We have a powerful brand with a good story to tell. Let’s tell it together.
Sign up for The League newsletter. Take part in our
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16
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
WEATHER VANE
“Everyone talks about the weather, but no one does anything about it.” Mark Twain, 1897
Seasonable late-summer weather
Issued: Monday, August 15, 2016 · Covering: August 17 – August 24, 2016
Daniel Bezte
Weather Vane
F
or a change, last week’s
u p p e r l ow e n d e d u p
weakening considerably as it passed through our
region, so instead of seeing
several days with clouds and
showers we only saw partly
cloudy skies with only a few
widely scattered showers and
thunderstorms.
For this forecast period, for
the first time in a long while,
it looks like we won’t have to
deal with any upper lows, but
this doesn’t mean there will
not be any surface-based lows
to deal with. The first area of
low pressure will be moving
across nor ther n Manitoba
dur ing the middle of this
week. This low will not directly
affect us, as it will be too far
to the north. What we will see
is a cold front slide through
behind this low on Thursday,
bringing with it the chance of
some thunderstorms.
Co o l h i g h p re s s u re w i l l
then build in on Friday and
Saturday. This will likely bring
clear skies in the mornings
and partly cloudy skies in the
afternoons. Daytime highs
look to be in the low 20s, with
overnight lows around the 10
C mark. The weather models
then show a weak low zipping through our region late
on Sunday and into early
Monday, bringing the chance
for some showers.
Another larger area of high
pressure is then forecast to
move in by Tuesday, bringing
plenty of sunshine along with
nice seasonable late-summer
temperatures. Expect daytime highs to be in the low to
mid-20s with overnight lows
in the low to mid-teens. This
high will slowly pull off to the
east by the second half of next
week. Combine this with a
developing area of low pressure to our west, and it looks
like the latter part of next
week will see warmer and
more humid air move back in,
along with the chance of more
thunderstorms.
Usual temperature range for
this period: Highs, 20 to 28 C;
lows, 8 to 14 C.
Daniel Bezte is a teacher by profession
with a BA (Hon.) in geography,
specializing in climatology, from the
U of W. He operates a computerized
weather station near Birds Hill Park.
Contact him with your questions and
comments at [email protected]
WEATHER MAP - WESTERN CANADA
1 Month (30 Days) Departure from Average Precipitation (Prairie Region)
July 13, 2016 to August 11, 2016
< -60 mm
-60 to -50 mm
-50 to -40 mm
-40 to -30 mm
-30 to -20 mm
-20 to -10 mm
-10 to 0 mm
0 to 10 mm
10 to 20 mm
20 to 30 mm
30 to 40 mm
40 to 50 mm
50 to 60 mm
> 60 mm
Extent of Agricultural Land
Lakes and Rivers
Produced using near real-time data that has
undergone initial quality control. The map
may not be accurate for all regions due to data
availability and data errors.
Copyright © 2016 Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada
Prepared by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s National Agroclimate Information Service (NAIS). Data provided through partnership with
Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada, and many Provincial agencies.
Created: 08/12/16
www.agr.gc.ca/drought
This issue’s map shows the total amount of precipitation that fell across the Prairies as a departure from average for the 30 days ending Aug. 11.
A large portion of southern Alberta, south-central Saskatchewan and parts of southern Manitoba saw significant rainfall during this period.
Areas in purple were the wettest regions, receiving more than 60 mm above average.
Can’t seem to avoid these upper lows
A stalled area of low pressure over Louisiana tapped into near-record moisture
BY DANIEL BEZTE
Co-operator contributor
T
hanks to what seems
to be an endless procession of upper-level
lows across the Prairies this
spring and summer, the prospect of a hot and dry summer has pretty much fizzled
away. While these upper lows
have brought excessive rains
to some areas, they have also
brought much-needed rains
to others. Some have experienced flooding, but even the
worst rains and flooding this
year were nothing compared
to the historic rainfall event
that hit a large portion of
Louisiana late last week.
A stalled area of low pressure sitting over Louisiana
was able to tap into nearrecord amounts of atmospheric moisture over the Gulf
of Mexico and dump some
unbelievable quantities of
rain. Over a five-day period
ending Aug. 14, Watson, La.,
northeast of Baton Rouge,
recorded 739.3 mm of rain!
That’s not a typo; they actually received nearly threequarters of a metre! That kind
of rainfall event would be
estimated to occur only once
in 500 years. Needless to say,
several rivers in the region
… there is some talk that this current pattern is a
precursor to a La Niña winter.
quickly hit record flood levels,
with over 1,000 water rescues
taking place.
This leads us back to a discussion on upper-level lows
that we had in the spring. At
that time I was hoping we
wouldn’t have to take a look at
them again, but it just doesn’t
seem like we can avoid them
this year. Luckily, for the most
part, they haven’t been big
rain producers as in the summer of 2009, when we saw
not just plenty of rain but
also plenty of clouds and cold
temperatures. So far this year
the upper lows have brought
unsettled weather with plenty
o f t h u n d e r s t o r m s, b u t n o
prolonged per iods of cold
weather.
I’ll have to admit, whenever
I hear mention of an upperlevel low or a cut-off low, I
kind of cringe. Upper-level
lows are almost never a good
thing. They are difficult to
forecast, and if they form cutoff lows they tend to move
very slowly, and because of
that, can stick around for days
or even weeks!
Extreme loops
So, just what are upper-level
lows and cut-off lows — and
what causes them? Upperlevel lows are often asso ciated, at least at first, with
strong surface lows. Surface
lows can form for a number of
reasons, but a vast majority of
them forms along the boundary between two different air
masses and are associated
with the jet stream. If you
remember back to some of
the articles I’ve written about
the jet stream and waves, you
might remember that areas
of low pressure tend to form
in the turbulent flow along
the edges of the jet stream.
This is kind of like watching eddies form in the water
when two different currents
meet. These eddies or lows,
if they stay along the edge of
the two different currents or
jet stream, tend to move along
fairly quickly. Occasionally
these features can break away
from this region and when
they do, they tend to meander around until they either
slowly weaken or get caught
up in the main current once
again and then quickly move
away.
This is what can happen
when we see extreme loops
o f h i g h a n d l ow p re s s u re
develop. The current positioning and strength of the
jet stream is such that upper
lows are for ming over the
Pacific Ocean and are coming
inland, mostly over B.C. and
then holding together as they
continue across the Prairies.
If the conditions are right,
these upper lows can tap into
colder air to the north and
strengthen. If they get big
and strong enough, they can
sometimes break away from
the main jet stream and then
simply spin in place, often
moving very slowly and erratically before they either slowly
die or finally get caught back
up into the jet stream.
In t h e s u m m e r, b e c a u s e
these upper lows are pools of
cold air in the upper atmosphere, we tend to see a lot of
showers and thunderstorms
develop. During the day the
sun tries to warm the surface
area under these lows. This
warming air starts to rise and
it finds a cold atmosphere
around it. This allows the air
to continue to rise, creating
showers and thunderstorms,
usually by mid- to late aftern o o n . T h e s e s h ow e r s a n d
storms tend to weaken overnight, only for the whole cycle
to begin again the next day.
So far this year we’ve only
seen a couple of upper lows
get large enough to become
cut-off lows. The rest of the
upper lows have been relatively quick moving, taking
only two to four days to move
through a region, compared
to one to two weeks for a cutoff low. Their faster motion
gives these lows less time to
pull in colder air, which is
why our temperatures so far
this summer have been near
to only slightly below average.
What does this mean for the
weather this fall and winter?
Well, there is some talk that
this current pattern is a precursor to a La Niña winter.
The current forecast is for a
weak La Niña to develop and
continue throughout the winter. La Niña winters across the
Prairies tend to have a greater
chance of being cold and
snowy, but as usual, winter is
a fair ways off and a lot can
change.
17
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
CROPS
Soil test right
after the combine
The tradition has been to sample for soil nutrients later in
the fall, but there are compelling reasons to go sooner than later
BY ALLAN DAWSON
Co-operator staff
I
t’s been the accepted wisdom
to soil test as late as possible
in the fall, but one soil test lab
says it might pay to go earlier.
Agvise Laboratories, that has
soil-testing labs in North Dakota
and Minnesota and a large stable
of Canadian customers, told growers in a recent email it may be a
sound strategy to soil test right
after the combine.
“Crop residue from spring wheat
or other cereals is very high in carbon and takes a long time to break
down,” Agvise wrote Aug. 9. “Since
the wheat straw breaks down or
mineralizes so slowly, soil nitrate
levels from samples taken right
after harvest change very little
through the entire fall season.”
The company added it’s done
several sampling date projects
over the past 25 years, which
show the soil nitrate level in
wheat fields is very stable all fall.
Researchers from North Dakota
State University also recommend
soil sampling right behind the
combine to get the best-quality
soil samples, Agvise said.
Manitoba Agriculture soil fertility specialist John Heard agrees.
“Historically we have stuck to
the ‘best’ principle, but the best
principle is not always the most
practical principle,” he said. “The
best would be to wait until spring,
closest to the time when the crop
needs it (nutrients). But that is not
at all practical.”
Agvise lists the following advantages for sampling cereal fields following the combine:
• It provides very stable nitrate test
levels.
• It gives the highest-quality soil
sample before any tillage occurs.
• S ampling an undisturbed soil
profile means accurate depth
control.
• Sample depth control is important for getting consistent results
for tests such as phosphorus,
Manitoba Agriculture soil fertility specialist John Heard, soil sampling the old-fashioned
way, says sampling cereals fields right after combining provides some advantages. PHOTO: ALLAN DAWSON
potassium, zinc and organic matter percentage from year to year.
• It reveals the nitrate level in the
soil profile before volunteer grain
starts taking up nitrogen a few
weeks after harvest.
• I t allows more time to make
plans for variable-rate fertilizer
applications.
• It ensures that each field gets
sampled, avoiding bad weather,
which can prevent sampling later
in the fall.
Unleash the
power of
Ideally sampling would occur
in spring just before the crop is
planted, but it doesn’t give farmers enough time to plan, Heard
said.
If it’s a wet fall, which can result
in nitrogen leaching, a farmer can
adjust their fertilizer application
rate, or resample, Heard said.
“Winter is not necessarily a
downtime for farmers, it is planning time and they are far better
to do their planning when they
have soil test values in hand so
they can do their budgets,” he
said. “There’s just no time to do
sampling in the spring. Fall soil
sampling is our competitive
advantage.”
By starting earlier soil-testing
services can also do a better job,
Heard added. With more acres of
soybeans and corn, which mature
later and are harvested later,
there’s less time to get all the sampling done before freeze-up.
Soil test results are just the start
of the planning phase for farmers, he said. Farmers need to take
other factors into account such as
potential yield, whether the fertilizer will be applied in spring or
fall and whether it will be banded
or broadcast.
“It’s nice to wait until you are at
the finish line to make your decisions, but you may not have time
to do that so you have to sample earlier,” Heard said. “And that
allows the soil test industry a head
start.
“Going earlier allows farmers to
make some fertilizer plans in the
fall.”
Steve Barron, business development manager in south-central
Manitoba for crop input supplier
Double Diamond, is seeing more
interest in earlier soil testing.
“A lot of our customers plan on
applying fertilizer in the fall and
need the results,” he said.
“When a guy takes a soil test
core when the field has been
worked the consistency and the
depth of the core are so marginalized. If you can take it before
the field is worked the depth and
the consistency are so much more
accurate and what you learn from
it is so much better.
“It’s not just about nitrogen and
phosphorus, but all the micronutrients. If you can be more consistent with that zero to six (inch)
core it’s going to help a lot with
your interpretation for your seedplaced micronutrients as well.”
Varieties that are glyphosate tolerant (including those designated by the letter “R” in the product number) contain genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate herbicides. Glyphosate
herbicides will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. Individual product responses are variable and subject to a variety of environmental, disease and pest pressures. Refer to
www.pioneer.com/products or contact your local Pioneer Hi-Bred Sales Representative for the latest and most complete listing of traits and scores for each Pioneer brand product
and for product placement and management suggestions specific to your operation and local conditions. Pioneer® brand products are provided subject to the terms and conditions
of purchase which are part of the labeling and purchase documents. ®, SM, TM Trademarks and service marks of DuPont, Pioneer or their respective owners. © 2016, PHII.
h u s b a n d r y — t h e s c i e n c e , S K I L L O R ART O F F AR M IN G
[email protected]
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18
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
Home gardeners could hold
key to potato crop quality
Home gardens can be a source of infection for the fungal disease that kills potatoes and tomatoes
BY ALLAN DAWSON
Co-operator staff
M
anitoba gardeners need
to scout for late blight
in their tomatoes and
potatoes, not just to protect
themselves but the province’s
64,500 acres of commercial
potato production.
Late blight was detected
July 16 in a potato field near
Carberry. Manitoba Agriculture
plant pathologist Vikram Bisht
said in an Aug. 10 interview
more than 15 fields have been
found, most near Carberry, but
also near Sydney, Melbourne and
Glendora. The most recent cases
are near Carman and Winkler,
and on tomatoes east of Portage
and east of PTH 75.
“The message to home gardeners is if you... are seeing
the (late blight) infection and
have not sprayed fungicide the
plants will go down and die
very quickly,” Bisht said. “The
fruit will also get infected and
it will appear with brown spots.
They don’t store very well. If
your leaves have infection harvest as many of the fruits as you
can then destroy the plants. Put
them in black garbage bags and
keep them in the sun. After two
to three days they should get
cooked very well and that will
destroy the disease. If you throw
the plants in the compost pile
the plants will not dry quickly
enough and will continue to
sporulate. Those spores will be
a risk to commercial potato producers of Manitoba.”
Manitoba gardeners need to be watching for late blight in their tomatoes and
potatoes. These tomatoes have late blight and should be destroyed to protect
Manitoba’s 64,500 acres of commercial potatoes. Late blight lesion on a tomato leaf.
PHOTOs: VIKRAM BISHT, MANITOBA AGRICULTURE
Late blight symptoms are
similar on tomatoes and potatoes. Manitoba Agriculture’s
website says to look for small,
light- to dark-green, circular to
irregular-shaped, water-soaked
spots.
“During cool, moist weather,
these lesions expand rapidly
into large, dark-brown or black
lesions, often appearing greasy,”
the site says. “The lesions are
not limited by leaf veins and as
new infections occur and existing infections coalesce, entire
leaves can become blighted
and die within a few days. The
lesions may expand down petioles and stems of the plant.”
The late blight strain found
in Manitoba is US23, which is
very aggressive in tomatoes and
potatoes, Bisht said. He suspects the fungal disease spread
in high winds during recent
thunderstorms.
Although more than 15 cases
of the disease have been found,
in some cases only a few potato
plants were infected, Bisht said.
The infected plants have been
destroyed.
“The growers are trying to
keep on top of it with a five- to
seven-day (fungicide) spray
schedule,” he said. “Commercial
potato growers currently appear
to be managing.
> Empty Pesticide Container Recycling Program
There are many
reasons to rinse.
#1
Only rinsed containers
can be recycled
#2
Helps keep collection
sites clean
#3
Use all the chemicals
you purchase
#4
Keeps collection sites
safe for workers
#5
Infected volunteer potatoes
could be a disease source and
should be destroyed. Volunteer
tomatoes come from seed, which
doesn’t harbour the disease.
Late blight was found in
Manitoba last year but not until
September 11.
So long as the crop is growing it is susceptible to late blight
infection.
Potatoes infected with late
blight can rot in storage. Late
blight doesn’t rot potatoes, but
the damage it causes allows
other infections that cause rot to
develop.
Treating potatoes with phosphorus acid (Phostrol, Rampart
and Confine) as they go into storage can protect them from rot.
Although some fields have
suffered due to excess moisture
and others have been damaged
by hail, most were doing well as
of Aug. 12, said Keystone Potato
Growers Association manager
Dan Sawatzky.
[email protected]
Trait Stewardship Responsibilities Notice to Farmers
Monsanto Company is a member of Excellence Through Stewardship® (ETS). Monsanto products are commercialized
in accordance with ETS Product Launch Stewardship Guidance, and in compliance with Monsanto’s Policy for
Commercialization of Biotechnology-Derived Plant Products in Commodity Crops. These products have been approved for
import into key export markets with functioning regulatory systems. Any crop or material produced from these products can
only be exported to, or used, processed or sold in countries where all necessary regulatory approvals have been granted. It is
a violation of national and international law to move material containing biotech traits across boundaries into nations where
import is not permitted. Growers should talk to their grain handler or product purchaser to confirm their buying position for
these products. Excellence Through Stewardship® is a registered trademark of Excellence Through Stewardship.
ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW PESTICIDE LABEL DIRECTIONS. Roundup Ready® technology contains genes that
confer tolerance to glyphosate, an active ingredient in Roundup® brand agricultural herbicides. Roundup Ready 2 Xtend™
soybeans contain genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate and dicamba. Agricultural herbicides containing glyphosate will
kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate, and those containing dicamba will kill crops that are not tolerant to dicamba.
Contact your Monsanto dealer or call the Monsanto technical support line at 1-800-667-4944 for recommended Roundup
Ready® Xtend Crop System weed control programs. Acceleron® seed applied solutions for canola contains the active
ingredients difenoconazole, metalaxyl (M and S isomers), fludioxonil and thiamethoxam. Acceleron® seed applied solutions
for canola plus Vibrance® is a combination of two separate individually-registered products, which together contain the
active ingredients difenoconazole, metalaxyl (M and S isomers), fludioxonil, thiamethoxam, and sedaxane. Acceleron® seed
applied solutions for corn (fungicides and insecticide) is a combination of four separate individually-registered products,
which together contain the active ingredients metalaxyl, trifloxystrobin, ipconazole, and clothianidin. Acceleron® seed
applied solutions for corn (fungicides only) is a combination of three separate individually-registered products, which
together contain the active ingredients metalaxyl, trifloxystrobin and ipconazole. Acceleron® seed applied solutions for
corn with Poncho®/VoTivo™ (fungicides, insecticide and nematicide) is a combination of five separate individually-registered
products, which together contain the active ingredients metalaxyl, trifloxystrobin, ipconazole, clothianidin and Bacillus
firmus strain I-1582. Acceleron® seed applied solutions for soybeans (fungicides and insecticide) is a combination of four
separate individually registered products, which together contain the active ingredients fluxapyroxad, pyraclostrobin,
metalaxyl and imidacloprid. Acceleron® seed applied solutions for soybeans (fungicides only) is a combination of three
separate individually registered products, which together contain the active ingredients fluxapyroxad, pyraclostrobin
and metalaxyl. Acceleron®, Cell-Tech™, DEKALB and Design®, DEKALB®, Genuity and Design®, Genuity®, JumpStart®,
Optimize®, RIB Complete®, Roundup Ready 2 Technology and Design®, Roundup Ready 2 Xtend™, Roundup Ready 2 Yield®,
Roundup Ready®, Roundup Transorb®, Roundup WeatherMAX®, Roundup Xtend™, Roundup®, SmartStax®, TagTeam®,
Transorb®, VaporGrip®, VT Double PRO®, VT Triple PRO® and XtendiMax® are trademarks of Monsanto Technology LLC. Used
under license. Fortenza® and Vibrance® are registered trademarks of a Syngenta group company. LibertyLink® and the Water
Droplet Design are trademarks of Bayer. Used under license. Herculex® is a registered trademark of Dow AgroSciences LLC.
Used under license. Poncho® and Votivo™ are trademarks of Bayer. Used under license. ©2016 Monsanto Canada Inc.
Maintain your farm’s
good reputation
No excuse not to!
For more information or to find a collection
{ site
near you visit cleanfarms.ca
Now, take your empty fertilizer containers along for the ride!
10901A-CFM-5Reasons-QRTPage-MBCoop.indd 1
“It would be good to see some
dry weather because every
three or four days we have rain
events and that is creating trouble. The commercial potato
growers are at risk basically
if the home gardeners do not
do a good job (controlling late
blight).”
Commercial growers can control late blight with fungicides
that contain chlorothalolil or
mancozeb.
Home gardeners can spray
copper sulphate.
Garden tomatoes and potatoes are also more susceptible
to late blight if plants remain
damp, which can occur when
plants are thick, preventing air
circulation. As a result weedy
gardens are more at risk, Bisht
said.
Bisht also recommends gardeners buy late blight-resistant
tomatoes.
Gardeners should buy new
certified seed potatoes next
spring and plant healthy-looking tomatoes.
4/2/14 12:03 PM
19
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
CROP REPORT
Harvest operations are picking up steam
Manitoba Agriculture Crop Report, issued August 15, 2016
Southwest Region
Rainfall amounts varied again
with some large storms in the
middle of the week in the north
around Rossburn, Russell and
Angusville.
Winter wheat and fall rye harvest continues with reports of
average yields and good quality. Producers are also harvesting peas, with average to
below-average yields and quality. Several producers have
started pre-harvest spraying of
cereal crops. Some early-seeded
cereal acres, mainly barley, have
been harvested with average to
above-average yields.
Sw a t h i n g o f c a n o l a h a s
started with disease being a
major issue in deciding when
to cut. Soybeans are progressing and are in the R5 to R6
stage. Symptoms of sclerotinia
are starting to appear in some
sunflowers.
Corn is growing rapidly and
some fields have advanced to
milk stage. Soybeans continue
to flower and pod. Bacterial
blight is evident in many fields,
and both phytophthera and
white mould are showing up.
Edible beans are podded and
the most advanced fields have
some colour change.
Many pea fields have dried
down. In most flax fields colour
change is evident. Sunflowers
are flowering and in the R4 to
R5.5 stage, and some lodging
and snapped stems are present.
Eastern Region
The weather last week saw
less rainfall. Southern districts
received up to 15 mm of rain
with most occurring early in
the week. Central and northern
districts experienced minimal
precipitation. Overal improved
drying conditions allowed for
greater field access with producers continuing with pre-harvest applications, harvesting,
and haying.
Crop development in warmseason crops continued to
accelerate given the seasonal to
warm temperatures. Soil moisture conditions are considered
ample to support continued
development in warm-season
crops.
Winter wheat harvest
is almost complete with
reported yields ranging from
60 to 95 bu./acre. Protein levels are often at 11 per cent or
higher. Fusarium-damaged
kernel levels are lower than
expected based on pre-harvest
field observations. Majority of
spring cereals is mature with
the remainder of the crop
quickly moving from late hard
dough to maturity. Harvesting
of spring wheat is five per
c e n t c o m p l e t e. Ca n o l a i s
mostly mature with pre-harvest applications about 60 per
cent complete and swathing
about 25 per cent complete.
Field peas are mature and
harvest has started. The soybean crop ranges from the R5
(beginning seed fill) or R6 (full
seed) stages. The frequency of
reports of soybeans displaying
potassium-deficiency symptoms, phytophthora wilt and
sclerotinia increased last week.
Sunflowers are mostly at the R6
stage with the remainder of the
crop at late R5. Corn is mostly
at the R3 with the remainder of
the crop at the R2 stage.
Interlake Region
Warm temperatures with scattered thunderstorms were once
again the weather pattern last
week. Near Fisher Branch, producers received anywhere from
60 to 100 mm of rainfall in a
short period. North of Arborg,
producers received 35 to 45
mm, along with hail.
Winter wheat har vest is
nearly complete in the south
Interlake but is still ongoing in
north Interlake. Yields range
from 60 to 80 bu./acre with
minimal levels of fusariumdamaged kernels. Spring cereal
harvest has started with barley,
wheat, and oats acres being
combined. Canola development varies from 10 days since
swather to just finishing flowering. Soybean crops are at the
R5 stage, and sunflowers are in
the mid-flowering stage. Some
insecticides are being applied
on alfalfa seed fields for lygus
control. Pea fields in the region
are being harvested with yields
of 40 to 50 bu./acre. Flax fields
are starting to dry down as the
crops start to turn colour.
Northwest Region
There was unsettled weather
over the week, with intermittent
showers and poor drying conditions and variable rainfall.
Fall rye, perennial ryegrass
and winter wheat harvest continuing in the Dauphin and
Roblin areas. Some barley has
been harvested in the Ste. Rose
area. Spring wheat is maturing
and throughout the region with
reports of some fields receiving pre-harvest herbicide application. Canola continues to
develop with 100 per cent of the
canola fields podding and some
swathed in the Dauphin and
Swan River areas. Field peas are
also advancing, some fields are
being desiccated and a small
number of acres were harvested in the Swan River area.
Soybeans are at R3 stage.
Some crop lodging is evident
and crop damage due to excessive moisture in lower areas in
fields. Aster yellows is present
at low levels in canola in the
Roblin and Swan Valley areas.
Some oat blast in the Roblin
area has been reported and
fusarium head blight is present
in spring wheat throughout
the region. White mould and
powdery mildew is reported in
some pea fields, as well as sclerotinia in canola where fungicide was not applied.
COMPETITION + GLYPHOSATE
DAY 21: re-growth occurs
EXPRESS + GLYPHOSATE
DAY 21: complete burn
®
Central Region
Warm temperatures throughout
the week allowed for continued
rapid crop growth. Unsettled
weather remains, and the
majority of the region saw some
rain or thundershowers with
amounts ranging from five to 25
mm. High humidity continues
to limit drying conditions.
Fall rye and winter wheat harvest is nearly complete. Yields
of winter wheat range from 65
to over 100 bu./acre. Protein is
in the 11 to 11.5 per cent range.
Early yield reports for fall rye
are from 75 to 95 bu./acre.
Spring cereals are maturing
and pre-harvest applications
continue. Spring wheat yields
range from 40 to 60 bu./acre
to date, and barley yields are
in the 70 to 85 bu./acre range.
Oats are being swathed with
some acres harvested.
The later-seeded canola is
podded while early-seeded canola is seeing good seed colour
change. Swathing continues.
Actual test results. University of Guelph, 2014.
SEE THE PROOF FOR YOURSELF IN YOUR FALL BURNDOWN
Fall is the best time to control many tough perennials and winter annuals. By adding DuPont™ Express®
herbicides to your glyphosate post-harvest burndown you’ll eliminate your toughest weeds from shoots to
roots with their complete systemic activity. Visit fallexpress.dupont.ca for more proof of performance.
DuPont
Express
TM
®
herbicide
Ask your retailer how you can save up to $5.50/acre with the FarmCare® Connect Grower Program.
As with all crop protection products, read and follow label instructions carefully.
Member of CropLife Canada.
Unless indicated, trademarks with ®, TM or SM are trademarks of DuPont or affiliates. © 2016 DuPont.
1791 Express Post Harvest Ad_ManCooP.indd 1
8/11/16 11:22 AM
20
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
FARMER'S
MARKETPLACE CLAssifiEds
Selling?
Manitoba Co-operator
The Western Producer
Call to place your classified ad in the next issue: 1-800-782-0794
EMAIL your classified ads to: [email protected]
1963 CESSNA 185A, IO-520, 300 HP, 6870
TT, 667 SMOH, EDO 2960 c/w hatch,
McSherry Auction Service Ltd
wheel gear, Kehler hyd. skis, bubble windows, Vortex gen, Robertons STOL, tip
tanks, droop tips, JPI-EDM 930 eng. moniNestor Myska
tor, dual Com, AT50A transponder, Artex
406 ELT, Garmin 296 panel mounted GPS, Appollo GPS, remote compass, split back seats,
Sun., Aug. 21st @ 10:00 am
wing covers, elevator cover, screen cover,
Rosser, MB
engine tent, jig for lifting, booster cables,
2- David Clark headsets, new paint in 2010,
4 Miles East on Hwy 221
ext. 9/10, int. 8/10, well main-tained and
Then Go ½ Mile South on RD 4 E #65149
ready to fly. Great performer on wheel skis or
Contact: (204) 633-5064
floats, asking $139,000 Cdn. 204-378-2948,
[email protected] Riverton, MB.
Construction
* Combine &
PIPER PA22-20, 3637 TT, 150 HP, 947
Swather * Tractors & Equipment *
eng. hrs., wing tip exts., Vortex generaTruck & Trailers * Light Vehicles
tors, Cleveland brakes, Scott tail wheel,
new battery, new turn and bank, new DG,
& Yard * Tools * Misc * Antiques *
new vertical compass, Tanis engine heater,
$35,000. Skis and extra propeller
Stuart McSherry
available. 306-768-7330, Carrot River, SK.
(204) 467-1858 or (204) 886-7027
1976 GRUMMAN CHEETAH, 4650 TTSN,
www.mcsherryauction.com
2650 SMOH, 550 hrs. on new Millenium
cylinders, new C of A, basic VFR aircraft,
MEYERS PRELIMINARY RESTAURANT
$20,000. Wayne 306-453-2450, Carlyle, SK
Auction Notice end of August. Full line
of Restaurant Equipment, tables, chairs,
dishes etc. Check website for full details.
Bradley Meyers, Auctioneer 204-476-6262.
AVIATION BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY for www.meyersauctions.com
sale in NE SK. Air taxi and flight training
operating certificates. Modern 10 year old POSTPONED: Vintage Tractor Auction,
two aircraft hangar with office space. One Saturday, August 20, 2016, at 10:00 EST,
two place and one four place aircraft. Thunder Bay, ON. Watch for new and list
Comes with full-time government contract and time. Owner, 807-475-4726, 2-5 PM
transporting medical staff. Will sell turn- EST. Auctioneer: P. Kantola 807-474-6210.
key complete or any combination to suit
buyer. Contact Wayne 306-862-7761 or MEYERS AUCTION, SUNDAY, AUGUST
21st, 10:00 AM, Arden, MB. 1994 Dodge
Harold 306-862-7524, Nipawin, SK.
3500, safetied; 2012 Polaris quad; Lund
ALWAYS HANGARED, org. J3 Cub 65 HP, 15’ alum. boat and trailer; gas ice auger;
metal prop, recent ceconite. Good inside/ Craftsman YS4500 riding mower; Craftsout. 3770.20 TT Airframe, 1185.2 SMOH, man snowblower; fishing rods and items;
engine 33 hrs. since top overhaul. Extra 5 Club Car elec. golf cart; Polaris Trail Degallon wing tank, shoulder harness, cyl luxe snowmobile; stoves; fridges; dishtemp. Estate sale $35,000 cdn. Phone washer; antiques and collectibles; 4’ Coke
204-836-2686, St. Alphonse, MB.
button; hair salon closeout. Much more on
the web. Bradley Meyers Auctioneer
204-476-6262. www.meyersauctions.com
AUCTION SALE
ADRIAN’S MAGNETO SERVICE. Guaranteed repairs on mags and ignitors. Repairs.
Parts. Sales. 204-326-6497. Box 21232,
Steinbach, MB. R5G 1S5.
1948 8N FORD tractor, c/w 5’ finishing
mower, 6’ 3 PTH cultivator, 6’ 3 PTH disc
big blades. MF 165, 3 PTH, FEL. Rocanville,
SK., 306-645-4408, 306-746-7397.
2- MASSEY FERGUSON Super 92 combines
for parts only. Phone for info
403-318-8135, Delburne, AB.
WANTED: STARTER for WD9 International
tractor. Call 306-463-7527, Kindersley, SK.
1964 CASE 830 tractor, diesel, runs good.
Call 306-492-4642, Clavet, SK.
1973 CORVETTE 350 auto., gold, AC, PW,
power steering, power brakes, vg cond.,
$24,500. 306-463-7527, Kindersley, SK.
WANTED: TRACTOR MANUALS, sales brochures, tractor catalogs. 306-373-8012,
Saskatoon, SK.
1959 FORD CAR RADIO, also late 1940’s or
1950’s Mopar Chrysler radio. Both push
button. Call 306-259-4430, Young, SK.
ADVERTISING
DEADLINE: NOON
on THURSDAYS
(unless otherwise stated)
Advertising rAtes
& informAtion
RegulaR Classified
• Minimum charge—$11.25 per week
fora3linewordad.Eachadditionallineis
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boxnumber,pleaseadd$5.00perweekto
yourtotal.Counteightwordsforyouraddress.
Example:AdXXXX,ManitobaCo-operator,Box
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• Yourcompletenameandaddressmustbe
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display Classified
• Advertisingcopydeviatinginanywayfrom
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$32.20percolumninch($2.30peragateline).
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+ $5.00 for online per week.
• Illustrationsandlogosareallowedwithfull
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• Advertisingratesareflatwithnodiscountfor
frequencyofinsertionorvolumeofspaceused.
• Telephoneordersaccepted
• PricequoteddoesnotincludeGST.
Allclassifiedadsarenon-commissionable.
McSherry Auction Service Ltd
AUCTION SALE
Nestor & Rose Smerchanski
Sat., Aug. 20th @ 10:00 am
Winnipeg Beach, MB
Jct Hwy 8 & 229 West 4 ½ Miles
on Hwy 229 #14145E
Contact: (204) 633-3327
or (204) 799-0294
Modern Tractor & Equip: 02 Case
IH C 50 MFWA 3PH FEL 709 Hrs *
Vintage Tractors, Crawler & Equip *
Snow Plane * Trailers & Yard * Tools
* Misc * Antiques * Items!
Stuart McSherry
(204) 467-1858 or (204) 886-7027
www.mcsherryauction.com
AL AND CAROL TODOSICHUCK Auction
Saturday, August 27th, 2016, 9:30AM.
Directions: 16 kms S on #18, 4.8 kms W,
2.4 kms S of Kamsack, SK. Contact
306-542-3260. Equipment: 1988 Universal 1010DT tractor, FWA, 169 spd
w/creeper gear, cab, cooler, 3 hyd, good
rubber, dual PTO, 3 PTH, 18.4x38 tires
w/Universal 950 loader, 436 hrs., c/w
manuals, excellent; Ford 1700 tractor,
FWA, cab, 3PTH, 2 cyl. dsl w/front mount
snow blower, 1074 hrs., excellent; Suzuki
300 quad, 4x4, 2100 hrs.,; Kubota FL120
3PTH finishing mower; Woods L59 mower
(can be adapted to 3PTH); 3PTH potato
planter; Dymark 18HP 43” riding mower;
Grass sweep; Swisher 44” PT mower
w/elec. start, nice; 17’ T/A car hauler;
Yard pull scraper; Home built wood splitter on wheel, motor, hyd., real nice.
Trucks: 1978 Dodge Retriever dually
1 ton tow truck, 318 4 spd, good; 1988
Dodge truck, 4x4 (for parts); 1997 Dodge
Ram 2500, V10, gas, auto, reg. cab,
173,000 kms, nice. Shop: Ben Pak 10,000
lb shop hoist, new cable (to be put together); 10’ 5” aluminum bender, like new.
Much More! Plus: Misc. and Antiques.
Note: Al is cleaning up the acreage.
There are a lot of items we haven’t
seen. Tractors are in excellent shape.
On-line Bidding starts at 1:00 PM. For
updated pictures and listing visit:
www.ukrainetzauction.com PL 915851
MEYERS PROPERTY AND PETTING Zoo
Auction, 10:00 AM, Saturday, August 27,
Rossendale, MB. Property: 9.99 acre
property w/house and. outbuildings. Aunt
Muffy’s Hobby Farm Animals: 2 llamas;
goats; Miniature donkeys; sheep; geese;
Dexter cow; chickens; Pot Belly pigs;
Miniature horses; chickens; peacocks; rabbits; 2 bumper hitch trailers; animal cages;
Westeel grain bin; picnic table; Porta Potty. Household furniture. Much more on
the website. Bradley Meyers Auctioneer
If you want to sell it fast, call 1-800-782-0794.
204-476-6262. www.meyersauctions.com
McSherry Auction Service Ltd
AUCTION SALE
Jerry & Julie Dunsmore
Sat. August 28th @ 11:00 am
Anola, MB – 60029 Stoneridge Rd
Contact # (204) 866-2954
Recreation & Trailer: 08 Yamaha Kodiak 350 4 x 4 Quad 2443 KM * Aroliner 16’
Al Boat & Trailer w 05 Johnson 4 Stroke 40 HP Outboard * 2012 Carry On 12’ BH
Trailer * 84 Ford Ranger * Double Snowmobile Trailer * Utility Trailer * Rem BA 22
* Daisey 118 BB Gun * Gun Cabinet * Live Trap * Camping Items * * Fishing Rods *
Tackle * Trail Camera * 12 Volt Outboard * Inflatable Boat * Helmets * Sports Items
* Pedal Bikes * Tools & Misc: Air Comp * Stihl Chain Saw * Power Wet Saw * De
Walt Inspection Camera * Battery Charger * Power Tools * Cordless Tools * Hand
Tools * Shop Items * 16’ x 34’ Dog Kennel * New 3000lb Winch * Elec Wood Splitter
* 3 Wood Heaters * 7” Chimney Pipe * 7 Construction Heaters * Com Drying Fan
* Al Ladder * Home Repair * Electrical Items * Wireless Security * Loading Ramps
* Picnic Table * Yard Swing * Leaf Blower * Yard Fogger * Yard Tools * Musical:
3 Elec Acoustic Guitars * 2 Elec Bass Guitars * Keyboard * 2 Amplifiers * 1 PA
System * Antiques: Game Table * Cedar Chest * Enamel Top Table * Rocking
Chairs * Wood Chair * Chrome Legged Table * Cabinet Radio * Cash Register *
Cuckoo Clock * Mantle Clock * Cast Dog Door Stop * Chrome Ashtray Stand *
Pictures * Ornaments * Soap Stone * Blue Mountain * Avon * Ginger Beer Bottles
* Enamelware * Double Washtub * Sewing Machine * Folding Camera * Egg Crate
* Implement Seats * Ammo Box * Cream Can * Lanterns * Neon Cigar Sign * 7 Up
Sign * Elvis Telephone * Child Wagon * Figurines * Household: Fridge * Deep Freeze
* Marble Kitchen Table * Wrought Iron K Chairs * Day Bed * Wicker Desk * Vanity
Dresser * Stereo * Electronics * DVD Players * DVD Movies * & Much More!
Stuart McSherry
(204) 467-1858 or (204) 886-7027 www.mcsherryauction.com
McSherry Auction Service Ltd
AUCTION SALE
SOUTHSIDE AUTO WRECKERS located
in Weyburn, SK. 306-842-2641. Used car
parts, light truck to semi-truck parts. We
buy scrap iron and non-ferrous metals.
WRECKING VOLVO TRUCKS: Misc. axles
and parts. Also tandem trailer suspension
axles. Call 306-539-4642, Regina, SK.
Sat. August 27th @ 10:00 am
VS TRUCK WORKS Inc. Parting out GM
1/2 and 1 ton trucks. Call 403-972-3879,
Alsask, SK. www.vstruckworks.com
TOW TRUCK for parts: 1996 Chev 3500,
6.5D, wheel lift, new 6.5D, rebuilt 5 spd.
trans., $8000 OBO. Call 204-564-2332,
Dropmore, MB.
Pat Zaretski (Late Joe)
2260 Howlarke Rd – East St Paul (Wpg), MB
Auction Note: Well Taken Care of Items! Joe was a professional
Mechanic, So There is Very Good Tools at This Auction!
Contact: (204) 667-2465
Classic Vintage Car: 27 Chev Imperial Landau Original 1769 Miles Original Solid *
Tractor & Equipment: Ferguson TE20 3PH * Farm King 3PH 72" Finishing Mower *
Yard: 2011 Crafts PGT 9000 26 HP Hyd R Mower w Mower Snowblower, s 133
Hrs * 16 HP 3PH Garden Tractor w Mower, Snowblower, Tiller * 44" Grass Sweep
* Wheel Barrows * Sprayer * Hand Yard Tools * Patio Set * Tools: Hobart Handler
150 Mig Welder * 5 HP Gal Air Comp * Migmatic Welding Gun * Acetylene Torches
* Makita Chop Saw * Floor Drill Press * Power Tools- Makita -Dewalt * Air Tools
* New 3/4" Impact * Shop Cherry Picker * Hyd Power Pac * 6/12 V Charger *
3000lb Honda Gas Pressure Washer * Parts Washer * Hand Tools * Chain Wrench
* Professional Specialty Tools: Snap On Tool Cabinets * Tire Rod / Inner Bearing
Race Puller * 5 Pc Trans Stopoff Set * Snap On Gear Puller * Snap On Bushing
Driving Set * Snap On Steering Wheelplate Remover * Power Steering Pump Puller
Set * Bearing Seal Driver Set * Snap On Timing Light * Snap On Pressue Gauge
* Coil Spring Compressor * Valve Spring Compressor * Coolant Pressure Tester *
Mac Manifold Gauge Set * Snap On 1/2" 250 lb Torque Wrench * Cat Dial Indicator
* Infrared Thermometer * Various Testers * Digital Tachometer * Digital Caliphers *
Much More * Misc: 225 Gal Poly Tank * Al Ladder * 12 Volt Slip Tank Pump * Oils
* Grease* Antifreeze * Receiver Hitches * Hyd Jacks * Floor Jacks * Hyd Jacks *
Chains & Hooks * Ratchet Load Strapping * CB's * 2 Way Radios * Welding Material
* Bolt Bin * Shelving * Home Repair Items * Electrical Wire * HD Ext Cond * Welding
Cable * Safety Wear * Various New Auto Parts-Light & Heavy * Household: 21 CU
Ft Freezer * Bar Fridge * 4 Pc BR Suite * End Table * Desk * Various Household*
Stuart McSherry
(204) 467-1858 or (204) 886-7027 www.mcsherryauction.com
UNRESERVED CLOSED OUT
AUCTION SALE
532 Ellice Ave. Wpg. MB
Sunday August 21, 2016 at 12:00 Noon
(Viewing 9:00 am until the Time of Sale Only)
Having received instructions, we will sell the following:
SKID STEER & FORKLIFT
Thomas 133 skid steer (showing 4,200 hours) Nice
shape* Raymond model 20R40TT electric stand-in
fork lift, 4,000lbs cap.*
HOISTS
Magnum XL lift (2-post hoist) 9,000lb lift* Malcan
(2-post hoist) 6,000lb lift* 3-Bear Lifts (2-post hoist)
8,000lb lift* 2-Drive on 9,000lb electric lifts (144”
base & 185” base)*
SHOP EQUIPMENT
& MISCELLANEOUS
Dyno tester D1L-4250 w/Fuglebjerg Danmark*
DeVilbiss Tap 5050 air compressor 175PSI* DeVilbiss
44642 air compressor* Upright commercial parts
washer* Hunter DSP 9000 tire balancer w/split
weight* Coats 40-40A tire changer* Mobile Mac
11-drawer tool box* Oil dispenser tank w/squirt
table* Lincoln SPS-175 welder* 2-Grey air-over
transmission jacks* Lincoln AC 225 welder* Bear
brake lathe A1469* Coolant flusher* Power Fist
small 12-ton press* Power Fist 8” swivel vise &
assorted other vises* Citation gas caddy* 2-air
greasers* Assorted floor jacks* Assorted pressure
washers* Bear gas analysis system* Buffalo 15 drill
press* Hoppy 25 headlamp aimer* Rez Nor waste
oil furnace* 2-commercial floor fans* Assorted work
tables* Assorted bolts & parts bins* Assorted jack
stands* Allied floor press* Terraclean injector cleaner*
Better Engineering parts washer* Superior Blast-NPeen sandblaster* 3-Parts washers* Parts agitator*
Rockwell belt sander* Carburetor pressure tester*
Genisys SPX scanner* Assorted parts cabinets*
Acetylene & oxygen torch & cart* Assorted extension
ladders* Small Star safe* Assorted office furniture*
Eye wash station* S.S hand wash sink* E3 pint standalone toxic & combustible gas detector* Simplex time
clock* Large assortment Chilton & Mitchell manuals*
Assorted fire extinguishers* Large amount of
transmission parts (Sold in Lots)* Approx. 40-Rebuilt
transmissions (GM, Dodge, Ford, etc.)* Plus lots of
other items too numerous to mention.
0100-0340
0400
0701-0710
0900
1050-1705
2800
3510-3560
3600
4000-4005
4103-4328
5000-5792
5943-5948
5950-5952
6110-6140
6161-6168
6210-6245
6404-6542
8001-8050
Foracompletecategorylistvisitusonlineat:http://classifieds.producer.com
WRECKING TRUCKS: All makes all
models. Need parts? Call 306-821-0260
or email: [email protected]
Wrecking Dodge, Chev, GMC, Ford and
others. Lots of 4x4 stuff, 1/2 ton - 3 ton,
buses etc. and some cars. We ship by bus,
mail, Loomis, Purolator. Lloydminster, SK.
WRECKING SEMI-TRUCKS, lots of parts.
Call Yellowhead Traders. 306-896-2882,
Churchbridge, SK.
SUMMER CLEAROUT Sales Event. Up to
$14,000 in Savings on select models, OAC.
1-866-944-9024. www.dodgecityauto.com
DL #911673.
TRUCK BONEYARD INC. Specializing in
obsolete parts, all makes. Trucks bought
for wrecking. 306-771-2295, Balgonie, SK.
SASKATOON TRUCK PARTS CENTRE
Ltd. North Corman Industrial Park.
New and used parts available for 3 ton
trucks all the way up to highway tractors,
for every make and model, no part too big
or small. Our shop specializes in custom
rebuilt differentials/transmissions and
clutch installations. Engines are available,
both gas and diesel. Re-sale units are on
the lot ready to go. We buy wrecks for
parts, and sell for wrecks! For more info.
call 306-668-5675 or 1-800-667-3023.
www.saskatoontruckparts.ca DL #914394
ONE OF SASK’s largest inventory of used
heavy truck parts. 3 ton tandem diesel motors and transmissions and differentials for
all makes! Can-Am Truck Export Ltd.,
1-800-938-3323.
SCHOOL BUSES: 19 to 66 pass.; 1986 to
2007. $3400 and up. 20 buses in stock.
Phoenix
Auto,
Lucky
Lake,
SK.
1-877-585-2300. DL #320074.
2012 SUBARU LEGACY 2.5i Ltd. AWD,
2.5L H-4 cyl., 61,869 kms, stk# SK5357A. Call for price! 1-877-373-2662 or
www.subaruofsaskatoon.ca DL #914077.
2015 SUBARU WRX, 2.0L H-4 cyl, 30,963
kms, stk#U02102. Call for our best price!
Call 1-877-373-2662, DL #914077, or
www.subaruofsaskatoon.ca
CHECK OUT OUR inventory of quality used
highway tractors. For more details call
204-685-2222 or view information at
www.titantrucksales.com
REMOTE CONTROL TRAILER CHUTE
openers can save you time, energy and
keep you safe this seeding season. FM remote controls provide maximum range
and instant response while high torque
drives operate the toughest of chutes.
Easy installation. Kramble Industries,
call 306-933-2655, Saskatoon, SK. or visit
us online at: www.kramble.net
PALLET RACKING
7-sections of Orange & Red pallet racking*
TERMS:
Cash, Visa, MasterCard & Debit Paid in Full Day of Sale. 5% Buyer’s Fee.
“Everything Sold As is, Where is” with no warranties implied or expressed
“SUBJECT TO ADDITIONS & DELETIONS”
KAYE’S AUCTIONS
NORMS SANDBLASTING & PAINT, 40
years body and paint experience. We do
metal and fiberglass repairs and integral to
daycab conversions. Sandblasting and
paint to trailers, trucks and heavy equip.
Endura primers and topcoats. A one stop
shop. Norm 306-272-4407, Foam Lake SK.
204-668-0183 Wpg.
www.kayesauctions.com
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Seed (Pedigreed & Common)
Careers
TRUCK PARTS: 1/2 to 3 ton. We ship
anywhere. Phoenix Auto, 1-877-585-2300,
Lucky Lake, SK.
Is your ag equipment search more
like a needle in a haystack search?
OVER
30,000 Find it fast at
PIECES OF AG
EQUIPMENT!
WE ARE NOW dealers for Emerald grain
trailers, tandem, tri-axle and Super B. Built
in Western Canada. Cam-Don Motors Ltd.,
306-237-4212, Perdue, SK.
2009 TIMPTE AG HOPPER, 40’ long, 96”
wide, 78” high, air ride, alum. wheels,
good brakes, $27,500. Sanford, MB.
204-736-4854 or 204-226-7289.
PRAIRIE SANDBLASTING & PAINTING.
Trailer overhauls and repairs, alum. slopes
and trailer repairs, tarps, insurance claims,
and trailer sales. Epoxy paint. Agriculture
and commercial. Satisfaction guaranteed.
306-744-7930, Saltcoats, SK.
1996 MIDLAND 24’ tandem pup, stiff pole,
completely rebuilt, new paint and brakes,
like new, $18,500. Merv 306-276-7518,
306-767-2616, leave message, Arborfield,
SK. DL #906768.
21
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
SANDBLASTING AND PAINTING. We do
welding, patching, repairs, re-wiring of
trucks, trailers, heavy equipment, etc. We
use Epoxy primers and Endura topcoats.
Competitive rates. Contact Agrimex at
306-331-7443, Dysart, SK.
NEW WILSON AND Castletons: 44’ tridem, 3 hopper and 2 hopper and 36’ tandem; 2014 Wilson Super B; 2010 LodeKing alum., with alum buds, lift axles, Micheals chute openers; 2005 Lode-King Super B; 2004 Doepker tandem; New Michel’s
hopper augers and chute openers. Ron
Brown Imp. 306-493-9393 www.rbisk.ca
DL#905231
CHECK OUT OUR inventory of quality used
highway tractors. For more details call
204-685-2222 or view information at
www.titantrucksales.com
2002 KENWORTH T300, brand new BH&T, 2007 GMC C7500, SA, 20’ flatdeck/hoist,
near new tires, 248,000 kms., 300 Cum- 6 cyl dsl., 6 spd., 12/23 axles, hyd. brakes,
mins,
$55,000.
Call
204-243-2453, SK unit $22,000. 306-563-8765, Canora SK
204-871-4509, High Bluff, MB.
2006 GMC 1500, ext. cab, 4x4, AC, CC,
PW, PD, SK. tax paid, $8995. Phone Glen
204-981-0970, Winnipeg, MB.
2014 RAM 1500 Eco dsl., Crew, Outdoorsman, 6.5 box, 19,000 kms, $38,995, PST
paid; 2013 Ram 2500 Laramie, Crew,
98,000 kms, $43,900; 2008 Ram 2500
Laramie, Quad, $21,500; 2012 Ram 4500,
C&C, dsl., $36,999; 2012 GMC Duramax,
C&C, $28,900; 2011 Ram 3500, C&C, dsl.,
$27,900. Call 1-800-667-4414, Wynyard,
SK. www.thoens.com DL #909250.
SUMMER CLEAROUT Sales Event. Up to
$14,000 in Savings on select models, OAC.
1-866-944-9024. www.dodgecityauto.com
DL #911673.
2010 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5L h-4 cyl.,
64,262, stk#SK-U01890. Call for our best
price! Call 1-877-373-2662, DL #914077,
or www.subaruofsaskatoon.ca
SUMMER CLEAROUT Sales Event. Up to
GRASSLAND
TRAILERS
OFFERING $14,000 in Savings on select models, OAC.
quality trailers at wholesale prices. 20’ 1-866-944-9024. www.dodgecityauto.com
2005 PETERBILT 379 SH, MB Safety, ISX
steel livestock, starting at $13,450; 20’ DL #911673.
Cummins 450 HP, 13 spd., 40,000 lb rears,
aluminum livestock, starting at $21,650.
2009
SILVERADO
3500
LTZ
dually,
Crew3.55 ratio, 800,000 kms, new rad/water
Call Glen, 306-640-8034, Assiniboia, SK. or
cab, 4x4, dsl., auto, leather, 133,000 kms, pump/exhaust, list goes on, recent oil
email: [email protected]
1 owner, $33,995. Hendry’s Chrysler change, air filters, $37,000 OBO. Not used
REAL IND. GOOSENECK 7x20 cattle trailer, 306-528-2171, Nokomis, SK. DL #907140.
in a while, needs to go. Call 306-452-7026,
$5000
OBO.
306-232-3442
or
Bellegarde, SK.
306-232-5688, Rosthern, SK.
2005 PETE 378, flattop bunk, Cat C15, 485
FEATHERLITE 2 HORSE TRAILER w/living
HP, 18 spd., full lockups, winch, new MVI,
quarters, $26,000. Call 306-325-1212,
$45,000. 780-977-4709, Edmonton, AB.
Preeceville, SK.
1984 FORD LTL 9000 tandem, Cat 400,
strong eng, 13 spd., HD rrs, 5th wheel, wet
kit, ideal 2nd farm truck for hauling $8000.
306-690-9407 after 5 PM, Riverhurst, SK.
53’ AND 48’ tridem, tandem stepdecks,
w/wo sprayer cradles; 53’, 48’ and 28’
tridem, tandem highboys, all steel and
combos. Super B Highboys, will split; CIM TRUCK BODIES, grain, silage, gravel,
Tandem and S/A converter w/drop hitch; decks, service and installation. For factory
53’-28’ van trailers. Ron Brown Imp. direct pricing and options, call Humboldt,
306-493-9393, Delisle, SK. DL #905231. SK., 306-682-2505 or www.cim-ltd.ca
www.rbisk.ca
1997 WESTERN STAR 4964, Cat C12, 400
100 MISC. SEMI TRAILER FLATDECKS, HP, 13 spd., 4-way locks, new CIM BH&T,
$2,500 to $30,000. 7 heavy tri-axle low fresh Sask. safety, 11R-24.5, very good
beds and 8 16-wheelers, $18,800 to cond., $52,900. Cam-Don Motors Ltd.,
$70,000. 306-222-2413, Saskatoon, SK. 306-237-4212, Perdue, SK.
www.trailerguy.ca
1997 WESTERN STAR 4964, Cat C12, 400
BELLY DUMP GRAVEL TRAILER, tandem HP, 13 spd., 4-way locks, new CIM BH&T,
axle, load close w/air, Sask. safetied, fresh Sask. safety, 11R-24.5, very good 2006 FREIGHTLINER COLUMBIA, Detroit
cond., $52,900. Cam-Don Motors Ltd.,
$15,000. 306-940-6835, Prince Albert, SK.
60 Series, 14L, 515 HP, 13 spd., 425,000
306-237-4212, Perdue, SK.
HAUSER GOOSENECK TRAILERS: Fea- 1976 DODGE D600 HD 3T, HD, 361 eng. kms, 11Rx22.5 (vg), fresh SK. safety, vg
turing 2 trailers in 1, use as HD gooseneck 5 spd., hi/lo, 11000/20 rubber, 8’.5” B&H, Western fleet maintained truck, $36,900.
trailer and/or round bale transporter. Me- steel floor, Univision tarp, 40,000 miles, Cam-Don Motors 306-237-4212 Perdue SK
chanical side self-unloading. LED lighting. truck- very straight $8500. 306-460-9027, CHECK OUT OUR inventory of quality used
Ramps optional. Hauser’s Machinery, Mel- 306-460-4462, 306-463-3480, Flaxcombe
highway tractors. For more details call
ville, SK. 1-888-939-4444. www.hausers.ca
204-685-2222 or view information at
CHECK OUT OUR inventory of quality used www.titantrucksales.com
highway tractors. For more details call
204-685-2222 or view information at 2009 KENWORTH W900, 525 Cummins, 18
speed, 46 rears, very good tires, 550,000
www.titantrucksales.com
kms., Call 204-243-2453 or 204-871-4509,
1982 CHEV C70, 366, 92,577 kms, 5&2, High Bluff, MB.
roll tarp, good cond., $12,900. Call
306-862-7524, 306-862-7761, Nipawin, 1979 IH CARGOSTAR 1950B w/15’ van, DT
466 eng, only 34,000 kms, $7900; 2- Mack
SK. agriquip.ca
cabovers w/15’ and 19’ boxes, full tandem,
AUTOSHIFT TRUCKS AVAILABLE: Boxed diesel, take choice at $6900 ea; IH S1900
tandems and tractor units. Contact David truck w/snowplow, B&H, dsl., single axle,
306-887-2094, 306-864-7055, Kinistino, $6900; Ford 8000 diesel, tandem, w/box,
CASTLETON TRI-AXLE BELLY DUMP, with SK. DL #327784. www.davidstrucks.com
$3900; IH deck truck, Crewcab, DT 466
minimal use, original tires. Ready for work,
full tandem, 8-1/2’x16-1/2’ deck,
asphalt, etc., $44,900. Call 403-575-1146, 1977 FORD F600, 15’ steel box and hoist diesel,
and roll-up tarp, low miles, above average large Fassi crane, rear hyd. winch, only
Veteran, AB. [email protected]
$8900;
Ford 8000 tandem w/near new
cond. Call 306-492-4642, Clavet, SK.
140 Hiab crane, call for price; 2- 100’ lad24’ GOOSENECK 3-8,000 lb. axles, $7890;
Bumper pull tandem lowboys: 18’, 14,000 2008 KENWORTH T800 ISX, 485-500 HP der truck fire engines; 4- large 2 WD and 4
lbs., $4450; 16’, 10,000 lbs., $3390; 16’, Cummins, 18 spd. trans, sunroof, 24.5 WD trucks w/snow ploughs and wings.
7000 lbs., $2975. Factory direct. tires, alum. wheels, 4-way locks, 14’ front Many other snowblowers and blades. 2
axle, 46 rears, 3.91 ratio, new 20’ box yards, over 50 acres of new and used
888-792-6283. www.monarchtrailers.com
w/elec. tarp, remote hoist and tailgate, parts, equipment and attachments. Call
PRECISION TRAILERS: Gooseneck and exc. shape, fully dressed, 772,864 kms, Cambrian Equip. Sales Ltd., 204-667-2867,
bumper hitch. You’ve seen the rest, now $72,500. Call Merv, Arborfield, SK, fax 204-667-2932, Winnipeg, MB.
own the best. Hoffart Services, Odessa, SK. 306-767-2616, 306-276-7518 DL #906768
T800 KENWORTHS ALL HEAVY SPECS
306-957-2033 www.precisiontrailer.com
ALLISON AUTOMATIC TRUCKS: Several 18 spd., full lockers, 2008, 2007 w/bunks.
TRAILERS: BELLY DUMP, end dump, vans, trucks with auto. trans. available with C&C Also daycab 2009, new trans. and clutch;
flatdecks, lowbed, tankers, dropdecks, or grain or gravel box. Starting at $19,900. 2007 379 Pete daycab and bunk; 2013 IH
beavertails. 306-563-8765, Canora, SK.
K&L Equipment, 306-795-7779, Ituna, 5900i, 42” bunk, 46 diff, 4-way lock, 18
spd., 390,000 kms; 2006 378 Pete, Cat 18
14’ TANDEM UTILITY flat deck w/ramps, SK. [email protected] DL #910885.
spd., 46 diff, 4-way locks w/roo-bar bump12,000 lbs. GVW, new safety, $4250 OBO. ATTENTION FARMERS: 15 tandems in er; 2007 IH 9200 daycab, ISX 435, 13 spd;
204-794-5979, Springfield, MB.
stock, automatics and standards. Yorkton, 2006 IH 9200, 475 Cummins, 18 spd., 46
SK., Yellowhead Sales, 306-783-2899.
diff; 2004 IH 8600, S/A, daycab, Cat C10,
COMPONENTS FOR TRAILERS. Shipping
daily across the prairies. Free freight. See REMOTE CONTROL ENDGATE AND 10 spd.; 2001 Freighliner Coronado, 515
“The Book 2013” page 195. DL Parts For hoist systems can save you time, energy Detroit, 18 spd., lockers; 1996 T800 KW,
Trailers, 1-877-529-2239, www.dlparts.ca
and keep you safe this seeding season. 475 Cat, 13 spd. Ron Brown Implements,
Give Kramble Industries a call at Delisle, SK. 306-493-9393 www.rbisk.ca
TOPGUN TRAILER SALES “For those who 306-933-2655, Saskatoon, SK. or visit us DL #905231.
demand the best.” PRECISION AND online at: www.kramble.net
2011 MANAC 53’ FLAT step deck, good
AGASSIZ TRAILERS (flatdecks, end
condition, low miles, w/3 bunks, 12
dumps, enclosed cargo). 1-855-255-0199, COMING BEFORE HARVEST: 2006 Ken- winches sliding on left side, $26,500 OBO.
worth T800, AutoShift, new B&H; 2002 IH 306-641-0071, Yorkton, SK.
Moose Jaw, SK. www.topguntrailersales.ca
2600 w/B&H; 2005 IH 9200, AutoShift
BEHNKE DROP DECK semi style and w/B&H; 2009 Mack AutoShift, B&H; 2009 2016 VOLVO 670 I-Shift, 46,000 kms;
pintle hitch sprayer trailers. Air ride, IH ProStar 8600, Cummins eng, AutoShift, 2014 Volvo 780, I-Shift; 2013 Volvo 430,
tandem and tridems. Contact SK: B&H.
Call Merv at
306-276-7518, I-Shift. Call 204-871-5170, Austin, MB.
306-398-8000; AB: 403-350-0336.
306-767-2616, Arborfield, SK DL #906768
2013 VOLVO 630, 12.5 fronts, 46 rears,
CHECK OUT OUR inventory of quality used 2007 IH 9400, with Cummins 435 HP, 10 4-way lockers, 12 spd. I-shift, Platinum
highway tractors. For more details call spd. AutoShift, 20’ box, alum. wheels and warranty to Nov/17, 330,000 kms, wet kit,
204-685-2222 or view information at tanks, exc. cond., certified, $67,500; 2006 $92,000 OBO. 306-287-7707, Quill Lake SK
www.titantrucksales.com
Peterbilt, 475 HP, Detroit 18 spd., A/T/C,
wheels, tanks, chrome bumper, like 1989 IH EAGLE, 425 CAT, 3406 engine,
REBUILT 1990 DOEPKER 32x32 hay trail- alum.
tires, new paint, 20’ BH&T, exc. shape, 5th wheel, 24.5 alum. budds, white,
ers, air ride w/lift axles, Beacons, wide new
truck, $69,500; 2007 Mack, 460 $16,500. 306-960-3000, St. Louis, SK.
load lites, totally refurbished, $31,500. show
Mack eng., 12 spd. auto. trans., 3-way 2007 WESTERN STAR 4900, CAT, 18 spd.,
Can deliver. 204-729-7297, Brandon, MB.
lockers, alum. wheels, good tires, 20’ 46,000 diff., A/T/C, alum. wheels, new
BH&T, rear controls, pintle plate, $69,500; 24.5 radials, Sask. Safety, $39,900. Call
1990 Kenworth T600, 450 HP Detroit, 10 306-621-0425, Yorkton, SK.
spd., alum. front wheels, good tires, pulls
good w/1996 36’ Cancade 2 hopper grain SANDBLASTING AND PAINTING of heavy
trailer- nice shape, $35,000. Trades ac- trucks, trailers and equipment. Please call
cepted. Call Merv at 306-276-7518, for details. Can-Am Truck Export Ltd.,
1-800-938-3323, Delisle, SK.
www.titantrucksales.com to view info 306-767-2616, Arborfield, SK. DL#906768
or call: 204-685-2222, to check out our in- 1986 FORD 800, 16’ B&H, 429, 45,000
ventory of quality used highway tractors!
kms, acceptional conditional, $16,500.
SUMMER CLEAROUT Sales Event. Up to 306-738-2173, Riceton, SK.
1997 MACK RD688, 100 barrel tank,
$14,000 in Savings on select models, OAC. 2008 TANDEM, 7600 IH, Cummins, 10 pump and etc., 400 Mack, 24.5 wheels,
1-866-944-9024. www.dodgecityauto.com spd., new BHT; 2004 Pete 330 single axle, white, $16,500. 306-960-3000 St. Louis SK
DL #911673.
Cat, Allison auto. w/new 16’ BHT. Ron
FUEL TRUCK: 1996 T450 Kenworth, 3600
RETIRED FARMER: 2005 Ford 350 XLT, su- Brown Imp. 306-493-9393, www.rbisk.ca
gal., dual pumps and meters; 2009 IH tanper duty, V8, 4x4, diesel, auto., 4 door,
dem 7600, ISX, 10 spd., 24’ van w/power
loaded, approx. 160,000 kms, offers. Call
tailgate. Call 306-493-9393, Delisle, SK.
306-921-9920, Melfort, SK.
1999 IH 4700, SA, flatdeck w/17’ steel
2012 CHEV LT, extended cab, 4x4, grey
flatdeck, 11x22.5 tires, 230,000 kms, 444
w/black cloth interior, PS, PB, keyless enIH dsl., 10 spd., safetied, real good shape,
try, power drivers seat, 73,000 kms. Call
$19,500. 1994 GMC Topkick tandem
306-365-7777, Lanigan, SK.
with 24’ flatdeck, 563,000 kms, 3116 Cat
diesel, 10 spd., 11x22.5 tires, real good
2004 GMC 1/2 ton, ext. cab, AC recently
shape,
$21,500.
Call
Merv
at
serviced, 99,260 kms, newer shock ab306-276-7518, 306-767-2616, Arborfield,
sorbers, $5500. 306-382-2779, Saskatoon.
SK. DL #906768.
KENWORTH T300, 13 spd. Eaton Fuller,
8.3L Cummins 300 HP, 121,000. orig. kms, 2004 FREIGHTLINER CONDOR, very low
5762 hrs., 12,000 fr., 40,000 rr., 411 ratio, miles, C&C, long WB, C10 Cat, Allison au2009 20’ Cancade box, remote control H&T to, complete hyd. system, includes hyd.
& endgate, new tires 5 years ago, super side arm lift, suitable for conversion to a
clean, never hauled fertilizer, serviced, MB. bale hauler, $19,900. K&L Equip., Ladimer, 306-795-7779, Ituna, SK. DL #910885.
Safety. 204-734-0422, Minitonas, MB.
1985 INT. TANDEM dump truck, Cummins
210 HP, 9 spd., good 11R22.5 rubber,
2004 F150XL, 5.4 auto, 2WD, service body, $15,000. 204-795-9192, Plum Coulee, MB.
only 65,000 kms, runs on eco friendly nat.
gas, fresh SK. safety, $7900. Call Cam-Don 2013 MACK CHU613 Pinnacle, 505 HP, 18
spd., 14 front, 46 rears, 222” WB, alum.
Motors Ltd., 306-237-4212, Perdue, SK.
wheels, 15’ Renn box plumbed for pup,
2000 FORD F150 Lariat, new paint, new 174,000 kms, 11.24 rubber, $115,000.
rebuilt 5.4 engine, 7700 GVW, asking Call 306-731-7266, Strasbourg, SK.
$8900. 306-307-1747, Lloydminster, SK.
1989 GMC TANDEM automatic, 15’ B&H,
1975 CHEVY C60 GRAIN truck, 350 eng., Cummins, very clean, rust free, $19,900;
good steel B&H and roll tarp, 32,000 orig. 2001 Sterling, Allison auto., 300 HP Cat,
miles, very little rust, plumbed for drill fill, 14’ gravel box, good condition, $29,900;
will safety, asking $8500. 204-825-2799 or K&L Equipment, 306-795-7779, Ituna,
204-825-8340, Pilot Mound, MB.
SK., [email protected] DL #10885.
Hail season
is here…
protect your
equipment!
Lease Options available!
Quality Post Frame Buildings
www.goodon.com
2008 SUBARU OUTBACK Ltd., Turbo, AC,
leather, 55,000 kms, stk#SK-U0901. Call
for our best price! 1-877-373-2662 or
www.subaruofsaskatoon.ca DL #914077.
1.800.665.0470
2011 FORD ESCAPE, silver, price reduced
$9999. Call 1-800-667-4414, Wynyard, SK.
www.thoens.com DL #909250.
2012 SUBARU TRIBECA Ltd. H-6 7 pass.
AWD, 59,725 kms, stk# SK-3144A. Call for
our best price! 1-877-373-2662 or
www.subaruofsaskatoon.ca DL #914077.
Call our toll-free number to take advantage
of our Prepayment Bonus. Prepay for 3 weeks
and we’ll run your ad 2 more weeks for free.
That’s 5 weeks for the price of 3. Call 1-800782-0794 today!
www.windandweathershelters.com
COMMERCIAL GRADE Wind and weather
shelter buildings available in widths from
20’ to 90’. Prices starting at $2495. If you
have bought an auction building and need
to upgrade to more durable material or
parts we can help. Located in Yorkton.
Contact Paul at 306-641-5464 or Ladimer
306-795-7779.
1995 S800, 5.9 Cummins dsl, 6 spd., AC,
20’ deck available, $5500; 1978 IH Lode
Star 1800 w/bulk fuel tank, $2500. Austin,
PRIVE BUILDING MOVERS Ltd.! Bonded,
MB. Call 204-871-2708 or 204-685-2124.
licensed for SK. and AB. Fully insured.
CHECK OUT OUR inventory of quality used Moving all types and sizes of buildings.
highway tractors. For more details call Call Andy 306-625-3827, Ponteix, SK.
204-685-2222 or view information at www.privebuildingmovers.com
www.titantrucksales.com
It doesn’t get any better than this. Prepay
your ad for 3 weeks and get 2 weeks free!
Call today! 1-800-782-0794.
2001 FORD 150 handicap van, 113,000
orig. kms, new tires/brakes, never smoked
in, $12,500 OBO. 306-563-3000 Canora SK
QUICK SHIFT TRUCKING LTD. Heavy
equip. hauling, pilot and Hotshot services.
Air seeders & other farm machinery. Competitive rates. Will travel. Owner operator,
Ray Hammel call 306-460-7737, Brock, SK.
ROUND BALE PICKING and hauling, small
or large loads. Travel anywhere. Also hay
for sale. 306-382-0785, Vanscoy, SK.
EQUIPMENT TOWING/ HAULING. Reasonable rates. Contact G H Wells Services
and Trucking, 306-741-9059, Morse, SK.
LONG LAKE TRUCKING, two units, custom
hay hauling. Call 306-567-7100, Imperial,
SK.
NEUFELD ENT. CORRAL CLEANING,
payloader, Bobcat with rubber tracks and
vertical
beater
spreaders.
Phone
306-220-5013, 306-467-5013, Hague, SK.
LAND CLEARING. Rock picking and digging, stone piles, brushing, fencing, demolition. 306-382-0785, Vanscoy, SK.
BRUSH MULCHING. The fast, effective
way to clear land. Four season service,
competitive rates, 275 HP unit, also avail.
CASH BUSINESS- MAKE $50/hr, part-time. trackhoe with thumb, multiple bucket atRegina/Southey, Weyburn/Grenfell, Wa- tachments. Bury rock and brush piles and
trous/Lanigan/Humboldt. 306-795-2806.
fence line clearing. Borysiuk Contracting
Inc., www.bcisk.ca Prince Albert, SK.,
160 ACRES, near Regina, w/yard and busi- 306-960-3804.
ness opportunity; 3 acre greenhouse opDUGOUTS:
120x60x14’,
eration, near Regina, includes home; SW REGULATION
LEAFCUTTER BEE SHELTERS and wooden SK. restaurant, lounge includes 15 room $2000; 160x60x14’, $2950; 180x60x14’,
nesting trays (stackable). Call Michael motel; Assiniboia Investment Property - $3450; 200x60x14’, $3950; Larger sizes
306-874-9221, 306-874-8032, Naicam, SK
Medical building; 30 minutes from Regina, available. Travel incl. in Sask. Gov’t grants
viable hotel, restaurant/offsale on Hwy 39; available. 306-222-8054, Saskatoon, SK.
Vanguard bar and grill, incl. 3 bdrm. home.
Brian Tiefenbach, 306-536-3269, Colliers CUSTOM LIQUID MANURE hauling, 3
tanks available. Contact George in Hague,
Int., Regina, SK. www.collierscanada.com
SK. 306-227-5757.
MULCHING- TREES, BRUSH, Stumps.
Call today 306-933-2950. Visit us at:
www.maverickconstruction.ca
AFFORDABLE RADON mitigation solution
with Polywest, Liberty Pumps and Fantech!
1-855-765-9937 or visit: www.polywest.ca
OUR CODE BLUE pump metering service is
designed to ensure proper maintenance of
your pumps! Call 1-855-765-9937 or view:
www.polywest.ca
ROUGH LUMBER: 2x6x16’, 2x6x8’, 4x6x16’.
Call 306-238-4411, Goodsoil, SK.
ROUGH LUMBER: 2x6, 2x8, 2x10, 1”
boards, windbreak slabs, 4x4, 6x6, 8x8, all
in stock. Custom sizes on order. Log siding, cove siding, lap siding, shiplap, 1” and
2” tongue and groove. V&R Sawing,
306-232-5488, Rosthern, SK.
FARM CHEMICAL /
SEED COMPLAINTS
We also specialize in: agricultural
complaints of any nature; Crop ins.
appeals; Spray drift; Chemical failure;
Residual herbicide; Custom operator
issues; Equip. malfunctions. Licensed
Agrologist on Staff. For assistance and
compensation call
Back-Track InvesTIgaTIons
1-866-882-4779. www.backtrackcanada.com
HYDRAULIC PULL SCRAPERS 10 to 25
yds., exc. cond.; Loader and scraper tires,
custom conversions available. Looking for
Cat cable scrapers. Quick Drain Sales Ltd.,
306-231-7318, 306-682-4520 Muenster SK
FARM/CORPORATE PROJECTS. Call A.L.
Management Group for all your borrowing
and lease requirements. 306-790-2020,
Regina, SK.
HYDRAULIC SCRAPERS: LEVER 60, 70,
80, and 435, 4 to 30 yd. available. Rebuilt
for years of trouble-free service. Lever
Holdings Inc. 306-682-3332 Muenster, SK.
Hit our readers where it counts… in the classifieds. Place your ad in the Manitoba Cooperator classifed section. 1-800-782-0794.
PRICE TO CLEAR!!
29 gauge full hard 100,000PSI
high tensile roofing & siding.
16 colours to choose from.
B-Gr. coloured................ 70¢/ft.2
Multi-coloured millends... 50¢/ft.2
B-Gr 30 gu Galv. barn master
available in 12ft sheets.... 49¢/ft.2
BEAT THE PRICE
INCREASES CALL NOW
FOUILLARD STEEL
SUPPLIES LTD.
ST. LAZARE, MB.
1-800-510-3303
CONTINUOUS METAL ROOFING, no exposed screws to leak or metal overlaps.
Ideal for lower slope roofs, rinks, churches, pig barns, commercial, arch rib building and residential roofing; also available
in Snap Lock. 306-435-8008, Wapella, SK.
PIONEER 2436 PRIMARY jaw crusher,
good running condition, $95,000 OBO. Call
204-372-6832, Broad Valley, MB.
DEBTS, BILLS AND charge accounts too
high? Need to resolve prior to spring? Call
us to develop a professional mediation
plan, resolution plan or restructuring plan.
Call toll free 1-888-577-2020.
SEC STONE OR STUMP rake, to fit on Track
Hoe, hardly used. For more information
call 306-620-2218, Ituna, SK.
1996 CAT IT28, Cat loader, $38,000. Call
Can-Am Truck Export Ltd 1-800-938-3323,
Delisle, SK.
5 YARD PULL SCRAPER, good condition,
new blade, fresh paint, $5000. Call
CAST ALUMINUM PUMPS, from Polar 306-335-2777, Lemberg, SK.
Pumps! Designed for heavy duty applica- WANTED: BETWEEN 2000-2006 WG64
tions where you need the durability. Call Volvo concrete mixer truck. Prefer London
1-855-765-9937 or visit: www.polywest.ca
8-1/2 cu. yd., drum 6 cu. meters, Cummins 1SmV+, 10.8L. Fax 204-623-4945,
DIGITAL AGRICULTURE PUMPS and me- ph. 204-623-2855, The Pas, MB.
ters! Dura Products offer best in class solutions for consumers wishing to transfer
liquid. 1-855-765-9937, www.polywest.ca
THE HANDLER IS available in 5 sizes and
proven on tens of thousands of farms from
across the world. Call 1-855-765-9937 or
visit: www.polywest.ca
BANDIT 3210 LIQUID fertilizer system!
Introducing the all new and fully engineered TBH caddy. Call 1-855-765-9937 or
visit: www.polywest.ca
SUMP PITS TO suit any application! All
manufactured using durable polyethylene
for guaranteed long life! 1-855-765-9937
or view: www.polywest.ca
EXCAVATOR ATTACHMENTS IN STOCK.
WBM/CAT/CWS. Western Heavy Equipment, 306-981-3475, Prince Albert, SK.
ONLINE ONLY UNRESERVED AUCTION,
Aug. 17-24, 2016. Call 306-865-7660,
www.championassets.ca CAT 140G
CUSTOM SWATHING AND COMBINING, motor grader, front dozer & sno-wing.
CONCRETE FLATWORK: Specializing in cereals and specialty crops. 36’ and 42’
place & finish of concrete floors. Can ac- HoneyBee headers. Murray 306-631-1411.
commodate any floor design. References
available. Alexander, MB. 204-752-2069.
AFAB INDUSTRIES IS YOUR SUPERIOR
post frame building company. For esti- CUSTOM GRAIN HAULING FROM La
mates and info 1-888-816-AFAB(2322). Salle, MB. For more info. and rates please
call 204-771-6350.
Website: www.postframebuilding.com
ROLLWORKS
2014 F550 FORD, w/Maxon, 1650 lbs.,
144”x90” deck with lift/gate, 6550 miles,
mint condition, $58,000 OBO. Call
204-981-3636, Cartier, MB.
CHECK OUT OUR inventory of quality used
highway tractors. For more details call
204-685-2222 or view information at
www.titantrucksales.com
Decker Colony,
Decker MB
FACTORY DIRECT METAL ROOFING SIDING CLADDING
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
CALL TODAY 204-412-0234  204-764-0527 [email protected]
1992 CHAMPION GRADER, 740 Series III
w/snow-wing, 14,000 hrs., 16R24TG
Bridgestone tires, all around good cond.,
$42,000. 204-981-3636, Cartier, MB.
ONLINE ONLY UNRESERVED AUCTION,
Aug. 17-24, 2016. Call 306-865-7660,
www.championassets.ca 1992 Western Star heavy truck, 15’ gravel B&H.
22
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
ONLINE ONLY UNRESERVED AUCTION,
Aug. 17-24, 2016. Call 306-865-7660,
www.championassets.ca
1974
IHC
4300 Transtar heavy truck, T/A.
ONLINE ONLY UNRESERVED AUCTION,
Aug. 17-24, 2016. Call 306-865-7660,
www.championassets.ca
CAT
D8N
dozer, 2nd owner, vg condition.
SKIDSTEER LOADERS: 2008 CASE 440
Ct series, $34,500 OBO; 2008 Case 440,
series 3, $29,500 OBO; 2006 Case 440,
$26,500 OBO; 2007 Case 420, $24,500
OBO. 204-794-5979, Springfield, MB.
ONLINE ONLY UNRESERVED AUCTION,
Aug. 17-24, 2016. Call 306-865-7660,
www.championassets.ca
Champion
740 motor grader.
ATTACHMENTS: Skidsteer brush cutters,
W20C CASE, 1983 payloader, 6600 hrs., forks, buckets, augers, brooms. Conquest
grapple fork, 2200 hrs. on motor and Equipment, 306-483-2500, Oxbow, SK.
trans., tires- 95%, always shedded, vg,
$32,000. 306-648-7766, Gravelbourg, SK.
2005 D6R LGP w/winch, dozer w/tilt,
CATERPILLAR 60 flat bottom scraper, vg cab and canopy, 8800 hrs., new Cat UC,
shape, tires all vg, good paint, $22,000; 2, very clean, $115,000. 2006 CAT D6R LGP
14.9x26 on 8 hole wheels, $75 ea; 3, Series III crawler tractor, w/cargo winch,
11.2x24 and 1, 12.4x24 tractor tires, $40 6-way dozer, $110,000. 2004 CAT D6N
LGP crawler, 6-way dozer, AC, canopy, diff
ea. 204-746-8733, Morris, MB.
steer, cargo winch, new UC, 10,800 hrs,
COMPACTORS: 84”, 66” and 54”. Pad foot $90,000. 1999 CAT D6R LGP crawler,
and smooth drum. For sale or rent. 6540 hrs, w/dozer, tilt, AC, canopy, new
UC, $70,000. 2007 KOMATSU PC200
306-483-2500 Conquest Equip. Oxbow, SK.
LC-8 hyd. excavator w/QA cleanup bucket,
NORDBERG 42” JAW crusher conveyor, 9’6” stick, aux. hyds., 12,582 hrs, $55,000.
$150,000. Pro Ag Sales, 306-441-2030 To Fit 320 KOMATSU loader: loader
forks, $2,800; pallet forks, $3,400; 104”
anytime, North Battleford, SK.
3-1/2 yard tooth bucket, $5,000. 6- 64”
excavator cleanup buckets, $4,000$5,000 each. 58” wrist swivel bucket,
like new, $8,500. 62” cleanup bucket,
$4,000. 48” frost ripper, $2,500. New hyd.
thumb
and
cylinder,
$4,000.
DIESEL ENGINES, OVERHAUL kits and
204-871-0925, MacGregor, MB.
parts for most makes. Cat, CIH, Cummins,
CAT HYDRAULIC PULL SCRAPERS: Detroit, Mack. M&M Equipment Ltd., Parts
463, 435, 80 and 70, all very good cond., and Service phone: 306-543-8377, fax:
new conversion. Also new and used scrap- 306-543-2111, Regina, SK.
er tires. Can deliver. 204-793-0098, Stony
The Manitoba Co-operator. Manitoba’s best2002 KOMATSU WA380-3L WHEEL loader, Mountain, MB.
read farm publication.
low hrs., 4 yd. bucket, tires 23.5x25- 90%,
ONLINE ONLY UNRESERVED AUCTION, WANTED DIESEL CORES: ISX and N14
exc. cond. Call 306-921-7583, Melfort, SK.
Aug. 17-24, 2016. Call 306-865-7660, Cummins, C15 Cats, Detroits Ddec 3, 4,
BUCYRUSERIE SCRAPER, 12 yard, good www.championassets.ca 2000 Komat- DD15. Can-Am Truck 1-800-938-3323.
cond., $8500. Call for info 306-338-2750, su PC250LC excavator, needs engine.
or text 306-560-0234, Wadena, SK.
RUNNING ENGINES: 330 CAT; 3306 Cat
2014 TEREX FINLAY 683 2 deck screener, power unit c/w rad and skid; 6V71 power
BAILIFF SEIZURE ONLINE AUCTION: c/w 50’ Kaska radial stacker, Cat powered, unit; Rebuilt 353 Detroit. Western Diesel,
Saskatoon 7 Cat light tower/generators, 1500 hrs., very nice cond., $205,000. 306-280-4132, Saskatoon, SK.
Genie 1930 lift, Wacker DPU6055 packer, 306-536-5055, Lumsden, SK.
1- Forest River tandem mens/ladies
GREAT PRICES ON new, used and remanuportable washroom, New unused Bobcat
factured engines, parts and accessories for
grapple. [email protected]
diesel pickups. Large inventory, engines
can be shipped or installed. Give us a call
ATTACHMENTS PARTS COMPONENTS
or check: www.thickettenginerebuilding.ca
for construction equipment. Attachments
Thickett Engine Rebuilding. 204-532-2187,
for dozers, excavators and wheel loaders.
Russell, MB.
Used, Re-built, Surplus, and New equipment parts and major components. Call
Round up the cash! Advertise your unwanted
Western Heavy Equipment 306-981-3475,
equipment in the Manitoba Co-operator clasPrince Albert, SK.
sifieds.
ESCORT VEHICLE SIGN c/w LED lights
and sign inserts, HD electric cylinder for
sign lift, $800; 4 GOOD YEAR TIRES,
P265/65R18, tires taken off 2015 GMC
Sierra, good cond., $150. 204-822-3445 or
call/text 204-823-1220, Morden, MB.
BEHLEN STEEL BUILDINGS, quonsets,
convex and rigid frame straight walls,
grain tanks, metal cladding, farm- commercial. Construction and concrete crews.
Guaranteed workmanship. Call your Saskatoon and Northwest Behlen Distributor,
Janzen Steel Buildings,
306-242-7767,
Osler, SK.
5- 5000 PLUS bu. Westeel bins, 2- 4000 MERIDIAN 300 TON SS liquid fertilizer
bu. bins, plus 3- 2200 on hoppers w/bas- tank, 2- 3” SS valves, like new, $42,500.
es. Call 306-921-9920, Melfort, SK.
306-921-6697, 306-921-8498, Melfort, SK.
4- 1650 BU Westeel Rosco bins, 2 on wood 8300 GAL. IMP. VERT. LIQUID fertilizer
floors, 2 on concrete; 3300 bu on concrete tank, $6250. Also in stock, transport tanks
306-231-8355, 306-944-4325, Bruno, SK.
in various sizes. Call 1-888-435-2626.
www.flaman.com
BIN MOVING, all sizes up to 19’ diameter,
FITTINGS AND VALVES for your liquid
w/wo
floors;
Also
move
liquid
fert.
tanks.
STRAIGHT WALL BUILDING packages or
handling needs, all offering the ultimate in
built on site. For early booking call 306-629-3324, 306-741-9059, Morse, SK.
sealing power and corrosion resistance.
1-800-667-4990 or visit our website:
Call 1-855-765-9937 or www.polywest.ca
www.warmanhomecentre.com
WOOD POST BUILDING packages or built
on site. For early booking call
1-800-667-4990 or visit our website:
www.warmanhomecentre.com
POLE BARNS, WOODSTEEL packages,
hog, chicken and dairy barns. Construction
and concrete crews available. Mel or Scott, PORTABLE GRAIN RINGS made of steel.
MR Steel Construction, 306-978-0315, New 20 gauge wide-corr steel sheets 48”H.
Sizes from 3650 bu., $2072 to 83,000 bu.,
Hague, SK.
$11,447 including hardware. All sizes in
WANTED: OLDER STEEL quonsets, any stock. All rings 4’H. Best quality available.
size, Standard Steel, Behlen, or Fairford. Canadian made quality silver cone shaped
306-745-6140 306-745-7530 Esterhazy SK
tarps avail. for all sizes. All tarps in stock.
packages include freight to any
100’X200’X22’ Steel Farm Building. Ready Complete
point in Western Canada. Overnight
for set-up on your farm today. Foundation major
delivery
to
most major points in Western
specs can be supplied. Includes 26 gauge Canada. Willwood
Industries toll free
ext. sheeting and trims, $153,900 plus 1-866-781-9560, fax 306-781-0108.
For all
tax. Add doors and insulation as needed. pricing, details, pictures visit our website:
Other sizes available. 1-888-398-7150 or www.willwood.ca
email [email protected]
AFAB INDUSTRIES POST frame buildings. CUSTOM GRAIN BIN MOVING, all types
For the customer that prefers quality. up to 22’ diameter. 10% spring discount.
Accurate estimates. Sheldon’s Hauling,
1-888-816-AFAB (2322), Rocanville, SK.
306-961-9699, Prince Albert, SK.
PRE-ENGINEERED STEEL BUILDINGS for
all your agricultural, equestrian, industrial, LIFETIME LID OPENERS. We are a stockshop or storage needs. Call 306-249-2355 ing dealer for Boundary Trail Lifetime Lid
for a free quote. Montana Construction Openers, 18” to 39”. Rosler Construction
2000 Inc., 306-933-0033, Saskatoon, SK.
www.montanasteelbuilders.ca Saskatoon.
8- 1900 BU. TWISTER bins, Micada hoppers, Micada double skids; 6 w/18” full air,
3 HP, 220V fans; 2 bins without air. All
w/grain level indicators and OPI cables.
306-369-7724, 306-369-7794, Bruno, SK.
2015 CIM BIN TRANSPORT TRAILER
17,000 lb. cap., 32’ bed accommodates up
to 21’ dia. bin. For factory direct pricing
and options call 306-682-2505, Humboldt,
SK. or www.cim-ltd.ca
TEMPORARY GRAIN BINS, selected 3/8”
fir plywood with all holes drilled. Wood
sizes from 1750 bu., $431 to 11,700 bu.,
$852 including hardware. All sizes in stock.
All rings 4’ high. Best quality avail. Canadian made quality silver cone shaped tarps
available for all sizes. All tarps in stock.
Complete packages include freight to any
major point in Western Canada. Overnight
delivery to most major points in Western
Canada. Willwood Industries toll free
1-866-781-9560, fax 306-781-0108. For
pricing, details, pics: www.willwood.ca
2012 WHEATHEART 13x74 swing auger,
like new, electric swing, hyd. winch, reverser, $17,500. 306-493-7871, Harris, SK.
SAKUNDIAK 7”x52’ AUGER, c/w 18 HP
Briggs & Stratton start motor, $2000 OBO.
306-675-4566, 306-795-7382, Leross, SK.
2012 SAKUNDIAK HD8-1600, 52’, exc.
shape, Hawes mover kit (2 wheel), Kohler
29 EFI HP, electric clutch, $12,000; 2013
Sakundiak HD8-1400, 46”, excellent,
Hawes mover kit (4 wheels), Kohler 27 HP
V-Twin, elec. clutch, $13,000. Bruno, SK.
306-369-7724, 306-369-7794.
2010 BRANDT 13x70 HP swing away, hyd.
hopper winch, elec. hopper mover, light
kit, $16,500. 306-459-7767, Ogema, SK.
MK 130-61 WESTFIELD auger, good condition, $5800. 780-233-2222, Sangudo, AB.
AUGERS: NEW and USED: Wheatheart,
Westfield, Westeel augers; Auger SP kits;
Batco conveyors; Wheatheart post pounders. Good prices, leasing available. Call
1-866-746-2666.
13x71 PLUS WESTFIELD with hydraulic
mover on swingout, excellent, $10,500.
306-960-3000, St. Louis, SK.
2013 TELEVEYOR, PTO driven, fits on 13”
or 16” augers, made by Dekoning Innovations, $13,500. 204-215-0999, Boissevain.
2- 7X35 BRANDT augers: 16 HP Vanguard,
13 HP Honda, excellent cond. Call
306-677-2598, Hodgeville, SK.
7” WHEATHEART BIN sweep, like new;
Westfield 8”x51’, PTO; Brandt 7”x40’
w/motor; 4”x16’ w/electric motor. Call
306-492-4642, Clavet, SK.
2014 FARM KING 16x104 grain auger,
PTO,
used
very
little,
$34,000.
306-640-8181, Willow Bunch, SK.
2009 BRANDT AUGER, 13x70, electric
mover w/remotes, hyd. winch, reverser,
light, good cond., $13,500. 306-921-6697,
306-921-8498, Melfort, SK.
FARM AND INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICAL
motor sales, service and parts. Also sale
REMOTE CONTROL SWING AUGER
of, and repairs to, all makes and sizes of
movers, trailer chute openers, endgate
pumps and phase converters, etc. Tisdale
and hoist systems, wireless full bin alarms,
Motor
Rewinding
1984
Ltd.,
swing belt movers, wireless TractorCams,
2010 CAT 950H WHEEL LOADER, 306-873-2881, fax 306-873-4788, 1005Amotorized utility carts. All shipped directly
27,417 hrs, w/Cat quick coupler bucket, 111th Ave., Tisdale, SK. [email protected] FRIESEN HOPPER BOTTOM BIN 1500 HORNOI LEASING NEW and used 20’ and to you. Safety, convenience, reliability.
3-3/4 cu. yards, 23.5x25 tires, F.O.B. Website: www.tismtrrewind.com
bu. $2400; Friesen 1000 bu. hopper bot- 40’ sea cans for sale or rent. Call Kramble Industries at 306-933-2655,
$75,000. 204-795-9192 Plum Coulee, MB
tom bin, $1800. 204-388-4291 leave msg, 306-757-2828, Regina, SK.
Saskatoon, SK. or www.kramble.net
Ile des Chenes, MB.
2010 BRANDT 1390 HP swing auger,
ROAD GRADERS CONVERTED to pull
very clean, $16,500. Contact Chad
EXTREME DUTY BRUSHCUTTER. Made in behind large 4 WD tractors, 14’ and 16’ INSULATED FARM SHOP packages or TALBOT HOT BIN SEALING, we seal bins
306-741-7743, Swift Current, SK.
Canada, 1/4” steel, 66” cut Omni HD gear- blade widths avail. 306-682-3367, CWK built on site, for early booking call on wood and concrete floors. Serving SK.,
and MB. 306-631-0203, Moose Jaw,
box & Parker hyd. motor. Cuts up to 4” Ent. Humboldt, SK. www.cwenterprises.ca
1-800-667-4990 or visit our website: AB.
2013 GRAINMAX AUGER, 13x85, c/w bin
SK.
[email protected]
trees, two 1/2”x3”x24” blades on a stump
www.warmanhomecentre.com
sensor, vg shape, $15,000 OBO. Flaxcombe
jumper, c/w hyd. hoses and flat face cou- 1988 JD 644E wheel loader, 23.5x25
MERIDIAN AND WESTEEL fertilizer bins.
SK., call 306-463-3113, 306-463-8176.
plers. Std. flow operation, open rear dis- tires, 4 cubic yard bucket w/teeth,
on sale now. See your nearest Flaman
charge prevents under deck build up, fits $30,000. 204-795-9192, Plum Coulee, MB.
store of call 1-888-435-2626.
SAKUNDIAK GRAIN AUGERS available
most skidsteers, $4995. 72” & 80” also in
with self-propelled mover kits and bin
stock. Agrimex, 306-331-7443, Dysart, SK.
ONLINE ONLY UNRESERVED AUCTION,
2015 CIM BIN Cranes (Westeel design),
sweeps. Contact Kevin’s Custom Ag in NiAug. 17-24, 2016. Call 306-865-7660,
8000 lb. capacity. For factory direct pricing
pawin, SK. Toll free 1-888-304-2837.
www.championassets.ca Tandem axle
and options call 306-682-2505, Humboldt,
tool van trailer, w/JD 25 KWA genset.
SK. or www.cim-ltd.ca
1997 WESTFIELD MK1051, always shedded, good shape, new bearings last fall.
2- 1650 WESTEEL ROSCO bins on wooden BEAVER CONTAINER SYSTEMS, new Call 204-878-3358, Isle des Chenes, MB.
JD 544B LOADER, $14,500; Bobcat 943
floors, one floor fair condition, $850 each. and used sea containers, all sizes.
skidsteer, $14,900; NH LX865 skidsteer,
306-220-1278, Saskatoon and Regina, SK.
Call Greg at 306-436-4426, Milestone, SK.
MERIDIAN AUGERS IN STOCK: swings,
$12,900; Midland 8.5 yd. scraper, $8500;
truck loading, Meridian SP movers. Call
Soil Mover 7 yd. scraper, $7000; Ashland 6
HOPPER
BOTTOM
CONES:
We
make
SHIPPING CONTAINERS FOR SALE. 20’- Hoffart Services Inc., Odessa, SK.,
SUMMER SPECIAL on all post or stud
yd. scraper, $5000. Call 1-866-938-8537.
frame farm buildings. Choose: sliding cones and steel floors for all makes of 53’, delivery/ rental/ storage available. For 306-957-2033.
doors, overhead doors, or bi-fold doors. bins. Call Middle Lake Steel 306-367-4306 inventory and prices call: 306-262-2899,
1988 SAKUNDIAK 41’x7, B&S 18 HP, $750.
New-Tech Construction Ltd. Phone: or 306-367-2408, Middle Lake, SK. Visit us Saskatoon, SK. www.thecontainerguy.ca
on-line at: www.middlelakesteel.com
306-738-2173, Riceton, SK.
306-220-2749, Hague, SK.
BOND
SEA
CONTAINERS.
New,
used
and
290 CUMMINS, 350 Detroit, 671 Detroit,
(BUTLER) GRAIN BIN PARTS modified sea containers. All sizes avail. 2010 WHEATHEART 13x91 swing away
Series 60 cores. 306-539-4642, Regina, SK
STEEL CLADDING SALE: New Grade A BROCK
29 gauge white-white metal cladding 3/4” and accessories available at Rosler Con- Buy, rent or lease. Call Bond today grain auger, like new condition, $7900
306-373-2236, [email protected] or visit OBO. 204-851-0745, Elkhorn, MB.
ONLINE ONLY UNRESERVED AUCTION, DIESEL ENGINES, OVERHAUL kits and high rib cut to your length for only struction. 306-933-0033, Saskatoon, SK.
Aug. 17-24, 2016. Call 306-865-7660, parts for most makes. Cat, CIH, Cummins, .75¢/sq.ft. All accessories, fasteners and FOR ALL YOUR grain storage, hopper www.bondind.com
2009 BRANDT 110x13 HP w/2012 pit exwww.championassets.ca
1996
CAT Detroit, Mack. M&M Equipment Ltd., Parts flashings are available. Call Prairie Steel in cone and steel floor requirements contact:
FUEL TANK, split tank w/cat walk press, not used last 3 yrs, c/w orig. swing
IT28F wheel loader, QA fork, bucket & and Service phone: 306-543-8377, fax: Clavet, SK., 1-888-398-7150, or email Kevin’s Custom Ag in Nipawin, SK. Toll ENVIRO
auger, $26,500. 306-873-7786, Bjorkdale.
and
stairway.
Gas
capacity
7116L,
diesel
snow-blade.
306-543-2111, Regina, SK.
[email protected]
free: 1-888-304-2837.
cap. 28,823L, double wrapped, c/w meters
MERIDIAN AUGER REBATE: Up to
and
pumps,
$30,000.
306-672-3516
or
2- WESTEEL ROSCO 3300 bu. steel bins,
$2000 off. Large inventory. Call for pricing.
not hoppered, on concrete pads, ladders 306-672-7502, Gull Lake, SK.
306-648-3321, Gravelbourg, SK.
and lid openers, good condition. Phone for 20’ TO 53’ CONTAINERS. New, used and
details. 306-259-4430, Young, SK.
modified. Available Winnipeg, MB; Regina
BIN SENSE- Protect your livelihood. Check and Saskatoon, SK. www.g-airservices.ca
GRAIN BAGS - 9’ & 10’ grain bags. All sizes
moisture and grain temperature right from 306-933-0436.
your
smart
phone.
Call
Flaman 20’ AND 40’ SHIPPING CONTAINERS, up to 400’ long. Quantity discounts
available. See your nearest Flaman loca1-888-435-2626.
large SK. inventory. Ph. 1-800-843-3984, tion or call 1-888-435-2626.
BOOK NOW, TAKE DELIVERY, DON’T 306-781-2600.
2014 LOFTNESS, GL System 10 with swing
PAY UNTIL NOVEMBER, 2016. Top
away truck unloading auger. Incl. optional
quality MERIDIAN bins. All prices include:
road transport system for highway travel.
skid, ladders to ground, manhole, set-up
Has only filled 25 bags, stored inside. Call
and delivery within set radius. Meridian
Roy Bailey, 306-935-4702, Milden, SK.
Hopper combos: 3500 bushel, $10,450.
SPECIAL: 5000 bu., $13,990. We manufacture superior quality hoppers and steel
floors for all makes and sizes. Know what KEHO/ GRAIN GUARD/ OPI STORMAX.
you are investing in. Call and find out why For sales and service east central SK. and GRAVITY WAGONS: New 400 bu, $7,400;
our product quality and price well exceeds MB., call Gerald Shymko, Calder, SK., 600 bu., $12,500; 750 bu., $18,250. Large
the competition. We also stock replace- 306-742-4445 or toll free 1-888-674-5346.
selection of used gravity wagons, 250-750
ment lids for all makes and models of bins.
bu. Used grain carts, 450 to 1110 bushel.
Leasing available. Hoffart Services Inc., KEHO/ GRAIN GUARD Aeration Sales View at: www.zettlerfarmequipment.com
and Service. R.J. Electric, Avonlea, SK. Call 1-866-938-8537, Portage la Prairie, MB.
306-957-2033, Odessa, SK.
306-868-2199 or cell 306-868-7738.
SUPERIOR BINS: Hopper bottoms from
Prepay your regular word classified ad for
2004 BRENT 1084, tandem walking axle,
3300 to 12,000 bu.; 18’ 5000 bu. combo at
always shedded, 1000 bu., rubber and
$11,800.
Middle
Lake
Steel
306-367-4306
3 weeks and your ad will run an additional
flighting good, green in color, $42,500.
or 306-367-2408, Middle Lake, SK.
BATCO CONVEYORS, new and used, Call Chad 306-741-7743, Swift Current, SK
2 consecutive weeks for free!
grain
augers
and
SP
kits.
Delivery
and
USED WESTEEL ROSCO Bins Two 3350’s;
GRAIN CARTS: 450-1050 bushel, large
One 2750. All with new style doors. leasing available. 1-866-746-2666.
selection, PTO and hyd. drive. Also gravity
$.60/bu OBO. 306-648-7766, Gravelbourg.
Call Our Customer Service Representatives
www.zettlerfarmequipment.com
2010 BATCO CONVEYOR 1585, 35 HP Van- wagons.
guard, $26,000; 1515 8 HP Honda, c/w 1-866-938-8537, Portage la Prairie, MB.
To Place Your Ad Today!
mover, $7500. Both units used very little. J&M GRAIN CARTS, 750-1500 bu., c/w
Call 306-677-2598, Hodgeville, SK.
tarp. Comes in red or green. Available with
BUILD YOUR OWN conveyors, 6”, 7”, 8” integrated Ifarm Technology. We take
and 10” end units available; Transfer con- trades! See your nearest Flaman location
veyors and bag conveyors or will custom or call 1-888-435-2626.
build. Call for prices. Master Industries KILBRO 950 BU. grain cart, new tires,
Inc.
www.masterindustries.ca
Phone tarp and paint, field ready, $18,000. Call
1-866-567-3101, Loreburn, SK.
306-731-7235, Earl Grey, SK.
Watch your
profits grow!
Prepayment Bonus
Outside Winnipeg: 1-800-782-0794
Winnipeg: 954-1415
Manitoba’s best-read farm publication
1-800-782-0794
2011 BATCO 20105 swing w/hydraulic NEW 2016 ARMSTRONG 750 bu. 4 wheel,
swing and lift, excellent condition, $33,000 $28,900. New 2016 Armstrong 750 bu., on
Phone 306-648-3622, Gravelbourg, SK.
tracks, $38,900. K&L Equipment and
BATCO CONVEYORS- On sale while sup- Auto, Ladimer, 306-795-7779, Ituna, SK.
plies last. Up to 120 feet. See your nearest 2007 BRENT 1080, $37,000; 2001 JM 750,
Flaman location or call 1-888-435-2626.
$25,000; 2003 Bourgault 750, $26,000;
BN1805RL HOPPER BOTTOM bin pkg. incl.
2007 Unverferth 6500, $25,000. Hydraulic
anchors, 24” air and skids, 4900 bu.,
drive & delivery available. 306-563-8482.
$15,995.
Call
Jason’s
Agri-Motive,
306-472-3159. www.jasonsagri-motive.ca
BANDIT 3210 LIQUID fertilizer system!
BINS SPECIAL PRICING on remaining in- Introducing the all new and fully engiventory of 10,000 bu. Twister hopper bins. neered TBH caddy. Call 1-855-765-9937 or WANTED: CARTER DAY #3 Uniflow Indent
cleaner. 306-862-3573, Nipawin, SK.
See your nearest Flaman store for more visit: www.polywest.ca
details 1-888-435-2626.
FOR DECADES, FARMERS and retailers DUAL STAGE ROTARY SCREENERS and
TIM’S CUSTOM BIN MOVING and Haul- have recognized fibreglass tanks are the Kwik Kleen 5-7 tube. Call 204-857-8403,
ing Inc. Up to 22’ diameter. 204-362-7103 ideal tank for storing liquid fertilizer! Call Portage la Prairie, MB. or visit online:
[email protected]
1-855-765-9937 or visit www.polywest.ca
www.zettlerfarmequipment.com
23
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
CUSTOM COLOR SORTING chickpeas to HESSTON 1200 PT, 30’, batt reels, good
mustard. Cert. organic and conventional. condition, $4500. Call 306-245-3777,
Francis, SK.
306-741-3177, Swift Current, SK.
HESSTON, double swath, PU reel,
DUAL SCREEN ROTARY grain cleaners, 8100
canvases, guards and knife, field
great for pulse crops, best selection in new
ready.
306-322-4755,
Rose Valley, SK.
Western Canada. 306-946-7923, Young SK
WESTWARD 3000 PT swather, 25’ PU reel,
6 CLELAND DOUBLE spiral separators, fair vg cond; Co-op 550, 18’ plus 18’ PU reel on
condition, $3000. Call 306-335-2280, transport. 306-491-2227, Blaine Lake, SK.
Lemberg, SK
2002 MF 220XL, 30’ header, UII PU reel,
shedded, mint condition, 1087 hrs. Call
306-228-7556, Unity, SK.
IHC 5000, 19.5’, PU reel, Keer sheer.
306-764-6372, Prince Albert, SK.
4700 VERS. SWATHER, ONE owner, 30ft header, always shedded. $5,800 OBO.
Phone: 204-736-2941.
2- 50’ CASE/IH piggyback double swath
swathers, 1 for parts, 1 good, $6000 for
both OBO. 306-460-9027, 306-460-4462,
306-463-3480, Flaxcombe, SK.
1995 MASSEY 200 swather, 2258 hrs., UII
PU reel, Schumacher knife drive, runs well.
CARTER DAY AIR screen cleaner, Model 306-478-2520, McCord, SK.
#F515, Style #DDK1, vg cond., only 2 yrs.
use, always shedded, c/w fan and 120
Swather: 25-Ft MacDon Westward
spare screens of various sizes, $50,000.
Pull-Type Swather $1,500 at Holland.
Call 306-617-9009, Zealandia, SK. Email:
(204)526-7590, Don.
[email protected]
FARMFAN AB8, continuous batch 120
bu., canola screens, propane, new fan, exc.
cond., $5500. 306-862-1457, Choiceland.
VERTEC 3600 GRAIN dryer, natural gas
or
propane,
$4500
OBO.
Call
306-548-4344, Sturgis, SK.
WESTERN GRAIN DRYER, mfg. of grain
dryers w/fully auto. drying/moisture control. Updates to IBEC/Vertec roof, tiers,
moisture control. Economic designed
dryers available. Call 1-888-288-6857.
westerngraindryer.com
AERATION FANS, rockets ductwork, temp
monitoring equipment and more. Visit
your nearest Flaman store to see selection
or call 1-888-435-2626.
REFURBISHED PROTEIN TESTERS for
sale. Protein in wheat and durum, 4 units
avail. Protein in wheat, barley and durum,
2 units available. Jason 204-772-6998.
2007 MF 9430 w/30’ draper deader
#W22408A, 1108 hrs, 30’ center delivery
$59,000. 306-864-3667, Kinistino, SK. or
www.farmworld.ca
2006 CASE/IH WDX1202 w/36’ draper
header #W22816B, 1057 hours, $63,000.
306-864-3667,
Kinistino,
SK.
or
www.farmworld.ca
1983 MASSEY FERGUSON swather, 25’,
field ready, some new parts. Call
306-492-4642, Clavet, SK.
2012 MACDON M155 w/30’ draper header
#W22651A, 236 hrs., D50 30’ single reel
$123,600. 306-922-2525, Prince Albert,
SK. or www.farmworld.ca
2012 MF WR 9740, 36’, 400 hrs., $99,000.
0% for 36 months OAC. Cam-Don Motors
Ltd., 306-237-4212, Perdue, SK.
JD 2420 DIESEL, 25’ header, UII PU reels,
gauge wheels, AC, hydro, vg cond., field
ready, $6500. 306-723-4317, Cupar, SK.
36’ WESTWARD 9000 SP swather, PU reel,
big tires, swath roller, knives good shape,
$28,000. 306-786-6510, Rhein, SK.
2001 CASE/IH 8230, 30’ PT w/PU reels,
knife drive assembly redone, good cond.,
$7000. Call 306-782-7347, Ebenezer, SK.
590 JOHN DEERE 36’ PT, good condition.
Call 306-642-8111, Rockglen, SK.
1993 MF 200, 2200 hrs., 30’ swather, PU
reel; Also swath roller. Call 306-759-2651
or 306-759-7745, Brownlee, SK.
1996 MACDON SP swather, 30’ 960 header, PU reel, Cummins turbo 2 spd, original
owner, 3800 hrs., field ready, $25,000.
306-224-4777, Corning, SK.
TRAILTECH FULL CARRY swather transport, tandem, 1400O GVW, lights, brakes,
c/w all transporting hardware, $12,000.
306-466-7744, Leask, SK.
TIM GRAIN VAC REPAIR Used REM grain
vac’s: 2700, 3700 and 2500. All have gone
through shop for repairs. 306-784-2407,
1997 CASE/IH 8825 HP 30’ SP swather,
306-772-1004, leave msg. Herbert, SK.
SN #CFH0127052, 2242 hrs., double knife
drive, shiftable drapers for DS, poly skid
plates, New UII PU reel in 2012, rear
weights, poly swath roller, rear hitch
mounted w/1 7/8” ball, shedded, $25,000.
Call 306-377-2002, Herschel, SK.
2005 9220 30’ MF swather, 1000 hrs., dou2000 CASE/IH 8465 round baler, auto. tie, ble swath, excellent, $55,000. Call
5x6 baler, vg condition, $7500. Call 306-567-8614, Davidson, SK.
306-861-4592, Fillmore, SK
2012 CIH WD1903 swather, 539 eng. hrs.,
NEW HOLLAND 116 haybine, good condi- big rubber, deluxe cab, never smoked in,
190 HP, 6 cyl., 36’ dbl. knife drive and dbl.
tion. Call 306-642-8111, Rockglen, SK.
reel drive, hyd. fore/aft, dual shears, shedCIH 8435 SILAGE baler; NH 166 swath ded. 306-463-8669, Kindersley, SK.
turner. Both always shedded and in good
2005 NH HW325 with 36’ draper header,
shape. 204-878-3358, Isle des Chenes, MB
#HN3119A,
1926
hours,
$56,000.
Kinistino,
SK.
or
NH 273 SQUARE BALER w/hydraulic ten- 306-864-3667,
sion, shedded, field ready, exc. cond., www.farmworld.ca
$1950 OBO. 306-280-4020, Saskatoon, SK.
1997 MACDON 9200 SWATHER, 21’,
JOHN DEERE 535 round baler, shedded, shedded, PU reel, 1360 hrs., $37,500;
good condition, bale kicker, hydraulic PU. 2010 Case/Steiger, 4WD, shedded, 795
hrs., $185,000. 204-268-2853, Selkirk, MB.
Call 306-228-7556, Unity, SK.
MACDON M155 w/35’ draper header
BUHLER 4500 BALE picker, picks 4x8 or 2014
129 hrs., 35’ D65 triple deliv3x3x8 bales, always shedded, vg cond., #W22653A,
ery
header,
$161,000. 306-922-2525,
$25,000. Call 204-773-6890, Inglis, MB.
Prince Albert, SK. or www.farmworld.ca
LOOKING FOR DECENT NH 851 baler with 2013 MF 9740 w/36’ draper header
hydraulic tie. Must be reasonably priced. #W22657B, 180 hrs., 36’ center delivery
204-764-2015, Hamiota, MB.
header, $127,000. 306-922-2525, Prince
CASE/IH RBX 561 round baler, 1000 PTO, Albert, SK. or www.farmworld.ca
good condition, $4500 OBO. Call 10’ MANDAKO MOUNTED ROLLER, used
306-395-2668, 306-681-7610, Chaplin, SK.
$2000. Call Cam-Don Motors Ltd.,
306-237-4212, Perdue, SK.
HESSTON 565 ROUND baler, good cond.,
$4500.
306-634-7920,
306-421-1753, 2013 MF 9725 w/30’ draper header
#N22068A, 174 hrs., 30’ center delivery
Estevan, SK
$98,000. 306-864-3667, Kinistino, SK. or
BALE SPEAR ATTACHMENTS for all www.farmworld.ca
loaders and skidsteers, excellent pricing. 1997 CIH 6000 w/25’ draper header
Call now 1-866-443-7444.
#PN3020D, 3893 hrs., 25’ shift header,
MORRIS MODEL 1400 HAY HIKER, $15,000. 306-922-2525, Prince Albert, SK.
chains replaced 2 yrs ago, exc. working or www.farmworld.ca
cond. $12,000. 306-858-7772, Lucky Lake,
CASE/IH 8230 PT SWATHER, 30’ with UII
PU reel . 306-460-9440, Smiley, SK.
278 NEW HOLLAND square baler, 1/4 turn.
306-460-9440, Smiley, SK.
NEW IDEA 4865 5x6, hyd. PU, rubber
mount teeth, 2300 bales, shedded, good.
306-944-4325, 306-231-8355, Bruno, SK.
2007 MF 9430, 2376 hrs., Outback AutoSteer, vg, w/30’ header, $49,000 or w/36’
header, $53,000. Call 306-862-7524,
306-862-7761, Nipawin, SK. agriquip.ca
IHC 4000 SP, 24.5’ with UII PU reel, runs,
$1500. 306-358-2120, Macklin, SK.
CIH 6500 SP, 21’, MacDon PU reel, 2870
hrs., new wobble box, knife, canvas, 2008 8010, 1398 sep. hrs., long auger,
loaded, new rotor, 2016 PU header, shed$12,500 OBO. 306-338-7603, Margo, SK.
ded, exc. cond. Terre Bonne Seed Farm,
2012 NH H8060 w/36’ draper header 306-921-8594, 306-752-4810, Melfort, SK.
#HW3388A, 509 hrs., HB36 header, 2002 2388 CASE/IH, 3063 eng. hrs., 2515
$105,000. 306-682-9920, Humboldt, SK. rotor hrs., very nice shape, always shedor www.farmworld.ca
ded, $70,000 OBO. Wayne Nickason
NEW MF WR9735, 30’, UII PU reel, 306-378-7336, Wiseton, SK.
fore/aft, axle susp., 130 HP,
$91,000 1994 CASE/IH 1688, 5875 eng. hrs., spec.
OBO. 306-699-2442, McLean, SK.
rotor, through shop in 2012, $13,000. Call
885 MASSEY SP, gas, 1700 hrs., 30’, 66” 306-231-8999, Humboldt, SK.
opening, PU reel, HD wobble box, dual 2014 CASE/IH 7130, 800 singles, deluxe
Roto-sheers, new canvases, spare parts. cab, lateral tilt, elec. folding hopper cover,
306-335-2777, Lemberg, SK.
Stk #014705, $279,000. Saskatoon, SK.,
10’ STEEL SWATH ROLLERS - only 6 left! 1-888-576-5561. redheadequipment.ca
$1995 each. Located in Saskatoon, call 1987 CASE/IH 1680 combine w/header
Flaman 306-934-2121.
reverser, internal chopper, $10,500. LocatCIH 8230 PT 30’ batt reels, very little use, ed at Canora, SK. Call 780-926-9773.
new cond., always shedded, $4500. 2006 CIH 8010 SP axial-flow with 2015
306-675-4883, 306-331-7456, Lipton, SK
header, 1644 eng./1238 sep. hrs., exc.
condition; 2009 2020 flex header (done
MF 9420, SP, 30’, 989 hrs, UII PU reels, 500 acres) sold separately. 204-648-3042,
$55,000.; JD 590, PT, 30’, batt reels, exc. 204-546-2789, Grandview, MB.
cond., $4500. Both shedded. Retired. Call
306-493-7871, Harris, SK.
2009 CASE/IH 7120, 1475 threshing hrs.,
16’ PU header, 520 duals, lateral tilt, fine
1999 MACDON 2920 w/30’ draper header cut chopper, engine air filter, updated, var.
#W22404C, 2660 hrs 30’ 962 header, cen- speed feeder, shedded, $160,000. Eskdale
ter delivery, PU reel, $29,900. Humboldt, Acres Inc., Leross, SK. 306-795-7493,
SK, 306-682-9920 or www.farmworld.ca
306-795-7747, 306-795-7208.
SWATHER CARRIER, SHEDDED, up to 30’, 2003 CASE/IH 8010, c/w 2016 PU headcan
be
adjusted,
$1900
OBO. er, 900 singles, rear wheel assist, Stk
204-736-2941, Sanford, MB.
#016932, $119,000. 1-888-576-5561,
2015 MACDON M-155 40’ D65 double Saskatoon SK. www.redheadequipment.ca
knife drive, GPS, hyd. roller, 47 cutting 2006 CASE/IH 2388, field ready, shedhrs, shedded. 306-287-7707, Quill Lake SK
ded, 1486 threshing hours, $110,000. Call
306-567-8081, Davidson, SK.
MF 860 combine, 6 cyl. Perkins standard,
new radiator, combination header, good
2000 9650 STS, w/914, approx. 2500 sep. shape, $10,000 OBO. Call 306-497-2917,
hrs., covered hopper ext., field ready, vg Blaine Lake, SK.
cond., $59,000. 306-948-7223, Biggar, SK.
1994 MF 8460 CONVENTIONAL, 2606 hrs.,
1998 JD 9500, 3950 eng., 3100 sep. hrs., Mercedes, Rake-Up PU, shedded, good.
vg cond., field ready, always shedded, 306-944-4325, 306-231-8355, Bruno, SK.
$30,000. 306-868-7991, Avonlea, SK.
FOR SALE FOR PARTS 860 Massey Com2002 JD 9750 STS, 2863 eng., 2165 sep. bine: 8 belt pick-up hydraulic drive. New
hrs., Outback ready, duals, 2014 Michel’s belts & teeth never used. Good sieves &
elec. tarp, 2013 Redekop chopper, single more. Call 204-729-1254, 204-761-8739.
point hookup, Y&M, HID lights, more options, always shedded, exc. cond., $85,000
OBO. 306-644-4703, Loreburn, SK.
1985 8920 White combines, shedded,
1994 JD 9500, 3400 eng. hrs., 3039 sep. 2maintained. 306-675-6012, Kelliher,
hrs., 914 header w/Rake-Up PU, 930 rigid well
SK.
header w/PU reels,
$42,000 OBO.
306-848-0088, Weyburn, SK.
2008 JD 9770, Contour-Master, AutoSteer,
800/70R38 tires, 28LR26 rears, 1852/
1350 hrs., Michel’s hopper cover, shedded,
exc., $185,000. 306-628-7337, Leader, SK.
1984 JD 8820, turbo, 2530 eng. hrs., long
unloading auger, PU, $5000 work order
completed, rub bars and concave 2 years
old, always shedded, $13,000 OBO. Pics
avail; 1975 6601 PT, good cond., $900;
306-395-2651, 306-690-5715, Chaplin, SK.
1986 CASE 1680, 3500 eng. hrs., rice tires, 2004 9760 STS, 2460 sep. hrs., Greenlightgood condition, $17,000. 204-824-2196, ed, fine cut chopper, hopper topper, long
auger, Y&M, more options, exc. cond.,
204-573-6723, Wawanesa, MB.
$110,000. 306-642-8111, Rockglen, SK.
1991 1680 w/1015 header, new engine,
$28,000. 2000 2388 w/1015 header, 2004 9860 STS, combine, 914 JD PU, 2395
$65,000. 2004 2388 w/2015 PU header, eng., 1650 threshing hrs., chopper and
$115,000. 2006 2388 w/2015 PU header, chaff spreader, shedded, good cond.,
HAUSER SWATH ROLLER inventory re- $130,000. 2009 7088 w/2016 PU header, $118,000 OBO Fisher Farms Ltd., Dauphin,
duction sale. Save 20% factory direct. All $180,000. A.E. Chicoine Farm Equipment, MB, 204-622-8800 office, 204-638-2700
cell. Email: [email protected]
steel 10è drum. Mimics every movement 306-449-2255, Storthoaks, SK.
of the swather, accurate and consistent 2004 CASE 8010 heavy land combine,
ground gauging, legal width transport. RWA, exc., better than new, $140,000 1997 JD CTS, 1824 sep. hrs., loaded incl.
Contour-Master, single point connector,
Starting at $3,600. Hauser’s Machinery, OBO. Call Ed 204-299-6465, Starbuck, MB.
wiring harness for JD GPS, 80 hrs. since
Melville. www.hausers.ca 1-888-939-4444.
last Greenlight, $45,000. 306-672-3993,
2011 CIH 8210 w/3016 PU, PN3305B, Webb, SK.
$250,000. 306-922-2525, Prince Albert,
SK. or www.farmworld.ca
1991 JD 9500, many upgrades incl.
BALERS: JD 535, $4500; JD 510, $1500;
greaseable straw walkers, gauge sieves,
JD 336, $3000. Rakes: NH 216, $5500; ONLINE ONLY UNRESERVED AUCTION, chaff spreader, new drive tires, 3983 sep.
Vermeer hydraulic R23, $9000; Gehl 2270 Aug. 17-24, 2016. Call 306-865-7660, hrs., $19,500. 306-728-2529, Yorkton, SK.
Case/IH
haybine, $2500. Mowers: NH 456, $2000; www.championassets.ca
2008 9870 STS, w/615 PU, approx. 1500
Bushog 9’, 3 PTH disc, $2000; Woods 315 1680 combine, Victory PU, shedded.
sep. hrs., duals, loaded up nice, vg cond.,
Batwing,
$6000;
JD
15’,
$6000.
$149,000. Call 306-948-7223, Biggar, SK.
1-866-938-8537, Portage La Prairie, MB.
Rebuilt Concaves
Rebuild combine table augers
Rebuild hydraulic cylinders
Roller mills regrooved
MFWD housings rebuilt
Steel and aluminum welding
Machine Shop Service
Line boreing and welding
Penno’s Machining & Mfg. Ltd.
Eden, MB 204-966-3221
Fax: 204-966-3248
Check out A & I online parts store
www.pennosmachining.com
FOUILLARD IMPLEMENT
Serving The Community Since 1908
Last Chance Sale All Sales Final Cash
Or D/C Only Doors Close Aug. 31, 2016
(204) 683-2221 ST. LAZARE, MB.
1991 JD 9500, 4500 eng. hrs., 914 PU
header, many new parts including new
tires, shedded, field ready, $40,000 OBO.
306-227-0075, Alvena, SK.
2004 GLEANER 475 w/Swathmaster PU,
#N225110, 2750 hrs., 16’ PU, $99,000.
306-864-3667,
Kinistino,
SK.
or 2001 MF SP 8780XP, $30,300; Also avail.
www.farmworld.ca
2005 Atco 4200 header w/16’ Swathmas1976 GLEANER L 24’ straight cut header, ter PU. 204-728-1861, Brandon, MB.
duals, chopper, PU, transport, open to of- 1974 MF 750 combine, diesel, good to exc.
fers. Call 306-693-9847, Moose Jaw, SK.
shape, field ready, shedded, $3500. Call
2005 GLEANER R75 w/Swathmaster PU, 306-549-4701, Hafford, SK.
#N22511D, 2750 hrs., 16’ PU, $99,000. MF 550, Perkins dsl hydro, MF PU header,
306-864-3667,
Kinistino,
SK.
or Melroe 378 PU, $3000 OBO. 306-858-7345
www.farmworld.ca
or 306-867-9899, Lucky Lake, SK.
2014 JD S670, 243 threshing hrs., Contour-Master,
chopper,
GS3
screen,
1996 CASE/IH 2188, 1950 sep. hrs., very 900/60R32 singles, 22.5’ auger, hyd. fold
hopper,
powertrain
warranty
until
Aug.
16,
18’ UII REEL, steel teeth, $1250. 21’ Hon- good, $52,000; 2001 HoneyBee 30’, 2019. Comes with 2014 P615 PU. Stored
eyBee header, no reel, $1250. Leon 606 $20,000. Call 306-563-8482.
inside. Roy Bailey, 306-935-4702 Milden.
FEL, $3200. 306-960-3000, St. Louis, SK.
1999 CASE/IH 2388 with Swathmaster
1986 JD 8820 Titan II combine w/PU
PU,
#HN3133B,
2819
hrs.,
2129
threshing
2006 MF 5200 header, 25’, PU reel, double
header, $16,000; JD 925 straight cut flex
swath, fore&aft., exc. cond. 306-344-4723 hrs, $68,000. 306-682-9920, Humboldt, header, $13,000. Both field ready.
SK. or www.farmworld.ca
evenings. Frenchman Butte, SK.
306-493-2762, 306-493-7324, Delisle, SK.
1983 CIH 1480 SP, 3998 eng. hrs., shedWANTED: 30’ SWATHER HEADER to fit ded, field ready, tires- good, , hyd. rever- 2011 JD 9770, 1077 sep. hrs., 615 PU,
2014 NH bi-directional. Call 780-745-2574 ser, $6500; 810 24’ straight cut header, second owner, shedded, exc. cond.,
or 780-870-1407.
w/warranty,
asking
$235,000.
Call
$1000. 306-753-7094, Macklin, SK.
204-324-6298, Altona, MB.
20’ Ull PU REEL, late model, exc. shape, PARTING OUT: 1986 CASE/IH 1680,
steel teeth, $1850; SwathHent roller on w/good motor, hydro, trans and planetary 2004 9760 STS, dual wheels w/1300 drapwheels, $500. 306-960-3000, St. Louis, SK.
axles. Sieves and frames good w/no welds er PU, $120,000. 2008 9770 STS, dual
wheels w/2010 615 PU header, $195,000.
204-662-4510, 204-522-5283, Sinclair, MB
Call A.E. Chicoine Farm Equipment,
CASE/IH 2188, w/PU, chopper, rocktrap, 306-449-2255, Storthoaks, SK.
new tires w/AFX rotor, new unload auger
and feeder chain. Upgraded yearly, stored 1990 9600, 4300 sep. hrs., 914 PU w/new
inside, 3127 hrs., excellent paint, mint, belts, chaff spreader, always shedded,
$26,000 OBO 204-773-0111 Angusville MB
$40,000. 306-891-9772, Yellow Grass, SK.
Bean Combine, Sun Pickup, Bean Cutter
Bean Combine with dumping hopper
Pull type. 24-ft Sunpick up. Also
Elmers 8 row 30-in bean cutter with lift
attachement. (204) 312-0726
[email protected]
2004 HONEYBEE 30’ draper header, pea
auger, Case 88 adapter, shedded, excellent
condition, $22,500 OBO. 306-889-4263,
306- 873-7499, Mistatim, SK.
1997 HONEYBEE 25’ c/w 2004 JD
adapter, to fit 9600/9610 combine, UII PU
reel, shedded, good condition, $9000 OBO.
306-675-4566, 306-795-7382, Leross, SK.
LIKE NEW 2013 and 2011 JD 635 flex
headers, both with AWS air reels. Contact
306-264-7742, Kincaid, SK.
2013 HONEYBEE SP36, 36’, hyd. center
link, hyd. fore/aft, transport, Stk#018553,
$73,900. 1-888-576-5561, Prince Albert,
SK. www.redheadequipment.ca
CORN HEADERS: 2-2008 Geringhoff
Models 630 and 1230 rotodisk chopping
corn headers, 6 and 12 row, both 30” spacing, good cond., $25,000 fits Case/IH 80
series; $60,000 fits Case/IH flagship series combines. 306-421-1361, Torquay, SK
2013 NEW HOLLAND 840CD-40, 40’ header, loaded, exc. cond. Call 306-862-7524,
306-862-7761, Nipawin, SK. agriquip.ca
2009 MACDON FD70, 40’, new sickle
and drapers, JD adapter, gage wheels, ask
$48,900. Pea auger available. Can deliver.
Call 204-324-6298, Altona, MB.
2011 MACDON FD70, 40’ flex header, JD
adapter, cross auger, transport, dual knife
drive, hyd. fore&aft., always shedded,
$62,500. 306-459-7767, Ogema, SK.
2012 CASE/IH 2162, 40’, single knife
drive, transport, cross auger, Stk
#019119, $81,000. 1-888-576-5561, Swift
Current, SK. www.redheadequipment.ca
2001 CAT LEXION 450, 2100 sep. hrs., 1994 JD 9500, w/914 header, Greenlightconventional, field ready. 306-270-1686, ed yearly, 4200 eng. 3200 sep. hrs., shed- 2014 JD 635F Duraflo flex header, hyd.
ded, vg cond., $30,000. 306-274-7636, fore/aft, fits S670 and 70 Series, includes
near Aberdeen, SK.
transport. Call Roy Bailey, 306-935-4702,
306-274-2192, Lestock, SK.
Milden, SK.
2005 JD 9660, 2325 eng. hrs, 1757 sep.
hrs., 800/70R38 tires, 15’ MacDon PW7 2011 CIH 2162 flex draper, double knife,
2009 NH CR9080 with Swathmaster PU, Swathmaster
PU,
fresh
Greenlight, 40’, CR/AFX adaptors, $65,000. Call
#HN3373B, 1292 hrs., 1292 threshing $110,000. 306-442-7588, Khedive, SK.
306-563-8482.
hrs., $210,000. 306-682-9920, Humboldt,
SK. or www.farmworld.ca
2005 NH CR9060 with Swathmaster PU,
#HN3375B, 2781 hrs., 2295 threshing
hours, $75,000. 306-682-9920, Humboldt,
SK. or www.farmworld.ca
1994 TR96, 36’ HoneyBee header, PU reel,
very good canvases and tires, Redekop
chopper w/PU table and Sund PU,
$25,000. 306-296-4741, Frontier, SK.
1997 TX68 COMBINE, updated to 1999, no
hassle electronics, straight cut available,
$22,000 OBO. Nate Golas, 204-372-6081,
204-280-1202, Fisher Branch, MB.
2004
NH CR9070 with Rake-Up,
#HN3179B, 3600 hrs., 2308 threshing
hours, $95,000. 306-682-9920, Humboldt,
SK. or www.farmworld.ca
530 JD BALER, always shedded, in good
shape. 400 Versatile 18’ SP swather with 2002 4WD TR99, SN#566299, 2207 hrs.,
1464 thresh hrs., 971 header, SN#622833,
cab, good shape. 204-748-1024 Virden MB
w/397 Westward PU, Crary big topper,
FLEXHEADS-CASE-IH 1020 25-FT, Y&M monitor, lateral float, MAV chopper,
$6000; 30-ft $8000; 2020 30-ft, $15,000; $80,000. 306-929-4693, Prince Albert, SK.
1015 PU Header, $3500; JD 925, $6500;
JD 930, $9000; Nissen bean windrower, 2008 NH CR9070 with Swathmaster PU,
$5000; Large selection of used Grain carts #N22195B, 2130 hrs, 1654 threshing hrs.,
$172,000. 306-922-2525, Prince Albert,
& Gravity wagons. 204-857-8403.
SK. or www.farmworld.ca
GOOSENECK SELF-UNLOADING round bale
trailer, hauls 10 bales, sideways unload, LAST OF THE MACDON M155’s without
can be pulled with a pickup, $5000. Ros- DEF, 35 and 40 in stock. Cam-Don Motors
thern, SK. 306-232-3442 or 306-232-5688
Ltd., 306-237-4212, Perdue, SK.
VERMEER 605M ROUND baler, monitor,
kicker, new pickup, good cond, field ready,
1994 CIH 1688, internal chopper, straw
$15,000. 306-335-7875, Lemberg, SK.
and chaff spreader, hopper topper. Recent
repairs incl: all shaker bushings, hydro
BALE SPEARS, high quality imported
pump, top and bottom rotor bearings and
from Italy, 27” and 49”, free shipping, exrear tires, shedded, field ready, $17,000
cellent pricing. Call now toll free
OBO. 306-744-7663, Saltcoats, SK.
1-866-443-7444, Stonewall, MB.
2011 M150 c/w D60 40’, 300 hrs., shed8 AND 14 BALE WAGONS in stock, Morris ded, very good cond., $119,000. Cam-Don
and Inland. Call Cam-Don Motors Ltd., Motors Ltd., 306-237-4212, Perdue, SK.
306-237-4212, Perdue, SK.
IH 4000 24’ SP swather, AC, air seat, PU
reel, big tires, $4500. 306-634-7920,
306-421-1753, Estevan, SK.
2007 CASE/IH HDX 18’ haybine, manual CASE/IH 736 36’ swather, not used in 12
reverser, steel crimpers, good condition, years, excellent, shedded, $6500. Call
$16,900. 306-883-9230, Leoville, SK.
306-628-4267, Liebenthal, SK.
2011 GLEANER A6 with Swathmaster PU
#PN3014C,
836
hours,
$255,000.
306-922-2525, Prince Albert, SK. or
www.farmworld.ca
2002 NH TR99, new feeder chain, new
clean grain chain, fine cut chopper, lateral
tilt, moisture tester, AHH, hopper topper.
Call 306-542-7786, Kamsack, SK.
1991 NEW HOLLAND TR96, Ford motor,
rice tires, 3,155-hrs, $15,000 OBO. Phone
204-781-8855.
1999 TX68, 2600 eng. hrs., mostly new
bearings and belts, Hassle free electronics,
exc., $24,000 OBO. Nate 204-372-6081,
204-280-1202, Fisher Branch, MB
1998 2188, 4340 eng./3327 sep. hrs.,
specialty rotor, sent through shop 2015, 2008 NH CR9060, 14’ Rake-Up PU, deluxe NH chopper, Intelliview monitor,
$26,000. 306-231-8999, Humboldt, SK.
Y&M, remote sieve adj., elect. stone trap,
2015 CASE/IH 9240, c/w 3016 PU head- 1470 hrs., vg cond., serviced, field ready,
er, 620 duals, HD lateral tilt, Stk #019788 $105,000 OBO. 306-497-7756, Blaine Lake.
$510,000. 1-888-576-5561, Saskatoon, SK.
2005 NH CR970 with Swathmaster PU,
or view www.redheadequipment.ca
#PN3202B,
2312
hours,
$89,000.
1989 CASE 1680 combine, 5100 engine 306-922-2525, Prince Albert, SK. or
hrs, shedded, excellent condition, $25,000. www.farmworld.ca
Call 306-567-8614, Davidson, SK.
1999 TX66 2700 ENGINE, 2,300 sep hrs,
2013 CASE/IH 7230, full auto-guidance, Swath Master PU, always shedded, VGC,
620 duals, hyd. folding tank cover, Stk field ready. Also 973 30-ft. flex head, ask#018867, $325,000. 1-888-576-5561, ing $42,000 OBO for the pair.
Swift Current, SK. redheadequipment.ca
204-461-0706.
Our offices will be closed
Monday, September 5th for
Labour Day
Early Deadline for the
September 8th issue is
Wednesday, Aug., 31st
at 12 Noon
FBC
2X5.0000
000027300r1.PDF
24
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
2009 HONEYBEE DRAPER header, 36’, JD
adapter, PU reel, hyd. fore & aft, hyd. tilt,
double pump drive, double knife drive, pea
auger, poly skid plates, quick transport,
shedded. 306-946-7557, Simpson, SK.
NH FLEX PLATFORMS: 1998-973- 25-ft
& 30-ft; 2002 73C 30-ft; 2004 74C 30-ft
w/air reel; 2008 88C 42-ft. Flex Draper,
Special Price. Reconditioned. Reimer Farm
Equipment, Hwy #12 N, Steinbach, MB.
www.reimerfarmequipment.com Call Gary
2011 CASE/IH 3020, 35’, single knife, Reimer: 204-326-7000.
Crary air reel, Stk #017943, $33,750.
1-888-576-5561. redheadequipment.ca
JD FLEX PLATFORMS: 1997 925 25-ft;
NEW HOLLAND 971, 30’, dual knife w/Luke 1998 930 30-ft; 2000 930F 30-ft;
sunflower pans, $7500; 2001 Honeybee 2002 930F 30-ft; 2003 930F 30-ft;
draper header, SP30, w/NH CR adapter, 2005 630F 30-ft w/air; 2007 630F 30-ft;
PU reels, SN#430010979, $20,000. Call 2010 630F 30-ft; 2012 630F 30-ft;
306-929-4693, Prince Albert, SK.
2005 635F 35 ft; 2007 635F 35-ft;
635F 35-ft; 2011 635F 35-ft w/air
1995 960 MACDON 36’ draper header, 2009
One used 30-ft air bar for 630F.
exc.; 30’ MF 9030 w/PU reel; 25’ Claas reel;
Farm Equipment, Hwy #12 N,
(8560 MF), PU reel; 24’ JD 224 Series, fits Reimer
MB. www.reimerfarmequipCase 2188; 24’ Int. straight cut; 22’ Sund Steinbach,
ment.com
Call Gary Reimer 204-326-7000.
PU on Case header; 14’ Sund PU; 17’ Claas
straight cut; 16’ Cockshutt, fits White
8600; 24’ JD 100, fits 7700; Extra Coulter WILDFONG CONCAVES an improved
PU wheels; Cockshutt 8800 and 8700 com- threshing element for JD S series. Also
bines w/header reversers, others for parts; new improved front beaters for JD STS
Fresh JD 8820 for parts; JD PU’s; 7721 JD and S Series, no more plugging. Please call
combine, vg. Sieve rebuilding. Call Roland, us Wildfong Enterprises Ltd., Russ
306-260-2833 or Rick 306-734-7721 or
306-256-7088, Cudworth, SK.
the shop 306-734-2345, Craik, SK.
2009 HONEYBEE SP30, 30’ draper, w/roto
shear on each side, no adapter, exc. cond., MACDON ADAPTER FOR CASE/IH 960
$17,500. Call 306-861-4592, Fillmore, SK.
header. Massey 50 or 60 Series, whole or
JD 930R and 930S 30’ combine headers, parts. Call 306-295-7800, Eastend, SK.
both w/new Schumacher wobble boxes,
$4500 ea. 204-773-0111, Angusville, MB
CIH FLEX PLATFORMS: 1995-2002-2004
25-ft & 30-ft; 2005 2020 30-ft w/air
2013 CASE/IH HONEYBEE 3016, 40’ drap- 1020
2008 2020 30-ft; 2007 2020 35-ft. All
er header, fore/aft, lifters, used 1200 reel;
have
been reconditioned. Reimer Farm
acres wheat, shedded, $52,000. Retired. Equipment,
Hwy #12 N, Steinbach, MB.
306-382-1200, Saskatoon, SK.
www.reimerfarmequipment.com Call Gary
MACDON 30’ 972 draper header, Reimer: 204-326-7000.
fore/aft, PU reel, Case 80 series adapter,
Bergen trailer, good cond., $19,000. Ph.
306-421-1361, Torquay, SK
EXPERIENCED RANCH HAND available
for fall/winter while you go on vacation.
NS, ND, single. References available.
Please contact [email protected]
2006 JD 936D, 36’, PU reel, skid shoes,
transport, Stk #019157, $39,170. Melfort,
SK. 1-888-576-5561 or view website:
www.redheadequipment.ca
2002 42’ SP42 HoneyBee, pea auger,
transport, Cat adapter, $25,000. 2002 30’
F30, Cat flex header, PU reel, w/4 wheel
transport, $16,000. Used JD adpater plate
for newer MacDon headers, $1400. Call HEADER TRAILERS & ACCESSORIES.
A.E. Chicoine Farm Equipment, Storthoaks,
Arc-Fab Industries. 204-355-9595
SK., 306-449-2255.
[email protected] www.arcfab.ca
2010 HONEYBEE 36’, dbl knife, $35,000;
2008 NH 94C 36’, DK, $31,000. Pea augers AGCO GLEANER-MF FLEX PLATand AFX/CR adaptors. Ph 306-563-8482.
FORMS: 1994 GL 500 25-ft & 30 ft; 2000
GL 800 30-ft w/air reel; 2002 GL 8000 30FLEX HEADS: CASE/IH 1020, 25’, $6000; ft; 2008 GL 8200 35-ft; 2009 MF 8200
30’, $8000; CASE/IH 2020, 30’, $15,000; 35-ft. Reconditioned. Reimer Farm Equip1015 PU head, $3500; JD 925, $6500; JD ment, Hwy #12 N, Steinbach, MB. Call
930, $9000; Nissen bean windrower, Gary Reimer 204-326-7000. www.reimer$5000. Call toll free 1-866-938-8537.
farmequipment.com
2010 CASE/IH 2020 35’ flex header, excellent condition, field ready, $23,500. Call
306-861-4592, Fillmore, SK.
2013 CASE/IH FL4530 floater, 70’, auto
fold tip, luxury cab, 810 flex air applicator,
Stk #021154, $320,000. Prince Albert, SK. 2000 MORRIS MAXIM II 50’ air drill, 7300
1-888-576-5561. redheadequipment.ca
VRT air cart w/elec. over hyd. in cab controls, 3rd tank, 10” spacing, 3.5” steel
packers, Agtron primary blockage, DS, can
switch to SS, Atom Jet side band openers,
scrapers, opt. 3 camera CabCam system,
$45,000. 306-377-2002, Herschel, SK.
2- FIELD READY 2011 JD S35 headers,
c/w air reels and transports, $32,000 each
OBO. 306-587-7159, Abbey, SK.
2010 NH 94C, 36’, AFX adapter, double
knife, cross auger, Stk #020673, $30,000.
1-888-576-5561, Swift Current, SK. or
view www.redheadequipment.ca
CASE 1010 25’ straight cut header, PU
reels, $3000. 306-429-2820, Glenavon, SK.
2009 CASE/IH 2020, 35’, AFX adapter,
double knife drive, AWS air reel, Stk
#019849, $29,500. 1-888-576-5561, Swift
Current, SK. www.redheadequipment.ca
RECONDITIONED rigid and flex, most
makes and sizes; also header transports.
Ed Lorenz, 306-344-4811, Paradise Hill, SK
www.straightcutheaders.com
JD 930 RIGID HEADER, 30’ comes with
new header trailer, nice shape, $6500. Call
204-529-2595, Cartwright, MB.
JD headers 224 straight cut. Also 8 row
corn head, corn head also fits CIH.
204-746-5747, Rosenort, MB.
JD 230 RIGID HEADER, batt reel, w/transport, $5450 OBO. Contact 204-781-8664,
Rosser, MB.
2002 MACDON 872 ADAPTER for CAT
Lexion
and
Claas,
$7900.
Call
306-693-9847, Moose Jaw, SK.
IH 4386/4586/4786 PUMPS in stock, built 1978 VERSATILE 835, 1000 PTO, 7300
here. We can increase pump flow for air hrs., clutch, rad, batteries replaced last
seeder use. Call with your part #. 500 hrs. 204-535-2253, Baldur, MB.
800-667-7712 Hydratec Hydraulics, Regina
CASE/IH STEIGER 9180, PTO, powershift,
w/wo 12’ Degelman dozer blade, exc.
maintenance, $60,000 w/blade, $53,000
without. Retired from farming.
Phone
306-962-3821, 306-463-7172, Eston, SK.
LIZARD CREEK REPAIR and Tractor. We
buy 90 and 94 Series Case, 2 WD, FWA
tractors for parts and rebuilding. Also have
rebuilt tractors and parts for sale.
306-784-7841, Herbert, SK.
2011 ROGATOR 1396, 120’, Sharp Shooter, 2 sets tires, Viper, dividers, Smartrax,
Stk #020465, $240,000. 1-888-576-5561
or www.redheadequipment.ca.
WRECKING FOR PARTS: Case 886, c/w
Overhauled engine, 18.4 Firestone radials
at 90%, 690 Leon loader, bucket, grapple
and joystick; JD 3010, excellent sheet
metal, 18.4x30 Goodyear rear- 90%, Call
1-877-564-8734, Roblin, MB.
2009 CASE/IH 4420, 100’, AIM, 1200
gal., Norac boom height, Stk #020576,
$199,500. 1-888-576-5561, Estevan, SK.
or view www.redheadequipment.ca
1997 ROGATOR 854, 800 gal., SS tank,
rinse tank, 90’ boom, Trimble EZ-Steer,
GPS, Raven monitor, 5 nozzle bodies,
Thompson ind. filter, 2 sets tires, $42,500.
306-843-7057, 306-658-4674, Wilkie, SK.
2001 CASE CX90, 2200 hrs., CAHR, 3 PTH,
595 Allied loader QA, bale fork, 540/1000
PTO, $45,000. 306-862-3136, Nipawin, SK
1998 CASE/IH SPX3185, 90’, 2 sets of
tires, Stk: 017817, $79,000. Saskatoon,
SK., 1-888-576-5561 or view website:
www.redheadequipment.ca
STEIGER TRACTOR PARTS. New and
used, from radiator to drawpin, 1969 to
1999. Give us a call 1-800-982-1769 or
www.bigtractorparts.com
1994 SPRA-COUPE 210, shedded, field
ready, $4500. Call 306-738-2173, Riceton,
SK.
Big Tractor Parts,
Inc.
Geared For
The Future
STEIGER TRACTOR SPECIALIST
RED OR GREEN
1. 10-25% savings on new replacement
parts for your Steiger drive train.
2. We rebuild axles, transmissions
and dropboxes with ONE YEAR
WARRANTY.
3. 50% savings on used parts.
1-800-982-1769
STEIGER PUMPS IN stock. Spline drive
and gear drive models built here and are in
www.bigtractorparts.com
stock. Call us with part #. Hydratec HyAIR SEEDER DRIVE systems available for
draulics, 1-800-667-7712, Regina, SK.
older tractors, lots of variations. Hydratec
Hydraulics, 1-800-667-7712, Regina, SK.
2015 CASE/IH 4440, 120’, luxury cab, active susp., 710 floaters and 380/90R46,
Stk #019629, $480,000. 1-888-576-5561,
Prince Albert. www.redheadequipment.ca
FOR SALE: ARMSTRONG 20.8X42 4WD
2004 CAT CHALLENGER 865, 500 HP, 36” tires, approx 60-70% tread life, asking
track, trimble AutoSteer, swinging draw $1,600 OBO. (204)461-0706
bar, deluxe cab, mint cond., $155,000.
306-861-7488, 306-842-5891 Weyburn SK
STEVE’S TRACTOR REBUILDER specializing in rebuilding JD tractors. Want Series
20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 7000s to rebuild or for
parts. pay top $$. Now selling JD parts.
204-466-2927, 204-871-5170, Austin, MB.
1985 JD 4850, FWA, 6080 hrs., 3 hyds.,
rebuilt AC, good condition, $36,000.
VALMAR AIR FLOW TANK 4400, for small 306-672-7616, Gull Lake, SK.
or large seeds or chemicals, shedded,
2004 JD 6715, with FEL, 3 PTH, 105 HP, 2009 HYUNDAI LOADER HL740XTD, S/N#
$3500 OBO. 204-736-2941, Sanford, MB.
4100 hrs., vg cond. Call 306-773-7122, LF0710299, mint condition, 13,540 hrs.,
$58,000. Call 204-981-3636, Cartier, MB.
Swift Current, SK.
2013 VERSATILE SX275, 120’, 1200 gal.,
14.9x46 duals, crop dividers, AutoBoom, DEGELMAN 7000 STRAWMASTER, new
AutoSteer, 860 hrs., 1 owner, shedded, vg, tines,
good
condition,
$19,000.
$179,000. Call Cam-Don Motors Ltd., 306-273-4705, Rhein, SK.
306-237-4212, Perdue, SK.
PILLAR MODEL 600 heavy harrow w/hyd.
2004 JD 4710, 100’ 800 gal. SS, down pressure, wheel and tine adjust.
380/90R46 and 520/85R38 tires, ITC JD Priced to move, financing and delivery
AutoSteer, mapping, boom control and available. Located in Saskatoon. Phone
AutoHeight, very good, $100,000 OBO. Flaman 1-888-435-2626.
306-227-5217, 306-644-2166 Loreburn SK
2001 DEGELMAN HEAVY harrow 70’, one
2012 JD 4940, 120’, 1200 gal., Boom Trac owner, low use, $26,000. 306-563-8482,
Pro 5, leveling, 1300 hrs., STK# 020967, Rama, SK.
$297,000. 1-888-576-5561, Swift Current,
SK. or view www.redheadequipment.ca
1982 4440, 8750 hrs., 726 FEL, grapple WANTED: DOZER BLADE to fit 8050 Allis
fork,
joystick,
Outback
AutoSteer, Chalmers tractor. 306-723-4317, Cupar,
540/1000 PTO, duals, $38,000 OBO. SK.
306-773-9058, Stewart Valley, SK.
WATROUS SALVAGE
2011 CASE/IH 4420, 120’, 2 sets of tires,
deluxe cab, Pro 600, 262 Receiver, 2500 SALFORD 41’ VERTICAL tillage unit, c/w
hrs,
Stk
#020293,
$240,000. MaxQuip NH3 pump, sectional control.
Great for fall straw management and ferti1-888-576-5561. redheadequipment.ca
lizer application. 306-620-2218, Ituna, SK.
PUMPS, PRESSURE WASHERS, Honda/Koshin pumps, 1-1/2” to 4”, Landa pressure
washers, steam washers, parts washers.
M&M Equip. Ltd. Parts & Service, Regina,
SK. 306-543-8377, fax 306-543-2111.
2003 SPRA-COUPE 4640 High Clearance
sprayer, 80’ boom, 600 hrs., $65,000. A.E. USED WISHEK: 14’, 16’, 30’; Rome 16’;
Chicoine Farm Equipment, 306-449-2255, Hesston #2410 50’ one-way; Kewanee
breaking disc, 14’ to 16’; DMI 5-7 shank
Storthoaks, SK.
rippers.
www.zettlerfarmequipment.com
1-866-938-8537, Portage la Prairie, MB.
2010 JD 4830, 100’, SS 1000 gal. tank, 2
sets tires, Stk #016381, $208,000.
1-888-492-8542,
Lloydminster,
SK. ROME DISC, Model TAH20-28, 10’, double
offset hyd. angle adjust and manual angle
www.redheadequipment.ca
hitch, $8500. 306-580-7602, Minnedosa.
1979 IH 1460 combine, field ready, $7000
OBO; 2 Sakundiak augers: 10” 1800, 60’
excellent shape; 8” 1400, 46’, w/25HP
Kohler eng. $5000 each; Versatile PT #10
swather w/extra parts, $600 OBO. Call or
text Les 403-548-5758, Golden Prairie, SK.
The Real Used FaRm PaRTs
sUPeRsToRe
Over 2700 Units for Salvage
• TRACTORS • COMBINES
• SWATHERS • DISCERS
Call Joe, leN oR daRWIN
(306) 946-2222
monday-Friday - 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
WaTRoUs, sK.
Fax: 306-946-2444
FYFE PARTS
1-800-667-9871 •• Regina
1-800-667-9871
Regina
1-800-667-3095 • Saskatoon
1-800-667-3095
Saskatoon
1-800-387-2768 •• Winnipeg
1-800-222-6594 •• Edmonton
1-800-667-3095
Manitoba
“For All Your Farm Parts”
www.fyfeparts.com
2012 MACDON FD70, 35’, new drapers
and sickle, JD adapter, low acres, ask
$48,900. Pea auger avail. Can deliver. Call
COMB-TRAC SALVAGE. We sell new and
204-324-4277, Altona, MB.
used parts for most makes of tractors,
combines, balers, mixmills and swathers.
Phone 306-997-2209, 1-877-318-2221,
Borden, SK. www.comb-tracsalvage.com
MF 5200 36’ HEADER, low acres, 676 hrs., We buy machinery.
vg cond., $19,900. Call 306-862-7524 or
306-862-7761, Nipawin, SK. agriquip.ca
G.S. TRACTOR SALVAGE, JD tractors
2000 36’ 1042 Case/IH w/Case adapter, only. Call 306-497-3535, Blaine Lake, SK.
$18,000. 2008 36’ SP36 HoneyBee, transport, pea auger, 7120 or 8120 Case adapt- TRIPLE B WRECKING, wrecking tractors,
er, $37,000. 2010 40’ D60 MacDon, trans- combines, cults., drills, swathers, mixmills.
port, $60,000. 2012 36’ D50 MacDon, etc. We buy equipment. 306-246-4260,
transport, $50,000. 2010 40’ Case/IH, 306-441-0655, Richard, SK.
transport, pea auger, $60,000. Call A.E.
Chicoine Farm Equipment, 306-449-2255, LOEFFELHOLZ TRACTOR AND COMBINE
Storthoaks, SK.
Salvage, Cudworth, SK., 306-256-7107.
1999 JD 893 CORN HEADER, 8x30”, We sell new, used and remanufactured
HHC, gathering chains, stripper plates and parts for most farm tractors and combines.
cob saver all in vg condition, single pt.
hookup, field ready, Asking $16,500. Call GOODS USED TRACTOR parts (always
buying tractors). David or Curtis, Roblin,
Jim 204-745-8007, Elm Creek, MB.
MB., 204-564-2528, 1-877-564-8734.
1998 HONEYBEE SP36, 36’, PU reel, AFX
adapter, cross auger, Stk #021539, WRECKING COMBINES: IHC 1482, 1460,
$12,250. 1-888-576-5561, Swift Current, 915, 914, 815, 715; JD 7721, 7701, 7700,
SK. www.redheadequipment.ca
6601, 6600, 105; MF 860, 850, 851, 760,
JD 9030F FLEX header, SN#666194, full 751, 750, 510, S92; NH TR70, 95; White
length composite auger fingers, 1000 8900, 8800, 8700, 8650, 8600; CFE 5542;
shaft, single point hookup, PU reel, good Gleaner C, F, L, M; CCIL 9600, 951; Vers.
plastics, sensors, $8500; JD 9030F flex 2000. Call 306-876-4607, Goodeve, SK.
header, SN#672291, PU reel, chain couplers, good plastics, $6500; 1998 MacDon SMITH’S TRACTOR WRECKING. Huge
972, 30’, PU reel, adapter to fit new style inventory new and used tractor parts.
JD, single point hookup, $10,000. Call 1-888-676-4847.
204-636-2448, Erickson, MB.
1998 MACDON 960, 36’ draper, fact. trans. PARTING OUT: Combines: JD 7700 dsl.
to fit JD 9600, 9610, 9650, vg cond., hydro; Gleaner L; MF 760. Swathers: Versatile 400; IHC 4000. Tractors: AC 7060;
$11,500. Call 306-861-4592, Fillmore, SK.
White 2-155 and 2-150; Deutz DX90
2004 JOHN DEERE 635 flex header, good w/707 Leon loader; IHC 650 dsl.; Farmall
condition, $18,900. Call 306-948-7223, 300, H, MD; Cockshutt 550, 560, 770 and
Biggar, SK.
40; Case 900, 800 and 930. Also: cultiva2015 MACDON FD75, 45’, cross auger, tors, deep tillers, seed drills, tires, hyd.
transport, AFX adapter, Stk #019163, parts and some older semi-trucks. Austin,
$105,900. 1-888-576-5561, Swift Current, MB. Call 204-871-2708 or 204-685-2124.
SK. or view www.redheadequipment.ca
AGRA PARTS PLUS, parting older trac2004 MACDON 962, 36’ draper, factory tors, tillage, seeding, haying, along w/othtrans., gage wheels to fit CAT 400, exc. er Ag equipment. 3 miles NW of Battlecond, $17,500. 306-861-4592, Fillmore, SK
ford, SK. off #16 Hwy. Ph: 306-445-6769.
WHITE MF 9230, 30’ straight cut header, RICHARDTON 1200, 700, 750 hydumps;
fits White 9700, 9720 and MF 8570, 8590, JD 3970 Harvester, corn and hay head.
$5500 OBO. 204-794-5979, Springfield MB
1-866-938-8537 Portage La Prairie, MB.
VERS. #20 PTO SWATHER 20’, good
cond, $500 OBO. JD drill 24 run on rubber
$300 OBO. 204-827-2162, Glenboro, MB.
JOHN DEERE 8440 4 WD tractor, very
good condition, only 5300 hours, PTO,
shedded, Greenlighted in 2015, 6 tires at
75%, 2 new tires, $25,000. Call for more
information 306-333-4912, Abernethy, SK.
2007 JD 9400, 24 spd., new triples, 6900
HORSCH JOKER DISCER PT400, large floa- hrs., Greenlighted, $105,000 OBO. Call Ed
tation tires, done very little acres, exc. for details 204-299-6465, Starbuck, MB.
TRIDEKON CROP SAVER, crop dividers. cond., $97,000. 204-573-6354 Brandon MB
Reduce trampling losses by 80% to 90%.
1995 JD 7410, mint cond., MFWD, new
Call: Great West Agro, 306-398-8000.
2014 NORWOOD 25’ high speed disc. front rubber, SN RW7410H012568, quad,
Breakdown soil quickly and efficiently. 30 front fenders, heavy front axle, never had
BANDIT 3210 LIQUID fertilizer system! acre/hr., 19” blades. Located in Southey, a loader (used for sprayer), no LHR,
$55,000. 204-427-3311, Woodmore, MB.
Introducing the all new and fully engi- SK, Flaman 1-888-435-2626.
neered TBH caddy. Call 1-855-765-9937 or
2008 JD 9430T, 6500 hrs., exc. cond.,
visit: www.polywest.ca
2013 WISHEK 842N 18’, 30” blades, hyd. $177,500. May consider 35’ air drill or
hitch, new condition, $39,500 OBO. 1680 Case combine on trade. Briercrest,
FLOATER TIRES: Factory rims and tires: 306-699-2442, McLean, SK.
SK. 306-799-4201, 306-631-8589.
JD 4930/4940, R4045; 800/55R46 Goodyear tire and rim; 710/60R46 Goodyear 2008 ST830 47’ chisel plow, 5 plex, 650 lb. 2001 7810 FWA, 20 spd. AutoQuad trans.,
LSW; Case 650/65R38 Michelins, $13,500. trip, 8” knock-on shovels, anhydrous Raven LHR, 3 PTH, HD front susp., 741 self-level
Duals
available
for
combines. rate control, factory hitch, hyd. winch, loader w/grapple, 7300 hrs., recent OH on
306-697-2856, Grenfell, SK.
9/16” heavy harrows, $75,000 OBO. Call trans, $85,000. 306-883-9230, Leoville, SK
204-733-2446, Ochre River, MB.
JD 8970, new tires; JD 4440, rebuilt enSPRAYER TIRES: 3 good used 320/90R46
gine; JD 4450, FWD, 3 PTH, new engine;
306-268-7550, 306-268-7400, Bengough,
JD 4255, FWD. 204-871-5170, Austin, MB.
SK.
2001 JD 8210, 3850 hrs., AutoTrac ready;
FITTINGS AND VALVES for your liquid
2001 7710, 4200 hrs., 3 PTH. Both have
handling needs, all offering the ultimate in
540/1000 PT0. 204-522-6333, Melita, MB.
sealing power and corrosion resistance.
JD 3038E COMPACT utility tractor w/JD
Call 1-855-765-9937 or www.polywest.ca
1986 DX710, 5800 hrs., AC, 540/1000 loader 305 and bale spear, $22,500.
PTO, 50% rubber, shedded, good cond. 306-325-1212, Preeceville, SK.
306-642-3454 evenings, Assiniboia, SK.
JD 4440, factory duals, dual PTO, very
Call
1976 ALLIS CHALMERS 200, 2660 hrs, exc. clean, 6782 hrs., $23,500.
cond., 3 PTH, 9’ Leon blade, 100% ready to 204-746-2016, 204-746-5345, Morris, MB.
work, $9000. 306-380-4565, Aberdeen, SK
JD 2950 2WD W/LOADER & cab, 3 PTH,
very good 18.4x38 tires, 7200 hrs, 85 HP,
2012 MORRIS CONTOUR II 61’ air drill,
c/w quick detach bucket & bale fork, trac12” spacing, w/8650 XL air cart w/duals,
tor runs & looks excellent, asking $26,500
var. rate, Eston special fertilizer Broadcast
kit, Bourgault tillage tool, 3/4” Eagle Beak 1984 IHC 5088, 130 HP, 8920 hrs., triple OBO. 204-825-8340 or 204-825-2799.
knives. Best offer. Ph Gerald 306-379-4530 hyds., dual PTO, 20.8.x38 radials, blade is
or Nathan 306-831-9246, Fiske, SK.
extra, $18,000. 204-525-4521, Minitonas,
MB. www.waltersequipment.com
MF 55 DIESEL tractor, good running order,
ONLINE ONLY UNRESERVED AUCTION,
Aug. 17-24, 2016. Call 306-865-7660, CIH 1460 SP combine, always shedded, good rubber, $1350 OBO. 306-395-2668 or
www.championassets.ca Bourgault 30’ field ready, great shape, approx. 2200 hrs. 306-681-7610, Chaplin, SK.
Call 204-878-3358, Isle des Chenes, MB.
cultivator, 8” spacings.
MASSEY 4000/4840/4880/4900 hydraulic
pumps built here and in stock. Suitable to
run air seeder systems. Big savings, superior product. Hydratec Hydraulics,
1-800-667-7712, Regina, SK.
725 – CaseIH Pulltype swather – good shape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,000
MP-912 Morris Chisel Plow – 25 ft . circa 1990; good maintenance program;
Excellent shape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500
Bourgault coil packer 25ft . Excellent shape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,000
9282 New Holland tractor 1998; Major preventative maintenance
program; excellent, 5100 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60,000
1972 GMC ¾ ton truck; frame up restoration; $50,000 spent; excellent . . . $25,000
10-84 Elias reliabelt conveyor; 2014; 37 hp; self mover; near new . . . . . . . . $35,000
1500 VP Kamas Westrup air/screen machine $10000;
100 extra screens $100 each . Buy everything . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,000
8 BELT VICTORY PU with hydraulic drive
motor, good shape. Call 306-944-4325, 2004 IHC 7400, new 20’ B&H with silage
306-231-8355, Bruno, SK.
gate, rebuilt motor, $69,900. Call K&L
Equipment, 306-795-7779, Ituna, SK.
[email protected] DL #910885.
1995 JD 6400, 2 WD, 620 loader, 11,100
hrs, good tires, powerquad, 1 owner, very 8640 JD TRACTOR; 2000 Series Bourgault
well serviced, 2 buckets, bale spike, 3 PTH, air seeder Model 2155 w/Valmar.
asking $27,500. 306-948-2963, Biggar, SK.
306-868-4615, Truax, SK.
1981 JD 8640, 4WD, 8300 hours, good FERGUSON TEA (8N look alike) 3 PTH,
condition, $19,500. Call 306-739-2442, $550; Early 1940’s AC WC?, $600; 1968
Moosomin, SK.
Impala Super Sport convertible, fully loaded very nice, $22,500; Crop Saver, used 1
day, $500; Anhydrous kit for deep tiller,
hoses, gauges, hyd. lines, and hitch, $750.
204-641-3615, 204-378-2974, Arborg, MB.
3 - #3 Indent uniflo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500 each or $9,800 for all
6 pairs of spiral separator with stands and hopper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,000
Fire Truck, 1977, 84 ft scissor lift, 320 hrs, 19,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $48,000
Call Warren or Simon at
1-800-463-9209
Ellis Seeds Wawanesa MB
ODESSA ROCKPICKER SALES: New Degelman equipment, land rollers, Strawmaster, rockpickers, protill, dozer blades.
306-957-4403, 306-536-5097, Odessa, SK.
TANDEM & TRIPLE AXLE container
chassis, 20’, 40’ to 53’ frames. Can be
made into good hay or water trailers. Call
Roy: 204-385-2685, Gladstone, MB.
GRAIN SCREENERS: HICAP 44, $3000;
Neco 52, $5000; Sukup 50-in, $4000;
Hutchinson 1600 w/tailings auger, $3500;
Kwik Kleen 5&7 tube cleaners, $5000 up;
Screens $150; New 10-ft Landlevellers,
$2450; 12-ft, $2650; Scrapers Ashland
4.5-yd, $4500; Ashland 6-yd, $5000; Eversman 6-yd, $5500; John Deere 6.5-yd,
$6500; Soilmover 740, $7000; Midland
8-yd, $8000; V Drainage plow, $2000.
204-857-8403.
FARM EQUIPMENT: 1996 JD 6620 SP
combine, 472 hrs.; 1996 JD 224 straight
cut header, 24’; 1995 Case 4490 tractor,
1772 hrs; 1977 Allis Chalmers A-C 7040
3500 model, PS, 6800 hrs.; 1994 Agco
4865 New Idea round baler; 1995 Brandt
50’ grain auger, hyd. swing hopper; 1995
Rite-Way 6000 tine harrow packer, 50’;
1981 CI 1001 diskers, 28’; 1985 CI 279
cultivator, 40’. 306-460-7188, Alsask, SK.
BERGEN INDUSTRIES FULL carry swather
mover, $6500 OBO. Wanted: Approx. 40’
Deep tillage and tandem grain truck. Both
in good cond. 204-937-2896, Roblin, MB.
GOOD USED 8’ FARMHAND steel hay
sweep teeth, $25 each; Used underframe
truck hoists, $350; Farmhand F-21 loader,
w/dozer blade and manure fork, $950.
204-385-2685, Gladstone, MB.
FLAX STRAW BUNCHER and land levelers.
Building now, taking orders. Don’t delay,
call now! 306-957-4279, Odessa, SK.
2006 NH TM140 tractor w/loader, 3338
hrs., $55,000; 2005 Case MXU125 tractor,
6100 hrs., $52,500; 2010 Highline RCH 15’
mower, $15,000. For viewing or more info
contact RM of Glen Bain No. 105, Glen
Bain, SK. S0N 0X0. Phone 306-264-3607.
ESTATE SALE: NH 7090 round baler, like
new; Snocrete 848a 8’ tractor mounted 3
PTH snowblower; 1975 Int. 1466, duals,
new sleeves and pistons; 1977 Ford F600 3
ton truck, 40,000 miles; 1975 Massey 760
65 MF DIESEL, good paint, good tires all V8 hydro combine; Walinga 6614 agra vac,
around, FEL, front mount hyd. pump, 3 used 3 times. 403-304-9217, Hoosier, SK.
PTH. Call eves. 306-239-2072, Osler, SK.
CHECK OUT OUR inventory of quality used
VARIOUS SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS for highway tractors. For more details call
800/900 series Versatile tractors. Can 204-685-2222 or view information at
easily be converted to pull air seeders. Hy- www.titantrucksales.com
dratec Hydraulics, 800-667-7712, Regina.
THE HANDLER IS available in 5 sizes and
proven on tens of thousands of farms from
across the world. Call 1-855-765-9937 or
1998 FORD/VERSATILE 9882, 5300 hrs., visit: www.polywest.ca
710/38 duals, trimble AutoSteer, excellent
condition, $90,000 OBO. 204-523-7469, 50,000 FARMERS CAN’T be wrong! When
you purchase a Norwesco tank, you’re not
204-534-8115, Killarney, MB.
just
purchasing
a
tank.
Call
1-855-765-9937 or visit: www.polywest.ca
2013 VERSATILE 450, PS, PTO, 800 duals,
deluxe cab, 675 hours, vg, shedded,
$279,000. Call Cam-Don Motors Ltd.,
306-237-4212, Perdue, SK.
1972 GMC 2 ton grain truck, tilt cab, B&H,
roll tarp; Flexi-Coil PBH swath roller; 50’
Flexi-Coil harrow packers; CIH 25’ heavy
tandem disc; Morris 36’ cult.; Morris 36’
rodweeder. 306-227-0075, Alvena, SK.
25
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
WANTED: USED, BURNT, old or ugly tractors. Newer models too! Smith’s Tractor
Wrecking, 1-888-676-4847.
WANTED: JD 1830, 1010, 2010; or MF 65,
88; or IHC 654 in good cond. Must of live
PTO and powersteering. 306-734-2970,
306-734-7335, Chamberlain, SK.
The Icynene
Insulation System®
• Sprayed foam insulation
• Ideal for shops, barns
or homes
• Healthier, Quieter, More
Energy Efficient®
GRUNTHAL, MB. AGENT FOR T.E.A.M. MARKETING
REGULAR CATTLE SALES
TUESDAY at 9:30 am - Aug 23rd & 30th
WANTED shop manual for white tractor
model 6085. 204-659-5842
www.penta.ca
1-800-587-4711
MF #36 DISCERS. Will pay top dollar
and pick from anywhere. Phone Mike
306-723-4875, Cupar, SK.
NEW STEEL PIPE for sale. Great for
fence posts, cheaper than wood. 76,000 ft.
2.375” O.D.x.125/.154 Wall at $.90/ft.
107,000 ft., 3.500” O.D.x.125/.156/.188
Wall at $1.00/ft.; 86,000 ft., 4.500”
MULCHING- TREES, BRUSH, Stumps. O.D.x.125/.156/.188 Wall at $1.10/ft.;
Call today 306-933-2950. Visit us at: 28,000 ft. 6” O.D.x.125 Wall YJ at $.95/ft.
www.maverickconstruction.ca
Please call 306-955-3091 for more info.
SOLIDLOCK AND TREE ISLAND game wire
and all accessories for installation. Heights
from 26” to 120”. Ideal for elk, deer, bison,
sheep, swine, cattle, etc. Tom Jensen
ph/fax: 306-426-2305, Smeaton, SK.
Hwy #205, Grunthal • (204) 434-6519
2-7/8” OILFIELD TUBING, $40 each, truckload quantities only. Call 306-861-1280,
Weyburn, SK.
Mon., August 29th at 12:00 Noon
Sheep and Goat with
Small Animals & Holstein Calves
For on farm appraisal of livestock or for marketing
information please call Brad Kehler (Manager)
Cell 204-346-2440
Auction Mart (204) 434-6519
MB. Livestock Dealer #1111
WWW.GRUNTHALLIVESTOCK.COM
5- TWO YEAR old purebred Black Angus
bulls. Pedigrees from Merit Cattle Co.
herd. Semen tested, excellent feet, injected with Foot Rot vaccine, quiet, ready to
work. Call Steven at 306-360-7894, Herb
306-360-7465, Drake, SK.
FREE STANDING CORRAL PANELS:
Feeders & Alley ways, 30-ft or order to
size. Oil Field Pipe: 1.3, 1.6, 1.9, 1 7/8, 2in, 2 3/8, 2 7/8, 3 1/2. Sucker Rod: 3/4,
7/8, 1-in. Casing Pipes: 4-9inch. Sold by
the piece or semi load lots. For special
pricing call Art 204-685-2628 or cell
PUREBRED BLACK ANGUS long yearling
204-856-3440.
CUSTOM FENCING AND corral building, no
bulls, replacement heifers, AI service.
job too big or too small. Call
Meadow Ridge Enterprises, 306-373-9140
306-699-7450, Qu’Appelle, SK.
or 306-270-6628, Saskatoon, SK.
GUARANTEED PRESSURE TREATED fence
posts, lumber slabs and rails. Call Lehner
Wood Preservers Ltd., ask for Ron
306-763-4232, Prince Albert, SK.
FENCE REMOVAL. Wire rolled, posts 549 IHC, nat. gas, w/pump, $2500; 549
piled. Call 306-783-5639, 306-641-4255, IHC, nat. gas, motor only, $1000; Factory
new 8.3 Cummins, nat. gas, complete in
Ebenezer, SK.
skid, unit, $58,000. Can-Am Truck Export
Ltd, 1-800-938-3323, Delisle, SK.
We know that farming is enough of a gamble
so if you want to sell it fast place your ad in
the Manitoba Co-operator classifieds. It’s a BLUE WATER IRRIGATION DEV. LTD.
Sure Thing. Call our toll-free number today. Reinke pivots, lateral, minigators, pump
We have friendly staff ready to help. 1-800- and used mainline, new Bauer travelers
dealer. 22 yrs. experience. 306-858-7351,
782-0794
Lucky Lake, SK. www.philsirrigation.ca
BLOCKED SEASONED JACK Pine firewood
and wood chips for sale. Lehner Wood Preservers Ltd., 306-763-4232, Prince Albert,
SK. Will deliver. Self-unloading trailer.
IRRIGATION SYSTEM w/Gould 3HP 240V
submersible pump, control box, wiring,
sprinklers and drip irrigation pipes, $2000;
Utility Trailer: 5’x8’, steel frame, plastic liner w/truck cap topper, needs new base,
$800. 306-468-2831, Mount Nebo, SK.
BIRCH, POPLAR and SPRUCE firewood, cut It doesn’t get any better than this. Prepay
and split or 16’ logs. Self unloading truck, your ad for 3 weeks and get 2 weeks free!
can deliver. 306-577-5377, Kennedy, SK.
Call today! 1-800-782-0794.
BEV’S FISH & SEAFOOD LTD., buy di- NEW TORO ZERO-TURN mowers, 42”,
rect, fresh fish: Pickerel, Northern Pike, $2850; 50”, $3500; 54”, $4100. Pro Ag
Whitefish and Lake Trout. Seafood also Sales, 306-441-2030, North Battleford, SK.
available. Phone toll free 1-877-434-7477,
306-763-8277, Prince Albert, SK.
Closed
August 14-20
HERD DISPERSAL: 80 Black Angus cross
pairs and 80 mixed pairs, all exposed to
Registered Angus bulls. Full herd health
program. $2800 per pair firm. Pasture
available. 306-335-7875, Lemberg, SK.
SELLING: BLACK ANGUS BULLS. Wayside
Angus, Henry and Bernie Jungwirth, 30th ANNUAL ROCKING W HORSE Sale,
Tack Sale, Friday, Sept. 2nd, Horse Sale
306-256-3607, Cudworth, SK.
Sat., Sept. 3rd Keystone Centre, Brandon,
HAMCO CATTLE CO. HAS for sale Reg MB. 204-325-7237. www.rockingw.com
Red & Black Angus yearling bulls & 2-yr
olds. Good selection. Semen tested, per- MBPHB LOUD AND PROUD Foal and
formance data & EPD’s available. Top ge- Horse Sale, Sept. 17, 1:00 DST, at Spot A
netics, Free Delivery. Contact Glen, Albert, Quarter Arena, Pierson, MB. 204-634-2375
Larissa Hamilton 204-827-2358 or David for info. www.mbpainthorsebreeders.com
Hamilton 204-325-3635.
Don’t miss it.
Sign up for daily enews at
manitobacooperator.ca
ONLINE ONLY UNRESERVED AUCTION,
Aug. 17-24, 2016. Call 306-865-7660,
www.championassets.ca
Timberjack
480C skidder, DFG 7054 orig. hrs.
ONLINE ONLY UNRESERVED AUCTION,
Aug. 17-24, 2016. Call 306-865-7660,
www.championassets.ca
2000
JD
230LC Delimber, w/Denharco 4100.
ONLINE ONLY UNRESERVED AUCTION,
Aug. 17-24, 2016. Call 306-865-7660,
www.championassets.ca
2003
CAT
320 C LL Delimber, w/4400 Denharco.
WANTED:
LOG
DEBARKER.
204-848-2254, Onanole, MB.
Call
DIESEL GENSET SALES AND SERVICE,
12 to 300 KWs, lots of units in stock. Used
and new: Perkins, John Deere and Deutz.
We also build custom Gensets. We currently have special pricing on new John
Deere units. Call for pricing 204-792-7471.
NEW AND USED generators, all sizes from
5 kw to 3000 kw, gas, LPG or diesel. Phone
for availability and prices. Many used in
stock. 204-643-5441, Fraserwood, MB.
Email: [email protected]
125 KW DIESEL genset, in enclosed building, very low hours, new condition. Call
306-237-4406, Perdue, SK.
SPECIAL SHEEP LAMB
GOAT SALE
Wed., Sept. 7, 2016 @ 1:00
Receiving Tuesday 8:00 - 8:00
and up to sale time.
• Demand will be strong with
local and Eastern orders for
religious sacrifice holiday
• We have 6 to 7 regular
buyers and 10 to 15
local buyers
• Last years sale saw a
20 to 30 cent premium
•If you are on the west side
of Manitoba give us a call
for freight assistance
“Where Buyers & Sellers Meet”
To Consign or for more
information call: 204-694-8328
or call Mike at 204-807-0747
www.winnipeglivestocksales.com
Licence #1122
We BUY used oil & filters
PUREBRED NUBIAN GOATS, dry does,
doelings, bucks, bucklings, no CAE/CL.
306-231-4036, Humboldt, SK.
FREESTANDING PANELS: 30’ windbreak
panels; 6-bar 24’ and 30’ panels; 10’, 20’
and 30’ feed troughs; Bale shredder bunks;
Silage bunks; Feeder panels; HD bale feeders; All metal 16’ and 24’ calf shelters. Will
custom build. 306-424-2094, Kendal, SK.
SVEN ROLLER MILLS. Built for over 40
years. PTO/elec. drive, 40 to 1000 bu./hr.
Example: 300 bu./hr. unit costs $1/hr. to
run. Rolls peas and all grains. We regroove
and repair all makes of mills. Call Apollo
Machine 306-242-9884, 1-877-255-0187.
www.apollomachineandproducts.com
STEEL VIEW MFG. Self-standing panels,
windbreaks, silage/hay bunks, feeder panels, sucker rod fence posts. Custom orders. Call Shane 306-493-2300, Delisle,
SK. www.steelviewmfg.com
GREG’S WELDING: Freestanding 30’ 5 bar
panels, all 2-7/8” drill stem construction,
$470; 24’x5.5’ panels, 2-7/8” pipe with 51” sucker rods, $350; 24’x6’ panels, 2-7/8”
pipe with 6- 1” rods, $375; 30’ 2 or 3 bar
windbreak panels c/w lumber. Gates and
double hinges avail. on all panels. Belting
troughs for grain or silage. Calf shelters.
Del. avail. 306-768-8555, Carrot River, SK.
PUREBRED REGISTERED CHAROLAIS
POLLED bulls, 1) 2-yr old & 1 yearling, semen tested, guaranteed. 204-748-1024,
Virden. Keith Hagan, K.E.H. Charolais.
12V. or Hydraulic
Electronic Scale Opt.
INTERESTED IN GETTING SOME shorthorn influence into your breeding program? Contact us at www.manitobashorthorns.com or call the field rep Tom Walls
204-895-8191.
Specialized waste removal
Winter & Summer
windshield washer fluid
Peak Performance anti-freeze
( available in bulk or drums )
The only company that collects,
recycles and re-uses in Manitoba!
888-368-9378 ~ www.envirowestinc.com
BEST COOKING PULSES accepting samples
of organic and conventional pulses for
2014/2015 crop year. Matt 306-586-7111,
Rowatt, SK.
WANTED: ORGANIC LENTILS, peas and
chickpeas. Stonehenge Organics, Assiniboia, SK., 306-640-8600, 306-640-8437.
Call
DMI
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Read stories. Find
insight.
SHIPS! Life is meant to be shared. We are
here to help you. Candlelight matchmakers. Confidential, Rural, Photos/Profiles to
selected matches, Local, Affordable, Serving MB, SK, NW-ON. Write/Call: Box 212,
Roland, MB. R0G 1T0, 204-343-2475, or
[email protected]
MANITOBA MAN LOOKING for companion
to go for coffee and dances. 67-71 yrs. old.
Box 5586, c/o The Western Producer, Box
2500, Saskatoon, SK., S7K 2C4.
1 877 695 2532
www.ezefeeder.ca
KELLN SOLAR SUMMER/WINTER WATERING System, provides water in remote
areas, improves water quality, increases
pasture productivity, extends dugout life.
St. Claude/Portage, 204-379-2763.
YEARLING AND 2 year old polled Hereford
bulls. avail. Excellent selection, properly
developed, fully guaranteed. Deposit holds NOW PURCHASING AT Roy Leitch Livetil needed. Will deliver. Brian Longworth, stock Co. Ltd. Fat lambs, feeder lambs, cull
ewes and goats. Brandon, MB. Phone:
306-656-4542, 306-831-9856, Harris, SK.
204-727-5021, 204-729-7791.
TRIPLE R LIMOUSIN HAS Bulls for sale.
2-yr olds & yearlings. Red, Black & Yellow.
Polled & performance, or calving ease
ones. Limousin, Limousin X Angus, Limousin X Charolais. All bulls guaranteed & can
deliver. Volume discount. 204-685-2628 or
Cell: 204-856-3440.
Glycol recovery services
LEON 755 MANURE SPREADER, brand new MOST NATURAL LIVESTOCK for sale or
calf
crop
share.
Phone/fax
beater assembly, $39,000 OBO. Phone on
250-630-2524, Fort St. John, BC.
306-739-2748, Wawota, SK.
QUIET POLLED YEARLING CHAROLAIS
bulls. Will semen test and deliver. Call Bar
H Charolais, Kevin Haylock, 306-697-2901 QUALITY HAMPSHIRE and DORSET ewe
or 306-697-8771, Grenfell, SK.
ram lambs and yearlings from proven flock NH 358 MIX MILL, power bale feeder,
Heeroma’s 306-823-4526, Neilburg, SK.
good working cond, $5000 OBO. Rosthern,
SK., call 306-232-5688 or 306-232-3442.
FRESH AND SPRINGING heifers for sale.
Cows and quota needed. We buy all classes of slaughter cattle-beef and dairy. R&F
Livestock Inc. Bryce Fisher, Warman, SK.
Phone 306-239-2298, cell 306-221-2620.
Collection of plastic oil jugs
FFS- FUCHS FARM SUPPLY is your partner
in agriculture stocking mixer, cutter, ORGANIC FEED GRAIN.
feed wagons and bale shredders and in- 306-515-3500, Regina, SK.
dustry leading Rol-Oyl cattle oilers.
306-762-2125, Vibank, SK. www.fuchs.ca
BLACK ANGUS BULLS, two year olds, seFREESTANDING CORRAL PANELS for
men tested, guaranteed breeders. Delivery
available. 306-287-3900, 306-287-8006, QUALITY PONIES, harness and saddle cattle, horses, bison and sheep. 21’x5-bar,
trained. Bamford Pony Farm, La Riviere, $219; 21’x6-bar, $239; 21’ horse panel,
Englefeld, SK. www.skinnerfarms.ca
$179; 21’x7-bar bison, $299; 24’x5-bar HD
MB, 204-242-2369.
continuous panels, $189; Feedlot continuous bunk feeders “you will love them”; 30’
windbreak frames; Framed gates; FS panels w/gates; 20’ barrel feed trough, $295;
RED ANGUS BULLS, two year olds, se21’ belted feed trough, $395; 20’ bunk
men tested, guaranteed breeders. Delivery
feeder panels, $399; 50’ round pen kits
available. 306-287-3900, 306-287-8006,
from $1385; 10’ panels, $79; 10’ bull panEnglefeld, SK. www.skinnerfarms.ca
el, $129; Horse haysavers, $489; Round
bale feeders. For sheep: 4’ and 7’ panels;
2 YEAR OLD RED PB bulls, semen test21’ freestanding panels; Feed troughs;
ed, $2500 each. Phone 204-371-6404, St.
Rnd. bale feeders; Small hay feeders; Lots
Anne, MB.
of gates. 1-844-500-5341. For pics/info
www.affordablelivestockequipment.com
SOUTH VIEW RANCH has Red and Black
Will accept custom orders. Reasonable
Angus Bulls-yearling and 2 yr. old. Semen
trucking rates available for delivery.
tested, performance records. Ceylon, SK.
Shane 306-869-8074, Keith 306-454-2730.
ONE SEATER BUGGY completely restored LOWEN 530 CU. FT. mix wagon, c/w scale,
HIGH QUALITY YEARLING bulls from AI w/poles and shafts, $3500. Call Buddy good shape, heavy duty 4 augers, low use.
Call 306-295-7800, Eastend, SK.
program. Performance tested and carefully Bergner at 204-768-0018, Ashern, MB.
developed. Semen tested and delivery
available. Call KC Cattle Co. 306-290-8431,
CATTLE SHELTER PACKAGES or built on
Saskatoon, SK. www.kccattleco.com
site.
For
early
booking
call
1-800-667-4990 or visit our website:
www.warmanhomecentre.com
WANTED: ALL KINDS of bison from yearlings to old bulls. Also cow/calf pairs. Ph 2 AND 3 yr. olds and yearling bulls. Silver
Kevin at 306-429-2029, Glenavon, SK.
Bullet and Specialist breeding. Marten’s
Charolais, 204-534-8370, Boissevain, MB.
QUILL CREEK BISON is looking for finished, and all other types of bison. COD, POLLED PUREBRED COMING 2 year old
paying market prices. “Producers working Charolais bulls, Red Factor and white. Easy
with Producers.” Delivery points in SK. and calving. Call Kings Polled Charolais, STAGECOACH, $15,000. For more info. call
MB. Call 306-231-9110, Quill Lake, SK.
306-435-7116, Rocanville, SK.
Buddy Bergner 204-768-0018, Ashern, MB.
HARMONY NATURAL BISON buys all
types of bison. Up to $4.75/lb USD HHW
ONLINE ONLY UNRESERVED AUCTION, on finished. Up to $4.50/lb CDN live
Aug. 17-24, 2016. Call 306-865-7660, weight on feeder bison. Call or text
www.championassets.ca
2015
JD 306-736-3454, Windthorst, SK.
2154D w/Waratah HTH 622B, 3351
hrs., prem. cond., trans. warranty.
WANT TO PURCHASE cull bison bulls and
cows, $4.00 to $4.50/lb. HHW. Finished
Farming is enough of a gamble, advertise in beef steers and heifers for slaughter. We
the Manitoba Co-operator classified section. are also buying compromised cattle that
can’t make a long trip. Oak Ridge Meats,
It’s a sure thing. 1-800-782-0794.
McCreary, 204-835-2365, 204-476-0147.
WANTED: ELK HUNT bull, scoring over 500
plus. Also want large mule deer and large
white-tailed deer.
Keith 306-468-2925,
306-961-1150, Debden, SK
Proud Supporter of Manitoba Businesses & Municipalities
WANTED: Older and newer tractors, in
running condition or for parts. Goods Used
Tractor Parts, 1-877-564-8734.
DO YOU KNOW an amazing single guy
who shouldn’t be? Camelot Introductions has been successfully matching people for over 22 years. In-person interviews
by Intuitive Matchmaker in MB and SK.
www.camelotintroductions.com or phone
204-888-1529.
ALTERNATIVE POWER BY SUNDOG
SOLAR, portable/remote solar water
pumping for winter/summer. Call for pricing on solar systems, wind generators,
aeration. Service and repair on all
makes/models.
Carl
Driedger,
204-556-2346 or 204-851-0145, Virden.
SASK. SHEEP DEV. BOARD sole distributor of sheep ID tags in Sask., offers
programs, marketing services and sheep/
goat supplies. 306-933-5200, Saskatoon,
SK. www.sksheep.com
WANTED:
BUTCHER
HOGS
SOWSANDBOARS
FOREXPORT
P. QUINTAINE & SON LTD.
728-7549
Licence No. 1123
BLACK YEARLING SIMMENTAL bulls,
semen tested, ready to go. Phone Bill or
Farming is enough of a gamble, advertise in
Virginia Peters, 306-237-9506, Perdue, SK.
the Manitoba Co-operator classified section.
It’s a sure thing. 1-800-782-0794.
BLACK ANGUS AND HEREFORD BULL
and a few cows. 855 and 851 NH baler.
Two 250 3 wheelers. 204-425-3016, MB.
40 RED AND 80 Black big 1350 lbs. heifers
with calves for sale. Call 306-773-1049 or
306-741-6513, Swift Current, SK.
PUREBRED AND CROSSBRED Bird and
Small Animal Auction, Sunday, Sept. 18,
30 ANGUS BRED COWS, fall calving, 2nd & 11:00 AM, at the Weyburn Ag Society
3rd calvers, vaccinated w/Bovi-shield Gold Building, Exhibition Grounds, Weyburn, SK.
FP5, Ivomec. 204-851-0745, Elkhorn, MB.
To consign call Charlotte 306-861-6305.
PLASTIC STACKABLE PALLETS: Heavy
duty 3000 lb. weight, 48x40”, $8/each;
STEEL PALLETS: 40.5x40.5”, 44x44”,
$20/each. Call 204-822-3445 or call or
text 204-823-1220, Morden, MB.
NOTRE
DAME
USED
OIL &
FILTER
DEPOT
• Buy Used Oil
• Buy Batteries
• Collect Used
Filters
• Collect Oil
Containers
• Antifreeze
Southern,
Eastern and
Western
Tel: 204-248-2110 Manitoba
WANTED: REG. GERMAN Shepherd female
pup. Richard 306-287-3941, Watson, SK.
BONAFIDE REG. AUSTRALIAN Kelpie pups,
parents make a living on cow/calf operation at community pasture. Also started
working Kelpies. Call Watkinson Working
Kelpies, 306-692-2573, Moose Jaw, SK.
BLUE HEELER BORDER COLLIE cross
pups from good working parents, ready to
go, $150. 204-585-2106, Sandy Lake, MB.
IRISH WOLFHOUND and
GREYHOUND
pups for sale,
ready to go. Call
306-290-8806, Dundurn, SK.
DIGITAL AGRICULTURE PUMPS and meters! Dura Products offer best in class solutions for consumers wishing to transfer
liquid. 1-855-765-9937, www.polywest.ca
OUR CODE BLUE pump metering service is
designed to ensure proper maintenance of
your pumps! Call 1-855-765-9937 or view:
www.polywest.ca
26
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
Crosswor
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Worth...
by Adrian Powell
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Manitoba Co-operator,
Box 9800, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C 3K7
PhONE IN: TOLL
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PLEASE NOTE: Even if you do not want your name & address
to appear in your ad, we need the information for our files.
DOWN
1 Deep wound
2 Step ___ the plate
3 Armenia's southern neighbour
4 One sign of an old hippie
5 Come to a halt
6 More runtish
7 Farriers work with it
8 Bean holder
9 "Boar's Head" beverage
10 Loud crier
11 Ismaili Muslim's ___ Khan
12 Donor of CFL's cup
13 Verbalizes
18 Koran faith
19 ___ & Span (cleanser)
24 Egg, technically
25 Elastic item
26 Flu bug's make-up
27 Encore-eliciting shout
28 Shiftless sort
29 Just scraping by
30 "If it ___ broke,..."
31 Willie, the legendary Giant slugger
32 Tulip-to-be
33 Like Felix Unger, maybe
37 Work by Chopin
38 Sound of a fan
39 Dr. Lecter of "The Silence
of the Lambs"
41 Really big spade
42 Butt heads
44 Talks pompously
45 Big pile of shifting sand
46 Oceanic abysses
49 Take orders
50 Use the smokehouse
51 Explosive location on Sicily
52 Gem for most Libras
54 "Mon frere Yves" author
Pierre ___
55 Nasty mideast terrorist gp.
56 Poses
58 Persian export
59 SW. US native
60 Recede
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Province: ___________________ Postal Code: _________________
Hand-dyeing technique
Affirmative yells
Becomes firm
Ecstasy
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1 Skilful deceit
6 1/6 inch, to a printer
10 Grocery shopping aids
14 Chef's garment
15 2,500km. Eurasian river
16 Indian city in "Slumdog Millionaire"
17 Something dairy farmers shouldn't do
20 ___ Kong, China
21 One of seven deadly items
22 Some Shakespeare works
23 Bagel feature
25 Camembert's cousin
27 European dairy import, maybe?
32 Element #56
34 "CSI" evidence, often
35 South Korea's oldest car company
36 Render weaponless, archaically
37 Venerable
38 Snivelling
40 Biffy
41 You or me, biologically
42 Performs some Gregorian works
43 Like a terrifying yell from
the cheesery?
47 Regrets bitterly
48 Work for a living
49 It's west of Vancouver Island
52 Campaign events: photo ___
53 Bones hiphuggers hug
57 Curry favour in the dairy?
61 Europe's white-tailed eagle
62 Nevada's neighbour
Address: _________________________________________________
❏ I would like to take advantage of the Prepayment Bonus of 2 FREE
weeks when I prepay for 3 weeks.
Classification: ___________________________
TAKE FIVE
No. of weeks __________________
Minimum charge $11.25/week (3 line word ad)________________
Each additional line $1.98/week ___________________________
❏ VISA
Sudoku
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Minus 10% if prepaying: ______________________
Add 5% GST: ______________________
TOTAL: ______________________
WINNIPEG OFFICE
Manitoba Co-operator
1666 Dublin Avenue,
Winnipeg, MB R3H 0H1
AGREEMENT
The publisher reserves the right to refuse any or all advertising for
any reason stated or unstated.
Advertisers requesting publication of either display or classified
advertisements agree that should the advertisement be omitted
from the issue ordered for whatever reason, the Manitoba
Co-operator shall not be held liable. It is also agreed that in the
event of an error appearing in the published advertisement, the
Manitoba Co-operator accepts no liability beyond the amount paid
for that portion of the advertisement in which the error appears or
affects. Claims for adjustment are limited to errors appearing in the
first insertion only.
While every endeavor will be made to forward box number replies
as soon as possible, we accept no liability in respect to loss
or damage alleged to a rise through either failure or delay in
forwarding such replies, however caused, whether by negligence
or otherwise.
CAUTION
The Manitoba Co-operator, while assuming no responsibility
for advertisements appearing in its columns, exercises the
greatest care in an endeavor to restrict advertising to wholly
reliable firms or individuals. However, please do not send
money to a Manitoba Co-operator box number. Buyers are
advised to request shipment C.O.D. when ordering from an
unknown advertiser, thus minimizing the chance of fraud and
eliminating the necessity of a refund where the goods have
already been sold.
At Farm Business Communications we have a firm commitment
to protecting your privacy and security as our customer. Farm
Business Communications will only collect personal information if it is required for the proper functioning of our business.
As part of our commitment to enhance customer service, we
may share this personal information with other strategic business partners. For more information regarding our Customer
Information Privacy Policy, write to: Information Protection Officer, Farm Business Communications, 1666 Dublin Ave., Winnipeg, MB R3H 0H1.
Occasionally we make our list of subscribers available to other
reputable firms whose products and services might be of interest to you. If you would prefer not to receive such offers, please
contact us at the address in the preceding paragraph, or call
1-800-782-0794.
The editors and journalists who write, contribute and provide
opinions to Manitoba Co-operator and Farm Business Communications attempt to provide accurate and useful opinions,
information and analysis. However, the editors, journalists and
Manitoba Co-operator and Farm Business Communications,
cannot and do not guarantee the accuracy of the information contained in this publication and the editors as well as
Manitoba Co-operator and Farm Business Communication
assume no responsibility for any actions or decisions taken by
any reader for this publication based on any and all information provided.
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Toll-Free in Canada 1-800-782-0794
Phone 204-954-1415 in Winnipeg
FAX 204-954-1422 Mailing Address:
Box 9800, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C 3K7
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Puzzle by websudoku.com
Here’s How It Works:
✁
Published by
Farm Business Communications,
1666 Dublin Avenue,
Winnipeg, MB R3H 0H1
Last week's answer
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers
1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You
can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes.
The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
27
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
AFFORDABLE RADON mitigation solution
with Polywest, Liberty Pumps and Fantech!
1-855-765-9937 or visit: www.polywest.ca
EXCELLENT
LIVESTOCK
FARMS:
1) 1000 head feedlot, Hartney. 2) 1732 deeded acs w/4,425-acs of Crown land,
fenced, small bungalow, very good buildings & metal corral system, can carry 450
cow/calf pairs. 3) 1,270 deeded ac cattle
farm by Lac du Bonnet, 640-acs Crown
land, turnkey operation. 5) Excellent horse
ranch in Erickson MB, Riding Arena & Bldgs
in Fantastic condition. 6) 640-ac mixed
farm within 15-min of Brandon. Jim
McLachlan 204-724-7753, HomeLife Home
Professional Realty Inc, Brandon, MB,
www.homelifepro.com
CAST ALUMINUM PUMPS, from Polar
Pumps! Designed for heavy duty applications where you need the durability. Call
1-855-765-9937 or visit: www.polywest.ca
204-371-5131
204-371-5930
204-745-0451
204-825-8378
204-573-5396
204-720-4779
Visit our farm listings and videos
at www.canadianfarmrealty.com
TO BE MOVED, south of Mortlach, SK.,
1070 sq. ft. bungalow, $15,000 OBO. Call
306-476-2635, 306-690-5209.
SMALL HOUSE, 837 Main St., Saskatoon,
SK. 720 sq. ft., 2 bdrm, 26.5’ lot, close to
Broadway Ave and University, asking
$272,900. Selling by owner. 306-280-2646
or 306-343-6704.
FARM LAND FOR SALE
BY TENDER
Sealed, written tenders for property in the
Municipality of Pembina described below
will be received by:
McCULLOCH MOONEY
JOHNSTON SELBY
351 Main Street, PO Box 279
Manitou, MB. R0G 1G0
PROPERTY:
Parcel 1:
NW 1/4 32-2-8 WPM
(approx. 142 cult. acres);
Parcel 2:
SW 1/4 32-2-8 WPM
(approx. 140 cult. acres);
SPECTACULAR RANCH ON Lake Diefenbaker, 10,670 acres for sale. Prime Sask. real
estate. Tenders closing Sept. 16. View:
www.castlelandranch.com
RM OF EAGLE CREEK #376, Sonningdale,
Parcel 3:
SK. area. 160 acres w/150 acres cultivated, rented out for $6000/year, balance is
SE 1/4 32-2-8 WPM
mainly yard. Comfortable 2 bdrm home on
Exc the Sly 900’ of the Ely
a basement plus a back and front porch,
1050’(approx. 120 cult. acres).
most furniture included, upgraded panel
box, 220 power underground, high effiTENDERS CLOSE 2PM
ciency propane furnace, a summer guest
SEPTEMBER 1ST, 2016.
house and furniture summer water. Hip
roof barn, chicken barn, 55x80 steel quanFOR FURTHER INFORMATION
set w/dirt floor cement footings. Water
CONTACT LARRY J. SELBY AT:
well 30x40 insulated heated work shop,
Ph: 204-242-2801
most tools and equipment, 20x26 woodworking shop insulated, heat and most
Fax: 204-242-2723
tools. 2096 Case FWA tractor w/FEL,
email: [email protected]
truck, quad, camper trailer. Agent has full
list available. This deal gets better!
TIMBER FRAMES, LOG STRUCTURES MLS®568342. For further info. or a full
and Vertical Log Cabins. Log home refin- viewing, call Lloyd Ledinski, Wally Lorenz,
ishing and chinking. Certified Log Builder Re/Max of the Battlefords, 306-446-8800.
with 38 years experience. Log & Timber
Works, Delisle, SK., 306-717-5161, Email RM OF MAYFIELD #406, Maymont, SK.
[email protected] Website at Just listed this over 3200 acre mixed farm
www.logandtimberworks.com
that offers both grain & cattle operations.
Over 66,000 bu. of steel grain storage.
Older 3 bdrm family home, 40x50 Belhan
quonset w/cement footings, 40x80x18’
metal clad pole building for machinery
MEDALLION HOMES 1-800-249-3969 storage, 40x70 metal clad pole calving
Immediate delivery: New 16’ and 20’ building, water well & 2 water bowls,
modular homes; Also used 14’ and 16’ mainly 3 wire fences w/treated posts. The
homes. Now available: Lake homes. property adjoins Hwy #16 to the North
Medallion Homes, 306-764-2121, Prince and the North Sask. River to the South.
What a dream view with the rolling hills
Albert, SK.
and the cattle grazing! MLS®579957. Call
Lloyd Ledinski, Re/Max of the Battlefords,
BEST CANADIAN HOMES built by Moduline North Battleford, SK. 306-446-8800 or
Best prices! 1520 sq. ft., $111,500; 1216 306-441-0512.
sq.ft. $99,900; 1088 sq.ft. $92,900. Ready
for delivery. Custom orders welcome. On- FARMLAND NE SK(Clemenceau) 4 quarters
site consultation. Yellowhead Modular plus 36 acre riverside parcel w/5 bdrm.
Home Sales, 306-496-7538, 306-849-0002 home. Featuring: bins on concrete with diweekend calls. Personalized service. rect hit on railroad cars, 40 acres of mostly
www.affordablehomesales.ca
mature spruce timber, 2 farmyards- 1 bordering Etomami River and 50 miles of provincial forest, excellent elk hunting and
2012 MODULINE 20x76 mobile home to other big game and goose. 580 acres cult.
be moved. 4 bdrm., 2 baths, open concept Full line of farm equipment and sawmill
living/kitchen. Available immediately. Ask- also available Reg Hertz, 306-865-7469.
ing $115,500. 780-789-2555, Thorsby, AB.
RTMS AND SITE built homes. Call
1-866-933-9595, or go online for pictures
and pricing at: www.warmanhomes.ca
READY TO MOVE HOMES: just completed, 1,560-sq.ft. home, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath,
master has ensuite bath & walk-in closet,
main floor laundry, beautiful large kitchen
& island, front covered deck. Call or email
for more info MARVIN HOMES INC, Marvin
Vogt, Mitchell, MB. 204-326-1493 or
204-355-8484. [email protected]
www.marvinhomes.ca
Why wait?
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and information sent
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manitobacooperator.ca
DWIGHT LITTLE OF WINNIPEGOSIS,
MB. is offering the following private land
for sale: NE-31-31-18-W, NW-32-31-18-W,
SW-32-31-18-W, SE-08-32-18-W, SW-0832-18-W,
SE-05-32-18-W,
SW-05-3218-W, NW-10-31-18-W. The successful
purchaser will be considered by Manitoba
Agriculture for possible transfer of the
Crown land forage lease associated with
this ranch unit. This forage lease currently
consists of the following: SE-29-31-18-W,
NE-32-31-18-W, SE-32-31-18-W, NW-0532-18-W, SE-06-32-18-W. If you wish to
purchase the private land contact the
Lessee, Dwight Little, Box 56, Winnipegosis, MB., R0L 2G0. If you wish to comment
on or object to the eligibility of this Unit
Transfer write the Director, Manitoba Agiculture, Agricultural Crown Lands, Box
1286, Minnedosa, MB., R0J 1E0 or fax
204-867-6578.
RM OF PRAIRIE VIEW near Birtle, MB.
Land for sale by tender, SW24-16-27 &
SE24-16-27, interested parties must rely
on their own inspection of the land, tenders must be received by October 15, 2016,
highest or only tender not necessarly accepted, mail tenders to the following address: Wady Farm Inc, P.O. Box 459, Birtle,
MB., R0M 0C0.
EXCELLENT
LIVESTOCK
FARMS:
1) 1000 head feedlot, Hartney. 2) 1732 deeded acres w/4425 acres of Crown land,
fenced, small bungalow, very good buildings and metal corral system, can carry
450 cow/calf pairs. 3) 1270 deeded acres
cattle farm by Lac du Bonnet, 640 acres
Crown land, turnkey operation. 4) Excellent horse ranch in Erickson, MB., Riding
Arena and buildings in fantastic condition.
5) 640 acres mixed farm within 15 min. of
Brandon. Jim McLachlan 204-724-7753,
HomeLife Home Professional Realty Inc,
Brandon, MB, www.homelifepro.com
NORMAN AND FERN LUSSIER of Lac du
Bonnet, MB. intend to sell private lands:
SEC-1-16-10-E,
N1/2-2-16-10-E,
E1/2-12-16-10-E,
S1/2-3-16-10-E,
SE-35-15-10-E, N1/2 of NW-36-15-10-E to
Rupert and Mary Theuerer, Moose Jaw,
SK. who will be considered by Manitoba
Agriculture, Food, and Rural Development
for possible transfer of Crown Land forage
lease associated with this ranch unit. This
forage lease currently consists of the following: NE-11-16-10-E, SE-11-16-10-E,
NW-12-16-10-E, SW-12-16-10-E. If you
wish to comment on, or object to the potential transfer of this forage lease to this
purchaser, write to MAFRD, Agricultural
Crown Lands, PO Box 1286, Minnedosa,
MB. R0J 1E0 or fax 204-867-6578.
Planning to sell your farm?
Manage Crop
residue with MiCrobes
I have several
out of province
clients coming
to MB. over the
next 3 months.
Contact me
now & we can arrange to
have your farm shown to
these serious Buyers.
Phone: 204-761-6884
[email protected]
RM #470, PAYNTON, SK. 63.9 acres, NW
8-47-21 W3 extension 49. Most services,
Bordering Yellowhead Hwy. Fenced. Oil
well site (revenue). Good water well,
$145,000 OBO, motivated to sell!! Call for
info. 306-903-7007, Maidstone, SK.
BEAUTIFUL 4800 sq.ft. home w/attached
garage, 20 mins North of Neepawa, MB.
50x100 heated shop, 60x200 newer shed
(could be converted to riding stable),
$675,000. 204-243-2453 or 204-871-4509
SCENIC SETTING, 158 acres and house,
near Prov. Park, $190,000. 204-569-4927,
[email protected] Cowan, MB.
Ecotea™
Liquid Biological
Amendment.
Now available for large
commercial farms.
CERTIFIED PRIMA FALL RYE. Hickseed
Ltd., Mossbank, SK., Barry 306-354-7998
or Dale 306-229-9517.
(204) 417-4122
Winnipeg, MB.
[email protected] • www.ecotea.ca
WANTED: FEED GRAIN, barley, wheat,
peas, green or damaged canola. Phone
Gary 306-823-4493, Neilburg, SK.
FEED OATS, for sale, 4% wheat, .06¢/lb.
Will deliver up to 150 kms. 306-336-2684,
306-331-8305, Lipton, SK.
Phone: 204-526-2145 | www.zeghersseed.com
Email: [email protected]
Quality Fall Cereal Pedigree
Seed Available
HAZLET Fall Rye Proven performance!
EMERSON Winter Wheat Excellent FHB Rating *R*! Improved
winter hardiness, excellent yields!
BUYING:
HEATED CANOLA
& FLAX
• Competitive Prices
• Prompt Movement
• Spring Thrashed
“ON FARM PICK UP”
1-877-250-5252
Winter Triticale -
Excellent cover crop, high yielding
green feed and forage.
Looking for Pea seed, Yellow, Green
or Forage types. Give us a Call!
HONDA 420 CAMO ATV, 1 owner, winch,
heated handlebars, 2” hitch, exc. cond.,
$4500 OBO. 306-491-2227, Blaine Lake, SK
Zeghers Seed Inc. is also a exporter of special
crops. Dealing in flax, Mustard, Rye, Triticale,
Spelt, Peas, Canary, Damaged Canola, millets,
and others. Give us a call or Visit online for
marketing opportunities!
CERTIFIED MOATS, 98% germ, 89% vigor,
1998 FRONTIER PLAINSMAN 5th wheel, 0% fus. gram. Ready for immediate pick
24’, AC, awning, vg cond., have hitch, up. Call Myles at Fox Family Farm
$6750 OBO. 306-843-7696, Wilkie, SK.
306-648-8337, Gravelbourg, SK. Visit us
on-line: www.foxfamilyfarm.ca
CERTIFIED #1 CDC MOATS winter
wheat. Hickseed Ltd., Mossbank, SK., Barry
306-354-7998 or Dale 306-229-9517.
For Pricing ~ 204-325-9555
NOW BUYING
Confection and
Oil Sunflowers,
Brown & Yellow Flax
and Red & White Millet
Edible Beans
Licensed & Bonded
Winkler, MB.
RESELLING CERTIFIED MOATS, 220 bu.
97%
germ., $9/bushel. 306-345-2039,
Pense, SK.
2012 ALPINE 3700RE, dual AC, 4 slides,
double fridge, built-in vac, sleeps 4,
plumbed for washer/dryer, 3 TV’s, DVD
surround sound, fireplace, low mileage
and use, power awning, vg, $39,900.
Would consider farm tractors or heavy
trucks on trade. 306-237-7667, Perdue, SK
CERT. #1 MOATS WINTER wheat, high
germ., exc. quality, avail. immediately.
Boyes Seeds, 306-327-7660 Kelvington SK
Independent Seed Grower since 1982
We have your 2017 Winter Wheat!
TM
AAC Gateway AC Emerson
We grow the top varieties from
Western Canada’s leading seed breeders.
Call to reserve your seed today!
Court
Seeds
courtseeds.ca
[email protected]
Vanderveen
Commodity
Services Ltd.
Licensed and Bonded Grain Brokers
37 4th Ave. NE Carman, MB R0G 0J0
Ph. (204) 745-6444
Email: [email protected]
Andy Vanderveen · Brett Vanderveen
Jesse Vanderveen
A Season to Grow… Only Days to Pay!
Plumas, MB
204 386-2354
CERT. AC EMERSON winter wheat, rated R
to fusarium, good winter survival. Call
Fedoruk
Seeds,
Kamsack,
SK.,
306-542-4235. www.fedorukseeds.com
WANTED HEATED CANOLA. No broker
involved. Sell direct to crushing plant.
Cash on delivery*6-Row*
or pickup. 306-228-7306
or 306-228-7325, Unity, SK.
MALT BARLEY
Celebration
& Tradition
MALT
BARLEY
MALT BARLEY
1997 SHASTA CLASS C, 28’, 7.3 powerstroke diesel, auto, 82,000 kms, $21,000.
Can-Am
Truck
Export
Ltd,
1-800-938-3323, Delisle, SK. DL #910420.
CERT. #1 MOATS red winter wheat, exc. We buy feed*2-Row*
barley,
feed wheat,
MALT
BARLEY
quality, Available now! Big Dog Seeds Inc.,
AC Metcalfe,
CDC Copeland
& AAC Synergy
*6-Row*
oats,
soybeans,
corn
& canola
306-483-2963, 306-483-7738, Oxbow, SK.
*2-Row*
We buy
feed barley,&feed
wheat,
Celebration
AC Metcalfe,
CDC Copeland Tradition
& AAC Synergy
oats, soybeans,
corn
canola IN
COME
SEE US AT
AG& DAYS
We
buy
feedbarley,
barley,
feed
wheat,
WeTHE
buy CONVENTION
feed
feed
wheat,
HALL
COME
SEE US AT
AG
DAYS
oats,
soybeans,
&
canola
oats,
soybeans,
corn
& IN
canola
BOOTH corn
1309
THE CONVENTION HALL
BOOTH
1309
COME SEE
US
AT
AGAG
DAYS
IN IN
COME
SEE
US
AT
DAYS
THE CONVENTION HALL
THE CONVENTION
HALL
TOP QUALITY CERTIFIED alfalfa and grass
BOOTH 1309
seed. Call Gary or Janice Waterhouse
BOOTH 1309
306-874-5684, Naicam, SK.
1/4 SECTION FARM FOR sale in Rossburn RM, Located 23-km North of Rossburn in Mears, 1-1/4-km South National
Park 90-acs, Clear rest in Trees, bordering
lake, Present hay land, organic. Good
hunting area. [email protected] Phone
204-837-4753, Cell 204-795-7830 .
Advertise your unwanted equipment in the
Classifieds. Call our toll-free number and
place your ad with our friendly staff, and
don’t forget to ask about our prepayment bonus. Prepay for 3 weeks and get 2 weeks free!
1-800-782-0794.
NUVISION COMMODITIES is currently
purchasing feed barley, wheat, peas and
milling oats. 204-758-3401, St. Jean, MB.
2013 Malt Contracts Available
2016 AOG Malt Contracts Available
Box 238 Letellier, MB. R0G 1C0
Box 238 Letellier, MB. R0G 1C0
Phone
Phone 204-737-2000
204-737-2000
2014 Toll-Free
AOG Malt
Contracts Available
Toll-Free 1-800-258-7434
1-800-258-7434
Box
238
Letellier,
MB. R0G SK.
1C0
Agent:
SK.
Agent:MM&& JJ Weber-Arcola,
Weber-Arcola,
2013 Malt
Contracts
Available
Phone
204-737-2000
Phone 306-455-2509
306-455-2509
Phone
BoxToll-Free
238 Letellier,
MB. R0G 1C0
1-800-258-7434
Agent:
M & JPRODUCTS
Weber-Arcola,
SK. BuyPhone
204-737-2000
LACKAWANNA
CORP.
ers andToll-Free
sellers
all types of feed grain
Phoneof306-455-2509
1-800-258-7434
and grain by-products. Call 306-862-2723,
Agent:
Nipawin,
SK. M & J Weber-Arcola, SK.
Phone 306-455-2509
2007 FLEETWOOD EXCURSION 40’ w/Cat
diesel, only 35,000 miles, completely loaded, includes washer/dryer, Autotrack satellite and diesel generator, $100,000.
306-867-3716, Loreburn, SK.
MUSTARD SEED! We can supply you with
new cert. treated or untreated seed. We
can upgrade your low grade mustard.
Ackerman Ag Services,
306-638-2282,
Chamberlain, SK.
MALT BARLEY
Sheldon Froese
Stacey Hiebert
Dolf Feddes
Junior Thevenot
Henry Carels
Catharina Carels
FARM AGENT
*6-Row*
Celebration & Tradition
We buy feed barley, feed wheat,
oats, soybeans, corn & canola
Royal LePage Riverbend
GRANT TWEED
COME SEE US AT AG DAYS IN
THE CONVENTION HALL
BOOTH 1309
1659.55 acres of grain land
in the RM’s of Hamiota and Miniota.
11 total parcels, all with crop
insurance rating B and some C.
MACK AUCTION CO. presents a Land
Auction for Reg and Dale Faber, Thursday,
October 20, 7:00 PM, Alameda, SK., Legion
Hall. Four quarter sections of pasture and
hay land situated on #9 Hwy. South of
Carlyle, SK., in the RM Moose Creek #33.
Parcel 1: SE-24-05-03-W2, Parcel 2: The
following 3 quarters sell as one package
AG AND RECREATIONAL land for sale. All with a combined oil SLR of $9500 annualoffers considered, but not necessarily ac- ly, SE-31-05-02-W2, NE-31-05-02-W2,
SW-31-05-02-W2, 4 water sources, barbcepted. For more info view www.agrec.ca
wire fence. For details view website:
WWW.EDBOBIASHTEAM.COM Ft Rabut www.mackauctioncompany.com PL911692
Bison Ranch & Farm, MLS®556997,
$1,250,000. 1007 acre ranch SW of St. 160 ACRES, near Regina, w/yard and busiLouis with cedar log home, 8’ and 5’ game ness opportunity; 15 acres w/large charfence on 5 quarters, 2 not fenced, excel- acter home, plus 2nd home on property
lent bison handling facilities for sorting within 35 miles of Regina or Weyburn on
and loading; MILLIS LAND HWY #2, Hwy. #35; 160 acres w/large home, 3 car
MLS®571430, $729,900. Prince Albert in- heated garage, large shop, horse barn,
vestment opportunity, 32.32 acres across plenty of water, 20 min. NE of Regina. Befrom Commercial and Light Industrial side Regina, SK: 3 acre property/
properties; HWY #2 EXPOSURE AT house/greenhouses; Near Pilot Butte, 80
MEACHAM, MLS®572211, $279,900. acre development land; 90+ acres, Hwy.
Great business location with fenced com- #11, 7 miles North of Saskatoon, developpound, 40’x50’ heated shop, 1998 Mod ment; RM Perdue, 2 quarters W. of Saskaspace office skid trailer with individual of- toon on Hwy #14; 2 miles East of Balgonie
fices; GIBBON ACREAGE, MLS®574576, Hwy. #1, 145 acre development land.
$950,000. Saskatoon/Grasswood, 31.41 Brian Tiefenbach 306-536-3269, Colliers
acres with 40’x54’x12’ workshop, in-floor Int., Regina, SK. www.collierscanada.com
heat, 40’x96’ barn w/13’ overhang, 7 boxstalls and a 84’x154’ indoor heated “Coverall” riding arena. Opportunity to construct
single detached country residence. Ed
WILLIAM AND BRENDA MURRAY of
Bobiash, Re/Max Saskatoon 306-222-7770
Makinak, MB are offering the following priRM ON KINGSLEY No. 124, 1280 acres vate land for sale: NW 29-22-16W, NE
(1000 cult., rest is pasture), new well, 29-22-16W, NE 30-22-16W. The successspring water. House 3800 sq. ft., fully ful purchaser will be considered by Manimodern, metal roof, stucco siding, elec. oil toba Agriculture for possible transfer of
and wood heat. All outbuildings nearly the Crown land forage lease associated
new w/metal siding and roofs. 82x40 ma- with this ranch unit. This forage lease curchine shed, workshop, 2 car garage com- rently consists of the following: N1/2
N1/2
28-22-16W,
SEC
bined w/wood working shop, 28x40 barn, 27-22-16W,
SEC
34-22-16W,
SW
20x40 cattle shed, farm yard established 33-22-16W,
35-22-16W,
S1/2
03-23-16W.
If
you
wish
1925 w/large tree’d yard, surrounded by
shelterbelt, 2 orchards w/many fruit trees. to purchase the private land contact the
Lessees William & Brenda Murray at GenContact 306-735-7250 or 306-735-7850.
eral Delivery, Makinak, MB R0L 1C0. If you
wish to comment on or object to the eligibility of this Unit Transfer, write the Director, Manitoba Agriculture, Agricultural
Crown Lands, PO Box 1286, Minnedosa,
MB. R0J 1E0, or Fax: 204-867-6578.
2013 Malt Contracts Available
Box 238 Letellier, MB. R0G 1C0
Phone 204-737-2000
Toll-Free 1-800-258-7434
Agent: M & J Weber-Arcola, SK.
Phone 306-455-2509
Grain Land for Sale
FOR SALE: ALFALFA, TIMOTHY, Brome,
Clover, hay & pasture blends, millet seed,
Crown, Red Prozo. Leonard Friesen
204-685-2376, Austin, MB.
FARMS WANTED. If you are considering
selling your farm, contact me. I have eight
years experience selling farms and farmed
all my life. All discussions are confidential.
Rick Taylor, Homelife Home Professional
Realty. 204-867-7551, [email protected] www.homelifepro.com
RM OF BIGGAR #347: Beautiful starter
ranch! Immaculate 2304 sq.ft. home on 2
levels plus fully developed bsmt., attached
garage, enormous shop 48x80 (32x48
heated w/cement floor). Older hip roof
barn, some corral facilities. 2 quarters all
pasture, NE 01-35-15 W3, SW 12-35-15
HOUSE FOR SALE to be moved, 2 bdrm, W3, $699,000. For more info. Call Duane
story and a half, ideal for a cabin. Call Neufeldt, RE/MAX Saskatoon - Biggar
306-389-4712, Maymont, SK.
306-948-8055. www.duaneneufeldt.com
CANADIAN FARM REALTY
WANTED: FARM COUPLE to spend winter
(Nov-March) in our well equipped beautiful
home in Saskatoon, SK. References required. Call 306-374-9204.
FALL RYE SEED, high germination, cleaned
ELIAS SCALES MFG., several different and field ready, $9.50/bu. 306-335-2805,
ways to weigh bales and livestock; Plat- Lemberg, SK.
form scales for industrial use as well, nonelectric, no balances or cables (no weigh
like it). Shipping arranged. 306-445-2111,
North Battleford, SK. www.eliasscales.com
TOP QUALITY ALFALFA, variety of grasses
MULCHING- TREES, BRUSH, Stumps.
and custom blends, farmer to farmer. Gary
Call today 306-933-2950. Visit us at:
Waterhouse 306-874-5684, Naicam, SK.
www.maverickconstruction.ca
South East Saskatchewan Farm
Nestled in the heart of the Moose MounTO BE MOVED: Cabin or hunting cabin, tains sits a beautiful piece of land with a
16x24 square timber, open rafter, w/loft, 4-yr old Custom Built home. This property
$12,000 OBO. 306-240-6003, Dorintosh SK
includes 4 quarters of land with oil lease
revenue, a 2,580-sqft + fully finished
walkout basement. 5 bdrm, 4 bath home.
LOTS AND CABINS FOR SALE at Sun Custom Hickory cabinets, hardwood & tile
Hills Resort, Lake of the Prairies, 40 min. throughout, Geothermal Heat & Heated
East of Yorkton, SK. Phone 306-597-9999 Double car garage. Full wrap around deck
or visit www.sunhillsresort.com
to enjoy the beautiful views. 20-mins
from Kipling, 35-mins from Carlyle. For
more information and to book viewings,
Email: [email protected] $1,750,000.
LOG POST AND BEAM shell package for
sale. 26’x34’ with loft 1220 sq. ft. total.
Douglas fir logs. Call 306-222-6558 cell,
email
[email protected]
or visit www.backcountryloghomes.ca
BESCO GRAIN LTD. Buyer of all varieties
of mustard. Call for competitive pricing.
Call 204-736-3570, Brunkild, MB.
28
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
WANTED: FEED BARLEY Buffalo Plains
Cattle Company is looking to purchase
barley. For pricing and delivery dates, call
Kristen 306-624-2381, Bethune, SK.
TEMPORARY GRAIN BIN replacement
tarps for all sizes from 22’ diameter to 105’
dia. Best quality available Canadian made
quality silver cone shaped tarps available
for all sizes. All sizes in stock. Shipped
overnight to most major points in Western
Canada. For all pricing, details, and pics
visit our website at www.willwood.ca or
phone Willwood Industries toll free
1-866-781-9560, fax 306-781-0108.
LARGE ROUND ALFALFA brome mixed hay.
Call 306-764-6372, Prince Albert, SK.
WINKLER, MANITOBA
SPECIALIZING IN:
Rye, Flax, Barley, Peas,
Oats, Corn, Wheat, Soybeans,
Canola, Soy Oil, Soymeal
- Licensed & Bonded Farm Pick-Up Pricing
Across Western Canada
400 BROME/ALFALFA 6x6 round hay bales,
.04¢ per lb., no rain. 306-634-7920,
306-421-1753, Estevan, SK.
TARPCO, SHUR-LOK, MICHEL’S sales,
service, installations, repairs. Canadian
company. We carry aeration socks. We
now carry electric chute openers for grain
trailer hoppers. 1-866-663-0000.
1500 large round, heavy hardcore bales
trucking avail in 36 bale loads, $25 & up;
46-ft. hay trailer w/converter; MacDon 10
bale mower. 1-204-345-8532
LARGE QUANTITY OF STANDING OATS,
Craik, Sask. area. Call Cliff Luther at
306-734-2997.
GOOD USED TRUCK TIRES: 700/8.25/
900/1000/1100x20s;
11R22.5/11R24.5;
9R17.5, matched sets available. Pricing
from $90. K&L Equipment and Auto. Ph
Ladimer, 306-795-7779, Ituna, SK; Chris
at 306-537-2027, Regina, SK.
2016 ALFALFA and ORCHARD grass bales,
3x4x8’, 4¢/lb. and up depending on
quality, reasonable freight. Call Alvin
204-355-4980, cell 204-371-5744.
MR. TIRE CORP. For all your semi and
half ton tire needs call Mylo 306-921-6555
Serving all of Saskatchewan.
LONG LAKE TRUCKING, two units, custom
hay hauling. Call 306-567-7100, Imperial,
SK.
Contact Us Toll Free:
888-974-7246
www.delmarcommodities.com
APPROX 90 BALES of 2015 3rd cut alfalfa, shedded, tested, good quality; Approx
175 2016 1st cut hay, suitable for beef
WANTED: OFF-GRADE PULSES, oil seeds cattle, all bales are net wrapped, will load;
and cereals. All organic cereals and spe- 348 JD square baler, good condition.
cialty crops. Prairie Wide Grain, Saskatoon, 204-799-8130 or 204-837-9750.
SK., 306-230-8101, 306-716-2297.
LARGE ROUND AND LARGE square hay and
Advertise your unwanted equipment in alfalfa, delivered in semi loads. Call or text
the Classifieds. Call our toll-free num- 306-408-0038, Moosomin, SK.
ber and place your ad with our friendly
staff, and don’t forget to ask about our HAY AND STRAW Delivered Anywhere:
prepayment bonus. Prepay for 3 weeks Now loading and hauling 48 large
and get 2 weeks free! 1-800-782-0794. round bales. Also hauling 90 large square
(3 wide in SK. and AB.) Phone or text Hay
Vern 204-729-7297, Brandon, MB.
FARMERS, RANCHERS,
SEED PROCESSORS
BUYING ALL FEED GRAINS
Heated/Spring Threshed
Lightweight/Green/Tough,
Mixed Grain - Barley, Oats,
Rye, Flax, Wheat, Durum,
Lentils, Peas, Canola,
Chickpeas, Triticale,
Sunflowers, Screenings,
Organics and By-Products
√ ON-FARM PICKUP
√ PROMPT PAYMENT
√ LICENSED AND BONDED
SASKATOON, LLOYDMINSTER,
LETHBRIDGE, VANCOUVER,
MINNEDOSA
1-204-867-8163
USED FRONT WHEEL ASSIST tractor tires,
16x9x28,
$250
for
all
4.
Call
306-240-6003, Dorintosh, SK.
400 BROME/ALFALFA 3x4 big square
bales, put up dry, no rain. 306-364-4700,
306-320-1041, Leroy, SK.
Go public with an ad in the Manitoba Cooperator classifieds. Phone 1-800-782-0794.
WE BUY OATS
Call us today for pricing
Box 424, Emerson, MB R0A 0L0
204-373-2328
KORNUM WELL DRILLING, farm, cottage
and acreage wells, test holes, well rehabilitation, witching. PVC/SS construction, expert workmanship and fair pricing. 50%
government grant now available. Indian
CUSTOM HARVESTER AND large grain
Head, SK., 306-541-7210 or 306-695-2061
farm looking for truck drivers, combine,
and grain cart operators to go on custom
harvesting run in SK and ends in Northern
SK./AB. Operating 4 new John Deere S670
U-DRIVE TRACTOR TRAILER Training, combines and Peterbilt semis. I may help
30 years experience. Day, 1 and 2 week obtain Class 1A license, year round emupgrading programs for Class 1A, 3A and ployment hauling logs, grain or crude oil.
air brakes. One on one driving instructions. 306-456-2877 please leave message or fax
resume to 306-456-2835, Bromhead, SK.
306-786-6600, Yorkton, SK.
email [email protected]
CHECK OUT OUR inventory of quality used
highway tractors. For more details call
204-685-2222 or view information at MOTIVATED FARM EQUIPMENT OPERATORS required near Kamsack, SK. for
www.titantrucksales.com
swathing, combining, fall tillage; and Class
1 driver required as well. Successful candiFOR DECADES, FARMERS and retailers
dates may need to work long hours and
have recognized fibreglass tanks are the
weekends, but will be offered a competiRead the latest ag news
ideal tank for storing liquid fertilizer! Call
tive wage. Contact 306-590-8537, e-mail
on your smartphone…anytime.
1-855-765-9937 or visit www.polywest.ca
resume: [email protected]
50,000 FARMERS CAN’T be wrong! When
you purchase a Norwesco tank, you’re not
just
purchasing
a
tank.
Call
1-855-765-9937 or visit: www.polywest.ca
Farming is enough of a gamble, advertise in
the Manitoba Co-operator classified section.
It’s a sure thing. 1-800-782-0794.
FIBERGLASS SEPTIC TANKS, ranging from
750 gal to 30,000 gallons. Now in stock at
BIG ROUND BALES, 1200 lbs., Orchard Flaman. Call 1-888-435-2626.
grass alfalfa mixture, solid core, no rain,
$35/bale. 204-886-2083 eves, Teulon, MB.
WATER TANKS- Complete line of water
tanks now in stock for spraying season.
Ranging from 950 gal. to 10,000 gal. Call
Flaman 1-888-435-2626.
COVER CROPS. Do you want to be free of
fertilizer bills and have cleaner fields? N
Fixation P&K scavengers. Taproot short
and long season plants. Limited quantity.
Give me a call 204-851-2101, Virden, MB.
PTO AUGER WATER PUMPS, Cardale Tech,
4000/8000 gal. per minute, mud, ice, slurry, plant matter. No prime, no filters, no
seize. New condition. Call 204-868-5334,
Newdale, MB. www.cardaletech.com
POLY TANKS: 15 to 10,000 gal.; Bladder
tanks from 220 to 88,000 gallon; Water
and liquid fertilizer; Fuel tanks, single and
double wall; Truck and storage, gas or dsl.
Wilke Sales, 306-586-5711, Regina, SK.
Download the app at
agreader.ca/mbc
AG. PRODUCTION ASSISTANT required
on a larger grain farm located in central
Sask. We are looking for a reliable, creative, and hard working individual to join
our team. The ideal candidate would have
a farm background and a Class 1A driver’s
license. Previous farm experience is also
an asset. Duties include operation of farm
machinery, hauling grain, loading and unloading grain and fertilizer. Other duties
include general yard duties, and some construction projects. We offer a comprehensive benefits package and negotiable
housing assistance. This position is a fulltime employment opportunity and wages
will be very competitive, but also based on
experience level of applicant. Please email
resume to: [email protected] or call:
306-554-7777 or visit us at website:
www.windypoplarsfarm.com
FARM LABOURER REQUIRED for livestock
operation. Duties include: operating, maintaining seeding & harvesting equip. Smoke
free enviro., $17/hr. Housing avail. Lyle
Lumax, 204-525-2263, Swan River, MB.
EXPERIENCED COMBINE/EQUIPMENT
operators for harvest.
Call Mike
306-469-7741, Big River, SK.
EXPERIENCED HARVEST workers required
immediately to operate combines and
swathers. Ph/text Murray 306-631-1411,
Tugaske, SK. Email [email protected]
FULL-TIME HD OR AG Journeyman and
Apprentice mechanic needed. JD Ag
Equipment experience is an asset. Wages
depending upon experience, overtime
avail. Jamie 306-259-1212, 306-946-9864,
EXPERIENCED HELP for large grain Young, SK. [email protected]
farm, Class 1 an asset. Competitive wagTOW ROPES rated up to 250,000 lbs. and es/house avail. 306-550-4894, Odessa, SK.
tow straps rated up to 240,000 lbs. See
your nearest Flaman location or call ROY HARVESTING is hiring for the 2016 DRIVERS WANTED: H. S. Knill Co. Ltd.
1-888-435-2626.
harvest. Require combine operators and Long haul - USA /Western Canada. Must
Class 1A truck drivers. Wages $25/hr. plus have min. 3 years. AZ driving experience
room and board. Ph. Chuck 306-642-0055, and a clean abstract. Must be able to cross
Chris 306-632-0076, Glentworth, SK.
border into USA. Livestock handling experience required. Group benefits after properiod.
$0.44/mile,
paid
POSITION AVAILABLE on Portage MB bationary
Grain Farm. Mechanically strong & well or- picks/drops and loaded border crossings.
ganized person needed to maintain, repair Email resume and driver’s abstract to:
Italy Land & Cruise ~ Oct 2016
& sometimes operate farm machinery & [email protected] or Fax: 519-442-1122
vehicles. Good team environment. GenerEgypt /Nile River Cruise ~ Nov 2016
ous salary. Advancement & farmyard
Australia /New Zealand ~ Jan 2017
available. Call Jim 204-274-2323 or Bryce
204-856-9529.
Kenya/Tanzania ~ Jan 2017
RURAL & CULTURAL TOURS
Search for
LARGE CAPACITY TARPS to cover grain
piles of varied sizes. Cover long grain piles
with 53’W, 90’W, or 109’W piles of any
length. 253,000 bu. pile covered for
$11,666. All sizes in stock. Best quality
available Canadian made quality silver
tarps avail. for all sizes. Shipped overnight
to most major points in Western Canada.
For all pricing, details, and pictures visit:
www.willwood.ca or Willwood Industries
1-866-781-9560, fax 306-781-0108.
SHUR-LOK TRUCK TARPS and replacement
tarps for all makes of trucks. Alan,
306-723-4967, 306-726-7808, Cupar, SK.
South America ~ Feb 2017
Costa Rica / Panama Cruise ~ Feb 2017
South Africa / Victoria Falls ~ Feb 2017
Vietnam/Cambodia/Thailand ~ Mar 2017
*Portion of tours may be Tax Deductible
Select Holidays
1-800-661-4326
www.selectholidays.com
HARVEST HELP NEEDED: Must have experience operating modern farm equipment. Call 306-468-2669, Canwood, SK.
DAIRY COW & CALF CARE: for someone
who enjoys working with animals. Duties
may include: feeding and caring for calves,
treating sick cows and doing other barn
work. Looking for self motivated, reliable
individual who pays attention to detail.
Competitive wages. Call 204-379-2640 or
204-745-7864 or email your resume to:
[email protected] Haywood, MB.
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The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
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LOCAL , NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL NEWS
Low-tech, co-operative approaches
support smallholder farmers
A simple plastic sheet may not look like much, but it can change lives and communities
BY STEFAN EPP-KOOP
Co-operator contributor
O
ver 70 per cent of hungry people
in the world today are smallholder
farmers. Those producing food are,
ironically, the most likely to go without.
This summer I visited Kenya with
Canadian Foodgrains Bank to explore what
can be done to address hunger and support
the smallholder farmers (farmers with less
than 10 acres of land) who make up the vast
majority of food producers in Kenya.
If we are to achieve a world without
hunger, solutions will need to meet the
challenges faced by these farmers. While
innovations in agricultural science and
technology are undoubtedly important
— we had a chance to visit world-class
agricultural research facilities in Kenya — I
was frequently amazed by the power of
simple solutions, using basic technology
and community co-operation, that helped
people produce more food.
Irrigation
Lillian Wambui is a 50-year-old farmer
who we met near Naivasha, a two-hour
drive northwest of Nairobi. For the past
23 years she had grown maize and beans
on her four-acre farm. But harvests
were becoming irregular due to changing rains. Her maize was also affected by
maize lethal necrosis disease, which led to
regular crop failures. As a result, by 2009
Lillian’s farm was unable to sustain her
family and she began receiving food aid.
Change for Lillian came in the form of a
sheet of plastic and a local farmer group.
The plastic was used to line a pond that
she dug to collect and store rainwater for
irrigation. She uses a manual pump to
pull water from the pond to use on her
fields. Fruit trees and vegetables could
now thrive where they had not before.
Together with other local farmers she was
also trained to grow new crops such as
sweet potatoes, pigeon peas, and cassava
and establish fruit tree nurseries.
When you visit Lillian’s farm now, it is
hard to imagine the years when her crops
failed. The farm is lush and green, with passion fruit, bananas, and papaya growing
abundantly. Young kale plants surround
Lillian’s irrigation pond and a field of
pigeon peas, a highly profitable crop, was
nearly ready for harvest. Lillian now earns
roughly $30 per week selling produce at the
local market and her family has a nutritious
diet. The farm also supports the school fees
for her six children and there is enough
money to make further upgrades to the
farm. All this because of a sheet of plastic.
Storage bags
Just down the road, a different sheet of plastic was solving another major challenge:
how to ensure that maize does not spoil
after harvest. In Kenya, weevils often get
into maize while it is stored, leaving it inedible. As a result, smallholder farmers often
lose the maize they were saving for their
family’s consumption. Many farmers have
to sell their maize immediately after harvest. This creates a glut on the market and
lowers prices. Waiting even a few months
can nearly double the price that farmers
receive for their maize.
AgResults has mobilized the private sector to solve this challenge by providing a
prize to the companies that can sell the
most maize storage bags to smallholder
farmers. These heavy-duty plastic bags
are air tight, prevent pest infestations, are
Lillian Wambui talks about her farm in front of a field of pigeon peas. PHOTO: ANDREW RICHARDSON
Maize that has been stored in an AgResultspromoted storage bag shows no sign of weevil
infestation. PHOTO: ANDREW RICHARDSON
Rose Maely Mululu and Sarah Mbaetha, members of the Watema Fruit Growers, water papaya and mango
seedlings. PHOTO: EMILY CAIN/CANADIAN FOODGRAINS BANK
affordable and easy to use. For the equivalent of $2.50, farmers can buy a bag that
will last for three years and store 90 kg of
maize, an affordable storage solution even
for farmers with very limited resources.
One of the farmers who had bought
a bag was Lucia Waringa Kamau. Lucia
fled Kenya’s post-election violence in
2008 and now rents half an acre of land
near Nakuru. This year she purchased a
bag and was amazed at the results. While
her neighbour’s maize turned into flourlike dust from weevil infestation within
a few months, Lucia proudly showed us
her maize that had been perfectly preserved for almost a year. For Lucia, this
has meant being able to feed her family.
It also means that any maize she decides
to sell will now fetch a much higher price.
For someone with only half an acre of
land, the ability to store what she harvested makes a big difference.
Working together
High on a hillside in a semi-arid region
southeast of Nairobi, the Watema Fruit
Growers has brought together 52 farmers
to improve community resilience and farm
livelihoods. As its name suggests, it began
with fruit, organizing a mango nursery to
grow and sell mangos.
Since there is little rainfall in the area,
the group has since worked on creating
furrows and ridges to capture rainwater. As
one group member said, “before we were
not getting food because of land preparation. The water was just flowing away.”
They have also developed a shared field
school where they are learning together
about new crops to diversify production
and more recently began working together
on a plan to raise and market chickens.
The solutions – new crops, fruit trees and
basic water preservation – were simple,
but have made a marked difference in the
community.
Creating change
These solutions have had a profound
impact on farmers and the communities in which they live: decreasing hunger,
increasing income, sending kids to school,
building a spirit of co-operation, and giving people a sense of pride.
Importantly, all these solutions are easily accessible to smallholder farmers. They
are cost effective and create long-term
change. These low-tech solutions are not
When you visit Lillian’s
farm now, it is hard to
imagine the years when her
crops failed.
reliant on ongoing support or specialized
technical knowledge, allowing them to
continue beyond the lifespan of funded
projects.
Canada can play a key role in this story.
Historically, our government has been a
strong supporter of agricultural development around the world. However,
the Canadian government’s support for
agriculture has declined significantly
since 2011. Canadian Foodgrains Bank’s
Good Soil campaign is encouraging the
Canadian government to reinvest in agriculture to achieve sustainable solutions
that end hunger and improve livelihoods
for farmers.
To find out more, visit http://www.
foodgrainsbank.ca/campaigns/good-soil/.
Stefan Epp-Koop is a Winnipeg historian, author, chair of
the Manitoba Mennonite Central Committee and acting
executive director of Food Matters Manitoba.
30
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
Wendy’s aims for antibioticfree chicken by next year
The burger chain also plans to set new beef and pork goals
STAFF
U
Wendy’s said it will commit next year to “specific goals” for reducing or eliminating
use of medically important antibiotics in its beef and pork supplies. photo: dave bedard
.S. fast-food chain
Wendy’s aims to source
all of its chicken products from birds raised without
the use of antibiotics “important
to human medicine” by 2017.
Columbus, Ohio-based
Wendy’s, the world’s No. 3 burger
chain behind McDonald’s and
Burger King, said in a blog post
Aug. 3 about 50 per cent of its
chicken supply already comes
from such sources, and it will
aim for 100 per cent “by next
year.”
Also in 2017, the company
said Aug. 3, it will “commit to
specific goals for reducing or
eliminating medically important
antibiotics in our pork and beef
supply.”
Eliminating the use of medically important antibiotics in
cattle and hogs “is harder to do
without compromising animal
welfare,” the company said.
“Because these animals live
longer than chickens, they’re
more likely to need antibiotics at
some point in their lives.”
But the company said it is
“actively working with our suppliers, the academic community and industry experts to
find antibiotic alternatives,”
citing examples such as probiotics, vaccines and feed supplements to either treat infections or reduce the risk of such
infections.
In its blog, authored by
Wendy’s chief communications
officer Liliana Esposito, the company acknowledged some people “may not like this approach.”
Canadian Young Speakers
for Agriculture Competition
Some consumers, the company said, “may prefer that we
just pick a date in the future and
announce a goal to eliminate all
medically important antibiotics by that time, even if we don’t
know exactly how we’re going to
accomplish that.”
The company noted it recently
published a new “ReplaceReduce-Refine” policy statement
on antibiotics in meat animals
on its website, describing the
protection of human health as
its “absolute priority.”
Antibiotics, the company said,
should only be used to treat a
meat animal that “has or is at
high risk of developing a medical problem.”
‘Impractical’
Wendy’s suppliers, the chain
said, are already “prohibited
from using antibiotics that are
important to human health to
make their animals grow,” a
practice which involves subtherapeutic doses of antibiotics,
often in feed, to stimulate muscle growth.
Scientists in recent years
have warned against such uses
of antibiotics in animals, out of
concern that pathogens could
develop resistance to antibiotics and put human and animal
health at risk.
“Withholding
treatment from
a sick animal is
cruel and we won’t
advocate for it just
because it makes a
good headline.”
Liliana Esposito
Join the young Canadians who are speaking up for agriculture.
A new U.S. federal standard
barring such uses of antibiotics
is due out later this year, Wendy’s
added.
But the company also stressed
that removing antibiotics immediately from all food production, “or trying to do so in the
near future, is not only impractical but also inhumane,” the
company added. “Withholding
treatment from a sick animal is
cruel and we won’t advocate for
it just because it makes a good
headline.”
The U.S. regulatory structure
on withdrawal times following
antibiotic use is “very specific,”
the company added. “If an animal is treated with antibiotics,
it cannot enter the food supply unless the antibiotics have
completely worked through its
system.”
Wendy’s rival McDonald’s,
which previously said it would
stop buying chicken raised using
medically important antibiotics from its suppliers by March
2017, said Aug. 1 it had completed that transition ahead
of schedule thanks to help
with verification from the U.S.
Department of Agriculture.
Are you passionate about agriculture? Do you enjoy sharing your views with others?
Join the upcoming Canadian Young Speakers for Agriculture competition.
As part of this unique competition, contestants prepare a five-to seven-minute speech on one of five
agriculture-related topics and present it in public. Cash prizes are available for two age groups:
Junior (11 to 15) and Senior (16 to 24).
The 32nd annual Canadian Young Speakers for Agriculture competition takes place on
Saturday, November 5, 2016 at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair in Toronto, Ontario.
For competition rules, a list of speaking topics and
accommodation assistance please visit www.cysa-joca.ca.
The application deadline is Sept. 30, 2016.
1730 CYSA print ad 2016_8.125x10_ManCoop1.indd 1
Wendy’s chief
communications officer, on
SquareDealBlog.com
7/27/16 2:34 PM
31
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
Olymel to
consolidate
Quebec ham
work
Ham lines will move
into the company’s
hog slaughter plants
next fall
STAFF
T
he meat-packing arm of
Quebec’s La Coop federee
plans to shut down major
ham lines at one of its furtherprocessing plants in the province next year, cutting up to 340
jobs.
Olymel said Aug. 5 it
will halt ham deboning at
i t s St - Hy a c i n t h e p l a n t i n
September 2017, eliminating
340 positions.
Ham deboning work, until
now the St-Hyacinthe plant’s
d e s i g n a t e d s p e c i a l t y, w i l l
instead be done at plants with
both slaughtering and butchering operations, Olymel said.
That move, the company said,
will “improv(e) operational efficiency and reduce costs considerably, in terms of both fixed
costs and shipping.”
Olymel’s Quebec hog slaughter and butchering plants —
at St-Esprit, Yamachiche and
Vallee-Jonction — are “now
geographically closer to the
further-processing plants they
supply with raw materials,” the
company said.
The St-Hyacinthe plant will
remain open, but with about 70
staff handling frozen product
storage operations and a rendering line for lard production.
Olymel said Aug. 5 it’s also
“studying various options to
find a new vocation for the
plant, which would enable
it to fulfil other needs for the
company.”
Olymel in June announced
expansion work at its St-Esprit
hog plant, which it said at the
time would begin to handle
greater output of “value-added”
products and chilled pork.
The company in June also
announced a Quebec City-area
sausage plant at St-Henri-deLevis would be repurposed for
ham processing, after Olymel
bought Trois-Rivieres sausage
maker La Fernandiere and said
it would move its sausage lines
to that company’s plant.
The cut at St-Hyacinthe was
“a difficult decision, but a necessary one if we are to achieve
the conditions of efficiency and
profitability that will enable us
to maintain the bulk of other
jobs across all our operations,
and even create new ones,”
Olymel CEO Rejean Nadeau
said Aug. 5 in a release.
The job cuts, he said, were
“deemed necessar y after a
thorough analysis of processing costs with a view to making all our operations more
efficient.”
Olymel’s St-Hyacinthe plant
saw a work stoppage in 2009,
with unionized workers reportedly protesting a proposed
wage freeze following a major
pay cut in 2005, when the plant
was said to be under threat of
closure.
“I have requested that everything be done to facilitate
the transition for employees
assigned to another position,
or their relocation to another
Olymel facility,” Nadeau said
Aug. 5.
Agricultural Hall of Fame
Four Manitobans were inducted into the Manitoba Agricultural Hall of Fame at a ceremony in
Portage la Prairie July 14. We’re featuring each one with their citations in successive issues
J
ack Marsden Parker began
his working career in 1938
working for the Dominion
of Canada Department of
Agriculture where he served
under Dr. Ellis as part of the
team that completed the Soil
Survey of Manitoba. After serving overseas in the Second
World War, he was hired in
1946 as the province’s first
soils specialist with Manitoba
Agriculture. He travelled the
province identifying soil-related
issues and designing on-farm
programs to solve them.
In 1954, the minister of agriculture established the Soils
and Crops Branch and commissioned Jack to direct and
supervise soils, crops, forage
horticulture, and weed control services being delivered
in Manitoba. Jack took it upon
himself to organize “Save the
Soils” clubs, and he engaged
farmers in a variety of demonstrations including crop rotation, permanent grass cover,
tree cover, and field shelterbelt
programs. As a result, hundreds of miles of field shelterbelts and thousands of acres
of fragile and erosion-prone
soils were planted with grass
and trees. Under Jack’s direction, conservation activities
combined with the need for
improved municipal water
management evolved into the
establishment of the first two
conservation districts — Turtle
Mountain and Whitemud.
Today, the conservation district
program encompasses most of
rural Manitoba.
Jack played an important
role in establishing potato and
canola industries in Manitoba.
His representation and interest in both industries resulted
in significant increases in production as well as the establishment of processing plants
for both crops.
Throughout his career, Jack
served on the board of directors of the Canadian Seed
Growers Association and was
granted a National Honorary
Life Membership for his contributions. He was a member
of the Agriculture Institute of
Canada, the Manitoba Institute
of Agrologists, the Manitoba
Horticulture Society and the
Manitoba Society of Soil
Science.
Shortly before Jack served
in the Second World War
as an artillery officer during the Allied invasion of
Europe, he married Kathleen
Wesson. They had four children: Kathleen, Mary, John
and Nancy. After the war
ended, Jack toured throughout
Germany and the Netherlands,
participating in a report on
the state of farmland in the
aftermath of the war as well as
completing a course on Danish
agriculture and co-operatives
in Helsingore, Denmark in
1945.
Throughout his life Jack was
very involved with his commu-
John (Jack) Marsden Parker, Winnipeg
1914 – 1989
nity in various volunteer roles.
For his exemplary service to his
church, Jack was awarded a life
membership in the Vestry of St.
Albans Church and became a
charter member of The Order
of St. Albans.
HIGH CAPACITY
AND HEAVY-DUTY
VISIT WWW.FARM-KING.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION OR SEE YOUR LOCAL FARM KING DEALER.
HIGHER INPUT COSTS AND TIGHTER MARGINS REQUIRE A
COMPLETE GRAIN MANAGEMENT SYSTEM TO MAKE YOUR
OPERATION AS PROFITABLE AS POSSIBLE. The complete line of
Farm King grain handling equipment ensures you get top dollar for
your crop. With decades of grain handling experience, Farm King
offers a line of durable, high capacity products for your farm.
©2016 Buhler Trading Inc. | [email protected] | www.farm-king.com
32
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
COUNTRY CROSSROADS
CON N EC T I NG RU R A L FA M I L I E S
When Manitoba set the
standard for tractors
A forgotten Manitoba competition tested early tractors for prospective buyers
BY ALEX CAMPBELL
Manitoba Agricultural Museum
L
ittle known today, either
in Manitoba or outside the province, the
Winnipeg Light Agricultural
Motor Contests were on the
cutting edge of the new technology of the tractor.
In fact, the tractor was so
new in 1908 that the word
tractor had not even been
invented. The Winnipeg contests were the first effort to
scientifically quantify factors, such as horsepower, fuel
economy, ease of handling
and other factors which were
important to tractor operators. The contests used newly
invented devices such as the
drawbar dynamometer and the
de Prony brake, a belt-driven
dynamometer, to achieve accurate measurements.
In 1908, people had barely
begun to grasp the technology of the internal combustion
engine and its possible uses.
Agricultural motors, as tractors
were more commonly known
as in 1908, were very complicated contraptions holding
promise — but of what?
It is thought that less than
1,000 internal combustion tractors in total had been sold by
1908 worldwide, so tractors
were still largely experimental
at this time. While these early
tractors were large, heavy and
crude, they did contain delicate ignition, carburetor and
oiling systems which needed
precise adjustment for decent
performance. Experts on these
technologies were few and far
between.
But whatever the drawbacks
of tractors, there were people who believed in the future
of tractors in agriculture or
“power” farming. Two adherents were E.W. Hamilton, editor
of the Canadian Thresherman
and Farmer magazine and A.
Burness Grieg, a machinery
salesman, agricultural writer
and a sessional lecturer at the
Manitoba Agricultural College.
In 1907, Grieg and Hamilton
came to the conclusion that a
contest would be a useful tool
to promote the new technology
of the tractor.
It appears that Grieg originated the idea, as he was aware
of the use of competitions in
Britain to promote agricultural machiner y. Hamilton
and Grieg managed to persuade the Winnipeg Industrial
Exhibition to host the event
and the two men organized
the “Light Agricultural Motor
Co m p e t i t i o n” a t t h e 1 9 0 8
Winnipeg Industrial Exhibition.
The revolutionary aspect of
this competition was the scien-
Winnipeg pioneered scientific tractor testing in the early part of the 20th century. Seen here is a Flour City tractor on a drawbar test. PHOTO: Manitoba Agricultural Museum
tific measurement of the performance of the tractors as the
tractor did real-life tasks such
as plowing and hauling. Other
important aspects of tractors
such as quality of construction were also quantified in
the competition. Points were
assigned to each of the performance parameters assessed.
E a c h t ra c t o r w a s t o b e
scored on these categories
and Gold, Silver and Bronze
Medals would be awarded to
the tractors scoring first, second and third. Hamilton and
Grieg secured experts in motive
power to act as judges for the
competition.
Seven tractors were
entered in 1908, three from
the International Harvester
Company (IHC), one from the
Transit Thresher Company
(later became the Gas Traction
Company) and one from
K i n n a rd - Ha i n e s Co m p a n y
(builder of the Flour City tractor line). English manufacturers
were well represented, with a
tractor entered from Marshall
and Sons Company and a tractor from H.P. Sanderson and
Company.
The 1908 event proved to
be a great success. Results of
the competition were carried
in Canadian and American
farm papers, plus distributed abroad. Farmers in large
numbers, as well as machinery company personnel from
North America and abroad,
came to Winnipeg to attend
the event. The United States
Department of Agriculture
(USDA) even sent an observer
to the competition.
The companies whose
products had won medals in
the competition immediately
trumpeted their success in the
farm newspapers by taking out
advertisements. The KinnardHaines Company, winner of the
1908 Gold Medal, took out fullpage ads in various farm newspapers discussing the advantages of its tractor and making
prominent mention of the tractor’s fuel economy as measured
in the 1908 competition. Even
Cockshutt, the maker of the
plows used exclusively in the
1908 competition, advertised
proudly its involvement in the
competition.
With the success of the 1908
competition it was assured that
the event would be repeated
in the years ahead. The event
was refined with further performance measurements being
taken and steam engines were
allowed their own classes in the
trials.
However, by 1912 problems
were apparent, such as the
costs of the trials for tractor
companies, the financial insta-
bility of the Winnipeg Industrial
Exhibition, the lack in the
Winnipeg area of virgin prairie
sod fields for the plowing trials
and the emerging use of field
days by individual tractor companies, where farmers could
actually operate the tractors
plus avoid awkward questions
the trials sometimes raised
about a tractor’s performance.
A significant problem was
that the trials were really a
technical event being operated at an entertainment event,
which is what the Winnipeg
Industrial Exhibition really was.
Only three companies chose
to participate in the 1913 trials, Sawyer Massey, J.I. Case
and the Avery Company. These
companies entered a variety of
steam engines and gas tractors
in the various classes of the trials. With such a low turnout of
companies, 1913 was the last
year for the trials.
However, the Winnipeg trials generated two important
results. The trials served as a
“hothouse” for tractor designers and manufacturers as they
could see various tractors in
action, doing the same work
and being accurately measured
while they did it. The manufacturers learned what worked
and, perhaps more importantly,
learned what ideas did not
work. An official with the Avery
company reportedly admitted that the company learned
a great deal about tractors by
participating in the trials.
The Winnipeg trials also
served as the pattern for the
Nebraska Tractor Tests which are
the yardstick tractors are measured by, from 1920 to this date.
The originator of the Nebraska
tests had been slickered by a
tractor salesman into buying a
poor tractor and, being aware of
the Winnipeg event, determined
that scientific tests would aid
farmers in buying tractors that
actually performed as advertised. He talked the state of
Nebraska into conducting such
tests.
Recently the Manitoba
Agricultural Museum completed a digital documentary of
the Winnipeg Light Agricultural
Mo t o r Co m p e t i t i o n s. T h e
museum obtained digital copies of a number of high-quality glass plate negative photos
of the trials from the archives at
the University of Saskatchewan.
The museum also scanned a
number of photos of the event
from various papers, primarily the Canadian Thresherman
and Farmer. The museum
researched the event in order to
write the narration to the photos
in the video. Currently the video
is being distributed to various
community TV channels.
33
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
COUNTRY CROSSROADS
Prairie fare
Be inspired by zucchini
BY JULIE GARDEN-ROBINSON
Food and nutrition specialist
NDSU Extension Service
I
remember bringing home a zucchini in
my purse. Someone had handed it to me
at a gathering, and my purse became a
makeshift grocery bag.
When I pulled the zucchini out of my
purse, my daughter, who was preschool age
at the time, looked at me in amazement. I
think she wondered if I had a magic purse
that grew long-necked, shiny green things.
After I set it on the countertop, she studied
it and sniffed it. Then she helped me wash
and grate it. Finally, she helped me transform
it into some zucchini bread.
If you have a mass-producing zucchini
plant, did you miss an opportunity? Aug. 8
was “National Sneak Some Zucchini Into Your
Neighbour’s Porch Day.” If so, perhaps you
can choose your own day to continue the recognition and distribution process.
Few foods are associated with as many
good-natured jokes as zucchini. Zucchini
plants are very easy to grow and, most of the
time, produce an abundance of green fruit.
Yes, we consider zucchini vegetables on the
menu, but technically, a zucchini is the fruit
of the plant. Zucchini is a type of summer
squash and also is known by other names.
The name “zucchini” comes from the Italian
word for squash.
A botanist might call it by its scientific
name, “Cucurbita pepo.” If you want to disguise the contents of your casserole, try
renaming the dish. In France, zucchini is
called “courgette.” In England and Ireland,
zucchini is called “marrow.”
Would you like a slice of “marrow bread?”
Those alternate names make “zucchini”
sound more appetizing, don’t they?
You need to keep an eye on zucchini in
your garden or they will grow large. In fact, if
you stood the largest zucchini on record on
its end, it would have been more than five
feet, nine inches tall. This record setter was a
skinny fruit, though, at 65 pounds.
For best quality, select zucchini that are
small to medium in size. Zucchini should
have shiny skin and be free of bruises. The
bruised areas are more likely to spoil rap-
PHOTOs: thinkstock
idly. Try to use refrigerated zucchini within a
week.
Nutrition-wise, zucchini is fairly high in
vitamin C, provides fibre and is low in calories. To get more fibre, eat the skin.
Zucchini has inspired cooks to create recipes that range from traditional to the slightly
unusual as they chop, grate and slice zucchini. Most of us have tasted zucchini muffins, cake, casseroles or salads. How about
zucchini fritters or zucchini curry?
You might want to try to use zucchini as
a “vessel” to fill with a favourite casserole,
and after cooking, slice your zucchini boat
into servings. Or try one of the more recent
kitchen tools that allow you to make skinny
zucchini noodles called “zoodles.”
Chocolate Zucchini
Cupcakes
3/4 c. brown sugar
1/4 c. canola oil
2 eggs
1-1/4 c. non-fat or low-fat milk
2 tsp. vanilla extract
2 c. whole wheat flour
1/2 c. unsweetened cocoa powder
4 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
1 c. zucchini, puréed
1 c. semi-sweet chocolate chips
Frosting of your choice, optional
Personally, I like to sauté sliced zucchini
with onion and add some salsa from a jar
to the consistency I like. I have a quick side
dish without a real recipe.
If you enjoy surfing the web, a simple
search for “zucchini recipes” will provide
you with hundreds of ideas. Visit https://
www.ag.ndsu.edu/food, click on “recipes”
and search our database for zucchini recipes, too.
In the meantime, here’s a chocolatey treat
made with antioxidant-rich cocoa powder
and fibre-rich whole wheat flour, plus a
not-so-secret ingredient. Add a thin layer
of frosting if you’d like or simply dust with
powdered sugar to keep the calorie count
moderate.
Preheat oven to 375 F. Place cupcake cups in muffin
tin and set aside. In a large bowl, whisk sugar, oil,
eggs, milk and vanilla. In a separate medium bowl,
combine flour, cocoa, baking powder and salt.
Fold this mixture into liquid mixture. Then fold in
zucchini and chocolate chips. Pour batter evenly
throughout cupcake cups, each about half full.
Bake for about 30 minutes. To test readiness, poke
one cupcake in the centre with a toothpick. If it
comes out of the batter clean, the cupcakes should
be ready. Let cool for 10 minutes on a cooling rack
and top with your favourite frosting and sprinkles
as desired. Serve within one to two days for freshness. Makes about 30 cupcakes.
Each cupcake has 110 calories, 4.5 grams (g) fat,
3 g protein, 18 g carbohydrate, 2 g fibre and 105
milligrams sodium.
34
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 4, 2016
COUNTRY CROSSROADS
“
S
o as I was saying...”
Roger Galbraith was in the middle of
what appeared to be a long and detailed
story as Andrew Jackson set his coffee cup
down on the café table and seated himself
next to Grant Toews and across from Bernie
Brandt, who were well on the way to finishing
their own first cups.
“As I was saying,” Roger repeated when
the obligatory greetings had been made all
around, “I’m at my computer at work, in the
middle of an important project, when my
phone rings. I look at the display and it’s my
son Darren calling from home. Darren’s 19
years old,” he added, then paused to take a sip
of coffee.
“So you answer it?” said Bernie, clearly
engrossed in the unfolding tale.
Roger nodded. “I pause the cat video I’m
watching and I answer the phone. ‘Dad,’ says
Darren. ‘I need to talk to you.’ OK, I say. Is
it an emergency? I cross my fingers. The kid
thinks about that for a second and says, ‘yeah,
yeah it is.’ Yesss! I think to myself, I get to go
home early! As a parent, I’ve learned to look
on the bright side.” Roger took another sip of
coffee.
“There’s always a silver lining,” said Grant.
“When life gives you lemons,” said Andrew,
“make the closest thing you can to a mojito,
since life never gives you a lime.”
“Sure whatever,” said Roger. “Anyway, I
finish watching the cat video and then I tell
my boss I have to deal with an emergency at
home and away I go.
“When I get home I head straight to Darren’s
room, which I will confess, I haven’t been in
for at least a couple of years. The first thing I
notice when I step inside is the number of rats
running around. Dude, I say. You have rats. No
wonder you called me. ‘I didn’t call you about
the rats Dad,’ says Darren. ‘I’ve had pet rats
for three years.’
“You know,” I say, “when I was a kid the
closest I ever got to a rat was when my brothers and I would sneak the truck in the middle
of the night and go to the municipal dump.
When we got there we’d turn off the headlights and park in the middle. My brothers
The
Jacksons
By Rollin Penner
would get in the back of the truck with their
shotguns resting on the roof and then I’d turn
on the headlights and there’d be 100 beadyeyed rodents staring straight at the lights. It
was like shooting ducks in a barrel.”
“Shooting fish in a barrel is the saying, I
think,” said Grant.
“Nobody shoots fish,” said Roger. “That
would be crazy.”
“Why would you decide to tell your kid a
story like that right when he’s trying to tell
you something important?” said Andrew.
“Because as a parent,” said Roger, “I want to
try to stretch this out long enough so I don’t
have to go back to work.”
He set his coffee cup down and continued.
“So anyway, Darren finally says Dad, you
know how I have serious social anxiety and
I almost never leave my room and... here I
interrupt him. If this is about your mother’s
and my divorce, I say, we’ve been through
that right? And we agreed, that was your own
fault.”
The three listeners look at Roger askance.
“I know,” said Roger. “You want your kids to
remember stuff on their own, but as a parent
you have to keep reminding them. But anyway
Roger says it’s not about that.
“I didn’t think so,” I say, “so go ahead sonny,
I’m listening.”
“It takes a little while. The kid is having a
hard time. But finally he blurts it out.”
Here Roger stopped to reach for the sugar
and stir another teaspoonful into his coffee.
“Well? What did he say?” asked Grant.
Roger stopped stirring. “He said Dad, it’s
because I’m gay.”
There was a short, somewhat awkward
pause.
“Wow,” said Andrew. “And what did you
say?”
“I said thank goodness,” said Roger.
“Your son told you he’s gay and you said
thank goodness? Why?” asked Andrew.
Roger took a last sip of coffee and got up
to go. “Because that’s what I’ve been telling
people for the last two years,” he said as he
walked away.
There was a long silence at the table.
“I can’t decide,” said Andrew.
“Can’t decide what?” asked Grant.
“Whether that man is the worst parent
ever,” said Andrew, “or the best.”
There was another pause.
“I think he might be both,” said Grant.
“Amen,” said Bernie.
Growing nasturtiums
There are many different categories so make sure you are getting the type you want
The plants grow quickly —
the reason they are usually
grown from seed rather
than bedding plants.
By Albert Parsons
Freelance contributor
A
t horticultural shows in August
I always admire the nasturtium
exhibits. Often the class calls for a
“suitable container,” as nasturtium blooms
do not look their best exhibited as “three
blooms” or “five blooms.” Often an exhibit
will include several blooms, some buds,
as well as some foliage, all presented in a
low bowl or other suitable container. The
stems are rather weak and so the blooms
and buds can be supported by the leaves to
show to best advantage.
Nasturtiums are often grown from seed
planted right into the ground in spring,
but they are also sold as bedding plants
in the spring at many garden centres. The
plants grow quickly — the reason they are
usually grown from seed rather than bedding plants. Either way, read the package
or plant tag carefully as there are different
categories.
There are dwarf nasturtiums, varieties
suitable for use as edging plants or that
can be planted toward the front of beds,
climbing varieties that will need to be
planted in front of a fence or trellis that
affords support, and trailing varieties that
are most suitable for use in hanging bas-
Some varieties of nasturtiums have
variegated foliage. PHOTO: ALBERT PARSONS
kets. All nasturtiums, however, have the
same rounded leaves and brightly coloured blooms that are funnel shaped with
a unique spur on the underside of each
bloom. There are myriad bloom colours
including vanilla, bright yellow, orange,
fiery red, pink, and mahogany, and some
newer varieties have two-toned blooms.
Nasturtiums produce a mass of foliage and the flowers poke out through the
leaves like bright jewels. Most varieties have
bright-green leaves but some are variegated
that have marbled green and ivory foliage.
“Alaska” is a dwarf variegated variety, while
“Jewels of Africa” is a variegated climbing
type. Climbing nasturtiums need a bit of
training onto a support as they are not naturally as twining as some climbing plants.
Care must be taken when training them up
a support system because the stems tend to
be brittle and easily broken.
Trailing nasturtiums add both unique
foliage and colourful bloom to a hanging
basket or window box. “Alaska” adds a lot
of interest to a hanging basket or a large
container which is tall enough to allow the
plants to cascade without reaching the
ground. A wonderful wall of foliage and
jewel-like flowers can be created at the back
of a border with climbing nasturtiums,
which can reach a height of 80 cm by season’s end.
Nasturtiums like rich soil; fertilize regularly if they are grown in soilless mix in a
container. The plants soon deteriorate and
do not look their best if they do not get
enough water. They like consistently moist
soil. Aphids like them but usually regular
showers with the garden hose will deter
these pests enough that their damage will
be minimal. This is not the case with flea
beetle attacks. They also love nasturtiums
and in early spring and in late summer they
are apt to attack nasturtiums in great numbers and ruin the plants within a day or
two. The pests are easiest to control in the
spring when the small plants can be covered with a protective covering. This is not
as easily done in the fall when the plants
have matured and resorting to chemical
defences might be the only way to save the
plants.
Some gardeners are willing to grow
nasturtiums and enjoy them during the
summer and then willingly give them up
when flea beetles arrive in the fall — usually
after the canola fields have been swathed
— replacing them with something else that
will keep the garden attractive until the
growing season ends. Nasturtiums are such
beautiful plants that many grow them in
spite of having to battle insect attacks.
Albert Parsons writes from Minnedosa, Manitoba
35
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
COUNTRY CROSSROADS
Reena answers more questions
Plus, readers’ feedback and a tip
READER’S PHOTO
reEna nerbas
Household Solutions
Hi Reena,
I was wondering if you knew anything about
using Dawn dish soap on front or back steps to
keep ice from building up. We had problems last
winter with ice buildup when it melted and I don’t
know the portions to use. Could you please let me
know if Dawn is used and how? It would certainly
save me using ice melt products this winter which
I’m not happy with. — Thank you, Charlotte
Hi Charlotte,
Some love it, while others say it doesn’t work. I
can tell you that the recommended proportions
are to mix half-cup Dawn dish soap with half-gallon
of warm water and pour it over your steps and
sidewalk. Since Dawn dish soap has a high concentration of alcohol in it some people report that it
does not freeze in minus temperatures. You can use
plain old table salt as an alternative. Whatever you
decide, test on an inconspicuous area first to avoid
slipping.
Another interesting use for Dawn dish soap is to
make your own ice pack. Fill a strong freezer bag
halfway with Dawn Original dish soap (the blue
kind, non-ultra). Double-bag for extra leak protection. These super-soft ice packs are great for all
kinds of injuries. Note: Little ketchup packs kept in
the freezer also work well as ice packs.
Hi Reena,
I do hope you can help me. I was treating my
arthritic hands in a paraffin wax bath and accidentally splashed some on one of my beige suede
dining room chairs. I was able to scrape some of
it off, but there is still a dark spot remaining. Do
you have any solution to remove the stain? HELP!
— Marlene
Hi Marlene,
You want to be careful when cleaning the area not
to scorch it. Place a single layer of brown paper on
the wax area and move a warm iron over the paper.
Move the paper around to soak up all wax. Next,
sprinkle baking soda onto the wax stain and brush
the area with a damp stiff brush to restore the nap.
A tissue box makes a great container to store empty plastic
grocery store bags. PHOTOs: THINKSTOCK
Readers’ feedback
Hello Reena,
I love all the household tips you give us. Now, with
regards to smelly dish clothes, I would like to mention how simple it is to keep cloths clean. Boil them
with a little soap and water on top of your stove for
five minutes or less. Rinse, and if time permits, hang
in the sun. Should a family member have a skin condition, boil their face cloth. If any wash item smells,
wash with hot water and hang it outside. Thank you
Reena and keep up the good work. Oh yes, I would
like to mention that wonderful bar of “Sunlight
soap,” from a long time ago; it cleans everything from
shoes to socks. — With best regards, Astrid
Dear Reena,
Here is a suggestion for how to remove spider
droppings from the siding on a house. I have found,
through trial and error that GM Spray Cleaner sold
by General Motors dealers works very effectively. I
spray it on, let sit for a few minutes, then wipe with a
paper towel — works like a charm. Old deposits that
have baked in the sun for a while need a little more
effort. — Gil
Coming in for a landing — right in the flowerpot. PHOTO: CINDY MURRAY
Welcome to
Country Crossroads
I
f you have any stories, ideas, photos or a comment on
what you’d like to see on these pages, send it to Country
Crossroads, 1666 Dublin Ave., Winnipeg, Man. R3H 0H1,
phone 1-800-782-0794, fax 204-944-5562, email [email protected]
fbcpublishing.com. I’d love to hear from you.
Please remember we can no longer return material, articles,
poems or pictures.
— Sue
Tip of the week
·Store plastic grocery bags in an empty tissue box.
This will not take up much room and is easily
accessible.
I enjoy your questions and tips, keep them coming. Need a
professional presenter for your upcoming event? Check out my
website reena.ca.
This
Old
Elevator
I
n the 1950s, there were over 700 grain elevators in Manitoba.
Today, there are fewer than 200. You can help to preserve the
legacy of these disappearing “Prairie sentinels.”
The Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) is gathering information about all elevators that ever stood in Manitoba, regardless of
their present status. Collaborating with the Manitoba Co-operator
it is supplying these images of a grain elevator each week in hopes
readers will be able to tell the society more about it, or any other
elevator they know of.
MHS Gordon Goldsborough webmaster and Journal editor has
developed a website to post your replies to a series of questions
about elevators. The MHS is interested in all grain elevators that
have served the farm community.
Your contributions will help gather historical information such
as present status of elevators, names of companies, owners and
agents, rail lines, year elevators were built — and dates when they
were torn down (if applicable).
There is room on the website to post personal recollections and
stories related to grain elevators. The MHS presently also has only a
partial list of all elevators that have been demolished. You can help
by updating that list if you know of one not included on that list.
Your contributions are greatly appreciated and will help the MHS
develop a comprehensive, searchable database to preserve the
farm community’s collective knowledge of what was once a vast
network of grain elevators across Manitoba.
Please contribute to This Old Grain Elevator website at:
http://www.mhs.mb.ca/elevators. You will receive a response, by
email or phone call, confirming that your submission was received.
At one time, United Grain Growers had three elevators at Plumas, on the CNR Gladstone Subdivision in what is now the
Municipality of WestLake-Gladstone. One of them dated from May 1926, replacing an earlier elevator from around 1912 that had
been leased then purchased by UGG in August 1924. This elevator was destroyed by fire on December 28, 1974 and not rebuilt. A
second UGG elevator, known as Elevator #1 (photo taken in 1962), was formerly owned by the Western Canada Flour Mills. Built
in 1898, it was purchased by UGG agent J.F. Rogers and resold to the company in June 1940. The third UGG elevator, known as
Elevator #2 (photo taken in 1981), was constructed in 1949. Renovated in 1976, an annex from Tenby was moved beside it in
1977. Photos: Agricore United Engineering Department, Tom Price (Mgr), provided by Glenn Dickson
36
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 18, 2016
*For commercial use only. Offer subject to credit
qualification and approval by CNH Industrial Capital
Canada Ltd. See your New Holland dealer for details and
eligibility requirements. CNH Industrial Capital Canada
Ltd. standard terms and conditions will apply. Depending on model, a down payment may
be required. Offer good through September 30, 2016, at participating New Holland dealers
in Canada. Offer subject to change. Taxes, freight, set-up, delivery, additional options or
attachments not included in price. © 2016 CNH Industrial Capital America LLC. All rights
reserved. New Holland Agriculture is a trademark registered in the United States and many
other countries, owned by or licensed to CNH Industrial N.V., its subsidiaries or affiliates.
CNH Industrial Capital is a trademark in the United States and many other countries, owned
by or licensed to CNH Industrial N.V., its subsidiaries or affiliates.
USED EQUIPMENT www.agdealer.com/raymorenh
2015 NH 840CD-35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $83,000
2015 NH 840CD-35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $83,000
2015 NH 840CD-35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $83,000
2015 MB D65-35FT CNH . . . . . . . . . . . . . $78,000
2013 NH 840CD-35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $67,000
2013 NH 840CD-35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $67,000
2010 NH 94C-42FT CR/CX . . . . . . . . . . . $65,000
2009 NH 94C-42FT CR/CX . . . . . . . . . . . $50,000
2009 NH 94C-36FT CR/CX . . . . . . . . . . . $43,000
2008 NH 94C-36FT CR/CX . . . . . . . . . . . $39,000
2008 NH 94C-36FT CR/CX . . . . . . . . . . . $37,000
2003 JD 936 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,900
2000 CIH 1042-36 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,200
SEEDING
2016 NH P4460:-TBH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $187,143
2015 JD 1910 TBT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $139,000
‘96 New Holland 9482
‘15 New Holland Boomer 24
618931
‘15 Versatile 500DT
Tractor, 4WD, 550HP, Excellent cond., PS, 30”
TRACKS, 110GPM, 6 REMOTES, PTO, LUX CAB, GPS
$65,000
‘09 New Holland P2070 - 70’
‘07 SeedMaster 6612NH3
c/w P1060 TBH Air Drill, 66FT, 12IN, DB SHOOT,
ON BOARD TWIN NH3, 430BU, 3 TANK
$175,000
2009 NH BR7090 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,000
2008 NH BR7090 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900
1999 NH 688 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,900
SPRAYERS
1990 FC SYS 62 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,200
1994 WM 765HT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$21,000
TRACTORS
2016 VA 550DT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $490,000
2014 VA 550DT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $395,000
2013 JD 9560RT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $375,000
2011 NH T8.275 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$175,000
2010 NH T7040 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $110,000
2003 NH TM140 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $59,900
1998 NH 9682 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$77,000
1997 CIH 9350. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $78,000
1996 NH 9482 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $56,000
1992 MF 3690 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $35,000
772465
‘16 New Holland P4460
TBH Air Cart, Excellent cond.
782478
Air Drill, NH Opener, Double Shoot, Floatation
Tires
ROUND BALERS
776197
‘11 New Holland P1060
Tractor, 4WD, Excellent cond., BOOMER 47 $27,500
260TLA Loader $7,500 BOOMER 37 $21,900 250 $13,800
$475,000
770207
770206
$13,800
$56,000
759568
Tractor, 4WD, 7200hrs, Engine Hours: 7200 Engine
Horsepower: 310 20.8R42 Duals Performance
$14,900
COMBINE HEADS
2014 SEMST SXG-604 6012 . . . . . . . . . $205,000
2012 JD 1870-56FT-12IN . . . . . . . . . . . . $135,000
2012 SEMST 8012 CT TXB
w/300 Onboard tank and JD1910 . . . $295,000
2012 MR 8650. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $105,000
2011 MR 8370 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $66,429
2011 NH P1060-TBH-MEC . . . . . . . . . . . . $59,000
2010 JD 1910 TBH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $55,000
2009 NH P2070 70FT X 12IN. . . . . . . . . . $65,000
2009 SEMST 5012 TXB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $88,000
2009 NH P1060. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $44,000
2008 SEMST TXB 50FT-12IN
c/w 5440 TBH. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $108,000
2007 SEMST TXB66-12 DUAL
NH3 Tanks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $75,000
2005 MR MAX II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $72,500
2002 MR MAXIM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$19,000
2000 FC 5000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$19,000
1998 JD 1900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,900
1996 CC AT-4010-5 PLX . . . . . . . . . . . . . $45,900
‘11 New Holland T8.275
Tractor, MFD, 1435hrs, 275HP, 18F/4R POWERSHIFT,
480/80R46 DUALS, 380/85R34 FRONTS
$43,000
2015 NH CX8090 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $459,000
2014 NH CX8090 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $413,000
2013 NH CX8090 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $344,000
2011 NH CX8080. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$170,000
2011 NH CR9080. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $267,000
2011 NH CR9080. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $239,900
2010 NH CX8080 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $209,900
2010 NH CX8070 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $188,000
2009 NH CX8080 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $185,000
2009 NH CR9070 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$175,000
2008 NH CX8080 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $169,000
1996 JD 9600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $46,500
‘15 MacDon D65-35FT
CNH Header, 35FT, CNH ADAPTER, TRANSPORT,
ROCK RETARDER KIT
‘16 WATER CANNON
Air Cart, 4Tank, 460bu, DS, Sectional Control,
650 Duals, Dlx Auger
8”X83’ Pump, Excellent cond., 8” X 83’ SINGLE
KNOZZLE, 110 PTO HP
736163
790468
$375,000
COMBINES
‘08 New Holland BR7090
Round Baler, Good cond., 1.5M PICK UP, LACED
BELTS, 31X13.5-15 TIRES, HYD, PICK UP
$159,000
2013 CHLGR WR9740. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $99,000
2012 NH H8060-36FT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $105,000
2008 NH H8040-36FT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $79,000
2003 NH HW320-25FT/HS16 . . . . . . . . . .$41,000
2002 MB 2952-36FT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $62,000
1999 MB 9200. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $46,900
1997 MB 9300. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$27,857
1989 JD 590 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500
781371
$79,000
SWATHERS
790401
746039
$59,000
‘10 New Holland 94C-42FT
CR/CX Draper Head, 42FT CR/CX, GUAGE
WHEELS, SPLIT UII REEL, HYD F/A, HYD TILT
‘10 New Holland CX8070
Combine, 1160hrs, Excellent cond., 900/60R32
TIRES/600/65R28 REARS, HD LIFT CYL, 76C
$78,000
737592
‘08 New Holland CX8080
Combine, 1785hrs, 360HP, Good cond., 900/65R32
Tires, CAST, BLOWERS, 76C Swathmaster
$59,000
‘15 New Holland 840CD-35FT
Header, 35FT, TRANSPORT, GUAGE WHEELS,
AHHC, X-AUGER
‘11 New Holland CR9080
Combine, 1135hrs, 620 DUALS, S3, HID’S, DSP,
DELUX CHOPPER, 790CP-15
$169,000
$175,000
718052
$89,000
736273
‘11 New Holland CX8080
Combine, 2260hrs, 360HP, Good cond., 520 DUALS,
600/65R28 STEERS, LARGE TOUCH SCREEN DISPLAY
738299
$108,000
‘13 New Holland CX8090
Combine, 682hrs, 449HP, Excellent cond., 520
DUALS, CAST, Y&M, SPREADERS, HIDS, 790CP-15FT
739591
$190,000
737584
$239,900
677757
$344,000
733839
‘08 New Holland H8040-36FT
Windrower / Swather, 635hrs, Excellent cond., 36FT,
SCHUMACHER, UII, DELUXE CAB, CAB SUSPENSION
‘13 John Deere 9560RT
Tractor, 1877hrs, PTO 1000 Tracks 36” Durabuilt
5500 5 Hyd Outlets Drawbar Cat 5 Heavy Duty
Highway #2 South
Highway #6 North
Highway #10 East
Fax: 306-946-2613
Fax: 306-746-2919
Fax: 306-782-5595
Ph: 306-946-3301
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Ph: 306-783-8511