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new pdf - The Commercial Review
Wednesday, June 24, 2015
The Commercial Review
Portland, Indiana 47371
www.thecr.com
75 cents
A walk to remember
By JACK RONALD
The Commercial Review
For Jo Ann Gierhart, the
Walk Against Cancer is all
about remembering.
Remembering her parents.
Remembering her brother.
Remembering friends.
And remembering that Friday
in 2011 when she received her
own diagnosis.
When she joins hundreds of
others on Saturday at the 14th
annual Jay County Cancer Society event at the Jay County High
School track, the Bearcreek
Township resident will have all
that on her mind.
“It’s really inspirational,” she
Saturday’s event inspires
local cancer survivor
said this week. “It’s a good
remembering time.”
A host of activities are
planned for Saturday, beginning
with bed races at 4 p.m.
A cancer survivor dinner will
be served from 5:30 to 7 p.m., and
registration for the walk begins
at 6 p.m.
At 8:30 p.m., there will be an
opening ceremony including a
balloon release, and the annual
luminary ceremony is set for
9:30 p.m.
“Actually, I started walking
before my diagnosis,” said Gierhart, an instructional assistant
at Judge Haynes Elementary
School.
See Remember page 2
The Commercial Review/Jack Ronald
Jo Ann Gierhart relaxes on a swing outside her rural
Bearcreek Township home this week. Gierhart, who has been
dealing with cancer since 2011, will be among those
participating in the 14th annual Jay County Walk Against
Cancer on Saturday.
Flag
will
come
down
Jay, Adams host tour
The Commercial Review/Jack Ronald
Some of the farmers, agribusiness representatives and Purdue staff taking part in the Farm Management Tour get
a behind the scenes look at IOM Grain.
Tuesday stops included IOM, Johnson farm
By JACK RONALD
The Commercial Review
Purdue University’s 83rd
annual Farm Management Tour
drew hundreds to Jay and
Adams counties Tuesday and
today.
Farmers, agribusiness representatives, Purdue faculty, and
students toured IOM Grain’s
Portland operation and the Johnson family farm in rural Redkey.
IOM’s Ramon Loucks told a
crowd of about 250 how the company has successfully moved
into the marketing of food-grade,
non-GMO soybeans to consumers in not only the U.S. but
China, Japan and Singapore.
“Compared to the rest of the
United States, year-in-year-out,
we have higher oil content and
higher protein content,” Loucks
said. “Anytime you want to talk
quality … they’re talking (Indiana, Ohio, Michigan) soybeans.
They’re talking about our
region.”
Loucks took part in a panel
discussion led by Purdue agricultural economist Chris Hurt
and including Jay County
farmer Greg Miller, who produces soybeans for IOM.
The company has about 200 to
250 growers, though not all of
them are growing soybeans for
IOM every year.
“We are all about long-term
end user customers, and we are
all about long-term grower relationships,” said Loucks.
Soybeans raised for human
consumption in products such
as tofu bring a higher price per
bushel on the market than those
raised for animal feed.
“We do go after the premium,” said Miller. “That’s our
goal.”
Loucks explained that IOM
doesn’t see itself in competition
with huge companies like
Cargill but has instead identified a niche market.
“We’re a boutique market,”
he said. “We are a high end mar-
FR preps for 2015-16
By RAY COONEY
The Commercial Review
FORT RECOVERY —
Fort Recovery School
Board made preparations
Tuesday for a new school
year with a new superintendent at the helm.
The board hired several
new teachers, agreed to
purchase a new school van
and set elementary and
middle school student fees
for 2015-16. It also made
several moves to prepare
for new superintendent
Justin Firks to join the
school district.
Also joining the Fort
Recovery staff this year
after being hired Tuesday
will be fifth grade teacher
Jocelyn Meyer, middle
school teacher Chad Miller
and intervention specialist
Julie Billenstein. Miller
has served as an aide in
the middle school for the
last two years, while
Meyer and Billenstein will
be new to the district.
The high school still has
openings for a new business teacher, intervention
specialist and part-time
industrial
technology
teacher.
Board members Jose
Faller, Ginny Fortkamp,
Aaron Guggenbiller, Amy
Bihn and Dave Hull set elementary
and
middle
school student fees for
2015-16, with most going
up between $7 and $15. The
fees are: kindergarten $55.20; first - $62.12; second
- $64.15; third - $64.79;
fourth - $58.70; fifth - $53.90;
sixth - $66.70; seventh $67.90; and eighth - $62.75.
They also approved purchase of a new nine-passenger van from Cardinal
Bus Sales and Service,
Inc., at a cost of $41,284.
The board set the bond
for Firks at $50,000 with
Fort Recovery Insurance
Agency, approved allowing
him to attend meetings “as
he deems necessary for the
betterment of the school
district operation” and
agreed to let him hire
casual labor as needed.
All of those go into
effect July 13, when Firks,
who previously served as
principal at Fort Loramie
High School, officially
becomes superintendent.
He will replace Shelly
Vaughn, who will be the
new superintendent of
Mercer County Educational Service Center.
Firks has already spent
several days working with
Vaughn to learn about his
new job, and will continue
to do so until taking over
the position full-time.
See Preps page 2
Weather
In review
Portland’s weather station
measured a high temperature
of 80 degrees Tuesday. The
overnight low was 56.
Tonight’s low will be 64, and
thunderstorms with heavy
rain are expected after 5 a.m.
Thursday.
For an extended forecast,
see page 2.
The Indiana Academy for
Science, Mathematics and
Humanities and John Jay Center for Learning will host “H2O
A Go” for third through sixth
graders July 16 and 17. Students
will learn about water, test their
engineering skills and build a
pop bottle terrarium. For more
information, visit www.johnjaycenter.com.
ket. … The future looks good
(but) we’re only as good as the
last bushel we ship.”
Following the panel discussion, the group took guided
tours of the IOM plant, located
on county road 100 North in the
north Portland industrial park.
Three generations of the
Johnson family welcomed the
tour to their farm on county
road 1150 West. The family produces popcorn, seed soybeans,
and seed wheat.
This morning the tour moved
to Adams County, touring the
Sommer and Beer farms near
Berne and the Nidlinger farms
near Decatur.
Associated Press
Alabama Gov. Robert
Bentley has ordered Confederate flags to be taken
down from the grounds of
the state Capitol, the latest
move to banish the divisive
banner from state capitals,
store shelves, license plates
and monuments.
Bentley issued the order
this morning, one week
after police say a white man
killed nine black church
members in Charleston,
South Carolina in a racially
motived attack.
On Tuesday, South Carolina lawmakers voted
overwhelmingly to consider removing the Confederate flag from their Statehouse grounds and other
politicians took aim at Civil
War-era symbols across the
South, saying change is
imperative after police said
nine black churchgoers
were slain in a hate crime.
Prodded by Gov. Nikki
Haley’s call the day before
to move the flag to a museum, lawmakers approved a
measure enabling a flag
debate by a vote of 103-10 in
the House and a voice vote
in the Senate.
The House vote brought a
standing ovation after
Democratic and Republican leaders sponsored the
measure in a show of
uncharacteristic unity.
See Down page 5
Howlin’
Habegger
Saxophonists Lee
Habegger, left, and
Jonathan Rockwell, of
the Jay County High
School
Marching
Patriots
rehearse
Tuesday at JCHS.
Tuesday marked the
first day of practice for
the Patriots, whose
summer
schedule
includes the Archway
Classic on July 18 in
Centerville, the Jay
County Lions Contest
on July 24 at Jay
County Fairgrounds
and Indiana State Fair
Band Day on Aug. 8 in
Indianapolis.
The Commercial Review/Chris Schanz
Inside
Coming up
Page 4 — Columnist wonders
how much progress has actually been made.
T hursd ay — Photos from
the opening day of Pennville
Legion-Lions Fair.
Page 6 — U.S. Army Jazz
Ambassadors will perform Friday in Portland.
Saturd ay — The fourth
story in our series about
school consolidation.
Local
Page 2
The Commercial Review
Wednesday, June 24, 2015
Remember...
Continued from page 1
That was about 13 years ago after
the death of her brother, Jim Keller
of Minnesota, from colon cancer.
“The first one was for my brother,
and at that time I needed it,” she
said.
“I think it’s an inspiration to sit up
in the stands and see all the lit candles. When you walk around and see
all the names … you are reminded
about them.”
Walking in his honor and his
memory, she was inspired and
touched as she saw name after name
of people she knew who had been
lost to cancer or were still battling it.
Then her own diagnosis came.
It was July 1, the Friday before the
Fourth of July weekend, and she
was alone when she learned she had
breast cancer. By the following Tuesday, she had had a bilateral mastectomy.
“You’re just thrown into it,” she
said. “I cried. … I had always sort of
figured it would happen.”
Though other family members
had died of cancer, Gierhart’s breast
cancer is not the type that is hereditary.
Chemotherapy and radiation
treatments at the Cancer Center in
Muncie followed, and though Gierhart doesn’t feel comfortable with
the concept of “cancer free” she has
gotten good reports from her followup visits every six months.
“I am on a medication for 10
years,” she said.
Her advice to others: “Be tested.
Be aware of your body.”
She warns against denial.
“It really upsets me when people
say, ‘I don’t want to know,’ she added.
“It’s not like it’s going to go away.”
And for others who are facing a
diagnosis, Gierhart said there is
help and support out there.
“I just had to talk to somebody,”
she recalled.
“Some people are very private. … I
feel like if there’s any way I can help
anyone else, I will.”
Photo provided
Pet of the week
Ace has been at the Jay County Animal Control Shelter, 2209
E. 100 South, Portland, for more than a year and is available for
adoption. There is no adoption fee. Call (260) 726-4365 before visiting.
CR almanac Madison starts needle exchange
By LESLEY WEIDENBENER
TheStatehouseFile.com
Hoosier
Pick 4: 4-6-9-0
Pick 5: 7-7-7-7-4
Evening
Pick 3: 6-7-9
Pick 4: 9-6-7-9
Pick 5: 3-7-5-6-6
Rolling Cash 5: 4-7-1934-36
jackpot:
Estimated
$100,000
Midday
Daily Three: 3-6-3
Daily Four: 1-0-0-1
Quick Draw: 2-4-5-1012-25-30-33-36-39-40-46-4751-54-55-65-69-71-79
Evening
Daily Three: 4-2-4
Daily Four: 1-0-2-3
Quick Draw: 6-12-1520-27-30-31-33-37-38-42-4453-55-56-64-65-67-76-80
Cash 5: 1-6-12-17-31
jackpot:
Estimated
$319,500
Poker Lotto: AC-KH10C-2S-6S
6-13-38-56-70,
Mega
Ball: 2
Estimated
jackpot:
$52 million
Megaplier: 5
Ohio
Powerball
Midday
Pick 3: 7-6-0
Mega Millions
Estimated
$40 million
jackpot:
Markets
Closing prices as of Tuesday
Trupointe
Fort Recovery
Cooper Farms
Fort Recovery
Corn ........................3.70
July corn ................3.70
Oct. corn ................3.55
Jan. corn ................3.77
Wheat ......................5.16
POET Biorefining
Portland
June corn ................3.74
Central States
Montpelier
Corn ........................3.66
New crop ................3.60
Beans ....................10.05
New crop ................9.34
Wheat ......................5.26
New crop ................5.30
The Andersons
Richland Township
Corn ........................3.64
July corn ................3.64
Beans ......................9.97
July beans ..............9.92
Wheat ......................5.23
July wheat ..............5.23
Hospitals
Jay County
Hospital
Portland
Admissions
There
were
four
admissions to the hospitals on Tuesday, including:
Portland – Samuel
Glessner
Dismissals
There were two dismissals.
Emergencies
There were 24 people
treated in the emergency rooms of JCH,
including:
Portland – Don Sweat
Citizen’s calendar
Today
5 p.m. — Jay County
Hospital Board executive session, conference
rooms A and B, 500 W.
Votaw St., Portland.
5:30 p.m. — Jay County Hospital Board, conference rooms A and B,
500 W. Votaw St., Portland.
6 p.m. — Jay County
Soil and Water Conservation District, USDA
Service Center, 1331 W.
Indiana 67, Portland.
6 p.m. — Fort Recovery Village Council special meeting, village
hall, 201 St. Main St.,
Fort Recovery.
6:30 p.m. — Dunkirk
Library Board, city
building, 131 S. Main St.
Weather courtesy of American Profile Hometown Content Service
County.”
The state will be available to provide technical assistance to the
county, Adams said.
Earlier this year, Gov. Mike Pence
signed into law a bill authored by
Sen. Pat Miller, R-Indianapolis, and
sponsored by Rep. Ed Clere, R-New
Albany. It made syringe exchange
programs legal in Indiana for the
first time – but only if community
officials can convince the state it
has a Hepatitis C or HIV outbreak.
The law lays out procedural requirements that local communities must
meet for the state to declare an
emergency and authorize a needle
exchange.
Preps...
Continued from page 1
“It’s gone well,” said
Vaughn, who has served
as superintendent since
2012. “We’ve had the
chance to spend several
together
going
days
through lots and lots of
information. …
“It’s been a good time to
transition. I feel good
about where things are.”
In other business, the
board:
•Recognized coach Jerry
Kaup and the baseball
team for their run to the
state final four.
•Approved the following: participation in the
Federal Title Programs
and other federal and state
grant programs; participation in the federal free and
reduced lunch program; a
contract with the Northwest Ohio Area Computer
Services Cooperative; the
renewal of the school’s liability, fleet and property
insurance with Southwestern Ohio EPC Insurance; a contract with West
Central Ohio Assistive
Technology Center; allowing employees hired after
April 30 to accrue up to 10
inservice hours during
summer inservice week
and renewal of liability
insurance for school
groups such as booster
clubs.
•Accepted the resignations of Donna Rindler
(teacher), Chad Miller
(classified
aide)
and
Chuck Etzler (bus driver).
•Approved
Melissa
Homan, Brent Niekamp
and Robyn Armstrong as
summer school teachers
and John Bihn, Nicholas
Brockman, Jerry Byram,
Christopher
DuHamel,
Charles Etzler, Lisa Ful-
lenkamp, Michael Gower,
Phillip Harris II, Joseph
Hawk, Sandra Kaiser,
William Link, Nancy Reinhard, Barbara Sautbine,
Michael Thien, Ryan
Thien, Randall Wendel,
Kurt Wendel, Roger Wenning and Herbert Westgerdes as substitute bus
drivers.
•Hired athletics director
Kurt Rammel and coaches
Jerry Kaup (baseball),
Kevin Eyink (assistant
baseball), Tyler Wuebker
(assistant football), Dillian Schulze (middle
school cross country),
Harold Fiely (volunteer
assistant baseball) and
Nickolas Kallas (volunteer
assistant swimming).
•Heard from middle
school principal Matt
Triplett that a field trip
policy has been adopted.
In order to participate in
field trips, students must
be passing their classes,
cannot have multiple
missing assignments and
must be in good standing
with the principal. He is
also developing a guide for
the annual field trip to
Washington, D.C.
•Hired advisors Julie
Billenstein (drama), Amy
Kaiser (future teachers of
America), Sam Piehl
(instrumental music and
summer band), Robyn
Armstrong (math science
club and Local Professional Development Committees), Janice Osterloh
(National Honor Society),
Melinda Luthman (newspaper), Ashley Lavy (Students Against Drunk Driving), Maura Hanlon (show
choir), Julie Schlater
(Spanish Club), Kathy
Schwieterman
(sports
medicine club and fresh-
Happy
Sweet
16
Katie
Westfall
Love, Mom
man
class),
Chelsea
Rogers (student council),
Victoria Horstman (yearbook and sophomore
class), Kim Grube (junior
class), Brent Niekamp
(senior class), Joe Hawk
(agri-business and FFA),
Michael Gower (vocational agriculture and FFA),
Tami Winner (middle
school basketball cheerleading) and Lana Kahlig
(middle school football
cheerleading).
•Heard an update from
elementary school princi-
a
He
y
pp
pal Tracy Hein-Evers that
40 students are signed up
for Laffalot summer camp
July 20 through 24.
•Returned advances of
$10,000 from the Title I
Disadvantaged Children
fund and $7,000 from the
Improving Teacher Quality fund to the general
fund.
•Hired Matt Hart on a
three-year contract as
building
maintenance
supervisor.
•Accepted
donations
totaling $75.
avenly B
irth
Brandon
d
Scott Hilbert
ay
Corn ........................3.72
July corn ................3.70
Beans ......................9.83
July crop ................9.83
Wheat ......................5.01
July crop ................5.01
July corn ................3.77
Aug. corn ................3.81
Nov. corn ................3.63
‘I am confident that a syringe exchange
program will be operated as part of a
comprehensive public health response in
Madison County.’ – State Health Commissioner Jerome Adams
H
Lotteries
INDIANAPOLIS — Madison
County will launch a needle
exchange program to try to stem the
spread of Hepatitis C spread
through intravenous drug use.
State health officials on Tuesday
approved the Madison County plan
under a law the General Assembly
passed just this spring.
It’s the first community to use the
law outside Scott County, where an
HIV outbreak fueled support for the
legislation.
“Madison County officials led a
discussion with their community
and they submitted a detailed analysis of their Hepatitis C epidemic
and their plan to combat it,” said
Indiana State Health Commissioner
Jerome Adams. “I am confident that
a syringe exchange program will be
operated as part of a comprehensive
public health response in Madison
6/24/83 - 7/18/03
Love Mom, Dad, Chris, Leana and family
The Portland
Breakfast Club
2015 Miss
Jay County Fair
QUEEN
PAGEANT
Will Be held
Sunday, June
28th - 7:30 pm
Doors open @
6:30 pm
Reigning Queen –
Abby Muhlenkamp
Location Changed to
Jay County H.S. Auditorium
Family
The Commercial Review
Wednesday, June 24, 2015
Page 3
American Red Cross
blood drive draws 93
By VIRGINIA CLINE
The Commercial Review
An American Red Cross blood
drive was held Tuesday at Jay
Community Center. There were 93
donors.
Receiving gallon awards were
Juanita Basham — seven gallons,
Susan Schrock — 21 gallons, Janice Wendel — eight gallons,
Joseph Reinhard —19 gallons,
Ralph Frazee —19 gallons, Samuel
Crump — eight gallons and Nila
Newton — one gallon.
Also giving were Thomas Clutter, Don Morehous, Marlene Runyon, Barry Geist, Tony Schwieterman, Michael Schmidt, Eldon
Campbell, Shirley Miller, Carol
Mettert, Catherine Gelhaus, Matt
Blackford, Christina Haggard,
Niko Dominguez, Dillion Martinez and Samuel Grubb.
Also Freeda Osenbaugh, Elizabeth Schoenlein, Ernest Schoenlein, Leona Benedict, Ernest
Benedict, Joel Roberts, Tyler
Newell, Bobby Manning, Sally
Montgomery,
Amy
Daniels,
Wanetta Millett, Verena Sutton,
Olivia Braun and Jill Hemmelgarn.
Taking
Note
Also Michael Eads, Sean Knutson, Michele Link, Charlie Bentz,
Dru Hall, Joyce Eldridge, Jack
Freeman, Sue Brunson, Stephanie
Castillo, Kevin Keller, Darrell Borders, Margaret Hummel, Larry
Loyd and Amanda Campbell.
Also Kathryn Martyne, Linda
Shreve, Barbara Fullenkamp,
Susan Thumm, John Hart, Lori
Bantz, Jan Rittenhouse, Denise
Glentzer, Allison Ruiz, Douglas
Shidler, Pam Rogers, Eric Rogers,
Mary Laux and Rheta Kaufman.
Also Kay Haines, Elizabeth
Skiver, Andy Wendel, John Roessner, Ron Laux, Vickie Leonard,
Connie Ronald, Kelsie Walter,
Kiara Walter, Andrea Walter,
Carla Pogue, Jeff Pogue, Franklin
Hogle and Pamela Ray.
Also Ken Wellman, Larry Bar-
nette, James Humbles, Connie
Coleman, Gerald King, Susan
Myers, Karen Wellman, Sophia
Benedict, James Baughman, John
Erickson, Philip Laux, Caleb
Capetillo, Dalton Flatter, Paula
Sibery and Rodney Wolford.
Volunteering were Shirley Herrin, Rose Snow, Carol Stephens,
Barb Bruner, Norma Bickel, Janet
Barrett, Edith Dickey, Bev Bennett, Susie Knittle, Norma Cash,
Jean Rines, Sandy Berg and Betsi
Skiver.
Dean’s list
Tyler Geesaman, Pennville, was
named to the spring semester
dean’s list at Indiana State University in Terre Haute.
Zane Shreve, Redkey, was
named to the spring dean’s list at
Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.
He is majoring in electrical engineering.
Kendra Brunswick, Zachary
Dirmeyer, Karla Eichenauer,
Makayla Grove, Cody Homan and
Lauren Rammel, all of Fort Recovery, were named to the spring
semester dean’s list at Edison
State Community College.
Where is the
entertainment?
By TED KOOSER
U.S. Poet Laureate
Nightmare
Your TV cable’s on the fritz.
Your Xbox is corroded.
Your iPod sits in useless bits.
Your Game Boy just imploded.
Your cell phone? Static’s off the scale.
Your land line? Disconnected.
You’ve got no mail — E, junk or snail.
Your hard drive is infected.
So here you idle, dumb and blue, with children,
spouse and mother — and wish you knew what people
do to entertain each other.
American Life in Poetry
is made possible by The
Poetry
Foundation
(http://www.poetryfoundation.org), publisher of Poetry magazine. It is also supported by the Department
of English at the University
of Nebraska-Lincoln. Poem
copyright ©2014 by Melissa
Balmain,
“Nightmare,”
from Walking in on People,
(Able Muse Press, 2014).
Victim must share her secret
DEAR ABBY: Six months ago,
my best friend’s fiance raped me.
He is a man I’ve known for many
years, and I didn’t see it coming. I
became pregnant but had a miscarriage two months later. I
recently had to have a hysterectomy from damage incurred from
the rape and the miscarriage.
I never went to the police or
pressed charges, and very few
people are aware of the whole
horrific experience. I have been
beyond traumatized by what happened.
My best friend knows nothing
about it, and I have been unable to
face her since that awful night.
We text now and then, and she
keeps asking why I have suddenly
dropped out of her life. I don’t
know if I can tell her the truth.
We were as close as sisters, and I
honestly miss her like crazy, but I
can’t be part of her life if this
monster is in it.
Do I tell the truth? Or do I just
shut her out of my life? This has
taken a physical and emotional
toll on me. Please give me some
advice. — MISSING A FRIEND IN
CANADA
Dear
Abby
DEAR MISSING: Gladly. Find
the nearest rape and sex ual
assault treatment center in your
province and make an appointment im mediately! You need
more help than anyone can give
you in a letter, and the people
there can counsel you not only on
what to do, but also what your
options are at this point. Your
friend should abs olutely be
infor med about what she’s getti ng into if she m ar ries your
rapist, but I do not recommend
that you tell her until you have
strong emotional support beside
you.
DEAR ABBY: Our married son
and two young children live in
Kurdistan, Iraq. They are volunteering for a charity that helps
Syrian refugees. While we admire
their noble efforts, we struggle
with the daily sacrifices this
brings to our whole family.
We work full time and could
save up to visit them, but because
we are not comfortable with their
choice to live in this dangerous
part of the world, we continue to
refuse their invitation. What do
you advise? Are we being self-centered? — SO FAR AWAY
DEAR SO FAR AWAY: No, you
are being rational and self-protective. Not only do I not think you
are self-centered, I’m suggesting
you keep them in your prayers
and use Skype or video chatting
to stay in contact.
DEAR ABBY: Recently a friend
invited me to a sex toy party. The
saleswoman hosting the event is a
distant acquaintance.
What is the most polite way to
ask her if she has informed her
family of her profession? Is it OK
to attend if she hasn’t told her relatives she sells sex products? If I
refuse her invitation, would it be
polite to enclose an order for
some of her products? I prefer to
buy from a reputable saleswoman
rather than some anonymous
American
Life in Poetry
A poem whose subject
needs no introduction.
Melissa Balmain lives
in New York State, and
her most recent book is
Walking in on People,
from Able Muse Press.
She has been a finalist for Nemerov Sonnet Award,
the Donald Justice Poetry and the X.J. Kennedy ParPrize,
the
Howard ody Award.
website. — AWKWARD IN ILLINOIS
DEA R AWKWARD: I don’ t
think it would be appropriate to
ask your hostess whether she has
infor med her family about her
career, although I suspect she has
made them aware of it. And if
you prefer to decline the invitation, I’m sure enclosing an order
for her products would be fine
with her — and possibly the start
of an ongoing business relationship.
———
Dear Abby is written by Abigail
Van Buren, also known as Jeanne
Phillips, and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact
Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com
or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
Good advice for everyone —
teens to seniors — is in “The
Anger in All of Us and How to
Deal With It.” To order, send your
name and mailing address, plus
check or money order for $7 (U.S.
funds) to: Dear Abby, Anger Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL
61054-0447. (Shipping and handling are included in the price.)
Poem reprinted by permission of Melissa Balmain
and Able Muse Press. Introduction copyright ©2015 by
The Poetry Foundation.
The introduction’s author,
Ted Kooser, served as United States Poet Laureate
Consultant in Poetry to the
Library of Congress from
2004 to 2006. We do not
accept unsolicited manuscripts.
Hints from
Heloise
Traveling cookies
Dear Heloise: When
I visit my grandchildren, I take them
Carrying
cookies.
them in a suitcase is
more economical than
mailing, so I pack
them in wax-paper or
plastic-wrap boxes.
They work beautifully.
Of course, the cookies
need to be a size that
fit in the boxes standing on end. — Joy E.
in Nevada
Send a great hint to
Heloise at P.O. Box
79500, San Antonio, TX
78279-5000; FAX to 1210-HELOISE or email
to:
Heloise(at)Heloise.com.
Send Pet Pal photos
to: Heloise - Pets, to
the same address listed above.
Community Calendar
Notices will appear in
the Community Calendar
as space is available. To
submit an item, call family editor Virginia Cline at
(260) 726-8141.
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. each
Wednesday upstairs at
True Value Hardware,
North Meridian Street,
Portland. For more information, call (260) 729-2532.
AL-ANON
FAMILY
GROUP — New BeginToday
ALCOHOLICS ANONY- nings, a support group for
MOUS — Will meet from friends and families of
Sudoku
Sudoku Puzzle #3673-M
1
1
2
5
4
3
6
7
8
9
9
7
4 6 3
2
5
8
3
7 4 1
6
4
2
4
6
9
8
1
5
7
© 2009 Hometown Content
Medium
Tuesday’s Solution
Sudoku Solution #3672-M
The objective is to fill a
nine-by nine grid so that
each column, each row, and
each of the nine three-bythree boxes (also called
blocks or regions) contains
the digits from 1 to 9 only
one time each.
5
3
4
7
1
2
6 3 7 9
4 8 2 6
5 1 9 8
1
9
3
2
7
8
7
5
2
9
4
6
© 2009 Hometown Content
6
4
8
1
5
3
8
1
7
5
6
9
4
3
2
2
6
9
3
8
4
5
1
7
3
8
5
4
2
7
1
9
6
4
7
6
8
9
1
2
5
3
9
2
1
6
3
5
8
7
4
9187 or Dave Keen at (260) be held at noon Sunday at Bring food and family
Haynes Park in Portland. information.
335-2152.
COMMUNITY RELATIONS TEAM — Will play
euchre at 6 p.m. the second
and fourth Thursday of
each month at the telephone warehouse, 301 E.
Sixth St. in Portland. The
Thursday
NOBLE BUSY BEES — public is invited.
Will meet at 9 a.m. Thursday at Richards Restau- Saturday
ALCOHOLICS ANONYrant. Mary Strosnider is
the hostess and Esther MOUS — Will meet at 10
Marchal will give devo- a.m. upstairs at True
tions. Wear red, white and Value Hardware, North
blue. Program books will Meridian Street, Portland.
For more information, call
be completed.
CELEBRATE RECOV- (260) 729-2532.
PORTLAND FARMERS’
ERY — A 12-step Christian
recovery program, the MARKET — Will be open
group will meet at 10 a.m. from 8 a.m. to noon each
and 6:30 p.m. each Thurs- Saturday at the Jay Counday at A Second Chance At ty Courthouse.
Life Ministries, 109 S.
Commerce St. in Portland. Reunions
For more information, call
SHAWVER/SHAUVER
The West Jay Community Center located in Dunkirk,
Judy Smith at (260) 726- FAMILY REUNION — Will
IN has an opening for a part-time position for Community
Center Administrator. The administrator's position will be
responsible for the daily operations of the Center including
Looking for a Motivated,
coordination of activities, facility management, budgeting,
Creative, self-starter for
record keeping and correspondence, grant writing and
fundraising, and marketing of the center.
alcoholics, the group will
meet at 6:30 p.m. each
Wednesday in the Zion
Lutheran Church, 218 E.
High St., Portland. For
more information, call
(260) 726-8229.
Community Center
Administrator
Part Time Director of the
Jay County Solid Waste District.
Experience in office management,
accounting, Quick Books and budgets
helpful. Organizational and people skills
a must. Three day work week. Resumes
accepted through July 3, 2015.
Mail resumes to or deliver to:
Jay County Solid Waste District
Attn: Board of Directors
5948 W. St Rd 67
Portland, In 47371
Preference will be given to candidates living in or near
the Dunkirk area.
Candidates for the position should possess effective
interaction and communication skills.
Resumes are requested immediately.
Return Resume to:
E-mail: [email protected]
Fax: 765-768-1544 or mail
West Jay Community Center
P.O. Box 101
Dunkirk, IN 47336
Opinion
Page 4
The Commercial Review
Wednesday, June 24, 2015
How much has attitude changed?
By JACK RONALD
The Commercial Review
The ugliness of it was casual,
and that made it even uglier.
Growing up in Jay County in
the middle of the last century,
my generation was awash in
casual racism. It was something
we inherited from those who
went before us, but by the 1960s
it was also something we knew
made no sense.
Stop by a coffee shop in, say,
1963 and you were almost certain to hear “the N word,” casually. No big deal.
Ours was a generation that
found bigotry infested our childhood games. A couple of weeks
ago, I wrote a column about a
game of tag; and I’m still bothered by the fact that part of the
ritual before each game
involved the phrase, “Round as a
moon, dark as a coon.”
Ours was a generation that
routinely said, “Eeny, meeny,
miney, moe, catch a (Fill in the
Back
in the
Saddle
blank) by the toe” at recess time
at elementary school. A few
years later, some smarter parents were insisting on the word
“tiger” in its place.
And yet, here we were in the
white bread American Midwest,
with no more than a handful of
black families to encounter in
our everyday lives.
What was your opportunity
for interaction with an AfricanAmerican when you were growing up in Portland in the 1960s?
Her name was Wanda Watkins.
She was a sweet and smart kid
who lived on West Water Street,
and I think her family attended
the A.M.E. Church that once
stood on East Water next to
what is now Jay Community
Center.
What was your opportunity
for interaction with an AfricanAmerican when you were growing up in Dunkirk during the
same period? It might have been
George Miller, a biracial kid
who attended Dunkirk schools
for a time while he was living
with his grandmother. He later
went on to a distinguished —
and I mean distinguished —
career as an astrophysicist.
But in those days, he was just
a black kid with red hair and
freckles.
Beyond school, there were a
handful of A.M.E. families.
Ruth Nelson and her sister,
India Evans, did housekeeping
for a number of families, including mine. And Ruth is a permanent part of my childhood memories. She was like an extra parent.
While there was no tension,
while there was no overt bigotry,
there remained this hard-toexplain undercurrent of disparagement.
Maybe some of it had to do
with the division between rural
and urban.
We, after all, were hayseeds.
Despite the presence of a handful of families, most of us associated African-Americans with
the big city.
But the real answer is that the
Civil War wasn’t over.
The Union had won on the battlefield, but the Reconstruction
Era and the first half of the 20th
century belonged to the South.
Jim Crow was alive and well.
Every day’s papers brought
news of civil rights workers
being harassed or beaten or
murdered.
And in a very real way, the
South — the hateful principles
that led the Confederacy to war
— set the tone for small town
Midwestern America in that
era. Hollywood had glamorized
it with “The Birth of a Nation”
and “Gone with the Wind.” So
small town Indiana was ripe territory for George Wallace and
Lester Maddox and the vestiges
of the Klan that still hung
around.
That was then. This is now.
But how much has changed?
That seems a valid question in
the wake of last week’s horrific
church slayings in South Carolina.
Have we made any progress?
Have we cast off the infestation
of casual bigotry?
Or are we, when you peal back
the niceties, not all that far from
where we were a few generations back?
I’d like to hope that the Jay
County of today is different
from the Jay County of my
youth. But I think all of us need
to ask ourselves whether that is
actually true.
Water issue
can’t be ignored
Take this church seriously
By ABDUL HAKIM-SHABAZZ
IndyPoltics.Org
If you’re one of the people who
don’t take The First Church of
Cannabis (TFCC) seriously, you
should, because they do.
It might seem easy to dismiss
Church Founder and Grand Poobah
— I refer to him affectionately as the
High Priest — Bill Levin based on his
appearance, but I warn you that you
underestimate him at your own peril.
Levin is a lot of things, but stupid
is not one of them.
He took an idea I came up with in a
blog post and turned it into a faith
that has some Indiana lawmakers
and law enforcement trying to figure
out exactly what to do.
As you know the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) goes
into effect on July 1 and the first service at TFCC starts at 12:01 a.m. and
concludes with a “ceremonial light
up.”
It might seem easy to dismiss them
at first, but it’s important to remember that under RFRA, the government has to cite a “compelling state
interest” to crack down on your religious practice. Levin can make a
good argument that their use of marijuana is part of their legitimate religious faith.
•TFCC has been recognized by the
IRS as a legitimate church.
•They have procured a site (which
has been used as a church).
•They’ve outlined procedures on
how the service will be conducted.
•There is federal case law on the
books that provides an exemption
regarding controlled substances
under the federal RFRA statute. It
was a unanimous federal appellate
decision, by the way.
•In many cases where defendants
US PS 125820
Abdul
HakimShabazz
tried to use a religious exemption as
a defense they were doing things
with marijuana that had nothing to
do with religion, like major drug trafficking or driving under the influence.
•And Indiana, like many other
jurisdictions, has taken steps to
lessen the penalties for marijuana
possession.
Also, there is the question as to
what will law enforcement do? I
spoke briefly with Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department Chief
Rick Hite. The chief said they are
keeping a close eye on the situation,
but he was determined that in a day
and age of camera phones and
YouTube clips, he was not going to
provide anyone with “cheap entertainment.” So if anyone is expecting
an Elliott Ness type raid on July 1 at
TFCC, they are probably going to be
disappointed. And I can also promise
that cameras will be rolling the night
of the first service.
And if this goes to trial, law
enforcement knows (and prosecutors
privately admit) they are going to
have trouble prosecuting the case
because RFRA is a valid defense.
And here is some more food for
thought: Can Indiana lawmakers
come back in January and try to
amend RFRA without reopening the
whole can of worms that started this
controversy in the first place?
... they also
don’t want to go
anywhere near
anything that
might have RFRA
attached to it if
they can help it.
Trust me: I am not saying anything that hasn’t already been discussed by folks who get paid to pay
attention to this stuff. I am just saying it publicly. Even my friends in
the governor’s office privately admit
that the TFCC is not a priority. Of
course they also don’t want to go
anywhere near anything that might
have RFRA attached to it if they can
help it.
So if you think this entire situation is a joke, here’s a newsflash, a lot
of people are taking this very seriously. There is only one person who I
know who is enjoying the entire
spectacle. And he’s incredibly good
looking and is great at making life
more interesting here in Indiana.
And for the record, I, uh he, does
not smoke pot. But he will be there
for the inaugural service.
••••••••••
Hakim-Shabazz is an attorney and
the editor and publisher of IndyPoltics.Org. He is also a frequent contributor to numerous Indiana media
outlets. He can be reached at
[email protected]
The Washington Post
When rivers, streams
and reservoirs are low, as
they are in California,
people start digging holes.
Large, unseen pools of
water are trapped in the
spongy rock and soil of
the world’s aquifers, sometimes fairly close to the
surface, sometimes deep
underground.
Tapped
groundwater can save
communities from economic or humanitarian
catastrophe. But in too
many places, humans are
depleting this crucial
reserve, just as climate
change begins taking its
toll.
A NASA study released
this last week provides
authoritative estimates of
the state of 37 major
aquifers around the globe.
Using satellites that measured minor variations in
the earth’s gravitational
pull between 2003 and
2013, researchers found
that 21 of these aquifers
are being run down.
A handful of massive
aquifers in Africa, the
Middle East and Central
Asia were worst off, seeing
little to no refilling to offset withdrawals over the
decade of study. The Arabian Aquifer System and
the Indus Basin were particularly troubled. But
Western countries haven’t
done a great job of aquifer
management, either. Miners in Australia’s Canning
Basin and farmers in California’s Central Valley are
tapping
groundwater
resources at unsustainable rates. Groundwater
already accounts for more
than half of California’s
water use, a proportion
that may well continue to
rise.
In wealthy countries
with well-developed governing
institutions,
there’s simply no excuse
for failing to take care of
this vital resource. The
best way to promote
rational consumption is to
end government subsidies, explicit or implicit,
for overusing water, particularly in dry areas, then
to establish functioning,
transparent and efficient
markets for surfacewater
and groundwater alike.
Yet places such as California still operate on a system of confusing historical water rights and
claims that aren’t conducive to conservation or
to getting water where it’s
Guest
Editorial
most needed. The state is
finally starting to regulate
groundwater, but its leaders should aim for fundamental reform.
The challenge is harder
in poorer parts of the
world, where historical
and cultural claims to
groundwater are also
often
strong
but
economies are less diverse
and institutions are weaker. In the long term, the
solution is similar to that
in developed nations:
Remove irrational incentives to overuse or inefficiently divert water, then
build transparent markets
that force people to
account for the full costs
of the resources they use.
In the short term, transition costs might be high
and political forces incapable of making such a
leap.
to
J.S.
According
Famiglietti, the author of
the NASA study, the first
thing to do is establish the
of
groundwater
size
reserves, in a process akin
to estimating subterranean oil reserves, so
that people know how
much is left. From there
should come effective
monitoring of groundwater use, pinpointing who’s
taking how much and for
what purpose. This information will make it easier
to identify opportunities
to use water more efficiently, particularly in
agriculture, without suddenly pushing large numbers of people out of agricultural work. Along the
way, economic growth will
diversify employment and
reduce opposition to
broader reform, a 2003
United Nations report
notes, and institutions
might strengthen enough
to effect broader reform.
Many people didn’t need
satellites to know that
aquifers are in trouble.
They are drilling deeper
and deeper for groundwater. The poor can’t afford
to construct ever-deeper
wells, so they will be out
of the game in stressed
areas. Governments cannot ignore this issue for
long.
The Commercial Review
The Commercial Review is published daily except
Sundays and six holidays (New Years, Memorial Day,
Fourth of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, and
Christmas) by The Graphic Printing Co. Inc., 309 W.
Main St., Portland, Indiana 47371. Periodical postage
paid at Portland, Indiana. Postmaster: Send address
changes to The Commercial Review, 309 W. Main St., P.O.
Box 1049, Portland, Indiana 47371 or call (260) 726-8141.
We welcome letters to the editor. Letters should be
700 words or fewer, signed and include a phone number
for verification purposes. We reserve the right to edit
letters for content and clarity. Email letters to
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HUGH N. RONALD (1911-1983), Publisher Emeritus
JACK RONALD
RAY COONEY
President and Publisher
Editor
JEANNE LUTZ
Advertising Manager
VOLUME 143–NUMBER 46
WEDNESDAY EVENING, JUNE 24, 2015
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have government without newspapers or newspapers
without government I should not hesitate to prefer the
latter.” – Thomas Jefferson
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Wednesday, June 24, 2015
Nation/World
Page 5
France addresses spying revelation
By LORI HINNANT
and ANGELA CHARLTON
Associated Press
PARIS — Angry and embarrassed, France summoned the
U.S. ambassador today to
respond to the revelations by
WikiLeaks that the U.S. National Security Agency eavesdropped on three successive
French presidents and other
top officials.
The release of the spying revelations appeared to be timed to
coincide with a final vote today
in the French Parliament on a
bill allowing broad new surveillance powers, in particular to
counter terrorism threats.
French President Hollande,
calling the U.S. spying an
“unacceptable”
security
breach, convened two emergency meetings as a result of
the disclosures about the NSA’s
spying. The first was with
France’s top security officials,
the second with leading legislators, many of whom have
already voted for the new surveillance measure.
Hollande was to speak today
with President Barack Obama
on the issue.
The documents appear to capture top French officials in Paris
between 2006 and 2012 talking
candidly about Greece’s economy, relations with Germany, and
American spying on allies. While
there were no huge surprises, the
release of the documents late
Tuesday angered and embarrassed French officialdom.
The top floor of the U.S.
Embassy, visible from France’s
presidential Elysee Palace,
reportedly was filled with spying
equipment
hidden
behind
trompe l’oeil paintings of windows, according to the Liberation
newspaper, which partnered
with WikiLeaks and the website
Mediapart on the documents.
U.S. Ambassador Jane Hartley
was summoned to the French
Foreign Ministry. Hollande is
also sending France’s top intelligence coordinator to the U.S.
shortly, to ensure that promises
made after earlier NSA spying
revelations in 2013 and 2014 have
been kept, the spokesman said.
Prime Minister Manuel Valls
Search heads
back to woods
In review
Addressed
BOSTON — Boston
Marathon
bomber
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev
returned to court
today to be formally
sentenced to death and
listened as victims and
their loved ones came
forward one by one to
berate him for his
“cowardly” and “disgusting” acts.
“He can’t possibly
have had a soul to do
such a horrible thing,”
said
Karen
Rand
McWatters, who lost a
leg in the attack and
whose best friend, 29year-old Krystle Campbell, was killed.
Campbell’s mother,
Campbell,
Patricia
was the first person to
address the court. She
looked across the room
at Tsarnaev, seated
about 20 feet away, and
spoke directly to him.
By JOHN KEKIS
Associated Press
BELLMONT, N.Y. —
Hundreds of searchers
checked ATV trails and logging roads and went doorto-door in far northern
New York trying to close in
on two murderers who
escaped from a maximumsecurity prison more than
two weeks ago.
Spurred on by fresh evidence, law enforcement
officers
methodically
combed through heavy
woods on Tuesday looking
for inmates David Sweat
and Richard Matt.
Authorities began committing heavy resources to
the remote woods this week
after leads from a hunting
camp that was apparently
3
Leaving
NEW YORK — Fox
News Channel and
Sara Palin are cutting
ties again.
The network said
today that it was not
renewing Palin’s contract as a contributor.
The
professional
divorce, first reported
in
Politico,
was
described as amicable.
The 2008 Republican
vice presidential candidate had joined Fox
to great fanfare in 2010
and left three years
later
after
some
unpleasantness.
Moving?
LONDON — Queen
Elizabeth II may have
to move out of Buckingham Palace during
much-needed renovations to the residence,
which has not been
substantially redecorated since she took
the throne in 1952,
royal officials said
today.
Officials say the
palace needs an estimated 150 million
pounds ($237 million)
of renovation and
upgrades, including
replacing old plumbing and wiring and
removing
asbestos.
Having her move out
during the work is one
option being considered.
—Associated Press
broken into led to “good
evidence,
DNA
data”
regarding the inmates, said
Gov. Andrew Cuomo. Roadblocks were in place Tuesday around the remote
hamlets of Owls Head and
Mountain View in an area
of rugged terrain about 20
miles west of Clinton
County Correctional Facility.
Investigators conducted
grid searches in the thick,
mosquito-infested forests
and also checked railroad
beds, said Franklin County
Sheriff Kevin Mulverhill.
He said people were going
to seasonal properties looking for signs of intruders.
“If they’re here, we’re
going to find them,” Mulverhill said.
16th ANNUAL
Hardened
TEHRAN, Iran —
Iran has hardened its
stance less than a week
before the deadline for
a nuclear deal, with its
top leader rejecting a
long-term freeze on
nuclear research as it
ratified a bill banning
access to military sites
and scientists.
Ayatollah
Ali
Khamenei also insisted that Iran will only
sign a deal if international sanctions are
lifted first, which
could further complicate the negotiations.
The ratified bill, now
binding law, calls for
all sanctions to be lifted the first day of
implementation.
The supreme leader
has backed his negotiators amid criticism
from hard-liners, but
his latest remarks may
narrow their room to
maneuver ahead of a
self-imposed June 30
deadline.
said the U.S. must do everything
it can, and quickly, to “repair the
damage” to U.S.-French relations
from the revelations, which he
called “a very serious violation
of the spirit of trust” between
the allies.
“If the fact of the revelations
today does not constitute a real
surprise for anyone, that in no
way lessens the emotion and the
anger. They are legitimate.
France will not tolerate any
action threatening its security
and fundamental interests,” he
said.
on
3
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT
SaturdayJuly 4, 2015
DUNKIRK CITY PARK
Registration 7 am
3 on 3 Games begin at 8 am
3 AGE DIVISIONS
14 yrs & Under
Associated Press/Walla Walla Union-Bulletin/Michael Lopez
17 yrs & under boys & girls
18 yrs & Up
Trophies Awarded To All Players
In Each Division
Walla Walla work
REGISTRATION FORMS AT NEWS & SUN OFFICE
CONTACT: CONNIE RETTER: 765-768-6772
LYNYARD GOETZ: 765-744-4041
Pioneer Middle Schools' Aiden Carver, 11, left, and Gillian
Wardield, 13, change the cables to their quadcopter motors to make
sure it flies correctly during summer camp Tuesday at Garrison Middle
School in Walla Walla, Wash.
PRE-ENTRY REGISTRATION DEADLINE: June 27, 2015
Complete set of Rules to be Passed Out at Registration.
Pre-entry Fee is $40.00 per Team.
Late Entry Fee is $48.00 per Team after June 27, 2015
Down ...
Continued from page 1
Very few lawmakers rose
to say the flag should stay;
some said they were saving
speeches for what promises to be an emotional
debate later this summer.
Lawmakers then prayed
for state Sen. Clementa
Pinckney, who joined the
legislature in 1997 and
who, as pastor of the
Emanuel
African
Methodist
Episcopal
Church in Charleston, was
among the dead.
“I ask that in the memory of Mr. Pinckney that we
are generous in spirit, gracious in our conversation
and please — even if we
disagree, let’s agree to disagree agreeably,” Democratic Rep. Gilda CobbHunter urged her colleagues. “Those nine families have shown us how to
do it. I would strongly suggest we take a cue from
them.”
Dylann Storm Roof, who
faces murder and gun
charges in the church
attack, had posed in photos
displaying
Confederate
flags and burning or desecrating U.S. flags, and told
a friend that he was planning to do something “for
the white race.”
Haley’s call to put the
Confederate flag in a museum was quickly seconded
by leading Republicans
including U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Senate Majority
Leader Mitch McConnell,
giving others a political
opening to announce their
moves. Many cited the
church slayings as they
abandoned the long-held
position that even debating
the status of the flag would
be too racially divisive
today.
“Last week’s terrorizing
act of violence shook the
very core of every South
Carolinian,” South Carolina House Speaker Jay
Lucas said in support of
the measure.
And once South Carolina took action, other states
moved quickly.
Mississippi
House
Speaker Philip Gunn
called for removing the
Confederate emblem from
the state flag. Both Democrats and Republicans in
Tennessee said a bust of
Confederate general and
Ku Klux Klan leader
Nathan Bedford Forrest
must go from the Senate.
Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe wants vanity license
plates depicting the Confederate flag replaced.
McConnell joined Kentucky’s Republican nominee for governor, Matt
Bevin, in calling for the
removal of a statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis from their state
Capitol’s rotunda.
Big businesses also took
action: Wal-Mart Stores
Inc., Amazon.com Inc.,
EBay Inc., Target Corp.
and Sears Holding Corp.
announced they would no
longer sell merchandise
featuring the Confederate
flag. And the Valley Forge
Flag Co., which has sent
flags into battle and to the
moon, said it won’t make
them anymore.
“When you have a sea
change moment like you
have with the tragedy in
Charleston, we felt it was
simply the right thing to
do,” Valley Forge Vice
President Reggie VandenBosch said. “We don’t want
to do anything that causes
pain or disunity for people.”
“
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Entertainment
Page 6
The Commercial Review
Wednesday, June 24, 2015
J Taylors will
perform Sunday
Fort
Recovery
Friends of the Arts
will host its first
evening show of the
summer Sunday.
The group’s summer
concert series continues at 8 p.m. Sunday
when The J Taylors
perform at Van Trees
Park’s Hein Amphitheatre. The series began
June 14 with an afternoon performance of
The Magic of Disney.
Jonathan
and
Janelle Taylor of Fort
Wayne make up the J
Taylors
duo
(http://www.thejtaylors.com). They perform classic rock,
country and a variety
of other genres.
After taking the
Independence
Day
weekend off, the series
will continue with The
Junkyard Band on
July 12.
Classes scheduled
Arts Place will continue to hold Arts in
the Parks sessions
through the end of
July.
Upcoming offerings
in Portland include a
parade float design
class from 9 a.m. to
noon June 29 through
July 3. The float the
class creates will be
part of the city’s
Fourth of July parade.
There will also be a
cake decorating class
July 30, a balloon
Events
roundup
sculpture and paper
mache class June 29
through July 2 and a
“Create Your Own Cartoon Characters” class
July 1 and 2.
Other upcoming sessions include embroidery and puppetry
July 1 through 3 in
Dunkirk, and cartoon
characters June 29 and
30, weaving and textiles June 30 and July 2
and ballroom dancing
June 30 and July 2 in
Geneva.
For more information, visit www.artsland.org.
Concert set
The Webster-Depot
Park summer concert
series will continue
Saturday as the Jay
Fox Band takes the
stage at 7 p.m.
The band, based out
of Fort Wayne, will
perform polka, waltz,
big band, country rock
and bluegrass music.
The group has performed in Europe as
well as Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba.
The concert series
will continue with Harmony Band on July 11.
Photo provided
The U.S. Army Field Band’s Jazz Ambassadors will perform a free concert at 7 p.m. Friday at
the Hudson Family Park amphitheatre in Portland.
Jazz concert is Friday
By KATHRYNE RUBRIGHT
The Commercial Review
The U.S. Army Field Band’s Jazz
Ambassadors will perform Friday at
the Hudson Family Park amphitheatre in Portland.
The free 7 p.m. concert presented
by Arts Place is to help make up for a
cancellation by the Field Band’s Concert Band and Soldiers’ Chorus.
Those groups were scheduled to perform together March 1, but could not
travel to Portland because of snow.
That was “a real disappointment,”
said Eric Rogers, executive director
of Arts Place.
Arts Place had been waiting four
years to present the Soldiers’ Chorus,
and anticipated Jay County High
School’s auditorium to be full, with
more than 800 in attendance.
But the musicians couldn’t make
it, and a busy touring schedule meant
their next availability is not until fall
2017. The groups will return then,
with the specific date yet to be deter-
mined, Rogers said. In the meantime,
the Field Band offered Arts Place an
open date in the Jazz Ambassadors’
schedule.
“I wanted to see if we could work
together and give the Portland community a concert,” said Adam Getz,
tour coordinator for the Jazz Ambassadors.
The date fits between a Wednesday
concert in Indianapolis and a Saturday performance in Wilmington,
Ohio. The Concert Band and Soldiers’ Chorus are also playing a
string of Indiana and Ohio venues.
The military bands have the U.S. split
into five regions, Getz said, and it is
currently the Army Field Band’s
turn to play concerts in Indiana’s
region.
Though the Jazz Ambassadors
clearly have a focus on jazz, there will
be something for everyone, Getz said.
“The concert is designed to appeal
to people of all ages and all interest
levels in music,” Getz said.
The concert will go through each
period of jazz’s evolution, Rogers
said, from its early period, through
swing and bebop, and into modern
jazz.
Patriotic music will also be featured. Veterans in attendance will be
encouraged to stand up when their
branch’s song is played.
Master Sergeant Marva Lewis will
be a “fantastic featured vocalist,”
Getz said. Lewis sang in an a cappella choir in college, performed in the
U.S. Army Solider Show and has been
a principal vocalist for the Jazz
Knights at the United States Military
Academy.
After the concert, the band members will stay and talk to community
members.
“A lot of times veterans will stop by
and share their story,” Getz said.
Tickets are not required for the
concert. In case of inclement weather, the concert will be moved to the
Jay County High School auditorium.
Upcoming events
Today
Pennville Legion
Lions Fair
Pennville Park
Voices from the Soul
Concert
8 p.m.
Emens Auditorium
Ball State University
Muncie
Thursday
Pennville Legion
Lions Fair
Pennville Park
Bela Fleck and
Abigail Washburn
Concert
7 p.m.
Minnetrista Center
1200 Minnetrista Parkway
Muncie
The Wizard of Oz
Musical
7:30 p.m.
Muncie Civic Theatre
216 E. Main St.
Muncie
Whoʼs Got the Will?
Dinner theatre
6:15 p.m.
Arena Dinner Theatre
719 Rockhill St.
Fort Wayne
Michael Martin Band
Concert
11 a.m.
Canan Commons
Downtown Muncie
Buskerfest
Street performances
4 to 11 p.m.
Downtown Fort Wayne
Drum Corps International
7 p.m.
Scheumann Stadium
Ball State University
Muncie
Fort Wayne
Funk Orchestra
Concert
9 p.m.
The Phoenix
1122 Broadway
Fort Wayne
Maria Stein Country Fest
Let the Good Times Roll:
2291 St. Johns Road
A Tribute to the Legends
Maria Stein, Ohio
of Blues and Jazz
Concert
Daddyʼs Dyinʼ
2 and 8 p.m.
Whoʼs Got the Will?
The Wizard of Oz
Arts United Center
Dinner theatre
Musical
303 E. Main St.
6:15 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
Fort Wayne
Arena Dinner Theatre
Muncie Civic Theatre
719 Rockhill St.
216 E. Main St.
Sunday
Fort Wayne
Muncie
Miss Jay County
Fair Queen Pageant
Saturday
Ahn Trio
7:30 p.m.
Jay Fox Band
Concert
Jay
County
High School
Concert
8 p.m.
2072 W. Indiana 67
7
p.m.
Emens Auditorium
Portland
Webster-Depot Park
Ball State University
Dunkirk
Muncie
The J Taylors
Concert
The
Wizard
of
Oz
Grossology
8 p.m.
Musical
Zoo event
Van Trees Park
7:30
p.m.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Fort Recovery
Muncie Civic Theatre
Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo
216 E. Main St.
3411 Sherman Blvd.
The Wizard of Oz
Muncie
Fort Wayne
Musical
2 p.m.
Central Indiana
Friday
Muncie Civic Theatre
Gun
Show
Jazz Ambassadors
216 E. Main St.
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Concert
Delaware County
7 p.m.
Fairgrounds
Hudson Family
1210
N. Wheeling Ave.
Park Amphitheatre
Muncie
South Wayne Street
Portland
Muppets Most Wanted
Moonlight movie
Pennville Legion
7 p.m.
Lions Fair
Canan Commons
Pennville Park
Downtown Muncie
The J Taylors
Maria Stein Country Fest
Concert
2291 St. Johns Road
7:30 p.m.
Maria Stein, Ohio
Meunsterberg Plaza
Indiana 218 and U.S. 27
Daddyʼs Dyinʼ
Berne
Muncie
Central Indiana
Gun Show
9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Delaware County
Fairgrounds
1210 N. Wheeling Ave.
Muncie
LoneRaven
Concert
6:30 p.m.
Lakeshore Park
100 Lakeshore Drive
Celina, Ohio
Maria Stein Country Fest
2291 St. Johns Road
Maria Stein, Ohio
Walt Schmitmeyer
and the Moonlighters
Concert
6:30 p.m.
Crown Pavilion
New Bremen, Ohio
July 1
The Doobie Brothers
Concert
6:30 p.m.
Foellinger Outdoor Theater
3411 Sherman Blvd.
Fort Wayne
50th Birthday Celebration
Zoo event
11 a.m.
Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo
3411 Sherman Blvd.
Fort Wayne
Fall Out Boy
and Wiz Khalifa
Concert
7 p.m.
Klipsch Music Center
Strohl Appliance & Electronics
1513 N Meridian Street, Portland, IN
260-726-7136
“Savings throughout the store”
June 24-July 3
1940-2015
Enjoy Lunch...
Friday, June 26
11am-2pm
GE Appliance Sale
Electronics - Battery Sale
Scrapbook Specials
Traeger Grills
Register to Win a GE 11 cu ft Chest Freezer
No Purchase Necessary
Ribbon Cutting Friday, June 26 at 12:30
The Commercial Review
Wednesday, June 24, 2015
Health
Page 7
Get relief from sunburn
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· Get out of the sun
the moment you first
feel irritation. Your skin
may not be red, but irritation may be the first
indication that you are
being burned by the sun.
ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS
Malcolm C. George D.D.S. • 112 N. Ship St., Portland, IN • (260) 726-4710
· The American Academy of Dermatology
notes that sunburn may
lead to dehydration.
Drink plenty of water to
keep your body well
hydrated.
· Blisters may occur if
sunburn is particularly
bad. Do not succumb to
the temptation of popping the blisters, as
doing so may result in
an infection.
· Take a dose of
ibuprofen to reduce
swelling and counteract
the pain. Ibuprofen also
may help prevent some
long-term damage.
· If a blistering burn
covers more than 20 percent of the body, seek
medical attention. In
addition, visit your
physician if a sunburn
is accompanied by fever
· Take cool baths or and chills.
healing.
showers to relieve the
· Keep sunburn covpain and heat in the
Sunburn
can
be
skin. Cool, damp towels ered up with tightly
painful
and
increase
woven clothing to aid in
also can do the trick.
Adams
Physical Therapy Services, Inc.
Live Free From Pain!
Two Convenient Locations to Serve You:
111 West North Street
Portland, IN 47371
(260) 726-6828
Monday 8-5:00 Tuesday 12-7:00 Wednesday 8-12:00
Thursday 8-5:00 Friday 8-5:00 Select Saturdays
Oral & Facial
Cosmetic Surgery Center
BERNARD B. DREIMAN, D.D.S.
Specializing in
•ORAL SURGERY
• FACIAL And NECK
LIPOSUCTION
• FACIAL COSMETIC
IMPLANTS
• LASER FACIAL SKIN
RESURFACING
• FACE LIFT
Procedures Performed In The Office
260-726-3004
Evening & Sat.
Appointments
Available
910 East Washington Street, Suite 3
Winchester, IN 47394
(765) 584-3665
Toll Free: 1-888-222-0130
www.adamsptservices.com
Danny L. Ahrens
Hearing Instrument Specialist
765-348-3558
1608 N. Cherry St.
Hartford City, IN 47348
your risk for skin cancer, so prevention and
treatment should be
taken seriously.
260-726-7346
111 W. North St.
Portland, IN 47371
This Health Page Proudly Brought To You
By These Outstanding Health Professionals.
81
41
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· Use a moisturizing
lotion with aloe vera.
Avoid moisturizers with
petroleum, as they will
lock in heat.
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AI AC
CA LA E
TO LL BL
26 D
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0- A
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Sunburn is something
nearly everyone will
experience at least once
in
their
lifetimes.
Though men, women
and children should
look to prevent sunburn
entirely, sometimes sunburns occur, making
those exposed to too
much sun uncomfortable and possibly even
dealing with considerable pain.
Sunburn is marked by
red, sensitive skin that
can be hot to the touch.
Inflammation and blistering may occur. The
Skin Cancer Foundation
says that while sunburn
may seem like a temporary irritation, it can
cause long-lasting damage to the skin. Treating
sunburn may require
several
different
approaches.
Comics
Page 8
SPEED BUMP
Dave Coverly
The Commercial Review
Wednesday, June 24, 2015
3STATEWIDE
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70 INSTRUCTIO
N,
STRUGGLING WITH
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Call The Addiction Hope
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assessment. 844-8388002
ACORN STAIRLIFTS.
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ADVERTISERS:
You
can place a 25-word
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than 140 newspapers
across the state for as little as $340.00 with one
order and paying with
one check through ICAN,
Indiana Classified Advertising Network. For Information contact the classified department of your
local newspaper or call
ICAN direct at Hoosier
State Press Association,
(317) 803-4772.
Peanuts
Rose is Rose
AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here - Get FAA
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Full Time. Training provided. www.WorkServices3.com
Agnes
BUTLER TRANSPORT
Your Partner in Excellence. CDL Class A Drivers Needed. Sign on
Bonus. All miles paid 1or
800-528-7825
www.butlertransport.com
CAN YOU Dig It? Heavy
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Lifetime Job Placement.
VA Benefits Eligible! 1866-362-6497
Hi and Lois
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Call 877-968-7986 or
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Funky Winkerbean
CLASS A CDL Flatbed
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Pete’s/Trucks set @
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m
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DRIVER
NEEDED NOW! Learn
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Earn $850 per week! No
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DRIVERS - CDL-A
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$17.00 per Hour + OT.
$1,000 Sign-On Bonus.
Pickup/Deliver
within
250 miles of Plainfield,
IN. CDL-A & 1 yr T/T
exp. req’d 866-511-1134
Or Apply Online At:
www.JoinRed.XPO.com
GUN SHOW! Muncie, IN
- June 27th & 28th,
Delaware County Fairgrounds, 1210 N. Wheeling Ave., Sat. 9-5, Sun.
9-3 For information call
765-993-8942 Buy! Sell!
Trade!
HIRING
COMPANY
Drivers and Owner
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Dry Van. TanTara Transportation offers excellent
equipment, pay, benefits, home weekly. Call
800-650-0292 or applywww.tantara.us
OXYGEN
CONCENTRATOR - InogenOne Regain Independence.
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NO more Tanks! 100%
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Call 1-800-291-1233
PROBLEMS with the
IRS or State Taxes? Wall
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owe! Results may vary.
Not a solicitation for
legal services. 866-9169119
SWITCH & Save Event
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CABINS
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FOR RENT IN CANADA. Fish for walleyes,
perch, northerns. Boats,
motors, gasoline included. Call Hugh 1-800426-2550
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WERNER ENTERPRISES is HIRING! Dedicated, Regional, & OTR
opportunities! Need your
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Don’t wait, call today to
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00 CLASSIFIEDS
CLASSIFICATIONS
010 Card of Thanks
020 In Memory
030 Lost, Strayed or
Found
040 Notices
050 Rummage Sales
060 Services
070 Instruction, Schools
080 Business
Opportunities
090 Sale Calendar
100 Jobs Wanted
110 Help Wanted
120 Wearing Apparel/
Household
130 Misc. for Sale
140 Appliances
150 Boats, Sporting
Equipment
160 Wanted to Buy
170 Pets
180 Livestock
190 Farmers Column
200 For Rent
210 Wanted to Rent
220 Real Estate
230 Autos, Trucks
240 Mobile Homes
CLASSIFIED ADS
260-726-8141
ADVERTISING RATES
20 Word Minimum
Effective 1/01/2013:
Minimum charge....
$10.40
1 insertion.........52¢/
word
2 insertions.......71¢/
word
3 insertions.......86¢/
word
6 insertions.... $1.04/
word
12 insertions. $1.32/
word
26 insertions. $1.37/
word Circulator.......
$1.50 per insertion
Classified Display
$6.40/ per column inch
No borders or logos
allowed on Classified
By Steve Becker
GABBARD
FENCE
Snuffy Smith
FARM • COMMERCIAL
• INDUSTRIAL
RESIDENTIAL • VINYL
“SINCE 1969”
Ph. (765) 584-4047
ROCKWELL
DOOR SALES
(260) 726-9500
Beetle Bailey
Garage Doors Sales & Service
Dave’s
Heating & Cooling
J&N Bargain Shop
Furnace,
Air Conditioner
Geothermal
Sales & Service
Horse Tack,
Saddles, Misc.
277 W. 500 N., Bryant, IN 46326
(260) 726-2407
260-726-2138
Now accepting
MC/Disc/Visa
Raj Patel
Call for
free quote
Jay County
RETIREMENT CENTER
Tree Service
Tree Trimming, Removal,
Stump Grinding.
Firewood available
765-509-1956
We offer you another option
260-726-8702
E&T
Tree & Landscaping Service
and Snow Removal
We Do It All
Just Call!
Toll Free
1-866-trim-tree
(765) 209-0102
Little JJ’s
Retirement living
on the farm.
Insurance Agent
260-729-7104
[email protected]
Mobile Homes * Home * Renters * Auto * Life * Business
AB’s Tire Service, LLC
New & Quality Used
100’s of used tires
in stock
Mon. - Fri.: 9 am to 5:30 pm
Sat.: 9 am to 1 pm
110 Union St.
Pennville, IN 47369
Phone:
260-731-2040
The Commercial Review
Wednesday, June 24, 2015
CLASSIFIED ADS
Page
Card of Thanks Up to
100 words.... $12.00
In Memory Up to 100
words.... $12.00
Advertising Deadline is
12:00 p.m. the day prior
to publication. The
deadline for Mondays
paper is 12:00 p.m. Friday.
Pre-Payment required
for: Rummage sales,
business opportunities,
jobs wanted, boats and
sporting equipment,
wanted to rent, motorized vehicles, real
estate and mobile
homes.
30 LOST, STRAYED
OR FOUND
ATTENTION! LOST A
PET or Found One? The
Jay County Humane
Society can serve as an
information center. 260726-6339
40 NOTICES
CIRCULATION
PROBLEMS?
After hours, call:
260-726-8144
The Commercial
Review.
PLEASE NOTE: Be
sure to check your ad
the first day it appears.
We cannot be responsible for more than one
days incorrect copy. We
try hard not to make mistakes, but they do happen, and we may not
know unless you call to
tell us. Call before 12:00
pm for corrections. The
Commercial
Review,
309 W Main, Portland,
Indiana 260-726-8141.
CLASSIFIED
AD
DEADLINES In order for
your advertisement to
appear in the next day’s
paper, or for a correction
or stop order to be made
for an ad already
appearing, we must
receive the ad, correction or cancellation
before 12:00 p.m. Monday-Friday. The deadline
for Monday is 12:00 pm
on the previous Friday.
Deadline for The Circulator and The News and
Sun is 3:00 p.m. Friday.
The Commercial Review
309 W Main Portland,
Indiana 260-726-8141
FOR YOUR
CONVENIENCE
We accept Visa and
Mastercard, in person
or over the phone,
for the many services
we offer:
Subscriptions,
Advertising,
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Graduation Orders,
Classifieds.
Call today!
260-726-8141
ADVERTISERS:
You
can place a 25-word
classified ad five days a
week M-F in more than
50 daily newspapers
across Indiana reaching
more than 1 million
readers each day for
only $590. Contact
Hoosier State Press
Association 317 8034772.
BARB’S BOOKS 616 S
Shank, Portland. Sell
paperbacks. Half Price!
Tuesday and Saturday
10:00-2:00. Barb Smith,
260-726-8056.
In order for your
advertisement to
appear in the next
day’s paper, or for a
correction or stop
order to be made
for an ad already
appearing,
we must receive
the ad, correction or
cancellation before
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Monday-Friday.
Deadline for
Monday is
12:00 pm on the
previous Friday.
Deadline for
The Circulator and
The News
and Sun is
3:00 pm Friday.
The
Commercial Review
309 W. Main
Portland, Indiana
260-726-8141
Classifieds
70 INSTRUCTIO N,
50 RUMMAGE SALES
70 INSTRUCTION,
SCHOOLS
812 WEST SEVENTH,
Wednesday to Saturday,
8 AM to 7PM. Women’s
clothes, small to exlarge,
toys, brats, old fashion
baby cradle and more.
AVIATION
GRADS
WORK with JetBlue,
Boeing, NASA and others - start here with
hands on training for
FAA certification. Financial aid if qualified. Call
Aviation Institute of
Maintenance. 888-2423197
BARN SALE 1525
South Meridian. Thursday and Friday, 9-4.
Womens, mens, boys
and girls clothes. Household goods. Sports
items. Lots of miscellaneous items.
BARN SALE 3167 E
200 S, Thursday, Friday,
8am- 5pm., Saturday,
8am- 12pm. Primitives,
furniture,
antiques,
Longaberger, Precious
Moments, Boyds.
1347 S MERIDIAN ST
Open 8 to 4 Thurs and
Friday, weather permitting. Housewares, Lego
games, 2 player electronic basketball game,
Dewalt Circular saw,
baby, kids, and adult
clothes, bouncer, changing table, home décor
and so much more!
60 SERVICES
J. L. CONSTRUCTION
Amish crew. Custom
built
homes,
new
garages, pole barns,
interior/ exterior remodeling, drywall, windows,
doors, siding, roofing,
foundations. 260-7265062, leave message.
KEEN’S ROOFING and
Construction. Standing
seam metal, painted
steel and shingle roofing, vinyl siding and
replacement windows.
New construction and
remodeling.
Charles
Keen, 260-335-2236.
LARRY VANSKYOCK
AND SONS Siding, roofing, windows, drywall
and finish, kitchens and
bathrooms, laminated
floors, additions. Call
260-726-9597 or 260729-7755.
HANDYMAN
MIKE
ARNOLD Remodeling;
garages; doors; windows; painting; roofing;
siding; much more. 28
years experience. Free
estimates.
260-7262030; 260-251-2702.
GOODHEW’S ROOFING SERVICE Standing
Seam Metal Roofs. Free
Estimates! 40 year paint
warranty. We are the
original
Goodhew’s
Roofing Service 800310-4128.
STEPHEN’S FLOOR
INSTALLATION carpet,
vinyl, hardwood, and
laminate installed; 15
years experience; work
guaranteed. Free estimates call Stephen Ping
260-726-5017
WENDEL SEAMLESS
GUTTERING For all
your guttering and leaf
cover needs. Call us for
a free quote. Call Jim at
260-997-6774 or Steve
at 260-997-1414.
GOODHEW’S
ALL
SEASON Construction.
Do you need a new roof
or roof repair? Specializing in standing seam
metal roofing. We offer
various colors with a 30
year paint finish warranty at competitive prices.
Metal distributor for all of
your metal needs. Call
Rodney at 765-5090191.
HILTY-EICHER CONSTRUCTION. Foundations, concrete, roofing,
siding,
residential
remodeling and new
construction, pole barns,
garages, homes. Free
estimates. Call Keith,
new number 260-3123249
J G BUILDERS New
construction, remodeling, pole barns, garages,
new homes, concrete,
siding doors, windows,
crawl space work. Call
260-849-2786.
PORTLAND
CLOCK
DOC. REPAIRS 525
North Meridian, Portland, IN 47371. 260-2515024, Clip for reference
POWERWASHING
FERGUSON & SONS
Houses, walks, decks,
fences, etc. Spring pricing - ranch style onestory house. $165.00.
260-703-0364 cell. 260726-8503
SCHWARTZ
CONSTRUCTION. Seamless
guttering 5 & 6 inch; all
colors available, various
leaf guards. Free estimates. 260-731-9444
90 SALE CALENDAR
PUBLIC AUCTION
Saturday,
June 27, 2015
9:00 am
Located at: 10130 S.
Ohio St.
Keystone, IN
JD 400 Wheel Loader
& Back Hoe, Ford 8N,
Oliver Row Crop Guns,
Archery, Gas Engines,
Farm Artifacts, Craftsman Tool Chest, Scaffold, Extra Large
Assortment of Plumbing, Generators,
Mechanical and Carpenter tools, 2 box
vans, Farm JD Mowers,
Antiques, primitives,
garden tools, much
more.
Roger Grover Estate
Velma Grover, Owner
Kenneth Ellenberger
AU31200014
800-373-6363
www.EllenbergerBros.c
om
Kenneth Ellenberger
AU31200014
800-373-6363
110 HELP WANTED
MANPOWER PORTLAND Hiring for production workers. 609 N.
Meridian St. 260-7262888
NOW
TAKING
RESUMES for full or
part-time help nights
and weekends. Must be
21 years of age or older;
must be able to work
weekends; must have
references. Northside
Carry Out, Attn: Ruth,
1226 N. Meridian, Portland, IN 47371.
WALKING
ROUTE
FOR BRYANT and Pennville. Contact Kim at
260-726-8141 between
1pm and 6pm or stop in
and fill out an application between 8 am to 4
Commercial
pm.
Review, 309 West Main,
Portland.
LAWRENCE EXCAVATING Seeking Class-A
CDL
driver/heavy
machine operator. Must
have clean driving
record. Call Jason 260726-0827
DUNKIRK
POLICE
DEPARTMENT
now
taking applications for
dispatcher. Pick up
applications at the
Dunkirk Police Department. Deadline is June
25th. EOE
TLS BY DESIGN Experienced
Upholstery
Technician wanted. We
do not pay by piece or
group rate. We reward
excellence and care
about quality. Full time
position includes benefits and an enjoyable
work environment. Call
765-683-1971 to join a
great team.
25 DRIVER TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW! Learn
to drive for TMC Transportation. Earn $800
per week! Local 15 day
CDL training. TMC can
cover costs. 1-877-6499611
150 BOATS, SPORTING
110 HELP WANTED
150 BOATS, SPORTING
POSITIONS
AVAILABLE TO START Immediately! Accepting applications for Production
Team Members on 2nd
and 3rd shifts. Strong
safety awareness and
stable work history
desired. Prior experience
in production preferred,
but will train the right
candidates. Willingness
to learn in a fast paced
environment. We offer
on-the-job
training,
excellent job stability, and
good prospects for
advancement. Attractive
wage, excellent insurance and benefits package. Open House on
Wednesday July 1, 2015
9am till 4pm. Not available for the Open house?
Call to schedule an interview 419-678-2304 X104.
[email protected] EOE. Tastemorr Snacks, BGP Inc.
300 East Vine Street
Coldwater, Ohio 45828
FULL-TIME
HELP
WANTED
Bartender/Cook. Pick up
application at Pits Cocktail Lounge 214 N Meridian, Portland, or call 260251-1544.
FINANCE SPECIALIST
FULL-TIME
Process
payroll, purchasing, and
payable.
accounts
Knowledge of payroll
laws/requirements. Associates degree in accounting or business preferred;
or 2+ years of accounting/business experience.
Mail or email resume to
HR Director [email protected] Family
Life Care 108 S Jefferson
Street Berne, IN 46711
1-800-355-2817
JINNY’S
CAFE
BRYANT, IN 3rd shift
Cook/Waitress
Apply
between 6 am & 2 pm.
260-997-8300.
JRDS HAS FULL-TIME,
PART-TIME, and substitute direct care positions
available in Portland
Waiver/Group Homes,
providing assistance to
with
special
adults
needs. Positions available immediately, which
could include some
weekend hours. Wage
increase after 90 days
plus excellent benefits.
Apply or send resume
along with 3 work references to Jay-Randolph
Developmental Services,
901 E Water Street, Portland, IN. Call 877-7267931, ext 1228 our visit
website
our
www.jrds.org. EOE
NEED
PART-TIME
EXPERIENCED cook.
Apply in person from
8:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. The
Koffee Cup Diner, 301
North Meridian, Portland. 726-3800
SALES REPRESENTATIVES, experience preferred, will train qualified
applicants, send resume
to Fuqua at 127 East
Commerce
Street
Dunkirk, attention General Manager
130 MISC. FOR SALE
PLACE YOUR OWN
CLASSIFIED AD
ONLINE!
Go to www.thecr.com
and click the
“Classifieds” link.
Next, you enter your
information, create your
ad, review it, and pay
with a credit card.
110 HELP WANTED
MATERIAL SERVICES
DEPARTMENT
FCC (Adams) has both supervisory and
hourly positions to fill in the
MATERIAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT.
We offer a challenging and
stable career, 2 years to top pay,
competitive benefits and the
opportunity for advancement.
Responsibilities include:
• Safely operating forklift to load/unload
trailers in a fast-paced environment
• Moving product between departments
• Organizing/securing stored materials
Previous warehouse/forklift experience is
preferred but not required.
You may apply in person or
send resume to:
FCC (Adams), LLC
Attn: Human Resources
936 East Parr Road, Berne, IN 46711
Page 9
190 FARMERS
130 MISC. FOR SALE
150 BOATS, SPORTING
200 FOR RENT
70 INSTRUCTION,
200 FOR RENT
Proper grammar,
punctuation and
spacing is necessary.
All ads must be
approved prior to
appearing online and
in the newspaper.
Our Classified Deadline
is noon the day before
you want the ad to run,
and noon on Friday
for Monday’s paper.
Call us with questions,
260-726-8141.
LEASE SPACE available, Coldwater, OH.
Manufacturing, warehousing,
assembly,
distribution,
offices,
inside and outdoor
storage. Easy access
to major highways and
railroad access with
loading docks and
overhead cranes available.
Contact
Sycamore Group, 419678-5318,
www.sycamorespace.c
om
1
BEDROOM
UPSTAIRS
APARTMENT Heat and water
furnished. $375 plus
electric. West Main
Street, Portland. Call
Spencer Apts 260-7267368
ALUMINUM SHEETS
23”x30”,.007 thick.
Clean and shiny on one
side..35 cents each or
four for $1.40, plus tax.
The Commercial
Review, 309 W Main,
Portland 260-726-8141.
NEED EXTRA CASH?
Sell unwanted items in
The CR Classifieds. Call
Linda at 260-726-8141
or go online to
www.thecr.com Simply
click on “Classifieds” to
place your ad!
JAY
COUNTY
ANTIQUE MALL 500 S.
Meridian, Portland. 10%20% off selected booths.
Check us out. Great
buys on everything.
2 CEMETERY PLOTS at
Green Park cemetery.
$400 each. Call 260726-5112
FRESH SOUTH CAROLINA PEACHES Freestone; good for canning
and freezing; Willow
Creek Store; 5160 W
400 S, Berne, Indiana
260-334-5080
150 BOATS, SPORTING EQUIPMENT
GUN SHOW!! Muncie,
IN - June 27th & 28th,
Delaware County Fairgrounds, 1210 N. Wheeling Ave., Sat. 9-5, Sun 93 For information call
765-993-8942 Buy! Sell!
Trade!
200 FOR RENT
INMAN U-LOC Storage.
Mini storage, five sizes.
Security fence or 24 hour
access
units. Gate
hours: 8:00-8:00 daily.
Pearl Street, Portland.
260-726-2833
SANDY
HOLLOW
APARTMENTS; East
Main Street, Portland;
two bedroom, two bath
upstairs; living room,
family room, kitchen and
half bath downstairs;
central air; washer/ dryer
hookup;
detached
garage. $650 monthly
plus damage deposit
and utilities; 260-5250277 or 260-726-7257.
WHY RENT when you
may be able to buy for
zero money down. Call
for more information.
Heather
Clemmons.
765-748-5066.
MAPLE
HEIGHTS
APARTMENTS at 701
S Western Avenue,
Portland, Indiana, is
now taking applications for one and two
bedroom apartments.
Rent based on 30% of
adjusted gross income.
Barrier free units. 260726-4275, TDD 800743-3333. This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and
Employer.
NEED MORE STORAGE? PJ’s U-Lock and
Storage, most sizes
available. Call 260726-4631.
TIRED OF NON-PAYING RENTERS? For
just 10% of monthly
rent/ life could be
100% better. Property
managing.
Heather
Clemmons 765-7485066
TWO-BEDROOM
APARTMENT: 712 N
Main, Dunkirk. Stove/
refrigerator furnished.
Total electric. $325
plus deposit. Section 8
OK. 765-748-2379.
NEWLY REMODELED,
2 BEDROOM ground
level
apartment.
Stove/refrigerator furnished. Off-street parking. No pets. $400/mo
plus deposit, 729-1803
or 251-2305
HOUSE FOR RENT in
Dunkirk. Looking for
responsible tenant for
completely remodeled
home in town. Very
spacious, lawn care
provided. $590 per
month plus deposit.
References
are
required. Call 765-7686224, ask for Rock.
ONE AND TWO BEDROOM
Apartments.
Lake of The Woods,
Geneva, water included with rent, no pets,
260-368-9187
110 HELP WANTED
Manufacturing Facility is seeking
applications for Maintenance technicians.
2nd shift (2:00 PM to 10 PM). Candidate
must convey a cooperative attitude, be self
motivated, and have good communication
skills and a willingness to learn new
concepts and ideas. Ideal candidates should
possess one-year of relevant experience
and/or education with regards to:
repairing, maintaining, and troubleshooting
manufacturing equipment. Ideal candidate
should have specific experience or
education in working with hydraulics,
pneumatics, welding, machining, electrical
systems, and PLC's.
Facility offers a
comprehensive benefit
package including:
• Test based wage progression
• Family Medical/DentalNision insurance
option after 60 days.
• 401k with company match after 90
days/rollover after 60 days.
• Paid Holidays after 60 days.
• Company uniform and shoes provided
• Up to 80 Personal hours earned based
on length of service
• Personal hours remaining at end of the
year/bought back at associates current $
rate
• $$ 100.00 $$ Attendance Bonus paid
Quarterly
• Air-conditioned facility
• Voluntary Life Insurance Plan available
(optional)
• Long Term Disability Plan (optional)
Apply for position at:
Box 467
%The Commercial Review,
P. O. Box 1049,
Portland, IN 47371
1 BEDROOM DOWNSTAIRS APT. Washer/dryer hook-up. $340
plus utilities, located in
Portland. Call Spencer
Apts 260-726-7368
2
BEDROOM
UPSTAIRS
APARTMENT East Main Street,
Portland. $400 plus electric. Call Spencer Apts
260-726-7368
210 WANTED TO RENT
WANTED:
FARMGROUND TO RENT:
Experienced Farm Family. Top dollar rates, paid
upfront. Soil sampling
and management program. Call Mitch 937564-6058
220 REAL ESTATE
REAL ESTATE Before
you list your Real Estate
or book your Auction
Call Mel Smitley’s Real
Estate & Auctioneering
260-726-0541 cell, 260726-6215 office. Laci
Smitley 260-729-2281,
or Ryan Smitley 260729-2293
FOR RENT/RENT TO
OWN Jay, Blackford,
Randolph,
Delaware,
Madison, Henry Counties. Over 200 Houses
and
apartments.
Heather Clemmons 765748-5066
3 FIX-UPPER HOMES,
contract or cash. Redkey, Dunkirk, Hartford
City. $14,900, $24,900,
$27,500 cash prices.
Contract prices higher.
317-928-3230
230 AUTOS, TRUCKS
THE CLASSIFIEDS
Find it - Buy It - Sell It!
260-726-8141
FUQUA
CHRYSLER
DODGE JEEP RAM:
New and Pre-owned
cars, trucks, minivans,
SUV’s. Full service and
parts department 127
East Commerce Street,
Dunkirk, 765-768-6224.
Monday- Friday 8-6; Saturday
8-2
www.
FuquaChrysler.com
CA$H PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any year, any
condition. Running or
not. We tow away. 765578-0111 or 260-7265143 Massey’s Towing
WE PAY CASH for junk
autos. We pick up at
your location. 1-765546-2642 or 1-765-8571071. Slocum’s Salvage
250 PUBLIC NOTICE
Public Notice
Legal Notice
Notice is hereby given that the
Building
&
Jay/Portland
Planning Department InterLocal Joint Board will hold a
public meeting on Tuesday,
June 30, 2015, at 5:00pm, to
discuss the 2016 Department
Budget. The meeting will be
held at the Community
Resource Center, 118 S
Meridian Street, Portland,
Indiana 47371.
Patricia McLaughlin
Assistant Director
May 22, 2015
CR 6-24-2015- HSPAXLP
Public Notice
Notice of Administration
Cause No.
38C01-1506-EU-000028
In The Circuit Court Of Jay
County, Indiana
Notice is hereby given that
Marilyn Alberson was, on the
15th day of
June, 2015,
appointed
Personal
Representative
of
the
unsupervised estate of Charles
A. Hale, deceased, who died on
the 7th day of June, 2015.
All persons who have claims
against this estate, whether or
not now due, must file the claim
in the office of the clerk of this
court within three (3) months
from the date of the first
publication of this notice, or
within nine (9) months after the
decedent’s death, whichever is
earlier, or the claims will be
forever barred.
Dated at Portland, Indiana,
this 16th day of June, 2015.
Ellen Coats
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Jay County, Indiana
Jason E. Welch,
Attorney for Estate
111 North Main Street
Winchester, IN 47394
(765) 584-4171
Atty. No. 19617-49
CR6-24,7-1-2015- HSPAXLP
Visit Us At:
thecr.com
Wednesday, June 24, 2015
Sports
Run Jay County circuit
continues Saturday,
see Sports on tap
Page 10
Follow us
on Twitter,
@commreview
www.thecr.com
The Commercial Review
FR Eels
defeat
Arcanum
FORT RECOVERY — Fort
Recovery’s summer swim
team had five swimmers win
three events apiece Tuesday
in a 701-391 victory against
the Arcanum Stingrays at
Ambassador Pool.
With the win, the Eels
move to 3-2 on the season.
Triple-event winners for
the Eels included Neveah
Lennartz (8-and-younger),
Audra Bubp (9-10-year-old),
Jackson Ontrop (13-14-yearold), Cassidy Martin (13-14year-old), and Alexis Bubp
(15-and-older).
Earning two wins each
were Riley Grieshop (8-andyounger), Faith Wendel (9-10year-old), Reagan Grieshop
(13-14-year-old) and Sophie
Timmerman (15-and-older).
A total of 14 swimmers
picked up victories in individual events. Those included Olivia Albers, Grant
Fortkamp, Christine Merrill
and Joelle Kaup, who all
competed in the 8-andyounger age group.
Sage Wendel and Joscie
LeFevre were winners in the
9-10-year-old division, with
Valerie Muhlenkamp and
Jacob Acheson picking up
wins in the 13-14-year-old age
group.
Earning single victories in
the 11-12-year-old division
were Kyra Clark, Shelby
Stammen, Ava Bubp and
Gavin Thobe.
Nolan Thobe, Rachel Kaup
and Mackinley Timmerman
were all single-event winners in the 15-and-older age
group.
Fort Recovery, which closes its season at home against
Versailles on Thursday, won
14 of the 20 relay events as
well.
The Commercial Review/Chris Schanz
Juan Pablo Wiggins of the Jay County Summer Swim Team swims the final 25 yards of the 11-12-year-old boys
100-yard freestyle race against Union City on Tuesday at JCHS. Wiggins won the event without the aid of goggles — they
came off in the first 25 yards — and Jay County went on to defeat Union City 1,369.5-380.5
Jay tops Union City for fifth win
The Jay County Summer
Swim Team moved to 5-0 on
the season Tuesday, defeating
a small Union City squad,
1,369.5-380.5.
Five swimmers were tripleevent winners for Jay County.
Morgan DeHoff and Maddy
Snow each earned a trio of
victories in the 8-and-younger
girls division. DeHoff won the
long freestyle, backstroke and
short freestyle, with Snow finishing first in the butterfly,
individual medley and breaststroke.
Mara Bader and Josh Monroe were 9-10-year-old triple
winners. Bader won the long
and short freestyle races as
well as the backstroke. Monroe claimed the top spot in the
long freestyle, IM and breaststroke.
Elizabeth McDowell won the
backstroke, IM and short
freestyle in the 13-14-year-old
girls division.
Levi Muhlenkamp (8-andyounger) and Sophie Saxman
(9-10-year-old) each won a pair
of events in their respective
age groups. Lilli Clemmons,
Eliza Bader and Ashlyn Dow
earned two wins apiece in the
11-12-year-old division, with
Jason Minnich and Christopher McDowell both earning
two wins in the 13-14-year-old
age group. Alex Bader and
Anne Vormohr also won two
events in the 15-and-older age
group.
A total of 13 swimmers
picked up individual wins.
Those included Juan Pablo
Wiggins (11-12-year-old), Jesse
Brown (8-and-younger), Erica
(13-14-year-old),
Hathaway
Sophie Bader (15-and-older),
Jamie Valentine (15-andolder), Kaitlyn Dow (13-14year-old) and Bennett Weitzel
(11-12-year-old).
Also winning single events
were Jake Nichols (15-andolder), Konner Sommers (1112-year-old), Tayler Smeltzer
(13-14-year-old), Kaitlyn Hicks
(13-14-year-old), Luke Nichols
(13-14-year-old) and Damian
Hicks (11-12-year-old).
Jay County also won 17 of
the 20 relay events.
Pioneer, Pak-A-Sak get
14th ANNUAL
opening-round victories
WALK AGAINST CANCER
JAY COUNTY CANCER SOCIETY’S
Come and join us on
Saturday, June 27, 2015
At the Jay County High School Track
6:00 p.m.
Registration
Begins
8:30 p.m.
Opening
Ceremony
ep”
o Sle
T
r
e
Canc
“Put
4:
Walk Ends
Following
Luminary
Walk forms are available at the
Jay County Hospital
NE0W
15!!
TO 2 ACES
R
BED 00 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
Luminary
Ceremony
and the
Jay County Library
or
www.jaycountychamber.com
Concessions
6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Freshly grilled snacks and
drinks served by the
Jay County Knights of Columbus
Balloon Release 8:30 p.m.
- 9:00 p.m.
E
FRE Kid’s Area 6:00 p.m.
e Walk
Cak
Theme Laps and
Raffle Drawing - 8:30 p.m.
Survivor Dinner 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Cancer Survivor and Guest
*Free Catered Meal
*Free Survivor T-Shirt
*Reservation must be made by June 13th
by calling 260-726-8110
* Extra guest $6.00 each (max. 5 additional)
nce
Tickets available at Strohl’s Applia
THE LUMINARY CEREMONY
In remembrance of those lost, in honor of those suffering,
and in celebration of those that have won the fight ...
A tribute to those that have fought the battle against cancer.
For each $10.00 luminary donation, a candle will be placed along the walking
track in the name of a friend or loved one.
For additional information, or to make a donation, please contact:
The Jay County Cancer Society P.O. Box 614, Portland, IN, 47371
(260) 726-8110 (message line only)
SPONSORS
Dr. Charles Miller Memorial- Delta. Theta Tau, XI- L-J Miller Farms - Jeff & Tammy Bulmahn - Schmit
Chiropractic Offices LLC - Mayor Geesaman 2014 Golf Outing - Fellowship Baptist Church - American
Legion Post 211 - First Merchants Bank - Poet Biorefinery - Jay County Hospital & IU Health Ball
Memorial- Church of the Brethren - First Bank of Berne, Portland Branch - Dr. Malcom George - JSC
Transportation - Wholesale Carpet Outlet Express - Moser Engineering - Jay County REMC - Franklin
Electric - Stephen Myron - Mainsource Bank - Arch Bridge Kroozers - Family Worship Center - Dr. David
Fullenkamp, OD, PC - Altar Rosary Society- S.D.P. Manufacturing, Inc. - Inman U-Loc Storage - Williams
Auto Parts - Gamma Nu Redkey: Women's Life - Coca- Cola Refreshments - Knights of Columbus Blacksmith, Union Local 1620 - Remember When, The Vanskyock Family - New Beginnings Holiness,
Church of Blaine - Ali Inman in memory of Susie Inman - Faron Parr DBA Progressive Office Products Fullenkamp Machine - Williamson-Spencer & Penrod Funeral Home - Kiwanis Club of Portland - MSSL
Pioneer Packaging and Pak-A-Sak
both earned wins in the opening round
of Portland Junior League’s Rookie baseball tournament.
Pioneer knocked off Williams Auto
Parts 19-7, and Pak-A-Sak defeated AllCircuit Electrical 17-6.
Landon and Rhysin Blowers paced Pioneer. Landon Blowers smacked a home
run, a double and a triple, with Rhysin
Blowers adding two doubles and a single.
Dominick Bright tallied two singles and
a triple, and Maddox Huffman was a
home run shy of the cycle.
Jayden Comer chipped in with three
singles. Carson Busic, Max Dues and
Sam Wiggins each had two hits.
Iziah McAbee hit a home run to lead
Williams. Ryan Timmerman registered
three singles, with Max Klopfenstein and
Cole Carpenter each adding two singles.
Isaac Dues led Pak-A-Sak with a home
run, a triple and a single while also scoring three times. Alex Miller, Eli Stockton
and Freddie Lingo each tallied three singles. Mason Johnson and Layne Reidt
both had a double to go with their two
singles.
Wyatt Wendel recorded a triple, a single and scored twice for All-Circuit.
Ethan Gillum had a double and a single,
Junior League
roundup
and Grant Wendel chipped in with three
singles.
Boolman’s hits walk off
Boolman’s Auto Sales trailed Loy’s
Realty heading into the final inning.
Mitchell Langenkamp hit his team to
victory.
Langenkamp had a walk-off home run
Tuesday, lifting Boolman’s to a 12-11 victory in the opening round of the PJL’s
Sandy Koufax tournament.
Austin Funk had two hits, including a
home run, for Boolman’s. Gavin Myers
drove in three runs on two hits, and Rob
Garringer had two hits and an RBI.
Collin Kriegbaum had an RBI hit, and
Dekota Newland also drove in a run.
Jordan Shricker had a home run in the
losing effort for Loy’s. He also added a
single and tallied two RBIs. Nate Dalrymple added two hits.
Sports on tap
Local schedule
Today
Portland Rockets at Northeast Kekionga – 7 p.m.
Thursday
Jay County Summer Swim Team at
Adams Central – 6 p.m.
Saturday
Portland Rockets doubleheader vs.
Fort Wayne Expos – 3 p.m.
Sunday
Portland Rockets doubleheader at Fort
Wayne Expos – 3 p.m.
TV schedule
Today
8 p.m. — College Baseball: NCAA
World Series Championship – Vanderbilt
vs. Virginia, Game 3 (ESPN)
8 p.m. — Major League Baseball: Los
Angeles Dodgers at Chicago Cubs
(ESPN2)
11 p.m. — Major League Soccer: Portland Timbers at Los Angeles Galaxy
(ESPN2)
Thursday
7:30 p.m. — 2015 NBA Draft (ESPN)
7:30 p.m. — CFL Football: Ottawa RedBlacks at Montreal Alouettes (ESPN2)
Friday
4 p.m. — Soccer: FIFA Women’s World
Cup – Quarterfinal, Germany vs. France
(FOX-45,55,59)
7 p.m. — WNBA Basketball: Chicago
Sky at Indiana Fever (WNDY-23)
7:30 p.m. — Soccer: FIFA Women’s
World Cup – People’s Republic of China vs.
United States (FOX-45,55,59)
9 p.m. — CFL Football: Hamilton TigerCats at Calgary Stampeders (ESPN2)
Local notes
JCHS to host adult swim
There will be an adult lap swim sessions on Tuesdays and Thursdays beginning June 2.
Cost is $2 per session or $25 for a
season pass, and is open to adults 18and-older.
The swim will be from 6:30 to 7:30
a.m. at the Jay County High School pool.
The sessions will go through July, and
will be for lap swim only, not recreational
use.
For more information, contact JCHS
football coach Tim Millspaugh at (260)
251-0670.
Swiss Days 5 K is July 25
The Adams County Run/Walk Challenge continues July 25.
The next race is the 42nd annual
Swiss Days Race. The race will begin at
8:15 a.m. July 25 on Jefferson Street in
Berne.
For more information, contact CeAnn
Weaver at (260) 589-2151, or visit
www.adamscounty5kchallenge.com.
Run Jay County continues Saturday
The Run Jay County 5K Circuit continues Saturday with the Pennville Lions 5K
at Pennville Park.
Registration begins at 7:30 a.m., with
the race set to begin at 8:30 a.m.
Cost is $20, and the price increases to
$25 on race day.
Register at www.runjaycounty.com, and
call (260) 726-2727 for more information.
Starfires seeking coach
South Adams High School is seeking a
wrestling coach for the 2015-16 season.
Candidates should have varsity coaching experience, a strong knowledge of
wrestling techniques and fundamentals.
Candidates must also demonstrate the
ability to work with the administration and
successfully lead student athletes, the
coaching staff and the middle school and
youth programs.
Individuals interested should contact
SAHS athletics director Jason Arnold at
(260)
587-8231,
or
[email protected]
Patriot football camp is July 20
The Jay County High School football
team will be hosting a camp July 20
through 23.
The camp will be from 5:30 to 7 p.m.,
and is open for children in kindergarten
through eighth grade.
Cost is $20 and includes a camp
tshirt. Registration forms are available at
the high school.
Get your questions answered
Do you have a question about local college or pro sports?
Email
your
question
to
[email protected] with “Ask Ray” in the
subject line for a chance to have it
answered in an upcoming column.
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