July 2016 - American Physiological Society

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July 2016 - American Physiological Society
Published by the American Physiological Society – Integrating the Life Sciences from Molecule to Organism
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
July 2016 • Vol. 59/No. 4
What Does Science Tell us About
Resilience: Lessons for Early Career
Scientists
Karen S. Quigley
Research Physiologist, Bedford Memorial VA Hospital, Bedford, MA; and
Research Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Northeastern
University, Boston, MA
For last year’s Experimental Biology meeting,
I was asked to talk to junior scientists about
“what science tells us about being resilient in
our careers.” Like any professional, academic
scientists face ups and downs over a career,
and, for junior scientists, it can be hard to take
the long view because you don’t yet have a long
view. I like to think of it this way: Your career is
a series of marathons. Thinking about it in this
way will help you make it across the multiple
Karen Quigley
“finish lines” that will occur in your career.
The “science of resilience” provides some
suggestions about what to pay attention to in your career and your
life, in addition, of course, to doing really great science. Resilience has
been defined by the American Psychological Association (http://www.
apa.org/helpcenter/road-resilience.aspx) as “the process of adapting well
in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats and even significant
sources of stress.” There are a wide variety of major and minor events
that may require one to adapt. The scientific literature on resilience
reveals that some aspects of our lives that impact resilience are things
we have little choice or control over, such as having a childhood
with multiple major stressors, being born into poverty, or having a
serious or life-threatening illness. These can be overcome; in other
words, neither biology nor experience alone equals destiny. In fact,
many who are exposed to such events adapt very well. Here, I will
provide a brief and selective overview of the science behind the good
behavioral habits that all of us can use to enhance our resilience and
reduce distress in the face of professional adversity.
When it comes to determining the features of our lives that we can
control and that will help us adapt most quickly and adroitly when
life’s challenges come our way, what our parents always told us turns
out to be true. I will focus on four basic health habits that can help
us to weather the “slings and arrows” of an academic career – from
Continued on page 176
Annual Surveys
Association of Chairs
of Departments of
Physiology 2015
Survey Results
Elsa I. Mangiarua (Secretary-Treasurer;
Marshall University), Melinda E. Lowy
(Executive Assistant, ACDP), and
T. Richard Nichols (President, Georgia
Institute of Technology)
The Association of Chairs of Departments of Physiology annual survey was
sent electronically to 208 physiology
or physiology-related departments
throughout the U.S., Canada, Mexico,
and Puerto Rico. A total of 55 partial
or complete surveys were returned,
for a response rate of 26%. This rate
is higher than in previous years. Of the
55 surveys received, there were 14 private and 41 public medical schools.
Continued on page 180
THI S I S S UE:
167
Business Meeting Minutes
185
AAMC Medical School Faculty
Compensation Survey
189
The APS International
Opportunity Program
Symposium
191
APS and FASEB Showcase
NSF-Funded Research
195
Antibody Producer Settles
USDA Case, Relinquishes
AWA Credentials
the-aps.org
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 165
Published by the American Physiological Society – Integrating the Life Sciences from Molecule to Organism
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
Published bimonthly and distributed by
The American Physiological Society
9650 Rockville Pike
Bethesda, Maryland 20814-3991
ISSN 0031-9376
Martin Frank – Editor and Executive Director
Jane Reckelhoff – President
Patricia E. Molina – Past President
Dennis Brown – President-Elect
Councillors
Barbara T. Alexander, David D. Gutterman,
Lisa R. Leon, Rudy M. Ortiz, Jennifer Pollock,
Willis Samson, Harold Schultz, Irene C. Solomon,
Bill J. Yates
Ex Officio
Hannah V. Carey, Meredith Hay, Robert L.
Hester, Kevin C. Kregel, Wolfgang M. Kuebler,
J. Michael Wyss
Publications Committee:
Chair: Curt D. Sigmund; Vice Chair: Hershel Raff;
Members: Catherine E. Carr, Andrew S. Greene,
Paul Insel, Alicia A. McDonough, Susan M. Wall,
Loren Wold
Director of Publications: Rita Scheman
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Allen Wayne, Ltd.
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each; nonsubscriber $60.00 each. Subscribers
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The American Physiological Society assumes no
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Please notify the APS Membership
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http://www.the-aps.org
Printed in the USA
166 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
Contents
What Does Science Tell us About
Resilience: Lessons for Early Career
Scientists................................................ 165
APS Awards Outstanding High School
Students at the Annual Intel International
Science and Engineering Fair.................. 200
Association of Chairs of Departments of
Physiology 2015 Survey Results............. 165
Minority Travel Fellowship Awards
for 2016 Integrative Biology of
Exercise Meeting....................................... 201
Business Meeting Minutes
American Physiological Society 169th
Business Meeting...................................... 167
Annual Surveys
AAMC Medical School Faculty
Compensation Survey............................... 185
APS News
Chapter News
Indiana Physiological Society
Sixth Annual Meeting Report................... 202
People and Places
Patricia Halpin Received Presidents’
Good Steward Award............................... 205
Houser Named President-Elect
of American Heart Association................ 205
The APS International Opportunity
Program Symposium................................. 189
Kuebler Recognized by the German
Cardiac Society.......................................... 205
Tang Prize Summary Report
of EB2016................................................... 190
Feldman to Deliver HodgkinHuxley-Katz Prize Lecture......................... 206
Science Policy
APS and FASEB Showcase
NSF-Funded Research.............................. 191
APS Early Career Advocacy Fellows
go to Capitol Hill....................................... 192
APS Advises USDA on Ways to
Reduce Regulatory Burden...................... 193
ACE Symposium Seeks Ways to
Reduce Regulatory Burden...................... 194
Antibody Producer Settles USDA Case,
Relinquishes AWA Credentials................ 195
Katzenellenbogens Awarded Fred
Conrad Koch Lifetime
Achievement Award.................................. 206
Chien Receives Benjamin Franklin
Medal in Mechanical Engineering........... 206
News From Distinguished Physiologists
Images from the Past.................................... 207
Letter to Peter K. Lauf.................................. 211
Publications
Current Calls for Papers............................ 212
Books Received......................................... 212
Education
Members Foster Physiology Discovery
at the 2016 USASEF.................................. 196
2016 Frontiers in Physiology
Teachers Complete Fellowship................ 198
Nominations Sought for New A.
Clifford Barger Underrepresented
Minority Mentorship Award...................... 199
Bodil M. Schmidt-Nielsen Distinguished
Mentor and Scientist Award..................... 199
Membership
New Regular Members............................. 213
New Graduate Student Members........... 215
Undergraduate Student Members.......... 216
Affiliate Members...................................... 217
Positions Available................................. 218
Meetings & Congresses......................... 222
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Business Meeting Minutes
American Physiological Society 169th Business Meeting
Time: 5:45 PM, Tuesday, April 5, 2016
Place: San Diego, CA
I. Call to Order
The meeting was called to order at 5:45 PM by President
Patricia E. Molina, who welcomed members to the 169th
Business Meeting of the American Physiological Society.
II. Election of Officers
President Molina announced the results of the
election. The new President-Elect is Dennis Brown
(Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical
School; April 06, 2016 to April 10, 2019). The three
newly elected councillors are Jennifer Pollock
(University of Alabama at Birmingham), Harold
Schultz (University of Nebraska Medical Center), and
Willis “Rick” Samson (Saint Louis University School
of Medicine) (April 06, 2016 to April 10, 2019). The
newly elected councillors will serve a 3-year term. All
newly elected officers will assume office at the close
of EB2016.
III. Membership
A. Summary of the Membership Status
President-Elect Jane Reckelhoff reported on the status of
the Society membership. As of March 1, 2016, the current
membership of the Society is 10,830, of which 7,616 are
regular members, 22 are honorary members, 1,101 are
emeritus members, 112 are affiliate members, 1,641 are
graduate student members, and 338 are undergraduate
student members. She also indicated that women make
up 29% of the membership, 27% of our members reside
outside of the U.S., and 40% are under the age of 45.
B. Deaths Reported Since the Last Meeting
A list of the names of those members whose deaths
had been reported since the 2015 Business Meeting was
displayed. Reckelhoff asked the membership to stand
and to observe a moment of silence in tribute to their
deceased colleagues.
IV. State of the Society
President Molina addressed the membership and spoke
on the state of the Society.
A. Expenses and Revenue
Molina said that the Society is financially sound, with
the current revenue at $19.7 million and expenses
totaling $19.6 million. The majority of the revenue
is generated by the Publications Department, while
Meetings/Membership, Education, and the reserves
account for the majority of the remaining revenue.
Molina stated APS is fortunate to have a strong
publications program that contributes 76% of our
revenue. The Society also generates revenue from
your membership dues and our meetings, as well as
grants that are generally associated with our education
program. In addition, the APS utilizes 4% of its reserves
to help support the Society’s programs.
B. APS Initiatives
1. Publications.
Molina said that APS and The Physiology Society
(TPS) are publishing an open access journal entitled
Physiological Reports, which launched in March 2013.
Since the launch, 863 articles have been published, with
an average time to first decision of 8 days and an 89%
acceptance rate.
Molina said that all of the journals are doing well.
For the 14 published journals, 6,296 manuscripts
were received, and 3,978 were published. The time to
first decision is 21.2 days. The Society is pleased to
welcome two new editors for our journals, Bina Joe
for Physiological Genomics, and Andre Marette for AJPEndocrinology and Metabolism.
Molina reported on APSselect, which is a timely collection
that highlights the highest-quality research papers
accepted each month by the 10 APS research journals.
These articles are recommended by the Editors, and the
final selection is made by the Selection Committee. They
can be viewed at http://apsselect.physiology.org. APSselect
articles experience a spike in usage on publication vs.
non-APSselect articles.
2. Meeting Program.
Molina reported that APS would be holding three
conferences in 2016: The Institute on Teaching and
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Learning Workshop will be held June 20-24 in Madison,
Wisconsin; Inflammation, Immunity, and Cardiovascular
Disease is scheduled for August 24-27 in Westminster,
CO; and The Integrative Biology of Exercise VII is
scheduled for November 2-4 in Phoenix, AZ. She also
reminded attendees that next year’s Experimental
Biology meeting will be held in Chicago, IL, April 22-26,
2017. Molina stated it is our true desire to see a growth
in the number and quality of these APS conferences in
the future.
3. Education Programs.
Molina said that the APS Education programs help to
promote excellence in science teaching, learning, and
the training of future physiologists. The Education
Department is responsible for managing many of the
awards that are provided by the APS and provides
resources for K-12 education, undergraduates,
graduates/professionals, continuing education, and
minority scientists.
Molina reported that the Education Department has
developed a Professional Skills Training (PST) course
on “Becoming an Effective Teacher.” The Education
Department has also launched Physiology Educators
Community of Practice Fellowship (PECOP) for all
physiology educators. The Department is also working
with a task force to develop a Leadership Academy to
prepare the next generation of Society leaders and to
help our members succeed in their own careers. The
APS Archive of Teaching Resources has new partners
and new community tools. Professional Skills Training
courses are now available online, with some eligible for
graduate credit.
Molina encouraged all members to plan now for PhUn
Week 2016, which will be held November 7-11, 2016
(www.PhUnWeek.org).
4. Science Policy.
Molina said the Science Policy Office works with several
APS Committees, FASEB, and other organizations
to monitor issues related to federal research funding
and animal research. You can follow them via Twitter
@SciPolAPS or on the AP website.
5. International Outreach.
Molina stated that 27% of the APS membership lives
outside of the U.S. It is one of the reasons why APS
168 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
is outward facing and participated in a number of
international meetings. The APS will be participating
in a joint meeting in Dublin with The Physiological
Society, July 29-31, 2016. The APS is also participating
in the International Conference of Physiological Sciences
in Beijing, September 25-28, 2016. In 2017, the IUPS
Congress will be in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and, in 2019,
the 2nd Pan-American Congress will be in Havana, Cuba.
Molina noted that, on Monday April 4th, APS met with
colleagues from the African Association of Physiological
Sciences and discussed how we can partner to further
their research and teaching skills.
C. Final Comments
Molina expressed that, over the past few years, APS
has been concerned about how physiology is perceived
by the community of scientist, our academic and
government leaders, as well as students. As a result,
APS Council approved the hiring of a consulting group,
Minding Your Business, to help us create a strategic
communication plan that will help to improve the
image of physiology and the Society. Their approach has
included surveys and focus groups directed at learning
the perceptions of APS and physiology as a discipline.
Friday, April 1, the APS Council participated in an
afternoon of self-reflection and analysis of how we view
ourselves within the lay and scientific communities and
what we believe our challenges are. We hope to receive
consulting group’s report over the summer and use it as
the basis for our next strategic planning meeting.
Molina reminder the attendees to attend the Nobel
Prize lecture, held at 4:45 PM on Wednesday, April
6. The Lecture will be presented by Roger Tsien and
followed by a reception to allow graduate students and
postdoctoral fellows to meet him, get his autograph,
and have their picture taken with him. She pointed out
that the final event for this year’s APS annual meeting
will be the closing party, which will feature a semibattle of the bands. GI Distress will be joined on stage
by Cornu Ammonis.
V. Awards and Presentations
A. Ray G. Daggs Award
Ray G. Daggs was the APS Executive Secretary-Treasurer
between 1956 and 1972. In tribute to his devotion to the
Society, the Ray G. Daggs Award was established and is
given annually to a physiologist for distinguished service
to the Society and to the discipline of physiology. The
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over 390 publications and has written or edited 11
books, including the Textbook of Medical Physiology. He
has been Chief Editor of American Journal of Physiology
– Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology and
Hypertension, and serves on the editorial boards of
several international journals.
APS President Patricia Molina presents the Ray G. Daggs Award to
John E. Hall
2016 Daggs Awardee is John E. Hall, Guyton Professor
and Chairman of Physiology and Biophysics and
Director of the Mississippi Center on Obesity Research
at the University of Mississippi Medical Center.
Hall received his doctorate in physiology with James
Schwinghamer at Michigan State University in 1974
and did postdoctoral training at the University of
Mississippi Medical Center with Arthur Guyton
before joining the faculty in 1976. He was promoted
to full professor in 1982 and appointed as department
Chair in 1989. Hall’s major research interests include
cardiovascular and renal physiology, mechanisms of
hypertension, the renin-angiotensin system, obesity
and insulin resistance, and modeling and computer
simulation of the cardiovascular-renal systems. His
early work demonstrated the importance of the
direct intrarenal actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) in
regulating renal tubular sodium reabsorption, renalpressure natriuresis, and long-term blood pressure.
His laboratory was the first to demonstrate that renalpressure natriuresis plays a crucial role in maintaining
sodium balance in several experimental models of
hypertension and that increased arterial pressure
occurs as an essential compensation for impaired
kidney function and an inability to maintain sodium
balance at normal arterial pressure. In recent years,
his research has helped to unravel the renal and
neurohumoral mechanisms that link obesity with
hypertension and kidney disease. His research has been
continuously funded by the National Heart, Lung, and
Blood Institute (NHLBI) since 1975, and he has been the
principal investigator of a Program Project Grant from
NHLBI since 1988. Hall has authored or co-authored
Hall is the past Chairman of the Council for High
Blood Pressure Research, American Heart Association;
Chair of the Committee of Scientific Councils, AHA;
and President-Elect of the Inter-American Society
of Hypertension. He also serves on the executive
committee of The American Society of Hypertension
and the Board of Directors of the AHA. Hall has been
an active member of APS since 1976. He is a member
of the Water and Electrolyte Homeostasis Section,
the Renal Section, and a Fellow of the Cardiovascular
Section. He served as Chair, Treasurer, and Councillor
of the Water and Electrolyte Homeostasis Section,
as a member of APS Council in 1991, as Chair
of SAC from 1997 to 2000, on the APS Strategic
Planning Committees in 1992 and 2000, on the LongRange Planning Committee, on the Task Force for
Translational Research, on the Blue Ribbon Panel on
APS Programming, and on several other committees
of APS. He was the 74th APS President in 2001-2002.
Hall’s awards include the Richard Bright Award of the
American Society of Hypertension, the Harry Goldblatt
Award of the American Heart Association, the Merck,
Sharp, and Dohme International Research Award from
the International Society of Hypertension, the Lewis
Dahl Award of the American Heart Association, the
Marion Young Scholar Award of the American Society
of Hypertension, the Ernest Starling Lectureship of
the APS, an NIH Career Development Award, and the
Novartis Award in Hypertension Research.
In accepting the award, Hall thanked the Society
and mentioned that it was a tremendous privilege to
participate in the APS activities. He told the younger
members that they would not find a Society that is more
welcoming and encourages its younger scientists to get
involved in Society affairs. He encouraged everyone to
get involved in the APS. He thanked the University of
Mississippi Medical Center for supporting him for so
many years. Lastly, he thanked the Awards Committee
of the APS.
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B. S&R Foundation Ryuji Ueno Award
The S&R Foundation Ryuji Ueno Award was established
in 2007 by the American Physiology Society through
the generous support of Ryuji Ueno and Sachiko Kuno
and the S&R Foundation. Ryuji Ueno and Sachiko Kuno
are founders of Sucampo Pharmaceuticals and the
S&R Foundation, both in Bethesda, MD. This award
recognizes an APS member who has demonstrated
outstanding research promise. The award is given
annually to an early career physiologist demonstrating
outstanding promise in research in wound healing,
tissue remodeling, and/or organ regeneration. The
award of $30,000 is designated for the awardee’s
research program. APS is pleased to recognize this
year’s awardee, Li Zuo (Ohio State University). John
Cuppoletti joined with President Molina to present the
award to Zuo.
C. Beverly Petterson Bishop Award for Excellence
in Neuroscience
The Beverly Petterson Bishop Award recognizes
excellence in neuroscience/neurophysiology research.
The award is given to an investigator who holds an
academic rank no higher than assistant professor.
The award is presented annually to an individual
demonstrating outstanding promise based on his/her
program in neuroscience/neurophysiology research.
Each recipient receives a $20,000 award designated for
use in their research program. APS is pleased to recognize
Brian Gulbransen (Michigan State University).
D. Giles F. Filley Memorial Awards
As a result of a bequest from the family of Giles F.
Filley, a memorial fund was established to recognize
excellence in research in respiratory physiology and
APS President Patricia Molina presents the S&R Foundation Ryuji
Ueno Award to Li Zuo of Ohio State University
APS President Patricia Molina presents Jing Liu with the Giles F. Filley
Memorial Award
APS President Patricia Molina presents the Beverly Petterson Bishop
Awards for Excellence in Neuroscience to Brian Gulbransen
APS President Patricia Molina presents Leonardo Ferreira with the
Giles F. Filley Memorial Award
170 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
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F. Lazaro J. Mandel Young Investigator Award
As a result of a bequest from the wife of Lazaro J.
Mandel, a memorial fund was established to recognize
excellence in epithelial or renal physiology. An award is
made to a junior faculty member who has demonstrated
outstanding research promise. The award is $6,500 and
is designated for use in the awardee’s research program.
This year’s awardee is Jennifer Pluznick (John Hopkins
University School of Medicine).
APS President Patricia Molina presents the Arthur C. Guyton Young
Investigator Award to Alain Frigon of the Universite de Sherbrooke
G. Shih-Chun Wang Young Investigator Award
As a result of a bequest from the wife of Shih-Chun Wang,
a memorial fund was established to recognize excellence
in physiology. An annual award is made to a junior
faculty member who has demonstrated outstanding
research promise. The award of $7,500 is designated
for the use in the awardee’s research program. APS is
pleased to recognize this year’s awardee, Il-man Kim
(Augusta University).
APS President Patricia Molina presents the Lazaro J. Mandel Young
Investigator Award to Jennifer Pluznick
medicine. Two annual awards of $14,500 are made to
junior faculty members (at an academic rank no higher
than assistant professor). APS is pleased to recognize
this year’s awardees, Leonardo Ferreira (University of
Florida) and Jing Liu (Northwestern University).
E. Arthur C. Guyton Award for Excellence in
Integrative Physiology and Medicine
The Arthur C. Guyton Award Fund was established
in 1993 to recognize the contributions of Arthur C.
Guyton and his interests in feedback, modeling, and
integrative physiology. The awards are made to an
independent, junior investigator pursuing research
that uses integrative approaches to the study of
physiological function and explores the role of
feedback regulation in physiological function. The
award is for $25,000 and is designated for use in the
awardee’s research program. This year ’s awardee is
Alain Frigon (University of Sherbrooke).
APS President Patricia Molina presents the Shih-Chun Wang Young
Investigator Award to Il-man Kim of Augusta University
H. Dean Franklin Young Investigator
The Dean Franklin Young Investigator Award was
established by Data Sciences International (DSI) to
recognize Franklin’s role in developing instrumentation
to monitor physiological function in conscious animals
and humans. The award recognizes a postdoctoral
scientist or junior faculty member who is pursuing in
vivo physiological research and is in the process of
establishing an independent laboratory. The award
recipient receives a travel award of $1,500 to attend the
annual Experimental Biology meeting to present his/
her work, and a DSI instrumentation starter kit valued
at approximately $20,000. Bradley Main of DSI joined
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APS President Patricia Molina and Bradley Main of DSI present the
Dean Franklin Young Award to Timo Rieg
APS President Patricia Molina presents Keisa W. Mathis the Dale J.
Benos Early Career Professional Service Award
Molina to recognize this year’s awardee, Timo Rieg
(University of California, San Diego, and VA San Diego
Healthcare System).
K. Arthur C. Guyton Teacher of the Year Award
I. ADI Macknight Progressive Educator Award
The ADInstruments Macknight Progressive Educator
Award is named in honor of Anthony Macknight, an
APS member since 1978 and founder of ADInstruments.
The award honors an APS member who incorporates
innovative teaching techniques and technology resources to engage undergraduates in physiology education.
The awardee receives a $1,500 travel award to attend
the EB meeting and an institutional grant providing the
award recipient’s institution with a PowerLab LabTutor
Physiology Teaching Bundle or equivalent. This year, the
Society is pleased to recognize Stefan Pulver (University
of St. Andrews) as the ADInstruments Macknight Progressive Educator Awardee.
J. Dale Benos Early Career Professional Service Award
The Early Career Professional Service Award honors an
APS member who is judged to have made outstanding
contributions to the physiology community and
furthered its broader goals. This award was established
to recognize the late Dale Benos, the Society’s 79th
President, Chair of Physiology at the University
of Alabama, Birmingham, and a distinguished
physiologist. The award recognizes Dale’s dedication
and commitment to excellence in the training and
mentoring of young physiologists and colleagues. APS is
pleased to recognize Keisa Mathis (University of North
Texas Health Science Center) as the 2016 Awardee.
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The Arthur C. Guyton Physiology Teacher of the
Year Award is selected by the Teaching Section and is
supported by Elsevier. This award recognizes a full-time
faculty member who has demonstrated excellence in
classroom teaching, commitment to the improvement
of physiology teaching, and contributions to physiology
education at the local community, national, or
international levels. This year, the recipient of the
Guyton Educator of the Year Award is Nancy Pelaez
(Purdue University).
L. Annual Reviews Award for Scientific Reviewing
The Annual Reviews Award for Scientific Reviewing is
given for excellence in providing systematic, periodic
examinations of scholarly advances, and provoking
discussion that should lead to new research activity.
The award recognizes an APS member who has helped
to provide an enhanced understanding of physiology
through their review articles. The recipient receives an
award of $2,000 and travel to attend the EB meeting. APS
is pleased to recognize two awardees this year: Barbara
Cannon and Jan Nedergaard (Wenner-Gren Institute,
Stockholm University).
M. Physiologists in Industry Committee Awards
The Novel Disease Model Awards were established
in 1999 and are given to a graduate student and to a
postdoctoral fellow submitting the best abstracts
describing novel disease models. This award is
sponsored by the Physiologists in Industry Committee
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and by Novo Nordisk Beijing. The recipient of this year’s
postdoctoral award is Kavaljit Chhabra (University of
Michigan), and the recipient of this year’s predoctoral
award is Renato Gaspar (Federal University of
Maranhao).
independent of the adrenal gland. The award is open
to a physiologist working in any area of research. The
awardee receives $1,000 and complimentary registration
for the EB meeting. APS is pleased to recognize this year’s
awardee, Matthew Racine (Colorado State University).
N. International Early Career Physiologist
Travel Awards
P. Steven M. Horvath Professional Opportunity Awards
The International Early Career Physiologist Travel
Award program was established in 2008 to assist
with travel expenses for international early career
physiologist who are attending the APS Annual Meeting
at EB to present their work. This year’s awardees are
Thales Barbosa (Fluminense Federal University), Jan
Czogalla (University of Zurich), Rodrigo Del Rio
(Universidad Autonoma de Chile), Igor Fernandes
(Federal Fluminense University), Linda Gallo (Mater
Research
Institute-University
of
Queensland),
Mohammad Jafarnejad (Imperial College London),
Simon Malenfant (Quebec Heart and Lung Institute),
Jamie Mayo (University of Melbourne), Aaron Phillips
(University of British Columbia), Bethen Phillips
(University of Nottingham School of Medicine), and
Amin Shah (University of Alberta).
The Steven M. Horvath Award is given to the top two
applications from minority candidates. This award
is a reflection of Horvath’s long-term commitment to
the training of minority physiologists. These awards
are made possible by a bequest of the family of Steven
M. Horvath. APS is pleased to recognize this year’s
awardees, Paulo Pires (University of Nevada School
of Medicine) and Monica Santisteban (University
of Florida).
O. Fleur Strand Professional Opportunity Awards
The Fleur L. Strand Award was established to recognize
the achievements of a graduate student or postdoctoral
fellow, enabling the recipient to attend the EB meeting.
The award is named in honor of the late Fleur Strand,
formerly Professor Emerita, New York University. Strand
was the first to show that stress-evoked hormones such
as ACTH can have a direct effect on peripheral systems,
APS President Patricia Molina presents Jack A. Rall with the Orr E.
Reynolds Award
APS President Patricia Molina and Eugene Shek presents Physiologist
in Industry Novel Disease Model Awards to Kavaljit Chhabra and
Renato Gaspar
APS President Patricia Molina presents the Annual Reviews Award for
Scientific Reviewing to Barbara Cannon and Jan Nedergaard
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Q. Caroline tum Suden/Frances Hellebrandt
Professional Opportunity Awards
The recipients of the Caroline tum Suden awards are
selected by the Women in Physiology Committee
chaired by Angela Grippo. This year’s 52 awards were
made possible by the bequests of Caroline tum Suden
and Frances Hellebrandt, who were long-time members
of the Society. Awards are open to graduate students or
postdoctoral fellows, and recipients receive a $500 check
and paid registration.
R. Recognition of Outgoing Section Chairs
Merry L. Lindsey (Chair of the Cardiovascular Section),
Timothy I. Musch (Chair of the Environmental & Exercise
Section), Martha E. O’Donnell (Chair of the Cell and
Molecular Physiology Section), Jennifer S. Pollock (Chair
of the Water and Electrolyte Homeostasis Section), and
Sean D. Stocker (Chair of the Central Nervous System
Section) completed their terms at the close of the EB16
meeting. Molina thanked them for their service to their
sections and to APS, and presented them with certificates
of service.
T. Recognition of Outgoing Committee Chairs
Margaret Anderson (Chair of the Distinguished
Physiologist Committee), Gaylen Edwards (Chair of
the Animal Care and Experimentation Committee),
Kathy Ryan (Chair of the Careers Committee), William
Talman (Chair of the Committee on Committee), and
J. Michael Wyss (Chair of the Education Committee)
completed their terms at the close of the EB16 meeting.
Molina thanked them for their service to their respective
committees and to APS.
the Society, and its members was apparent from her
first interaction with him. He was part of the leadership
group that visited Havana, Cuba, last spring to establish
a Memorandum of Understanding, opening the lines of
communication with our colleagues in Havana. He was
in his element when meeting with trainees interested
in studying hypertension in Havana. Molina said there
was one thing that she would like to remember Pollock
for and that is his passion, dedication, and persistent
effort to improve the Society. He also played an
instrumental role in pushing Council to hire Minding
Your Business, a strategic company helping to change
the perception of the Society. Finally, she stated, even
though she is not a renal physiologist, she will always
consider him a colleague. In closing, Molina stated
that clearly the Society has gained tremendously from
Pollock’s many contributions to the Society.
In accepting the Society’s recognition of his service,
Pollock noted what a privilege it had been to serve
the members of the APS as their President and that it
was certainly a highlight of his professional career. He
said it was a pleasure to also shake hands with all the
awardees and attend the poster sessions, meet with all
the students, and take pictures with them. He stated
that the Minding Your Business initiative was essential
because physiology is the most important discipline
in life science. He also stated that a lot of physicians
state that physiology was the most important science
they learned while in school, but our scientific world
is focused on new methodology and techniques, and
that is a problem. “We need to focus on the scientific
questions that we are asking, and physiology can
answer those questions.” He encouraged everyone to
U. Recognition of Outgoing Councillors
Councillors John C. Chatham, M. Harold Laughlin,
and Marshall H. Montrose completed their terms at the
close of the EB16 meeting. Molina thanked them for
their service to the Society and presented them with
a certificate.
V. Recognition of Past-President David Pollock
Molina asked the membership to join her in offering
a special thank you to our outgoing Past-President,
David Pollock, for his hard work and dedication to
APS over the past 3 years. She stated that working with
Pollock has been educational and inspiring and that
Pollock’s commitment to the discipline of physiology,
174 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
APS President Patricia Molina presents the Presidential Recognition
Plaque to David Pollock, APS Past-President
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
reach beyond their usual colleagues and collaborators,
and partner with the various other disciplines in the
scientific world, because we can help them in their
research endeavors with our knowledge of physiology.
He thanked Marty Frank and all the staff at the APS
Office. He said that it had been a particular pleasure
to work as a member of the Executive Cabinet with
the four Presidents with whom his term overlapped:
Patricia Molina, Jane Reckelhoff, Kim Barrett, and
Sue Barman.
the Society, protecting its health, and defending the
relevance of our discipline, not only in the context of
health and disease, but in every-day adaptations.
VI. Conclusion
VIII. New Business
Molina summed up her experience as President as
follows: “Life goes on and years change.” She thanked
the membership for their enthusiastic support. She also
thanked Marty and the APS staff for their outstanding
dedication, service, and support for her term as
President. She said she was humbled by the opportunity
granted to her in serving the APS. She encouraged
everyone to embrace the challenge of giving back to
Share Your
VII. Passing of the Gavel
Molina then passed the gavel to Jane Reckelhoff
(University of Mississippi Medical Center), with her
sincere commitment to support Reckelhoff and to work
with her to achieve her goals as incoming President of
the APS.
No new business.
There being no new business, the meeting was adjourned
at 6:54 PM, April 5, 2016. ●
Jane F. Reckelhoff
President-Elect
Story!
Do you have a story to share about how APS helped you or is
helping to further your goals and the future of physiology?
Share your story using #APSBenefitsMe at the-aps.org/fm/testimonials
What members are saying...
I joined the APS as a graduate student member in 1989 and have been an active part of this 10,000
member scientific family ever since that time. I benefited greatly from the APS mentoring sessions
held at the FASEB/EB meetings during my training years. Serving on the Women in Physiology,
Membership, and Education committees was my way of giving back to the society that had given
me so much. I’ve formed lasting friendships and scientific collaborations through the outstanding
networking that is provided by the exceptional society. I will be a lifelong member of the APS.
—Lisa Harrison-Bernard, Ph.D.
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center
I have spent time both as a writer and a reviewer of manuscripts for the American Journal of
Physiology. It has always been a pleasure to have participated in both roles. There are so many
persons I would have to thank, but mostly I thank the policies of the society and its high standards of
fair play and openness. As I reach my 90th Birthday, I, in turn, wish the American Physiology Society
many more rewarding years of leadership in this fun and exciting field.
—Edwin Daniel, Ph.D.
University of Alberta
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 175
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
Continued from page 165:
What Does Science Tell us About Resilience: Lessons for Early Career Scientists
rejected papers to experiments that don’t work to
harsh critical statements by colleagues (and if you have
never experienced any of these things, rest assured that
someday you will). The four key health habits are to 1)
be active, 2) sleep, 3) eat a healthy diet, and 4) do work
that you love and, if possible, with people you like. I
will provide some brief evidence in support of each
of these.
Be Active
When it comes to being active, two things matter:
some level of aerobic physical exercise that gets your
heart beating faster and not spending too much time
sitting. Exercise can regulate mood, improve cognitive
function (at least in older adults), and improve sleep,
and in some studies it has been shown to reduce
inflammation. I won’t have time to say much about
sedentarity, but it is now becoming an important issue
of interest among scientists. Sedentarity is typically
defined as “excessive inactivity” and is often defined
by the amount of sitting time or in some studies by the
amount of screen time (TV viewing or computer use),
and in some studies is measured using accelerometry
(for a review, see Ref. 18). Epidemiological evidence
in men with sedentary occupations, for example, has
shown an increased risk of cardiovascular events (10).
Simple exercises like walking have been reported to
improve mood symptoms when combined with social
support, and forms of movement as diverse as Hatha
yoga and African dance were related to decreases
in perceived stress and negative affect (see review in
Ref. 19). Aerobic fitness training in older adults can
enhance cognitive performance, especially on executive
function tasks like planning, maintaining focus and
resisting distraction, and coordinating complex tasks
(6). Exercise can also improve sleep, although this has
been mostly shown in epidemiological studies (rather
than in randomized controlled trials). For example, in
a Japanese study of >3,000 people, those who reported
no habitual exercise had an odds ratio (OR) of 1.3 for
insomnia [and, by comparison, reporting stress had an
OR of 1.8 or being unemployed had an OR of 1.2 (13)].
In a smaller study by Uezu and colleagues where sleep
reports were corroborated by actigraphy, those with
better sleep also exercised more (27). For a review of
epidemiological evidence on this issue, see Youngstedt
and Kline (36). [There also have been reports of poorer
sleep with very high levels of exercise (36).]
176 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
Sleep
To keep pace with the professional goals in your “career
race,” you also need to keep up good sleep habits. First,
this requires keeping relatively regular sleep times,
meaning that from day to day you should go to bed and
wake up at similar times. Second, limit the amount of
any caffeine you ingest and make sure that you stop
ingesting any caffeine early enough in the day; the halflife of caffeine is almost 6 hours for healthy individuals
(24). Other important sleep habits include keeping the
bedroom for sleeping and sex only (i.e., not for work),
and ensuring that your bedroom is quiet, cool, and dark.
Another useful sleep hygiene tip (from the evidencebased treatment Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for
Insomnia) is to get out of bed if you are awake for more
than about 20 minutes, do a quiet activity, and then
return to bed only when you are drowsy (for a review of
the elements of behavioral treatment for insomnia, see
Ref. 20). You may also find that some relaxation tools
can help you wind down at the end of the day or when
you cannot sleep (e.g., guided meditation, progressive
muscle relaxation techniques, deep breathing).
Critically important for academics, who spend hours at
their computers, is to stop viewing a screen (especially
if it is bright and close to the face) for 30-60 minutes
before bedtime. Otherwise, the screen signals to your
brain that you should be awake and works against your
getting sound sleep (34).
Better sleep can enhance mood, whereas sleep
disturbance can be prodromal to major depression and
anxiety, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD;
Refs. 5, 17, 21, 26, 35). Less objectively measured sleep
time has been related to 1) increased distress (29),
2) altered hormones related to appetite and hunger
(decreased leptin, increased ghrelin; Refs. 23, 25), and
3) increased risk of obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and
mental health outcomes (9, 28, 30-33). In short, getting
more and better-quality sleep can greatly improve your
ability to handle academic and work stressors.
Eat a Healthy Diet
Although what is deemed healthy does seem to vary
with time as new studies appear, several common
themes appear over and over again in epidemiological
studies. These include eating proportionally more
vegetables and fruits, eating little or no red meat,
eating fish, and eating whole grains rather than heavily
THE
refined ones like white flour or white rice. Systemic
inflammation is promoted by diets with lots of refined
starches and sugars, saturated and trans-fats, few
omega-3 fatty acids, and little fiber (for reviews, see
Refs. 1, 12). Stress can also increase inflammation
and interact with poor diet, as suggested by an
older correlational finding (with its usual inferential
limitations) that countries whose residents eat more
fish also have lower national rates of major depression
(11). Finally, stress has been shown to reduce fruit or
vegetable consumption in several epidemiological
studies (as reviewed in Ref. 12), suggesting that we
need to be especially cognizant of our tendency to let
good habits slide when we are busy and overworked.
Do Work That You Love With People You Like
So what about the work environment itself? Despite
cultural notions about the solitary scientist working
hard at the bench (or perhaps even more often, the
computer), science, like most other professions,
has an important social component. Humans are
social creatures who survive and thrive, not just by
competing but also by working cooperatively (7, 22).
Choose work that interests and excites you because
you will spend long hours doing it. Ensure that you
have a supportive social network, which preferably
includes individuals both in your workplace (e.g.,
coworkers, lab mates, mentors) and outside it. Once
you head your own lab, foster a team mentality that
respects, encourages, and supports one another’s ideas
and productivity. You are in this business for the longhaul, and fostering a cooperative environment in which
to work is important for both your individual success
and that of the members of your team. Science confirms
the importance of building social cohesion with those
with whom you work, including evidence of enhanced
team performance in cohesive groups (8, 16). Use your
social networks wisely as a source of encouragement or
moral support, to gain a fresh perspective, to confirm
that what you are experiencing is normative, and as a
source of new ideas. Talking with peers and colleagues
often solidifies and shapes thoughts about our work
in ways that suggest a new way forward when we are
stuck. An independent evaluation from someone whose
judgment you trust also can provide a buffer or reality
check that can enable you to keep moving forward. A
tip from a senior faculty member that I found especially
helpful early in my career was the idea of a “morale
folder.” Keep a folder on your computer or in hard copy
of compliments, nice e-mails, good reviews of papers or
grants, and other items that made you feel supported
and efficacious. Pull them out to read when you need
PHYSIOLOGIST
a reminder that things are not as bad as they seem –
or maybe they are, but to remind you that they will
get better. Different social networks of which you are
a part can serve different supportive roles, so connect
with networks that support a few of your most valued
identities, whether that is as a scientist, mentor, partner,
parent, child, friend, or volunteer. Just be careful to
choose these networks wisely since they can take time
and be sure they are fulfilling your social needs.
Some Final Take Home Messages
The science of resilience suggests two other important
take-home messages that are helpful. George Bonnano
of Teachers College, Columbia University, has
demonstrated two important findings about resilience
to extreme stressors over time in diverse groups
of participants. First, his team has showed that the
predominant trajectory or pattern of stressful response
over time (whether measured as PTSD symptoms,
depression symptoms, or reported distress) is a resilient
one, regardless of whether you have been deployed to
combat in the military (4), experienced a spinal cord
injury (3), or had surgery for breast cancer (15) (for
review, see Ref. 2). Take-home message 1 from this work
is that, even in the face of major life stressors (what is
called a “potentially traumatic event” in this literature),
most people weather potentially traumatic events well
and do not show prolonged distress reactions. Takehome message 2 from these data is that those who are
resilient to a major life event are those whose pre-event
functioning is better. This should provide motivation
to heed the tips here even in the face of the busyness
of one’s academic work life. A set of good behavioral
strategies that are well ingrained habits is your best
insurance against prolonged or serious distress (or
allostatic load in the stress literature; e.g., Ref. 14). In
keeping with the marathon analogy, if your functioning
is already impaired, you won’t be able to deal as well
with the unexpected detours that happen in every
career.
Thinking of your career as a series of marathons is
helpful because it reminds you to take the long view.
You’ve spent many years “training for your races,” but
that does not mean that any of us will make it through
them without the inevitable bumps in the course. By
maintaining good health habits – staying active, well
rested, well nourished, and establishing a supportive
social network – you will be best placed to optimize
your function and complete each race. If you don’t
love your work, think about why, and change what is
preventing you from loving it. It is important to work
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 177
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
with people you like (and if you cannot do so in the
short-term, at least seek out support and encouragement
from mentors, family, friends, and peers whom you
trust). By connecting with people, you build the very
social networks that can help you to create even better
opportunities in the future. Once you have your own
lab, ensure that you spend time and effort to make
sure that people in the lab feel supported and work
together as part of a team. It’s important to indicate
explicitly that this is a goal of your group and then do
the work needed to ensure it happens and be a good
role model. If there is good morale in your team, they
will be more productive and quite likely be even more
creative as a result. As the lab head, you help to create
the buffer against stressors that your research team
needs to perform at its best. Following these tips may
not be easy, but the best evidence is that consistently
engaging in these more healthful behaviors as part of
your career “plan of action” will reap the best rewards
in the long-term. ●
8.Evans CR, Dion KL. Group cohesion and
performance: a meta-analysis. Small Group Res 22: 175186, 1991.
References
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R. An epidemiological study of insomnia among the
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1. Barbaresko J, Koch M, Schulze MB, Nöthlings U.
Dietary pattern analysis and biomarkers of low-grade
inflammation: a systematic literature review. Nutr Rev
71: 511-527, 2013.
9.Fernandez-Mendoza J, Vgontzas AN, Liao D,
Shaffer ML, Vela-Bueno A, Basta M, Bixler EO. Insomnia
with objective short sleep duration and incident
hypertension: The Penn State Cohort. Hypertension 60:
929-935, 2012.
10.Hamilton MT, Healy GN, Dunstan DW, Zderic
TW, Owen N. Too little exercise and too much
sitting: inactivity physiology and the need for new
recommendations on sedentary behavior. Curr
Cardiovasc Risk Rep 2: 292-298, 2008.
11. Hibbeln JR. Fish consumption and major depression.
Lancet 351: 1213, 1998.
12.Kiecolt-Glaser JK. Stress, food, and inflammation:
psychoneuroimmunology and nutrition at the cutting
edge. Psychosomatic Med 72: 365-369, 2010.
2. Bonanno GA. Resilience in the face of potential
trauma. Curr Directions Psychol Sci 14: 135-138, 2005.
14.Korte SM, Koolhaas JM, Wingfield JC, and McEwen
BS. The Darwinian concept of stress: benefits of allostasis
and costs of allostatic load and the trade-offs in health
and disease. Neurosci Biobehav Rev 29: 3-38, 2005.
3. Bonanno GA, Kennedy P, Galatzer-Levy IR, Lude P,
Elfström ML. Trajectories of resilience, depression, and
anxiety following spinal cord injury. Rehab Psychol 57:
236-247, 2012.
15. Lam WWT, Bonanno GA, Mancini AD, Ho S, Chan M,
Hung WK, Or A, Fielding R. Trajectories of psychological
distress among Chinese women diagnosed with breast
cancer. Psych Oncol 19: 1044-1051, 2010.
4.Bonanno GA, Mancini AD, Horton JL, Powell
TM, LeardMann CA, Boyko EJ, Wells TS, Hooper TI,
Gackstetter GD, Smith TC. Trajectories of trauma
symptoms and resilience in deployed US military
service members: prospective cohort study. Br J Psych
200: 317-323, 2012.
16.Mullen B, Copper C. The relation between group
cohesiveness and performance: an integration. Psychol
Bull 115: 210-227, 1994.
5. Breslau N, Roth T, Rosenthal L, Andreski P. Sleep
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epidemiological study of young adults. Biol Psych 39:
411-418, 1996.
17.Neckelmann D, Mykletun A, Dahl AA. Chronic
insomnia as a risk factor for developing anxiety and
depression. Sleep 30: 873-880, 2007.
18.Owen N, Healy GN, Matthews CE, Dunstan DW.
Too much sitting: the population-health science of
sedentary behavior. Exer Sport Sci Rev 38: 105-113, 2010.
6. Colcombe S, Kramer AF. Fitness effects on the
cognitive function of older adults: a meta-analytic
study. Psychol Sci 14: 125-130, 2003.
19.Penedo FJ, Dahn JR. Exercise and well-being: a
review of mental and physical health benefits associated
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7. Cole SW. Human social genomics. PLoS Gen 10:
e1004601, 2014.
20.Pigeon WR. Treatment of adult insomnia with
cognitive-behavioral therapy. J Clin Psychol 66: 11481160, 2010.
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21.Riemann D, Voderholzer U. Primary insomnia: a
risk factor to develop depression? J Affect Disord 76:
255-259, 2003.
M, Chrousos GP. Persistent insomnia: the role of
objective short sleep duration and mental health. Sleep
35: 61-68, 2012.
22.Rilling JK, Gutman DA, Zeh TR, Pagnoni G, Berns
GS, Kilts CD. A neural basis for social cooperation.
Neuron 35: 395-405, 2002.
30.Vgontzas AN, Liao D, Bixler EO, Chrousos GP, VelaBueno A. Insomnia with objective short sleep duration
is associated with a high risk for hypertension. Sleep
32: 491-497, 2009.
23.Spiegel K, Tasali E, Penev P, Van Cauter E. Brief
communication: sleep curtailment in healthy young
men is associated with decreased leptin levels, elevated
ghrelin levels, and increased hunger and appetite.
Ann Int Med 141: 846-850, 2004.
24.Statland BE, Demas TJ. Serum caffeine half-lives.
Healthy subjects vs. patients having alcoholic hepatic
disease. Am J Clin Pathol 73: 390-393, 1980.
25.Taheri S, Lin L, Austin D, Young T, Mignot E.
Short sleep duration is associated with reduced leptin,
elevated ghrelin, and increased body mass index. PLoS
Med 1: e62, 2004.
26.Taylor DJ, Lichstein KL, Durrence HH. Insomnia as
a health risk factor. Behav Sleep Med 1: 227-247, 2003.
27.Uezu E, Taira K, Tanaka H, Arakawa M, Urasakii
C, Toguchi H, Yamamoto Y, Hamakawa E, Shirakawa
S. Survey of sleep-health and lifestyle of the elderly in
Okinawa. Psych Clin Neurosci 54: 311-313, 2000.
28.
Vgontzas AN, Bixler EO, Lin H-M, Prolo P,
Mastorakos G, Vela-Bueno A, Kales A, Chrousos GP.
Chronic insomnia is associated with nyctohemeral
activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis:
clinical implications. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 86: 37873794, 2001.
31.
Vgontzas AN, Liao D, Pejovic S, Calhoun S,
Karataraki M, Basta M, Fernández-Mendoza J, Bixler
EO. Insomnia with short sleep duration and mortality:
The Penn State Cohort. Sleep 33: 1159-1164, 2010.
32.Vgontzas AN, Liao D, Pejovic S, Calhoun S,
Karataraki M, Bixler EO. Insomnia with objective
short sleep duration is associated with Type 2
diabetes. A population-based study. Diabetes Care 32:
1980-1985, 2009.
33.Vgontzas AN, Lin HM, Papaliaga M, Calhoun S,
Vela-Bueno A, Chrousos GP, Bixler EO. Short sleep
duration and obesity: the role of emotional stress and
sleep disturbances. Intl J Obes 32: 801-809, 2008.
34.Wood B, Rea MS, Plitnick B, Figueiro MG. Light
level and duration of exposure determine the impact of
self-luminous tablets on melatonin suppression. Appl
Ergonomics 44: 237-240, 2013.
35.Wright KM, Britt TW, Bliese PD, Adler AB, Picchioni
D, Moore D. Insomnia as predictor versus outcome of
PTSD and depression among Iraq combat veterans. J
Clin Psychol 67: 1240-1258, 2011.
36.Youngstedt SD, Kline CE. Epidemiology of exercise
and sleep. Sleep Biol Rhythms 4: 215-221, 2006.
29.Vgontzas AN, Fernandez-Mendoza J, Bixler EO,
Singareddy R, Shaffer ML, Calhoun SL, Liao D, Basta
Karen Quigley is a Research Associate Professor of Psychology at Northeastern University in Boston, MA, and a
Research Physiologist at the Bedford Memorial VA Hospital in Bedford, MA. Her work focuses on the basic science
of emotion, including how we use bodily signals to make meaning of our experience, for example, as affective
feelings or physical symptoms. Her applied work emphasizes using physiological measures as a motivational tool
to encourage better self-management of chronic health problems, such as insomnia, and finding novel tools to
encourage greater social reintegration to civilian life in those who’ve experienced the life disruption of a military
deployment. She is currently Past-President of the Society for Psychophysiological Research, a member of the
editorial board of the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, and a Fellow of the Academy of Behavioral
Medicine Research.
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 179
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Continued from page 165:
Association of Chairs of Departments of Physiology 2015 Survey Results
We continue to encourage more of our colleagues to
respond so that we can have more robust data that will
benefit all.
The data provide the reader with general trends of
faculty demographics and distribution, overall departmental budgets, and space available for research. As a
reminder, beginning in 2004, ACDP decided not to include faculty salary information in this report. AAMC salary data is more generally used, so the ACDP Council
decided to no longer collect or report this data.
Data were collected on tenure status, gender, and
ethnicity of faculty members (Table 1). Table 1 also
includes information on the average number of
student contact hours for faculty in the lab, classroom
and small discussion groups and the type of teaching
interactions for the department (MD/DO, DVM, allied
health, etc.). Also included is information on the type
of medical physiology course being taught (note that
departments teach multiple class types, accounting
for the fact that the numbers do not add up to the
total respondents).
Table 1a. Faculty Summary
Faculty Summary (n = 911)
Male
Asian/Pacific Islander
Female
For your faculty, what is the average number of hours
of student contact (per year) for:
Total
98
34
132
Black (not Hispanic)
5
0
5
Native American
5
2
7
38
12
50
488
161
649
33
12
45
2
2
4
669
223
892
Hispanic
White (not Hispanic)
Foreign National
Not identified
Total
Gender or race/ethnicity
not identified
19
Lab Hours
Student
Type
Average
(hours)
Number
(inst.)
Graduate
358
39
46
41
115
29
99
46
Medical
Other
Lectures
Graduate
Medical
42
46
102
34
Graduate
34
42
Medical
21
46
Other
24
29
Other
Small Group
Medical Physiology Course Type
Yes
No
Total
Responded
Integrated Disciplines
39
11
50
Traditional
23
27
50
Within Traditional
36
14
50
Teaching Interactions (n = 55 departments)
MD/DO 46
DDS
15
DVM
Allied Health
Pharmacy Tenure Status in Each Department by Degree
Tenured
Not
Tenured
MD
13
11
15
PhD
545
139
119
41
8
14
2 Doctorates
Other
Total
Not
Not
Eligible Identified
0
0
4
599
158
152
180 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
Total
39
2
805
63
4
2
911
5
22
8
Other Biomedical
35
Life Science
26
Bioengineering
23
Other
17
THE
Table 2 focuses on student/trainee information. Included
is information on the gender and number of U.S. citizen/
resident alien vs. foreign pre- and postdoctoral students,
gender and ethnicity of the U.S. citizen/resident alien
PHYSIOLOGIST
predoctoral and postdoctoral fellows, and gender
and country of origin of the foreign predoctoral and
postdoctoral fellows. Also shown are the number of
predoctoral trainee completions by gender, the number
Table 2. Student/Trainee Summary
Foreign National Predoctoral Trainee Completions
Student/Trainee Summary
Predoctoral
Male
US Citizen/
Resident Alien
Foreign
Total
Female
Male
Female
Female
African
1
1
Asian/Pacific Islander
8
17
351
307
144
138
Central/South American
1
7
90
123
147
123
European/Canadian, etc.
4
6
441
430
291
261
Middle Eastern
3
2
Other
1
0
18
33
Total
Race/Ethnicity of US Citizen/Resident Alien Pre- and
Postdoctoral Students/Trainees
Predoctoral
Male
Native American
Male
Postdoctoral
Postdoctoral
Female
Male
Female
Number of Foreign Pre- and Postdoctoral Students/
Trainees
3
1
2
2
Asian/Pacific Islander
41
35
26
34
Black (not Hispanic)
20
32
9
8
Hispanic
21
27
14
15
White (not Hispanic)
266
212
93
79
Central/South American
8
9
13
15
Total
351
307
144
138
European/Canadian, etc.
14
22
27
39
Middle Eastern
15
20
8
6
1
0
5
7
90
123
147
123
Male
Male
African
Asian/Pacific Islander
Other
US Citizen/Resident Alien Predoctoral Trainee
Completions
Native American
Predoctoral
Total
Postdoctoral
Female
Male
Female
2
4
2
0
50
68
92
56
Female
1
1
10
12
Black (not Hispanic)
6
8
Hispanic
8
13
Institutional
73
34
White (not Hispanic)
58
51
Research Grants
73
189
Total
83
85
Private Foundations
5
21
12
12
Asian/Pacific Islander
Number of Foreign Pre- and Postdoctoral Trainees
Whose Primary Source of Support is:
Predoctoral Home (foreign) Government
Total Predoctoral Trainee Completions During the Year
Ending June 30, 2015
Other
Total
Postdoctoral
17
12
180
268
Total
Female
118
Male
101
Total
219
Average Annual Stipend ($U.S.)
Average
Number
(inst.)
Postdoctoral $42,670
45
Predoctoral $25,497
47
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of U.S. citizen/resident alien predoctoral completions
by gender and ethnicity, and the number of foreign
predoctoral completions by gender and country of
origin. The type of support that is used for foreign preand postdoctoral students is included, as are the average
stipends paid to all pre- and postdoctoral students by
the departments.
Institutional information is provided in Table 3 in terms of
the type of institution (public or private) and the average
square footage of space occupied by the departments for
research, teaching, administration, and other purposes.
Departmental budget information (Table 4) shows
average dollar amounts for type of support
(institutional hard money, research grants, training
grants, endowments, indirect cost recovery). Numbers
for all institutions are reported, as are the data broken
out by public medical, private medical, and nonmedical. Financial information is also given, including
fringe benefit rate, federally negotiated indirect
cost rates for both on and off campus, allocated
salary dollars from grants directly returned to the
departments, percentage of indirect costs returned to
the departments, percentage of total faculty salaries
derived from research grants, and percentage of
faculty having extramural research funding greater
than $100,000/yr.
Table 5 ranks responding Institutions according to their
total dollars (institutional hard money, research grants,
etc.), research grant dollars (direct or direct plus indirect,
as appropriate), research dollars per faculty member,
departmental research space, and research dollars
per research space. Total number of faculty in each
department is also shown.
For an update of AAMC salary data, please see the
accompanying article (p. 185). ●
Table 3. Institution Summary
Space Controlled by Department
Type of Institution
Private
Average, sq. ft.
14
Public
41
Research Space
Total
55
Administrative Space
20,121
50
3,472
48
Teaching Space
1,524
43
Other Space:
1,983
37
26,232
50
Total Space
182 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
No. of Depts
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Table 4. Institutional Financial Information
Budget by Institution
All
Institutions
No. of
Depts
Mean No.
of Faculty
Private
Medical
No. of
Institutions
Mean No. of
Faculty
Institutional (hard money, e.g,
operating costs, state allocations)
$2,261,766
50
18
$2,188,640
12
14
Outside Research Grants and
Contracts (direct costs only)
$4,090,291
48
19
$5,961,549
10
15
Training Grants (direct costs only)
$347,597
21
20
$315,515
6
16
Endowments
$411,180
35
18
$479,043
9
14
Indirect Cost Recovery (amount
returned to your department)
$385,725
35
20
$2,521,829
3
20
Other Budget Support
$526,995
28
18
$850,251
6
14
$7,151,729
50
$8,729,220
12
Average Departmental Budget
911
Total faculty
Public
Medical
No. of
Institutions
Mean No.
of Faculty
167
Non-medical
No. of
Institutions
Mean No.
of Faculty
Institutional (hard money, e.g,
operating costs, state allocations)
$2,306,240
36
20
$1,900,000
2
16
Outside Research Grants and
Contracts (direct costs only)
$3,737,936
36
20
$1,076,383
2
16
Training Grants (direct costs only)
$360,430
15
22
$0
Endowments
$401,170
25
20
$50,659
1
21
Indirect Cost Recovery (amount
returned to your department)
$185,465
32
20
$0
Other Budget Support
$438,835
22
19
$0
$6,905,272
36
Average Departmental Budget
Total Faculty
$3,001,713
2
708
31
Financial Information
Average,
%
No. of
Institutions
Current fringe benefit rate most frequently used for primary faculty
31
48
Federally negotiated indirect cost rate for FY 13-14 off campus 28
44
Federally negotiated indirect cost rate for FY 13-14 on campus 51
47
Percentage of allocated salary dollars from grants directly returned to your department
69
32
Percentage of indirect costs returned to your department
20
32
Percentage of total faculty salaries derived from research grants (does not include fringe benefits costs)
34
44
Percentage of faculty having extramural research funding greater than $100,000/year
53
47
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 183
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Table 5. Complete Ranking According to Total Dollars
Rank
Total
Dollars
Total
Dollars
Rank
Research
Grant Dollars
Research
Grant
Dollars
Rank
Research
Dollars/Faculty
Research
Dollars/
Faculty
Rank Total
Research
Space
Total
Research
Space
1
29,959,152
1
17,615,981
1
880,799
2
46,152
2
18,291,498
2
10,823,498
2
569,658
6
36,042
3
17,966,893
4
9,496,468
16
249,907
8
4
13,996,661
5
9,458,702
7
378,348
3
5
13,134,029
6
8,516,709
6
425,835
6
12,588,462
3
10,127,061
5
7
11,612,920
8
7,500,000
8
11,076,188
11
Rank
Research
Dollars/sqft
Research
Dollars/sqft
No.
of
Faculty
3
382
20
9
300
19
34,591
12
275
38
43,151
17
219
25
13
26,926
7
316
20
440,307
5
36,048
11
281
23
25
197,368
45
10,414
2
720
38
5,621,930
13
295,891
4
38,634
29
146
19
9
11,074,100
13
4,818,000
39
112,047
10
33,170
30
145
43
10
10,187,869
7
7,885,987
11
342,869
12
27,510
10
287
23
11
10,150,434
9
6,525,071
4
466,077
22
18,811
5
347
14
12
9,365,497
10
5,957,015
3
496,418
9
33,369
24
179
12
13
8,040,414
15
4,373,054
27
174,922
19
20,220
18
216
25
14
7,934,542
21
3,366,952
23
198,056
25
16,975
20
198
17
15
7,589,346
16
4,287,793
8
357,316
32
13,500
6
318
12
16
7,324,568
12
5,303,335
12
311,961
48
5,640
1
940
17
17
7,052,872
31
2,572,663
24
197,897
16
22,095
35
116
13
18
7,024,467
17
3,959,602
35
127,729
18
20,870
21
190
31
19
6,946,454
19
3,482,020
18
232,135
11
31,313
36
111
15
20
6,346,174
20
3,478,643
9
347,864
27
16,729
19
208
10
21
6,246,572
29
2,627,396
17
238,854
1
49,427
47
53
11
22
6,244,328
23
3,163,262
30
150,632
15
22,163
31
143
21
23
6,163,209
14
4,545,096
29
156,727
28
15,065
8
302
29
24
6,093,981
38
1,832,470
44
65,445
14
24,166
45
76
28
25
6,053,089
30
2,575,626
31
143,090
7
35,377
46
73
18
26
6,006,594
22
3,197,136
34
127,885
30
14,492
16
221
25
27
5,489,050
35
2,094,064
28
161,082
42
11,600
23
181
13
28
5,351,793
42
1,634,620
38
116,759
24
18,355
41
89
14
29
5,294,458
34
2,122,028
32
132,627
37
12,484
25
170
16
30
5,274,406
25
2,943,180
21
210,227
41
11,623
13
253
14
31
5,206,000
28
2,694,000
20
224,500
26
16,900
27
159
12
32
5,090,196
40
1,738,147
43
69,526
20
19,971
42
87
25
33
4,672,039
33
2,228,972
33
131,116
17
21,368
38
104
17
34
4,592,662
27
2,717,196
19
226,433
21
19,848
32
137
12
35
4,349,193
18
3,820,279
10
347,298
46
10,100
4
378
11
36
4,325,324
24
3,114,520
14
259,543
31
14,000
15
222
12
37
4,262,468
41
1,734,245
36
123,875
29
14,774
34
117
14
38
4,251,048
45
1,107,996
45
65,176
34
13,227
43
84
17
39
3,962,069
37
1,903,442
46
63,448
38
12,475
28
153
30
40
3,865,988
36
2,023,450
37
119,026
39
12,048
26
168
17
41
3,850,766
32
2,279,513
22
207,228
36
12,507
22
182
11
42
3,813,002
26
2,772,748
15
252,068
43
11,236
14
247
11
43
3,800,000
39
1,800,000
26
180,000
33
13,394
33
134
10
44
3,797,659
44
1,146,133
47
45,845
44
10,555
37
109
25
45
3,042,987
43
1,173,769
41
106,706
40
11,671
39
101
11
46
2,600,500
46
1,000,000
40
111,111
35
12,800
44
78
9
47
2,203,425
48
352,766
48
16,798
23
18,500
48
19
21
48
1,993,394
47
821,419
42
91,269
47
8,289
40
99
9
49
1,220,000
49
0
49
0
49
2,975
49
0
7
50
807,721
50
0
50
0
50
2,488
50
0
6
184 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
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AAMC Medical School Faculty Compensation Survey
Each year, the American Association of Medical
Colleges (AAMC) surveys all U.S. medical schools as
to faculty compensation. Because of this, the ACDP
(see associated article on p. 165) decided to no longer
collect the same data from its members.
As a supplement to the ACDP survey, the AAMC has
agreed to allow the APS to publish selected results
from their survey.
Table 1 shows the regional distribution of medical
schools responding to the AAMC survey in terms
of public medical and private medical. Also shown
is the number of physiology departments in those
regions that responded. The number of departments
responding to the AAMC survey is not the same as the
ACDP survey, since AAMC usually receives a much
greater response from institutions.
Summary statistics on faculty compensation in
physiology departments for PhD and MD faculty are
given in Table 2. Table 3 shows the changes in salary
that have occurred over the past 3 years for both PhD
and MD faculty. The summary statistics for separate
regions of the country for both PhD and MD faculty
are given in Table 4.
Table 5 shows the salary comparison between faculty
in all basic science departments vs. those in physiology departments. ●
Table 1. Distribution of Medical Schools Responding to AAMC Medical School Faculty Compensation Survey
Northeast
All
Physiology
Midwest
South
West
TOTAL
Private Medical
27
12
14
4
57
Public Medical
13
22
37
15
87
All Medical Schools
16
12
22
11
61
Table 2. Summary Statistics on Physiology Department PhD and MD Faculty Compensation
PhD Faculty
25th
Chair
Professor
Assoc. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Instructor
Median
75th
Mean
No. of Faculty
All Schools
234,000
276,000
326,000
284,900
61
Medical Public
230,000
267,000
306,000
265,500
42
Medical Private
235,000
304,000
360,000
327,700
19
All Schools
138,000
165,000
194,000
171,200
529
Medical Public
138,000
165,000
190,000
171,600
369
Medical Private
138,000
166,000
201,000
170,200
160
All Schools
102,000
115,000
131,000
117,400
321
Medical Public
101,000
115,000
128,000
115,600
231
Medical Private
104,000
115,000
143,000
122,100
90
All Schools
67,000
88,000
100,000
85,600
356
Medical Public
65,000
88,000
97,000
84,400
247
Medical Private
68,000
89,000
105,000
88,300
109
All Schools
48,000
52,000
58,000
53,300
71
Medical Public
48,000
51,000
57,000
51,800
51
Medical Private
50,000
55,000
67,000
57,000
20
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 185
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Table 2. Summary Statistics on Physiology Department PhD and MD Faculty Compensation (continued)
MD Faculty
25th
Chair
Professor
Assoc. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Instructor
Median
75th
Mean
No. of Faculty
All Schools
295,000
340,000
401,000
345,400
12
Medical Public
292,000
309,000
388,000
338,600
7
Medical Private
178,000
367,000
526,000
355,000
5
All Schools
156,000
183,000
230,000
193,300
63
Medical Public
160,000
186,000
231,000
194,200
32
Medical Private
153,000
180,000
217,000
192,500
31
All Schools
89,000
106,000
125,000
110,100
30
Medical Public
89,000
105,000
122,000
106,800
14
Medical Private
90,000
111,000
134,000
112,900
16
All Schools
70,000
92,000
103,000
88,800
26
Medical Public
70,000
83,000
98,000
82,800
16
Medical Private
90,000
97,000
107,000
98,400
10
All Schools
48,000
53,000
61,000
54,200
5
Medical Public
4
Medical Private
1
For less than 5 faculty, data are not reported
Table 3. Change in Total Compensation for Physiology Department PhD/MD Faculty
PhD Faculty
2014 - 2015
Mean
131,600
2013 - 2014
Median
122,000
Mean
129,100
% Change 2013 - 2014
to 2014 - 2015
2012 - 2013
Median
119,000
Mean
126,700
Median
118,000
Mean
Median
1.9
2.5
Mean and median values were combined for Assistant, Associate, and Professor
MD Faculty
2014 - 2015
Mean
149,500
Median
143,000
2013 - 2014
Mean
149,900
Median
134,000
2012 - 2013
Mean
147,200
Mean and median values were combined for Assistant, Associate, and Professor
186 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
Median
134,000
% Change 2013 - 2014
to 2014 - 2015
Mean
Median
-0.3
6.7
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PHYSIOLOGIST
Table 4. Summary Statistics on Physiology Department PhD and MD Faculty Compensation by Region
PhD Faculty
Chair
Northeast
Midwest
South
West
25th
235,000
238,000
224,000
214,000
Median
277,000
276,000
258,000
281,000
75th
323,000
349,000
319,000
328,000
Mean
298,200
310,200
267,300
272,900
15
13
24
9
Total faculty
Professor
25th
146,000
137,000
130,000
151,000
Median
171,000
166,000
157,000
176,000
75th
195,000
199,000
184,000
205,000
Mean
170,700
173,500
161,600
188,700
101
156
188
84
Total faculty
Assoc. Prof.
25th
111,000
98,000
97,000
111,000
Median
122,000
115,000
110,000
120,000
75th
144,000
130,000
124,000
137,000
Mean
128,000
115,700
112,200
119,100
69
106
116
30
25th
73,000
63,000
68,000
78,000
Median
97,000
87,000
85,000
94,000
75th
110,000
97,000
95,000
107,000
Mean
90,400
83,800
83,300
94,600
54
109
160
33
25th
50,000
42,000
48,000
48,000
Median
55,000
52,000
51,000
55,000
75th
66,000
60,000
56,000
58,000
Mean
58,900
51,200
52,200
53,100
10
11
30
20
Northeast
Midwest
Total faculty
Asst. Prof.
Total faculty
Instructor
Total faculty
MD Faculty
Chair
25th
290,000
303,000
75th
380,000
Total faculty
288,800
2
3
6
1
25th
161,000
156,000
128,000
160,000
Median
193,000
181,000
172,000
172,000
75th
239,000
217,000
224,000
204,000
Mean
202,300
186,300
182,600
187,800
30
6
15
12
86,000
108,000
76,000
Median
103,000
142,000
92,000
75th
107,000
156,000
116,000
Mean
101,800
133,700
96,200
6
9
12
Total faculty
Assoc. Prof.
West
Median
Mean
Professor
South
25th
Total faculty
3
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 187
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Table 4. Summary Statistics on Physiology Department PhD and MD Faculty Compensation by Region
(continued)
Northeast
Asst. Prof.
South
West
25th
83,000
Median
95,000
73,000
101,000
102,000
75th
Mean
Total faculty
Instructor
Midwest
70,000
93,800
82,500
2
12
12
0
1
1
1
2
25th
Median
75th
Mean
Total faculty
For less than 5 faculty, data are not reported
Table 5. Salary Comparison Between All Basic Science Departments and
Physiology Departments
All Basic Science Depts.
Chair
25th
235,000
234,000
Median
282,000
276,000
75th
338,000
326,000
Mean
290,800
284,900
540
61
25th
143,000
138,000
Median
172,000
165,000
75th
210,000
194,000
Mean
182,600
171,200
4,350
529
25th
102,000
102,000
Median
118,000
115,000
75th
136,000
131,000
Mean
121,900
117,400
3,418
321
25th
77,000
67,000
Median
94,000
88,000
75th
108,000
100,000
Mean
94,200
85,600
4,026
356
25th
Median
53,000
59,000
48,000
52,000
75th
68,000
58,000
Mean
64,200
53,300
654
71
Total faculty
Professor
Total faculty
Assoc. Prof.
Total faculty
Asst. Prof.
Total faculty
Instructor
Physiology
Total faculty
188 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
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APS News
The APS International Opportunity Program Symposium
The APS International Opportunity Program (IOP)
Symposium “East Meets West: Advances in Gut
Microbiome Effects on Pathophysiology of Human
Diseases” was held in Yangzhou University, China,
on March 5-6, 2016. This was the first APS IOP
symposium in China. Jun Sun, Associate Professor
from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC),
organized and chaired the meeting.
Researchers from UIC (Jun Sun and Pradeep Dudeja,
APS members) and researchers and students from
Yangzhou University, Shanghai Jiaotong University,
Nanjing Medical University, Chongqing Medical
University, Haerbing Medical University, Institut
Pasteur of Shanghai, and Zhejiang A&M University
participated in the symposium. This symposium
offered presentations and discussion on the most
recent progress in mechanisms of microbial host
interactions in human diseases, including digestive
disorders, obesity, autism, and cancer. Eleven research
talks were given by established researchers. Six awards
were given to students with excellent presentations
and abstracts. There were over 40 student attendees.
Topics explored included how gut microbiome
increases susceptibility to GI diseases and diseases in
distant organs, and how to facilitate the understanding
of mechanisms that maintain a healthy host-microbiota
relationship. Chinese researchers and students learned
new concepts and advances in the field. The mission
of the APS international committee was carried out,
which enhanced the impact and awareness of the APS
in China. Also highlighted were the benefits of APS
membership for faculty and trainees.
The meeting successfully achieved its original goals.
Many Chinese PIs and students express their interests
to become APS members, publish in the APS journals,
and attend the APS meetings. Beyond the original plan,
much was learned about the progress of microbiome
in clinical practice and veterinary medicine in China.
Also discussed were the global microbiome project,
microbes in animals, humans, and environment,
and the IOP’s mission to educate and train the next
generation of researchers. Researchers and PIs also
Group picture on day 1
Organizers and Award Committee (from left to right): Qiuchun Li, Jun
Sun, Pradeep Dudeja, Xinan Jiao, and Xiulong Xu
asked for future joint symposia that could then be
planned in the near future.
Some comments from the student attendees:
“Thank you very much to organize the APS microbiome
meeting in Yangzhou University. As a member of YZU,
it was my great pleasure to do some support work for
the meeting. Importantly, I learned research progress
on microbiome and human disease, especially in
clinical from the wonderful reports presented during
the meeting. Also, it was pleasure for me to meet with
so many new friends in the meeting.”
–Chuang Meng, PhD student, Yangzhou University
“That was an exciting meeting, let me benefit a lot, and
hope for more opportunity to attend similar meetings
of APS.”
–Xinxia Chang, Student, Nanjing Medical University ●
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 189
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
Tang Prize Summary Report of EB2016
event, with Jenn-Chuan Chern representing the Tang
Prize Foundation as its CEO. Martin Frank (Executive
Director of the American Physiological Society) also
participated this event.
In its second year of 10 in promoting education in
biology, the Tang Prize Lecture series at Experimental
Biology took place on April 5, 2016, in San Diego. There,
the 2014 Tang Prize Laureate in Biopharmaceutical
Science Tasuku Honjo addressed an audience of
300+ on cancer immunology and his work on the
inhibitory receptor PD-1. Shu Chien (National Medal
of Science awardee and director of the Institute of
Engineering in Medicine at UC San Diego) hosted the
Shu Chien (right)
hosted the lecture of
Tasuku Honjo (left)
Tasuku Honjo in
lecture
Left to right: JennChuan Chern
(CEO of Tang Prize
Foundation), Martin
Frank(Executive
Director of the APS),
Tasuku Honjo, Shu
Chien
190 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
The Tang Prize Lecture at Experimental Biology is
delivered yearly or bi-yearly by recent recipients of
the Tang Prize in Biopharmaceutical Science. It is
intended to build on the foundation of the prize field
by giving it a real-world platform for the sharing of
new and forward-looking ideas among the world’s
scientific community. The first year of the Tang Prize
Lecture series was delivered by James P. Allison on a
separate immune mechanism, the inhibitory receptor
CTLA-4. Honjo and Allison are two of the five
inaugural laureates of the Tang Prize. ●
Audience in the lecture
Group photo of
participants from
Taiwan with Tasuku
Honjo
Participants queued to
talk with Tasuku Honjo
after the lecture
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PHYSIOLOGIST
Science Policy
APS and FASEB Showcase NSF-Funded Research
APS and FASEB co-sponsored an exhibit at an April 27,
2016 Coalition for National Science Funding event on
Capitol Hill. APS member Allyson Hindle presented her
research on naturally occurring protection for the hearts
and brains of diving seals in Antarctica to an audience
that included Members of Congress and Congressional
staff. The exhibit was meant to highlight the value of
NSF-funded research and to make the case for future
budget increases. ●
Hannah Carey, Rebecca Osthus, Ben Krinsky, and Allyson Hindle at the
2016 Coalition for National Science Funding Exhibition
A monthly bulletin for APS members about science policy issues
of concern to physiologists with an emphasis on advocacy opportunities
Email [email protected] to sign up!
Stay Connected!
the-aps.org/sciencepolicy • twitter.com/SciPolAPS
[email protected] • animalresearchcures.org
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 191
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APS Early Career Advocacy Fellows go to Capitol Hill
On May 17, 2016, the APS Early Career Advocacy
Fellows convened in Washington, DC to meet with
their members of Congress. The Fellows, accompanied
by members of the APS Science Policy Committee and
staff, discussed the importance of federal funding for
research, as well as pending reauthorization for the
Small Business Innovation Research program.
The 2-year fellowship program offers early career
physiologists the opportunity to become engaged in
the Society’s policy and advocacy efforts under the
mentorship of the Science Policy Committee. ●
APS Early Career Advocacy Fellows Heidi Medford, LaShauna Evans,
Giovanna Collu, and Allyson Hindle
Hindle, Evans, and Science Policy Committee Chair Kevin Kregel brave
the rain to advocate for research funding on Capitol Hill
Kregel, Evans, and
Hindle get ready
to meet with staff
from Senator John
Cornyn’s office
Collu, Medford, and McCabe outside the office of
Representative Charles Rangel
Collu, Medford, and
incoming Science Policy
Chair Laura McCabe on
their way to the Senate
to discuss research
funding with the New
York and Washington
state delegations
192 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
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APS Advises USDA on Ways to Reduce Regulatory Burden
On January 26, 2016, the USDA solicited input on how
it can make its regulatory oversight less burdensome.
This request for information was part of a governmentwide review mandated by the White House to identify
ways that federal agencies can save time and money
consistent with their program objectives.
Below are excerpts from the statement the APS
submitted concerning two ways USDA can reduce
the administrative burden associated with Animal
Welfare Act oversight while still maintaining high
animal welfare standards. The full APS statement
is
available
online
at
http://www.the-aps.org/
USDARegulatoryRFI2016.
Modify the Emphasis of the Alternatives
Search Requirement
The current regulatory approach for the alternatives
search requirement is an inefficient and burdensome
process. §2143(a)(3)(B) of the Animal Welfare Act (AWA)
states that researchers must consider “alternatives to
any procedure likely to produce pain or distress in an
experimental animal.” USDA’s Animal Care Policy #12
favors the use of database searches to demonstrate that
alternatives have been considered. However, as noted
in comments the APS submitted in 2015 concerning the
reduction of regulatory burden, such search “requires
significant effort on the part of the investigator while
providing little insight into the investigator’s actual
consideration of alternative strategies” (see http://www.
the-aps.org/USDARegulatoryRFI).
We concur with the comments submitted by the
Association of American Universities, the Association
of Public and Land-grant Universities, and the Council
on Government Relations regarding this point. Their
letter recommends that USDA “identify alternatives
to the literature search that would reduce unnecessary
administrative work while meeting the intent of the
regulations.” The APS recommends that the emphasis
on database searches in Policy #12 be eliminated,
permitting investigators to provide a brief written
narrative addressing how reduction, refinement, and/
or replacement were incorporated into the protocol if
they prefer. As we noted in our 2015 comments: “Such
a narrative gives the review body (IACUC) much more
insight into the consideration of alternatives, satisfies
the regulatory objectives of the Animal Welfare Act, and
reduces burden for researchers.”
Extend the Review Period for Activities
Involving Animals
The current system for overseeing the care and use
of research animals is unduly complex because it is
governed by multiple federal agencies with different
policies. The National Academies of Sciences (NAS)
examined the problem in their 2015 report, “Optimizing
the Nation’s Investment in Academic Research.” The
report recommends “a unified federal approach for
the development, promulgation, and management of
policies and regulations pertaining to the care and use
of research animals.”
In terms of modifications that are feasible without a
change to the AWA, we urge USDA to harmonize its
requirement for periodic reviews of protocols to align
with the PHS Policy. Currently, Section 2.31 (d)(5) of the
Animal Welfare Regulations states, “The IACUC shall
conduct continuing reviews of activities covered by
this subchapter at appropriate intervals as determined
by the IACUC but not less than annually.” Section
IV, C, 5 of the PHS Policy takes a different approach:
“The IACUC shall conduct continuing review of each
previously approved, ongoing activity covered by this
Policy at appropriate intervals as determined by the IACUC,
including a complete review in accordance with IV.C.14 at least once every three years” (emphasis added).
Keeping track of different review timetables for two
different oversight agencies is burdensome. The APS
therefore urges USDA to utilize language similar to
that of the PHS Policy with respect to the frequency of
reviews.
Extending the period for reviewing protocols to 3 years
would significantly reduce burden while still fulfilling
the intent of the AWA. ●
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 193
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ACE Symposium Seeks Ways to Reduce Regulatory Burden
The Animal Care and Experimentation (ACE) Committee presented a symposium at Experimental Biology
2016 to address concerns about the local regulation of
animal care programs. As noted by the four speakers,
burdensome institutional policies can be a source of
frustration for investigators, especially when the policies go beyond regulatory requirements. Poor communication between IACUCs and investigators is another
significant source of problems.
Featured Speakers
ACE Committee Chair Jeffrey Henegar of the University of Missouri highlighted the federal laws and regulations governing oversight of research animals. These
agencies have separate requirements for animal care
that “overlap and, at times, contradict each other sometimes causing confusion for IACUCs and institutions.”
One example of contradictory requirements is the fact
that the AWA requires IACUCs to have at least three
members, whereas the PHS Policy requires a minimum
of five. He also noted that, when the distinction between
recommendations and regulations is unclear, institutions may take an unnecessarily burdensome approach
to oversight to protect themselves.
Anthony Comuzzie of the Texas Biomedical Research
Institute (TBRI) pointed out that improving IACUC
efficiency requires a willingness to review existing
policies, such as collecting only the information that
is needed to report animal activities to agencies. It
also requires recruiting qualified and engaged IACUC
members. To illustrate how this process can help,
Comuzzie listed some of the changes his IACUC made
to its policies. These included using designated member
review rather than full committee review whenever
possible; streamlining the protocol form to eliminate
unnecessary data requests; and referencing standard
operating procedures (SOPs) for routine animal
procedures instead of including all the information in the
protocol. By eliminating unnecessary and burdensome
requirements, more time could be dedicated to animal
care rather than administrative work.
194 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
J. R. Haywood of Michigan State University reviewed a
number of recent studies on the problem of regulatory
burden. He highlighted the recommendations of
reports by the National Science Board (NSB) and the
National Academy of Sciences (NAS). These included
calls to eliminate or modify ineffective regulations;
reexamine the federal oversight system on animal use
and care; and increase the efficiency and effectiveness
of institutional policies. Haywood also discussed ways
IACUCs can rein in self-imposed regulatory burden by
assessing whether their internal procedures are actually
required by law and whether they in fact improve the
welfare of animals. After that, the IACUC should also
consider whether the procedure can be conducted in a
more efficient or cost-effective manner and then decide
whether to change, continue, or stop the practice. This
systematic approach was first described in “Avoiding
an Overzealous Approach: A Perspective on Regulatory
Burden,” an article by Haywood and Greene that was
published in the ILAR Journal in 2008.
Barbara Hansen of the University of South Florida
suggested ways to resolve various problems that can
arise. She encouraged the use of a review process
when concerns about animal welfare are raised and
recommended developing procedures to help resolve
disagreements between investigators and the IACUC.
Her suggestions included having another institution’s
IACUC review disagreements about possible animal
welfare issues or consulting with outside experts
to resolve disagreements. Doing so will provide a
secondary review of animal welfare or protocol design
issues. She also recommended that IACUCs refrain from
reporting every concern that is raised for discussion as a
non-compliant issue.
The speakers’ presentations and other resources on
reducing regulatory burden are available at the-aps.org/
ReducingBurden. ●
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
Antibody Producer Settles USDA Case, Relinquishes
AWA Credentials
On May 19, 2016, antibody
producer Santa Cruz Biotechnology (SCBT), Inc. reached an
agreement with the USDA to resolve
allegations of numerous Animal
Welfare Act (AWA) violations. Under the terms of this
agreement, SCBT neither admitted nor denied wrongdoing. Nevertheless, the company agreed that by May
31, 2016 it would pay a record $3.5 million fine. SCBT
also agreed that, as of May 31, 2016, it would cease
antibody production involving USDA-regulated
species and relinquish its registration as a research
facility. SCBT further agreed to allow USDA to revoke its
license as a dealer as of December 31, 2016, after which
it can no longer sell antibodies made from USDAregulated species.
USDA filed three formal complaints against SCBT
between July 12, 2012 and August 7, 2015 based on the
observations of inspectors from the agency’s Animal
and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) during
multiple unannounced visits. The USDA complaints
alleged that the company repeatedly violated the AWA
in its treatment of goats used for antibody production.
[For more about the USDA’s case against SCBT, see
Caveat Emptor (http://www.the-aps.org/mm/Publications/
Journals/Physiologist/Archive/2016-Issues/January-2016Vol-59No-1/Caveat-Emptor).] The complaints included
allegations that SCBT failed to provide appropriate
veterinary care to sick and injured animals; that its staff
handled animals improperly; and that the company’s
institutional animal care and use committee failed to
ensure that animals were housed under appropriate
conditions and that the animals’ pain and distress were
minimized during antibody production. In its third
complaint dated August 7, 2015, USDA also alleged that
SCBT “demonstrated bad faith by misleading APHIS
personnel about the existence of an undisclosed location
where respondent housed regulated animals.” This
“undisclosed location” was a barn where some 841 goats
– including sick ones – were housed.
SCBT initially contested the USDA’s allegations and
sought a hearing before an administrative law judge.
After several delays, a hearing where both sides could
present evidence took place August 18-20, 2015 before
Administrative Law Judge Janice Bullard. The hearing
was suspended on the morning of August 21 with no
explanation given. It was later scheduled to resume on
April 5, 2016 and then postponed again until August
15, 2016.
The settlement agreement gives SCBT until the end of
2016 – when its license will be revoked – to sell antibodies
made from blood and serum it collected from regulated
animals prior to August 21, 2015. However, SCBT had to
stop producing antibodies from this blood and serum by
May 31, 2016, when it agreed to cancel its registration as a
research facility. Since the AWA does not regulate rodents
bred for research, SCBT can continue to sell antibodies
produced in mice.
Antibodies play an important role in both clinical
medicine and research because they react to the presence
of specific proteins. Antibody production starts by
injecting an animal with a protein. This activates the
immune system, which generates antibodies to identify
the invading protein. Some types of antibodies are
purified directly from blood collected from animals
injected with a protein. Other types can be produced
in a laboratory, with cell lines created by fusing an
initial batch of purified antibodies to harmless cancer
cells. Antibodies target either one region of a protein
(monoclonal antibodies) or several regions (polyclonal
antibodies).
Why did the SCBT case take almost 4 years to settle?
From a legal perspective, APHIS inspections findings
represent allegations of AWA violations, and our system
guarantees due process: Those accused of violating the
law are entitled to their day in court. Kudos should go
to USDA for its persistence in marshalling sufficient
evidence to convince SCBT to agree to this settlement. ●
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 195
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Education
Members Foster Physiology Discovery at the 2016 USASEF
Jeffrey Osborn, University of Kentucky
Margaret E. Stieben, Program Manager, K-12 Education Programs
More than 350,000 children, parents, and teachers
attended the 2016 USA Science & Engineering Festival
(USASEF) at the Convention Center in Washington,
DC, April 15-17. For the first time, the festival included
a “Sneak Peek Friday” that allowed school groups
to attend the festival. More than 60,000 students and
teachers attended this event. On Saturday and Sunday,
parents and children of all ages filled the exhibit halls,
exploring areas of science, engineering, and technology.
APS shared the Medicine and Health area with other
professional societies, NIH, NSF, and other federal
agencies and companies. APS activities were organized
by the Education Committee and the Education Office.
At the APS booth, seven members worked each
day to engage thousands of attendees in hands-on
physiology activities. Education Committee members
included Committee Chair Jeff Osborn (University
of Kentucky), as well as committee members Patricia
Halpin (University of New Hampshire) and Jessica
Taylor (College of Osteopathic Medicine William Carey
University). APS Minority Outreach Fellows (past
and present) included TanYa Gwathmey (Wake Forest
University), Elinette Albino-Rodriguez (Ponce Health
Sciences University), and Jessica Ibarra (University of
the Incarnate Word). Porter Committee member Stan
Andrisse (Johns Hopkins University) also served on
the team.
Cub Scouts learning about blood flow
196 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
Member volunteers Albino, Taylor, Halpin, and Andrisse
A demographic and ethnic diversity of visitors to the
APS booth included young and old adult individuals,
parent-child or family groups, and groups of young
children and adolescents. There was a steady and
constant flow of guests engaging in both APS
booth activities on the “Healthy Heart Race” and a
demonstration on insulation using fat, feathers, and
skin in cold water.
In the “Healthy Heart Pumping Race” (Pressley TA,
Limson M, Byse M, Matyas ML. The Healthy Heart Race:
a short-duration, hands-on activity in cardiovascular
physiology for museums and science festivals. Adv
Physiol Ed 35: 275-279, 2011) participants explored a
model of blood flow and the effects of atherosclerosis,
unhealthy diets, and lack of exercise. The model was
constructed with a unidirectional marine gas pump
and tubing that circulated fluid (water with red food
coloring) from a reservoir into a graduated jug. When
resistance was increased (the tube was clamped) to
demonstrate occluded arteries, the pump was more
difficult to squeeze, and the time to fill the jug was
longer. Participants could easily feel the additional
effort exerted by the “heart” to pump blood when
“arteries” narrowed.
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
At the insulation model (Limson M, Krontiris-Litowitz
J, Ortiz RM, Pressley TA, Matyas ML. The insulation
bag: learning thermoregulation through a “hands-in”
activity. Adv Physiol Ed 36: 65-67, 2011), participants
explored animal adaptations that allow survival in
extreme environments. The insulating properties of fat
of polar bears, the feathers of geese, and human skin
were all compared. Fat was simulated with vegetable
shortening, whereas feathers were represented by bubble
wrap, and skin served as the control in a bucket of ice
water. Each model system was fashioned as a doublegloved system with sealed plastic bags. Children made
predictions about the best insulator and then tested
each hypothesis. Participants were captivated with the
demonstration, which led to discussions on adaptations
and the physiological differences of polar bears, birds,
and humans.
Members distributed thousands of APS Career Trading
Cards and Phizzy Bear Activity Books to teens and
children to promote physiology career exploration. ●
Dr. Ibarra handing out trading cards
Inspire the Next Generation of Physiologists
Physiology Understanding Week (PhUn Week) is November 7-11, 2016
Start Planning your Event Now! Deadline: October 1st
• The theme for PhUn Week is Exercise & Health.
• APS provides resources to support and plan your event.
• APS Members and teachers partner NOW for preliminary planning
as the school year begins!
• Online submission request form for PhUn Week Event planners
is now open.
www.PhUnWeek.org
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 197
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2016 Frontiers in Physiology Teachers Complete Fellowship
Frontiers in Physiology Research Teacher Fellows
completed their fellowship year in April with their
attendance at EB2016 in San Diego, CA. Six middle and
high school teachers from across the nation began this
professional development course in April of 2015 and
progressed through the online lessons for 9 months.
The Frontiers in Physiology Program was made
available by generous support from APS and an NIH
Science Partnership Award (SEPA 5R25OD016492-03).
The course included readings, sharing of resources,
experimental design activities, online poster sessions
and discussion boards, lesson development, peer
reviews, and development of Bench-to-Bedside Primers.
Lead Mentor Instructor Robert Manriquez (Mansfield
High School, Mansfield, LA; Research Teacher in
2005) was assisted by Mentor Instructor Tonya
Smith (Richland County School District One Schools,
Columbia, SC; Research Teacher in 2005) in leading the
online forum of modeling inquiry methods for use in
the classroom. Overall, teachers from five states took
part in this rigorous professional development course,
learning not only about physiology but about the
best ways to help their students learn science via the
scientific method. ●
2015-2016 Frontiers in Physiology Fellowship awardees and mentors
at EB 2016
The teachers participating in the program included:
Research Teacher
Teacher School
Research Host
Host Institution
Stacey Benson
Pewaukee High School,
Pewaukee, WI
John Imig
Medical School of Wisconsin
Judy Birschbach
West Bend East High School,
West Bend, WI
John Imig
Medical School of Wisconsin
Catherine Dollard
Northampton High School,
Northampton, MA
Jane Kent
University of Massachusetts
Cecelia Dygdon
St. Ann School,
Lansing, IL
Sakthivel Sadayappan
Loyola University
Melanie Loulousis
New Berlin High School,
New Berlin, IL
Julio Copello
Southern Illinois University
School of Medicine
Caitlin Schecker
Bishop McLaughlin Catholic High
School, Spring Hill, FL
Jerome Breslin
University of South Florida
College of Medicine
Stephanie Schrader
Academy Del Sol,
Tucson, AZ
Thomas Pannabecker
University of Arizona
198 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
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Nominations Sought for New A. Clifford Barger
Underrepresented Minority Mentorship Award
APS Launches New Award to Recognize APS
Members With Exceptional Mentoring of
Underrepresented Minorities
The American Physiological Society (APS) is pleased
to announce the new A.
Clifford Barger Underrepresented Minority Mentorship Award. This award
recognizes society members
who have an outstanding
dedication and commitment
to excellence in training
and education of underrepresented minority (URM)
A. Clifford Barger
physiologists.
Awardees
will be evaluated on a variety of categories, including the number of URM trainees they have mentored and the quality of a trainee’s
mentored research experience, the long-term success of
these trainees in their field, demonstrated continued interested in the careers of URM trainees, development
and support of institutional programs to support URM
trainees, and the mentor’s success in scholarship and
administration. Award winners will receive a $1,000
award, a commemorative plaque that will be presented
at the annual Experimental Biology Business meeting,
travel expenses (up to $1,500 to attend) to Experimental Biology, and recognition at the annual Experimental
Biology Minority Travel Fellows Luncheon. Awardees
will also be invited to write an article relating to mentoring of URM scientists for publication in The Physiologist
and the APS website, as well as a featured webinar on
the topic.
Nominations should be coordinated by a potential
awardee’s current or former trainee. Each nominator
may nominate only one faculty member and may
solicit nominations for his/her nominee(s) from
no more than three other individuals. Application
instructions and more information can be found at
the APS website: http://www.the-aps.org/mm/awards.
Completed applications will be due on September 15,
2016, and an award winner will be selected before the
2017 Experimental Biology Meeting. Please contact the
APS Education Office ([email protected] or 301-6347132) with any questions. ●
Bodil M. Schmidt-Nielsen
Distinguished Mentor and Scientist Award
www.the-aps.org/schmidtnielsen
Award: $1,000 + travel expenses
for EB 2017 meeting
Deadline:
September 15, 2016
The Women in Physiology Committee invites you to nominate an APS member (male or
female) who is judged to be both a superb mentor and an outstanding scientist for the
2017 Schmidt-Nielsen Award. Visit the website above for details on the nomination packet
requirements and for the online application link.
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 199
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APS Awards Outstanding High School Students at the
Annual Intel International Science and Engineering Fair
Carmen De Miguel, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Anna Stanhewicz, Pennsylvania State University
APS Education Committee
The Intel International Science and Engineering Fair,
a program of Society for Science & the Public, is the
world’s largest pre-college science competition, and
it was held at Phoenix, AZ, from May 8-13, 2016.
This annual fair includes more than 1,700 high school
students who compete as finalists after winning a
top prize from one of the 419 Society-affiliated fairs
organized in more than 75 countries, regions, and
territories. Students showcase their research at the fair
as they compete for approximately 400 scholarships
and cash prizes totaling around $4 million. The Intel
International Science and Engineering Fair encourages
millions of students worldwide to explore their passion
for innovation and develop solutions for global
challenges.
For the 24th year, the APS presented special awards
for the most outstanding projects in the physiological
sciences in the form of cash prizes, certificates, t-shirts,
and a 1-year subscriptions to APS publications.
This year’s APS judging team included Carmen De
Miguel (University of Alabama at Birmingham),
Anna Stanhewicz (Pennsylvania State University),
Layla Al-Nakkash, Tobias Riede, Chad Carroll, John
VandenBrooks (all from Midwestern University),
and Rayna Gonzales and Cynthia Standley (from The
University of Arizona at Phoenix). The APS judging
team evaluated 207 projects based on students’ abstracts
and selected 18 candidates to interview at their posters.
The following students were selected to receive APS
Awards for Excellence in Physiological Research:
• The first place APS award ($1,500) was presented to
Julienne Chaqour from High Technology High School
(Lincroft, NJ) for her translational medical science
project titled “The Effect of Plant Hormone Abscidic
Acid on the Sprouting of Blood Vessels In Vitro.”
• The second place APS award ($1,000) was presented
to Aarushi Iris Pendharkar from Massachusetts
Academy of Math and Science (Worcester, MA) for
her biomedical and health sciences project titled
“The Effects of Near Infrared Light and Curcumin on
Wound Healing and Tissue Regeneration in Girardia
Tigrina.”
• The third place APS award ($500) was presented
to Asmaa Mahoui from Eman Schools (Fishers,
IN) for her animal sciences project titled “Using
Pharmacogenetics to Determine the Role of the
Orexin System in Panic-Associated Behavior and
Physiology.”
• The APS Exceptional Science Award ($500) was
presented to Roman Knudsvig from Berthold High
School (Berthold, ND) for his Biochemistry project
titled “Caffeine: The Effects on Physical and Mental
Alertness.” ●
Awards, Grants, and Fellowships of the APS
OVER 400 AWARDS GIVEN ANNUALLY TOTALING ~$1.2 MILLION!
9 Student/Trainee Awards
9 Section Awards
9 Society Awards
9 Teacher Awards
For more information, please visit the-aps.org/awards
200 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
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Minority Travel Fellowship Awards
for 2016 Integrative Biology of Exercise Meeting
Application Deadline: July 8, 2016
APS will be offering Minority Travel Fellowship Awards, which provide up to
$1,800 in travel expense reimbursement, for the seventh APS Intersociety
Meeting, “The Integrative Biology of Exercise,” which is held in conjunction with
the American College of Sport Medicine (ACSM). The meeting will take place
November 2-4, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona.
For more information about the Minority Travel
Fellowship Award program, visit www.the-aps.
org/minoritytravel or contact Brooke Bruthers,
Senior Program Manager, Diversity Programs, at
[email protected]
To apply,
visit
www.the-aps.org/
awardapps
Join the conversation and
stay connected with
See list of APS platforms at
www.the-aps.org/social
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 201
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Chapter News
Indiana Physiological Society Sixth Annual Meeting Report
Laura F. Michael
President, Indiana Physiological Society (2016-2017)
The Indiana Physiological Society (INPhys) held
its sixth annual meeting on February 27, 2016 at the
campus of DePauw University located in Greencastle,
Indiana. The 115 attendees comprised of faculty
from Indiana colleges, universities, and biomedical
companies, as well as trainee scientists from high
school, undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral
programs were welcomed with sunny and warm
weather conditions. The theme for the meeting was
Translational Science: Molecules to Organism.
Following registration and a continental breakfast,
the participants were welcomed by Richard Klabunde
(INPhys President, 2015-2016) and Pascal Lafontant
(Associate Professor of Biology, DePauw University).
The scientific sessions began with a keynote address
given by Andrew Coggan (Washington University
School of Medicine) titled “Popeye: Right for the
Wrong Reasons,” where he explained why spinach
makes muscles stronger (Figure 1). The high nitrate
content in the leafy greens, not the iron, creates the
effect. Patients with heart failure are known to have
weaker muscle strength than individuals without
heart failure, so Coggan’s team explored whether
nitrates could increase muscle strength in people
suffering heart failure. Two hours after administering
beet juice high in nitrate, heart failure patients
demonstrated a 13% increase in power in muscles that
extend the knee. The researchers observed the most
substantial benefit when the muscles moved at the
Andrew Coggan’s Keynote Address
Poster sessions in the Percy Julian Science Center
Student lecture in oral session
Alicia Schiller presents “Advocacy for Animal Research”
202 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
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Table 1. INPhys 2016 Award Winners
Award
Recipient Level/
Category
Amount
Type
Recipient Name
Recipient Institution
1st Place Oral
Any
$500 Travel Award
Gary Long
IUPUI
2nd Place Oral
Any
$300 Travel Award
Andrew Lutkewitte
IUSM
1st Place Poster
PhD/Postdoc
$200 Cash Award
Daniel Sassoon
IUSM
2nd Place Poster
PhD/Postdoc
$100 Cash Award
Alex Kiel
IUSM
1st Place Poster
Undergraduate
$200 Cash Award
Daniel Smith
Ball State University
2nd Place Poster
Undergraduate
$100 Cash Award
Noah Levi and Zach
Campbell
Wabash College
1st Place Poster
High School
$100 Cash Award
Asmaa Mahoui
Research conducted at IUSM
highest velocities. The increase in muscle performance
was significant in quick, power-based actions. By
comparison, muscle strength was not increased in
subjects given beet juice with nitrates extracted. The
lecture prompted many questions from students
and demonstrated simplicity and elegance that are
possible in translational sciences.
Four excellent oral presentations were given by
students who were selected by a student-led
committee based on their submitted abstracts. Topics
ranged from differentiation of progenitor endothelial
cells, biomarkers of nephropathy, mechanisms driving
obesity-induced hepatosteatosis, and live-recording
of blood pressures in the exercising rat (Figure 2).
Morning sessions were concluded with presentations
of the first half of 38 poster presentations (Figure 3).
Posters by students were evaluated and scored by a
panel of judges for student awards.
Following a catered hot lunch in the Union Building
Ballroom, the second half of poster presentations
resumed. Following the poster session, attendees
were invited to participate in one of three, hourlong breakout sessions: Careers in Physiology Panel
Discussion featuring Susan Gunst, Mark Kowala, and
Amy Haug; Model Organisms in Physiology Research and
Teaching Featuring Skin Grafting in Xenopus Laevis led by
Kevin Kinney and his students; Non-mammalian Model
of Heart Regeneration led by Lafontant’s laboratory;
or Educating the Educator featuring Keely Cassidy. A
second oral session for four student presentations
included topics such as vasculogenic properties
of endothelial colony-forming cells exposed to
intrauterine diabetes, characterization of a new
diabetes mouse model named FATZO, zebrafish as a
model of corneal repair, and the role of taste receptor
Tas1R3 in bone resorption. The final seminar for
INPhys 2016 was Animal Research Advocacy presented
by Alicia Schiller (American Physiological Society
Science Policy Committee Representative) (Figure
4). Schiller explained why simplifying messages
about research is critical to garner support. Engaging
a potential audience (family, friends, legislators)
with understandable information is foundational to
ultimately reaching agreement or disagreement on
a complex topic. Following Schiller ’s presentation,
awards and election results were announced (Table
1). Two travel awards were awarded to the top oral
presentations, and poster awards were given to
two undergraduate students and two postgraduate
students. One high school student earned a poster
award. Two new councilors were voted into office
during the meeting: Mikaela Drake (Butler University)
Scientists from across Indiana attend INPhys 2016
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 203
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
and Mark Kowala (Eli Lilly and Company); two
student councilors were elected: Cassandra Gohn and
Kaela Varberg, both of the Indiana University School
of Medicine; and Pascal Lafontant was chosen as
president-elect for the 2016-2017 term.
The INPhys leadership is inspired by the large
number of students who were able to participate
in the meeting from as far as Evansville, Indiana to
Upland, Indiana (Figure 5). The quality of oral and
poster presentations paralleled the national level,
illustrating that scientists in Indiana have bright
futures in global research programs. We are grateful
for the scientifically rich, yet entertaining Keynote
presentation that taught students that hypothesis
testing may lead to an unanticipated answer and
that science is fun. We are grateful that the American
Physiological Society funded the travel expenses for
Schiller to attend INPhys 2016 and encourage each
of us to share our passion for research with family,
friends, and community members who might be able
to champion science for improving quality of life.
Finally, we appreciate the following sponsors that
financially supported the meeting, keynote speakers,
and awards: DePauw University Office of Academic
Affairs, Science Research Fellows honors program,
and Department of Biology, IU School of MedicineMuncie, University of Southern Indiana, Data
Sciences International, Kent Scientific, the American
Physiological Society, and Eli Lilly and Company. ●
2015
ANNUAL REPORT
2 015
A N N UA L R E P O RT
Integrating the Life Sciences from
Molecule to Organism
Download a copy
of the report today
the-aps.org/annualreport
Integrating the Life Sciences from Molecule to Organism
204 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
People and Places
Patricia Halpin Received Presidents’ Good Steward Award
Patricia Halpin
APS member Patricia Halpin
has been awarded the 2016
Campus Compact for New
Hampshire-Presidents’
Good
Steward Award. This award
was given in recognition of
her outreach efforts in sharing
her expertise and passion for
science with the community.
Some of these efforts include
the implementation of the American Physiological
Society’s PhUn (Physiology Understanding) Week
Outreach Program, annually leading elementary
school students in the design and implementation of
an exercise physiology experiment, and conducting
PhUn outreach activities with the Manchester middle
and high school students who participate in the UNH
Manchester EXCELL in STEM Program. ●
Houser Named President-Elect of American Heart Association
Steven R. Houser
APS
member
Steven
R.
Houser
(Senior
Associate
Dean of Research, Vera J.
Goodfriend Endowed Chair of
Cardiovascular Research and
Director of the Cardiovascular
Research Center at the Lewis
Katz School of Medicine at
Temple University) has been
elected to serve as presidentelect of the American Heart
Association (AHA). Houser
has been an APS member since 1978. Houser is an
internationally respected cardiovascular researcher
who has helped define many fundamental features
of normal cardiac myocyte and identify molecular
and cellular processes that produce abnormal cardiac
myocyte function in cardiovascular disease. Under a
current NIH grant, his research group is now working
to develop new approaches to prevent, slow, or reverse
damage to the heart after a heart attack. His 1-year term
as president-elect runs through June 30, 2016. He will
then serve a 1-year term as AHA president beginning
July 1, 2016. ●
Kuebler Recognized by the German Cardiac Society
At the 82nd Annual Conference of the German
Cardiac Society, the Arthur Weber Preis for “Helping
by Research” was awarded to APS member Wolfgang
M. Kuebler. The German Cardiac Society recognized
Kuebler for his “outstanding contributions on the
PHYSIOLOGY of the pulmonary circulation and the
pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension.”. ●
From left to right: Andreas Zeiher (Frankfurt; Congress President),
Wolfgang M. Kuebler, Juergen Schrader (Duesseldorf; Chair Arthur
Weber Award Committee), Karl-Heinz Kuck (Hamburg, President of
the Society)
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 205
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
Feldman to Deliver Hodgkin-Huxley-Katz Prize Lecture
APS Member Jack Feldman, Distinguished Professor of
Neurobiology at the David Geffen School of Medicine
at UCLA, has been chosen to deliver the HodgkinHuxley-Katz Prize Lecture for 2017 in recognition of
his outstanding achievements in the physiological
sciences. The award is presented biennially by The
Physiological Society (UK) to a physiologist working
outside the United Kingdom. Feldman will present
his lecture to the International Union of Physiological
Sciences in Brazil in August 2017. ●
Katzenellenbogens Awarded Fred Conrad Koch Lifetime
Achievement Award
APS Member Benita S. Katzenellenbogen and her
husband John have been awarded the Fred Conrad Koch
Lifetime Achievement Award by the Endocrine Society.
The award is the Endocrine Society’s highest honor
recognizing lifetime achievements and exceptional
contributions to the field of endocrinology. Benita
Katzenellenbogen is currently the Swanlund Chaired
Professor of Molecular and Integrative Physiology,
and John Katzenellenbogen is the Swanlund Chaired
Professor of Chemistry at the University of Illinois,
Urbana. Their selection for the award is the first time
the award has honored two scientists who collaborate
both at work and at home as a married couple. Their
enormous contributions to the field of endocrinology
– spanning more than four decades – have greatly
advanced our understanding of the broad actions
of steroid hormones and their receptors in diverse
target tissues in health and disease. Their pioneering
work on estrogens and estrogen receptors has defined
the multifaceted modes by which these receptors are
regulated and act in distinctive and biomedically
significant ways. These seminal contributions have
also highlighted novel approaches for the diagnosis
and treatment of hormone-responsive cancers and
beneficial modes of tissue-selective estrogen action for
managing various disorders, including endometriosis
and multiple sclerosis. ●
Chien Receives Benjamin Franklin Medal in Mechanical
Engineering
APS Member Shu Chien (University of California,
San Diego) was the recipient of the Benjamin Franklin
Medal in Mechanical Engineering for his contributions
to the understanding of the physics of blood flow
206 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
and for applying this knowledge to better diagnose
cardiovascular disease. The award was presented to
Chien during The Franklin Institute’s Award Ceremony
and Dinner on April 21 in Philadelphia. ●
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
News From Distinguished
Physiologists
Images from the Past
Kenneth Goetz
While
rummaging
through
a neglected file cabinet some
days ago, I came across a stack
of photographs, each showing
segments of polygraph records
from old experiments. I turned
over the top photo and checked
the date written on the back:
Kenneth Goetz
February 19, 1973, some 3 years
after I had set up my laboratory
at St. Luke’s Hospital of Kansas
City. The date, seemingly so long ago, prompted me to
do a little calculation, which revealed a surprising fact. I
now have been retired for longer than I worked as a fulltime physiologist. Well, I can assure you that even an
aging brain snaps to attention with a discovery of that
magnitude. With my declining population of neurons
firing at an unaccustomed rate, I took the photos to my
desk to sort through, feeling again the excitement those
experiments had ignited, the astonishment they had
created, even experiencing an echo of the buzz I once
had felt. But, shortly after I sat down, my euphoria was
punctured by a disheartening truth. The remarkable
data from those experiments, the remnants of which I
held in my hand, were never properly published.
Why the flub? Time has blurred a definitive answer,
but the story of my stumble may alert others to avoid
a similar blunder. The experiments I refer to were
relatively straightforward. We denervated the aortic
baroreceptors and chemoreceptors in a group of dogs
by the method of Edis and Shepherd (2), leaving the vagi
intact, and then denervated the carotid baroreceptors
and chemoreceptors by severing the carotid sinus nerve,
delicately stripping adventitia from the carotid sinus,
and painting the area with phenol. Catheters were
inserted for hemodynamic recording, and the animals
were allowed to recover to full health.
Weeks after the operation, when we began our
recordings, the results created an instant stir. Although
the dogs lay peacefully on a padded table, their
hemodynamics were in a frenzy. Blood pressure swung
widely and unpredictably. Heart rate was equally labile,
accelerating as pressure rose and slowing as pressure
fell. Changes of >100 mmHg within minutes were
routine, and it was not uncommon to observe changes
of even greater magnitude appearing within seconds.
Most impressive were the striking periods of hypotension and bradycardia we observed, a phenomenon illustrated on the second photo I examined. Using a ruler
and the time marker on the photo, I counted the beats
occurring during a selected 1-minute period. Eight! I
recalled my amazement as that experiment unwound,
the animal lying quietly, showing no evidence of distress while its heart gathered itself to beat once every 7
or 8 seconds. Yet moments before (as I saw in the panel
directly above), the animal had been hypertensive, with
a systolic pressure of over 200 mmHg and a concomitant tachycardia. I looked at another photo from a different animal, this one depicting an even longer period
of asystole:12 seconds without a heart beat, an interval
during which the diastolic pressure fell to 17 mmHg.
Not only did these unexpected and dramatic periods of
hypotension rebut the then prevailing view that elimination of the sinoaortic baroreceptor reflex causes a
sustained hypertension, they also strongly reinforced
the opinion that the vital and primary importance of
this reflex is to buffer the huge and unpredictable fluctuations that occur when it is absent, at least in the conscious state.
Our observations during these experiments hinted
that the animals’ hemodynamic gyrations were
mediated, at least partially, by their emotional state.
While they were adapting themselves to the padded
table, their blood pressures tended to be higher than
after they became comfortable in their surroundings.
Moreover, blood pressure tended to correlate with
their levels of arousal. This was illustrated in the
first photo I looked at, one in which blood pressure
varied over the course of a few minutes from lows of
roughly 95/45 to highs of 200/145. When the pressure
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 207
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
was about 140/80, the investigator had tapped on the
table (marked on the record) and caused an abrupt
increase in blood pressure to a peak of 225/150 within
15 seconds. After the dog’s pressure came back down,
the investigator petted its head, a stimulus that
produced another abrupt rise in pressure, although
the response was less pronounced than that produced
by tapping on the table. Minutes later, an investigator
outside the laboratory knocked loudly on the closed
lab door. The dog lifted his head at this stimulus and
also lifted his blood pressure impressively, systolic
pressure peaking at 312 mmHg.
To confirm what seemed obvious, namely that these
huge fluctuations were produced by the autonomic
nervous system, we blocked activity of the vagi with
atropine, which increased heart rate and minimized its
fluctuations. We then induced sympathetic blockade
with propranolol and phentolamine, and, as anticipated,
blood pressure and heart rate became perfectly stable.
One rediscovered polygraph record
208 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
Even a loud knocking on the outside of the laboratory
elicited no hemodynamic response after blockade.
This was the state of our data collection from a sizeable
number of dogs in May 1973, the month when Cowley
and his colleagues (1) presented data indicating that
persistent hypertension is not produced in dogs
when effects from arterial baroreceptors are absent, a
conclusion fully compatible with our own. Their report
was not a complete surprise. I had known of their
investigation in progress, but somehow the publication
threw me off course. In retrospect, I don’t know
why I didn’t call or write Cowley (no e-mail then) to
congratulate him and his team, and tell him how our
work dovetailed nicely with theirs, and to discuss how
our dissimilar preparations had highlighted different
hemodynamic effects of baroreceptor denervation.
The Mississippi group had recorded data continuously
over 24-hour periods and used computer analysis to
determine mean arterial pressure and other variables
over extended periods of time, something we did
not. On the other hand, the vagal pathways in our
animals were intact, whereas Cowley and colleagues
had not only stripped the aortic arch of their animals,
but they also severed the left cervicovagal trunk and
the medial bundle of the right vagus. This substantial
removal of vagal influences likely explained why they
failed to observe the profound bradycardia and long
periods of cardiac standstill (and associated dramatic
falls in diastolic pressure) that were evident in our
experiments. In short, the two sets of experiments
were compatible, and when combined produced more
information than either one alone. All of this came back
to me as I examined the old photos.
Why did I throw in the towel and fail to follow
through? That I cannot reconstruct. Memory fails me,
but I suspect a combination of factors led me astray,
some embarrassing even now to admit. I probably
was green enough to think that the cat was out of the
bag, that careful investigators had demonstrated that
sinoaortic denervation does not cause hypertension
and that was that. Admittedly, I was an accidental
physiologist, one vastly undertrained. As a first-year
medical student, I had rebelled against what I saw as
little more than mindless memorization, committing
acts of immature idiocy for which I probably should
have been expelled. After those two distressing
semesters, I split my second year of medical school
THE
courses with a graduate assistantship in physiology
(being strapped for cash, and tempted by the stipend
offered by the department). After finishing that phase,
I opted to complete my PhD, which I somehow did,
unbelievable as it now sounds, without taking a single
graduate course, without attending a single scientific
meeting, without reading current journals, and by
doing a little project and writing a thesis without
a mentor. To compound my innocence, I took no
postdoctoral position (it wasn’t recommended to me),
but I landed a junior faculty position at the University
of Kansas Medical Center, where I began learning and
teaching physiology while applying for and receiving
a modest NIH grant (sorry youngsters, things were
easier then). About this time, it occurred to me that it
would be foolish not to complete the clinical years of
medical school, so I switched to half-time faculty status,
kept my NIH grant active, and completed my clinical
rotations, earning my MD in 1967. After returning to
the physiology department full time, I realized that an
MD is merely decorative without a medical license, so
I zigged through another zag and accepted a medical
internship at St. Luke’s Hospital of Kansas City,
one with the interesting enticement that I would be
paid twice the normal intern’s stipend for providing
biweekly pathophysiology lectures for the hospital’s
attending staff and house staff while completing my
internship. (While interviewing for the internship,
I had given an impromptu lecture on myocardial forcevelocity relationships to a group of residents struggling
with the concept.) Upon completing my internship, I
had planned to return to the physiology department
at the University of Kansas Medical Center, but when
the time came I was faced with two other options: to
continue my medical training by taking a residency
or to stay on at St. Luke’s where the hospital promised
to equip a new laboratory for me if I would continue
my lectures. I opted for the latter, thus establishing
and becoming head of a unit I chose to call the division
of experimental medicine in January 1970, a rather
high-sounding title for a unit consisting of one
member, me. The experiments described above were
conducted after I had added two technicians and a
postdoctoral fellow.
There probably were other reasons for my negligence.
We were doing other experiments at the time, some on
cardiac receptors, a major interest of mine then. I had
begun searching exhaustively through the sizeable
PHYSIOLOGIST
literature for anything even remotely related to what
then was known as the Gauer-Henry reflex with the
intention of writing a review, one that subsequently
was published in 1975 in Physiological Reviews. Beyond
that, I was pleasantly engaged in teaching, being
perhaps overzealous in my preparation of a steady
stream of fresh lectures on pathophysiology for the
hospital’s attending staff and house staff, and teaching
cardiovascular and pulmonary physiology in courses
for cardiac-care nurses. All of this, of course, is merely
background noise that probably distorts what was
actually going on in my head at the time. Whatever the
factors involved, a simple moral emerges. If you have
good data, publish it!
A small portion of the data described above did appear in
print. Because we had recorded central venous pressure
in our experiments, and because our animals had intact
vagi, our findings argued against the concept of what
has been called the Bainbridge reflex. Some may recall
that Bainbridge, over a century ago, infused blood or
saline into anesthetized dogs and observed a resultant
tachycardia, a response that no longer occurred after he
severed the vagus nerves bilaterally. He attributed the
infusion-induced tachycardia to a reflex from receptors
in the right heart or great veins. This interpretation,
of course, was a bit of a stretch. After vagotomy,
Bainbridge’s dogs naturally had a higher baseline heart
rate before they received the infusions, leaving less
opportunity for acceleration, and it goes without saying
that infusions influence the entire circulatory system,
not merely the right heart and great veins.
Contrast the above to our experiments in which central
venous and right heart filling pressures increased as
anticipated during bradycardia, the pressures rising
higher as the periods of diastole lengthened. Yet
these increases in central venous pressure elicited no
evidence of any cardiac accelerator reflex to counter
the prevailing bradycardia in these conscious animals
with intact afferent and efferent nerves to the heart.
This finding, contradictory to Bainbridge’s concept, was
particularly persuasive during those periods of severe
bradycardia that lasted over a minute, a time far longer
than it would take for a reflex to kick in and accelerate
the heart. These observations led us to conclude that
the Bainbridge reflex is likely an illusion engendered
by over-interpretation of nonspecific experiments. I
presented this portion of our data at a symposium
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 209
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
on cardiac receptors in Leeds in 1976, and two of the
photos I recently discovered appeared in the report of
that symposium (3).
Having experienced an extended and gratifying period
of unemployment, perhaps I’m qualified to conclude
with a few words about retirement. I recommend
keeping it cluttered. Waves of pursuits and new exploits
continue to make life interesting, even when the
professorship is emeritus and the laboratory is closed.
To this day, I jot down a daily to-do list on a 3 x 5 card.
(Yes, I have an iPhone, an iPad, and a PC, but some
habits die slowly.) Appearing on my cards are activities
with friends and family, plays, concerts, physical
exercise, hobbies, reading, travel, everything you might
expect, as well as completing this essay for several days
in a row. (I seldom cross off every item on my list by
day’s end.) I keep another list for projects requiring
more sustained effort. These I consider to be of prime
importance because, like research projects, they set
long-term goals. Here are two completed examples of
my own. When I learned that my two youngest siblings
have no memory of our mother, who died at 37, and
only vague memories of our father who passed on a few
years later, I wrote, over many months, an account of
our childhood for them. By chance, about this time I met
Frank McCourt, whose Angela’s Ashes was topping bestseller lists. Detecting a number of similarities between
McCourt’s story and my own, I thought mine might
draw a wider audience, so I cut the manuscript by half,
eliminating what I thought would interest only friends
and relatives, and saw the story emerge between covers
as Bending the Twig. While never a best-seller, the book
sold a few thousand copies, and sales continue to dribble
along even now, some 14 years after its publication.
More recently, I logged countless hours writing fiction.
During my less-than-exemplary first year of medical
school, I often thought the experience would be worthy
210 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
of a novel (in truth, I read a good number of novels
during that dismal year). So I took on the task of writing
one that came out in 2015, titled The Colors of Medicine.
I sent my novel’s protagonist (not me, but a young
man with a better brain and a more practical form of
rebellion) to the medical school I attended. Perhaps not
surprisingly, I then launched him into a research career,
and, because fraud often makes headlines, I inserted
into the plot a case of fraudulent research (simplified
for the lay reader). I even included a rather extended
conversation concerning baroreceptor reflexes and
the autonomic nervous system, putting it in a context
most suitable for an adult physiology course. Writing
that scene, and others that were set in laboratories and
scientific meetings, often evoked a lingering nostalgia
that in turn summoned recollections of my days as a
physiologist. And then, when I would think back and
focus on the many friends and former colleagues I
unavoidably have lost contact with, when I thought of
those I would never see again, I would come face to face
with the most palpable drawback of retirement. ●
References
1. Cowley AW Jr, Liard J F, Guyton AC. Role of the
baroreceptor reflex in daily control of arterial blood
pressure and other variables in dogs. Circ Res 32: 564576, 1973.
2. Edis AJ, Shepherd JT. Selective denervation of aortic
arch baroreceptors and chemoreceptors in dogs. J Appl
Physiol 30: 294-296, 1971.
3. Hainsworth R, Kidd C, Linden RJ (editors). Cardiac
Receptors. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1979,
p. 228-229.
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
Letter to Peter K. Lauf
Carolyn D. Berdanier writes: “What a pleasure to
receive your birthday greetings! Yes, the big 80 is
looming, and for the life of me I do not know where
the years have gone! However, I must admit that aging
is not for the faint of heart. Yet, the alternative is not a
picnic either.
”It is said that it takes a village to raise a child . . . I
think that is also true for scientists. It takes a whole
network of colleagues to mold a scientist. Remembering
all those terrific people is indeed a trip down memory
lane. My mentors were so giving and supportive; my
colleagues, new and old, helped me grow intellectually.
Will Gortner, Edith Weir, Shelly Reiser, Richard Tobin,
Royal McGraw, James Hargrove, Ed Leiter, and all those
scientists who reviewed my manuscripts and my grant
applications were incredibly helpful. Lastly, working
with such talented undergraduate and graduate
students made every day a challenge and a delight.
CALL FOR
NOMINATIONS
”Now that I am no longer in the lab, my best friend
is my computer. It provides daily updates from the
world of science, disclosing the latest discoveries and
breakthroughs. The joy of discovery has never left my
soul. I love to write, and in the writing I make new
discoveries for myself. Mostly what I write these days
are combinations of history and human adventure and
travails. Lately, I have written about the development of
the Native American plant foods, the use of pictures in
logos that sell food, and the use of new DNA techniques
to screen for genetic-based diseases, and I am going to
look into the life and times of Lavoisier. All fun topics!
”Eighty years of living has meant 80 years of experiences – too many to list. It has been a life that has given
me joy and sorrow. My husband of 59 years, three children who are productive adults, four grandchildren,
and one great-grandchild constantly keep me going.
Thanks to everyone!” ●
for the Editorship of
Journal of Applied Physiology
Applications should be received before August 15, 2016.
Nominations are invited for the Editorship
of the Journal of Applied Physiology to
succeed Peter D. Wagner, who will complete
his term as Editor on June 30, 2017. The APS
Publications Committee plans to interview
candidates in the Fall of 2016.
Nominations, accompanied by a curriculum vitae, should be sent to the
Chair of the APS Publications Committee via regular mail:
Curt D. Sigmund, Ph.D.
American Physiological Society
9650 Rockville Pike
Bethesda, MD 20814-3991
You may also send your nominations to Curt Sigmund via email,
care of the APS Publications Department Administrative Assistant,
Charmon Kight ([email protected]).
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 211
®
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
Publications
Current Calls for Papers
Physiological Genomics
• Gut Microbiota in Health and
Disease
• Systems Biology and Polygenic
Traits
• Single Cell Analysis
(Submission deadline:
May 31, 2017)
Journal of Neurophysiology
• Spinal Control of Motor Outputs
(Submission deadline:
December 31, 2016)
• Building Neural Circuits: Wiring
and Experience
(Submission deadline:
December 31, 2016)
• Biology of Neuroengineering
Interfaces
(Submission deadline:
December 31, 2016)
Advances in Physiology
Education
• Historical Perspectives and
Living Histories
• American Journal of Physiology
– Gastrointestinal and Liver
Physiology
• Microbiome and Host
Interactions
• Nutrient Sensing, Nutrition, and
Metabolism
• Systems Biology
• Translational Human
Pathophysiology
American Journal of
Physiology – Heart and
Circulatory Physiology
• Advances in Cardiovascular
Geroscience
(Submission deadline:
November 30, 2016)
• The Cardiorenal SyndromeIntegrative and Cellular
Mechanisms
(Submission deadline:
September 15, 2016)
• Metabolism, Cell Signaling and
Disease
(Submission deadline:
September 15, 2016)
• Cardiovascular Actions of
Hydrogen Sulfide and Other
Gasotransmitters
(Submission deadline:
August 31, 2016)
American Journal of
Physiology – Lung Cellular
and Molecular Physiology
• Electronic Cigarettes: Not All
Good News?
(Submission deadline:
October 1, 2017)
• I on Channels and Transporters in
Lung Function and Disease
• Age-Related Dysfunction in
Lung Barrier Function in Health
and Disease
•R
eal-Time Visualization of Lung
Function: from Micro to Macro
(Submission deadline:
January 2017)
• Biomarkers in Lung Diseases:
from Pathogenesis to Prediction
to New Therapies
(Submission deadline:
January 2017)
•S
ex Differences in the
Respiratory System
•T
ranslational Research in Acute
Lung Injury and Pulmonary
Fibrosis
(Submission deadline:
January 2017)
American Journal of
Physiology – Regulatory,
Integrative and
Comparative Physiology
•H
ypertensive Disorders of
Pregnancy: Effects on Mother
and Baby
(Submission deadline:
December 1, 2016)
For a complete list of current Calls for Papers, visit the APS website.
Books
Received
212 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
Animal Physiology (4th Edition)
By Richard Hill, Gordon Wyse, and Margaret Anderson
Sunderland, MA: Sinauer Associates, Inc., 2016, 828 p., 675
illus., $159.95 (hardback)
ISBN: 9781605354712
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
Membership
New Regular Members
*transferred from student membership
Mir Mohammad Kamran Abbas
Texas A&M Univ., Houston, TX
Carmen Canavier
LSU Hlth. Sci. Ctr., New Orleans, LA
Robin Altman
Beloit College, Beloit, WI
Jennifer Mehlman Carbrey
Duke Univ. Sch. of Med., Durham, NC
Cristina Maria Alvira
Stanford Univ. Sch. of Med.,
Palo Alto, CA
Aaron Cecala
Elizabethtown College,
Elizabethtown, PA
Zsolt Bagi
Augusta Univ., Martinez, GA
Andy J. Chang
Stanford Univ. Sch. of Med.,
Stanford, CA
Amy Michele Bataille
Eastern Connecticut State Univ.,
Marlborough, CT
Arthur J. Cheng
Karolinska Inst., Stockholm, Sweden
Clive M. Baumgarten
Virginia Commonwealth Univ.,
Richmond, VA
Streamson Chua
Albert Einstein College of Med.,
Bronx, NY
Mirza Irfan Beig
UNTHSC, Fort Worth, TX
Paola Contessa
Delsys, Inc., Natick, MA
Ivor J. Benjamin
Med. College of Wisconsin,
Milwaukee, WI
James Edward Cooke
UCSD, La Jolla, CA
Carol A. Bertrand
Univ. of Pittsburgh Sch. of Med.,
Pittsburgh, PA
Jean-Sébastien Blouin
Univ. of BC, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Robert Brenner
Univ. of Texas Hlth. Sci. Ctr.,
San Antonio, TX
Sylvain Brunet
Case Western Reserve Univ./
Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
Charles Francis Burant
Univ. Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Melissa Cameron
The Univ. of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
Cassy Cozine
Coe College, Cedar Rapids, IA
Prasad Shridhar Dalvi
Univ. of Bradford, Bradford, United
Kingdom
Anna K. Davis
Bastyr Univ., Seattle, WA
Lynn Diener
Mount Mary Univ., Milwaukee, WI
Michelle Digman
Univ. of California Irvine, Irvine, CA
David Duriancik
Univ. of Michigan-Flint, Flint, MI
John Robert Economides
Univ. California-San Francisco,
San Francisco, CA
Laura Edgington-Mitchell
Monash Inst. of Pharmaceutical Sci.,
Parkville, Australia
Samer Wassim El-Kadi
Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Dario Farina
Univ. Med. Ctr. Goettingen,
Göttingen, Germany
Jorge P. Figueroa
Wake Forest Sch. of Med.,
Winston-Salem, NC
Len Forgan
Deakin Univ., Grovedale, Australia
Susan K. Fried
Boston Univ. Sch. Med., Boston, MA
William Nelson Frost
Rosalind Franklin Univ., North
Chicago, IL
Teppei Fujikawa
UT Southwestern Med. Ctr., Dallas, TX
Scott Fuller
PBRC, Baton Rouge, LA
Pietro Renato Galassetti
Univ. California, Irvine Orange, CA
Christopher Gayer
Children’s Hosp. Los Angeles,
Los Angeles, CA
Asif Ghazanfar
Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ
Jeff Grim
The Univ. of Tampa, Tampa, FL
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 213
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
Jay Gump
Greenfield Community College,
Greenfield, MA
Fumi Kawano
Matsumoto Univ., Matsumoto City,
Nagano, Japan
John Mariadason
Olivia Newton-John Cancer Res. Inst.,
Heidelberg, Australia
Karen Melissa Hallow
Univ. of Georgia, Bishop, GA
Stephen J. Keely
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland,
Dublin, Ireland
Diana Martinez
McGill Univ., Montreal, Canada
Marc T. Hamilton
Univ. of Houston, Houston, TX
Osama F. Harraz
Univ. of Vermont, Burlington, VT
Larry Hoffman
Geffen Sch. of Med. at UCLA,
Los Angeles, CA
Ewout J. Hoorn
Erasmus Med. Ctr., Rotterdam,
The Netherlands
Richard Hoppmann
Univ. of South Carolina Sch. of Med.,
Columbia, SC
Susumu Hosokawa
The Univ. of Arizona, Tokyo, Japan
Ming Chang Hu
UT Southwestern Med. Ctr., Dallas, TX
Brady Hurtgen
U.S. Air Force MDW, San Antonio, TX
Reiko Inagi
The Univ. of Tokyo Graduate Sch. of
Med., Tokyo, Japan
M. Florencia Iulita
Université De Montréal,
Montreal, Canada
Amy S. Jordan
Univ. of Melbourne,
Parkville, Australia
Kishan Kadur
American Univ. of Antigua, St. John’s,
Antigua and Barbuda
Atsunori Kamiya
National Cardiovascular Ctr.,
Suita-City, Japan
214 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
Tuomas Kilpelainen
Univ. of Copenhagen,
Copenhagen, Denmark
Seung Kyum Kim*
Tufts Med. Ctr., Boston, MA
Annet Kirabo
Vanderbilt Univ. Sch. of Med.,
Nashville, TN
David F. Kisor
Manchester Univ., Fort Wayne, IN
Hugo Merchant
Instituto De Neurobiologia, UNAM,
Queretaro, Mexico
Satdarshan Monga
Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
Michele N. Moore
Butler Univ., Indianapolis, IN
Kuzhali Muthu
Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr., Maywood, IL
Joshua C. Kline
Delsys, Inc., Natick, MA
Vanina Alejandra Netti*
Facultad de Medicina, Universidad
de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires,
Argentina
Angelika Lampert
Univ. Hosp. RWTH Aachen,
Aachen, Germany
Richard J. Noel, Jr.
Ponce Health Sci. Univ. and Ponce
Res., Ponce, Puerto Rico
Ewa Lewin
Herlev Hosp., Herlev, Denmark
Caroline Owen
Brigham and Women’s Hosp./Harvard
Med. Sch., Boston, MA
Yulin Liao
Nanfang Hosp., Southern Med. Univ.,
Guangzhou, China
Josh Lipschutz
MUSC, Charleston, SC
Omar Logue
Univ. of Mississippi Med. Ctr.,
Jackson, MS
Gretchen Lopez-Hernandez
Kansas City Univ. of Med. and Biosci.,
Kansas City, MO
Rebecca E. K. MacPherson*
The Univ. of Guelph, St. Catharines,
Canada
Jorge Pacheco-Rosado
Inst. Politécnico Nacional,
Mexico City, Mexico
Pierre Paradis
McGill Univ., Montreal, Canada
Alejandro M. Pena
Clinica San Pablo, Lima, Peru
Daniel P. Poole
Monash Univ., Parkville, Australia
Ransom Poythress
Houghton College, Houghton, NY
Wei Qiu
Loyola Univ., Chicago, Maywood, IL
THE
John M. Redden
Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
Patrick Sonner
Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH
Robert Renden
Univ. of Nevada Sch. of Med.,
Reno, NV
Heather Logan Sprenger
Canadian Sport Inst. Ontario,
Toronto, Canada
Charles L. Rice
The Univ. of Western Ontario,
London, Canada
Yuriko Sugiuchi
Tokyo Med. and Dental Univ.,
Tokyo, Japan
Nicolette Richardson
York Univ., Guelph, Canada
Merryn Tawhai
Univ. of Auckland, Auckland,
New Zealand
Wito Richter
Univ. of South Alabama, Mobile, AL
Melissa Riddle-Kottke
Army Inst. of Surgical Res.,
Converse, TX
Stephen Walter Rothwell
Uniformed Services Univ.,
Bethesda, MD
Sharon M. Rymut
Case Western Reserve Univ.,
Broadview Heights, OH
Suha M. Saleh
Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL
Tracy Schatteman
Univ. of Illinois-Springfield,
Springfield, IL
Mark A. Segraves
Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL
Dae Yun Seo
Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disease
Ctr., Busan, Republick of Korea
Kristin Simokat
Ashland Univ., Ashland, OH
Melvin F. Simoyi
Heritage Univ., Toppenish, WA
Mayank Soni
Mustandmore Hlth., Delhi, India
Irina Alexandrovna Tikhomirova
Yaroslavl State Pedagogical Univ.,
Yaroslavl, Russian Federation
Theodore Francis Towse
Vanderbilt Univ. Med. Ctr.,
Nashville, TN
Theo A. Van Kempen
North Carolina State Univ.,
Venray, Netherlands
Chad M. Vezina
Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison,
Madison, WI
David Q. Wang
Saint Louis Univ. Sch. of Med.,
St. Louis, MO
PHYSIOLOGIST
Eric Yen
Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison,
Madison, WI
Liya Yin
Northeast Ohio Med. Univ.,
Rootstown, OH
Sotirios G. Zarogiannis
Univ. of Thessaly Med. Sch.,
Larissa, Greece
Teresa A. Zimmers
Indiana Univ., Indianapolis, IN
New Graduate Student
Members
Johnathon Michael Aho
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
Israa Al-Ibadi
Univ. of Salford, Manchester,
United Kingdom
Awad Almuklass
Univ. of Colorado Boulder,
Boulder, CO
Scott Amiss
California State Univ. Northridge,
Los Angeles, CA
Lewis J. Watson
Univ. of Pikeville, Pikeville, KY
David Cristóbal Andrade
Pontificia Univ. Católica de Chile,
Santiago, Chile
Paul J. Wolters
UCSF, San Francisco, CA
Sara Augustinas
Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA
Christiane Wrann
Massachusetts General Hosp.,
Charlestown, MA
Nicole Christine Aurigemma
Pennsylvania State Univ.,
State College, PA
Victoria Louise Wyckelsma
Victoria Univ., Melbourne, Australia
Vivian Biancardi
UNESP, Jaboticabal, Brazil
Yaoda Xu
Harvard, Cambridge, MA
Natalie Bickett
Scripps Inst. of Oceanography,
La Jolla, CA
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 215
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
Mehmet Bulbul
Akdeniz Univ. Faculty of Med.,
Antalya, Turkey
Timothy Burnett
Ball State Univ., Muncie, IN
David Bushart
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Robert Christner
Univ. of New Mexico,
Albuquerque, NM
Michael Cooper
Univ. Of Kansas Med. Ctr.,
Merriam, KS
Clifford Costello
NYIT College of Osteopathic Med.,
Brooklyn, NY
Emily C. Dabe
Univ. of Florida, St. Augustine, FL
Blair Denman
Univ. of Colorado Boulder,
Boulder, CO
Eryn Dixon
Univ. of Maryland Sch. of Med.,
Baltimore, MD
Johanna Finn
Univ. of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
Dennis K. Fix
Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
Shireen Roberta Lee Flores
Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Michelle Galeas-Pena
Tulane Univ. Sch. of Med.,
New Orleans, LA
Giliard Lago Garcia
Univ. of Brazilian-Unb, Brasília, Brazil
Justin Perry Hardee
Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
Tyler Harrell
Univ. of Charleston-South Carolina,
Charleston, SC
Jasmine Nicole Harris
Case Western Reserve Univ.,
Cleveland, OH
James Hester
Penn State Univ., University Park, PA
Rachel Catherine Kelley
Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Chad Thomas Dolan
Univ. of Houston, Houston, TX
Kyoungrae Kim
Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN
Shannon Dunn
Texas Tech Univ. Hlth. Sci. Ctr.,
Lubbock, TX
Abhilash Kizhakke
Puliyakote Univ. of Iowa, Redwood
City, CA
Tess Dupre
Univ. of Louisville, Louisville, KY
Timothy Robert Matsuura
Univ. of Minnesota,
Columbia Heights, MN
Carl Farah
Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada
Sara Lynn Nicole Farwell
Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA
Richárd Fiáth
Res. Ctr. for Natural Sci. of the
Hungarian Academy of Sci.,
Budapest, Hungary
216 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
Ekaterina Morozova
Indiana Univ. Bloomington,
Bloomington, IN
Deborah Paul
Cleveland State Univ., Cleveland, OH
Eline Borch Petersen
Eriksholm Res. Ctr.,
Snekkersten, Denmark
Gianpietro Elias Revolledo
Syracuse Univ., Syracuse, NY
Anica Sayoc
UCR, Riverside, CA
Ben Solomon
Washington Univ.-St. Louis,
Saint Louis, MO
Yasina B. Somani
The Pennsylvania State Univ.,
State College, PA
André Luiz Teixeira
Univ. of Brasília, Brasília, Brazil
Camilo Toledo
Universidad Autonoma,
Santiago, Chile
Thomas Turkette
Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI
Adam Voss
Ball State Univ., Muncie, IN
Bangchen Wang
Univ. of Nebraska Med. Ctr.,
Omaha, NE
Undergraduate Student
Members
Amber Beard
Lee Univ., Cleveland, TN
Anastasiya Borner
Univ. of Colorado at Colorado Springs,
Monument, CO
Sarah Elizabeth Brown
Lee Univ., Dayton, TN
Ariana Dubelko
Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX
THE
Brittany Eisinger
Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD
Genevieve Alexis Ellison
Lee Univ., Atlanta, GA
Loren Selina Garcia
Lee Univ., Marietta, GA
Joel Ramirez
California State Univ. Los Angeles,
Whittier, CA
Alan David Levine
Case Western Reserve Univ.,
Cleveland, OH
Al Seylani
California State San Marcos,
Hemet, CA
David Littlefield
Littlefield Optometry, Kansas City, MO
Jesus Torres
Lee Univ., Dalton, GA
William McAdams
Queens Univ. of Charlotte,
Charlotte, NC
Larissa Ester Wietlisbach
Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC
Jessica Marie Mitchum
Lee Univ., Lenoir City, TN
Affiliate Members
Marvin Hugh Nicoleau
Franklin and Marshall College,
Lancaster, PA
Raisa Nazir Ahmed
Kazi Prince sattam Bin Abdulaziz
Univ., Wadi Ad Dawaser,
Saudi Arabia
Adam Subait Obad
Alfaisal Univ., Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
PHYSIOLOGIST
Sanskruti Mukesh Mehta
West Coast Univ., Victorville, CA
Justyna Michalik
VBRI, East Orange, NJ
Eunjung Shin
Georgia Inst. of Tech., Johns Creek, GA
Brian Sugai
Big Island Footcare, Inc., Hilo, HI
Yi-Ting Yeh
UCSD, La Jolla, CA
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Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 217
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
Positions Available
Postdoctoral Fellowship: The Damage Control
Resuscitation Task Area at the U.S. Army Institute of
Surgical Research (USAISR) is seeking a candidate for
a postdoctoral position. The objective of our research
program is to improve methods to control severe
bleeding and to provide sufficient fluids and blood
products to stabilize the injured casualty. The specific
research focus area for this position is to explore
resuscitation strategies for the burned patient in a
pre-hospital setting due to prolonged field care and/
or mass casualty situations. Research projects will
utilize animal models of burn and/or hemorrhage to
study: 1) the effects of gastroenteral and intravenous
resuscitation fluids; 2) the relationship of systemic
and local inflammation (e.g., cytokines, leukocytes);
3) the role of oxidative stress in renal perfusion and
dysfunction. Qualified candidates must be highly
motivated, independent individuals with a PhD in
physiology, immunology, cell biology, biochemistry,
or a related field. Candidates must have exceptional
laboratory and written communication skills, and the
ability to work both independently and cooperatively
within a team. Candidates should also be U.S. Citizens
or have resided in the U.S. for a minimum of 3
years. Experience with large animal models and/or
assessments of kidney function preferred. Experience
with primary tissue culture, histology, and/or molecular
and biological techniques are essential. Individuals
with experience in large animal instrumentation, flow
cytometry, and knowledge of immunology or upper
urinary tract physiology are highly encouraged to apply.
The stipend/salary is $50,000 and up, depending on
prior experience. Candidates will be joining a research
program that focuses on understanding potential
mechanisms involved in battlefield burn injuries and
developing new treatment modalities to improve
patient outcome. Emphasis is placed on transitioning
products from pre-clinical to clinical testing in a
collaborative environment involving researchers and
clinicians. The USAISR is colocated with San Antonio
Military Medical Center (SAMMC) in San Antonio,
TX, which enables the research organization to have a
unique, in-depth understanding of combat injuries and
civilian trauma, and the clinical challenges faced by the
physicians and surgeons who treat them. This creates a
unique environment for translational research.
Postdoctoral Fellowship: A postdoctoral research
position is available in the laboratory of Dr. Lawrence
218 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
Sinoway at Penn State Hershey Heart and Vascular
Institute (PSHVI), Penn State College of Medicine, in
the area of autonomic and cardiovascular physiology.
The laboratory is focused on understanding the role
of the sympathetic nervous system in the control of
cardiovascular function during exercise in health and
in cardiovascular disease. Specifically, the major goal
of our laboratory is to examine how the rise in blood
pressure with exercise affects blood flow and oxygen
delivery to important organs in the body. These studies
utilize the techniques of Doppler ultrasound, MRI,
microneurography, and pharmacological interventions.
The ideal candidate will have a MD or PhD at the time
of appointment. A strong background in autonomic,
cardiovascular, muscle reflex, or exercise physiology is
required. Prior experience performing hemodynamic
studies is highly desired. The successful applicant will
be expected to participate in all aspects of the research
project, including experimental design, data collection,
data analysis, preparation of graphs and figures, and
preparation of manuscripts. Strong writing and oral
communication skills are highly desired. Leadership
ability and interpersonal skills are vital to this
position. Ample opportunity exists for collaboration
with other investigators in the PSHVI engaging in preclinical and clinical cardiovascular research. Highly
motivated candidates should submit 1) a cover letter
summarizing research interests and career goals, 2) a
current curriculum vitae, and 3) the names of at least 3
references to https://psu.jobs, job posting number 63000.
Penn State is an equal-opportunity, affirmative-action
employer, and is committed to providing employment
opportunities to all qualified applicants without regard
to race, color, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation,
gender identity, national origin, disability, or protected
veteran status.
Postdoctoral Fellowship: The Penn State Hershey
Heart and Vascular Institute has an open postdoctoral
research position in the laboratory of Marc P.
Kaufman. The laboratory investigates the control
of the cardiovascular system during exercise in both
health and in simulated peripheral artery disease. The
position offers a highly competitive salary, benefits,
and an outstanding research environment. Applicants
should have an interest in cardiovascular physiology,
electrophysiology, or integrative aspects of exercise
physiology. Studies include investigations into the
metabolic and mechanical signals that evoke the
THE
exercise pressor reflex in both health and simulated
peripheral
artery
disease.
Collaboration
and
interaction will be encouraged with other investigators
in the institute. In vivo rat models are used to
perform integrative and electrophysiological studies
using both pharmacological blockades and siRNA.
The ideal candidate will have a PhD or MD at the
time of appointment. A background in autonomic,
cardiovascular, genetic engineering, and/or exercise
physiology would be useful. The successful applicant
will be expected to participate in all aspects of the
research project, including experimental design,
data collection, data analysis, preparation of graphs
and figures, and preparation of manuscripts. Strong
writing and oral communication skills are highly
desired. Interested candidates should submit to https://
psu.jobs (job posting no. 63307): 1) a brief cover letter
summarizing research interests and career goals, 2)
a current curriculum vitae, and 3) the names of at
least 2 references. Penn State is an equal-opportunity,
affirmative-action employer, and is committed to
providing employment opportunities to all qualified
applicants without regard to race, color, religion, age,
sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin,
disability, or protected veteran status.
Postdoctoral Fellowship: A postdoctoral position
is available at the Joslin Diabetes Center/Harvard
Medical School in the area of translational exercise
physiology and muscle biology. The candidate
will work in the Department of Clinical Research
as a member of Joslin’s new Translational Exercise
Physiology Laboratory. The focus of the laboratory is to
determine how exercise-stimulated cellular signaling
and adaptations in skeletal muscle contribute to the
prevention and treatment of chronic metabolic disease.
We employ an integrative multi-disciplinary approach,
examining physiological responses to exercise in both
humans and animal models. The ultimate goal of this
work is to develop therapeutic protocols that will
maximize the health benefits of exercise in populations
at increased risk for metabolic disease. The Joslin
Diabetes Center is the world’s largest diabetes research
center and has a top-tier postdoctoral research training
program. The successful candidate will have access to
the multitude of resources available at Joslin, Harvard
Medical School, and Boston’s Longwood Medical
Area. Requirements: 1) PhD in biomedical science,
exercise science, or molecular biology; 2) experience
PHYSIOLOGIST
in physiological research involving animal models
and/or human subjects; 3) training and experience in
exercise physiology; 4) strong record of productivity
and publication; 5) excellent communication skills.
Interested applicants should e-mail a cover letter,
curriculum vitae, and the contact details of 2 references
to Dr. Sarah Lessard at [email protected]
Postdoctoral Fellowship: A postdoctoral researcher
position in physiological genomics is available within
the Department of Pharmacology & Experimental
Therapeutics at Louisiana State University Health
Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA. The position is
available to investigate the molecular and physiological
roles of angiotensin converting enzyme type 2 (ACE2)
in the regulation of cardiovascular function in vivo
and in vitro. Our laboratory (http://www.medschool.
lsuhsc.edu/pharmacology/lab_lazartigues_index.aspx)
takes a multidisciplinary approach to investigate
autonomic nervous function and to determine the
cellular and molecular mechanisms of ACE2 in normal
and transgenic mice overexpressing components of
the renin-angiotensin system, and their effects on
blood pressure regulation. Among those approaches
are cardiovascular and neurophysiological techniques
(mouse telemetry, cardiovascular function assessment,
central microinjections, microdialysis), gene therapy
tools including but not limited to siRNA and viral
transfection, molecular and recombinant DNA
methodology, immunohistochemistry and biochemical
methods (e.g., Circ Res 113: 1087-1096, 2013; PMID:
24014829). The Louisiana State University Health
Sciences Center (www.medschool.lsuhsc.edu) is a stateof-the-art facility with well equipped imaging and
molecular core facilities. Required Qualifications: PhD or
MD in basic or health science. Preferred Qualifications:
A doctoral degree in neurosciences or related field; a
strong background in animal physiology, molecular
pharmacology, and knowledge of brain circuitry
relative to the autonomic nervous system; additional
expertise in molecular/cellular biology. Applicant
Instructions: Send resume and the names of 3 references
to: [email protected]; reference: postdoc
researcher, pharmacology 0038804. LSU Health is an
equal-opportunity employer.
Assistant Professor: The Department of Physiology
at Midwestern University-Glendale (http://www.
midwestern.edu/programs_and_admission/az_osteopathic_
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 219
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
medicine/physiology.html) invites applications for a
tenure-track faculty position in physiology at the
rank of assistant professor. The successful applicant
will participate in a team-teaching approach to meet
the needs of various healthcare education graduate
programs that exist on our campus. Experience
teaching cardiovascular, endocrinology, or renal
physiology is highly desired. Candidates whose
research areas complement current research strengths
are encouraged to apply. Start-up funds and laboratory
space are available for the applicant to establish and
maintain a successful research program. Individuals
must have a PhD degree in physiology or a related field.
Previous research experience at the postdoctoral level
is required, and prior teaching experience is preferred.
Preferential consideration will be given to applications
received by 08/01/2016. About the Department: The
Physiology Department is composed of eight full-time
tenured or tenure-track faculty who share the common
goal of providing a strong foundation in physiology
education to the health science students at Midwestern
University. The faculty have diverse research interests,
which include genistein and intestinal function in
diabetes and cystic fibrosis, diabetes and exercise
training, molecular mechanisms of vocal learning
in songbirds, caveolins and insulin signaling,
neurophysiology and evolution of vocal control, water
balance in desert arthropods, and the effects of oxygen
on animal physiology and evolution. Faculty research is
complemented by a staff of three research technicians.
About the University: Midwestern University consists
of campuses in Illinois and Arizona. Midwestern
University’s Glendale Campus is a 20-minute drive
north of downtown Phoenix, where nearby you’ll
find everything from major-league sports, fine arts,
and fine dining to nature preserves, hiking, camping,
and quiet spots where you’ll enjoy taking a break to
keep your life in balance. How to Apply: Applicants
should apply online at www.midwestern.edu. In the
Quick Links section, select “Employment at MWU,”
then “Midwestern University Opportunities.” You may
search for the job posting by specifying Physiology as
the search term, Arizona for the location, and Assistant
Professor/Academic & Clinic Coord for the category. Your
online application should include a cover letter, a
curriculum vitae, a statement of teaching philosophy
(1-2 pages), and a statement of current and future
research goals (1-2 pages). Please include the names
and contact information of at least three professional
220 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
references. Please submit your application materials
as a single PDF file. For more information about this
position, contact Michael Quinlan, PhD, at [email protected]
midwestern.edu. Midwestern University is an equalopportunity/affirmative-action employer that does
not discriminate against an employee or applicant
based on race, color, religion, gender, national origin,
disability, or veterans status, in accord with 41 C.F.R.
60-1.4(a), 250.5(a), 300.5(a), and 741.5(a). We maintain
a drug-free workplace and perform pre-employment
substance abuse testing.
Chair: The LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport
(LSUHSC-S) seeks applicants for Chair of the
Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy. The
successful candidate should have a graduate degree
(PhD and/or MD), an impressive record of academic
achievement and leadership, and current national
funding in an area that complements the existing
departmental research strength in cardiovascular
disease. The candidate must have experience mentoring
graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior
faculty, as well as a commitment to the educational
mission of the medical school. This is an exciting
opportunity with resources provided to invigorate the
department and create a competitive research program.
The position includes a generous seed package and
research space for the chair-holder, the opportunity
to recruit additional faculty with competitive seed
packages and research space, and funding to expand
the research infrastructure of the Department.
Numerous outstanding research core facilities are
available, staffed by dedicated research associates
and scientific advisors. The LSUHSC-S is located in
northwest Louisiana, one of the fastest-developing
regions within the state. The Shreveport-Bossier City
area, with a population of 325,000, is a major regional
cultural and recreational center, and is within driving
distance from larger metroplexes, such as Dallas-Fort
Worth and Houston. Interested candidates may submit
a curriculum vitae, letter of interest, and letters of
reference to [email protected] LSUHSC-S
is an equal-opportunity employer, and all qualified
applicants will receive consideration for employment
without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national
origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or
any other characteristic protected by law.
THE
Director: The Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine
has opened a search for a Director of Physiology. We
are looking for a seasoned educator/leader to lead the
Physiology team. The successful candidate will have
a terminal degree (PhD, DO, or MD) with a minimum
of 5 years’ demonstrated excellence in teaching and
experience administering a medical physiology
course. Teaching responsibilities include the College of
Medicine, School of Pharmacy, and Post-Baccalaureate
programs. All faculty members are expected to
participate in research or scholarly activity. Faculty
PHYSIOLOGIST
rank and salary are dependent on qualifications and
experience. An applicant must complete the online
application at Director of Physiology and upload a
current curriculum vitae (CV) to the application site.
The applicant must also e-mail a cover letter outlining
how he/she would enhance the educational mission
of LECOM, a statement of teaching philosophy, and
contact information for three professional references
to [email protected] EOE/AA M/F/D/V. For more
information about LECOM, please visit our website at
www.lecom.edu. ●
All APS members receive FREE access to
Comprehensive Physiology through December 2016!
Comprehensive Physiology is the most authoritative and comprehensive collection
of physiology information that has ever been assembled. Its starting point is more
than 30,000 pages, 34 volumes of content from the American Physiological Society’s
renowned Handbook of Physiology series, which is presented now for the first time
in a new, dynamic online format.
Comprehensive Physiology covers all areas of current research and practice, has
a world-renowned editorial team, and is fully citable. APS members receive FREE
access through December 2016.
www.comprehensivephysiology.com
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 221
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
Meetings & Congresses
2016
July 6-9
21st Annual Congress of the European College of Sports
Science, Vienna, Austria. Information: internet: http://ecsscongress.eu/2016/16/
July 21-25
12th International Congress of Cell Biology, Prague,
Czech Republic. Information: internet: http://www.cscb.cz/
July 29-31
APS/TPS Joint Meeting: Physiology 2016, Dublin,
Ireland. Information: internet: http://www.physiology2016.
org/; #Physiology2016
August 4-8
Society for Developmental Biology 75th Annual
Meeting: International Society of Differentiation 19th
International Conference, Boston, MA. Information:
e-mail: [email protected]; internet: https://www.sdbonline.
org/2016mtg
August 23-26
2016 Cardiac Physiome Workshop, Seoul, Korea.
Information: internet: https://www.imagwiki.nibib.nih.gov/
msm-meetings/2016-cardiac-physiome-workshop
August 24-27
APS Conference: Inflammation, Immunity and
Cardiovascular
Disease,
Westminster,
Colorado.
Information: internet: http://www.the-aps.org/Inflammation;
#IICVD16
September 5-8
7th International Congress of the African Association
of Physiological Sciences, Lagos, Nigera. Information:
internet: http://aapslagos2016.org/
September 8-10
6th Annual Meeting of the North American Artery
Society (NAA) - Arterial Dysfunction in Cardiometabolic
Disorders: Advances in Mechanisms, Diagnosis and
Treatment, Chicago, IL. Information: Matthew Hansen,
Hansen Global Event Management, LLC;. e-mail: [email protected]
hansenglobalevents.com; internet: http://naartery.org/page1710768
222 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016
September 9-11
ILCA 2016 - The International liver Cancer Association’s
10th
Annual
Conference,
Vancouver,
Canada.
Information: internet: http://www.ilca2016.org
September 18-21
2016 SPS/CSPT/JSPS Joint
BC,
Canada.
Information:
safetypharmacology.org/am2016/
Meeting,
internet:
Vancouver,
http://www.
September 25-28
2016 International Conference on Physiological Sciences,
Beijing, China. Information: internet: http://www.pco-online.
com/icps2016
November 2-4
APS Intersociety Meeting: The Integrative Biology of
Exercise VII, Phoenix, Arizonia. Information: internet: http://
www.the-aps.org/mm/Conferences/APS-Conferences/2016Conferences/Exercise; #IBExercise7
2017
April 22-26
2017 Experimental Biology, Chicago, IL.
May 27-June 1
International Neuromodulation Society 13th World
Congress, Edinburgh, Scotland. Information: internet:
http://www.neuromodulation.com/ins-congress
August 1-5
IUPS 38th World Congress: Rhythms of Life, Rio de
Janeiro, Brazil. Information: Internet: http://iups2017.com/
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
®
Meetings and Conferences
Physiology 2016
July 29-31, 2016 • Dublin, Ireland
APS Conference:
Inflammation, Immunity, and Cardiovascular Disease
August 24-27, 2016 • Westminster, Colorado
APS Intersociety Meeting:
The Integrative Biology of Exercise VII
November 2-4, 2016 • Phoenix, Arizona
Experimental Biology 2017
April 22-26, 2017 • Chicago, Illinois
APS is also participating in the following meeting
2016 International Conference of Physiological Sciences
September 25-28, 2016 • Beijing, China
For more information on APS meetings, please visit:
the-aps.org/conferences
APS Members receive discounted registration to EB and APS Conferences!
The American Physiological Society usually holds one or more specialty conferences each year.
In addition, APS joins with other societies to sponsor Intersociety Meetings as interest warrants.
Please send an email to: [email protected] for questions or to propose APS Conferences.
TEL:
American Physiological Society • 9650 Rockville Pike • Bethesda, MD 20814
301-634-7967 • FAX: 301.634.7241 • www.the-aps.org • [email protected] •
#PhysiolConf
Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016 • 223
THE
PHYSIOLOGIST
FREE eAccess for APS Members
www.the-aps.org/books
M. L. Gumz
Circadian Clocks: Role in Health and Disease
• Updates readers on new findings concerning the essential role of biological rhythms
• Addresses both basic research and clinical aspects
• Written by leading scientists and clinicians
L.D. Longo
The Rise of Fetal and Neonatal Physiology
• Constitutes a definitive history of an important field of physiology, that which concerns the developing fetus and newborn infant
• Addresses the contributions of basic scientists and physiologists to clinical problems of prematurity, such as the causes of
premature labor, respiratory distress syndrome, retinopathy of prematurity, and thermoregulation
• Includes contributions from over 40 leading scientists in this field
J.B. West
Essays on the History of Respiratory Physiology
• The book is written for scientists but is accessible to interested non-scientists
• Covers the history of significant people and events over the whole course of respiratory physiology
• Discusses how historical events such as the Renaissance and Enlightenment shaped respiratory physiology
J.A. Rall
Mechanism of Muscular Contraction
• Describes the evolution of muscular contraction concepts since the discovery of sliding filaments
• Includes detailed scientific histories of principal investigators in the field
• Features information on contraction coupling and the role of calcium in contraction and relaxation
D.H. Evans
Marine Physiology Down East: The Story of
the Mt. Desert Island Biological Laboratory
• An exciting document for former, current and future scientists and friends of the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory (MDIBL)
• Provides a scientific genealogy of the MDIBL
• Combines research, administrative and social histories of the MDIBL
K.A. Hyndman
T.L. Pannabecker
Sodium and Water Homeostasis:
Comparative, Evolutionary and Genetic Models
• Features current innovative topics in the field of sodium and water homeostasis
• Features domestic and international contributions from experts in the field
• Covers multiple organ systems and cellular processes
K.L. Hamilton
D.C. Devor
Ion Channels and Transporters of Epithelia
in Health and Disease
• Updates readers on essential findings concerning the cell physiology, biochemistry, pathophysiology and
pharmacology of epithelial ion transport
• Addresses both basic research and clinical aspects
• All chapters written by leading scientists and clinicians
Have an idea for a book topic? Email your book ideas to [email protected]
Dee Silverthorn, Ph.D. APS Books Chair, University of Texas at Austin
224 • Vol. 59/No. 4 | July 2016