Annual Report | 2009 - 2010 - Canadian Centre for Victims of

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Annual Report | 2009 - 2010 - Canadian Centre for Victims of
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2009
Annual Report
2010
2,418 survivors walked through our doors this year
Charity No.: 133327908 RR0001
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Table of Contents
Mandate
3
A message from the Executive Director
4
A message from the Chair
5
Legal Committee Report
6
International Committee Report
7
Public Education Committee Report
9
Health Committee Report
11
Program Manager Report
13
Settlement Program Report
15
Child and Youth Report
17
Local Immigration Partnership (LIP) Program Report
20
Volunteer Program Report
22
Language and Skills Training Report
24
CCVT Programs
26
Financial Report
27
Board of Directors
29
Health Network Members
30
Legal Network Members
31
Partnering Organizations
32
CCVT Staff
34
CCVT Survivors
36
Individual Donors
38
CCVT Volunteers
42
Our Supporters and Patrons
43
Source of Funds and Donor Organizations
44
Contact Us
45
TABLE OF FIGURES
Figure 1: New Clients by Country
36
Figure 5: Age
39
Figure 2: Total Clients
37
Figure 6: Gender
39
Figure 3: Referral Sources
38
Figure 7: Marital Status
40
Figure 4: Internal Referrals
38
Figure 8: Client Education
40
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Mandate
The Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture (CCVT)
aids survivors to overcome the lasting effects of torture and war.
In partnership with the community, the Centre supports survivors
in the process of successful integration into Canadian society,
works for their protection and integrity, and raises awareness
of the continuing effects of torture and war on
survivors and their families.
“The CCVT gives hope after the horror.”
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ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Message from the Executive Director
Every country has ratified at least one international human rights treaty
recognizing ”the right to enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of
physical and mental health.” Freedom from torture and other cruel and
degrading treatment or punishment is a key aspect of this right, as is the right
to prevention and treatment. Although torture is often used to silence human
rights defenders and outspoken dissidents, the ones who most commonly
suffer torture belong to vulnerable populations who are defenseless and
marginalized.
Mulugeta Abai
Executive Director
The Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture (CCVT) works to meet the needs
and rights of torture survivors by developing psycho-social, legal and mental
health services. To meet the needs we work in partnership with community
organizations and health service providers to ensure that services are
appropriate and effective. As part of this effort we have partnered with
physicians, psychiatrists and other practitioners in private practice who are
affiliated with Mount Sinai Hospital to offer treatment and documentation at
CCVT.
In addition to direct services, we have pursued academic partnerships with the Centre for Refugee
Studies at York and worked with members of our health and legal networks to improve the skills of our
staff, and increase their knowledge on the provision of services to survivors of torture and their families.
Last year we assisted 2,418 survivors who sought our help and expanded our reach to include priority
neighborhoods by employing more staff and working in partnership with other organizations throughout
the City of Toronto. As in previous years, staff continued to assist survivors and their families deal with
the trauma, family separation and other hardships.
Our LINC classes are as busy as ever and a new course in Secretarial training has graduated 12
learners with certificates that will enable them to gain entry level jobs. Three of those graduates have
already secured employment.
As the lead agency, CCVT received funding from Citizenship and Immigration Canada to coordinate the
East Downtown Toronto Local Immigration Partnership (EDTLIP) which has grown to include 54
member organizations. EDTLIP is overseen by a steering committee which is representative of the
neighborhood we are a part of and has established planning tables that include Immigration &
Settlement, Health/Mental Health, Social & Cultural Inclusion, Employment, Training, & Language and
Housing. EDTLIP has developed a local settlement strategy and we are moving towards implementation
in the coming months. We will also increase the planning tables to include seniors, youth and women.
CCVT believes and recognizes the importance of working together to achieve systemic changes that
will facilitate the creation of supportive networks to enable survivors to move from victim to active
community members.
All the above achievements would not have been possible without the generous support from
Citizenship and Immigration Canada, the Ontario Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration, United Way of
Greater Toronto, the City of Toronto, the United Nations, the Trillium Foundation, Canadian Auto
Workers Union and our thousands of donors. Nor would the work have been possible without the
dedication and unwavering commitment of the Centre’s staff, volunteers and guidance from the board of
directors, for which I am most grateful.
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ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Message from the Chair
It has been an exciting and productive year at the Canadian Centre for
Victims of Torture! We have seen our services grow and improve. Our
space at the Scarborough office was expanded to allow for more programs
and we are now prepared to provide services at the Victoria Hub. Clients at
the Jarvis office now receive regular psychiatric counselling in the offices.
We are grateful for the psychiatrists from Mount Sinai Hospital who come to
the office each week. Their visits allow for better treatment of the clients
and professional development opportunities for our counselling staff.
The staff members have worked hard to implement the strategic plan
developed in collaboration with the board. All of the programs and practices
have been reviewed to ensure adherence to the strategic plan. As a result,
innovative program activities are being developed particularly for children
and seniors and we have been able to hire staff to support these programs.
Prof. Susan McGrath
Chair of the Board
We continue to provide specialized English language training to our
clients. Our staff and board speak out on crucial social issues and public
policy concerns through public presentations and letters to policy makers.
CCVT has provided strong leadership to the development of the East Downtown Toronto Local
Immigration Partnership (LIP). Fifty–four member agencies that include settlement services, educational
institutions, grassroots organizations, the city of Toronto, Toronto Police and local hospitals have all
collaborated to develop an environmental scan and a local settlement strategy and action plan for the
area. The LIP Program Manager Ermelina Balla and her team are to be commended for the success of
the project.
The Board has revised and updated our personnel and health and safety policies. All of the job
descriptions of the staff members have been analyzed and revised. We much appreciate the assistance
of Board Member Mohan Doss and the cooperation of the staff in these processes. I have been pleased
with the collaboration of CCVT and the Centre for Refugee Studies at York University, where I am
Director, in providing professional development programs for workers in the field.
A highlight of the year was the launch of a fundraising campaign to establish CCVT as a Centre of
Excellence. The initial focus is on children and youth. The launch took place at our successful First
Light celebration held in November. We are grateful for the leadership that Tony Boston, our former
Board President, has given to this initiative. I also want to congratulate the staff who worked to make
First Light such a wonderful evening, particularly Angela Woodcock and Teresa Dremetsikas.
It has been an honour to serve as Chair of the Board of Directors for such a vibrant and important
organization. I want to thank the Board members for their guidance and efforts. I congratulate our
dedicated executive director Mulugeta Abai and all of the staff for their hard work and contributions in
making CCVT such a remarkable agency.
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ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Legal Committee Report
The CCVT Legal Committee is presently composed of three lawyers
(within different fields of refugee/immigration law and human rights) and
three CCVT staff members. The committee recruits its members from the
CCVT Board of Directors and staff, the Legal Network, and volunteers. The
committee provides recommendations to the CCVT Board.
Staff members bring any legal problem CCVT clients may have to the
attention of the Committee. The Legal Committee addresses legal matters
arising within the CCVT mandate with the objective of making the Centre
work more effectively in serving its clients.
The legal committee is also active in the fields of policy analysis, legal
support and research, as well as monitoring national and international
human rights instruments in regards to torture survivors, refugees and other
uprooted people.
Dr. Ezat Mossallanejad
CCVT Policy Analyst
Last year the CCVT Legal Committee was involved in the following areas of
policy support:
Non-citizens in Limbo
The Legal Committee closely scrutinized the conditions and challenges experienced by non-citizens,
specifically survivors of torture and war in the midst of Canadian immigration limbo. The committee
provided feedback on best practices to serve these clients on an ongoing and case by case basis.
Backlog
The CCVT Legal Committee put forth recommendations regarding the lengthy waiting periods of
immigration hearings. It was proposed that: a) lawyers contact the Immigration and Refugee Board to
inquire about the date of hearings with hopes that this will speed up the process on Humanitarian and
Compassionate grounds as well as Pre-Removal Risk Assessment (PRRA); b) lawyers file an
application for mandamus to the federal court to accelerate the process (however this application is not
covered by Legal Aid); c) advised on the requirements of visa officer’s for families to undergo DNA
testing. DNA testing is costly and time-consuming. We have tried our best to help clients come up with
alternatives to DNA testing in a way that is acceptable to visa officers.
Clients’ Refugee and Immigration problems
Throughout the year the Legal Committee provided support and advised CCVT regarding immigration
limbo, legal obstacles to family reunification, and a variety of inadmissibility related issues which
assisted in family reunifications and acquiring landed immigrant status.
Co-chairs: Andrew Brouwer and Richard Wazana
Members: Hillary Evans Cameron, Ezat Mossallanejad, Aislinn Clancy, Jackie Gakumba, Selamawit Yohannes
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ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
International Committee Report
The CCVT International Committee monitors the activities and services of a network of organizations
that support survivors of torture, war, genocide and crimes against humanity. The international
committee makes necessary recommendations to the CCVT Board of Directors. This committee also
works towards monitoring and responding to global issues related to the prevention, exposure and
eradication of torture, war, genocide and crimes against humanity. During the year 2009-2010, the
International Committee was involved in the following activities:
Conference on forced migration
CCVT staff attended the 12th International Association for the Study of Forced Migration (IASFM)
Conference held at the University of Nicosia, Cyprus in June 2009.
Sri Lankan crisis
The CCVT monitored the desperate conditions of 300,000 internally displaced civilians (IDPs) who had
fled war-ravaged areas and had lived in overcrowded refugee camps under strict military control.
The CCVT wrote a letter to the Rt. Honourable Stephen Harper, Prime Minister of Canada, requesting
Canada to pressure the Sri Lankan government to:
Allow international relief agencies, journalists and independent human rights monitors to
enter Sri Lanka and be allowed access to the war-ravaged areas;
Allow the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to assist by registering
internally displaced people.
Campaign against refoulement to torture in Iran
The CCVT reiterated the concerns of Amnesty International regarding the fate of more than 3,000
Iranian exiles living in Camp Ashraf northeast of Baghdad in Iraq. CCVT wrote a letter of appeal to
Prof. Susan McGrath facilitating a workshop at the 12th Conference on Forced Migration organized by the International
Association for the Study of Force Migration (IASFM) held at Nicosia University in Cyprus.
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ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
International Committee Report
(continued)
United States Secretary of State Hillary Clinton as well as to Iraqi Prime Minister Mr. Nouri Al-Malik to
work towards their non-refoulemant as per article 3 of the Convention against Torture (CAT) and Article
33 of the Refugee Convention (1951).
Canadians in Saudi detention
The CCVT joined human rights agencies around the world by initiating a campaign for due process in
the cases of two Canadian citizens - Mr. Mohamed Kohail (22 years old) and his brother Mr. Sultan
Kohail (16 years old), who had been incarcerated in Saudi Arabia for the last three years. Honorable
Lawrence Cannon, Minister of Foreign Affairs, announced that the death sentence against Mr.
Mohamed Kohail had been revoked and that a retrial had been ordered (January 9th, 2010).
Canada and protection against torture
CCVT issued a media release expressing deep concern regarding the allegations that during 20052007, Canadian forces were implicated in the torture of detainees by Afghan authorities. The CCVT
reiterated that any kind of involvement in torture, including consent or acquiescence to, is a breach of
Canada’s human rights obligations, international law and the fundamental rights of humankind.
Eritrean refugees in Libya
CCVT closely monitored the treatment of Eritrean refugees in Libya and their inhumane prison
conditions. The CCVT appealed to the Hon. Lawrence Cannon, Minister of Foreign Affairs, the
Honorable Jason Kenney, Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, Libyan President Muammar Gaddafi,
Mr. Antonio Guterres, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Dr. Bingu Wa Mutharika,
President of Malawi and Chairperson of the African Union, and Mr. Alhussein Elzawawi, the Libyan
Acting Ambassador in Canada, seeking their intervention.
Abuse of the Interpol system
CCVT wrote to Mr. Ronald Kenneth Noble, the Interpol Secretary General, sharing its grave concern
over news about the abuse of the Interpol system by the highly tyrannical government of Iran. Mr.
Kenneth responded by sharing his limitations and suggesting a possible remedy.
Optional Protocol
The International Committee continued to monitor developments regarding An Optional Protocol to the
Convention against Torture, dealing with the mandate of the UN Committee against Torture to enter and
monitor conditions in places of detention. We will continue to urge the government of Canada for the
ratification of the Optional Protocol to the United Nations Convention Against Torture and other Cruel,
Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment
Canadian Centre for International Justice (CCIJ)
CCVT continued its collaboration with the Canadian Centre for International Justice (CCIJ). The CCIJ is
now incorporated as a non-profit non governmental organization with a mandate to bring torturers and
war criminals to justice.
Chair: Prof. Susan McGrath
Members: Hoda Aghloul, Mulugeta Abai, Ezat Mossallanejad, Teresa Dremetsikas, Chizuru Nobe
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ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Public Education Committee Report
The function of the Public Education Committee is to contribute to the implementation of the
organizational mandate to raise awareness of the continuing effects of torture, war, genocide and crimes
against humanity on survivors and their families, and to work for their protection and integrity.
As a learning centre, CCVT focuses on issues related to torture, international crimes, and the human
rights of survivors. Activities include research, the production and distribution of learning materials, onsite training and education programs for staff, volunteers, students and the community, as well as local
and global public forums and presentations.
The committee primarily focused on educating Canadian youth against torture, war, genocide, crimes
against humanity, and impunity.
Training and Education
Some countries, including advanced industrial, continue to sanction torture in the name of “excessive
measures” against suspected terrorists. While we must warn the public about the evils of terrorism, we
also need to work towards eradicating torture. This has prompted CCVT to increase its efforts towards
public education. During the past year, the CCVT looked closely into public education with regards to
the protection of uprooted people who make Canada their final destination.
The CCVT maintains its involvement with Mount Sinai Hospital by participating in training opportunities
and jointly presenting at different events.
Collaboration
In its public education endeavor, CCVT maintained a close collaboration with the Canadian Council for
Refugees, the Canadian Centre for International Justice, York University, University of Toronto (U of T),
Ryerson University, University of Ottawa, Wilfred Laurier University, George Brown College, Humber
College, Seneca College, FCJ Refugee Centre, Amnesty International and the Ottawa branch office of
the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.
In collaboration with the FCJ Refugee Centre, CCVT contributed towards the publication of the Refugee
Update, a journal for the protection of refugees in Canada.
Along with U of T professors, the CCVT supervised U of T students conducting research on topics
related to the CCVT mandate.
CCVT staff continued to play a major role as a member of the United Way Speakers Bureau. It has been
a wonderful training opportunity to educate non-profit agencies as well the business community about
the scourge of torture and the need for the rehabilitation of survivors.
Partnership
During the past year, CCVT continued its successful partnership with the Centre for Refugee Studies at
York University by providing a course as part of the Continuing Education program. This course
provided students with information and insight about the Canadian refugee determination system as well
as on the international conventions and remedies applicable in the context of refugees.
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ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Public Education Committee Report
(continued)
Public Awareness Workshop and Presentations
The following are examples of workshops and presentations the CCVT hosted in the past year:
Organized public awareness panels on genocide in different periods of history against
different people: Jewish, Rwandese, and Darfurians;
Participated at the panel discussion, “Human Rights, Politics and the Hippocratic Oath:
Exploring Physicians’ Roles in Conflict Situations.” Sponsored by Amnesty International
Canada and Save the Doctors Campaign. The event took place at the Munk Centre,
University of Toronto;
Workshop for the Canadian Churches Forum on the overview of international human rights
instruments and mechanisms;
CCVT provided three workshops on Crimes against Humanity- on site at CCVT, at George
Brown College (Toronto), and the Committee against Massacre of Political Prisoners
(Montreal);
Participated in a panel held at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) on the
topic of Women and Genocide;
CCVT provided students and teachers at University of Toronto, York University, Seneca
college, George Brown College and Wilfred Laurier University with workshops on
prevention, eradication and exposure of torture as well as the need for rehabilitation of
survivors
Learning Materials
CCVT’s journal, First Light continues to provide valued and critical commentaries on current issues
along with information on the Centre’s programs and activities. The last issue contained articles and
research works contributed by CCVT staff, volunteers, clients and supporters. First Light has and will
continue to serve as a valuable means of education and public awareness. These materials and other
public education materials are available on the CCVT web site at www.ccvt.org
Chair: Prof. Susan McGrath
Members: Regine King and Mulugeta Abai,
Ezat Mossallanejad, Teresa Dremetsikas, Chizuru Nobe
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ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Health Committee Report
The mandate and tasks of the Health Committee include:
Development and advising in the implementation of guidelines for the assessment of clients and the
provision of services;
Collaboration with the Executive Director and other CCVT Board committees in fulfilling the mandate
of the centre;
To collaborate with the personnel committee in respect to staff development;
Working with the public education committee and the volunteer advisory committee to promote
public and professional education;
As previous years, the fiscal year of 2009-2010 was a successful year for the Health Committee. The
committee met once a month and as the need arose. The committee has been consulting and working
closely with CCVT management, staff and the other board committees. Throughout the year the
committee worked hard to recruit more family physicians and psychiatrists to provide in-house services
for CCVT clients. In addition, to better serve CCVT clients the committee explored additional resources
that CCVT staff can use to refer clients for health issues.
The committee prepared and implemented a needs assessment to identify the health needs and barriers
that CCVT clients face. Identifying barriers enables CCVT to plan and design programs to assist clients
overcome these barriers. The development of the questionnaire involved a revision of existing tools and
consultation with all levels of the CCVT health committee and CCVT management. In total 148 clients
completed the questionnaire.
The survey indicated that many of our clients still do not have access to regular health care. This is
particularly true for newcomers and people who have difficulty with English. The committee believes
that the Interim Federal Health plan, as opposed to clients immediately getting a regular Ontario health
card, is a contributing problem. The major clientele groups that lack family doctors were refugee
claimants (68%). Most of the respondents were having difficulty accessing a dentist (57%).
The health committee organized a joint meeting with the CCVT legal committee to increase collaboration
between the committees in order to better serve CCVT clients. Over 30 members were in attendance
and discussed the best practice for writing documentations. Both committees agreed to continue
convening joint meetings.
The CCVT health committee recommended and expressed a lot of interest in researching and
developing a “Best Practice Guidelines” and the creation of a center of expertise for the mental health
care of newcomers with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is important to note that the commonly
accepted PTSD treatment guidelines in North America seem to be suited to North Americans with a
history of brief, local trauma, and does not include any cultural or major life displacement issues. The
center will enable other healthcare professionals to learn from the best practices and guidelines for
treatment of PTSD.
The Health Committee secured a researcher who will help CCVT and committee members explore the
existing literature and research about the treatment of PTSD.
Alongside CCVT management, health committee members finalized an agreement with Inner City
Health to fund more psychiatrists to provide services at CCVT. Currently five psychiatrists are providing
services at CCVT providing documentation and treatment to clients. They also provide additional training
to CCVT Trauma/Settlement counselors and are available to counselors for consultations.
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ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Health Committee Report
(continued)
Training conducted by the health committee members builds the staff capacity in mental health services.
In consultation with CCVT management, the health committee partnered with Mount Sinai hospital to
provide trauma training to CCVT staff. On several occasions CCVT staff members and psychiatrists
from Mount Sinai Hospital co-presented at national and international mental health conferences. CCVT
staff and Mount Sinai doctors delivered workshops to psychiatric residents to introduce them to the
mental health needs of newcomers.
The health committee secured a family doctor to provide documentation services at CCVT. These
doctors provide services to
CCVT clients pro bono. More
family physicians have joined
the health committee and
continue to contribute more
services and consultations.
Health Committee members
developed an outline for
writing documentations for
asylum seekers. This outline
is in the final stages of editing.
Joint Health and Legal Committee meeting
T h e h e a l th c o m m i tt e e
participated and contributed in
the strategic planning meeting
held by CCVT. From the point
of view of psychiatrists and
physicians they made recommendations and provided feedback on how to better assist CCVT clients
with mental and physical health problems.
In summary:
In collaboration with CCVT management, the committee recruited more family physicians to join the
CCVT Health Committee;
Alongside CCVT management, the committee secured one family physician to provide in-house
services to CCVT clients;
As part of enhancing professional capacity of CCVT staff, the committee organized and
implemented a training workshop on trauma
To better understand the health needs of the clients, the committee developed and implemented a
questionnaire for clients;
The committee actively participated in two international mental health conferences;
As part of networking and partnering with other institutions, the health committee participated in the
UNHCR advisory committee on mental health;
To increase collaboration with other CCVT board committees, the health committee organized and
implemented a joint meeting with the CCVT Legal Network members;
The Health Committee contributed in the creation of the CCVT Centre for Excellence Campaign.
Co-chairs: Dr. Marlinda Freire, Dr. Wendell Block
Members: Helen Gateri, Dr. Donald Payne, Dr. Rosemary Meier, Dr. Lisa Andermann, Dr. Clare Pain, Dr. Debra Stein,
Dr. Tripler Pell, Dr. Julia Rackal, Dr. Mitra Gholamaine, Teresa Dremetsikas, Mohamed Ahmed and Selamawit Yohannes
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ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Program Manager Report
Throughout all the different programs and services provided by CCVT to
clients; our staff, volunteers and the board have continued to fulfill the
organizational mandate.
There have been accomplishments in every single program and committee
this year. The highlight has been the initiation of the implementation of the
4 year strategic plan.
Other highlights include:
The formation of a client advisory committee including guidelines to
form the committee;
Increased capacity within the volunteer program;
The identification of resources for the Children and Youth Program;
Expansion of the English Instruction Program to the Scarborough
Dr. Teresa Dremetsikas
branch and the creation of a new secretarial course;
Program Manager
The CCVT website has been redesigned;
CCVT became the lead agency for the East Downtown Toronto Local
Immigration Partnership (LIP);
Increased our capacity to deliver Mental Health services for clients;
A joint Health and Legal committee meeting took place to review the CCVT Medical Legal
Guidelines;
The launch of a campaign to raise the profile of CCVT as a Centre of Excellence during the
First Light Celebration.
Scarborough Seniors Holiday Party
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ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Program Manager Report
(continued)
Professional Development training for staff and volunteers this year has included topics like:
Refugees and Trauma;
Logic Model;
Forming Partnerships;
CPR;
Database Management;
Introduction to Cultural Interpretation;
Forced Migration.
Participation and presentations delivered include:
Regent Park Community Health Centre for staff regarding the CCVT model of Service
Delivery;
Women’s College Hospital for Residents of Family Medicine;
World Refugee Day organized by a London Immigrant Serving Organization;
Children’s Aid Society;
The Culture and International Mental Health Conference “Resilience and Vulnerability”;
Mount Sinai Hospital Academic Day: “When Disasters Strike” what to do;
Canadian National Refugee Health Conference;
A four-day training for Clinicians at Winnipeg Mount Carmel;
“Cultural Psychiatry Day“ at the Toronto Western Hospital (A multi site video conference
jointly with Montreal Jewish General Hospital presented by Health and Legal Committee;
The certificate course between CCVT and York University on “Forced Migration and
Refugee Issues” ran successfully for the third consecutive year.
CCVT Health committee member Dr. C. Paine and CCVT Program Manager Teresa Dremetsikas
at the four-day training for clinicians in Winnipeg.
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ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Settlement Program Report
The Settlement Program at the Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
(CCVT) continues to play a critical role in the adjustment of newcomer
survivors fleeing war and torture. Applying CCVT’s innovative delivery
approach, the Centre’s trauma counselors provide unique services to meet
the needs of this unique community.
The network of physicians, consultants, lawyers and the use of an applied
crisis intervention model, serve as benchmarks of supportive one-on-one
counseling, referral, intervention, information dissemination and support
groups. The caliber of CCVT’s work is evidenced in the number of clients
served this year.
Huda Bukhari
Settlement Program Manager
The downtown office, to date, has provided services to 1,575 new clients,
including 365 children and youth, 733 women and 477 men. The
Scarborough branch served a total of 865 new clients including 295
children and youth, 362 women and 208 men.
The value of services provided is made possible by the staff in both
branches. For instance, trauma counselors provide service in over 17
languages, which enables the Centre to reach a large number of clients.
The languages assist in the progression of the settlement and adjustment
process of clients upon arrival to Canada.
In addition to service provision, staff also attended and participated in
several training sessions/certificate programs to enhance their skills. These
include:
York University’s Forced Migration Issues certificate Program;
CCVT supervision of 3 university graduate students from the University
of Toronto’s Faculties of Social Work, Medicine and Law;
Staff facilitation of 2 ½ day information sessions to sector peers in the
field of assisting children/youth regarding mental health issues;
Training on Cultural Approaches to Trauma Counseling;
Trauma Counseling Skills training by CCVT affiliated psychiatrists to all
Thilaga Jeganathan
staff;
Settlement Coordinator
Facilitating 2 workshops on Support Groups and Trauma/War Victims
(Scarborough)
at the OCASI Conference Understanding and Responding to Woman
Abuse in Immigrant and Refugee Communities: eLearning for Settlement Workers;
Developing Logic Model - United Way;
CPR training;
Relaxation Techniques, provided by Mt. Sinai Hospital Psychiatrist;
Attendance of OCASI Professional Conference and ISAP Conference;
Training in Humanitarian and Compassionate Cases;
Professional Development Session: Conflict and its Resolution taught by University of
Toronto’s Training for Field Instructors;
Workshop on Cultural Psychiatry at the Toronto West Hospital;
Workshop – International Legal Instruments and Remedies Against Torture;
Families/Children Affected by War Presentation.
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ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Settlement Program Report
(continued)
Examples of the several orientation and information sessions presented to clients include:
CCVT Services;
Ontario Works;
Immigration issues;
Housing issues;
CCVT LGBTQ services;
Rights of Old Age Security Recipients;
Income Tax;
Landlord & tenant rights and responsibilities;
Integration & settlement;
Driver's License;
ODSP Financial & Employment;
Employment: Resume Writing;
Relaxation Techniques;
Stress Management;
HIV Prevention;
Recreational Activities;
Diabetes;
H1N1;
TTC, Shopping, Healthy Foods;
Torture & Crimes Against Humanity;
Sponsorship Issues I, II, III.
Saturday Cooking Class
16
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Child and Youth Program Report
The Child and Youth program has continued to enhance its services to
assist the increasing number of children and youth who have experienced
the trauma of torture and/or war. Over the past year, the program has
provided these clients with information and referrals to medical
professionals for specialized treatment and documentation, social and
recreational activities, individual and family counseling, informational and
social groups, tutoring, befriending, advocacy, and many other activities.
The Child and Youth program staff served 366 new children and youth
clients at the downtown office and 295 at the Scarborough office. The
following services were provided:
Homework Club/School Support Program
Mbalu Wembo
Child and Youth Program
Counsellor
Aislinn Clancy
Child and Youth Program
Counsellor/Coordinator
CCVT’s Child and Youth program recognizes that many children and youth
who come from newcomer families sometimes experience difficulty in the
school system because of language, and other barriers. As a result, CCVT
continues to be committed to ensuring that these children and youth receive
after school academic assistance, so that they can achieve their full
potential within the Canadian educational system. Approximately 216 school
support sessions, three days a week, were held for children ranging in ages
from 5-18 years old. Approximately 50 children and youth from both
locations were tutored by staff, and volunteers, many of whom were
university students and professional teachers. Overall, the children and
youth were quite happy with the homework club, many of them saying that it
was “very fun”, and that they found the volunteers to be “very helpful, nice,
funny and interesting”. One child said “you learn something new when you
come here”. Another child said “I learned how to be more responsible for my
homework”. Parents also seemed quite satisfied with the homework club,
as many noted academic improvements in their children, as well as
improvements in their children’s mood and ability to socialize. Some
comments that parents shared included “My child feels happy”, “My child
does homework without postponing”, and “My child is very friendly with other
kids”. Volunteers also remarked that they felt that they had built meaningful
relationships with many students, that the homework club was engaging,
and that it was a great way for children to get assistance with their
homework and to have fun socializing with one another.
Story-time for Immigrant Families
In partnership with the Toronto Public Library, CCVT held a story-time program one day a week for 7
weeks for caregivers and their children under the age of 7. At the program, a librarian from the Toronto
Public Library provided babies and children with age appropriate learning, including story-telling, songs,
rhymes and finger plays. This program was intended to provide some of CCVT’s youngest clients with
fun and engaging learning activities that could help to stimulate their young minds.
Summer Quest Program
Every summer, CCVT’s children and youth clients are provided with the opportunity to access free
17
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Child and Youth Program Report
(continued)
recreational activities across the city of Toronto, and last year was no exception. Many newcomer
families do not have the financial resources to explore all the wonderful attractions that Toronto has to
offer. CCVT, therefore, removes these barriers through the “Summer Quest” program. This year the
Centre made it possible for children and their parents to participate in educational and entertaining trips
to the Toronto Botanical Gardens, the Ontario Science Centre, the Toronto Zoo, and Toronto Island. The
children highly enjoyed these activities, and parents felt empowered and satisfied that they played some
part in making these fun trips accessible for their children. CCVT’s child and youth clients also enjoyed
movie nights at the theatre, outdoor picnics and sports, a canoeing event at Toronto Harbourfront, and a
trip to Georgian Bay. These trips allowed newcomer youth to practice their English speaking skills,
create friendships with other youth, and build self confidence.
Youth
CCVT remains committed to meeting the needs of youth who have experienced war and/or torture,
especially those who are living in Canada by themselves and lack the social support of friends and
families. To address their needs and concerns, CCVT has provided numerous opportunities for youth to
engage in fun activities, especially over the winter holidays and March Break. Some of these activities
are movie nights, and skating at Nathan Phillips Square—a sport that is novel to the majority of the
newcomer youth clients. These events, along with the volunteer befriending program, have allowed
many of our youth clients to begin socializing with their peers, and built useful social networks.
Furthermore, CCVT recognizes that many youth are in need of specialized academic support to finish
their high-school diplomas and write college entry tests. Therefore the Child and Youth program works
collaboratively with the volunteer program at CCVT to ensure that youth are appropriately matched with
tutors who can help them succeed within the educational system in Canada. Finally, CCVT has also
provided numerous information sessions to help newcomer youth navigate Canadian society, including
sessions about job search skills, driver’s license information, volunteering information, and other topics
relevant to youth.
Detention Centre Program
CCVT has continued to provide support for children and youth who were born to parents who have
experienced war and/or torture and are currently being held in immigration detention centers. These
children and youth often experience a tremendous amount of stress associated with having to live in a
detention centre. In order to assist these clients, CCVT staff provided programs at the detention centre
once a week for 3 hours. This purpose was to provide opportunities for children to be active, release
some stress and build relationships. It included games, songs, arts and crafts, and outdoor play. Since
April 2009, 59 sessions have been held at the detention centre to children and youth ranging from age 2
to 15. Most of the children served at the centre are Canadians, born to parents of Caribbean or Latin
American descent. Some of the children also originally from countries such as Costa Rica, Colombia,
Hungary, St. Vincent and Mexico.
Outreach and collaboration
The Child and Youth program has also continued to build partnerships with the larger community to
engage in meaningful outreach. CCVT has successfully done outreach and created formal and informal
partnerships with many local organizations and agencies serving children and youth, such as Covenant
House, Toronto Public libraries, local elementary schools and high-schools, Tropicana Community
Services, among others.
18
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Child and Youth Report
(continued)
Overall, the Child and Youth program had a fruitful year in providing individual and group services to
families and youth who were in need of a wide variety of assistance. The program expects that its
relationship with children, youth and families will continue to strengthen, and that it will continue to play a
role in empowering clients while they successfully integrate into Canadian society.
Child and Youth Summer Quest Program
19
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Local Immigration Partnership
Report
The Local Immigration Partnership (LIP) is a program that was developed
by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) in partnership with the
Ontario Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration (MCI) to strengthen the role
of local neighbourhoods in serving and integrating immigrants. The LIP
program aims to provide a collaborative space for the development and
implementation of sustainable local and regional solutions for the
successful integration of immigrants in Toronto.
Ermelina Balla
LIP Program Manager
The Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture is the lead agency that has
assumed the responsibility to coordinate and advance the Local
Immigration Partnership in the East Downtown Toronto area. The East
Downtown Toronto LIP has grouped the main areas of need into five
planning tables: Immigration & Settlement, Health/Mental Health, Housing,
Social & Cultural Inclusion and Employment, Training & Language.
The objectives of the East Downtown Toronto LIP are as follows:
Improve access and coordination of immigrant integration services (settlement, language
training, labour market integration, health, and education support) in the community through
the establishment of a partnership council;
Enhance coordination of service delivery to newcomers residing in East Toronto, so that
programs complement and build towards a common goal of settlement and integration;
Build a community of practice that shares lessons learned from each partner and from
resident newcomers;
Strengthen local awareness and capacity to integrate immigrants through the engagement
of a broad range of local stakeholders and residents in the development of a settlement
strategy;
Help members develop best practices and create a forum for learning and sharing.
The East Downtown Toronto LIP received funding to begin their work in East Downtown Toronto in
November 2009. We are pleased to announce that over 54 local organizations have joined this
partnership since then, and they have consistently participated in our meetings to discuss ways to better
serve and integrate newcomers into Canadian society.
During the fiscal year of 2009 - 2010 the East Downtown Toronto Local Immigration Partnership has
successfully conducted the following activities:
Established the Partnership Council with over 54 organizations from many sectors, including
immigrant service providers, youth, women and seniors services, employment, health,
government and educational institutions;
All the planning tables and Steering Committee have developed their terms of reference;
Planning tables have met on a monthly basis to explore the needs and the gaps in service
delivery, and enhance collaboration among agencies;
20
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Local Immigration Partnership Report
(continued)
Conducted an environmental scan for the East Downtown Toronto area that included a
literature review, statistical data, labour market research on newcomers, and how they
select the services offered.
Conducted 7 focus groups with approximately 118 newcomers: men, women, seniors,
youth, LGBTQ, Francophone, and newcomers living with HIV/AIDS. In addition, interviews
were held with precarious status newcomers, employers, while a survey was completed by
service providers in the neighbourhood. A needs assessment report was also produced
based on all the findings.
The “East Downtown Toronto Community Voices” a monthly newsletter, provides news on the activities
and the achievements of the LIP and partner agencies. The following are some of the actions of the
East Downtown Toronto LIP:
Developed a local settlement strategy for the East Downtown Toronto area that focuses on
improvements in accessing and coordinating services that facilitate immigrant settlement
and integration, while strengthening local awareness and capacity for integration;
Developed an action plan to implement our local strategy;
Two community consultations were held, where over 100 representatives from service
providers, government, and educational institutions, participated in reviewing the proposed
Settlement Strategy and Action Plan.
The LIP program has created a platform where issues affecting settlement and immigration are
discussed and shared. Multiple stakeholders are also included in planning and coordinating service
delivery for newcomers in the East Downtown Toronto area, in order to improve the immigration
outcome for immigrants as well as Toronto as a whole. At the same time, CCVT`s visibility has highly
increased among service providers and newcomers through the LIP program.
LIP members attend a Community Strategy Consultation
21
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Volunteer Program Report
The CCVT Volunteer Program went through a major change in 2009-2010.
Thanks to generous support from the Trillium Foundation, we welcomed
two new Volunteer Coordinators to our program. Their efforts are reflected
in the increase number of new volunteers, additional volunteer workshops,
and new social events such as the Cultural Café. Not only were we able to
increase the volunteer base, we succeeded to solidify our community
based programs, providing more opportunities for survivors to interact with
the general public.
Here are some highlights from volunteer activities:
Training/ Workshops
Initial training for new volunteers: Between April 2009 and March 2010,
nine orientation sessions were held for 140 new volunteers recruited for
the program;
The opening of the new volunteer program is one of the highlights of
the
Scarborough branch. A total of 132 volunteers were registered and
Chizuru Nobe Ghelani
about
30 were actively involved in assisting in the homework program, in
Volunteer Services Manager
the English conversation circle, in teaching computer literacy, interpreting
and in one on one tutoring;
Volunteer meetings on relevant topics including: Canadian Refugee Determination System,
Bosnian Genocide, overcoming trauma, torture and war through community collaboration
and communications, Khomeini & Crime Against Humanity, Ogaden people in Ethiopia,
Homework Club Workshop & the Singh decision
Volunteer-led Program
56 Befriending matches arranged;
90 ESL students were matched with tutors;
Approximately 250 cases assisted through interpretation/ escorting program. Our volunteers
speak more than 60 languages altogether;
Eight-week tax clinic sessions attended by a total of 165 clients both in the downtown and
Scarborough offices;
Five English Conversation Circles held on a weekly basis at both CCVT locations providing
opportunities to practice speaking skills in a fun, safe environment;
The weekly Homework Club for elementary and high school students both in downtown and
Scarborough office.
Social Events
Refugee Rights Day events held in the week of March 30th and April 6th, 2009;
World Refugee Day celebrations held at the Queen’s Park on June 20th, 2009;
A film screening Teza was organized at the Royal Cinema for the United Nations
International Day in Support of Victims of Torture on June 25th, 2009;
The Annual Picnic at High Park on August 16, 2009;
The seventh annual First Light Celebration & CCVT Award Ceremony held at 1 King West
Suite on November 13, 2009
Annual General Meeting and Holiday Party held at the Bickford Centre on December 13,
2009.
22
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Volunteer Program Report
(continued)
The very first Cultural Café, which was attended by more than 20 clients, volunteers and
staff members, was organized on January 14th, 2010.
Volunteer Appreciation event was organized on March 24th, 2010. It was attended by more
than 40 volunteers, clients and staff members.
As this report makes clear, CCVT volunteers continue to touch survivors’ lives with gentle souls. As my
time at CCVT comes to end, I am reminded of the importance of community efforts in tackling the issue
of torture. Volunteers have played a critical role in meeting our mandate for many years and will
continue to do so in years to come.
Volunteer Appreciation Event
23
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Language Instruction and Skills Training Report
For the past 20 years, the CCVT English Language and Skills Training
program has been a key component in the recovery and successful
rehabilitation of survivors of torture and organized violence.
In
collaboration with the many services at CCVT and the community, the
English as a Second Language (ESL) and Skills Training program enables
and supports survivors in the process of successful integration into
Canadian society, and promotes hope after the horror.
Nurturing
Elena Solokhina
Computer Instructor
The ESL/LINC and Computer instruction courses at CCVT are specifically
adapted to the learning abilities and needs of our survivors, at the same
time designed to improve language proficiency and skills development. It
nurtures the individual and caters to the needs of adult learners who suffer
from debilitating imprints that make the learning process more strenuous.
The program is delivered by highly qualified and specially trained teachers
using a curriculum that is adapted to help students acquire skills related to
their immediate and long term life goals. The classroom atmosphere and
supportive environment provides clients with encouragement, hope,
community, social inclusiveness and the tools they need to progress with
their language and social skills.
CCVT has met the challenge of teaching ESL, Skills Training and
resettlement issues by creating a “safe haven”, where clients feel a sense
of acceptance and have the ability to access multiple services in one place.
Fostering Interpersonal Connections
Abdul Abubaker
LINC/ESL Coordinator
A feature of CCVT’s ESL/LINC Program is to foster interpersonal ties as an
objective in itself , and as a mediating link between survivors and the host
community. Clients attend LINC, ESL and Skills Training programs not only
to learn English, but to socialize with people of similar experiences and
backgrounds. They come to the CCVT “family” , where they know they are
accepted. Many of the ESL clients are seniors who socialize with their
classmates. This interaction plays into breaking their isolation and fosters
an interaction with our younger clients.
The Classroom
Involvement in ESL/LINC Skills Training programs gives our clients the opportunity to access trained
settlement staff, which provides other settlement needs and services. You can see the effort put into
language instruction at CCVT. It is not an ordinary class or learning environment but a unique and
specialized classroom for people who are torture survivors and suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress
Disorder.
Class levels available to our clients range from Low Beginner to Advanced. Every year CCVT provides
language training for approximately 300 clients from 78 countries. Clients stay in the English language
programs for an average of 3 to 18 months, moving through language proficiency levels at their own
pace. Classes are provided solely on site at CCVT so that clients and teaching staff will have access
to counselors to resolve sudden traumatic episodes.
24
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Language and Skills Training Report
(continued)
Funding
The ESL/LINC program is funded in part by the Federal
Government’s Language Instruction for Newcomers to
Canada (LINC) project, and the Toronto District School
Board, and through fundraising efforts.
CCVT Language Instruction
We are constantly seeking for ways to improve our programs
through collaborative work with instructors, counselors, the
CCVT computer and secretarial program, volunteers, and
partner agencies in Europe. The CCVT language program
Secretarial Course Graduates, May 2010
has accumulated significant expertise in delivering services
to traumatized immigrant and refugee learners, and in
providing workshops and seminars for ESL and educational professionals. CCVT has already developed
its reputation as an active and leading organization that can provide curriculum and delivery practice as
well as professional insight into newcomer and refugee learner issues.
Tutoring, Conversation Circles and Befriending
In cooperation with the volunteer program the English tutoring and befriending programs have been
enhanced to include a significant number of students. Two conversation circles have also been
introduced and facilitated by volunteers to assist low beginner and intermediate level students in their
communication skills. We now have a successful Computer Assisted English Language program that
benefits our students tremendously.
Secretarial Course and Computer Training Program
The new skills gained in these courses can help clients to be educated and equipped in using new
technology and find employment. To aid in this endeavor, a new secretarial course was successfully
started at CCVT this year. The first group of students graduated in June and the second session has
started. Of the 15 computer instruction students, 8 were female and 7 male.
The Computer Program provided basic and advanced instruction in MS Office, the internet, and e-mail.
In total there we have had 34 Computer Program students, 20 female, 14 male.
Success and Recovery
The CCVT Language Instruction and Skills Training Program continues to be a critical component of a
successful recovery program for clients. The English and Skills Training programs at CCVT have
become a source of strength and support that helps our clients resume their lives with independence,
confidence and dignity.
25
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
CCVT Programs
within a context of community
understanding of global issues.
The
“CCVT Newsletter” is sent to all volunteers
each month, which provides information on
CCVT events, volunteer opportunities and
job postings. A volunteer guide has also
been prepared.
Mental Health: mutual support groups,
crisis intervention, individual and group
therapy, coordinated professional
services including legal, medical and
social care which provide treatment,
documentation and legal support. The use
of group therapy assists survivors in
learning to cope with the torture
experience and transforms it into one that
is understood and objectified.
Public Education: responds to numerous
requests for information, assistance and
consultations on torture and the effects of
torture as well as regularly producing
resource materials. CCVT’s semi-annual
publication “First Light”, is produced which
discusses issues related to the CCVT's
mandate and ongoing work.
Settlement Services: employment,
housing, language, skills training, social
assistance, applications for family
reunification, sponsorships, orientations
based on the client’s needs are provided to
assist in settlement, Volunteers also
facilitate the settlement process by
providing interpretation, escorting,
Befriending and English tutoring.
Language Instruction and Computer
Training: English as a Second Language
courses which are specifically designed to
meet the needs of survivors and include a
strong life skills component.
Classes
include all levels of literacy: beginners,
intermediate and advanced. Computer
courses in Microsoft Office and Windows
are provided at introductory and
intermediate levels.
Children & Youth Program: individual
and family counseling, specialized
settlement services for children, crisis
intervention, homework club, support
groups for children, youth and parents,
recreational and empowerment activities
that incorporate conflict resolution,
mentoring, peer support and story-telling.
International Projects:
CCVT is
associated with a coalition of Centres
which support victims of organized
violence, repression and torture, in exile or
in their own countries
Volunteer Program: a Befriending
Program that assists survivors in
rebuilding their connections to others as
well as to the greater community; an
ESL Tutoring Program to help
students learn and practice their
English; Escorting and Interpreting for
survivors at different appointments
(medical, legal, social) More than 200
volunteers assist in all programs of the
CCVT and hold monthly meetings, usually
with a guest speaker. A structured
orientation program prepares volunteer
befrienders to work with torture survivors
26
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Financial Report
Consolidated Schedule of Operations
Year Ended March 31, 2010
Revenues
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
- ISAP
2010
2009
1,189,303
982,606
323,180
319,246
255,390
164,617
232,542
232,542
22,500
30,000
23,410
22,950
80,794
96,116
23,311
23,311
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
- LINC
Donation/Fundraising
United Way
United Nations
City of Toronto
Ministry of Citizenship
− NSP
Ministry of Citizenship
− Pay equity
Interest and sundry income
7,180
Honorarium
300
4,663
Foreign Exchange gain
32,533
Total Revenues
2,245,203
1,915,764
2,169,035
1,890,418
76,168
25,346
Total Expenses
Excess of Revenues
Over Expenses
27
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Financial Report (continued)
Consolidated Schedule of Operations
Year Ended March 31, 2010
Expenses
Wages and benefits
Exchange Loss
Fundraising Expenses
Program supplies and expenses
Stationary & admin supplies
Rent and Common Expenses
Travelling - Participants
Conferences and Meetings
Telephone
Maintenance and cleaning
Bookkeeping
Resource production
Mortgage interest
Utilities
Postage and courier
Insurance
Printing and photocopying
Interest and bank charges
Professional fees
Equipment rental/repair
Development and travel
Dues and fees
Publicity
Amortization
Funded Capital Purchases
Volunteer support
TOTAL EXPENSES:
2010
1,537,107
18,390
73,815
117,447
17,207
89,675
17,851
20,833
28,714
38,626
35,840
15,622
22,521
5,724
7,198
10,935
7,196
6,094
9,889
7,759
3,535
5,421
27,290
44,343
4,305
2,169,035
28
2009
1,394,149
55,891
101,694
23,986
51,909
49,641
21,476
19,666
22,748
30,108
2,000
5,455
11,029
6,985
9,871
7,641
(829)
5,417
11,383
11,790
2,235
2,387
23,147
17,870
2,769
1,890,418
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Board of Directors
Prof. Susan McGrath
Associate Professor,
Faculty of Social Work, York University.
Director of the Centre for Refugee Studies
Chair of the Board
Helen Gateri
Counselor, Women’s Health in
Women’s Hands
Member, Health Committee
Jasmine Artis
Manager, Employment Services
Operation Springboard
Vice Chair or the Board
Dr. Marlinda Freire
Psychiatrist, Hospital for Sick Children,
Assistant Professor, Faculty of
Medicine, Department of Psychiatry
University of Toronto
Chair, Health Committee
Richard Wazana
Immigration Lawyer
Secretary, & Member, Legal Committee
Renee Ferguson
Social Worker/Client Care Coordinator
Access Alliance Multicultural Health
and Community Services
Member, Personnel Committee
Blas Austria
Director of Finance
Working Women Community Centre
Treasurer
Shannon Ryan
Executive Director, The Black Coalition for
AIDS Prevention
Chair, Volunteer Committee
Regine King
Doctoral Candidate
Co-Chair, Public Education Committee
Aberra Mekonnen
Executive Director, Oromo Canadian
Community Association of GTA
Member, Personnel Committee
Malene Gallyot
Community Activist
Member at large
Dr. Reza Berahani
Professor of Literature, University or
Toronto
Member at large
Mohan Doss
HR Consultant
Member, Personnel Committee
29
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Health Network Members
Psychiatrists,
Psychologists
Other
Specialists
Dr. F. Allodi
Dr. L. Andermann
Dr. R. Berdichevsky
Dr. G. Devins
Dr. M. Freire
Dr. X. Fornazzari
Dr. M. Gholamain
Dr. O. Gozlan
Dr. S. A. Hassan
Dr. T. Lo
Dr. R. Meier
Dr. A. Munshi
Dr. C. Pain
Dr. D. Payne
Dr. J. Pilowsky
Dr. R. Ruskin
Dr. J. Santa Barbara
Dr. R. Stall
Dr. P. Stewart
Dr. D. Stein
Family
Doctors and
General
Practitioners
Dr. A. Banerji, Pediatrician
Dr. C. Degani, General Surgeon
Dr. S. Sliwin, Plastic Surgeon
Dr. M. Ryhanian, Dentist
Dr. P. Wade, Hearing Specialist
30
Dr. E. Alemayehoo
Dr. J. Blakeney
Dr. P. Berger
Dr. W. Block
Dr. N. Degani
Dr. H. Getu
Dr. W. Black
Dr. M. del Junco
Dr. S. Gazeley
Dr. T. Kiran
Dr. K. Ruleau
Dr. M. Goodman
Dr. J. Irazusta
Dr. R. Klein
Dr. J. Rackal
Dr. M. Rashid
Dr. L. Richmond
Dr. A. Stern
Dr. J. Sugiyama
Dr. A. Vaezi
Dr. J. Weinstein
Dr. M. Wiebe
Dr. L. Mascarenhas
Dr. T. Pell
Dr. T. Pham
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Legal Network Members
Aida P. Abraha
Michael F.Battista
Robert Blanshay
Raoul Boulakia
Michael Brodzky
Andrew Brouwer
Larry Butkowsky
David Buzaglo
Hilary Evans Cameron
Michael Campell
Juan F. Carranza
Tollis Chan
Laurence Cohen
Susan deLint
Daniel. H. Dagago
Chantal Desloges
Esther Dressler
Marshall Drukarsh
Ralph Dzegniuk
Lorne A. Faratovitch
Joseph S. Farkas
Daniel M. Fine
Jeffrey Goldman
Mendel Green
Stephen Green
Evan Green
Shoshana Green
John Grice
Isak Grushka
John M. Guoba
Peter E. Haber
Marchand Hagan
Kenneth N. Hagan
Toba Hamersted
Marc Herman
Rita Hisar
Barbara Jackman
Ravi Jain
Anthony Kako
El Farouk Khaki
Catherine Kerr
Mitchell E. Korman
Michael Korman
Benjamin A. Kranc
Marianne P. Kroes
Peter J. Kroshak
Daniel Kwong
Douglas Lehrer
Cynthia Mancia
Harry Mann
Harvey S. Margel
Jack Martin
Lisa McCullough
Adam Mclver
Kevin McTavish
Jegan N. Mohan
31
Melissa Melvin
Dr. Randal Montgomery
David Nakelsky
David Orman
Norris J. Ormston
Pamila B. Pohani
Joel Rosen
Lisa Rosenblatt
Roger Rowe
Geraldine Sadoway
Geary B. Shorser
Maureen Silcoff
Donald C.Simmons
Belva Spiel
William A. Sullivan
Leonard Susman
Byron J. M. Thomas
Helen Trentos
Helen Turner
Paul Vandervennen
Richard Wazana
Patricia Wong
Ian Wong
Rodney L. H. Woolf
Susan J. Woolner
Peter J. Wuebbolt
David P. Yerzy
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Partnering Organizations
Abaasarusi Missionary Church
Access Alliance Multicultural Community Health
Centre
ACCESS Employment Centre
Accessible Community Counselling and
Employment Services
Across Boundaries
Adam's House
Adelaide Resource Centre for Women
Afghan Association of Ontario
Afghan Women's Counselling & Integration
Community Support Organization
Afghan Women's Organization
African Community Services of Peel
Africans in Partnership Against Aids
Albanian Community
Albert Campbell Public Library
Applegrove Community Centre
Arab Community Centre of Toronto
Auberge Francophone
Barbara Schlifer Commemorative Clinic
Berhan Semai-Pastor Onatan
Bickford Centre - TDSB
Birkdale Women's Shelter
Bloor Information & Life Skills Centre
Brampton African Community Services
Canadian Arab Federation
Canadian Centre for International Justice
Canadian Council for Refugees
Canadian Red Cross
Canadian Tamil Youth Development Centre
Canoraaa (Centre Francophones des jeunes de
Toronto)
CAS North York
Casa de las Americas
Catholic Community Services of York Region
Catholic Cross Cultural Services
Catholic Immigration Centre
Cedrabrae Library
Centre for Ethics
Centre for Information & Community Services of
Ontario
Centre for Spanish Speaking Peoples
Centre Francophone du Toronto Metropolitan
Centre Medico-Social Communautaire
Charity Village - COSTI Branch
Chinese Family Services of Ontario
Christie Refugee Welcome Centre
32
City Adult Learning Centre (CALC)
Community Microskills Development Centre
Community Resources Connections of
Toronto
Cornwall & District Immigrant Service
Corvette Family Resource Centre
COSTI
Council of Agencies Serving South Asians
(CASSA)
Covenant House
Culture Link
Davenport-Perth Neighbourhood Centre
Dixie-Bloor Neighbourhood
Downsview Family Health Centre
Dr. Roz's Healing Place
East End Community Health Centre
East Metro Youth ServiceEast Scarborough
Boys and Girls Club
East Scarborough Community Festival
Market
Eglinton - Kennedy Public Library
Eritrea Canadian Association of Ontario
Eritrean Canadian Community Centre of
Metropolitan Toronto
Ethiopian Association in Toronto
Family Residence - Lido Motel
Family Service Association in Scarborough
FCJ Hamilton House Refugee Project
Fife House Foundation
Flemingdon Neighbourhood Services
Frontline Youth Network
Goodwill Employment Centre
Hamilton Urban Core Community Health
Centre
Highbrook Learning centre
Hong Fook Mental Health Association
Humber River Regional Hospital
Inter-Cultural Neighbourhood Social Services
International Charity Association Network
(ICAN)
Iranian Canadian Newcomer Association
Islamic Community of Afghans in Canada
Islamic Social Services & Resources
Association
Jane Alliance Neighbourhood Services
Jewish Vocational Services
Job Start (Formerly C.A.W.L)
Jones Avenue School - TDSB
JVS Toronto
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Partnering Organizations
(continued)
Kensington Bellwood Community Legal Services
LAMP Ask Community Health Centre
Latino-Canadian Community Association of
Scarborough
Lawrence Heights Community Health Centre
Le Regoupement des Femmes Immigrantes
Francophone
Legal Aid Ontario
Madina Mosque
Malton Neighbourhood
Mathew House
Maytree Foundation
Mennonite New Life Centre of Toronto
MIDAYNTA Association of Somali Service
Agencies
Mount Sinai Hospital
Mujer
Multi-Cultural Inter-Agency Group of Peel
Neighbourhood Legal Services
New Experiences for Refugee Women
Newcomer Women's Services Toronto
North American Muslim Foundation
North York Community House
OASIS Centre des Femmes
Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants
ODSP - Scarborough
Omar Bin Khattab Mosque
Ontario Works Offices
ON-TRACK for Women
Oromo Canadian Community Association of GTA
Operation Springboard
Parkdale Community Information Centre
Parkdale Community Legal Services
Policultural Immigrant Community Services
Polycultural LINC Program
Red Cross
Regent Park Community Health Centre
Reh'ma
Rexdale Women's Centre
Riverdale Immigrant Women’s Centre
Romero House
Salahedin Islamic Centre
San Lorenzo Latin American Community Centre
Scarborough Community Residential Area
Scarborough East Ontario Early Years Centre
Scarborough Community Residential Area
Scarborough Goodwill
Scarborough Housing Help Centre
33
Scarborough Village
Second Base Youth Shelter
Settlement and Integration Services
Organization
Shelton Institute for Mental Health
Sick Kids Hospital
Sistering
Skills for Change
Sojourn House
Somali Canadian Association of Etobicoke
Somali Immigrant Aid Organization
Somaliland Canadian Society
South Asian Family Support Services
St. Christopher House
St. James Town Library
St. Joseph Immigrant Women's Centre
St. Michael's Hospital
St. Paul Trinity Church
St. Stephen's Community House
Storefront
Sudanese Settlement Community
Tamil Eelam Society of Canada
Toronto District School Board (TDSB)
Thorncliffe Neighbourhood Services
Toronto Chinese Community Services
Association
Toronto Hostel Services Unit, Family
Residence
Toronto Public Health
Tropicana Community Services Organization
Vision Africana 2000
War Child Canada
Warden Woods Community Centre
West Hill Community Services - Family Resource Centre
West Scarborough Legal Services
West Scarborough Neighbourhood Centre
West Way Medical Clinic
Women's College Women's Health in
Women's Hands
Woodgreen Community Centre of Toronto
Working Skills Centre
Working Women Community Centre
YWCA of Greater Toronto
YWCA Family & Social Services
YMCA LINC Assessment Centre
Yonge Street Mission
Young Diplomats
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
CCVT Staff
Mulugeta Abai
Executive Director
Ezat Mossallanejad
Policy Analyst/
Researcher/Settlement/
Trauma Counsellor
Teresa Dremetsikas
Program Manager
* Chizuru Nobe
Ghelani
Manager,
Volunteer Services
Thilaga Jeganathan
Settlement
Coordinator/ Trauma
Counsellor
Scarborough
Huda Bukhari
Settlement
Program Manager
Abdurahman
Abubakar
LINC/ESL
Coordinator
Aislinn Clancy
Child & Youth
Coordinator/
Counsellor
Mbalu Wembo
Child/Youth
Program Counsellor
Delfina
Vega de Paiz
Administrative
Assistant/ Office
Coordinator
Mohamed Rabi Amed
Settlement/ Trauma
Counsellor
Jackie Gakumba
Settlement/Trauma
Counsellor
Selamawit
Yohannes
Settlement/Trauma
Counsellor
Gabriela Agatiello
Settlement/Trauma
Counsellor
Ermelina Balla
LIP Program Manager
34
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Malini
Pararajasingham
Settlement/Trauma
Counsellor
Scarborough
Michelle
Emamnazar
Settlement /Trauma
Counsellor
Scarborough
**Viola Byegeka
Settlement&
Community Outreach
Facilitator
**Tigist BekeleMekonnen
Administrative
Assistant
Juliette Ntege
Administrative
Assistant
Scarborough
Dave Burt
LINC Instructor
Catherine Raine
LINC Instructor
*Jane Desmond
LINC Instructor
Terri Iwaskow
LINC Instructor
Elena Solokhina
Computer Instructor
**Hodan Yusuf
Volunteer
Coordinator
Scarborough
*Hillary Blumfald
Volunteer
Coordinator
*Marcia Casado
LINC Teacher
Assistant
Elizabeth Jones
ESL Instructor
Toronto Board of
Education
Susanna Cluer
ESL Instructor
Toronto Board of
Education
Sarah Al-Tekreeti
Settlement/Trauma
Counsellor
Hanan Harb
LIP Outreach
Coordinator
Tanya Mouland
LINC Supply
Instructor
35
* resigned
** end of contract
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
CCVT Survivors
Figure 1. New Clients by Country with Convention Refugee or
Landed Immigrants Status: April 2009 - March 2010
Total Clients: 1240
Countries: 48
Child/Youth
Country
Female: 545
Male: 301
Adult
Children/Youth: 394
Child/Youth
F
19
M
27
F
20
M
19
Total
Country
Afghanistan
85
Kenya
Albania
2
2
22
12
38
Angola
0
3
0
0
Argentina
0
0
1
Bangladesh
1
0
Burundi
0
Cameroon
Adult
F
M
F
M
Total
Kosovo
1
0
2
4
0
8
2
1
5
13
3
Kyrgyzstan
0
0
2
0
2
0
1
Liberia
0
0
0
1
1
5
0
6
Libya
0
0
2
0
2
4
18
12
34
Malaysia
0
0
1
0
1
5
10
7
1
23
Mali
0
0
2
0
2
China
0
1
11
0
12
Mauritania
0
0
0
1
1
Colombia
8
3
13
8
32
Mexico
1
1
2
2
6
Congo D, R.
25
17
34
25
101
Nigeria
0
4
2
2
8
Dominican
Rep.
0
0
1
0
1
Pakistan
2
6
18
7
33
El Salvador
0
0
2
2
4
Peru
0
0
0
1
1
Ecuador
0
0
1
0
1
Philippines
1
1
3
0
5
Eritrea
16
28
78
43
165
Russia
0
0
1
0
1
Ethiopia
15
27
61
33
136
Rwanda
11
4
22
10
47
France
0
0
1
0
1
Somalia
13
3
16
6
38
Ghana
0
0
1
1
2
Sri Lanka
25
19
122
56
222
Guinea
0
1
1
1
3
St. Vincent
0
1
1
0
2
Haiti
10
7
10
7
34
Sudan
0
1
0
3
4
India
0
0
4
2
6
Togo
0
1
1
1
3
Iran
0
0
1
0
1
Turkey
0
0
1
1
2
Iraq
21
29
36
29
115
Uganda
1
0
2
7
10
Ivory Coast
4
2
6
5
17
Ukraine
0
0
1
0
1
Jamaica
1
0
0
0
1
Zimbabwe
0
1
4
0
5
Jordan
0
3
0
0
3
TOTAL 182 212 545 301
36
1240
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
CCVT Survivors
Figure 2. Total Number of Clients with Citizenship
or Refugee Claimant Status
April 2009 - March 2010
Total Clients: 1178 Countries: 58 Female: 537 Male: 346 Children/Youth: 267 LGBT: 28
Child/Youth
Country
Afghanistan
Albania
Angola
Antigua
Bangladesh
Bolivia
Burma
Burundi
Cameroon
Canada
Colombia
Congo D..R
Czech Rep
Ecuador
E. Guinea
El Salvador
Eritrea
Ethiopia
Ghana
Grenada
Guatemala
Guinea
Haiti
Hungary
India
Iran
Iraq
Israel
Ivory Coast
Jamaica
F
6
3
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
13
3
0
0
0
0
2
0
3
4
0
0
0
0
M
13
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
9
2
3
0
0
0
0
8
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
0
F
13
14
0
0
5
0
0
16
7
0
16
14
0
2
2
1
84
105
0
1
3
0
4
0
0
4
0
2
0
1
Adult
Adult
Child/Youth
M LGBT Total Country
F
M
F
M LGBT Total
12
4
48
Jordan
0
0
1
1
0
2
16
5
39
Kenya
1
3
5
1
0
10
0
0
1
Kosovo
0
1
5
3
0
9
1
0
1
Lebanon
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
6
Liberia
0
1
7
0
0
8
5
0
5
Malaysia
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
Mexico
14
24
41
48
1
128
8
0
27
Mongolia
0
0
0
1
0
1
6
1
14 Montenegro 0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
9
Nepal
0
0
2
0
0
2
42
2
64
Nigeria
0
8
30
13
0
51
9
0
26
Pakistan
0
0
3
1
0
4
1
0
1
Russia
0
3
1
1
0
5
1
0
3
Rwanda
3
5
4
2
0
14
0
0
2
Serbia
0
0
0
2
0
2
3
0
4
S. Leone
8
0
5
0
0
13
44
0
149
Somalia
16
3
10
3
0
32
61
0
174 Sri Lanka 33
36 100 28
0
197
0
4
4
St. Vincent 0
0
2
0
5
7
0
0
1
Sudan
0
0
4
0
0
4
1
0
4
Swaziland
0
10
2
1
0
13
2
0
2
Syria
0
0
0
1
0
1
5
0
11
Tanzania
4
0
8
0
0
12
2
0
2
Trinidad
0
0
1
0
0
1
3
0
6
Turkey
0
0
0
1
4
5
3
0
11
Uganda
3
2
5
3
1
14
4
0
4
Uzbekistan 0
0
1
2
0
3
0
0
2
Venezuela
0
3
0
0
1
4
0
0
5
Zimbabwe
0
0
5
1
0
6
0
0
1
TOTAL
119 148 537 346
28
1178
37
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Figure 3. Referral Sources
Figure 4. Internal Referrals
38
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Figure 5. Age
Figure 6. Gender
39
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Figure 7. Marital Status
Figure 8. Client Education
40
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Individual Donors
E.Vivien Abbott
Howard B.Abrams
Carolyn Acker
Richard M.Addinall
Susana I. Agatiello
Patricia Agius
Martin S. Alford
Jeanette R Amdur
Betty Anderson
Stephen Antle
Carolyn Archibald
David Armstrong
Jasmine Artis
Blas I. Austria
Heather Barclay
Guy J.Barton
Susan M.Beattie
Morton Beiser
Raul Berdichevsky
Deborah Birkett
Brenda Bisiker
Jill E.Blakeney
Wendell Block
John Blum
Donna Bobier
Majid Boozary
Tony Boston
Raoul Boulakia
Margaret Boyce
Isabelle Bradbury
Robert Breon
Rachel C. Brown
Barbara Browne
William Bryson
Grace T. Burke
Bruce E. Burton
John Buttars
Gabriela Byron
Marco Campana
J. Douglas Campbell
Ellen K.Campbell
Brenda Cardillo
June Caskey
Ansuya Chetty
Lynne Chichakian
Yvonne Chmielewski
Jal R. Choksi
Jessica M Choo
Olivia Chow
Brendan Clancy
Elaine Clancy
Kelly Anne Clarke
William Clarke
Bruce Cockburn
Dave Collacutt
Geraldine Connelly
Heather Cooper
Debby Copes
Geraldine Connelly
Heather Cooper
Paul Copeland
Jackie Corkery
Elizabeth M.Creal
Michael Creal
Lee Creal
Wendy Crewson
Jane Cullingworth
S Laurie Curtis
Andrey V. Cybulsky
B.A. Daughtry
Andrew Daviel
Suzanna Daviel
Hans B. De Groot
Derek de Sa
Mark Brett
Kathleen Denomy
Rufus Dickinson
John B. Dillon
Donald J.Dodds
Judith Dueck
Marie Dunn
Abe Dyck
Diana Dyson
Dale V. Edwards
Douglas Eggins
Mary Elliott
Guy Ewing
Margaret W.
Feenstra
Renée Ferguson
Helke Ferrie
Patricia L.Fors
Leanna Franco
John Fraser
Marlinda Freire
Naomi Fromstein
Helen Geagan
Peter Busby
Dr.K. A. Gelmon
Haregua Getu
Shachin Ghelani
Mitra Gholamain
Alireza Gholipour
Kathleen Giffin
Richard B. Gilman
Dorothy Marie
Glover
Philip Gold
Brydon Gombay
Angela Goyeau
Carol Graham
Catherine Graham
Anna Graham
Cumming
David Gramit
Frieda Gramit
Marilyn Grant
Barrie Gray
Yvonne Greig
Douglas Gruner
Peter Hajnal
Keith Halfyard
Edward A. McGivern
Burt Slater
Sarah Hamdi
Ann Harrington
Rhoda E. Hassmann
Douglas Hay
Frances Hay
Mary Heiberg
Ida C.Henderson
Mary Hickmott
Verna Higgins
Don Hogarth
Mary Hogarth
James Ironside
Michael J. Jackson
Carol Jamieson
Thirumagal Jeganathan
Harold E. Jones
Rosi Jory
David Jory
H. Jweke
Grace Kaattari
Levonah Kalant
Linda M. Kangas
Angela King
Lucile Kitchur
Martin Klein
Margaret Knittl
Alkis Kontos
Joy S.Korman
Bhavina Lal
Harinarine Lalla
James R.Lane
Kenneth R. Langdon
Rose Lee
James R. Ledwich
Ann Ledwich
Douglas Lehrer
Carolyn Lemon
Maureen Lennon
John Liver
Ted Lo
Carol J. Lodge
Shanthy Logeswarun
Tina Lopes
Cecil A.Louis
Hayford Lumor
Barbara Lyon
Hilary A. MacKenzie
Paul MacKey
Mary I. Macrae
Julie D.Maggi
Nancy Maguire
Karen Mahoney
Lynda Maki
Alexander Malycky
Pauline Mazumdar
Louise Mauffette-Leenders
Pamela McCallum
Jean McClure
Judith McCormack
Antonette McDonald
Carolyn J. McGhee
Helen Smith
41
Rose McIntyre
Marilyn J. McKim
Catherine McNairn
Rosemary Meier
Paul Michaud
Boyan Mihaylov
Anne E. Mills
Britt Mollerstedt
Timothy W. Morgan
Thomas Morris
Raymond Morris
Anne Morris
Sanjita Nag
Helen Nation
Tania Natscheff
Philip Nayman
Charles R. Neill
Christine Nelson
Marina Nemat
Michael Nevin
Pina Nitti-Claus
Margaret G.Norman
Shathasivam Nagalingam
Michele O'Keefe
Sheila O'Reilly
E.M. Orsten
Robin Pacific
John R. Palmer
Erma L. Parker
Bill Parsons
Soheila Pashang
Donald Payne
Ezzat Pezeshkzad
Sarah Polley
Joyce Potter
Elinor Powell
Lisa S. Price
Doug & Jane Pritchard
Nicholas Pyl
Julie Rackal
Margaret Reid
Paul H. Reinhardt
Kevin Reinhardt
Franklin T Richmond
Milli Richmond
Mary Jean Riddell
Mary Robinson
Maria Romanec
Shirley Roberts
Charles & Karen
Rosenberg
Frank Rothe
Geraldine Sadoway
Julie Salveron
Catharine Saxberg
Zindel V. Segal
Mary Sehl
Rachelle Sender
Harry S. Shannon
Ann Simpson
Allan & Beverley Slater
Wayne Snell
Marianne Sutton
David T. H. Stevenson
Frances Theilade
Barbara Thomas
Honey Thomas
Katharine Mary Thompson
Harvey Thomson
Shelagh Towson
Arthur Treloar
Joyce M.Tremmel
Claire Trevena
Henry Van Essen
Kathryn Mary
VanderVennen
Richard Vernon
John Vilcu
Stephen Wadhams
Beth Wagschal
Marguerite Wales
Sylvia Walker
Ted Walker
Mary Jane Ward
Menai Wardle
Frances Warren
Marc Warshaw
William Watson
Lindsay Watson
Richard Wazana
Belva Webb
Wesley Weber
Florea Jean Westney
Martha Whelton
Christopher & Colleen
Whynot
Christoph Dietzfelbiger
Margaret Whyte
Ruth Wilkins
Sheila M. Williams
Geoffrey Williams
Julie Wolfe
Sandra Wolfe
Leib & Sheila Wolofsky
David & Linda Yake
LATE Barbara Yealland
Andrew Zarebski
Milton Zaretsky
Rick Zytaruk
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Volunteers
Aarpita Berma
Abdelaziz Thabet
Abdelkader Filali
Adeel Amir
Adele Meleca
Adil Ahmad
Adriana Szombath
Adrienne Abrahamson
Alaa El Mourad
Alaha Husseinzadah
Aldina Muslija
Alejandro Terrones
Ali Bangi
Alia Miller
Aline Kurik
Alisha Watts
Alison Hawes
Alizah Benchetrit
Ama Gyamfua
Amanda Joseph
Amanda Joseph
Amanda Sparkman
Amina Muse
Amirabas Jamshidi
Amrit Singh
Anab Mohamed
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Andrew Zarebski
Angie Ji
Anjuman Shelly
Ann Dyer
Anna Kim
Anna Murray
Anna Popovitch
Anne Piper
Anne Pringle
Anoosh Chooljian
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Banafsheh Zia
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Bonnie Kim
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Brittany Logsdon
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Changkeun Lee
Charles Kernerman
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Charles Larry Bongomin
Cindy Li
Claudia Ramirez
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Daniel Blumenfeld
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Daniel Hwang
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Denisa Balla
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Dragan Acimovic
Dwayne Coombs
Edgar Alvarado
Efrah Abdurahman
Eleanor Berenson
Ellen Dyer
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Emily Rosser
Emmanuel Frimpong
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Esther Lensink
Eun-ji Jeoung
Farah Hafeez
Farahnaz Shahjakan
Farhad Waizi
Farheen Sher
Farzad Aghakajouii
Fathima Feroze
Fatima Imraan
Fatuma Koli
Fetije Dhima
Florence Mulera
Gail Kerbel
Ghazala Hasany
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Gisele Gauthier
Greg Carson
Gurbir Singh
Hamideh Babaki
Hanna Caplan
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Hayden McKellar
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Hellen Hajikostantinou
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Hilary Moore
Holly Huizenga
Hussam Majbour
Huthaifah Ssali
Ian Sutcliffe
Igor Mihajlovic
Iraj Soltani
Isabelle Dussault
Ishwori Dotel
Israh Enaz
Jackie Fitz
Jaclyn Katz
Jahey Sillah
Jamileh Arfa
Jane Pinto
Jane Shi
Janice Buchanan
Jason Baker
Jason Lawrence
Jean Exil
Jelena Ivanova
Jenan Smith
Jennifer Arango
Jessica Roher
Ji-Hyun Jang
Jini Yoganandan
Joan Sullivan
Jocelyn Mills
John Clark
John Faustmann
John Shi
Jonathan Porter
Joo Ah Lee
Joseph Baker
Joyce Zhu
Julia Dow
Julian Dyer
Julianne Jakobek
June Campbell
Kaja Richards
Kamila Samkova
Karen Ramsumair
Kate Radu
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Kelly Masterson
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Khalid Nour
Khurshid Press
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Kwasi Obeng
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Lambert Boenders
Lana Tetlock
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Lauren Zweep
Leah Lee
Lee Adagbonyin
Leticia Akparah
Lily Chen
Linda O'Connor
Lisa Sammut
Lou Natale
Luis Martin Flores Garcia
Mahi Varatha
Mahsa Kamali
Maiwand Noor
Manal Seyam
Manveen Bedi
Mara Herscovitch
Margaret Godoy
Mari Hotta
Maria Herrera
Maria Olaiya
Maria Shafa
Maricel Ramos
Marijke Anbeek
Marjorie Marshall
Marshall White
Martin John
Mary Choy
Mary Hanson
Maryann Armitage
Marzia Nazarova
Masooma Aftab
Matthew Keogh
Megan Sandhu
Megan Webster
Mehreen Bengali
Melany Bleue
Melissa McGrath
Melody Muere
Michelle Antemia
Michelle McCullough
Miko Belayneh
Milica Guberinic
Mindy Eklove
Minteh Krubally
Mohamed Aidarus
Monia Carine Umuhoza
Naba Sadia Siddiqui
Nada Nouman
Nada'a Fayyaz
Nailah Qadeer
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Nashwa Tawfiq
Nataleigh Gooden
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Naz Savarey
Neda Pajooman
Negar Shahyar
Neville Dewdney
Nicole Jakobek
Nikoletta Arghandewal
Nina Naeimi
Nishani Umasuthan
Noa Jasovich
Noel Palmer
42
Octavia Davidson
Oscar Gomez
Patricia Chraiteh
Patrick Muldoon
Peter Dobrinov
Prateek Sehgal
Pratheepan Kugathas
Praveena Srikandarajah
Puishan Man
Radyah Khan
Rafael Contreras
Rahel Gebregiorgis
Rahel Yirgaw
Rahma Mohamed
Ranjeev Dhir
Raquella Khan
Rejenthan Rajanthiran
Renee Blythe
Renee West
Reyhane Sheikh
Reyka Oré
Ricardo Rivera
Robert Dayton
Rodrigo Lopez
Rogers May
Rola Osseiran
Ron Chernysh
Rufus Dickinson
Rwakibaale Muhanga
Sabrina Salim
Sadie Wendt-Quibell
Saghar Azimi
Sahar Abd
Saima Shaheed
Saira Mughal
Samuel Getachew
Sanaa Thabet
Sandra Diaz
Sandra Maciel
Sara Fard
Sara Jaffri
Sara Womiloju
Sarah Ahmad
Sarah Al Naser
Sarah Bagheri
Sarah Burrell
Sarah Jurgens
Sarah Steinhoff
Sarita Navarro
Sasha Singer-Wilson
Seema Gajria
Sehrish Haider
Semhar Tesfatzion
Senight Wolde
Seol Baek
Shadi Ershad
Shane Moffatt
Shani Scherengel
Shani Sherenzel
Sharifa Jahan
Sharifa Jahan
Sharlene Monteiro
Sharmini Tharma
Shaween Khayait
Shawn Xu
Shayanika Suresh
Shellane D'Souza
Shepresa Vrenezi
Shiraz Abdul Rahman
Shirin Shabzandehdar
Shkelqim Braho
Sifat Siraji
Simone Brown
Sirus Kashefi
Smiljka Tasic
Smriti Upadhyay
Soheila Dehmassi
Sophia Javed
Sophia Liang
Sophie Ahn
Sophy Mao
Srivany Kanagalingam
Suresh Thiruvenkatam
Susan S Wurst
Tad Palmer
Tania Natscheff
Tarin Khandaker
Ted Yao
Tefelo Patrick Mohlomi
Tess Andrada
Theo Ndey Maka
Thi Van Hoang
Thiva Kodees
Thulasi Thiruchselvam
Tina Abu
Toma Shamani
Tracey Leonardo
Trevor Ormerod
Ulo Evoh
Vadim Paskarou
Vahagn Karapetyan
Vaithilingam Srikanthan
Vera Teschow
Vicki McGregor
Vicky Liu
Virginia Wilson
Viviana Filazzola
Wen Liu
Wendy Blushke
Winnie Liao
Xuan Zhang
Yonas Woldemichael
Yun Yue (Tonks) Chen
Zaid Abdulgader
Zarrin Mortezaeian
Zehra Abbas
Zehra Kizilbash
Easwarananthy Sathasivam
Nirubika Kathirgamanathan
Jessica Uthayakumaran
Patricia F. Ackah-Baidoo
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
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Lululemon Athletica
PIKTO
A Taste of Quebec
Segway Ontario
Soulpepper Theatre
Body Blitz
RKW Wine Imports
Abbott Pub
Dell Canada
Fairmountbooks.com
NOW Magazine
Toronto Raptors
The Rusty Fairmount Group
Toronto Community Housing
YWCA
National Film Board
Fourth Pig
Go Shani
Sweet Birch Traditional Medicine
Green Zebra
Gourmet Galaxy
Mount Sinai Hospital
YMCA
FLIP Publicity & Promotions Inc.
Rosedale Wellness Centre
Jazz.FM91
Corktown Designs
RKW Wine Imports
Research in Motion
The Cranial Therapy Centre
Dell Canada
True Source Seminars
Elmwood Spa
Art Gallery of Ontario
One King West Hotel
Special Thanks to Our Patrons
Sarah Polley
Jian Ghomeshi
43
Olivia Chow
& Jack Layton
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Source of Funds:
Government and Foundations
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
Immigration Settlement and Adaptation Program — ISAP – A
Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada — LINC
Local Immigration Partnership — LIP
City of Toronto
Community Services Grant
Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration
Newcomer Settlement Program (NSP)
Ontario Trillium Foundation
United Way of Greater Toronto
United Nations Voluntary Fund for Torture Victims
Toronto District Board of Education
Donors - Organizations
Alterna Savings
United Way of Calgary, Donors Choice Program
The Sisters of St. Joseph of the Diocese of London
Green & Spiegel
Chum City Christmas Wish
Wardens of St. Thomas' Anglican Church
The William Rathbone Family Charitable Trust
Harry Rosen Inc.
Beaches Presbyterian Church
Organization of Professional Immigration Consultants
44
ccvt Annual Report 2009-2010
Contact Us
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
Main Office:
Scarborough Branch:
194 Jarvis St., 2nd Floor
Toronto, ON
M5B 2B7
2425 Eglinton Ave. E., Unit 220
Scarborough, ON
M1K 5G8
Tel: (416) 363-1066
Fax: (416) 363-2122
Tel: (416) 750-3045
Fax: (416) 750-4990
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.ccvt.org
45
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Past recipients of the The Amina Malko Award. This award
is given to a woman active in the refugee movement who has
significant experience in policy, advocacy and settlement
services for newcomers.
2002 Geraldine
Sadoway
2006
Sister Lois
2003
Consuelo Rubio
2007
Joan Simalchik
2004
Madina Wasuge
2005
Dr. Jill Blakeney
2008
Paola Gomez
Restrepo
2009
Debbie Douglas
Past recipients of the Trevor Bartram Award. This award
is given to individuals who have made a significant
achievement in organizational development and policy
consistent with the mandate of CCVT.
2002
Tom Clark
2006
Dr. Wendell Block
2003
Miranda Pinto
2007
Douglas Lehrer
2004
Fred Franklyn
2008
Loly Rico
2005
Dr. Raoul Berdichevsky
2009
Dr. Donald Payne
“The CCVT gives hope after the horror.”

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