The Link Extra - March 2015 - University of Wales Trinity Saint David

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The Link Extra - March 2015 - University of Wales Trinity Saint David
THE LINK
EXTRA
The newsletter of the
Lampeter Society/Cymdeithas Llambed
Entrance to the refurbished Arts Block
2015
1963/4 First XI:
1963/4 First XI: winners of the Cardiganshire League Trophy
Back row: Grinter, Nurton, King, Milson, Jenkins, Groves, Wolfe, Dearing
Front row: Perks, Thomsett, Thacker, Davies, Hickman
A
short obituary for Peter Groves (grad. 1964) appeared in
Link 2015. In Link Extra we are now happy to include some
photos which, provided by Peter, together with his written
recollections of football at Lampeter from 1961-1964, provided the
basis for a commemorative exhibition in the Roderic Bowen Library
last year. See also the photo of members of the victorious 1963/4
team (who won the Cardiganshire league Trophy) attending the 2014
exhibition. Many thanks to Sarah Roberts of the Library for access to
this material.
CANON DR FRED LAPHAM
K
athy Miles reported some time ago that: “For anyone
who knew him, sadly, Canon Fred Lapham passed away in
December. Fred was a lovely, gentle, sweet man who taught
distance students and would come to the uni for residentials. He will
be much missed.”
In addition to teaching at Lampeter, Canon Dr Lapham received
his Phd from what was then the University of Wales, Lampeter. He
wrote a number of scholarly books including “Introduction to the
New Testament Apocrypha”.
PROFESSOR A. P. CAVENDISH
A
lthough not a news item now, Professor Anthony Pike
Cavendish passed away passed away in Bath on 19th January
2004. Born Anthony Henry Basson on 12th September 1916
in Northwood Hills, Middx. he changed his name by deed poll in
1962. He studied under A. J. Ayer at UCL, graduating in 1953. He
took up his appointment in Lampeter in 1969.
Members of the 1963/4 champion football team attending the 2014
exhibition
A
Adam Whitehurst
dam died tragically in the early days of this year.
If anyone could write an abituary for inclusion in next
year’s Link I would be grateful. It can be sent to the
Editor, Pushka Evans, or to me.
Mick Manson 1976
I have looked at past copies of the Link between 2004 and 2010
and have found no mention of his passing, so I felt that something,
however belated, should be mentioned here.
Mick Manson 1976
T
Teddy Topos
he article on “Teddy Topos” [In Link 2015 - Ed. refers
to a real member of the college domestic staff. “Topos” was
the term used for the toilets in my time at Lampeter (196063), the word being the Greek for place.
Teddy Topos was the odd-job man for the college. He pulled a
handcart around, saw to the coal fires in the SCR and JCR, and
cleaned the toilets (but was stopped from peeling the potatoes as
it was claimed he never washed his hands between jobs). A small
man, his words were monosyllabic, and he and Minnie his sister
were local personalities. They would deliver Christmas cards to
most people in the town, and later go back and request the cost
of card and stamp, while at other times the two formed a two-man
town band. His hand cart was used at the beginning and end of
each term by the students to transport the trunks to and from our
lodgings via the entrance to the Old Building where they would
be delivered by or collected by British Rail – these being the days
when there was still a railway station at Lampeter.
Roger L. Brown, D.Litt, MA, FSA
The photograph shows Teddy and
Minnie and is from the book Llambed
Ddoe: Lampeter Yesterday, published
in 1994 by Gomer Press (page 72).
FREE SPEECH UNIVERSITY RANKINGS
“Spiked”
(see
http://www.spiked-online.com/free-speechuniversity-rankings#VTQCn8t0wu5) surveyed British universities
with regard to free speech, ranking them accordingly with a red,
amber and green traffic-light system. UWTSD was ranked green,
with the comment: University of Wales Trinity Saint David and
its students’ unions collectively create an open environment for
free speech. Neither the university nor the students’ unions place
restrictions on speech or expression.”
Professor Danny Dawson
C
hris Staples writes of History Professor Danny
Dawson, [in his “Reminiscences” article, Link Extra
2014 - Ed.] and queries whether he had been wounded on
the Somme. His obituary states that he served throughout the First
World War in the infantry and was badly wounded at Beaumont
Hamel on the Somme. He was severely disabled, possibly as a
result of that war wound, so that one of the seniors in the history
honours class (in my time this was Eric Morris, who became a
military historian) would collect him from his home in Bryn Road
and take him back. He died aged 65. I have an idea Danny’s
widow gave Eric his slides of the trenches, for Danny had against
all regulations taken a camera with him, and these Eric showed to
the newly formed Historical Society shortly after his death.
Roger L. Brown, D.Litt, MA, FSA
L
BOOK LAUNCH
ampeter men Bill Gibson (Oxford Brookes University)
and John Morgan-Guy (UWTSD) on 18th February 2015
launched their new book “ Religion and Society in the Diocese
of St Davids 1485-2011”. The launch was well-attended – including
the presence of
William
Price,
who
is
one
of the book’s
contributors, and
who will also be
speaking at this
year’s Lampeter
Society
Annual
Reunion dinner.
A n o t h e r
distinguished
L a m p e t e r
graduate,
also
present, was Lord
Griffiths of Burry
Port.
He said
that the book was
“…history at its
best – it’s local
yet set against the
broad backdrop
of national and
international developments. It offers an impressive accumulation of
detail without losing sight of the bigger picture. And its imposing
range of contributors, under the watchful eye of its editors, avoid
the usual jumpiness of such volumes and manage to produce a silky
smooth text that is at once instructive and compelling.”
The book is hardback, with 252 pages, ISBN 978-1-4094-4772-6
and costs a rather eye-watering £70! (But see note below for a 50%
discount.)
Bill Gibson remarked to me that “…alas it won’t make the bestseller lists… even with a 50% discount which I think can be extended
to Lampeter society members!” (For 50% discount use code
50BNJ14N when ordering.)
L
ast year a copy of the 2013 Lampeter Society
Commemoration Service sermon, preached by Acting
Chaplain Dr John Morgan-Guy, was (at the suggestion of
members) was sent to HRH Prince Charles, Patron of UWTSD, by
Lampeter Society Committee Member Bill Fillery.
Dr Morgan-Guy spoke of the sermon preached by Alfred Ollivant
on 23rd August 1827, at the consecration of the College Chapel.
The College, (although founded of course in 1822), had first
opened its doors to students on 1st March 1827. Some extracts
from Dr Morgan-Guy’s discourse are included here:
to look to Bishop Burgess as our Founder. His, after all, was the
vision, tenaciously and energetically pursued over many years,
until it came to fruition when he laid the foundation stone in 1822.
But neither he nor the college saw him in that light. The college,
Ollivant pointed out, had a Royal Founder, the reigning King,
George IV, who provided the largest single donation to the building
out of his Privy purse, a fund matched only by the local landowner,
John Scandrett Harford. The King granted the college its charter,
and it is his Arms which adorn the tower of this building. For
Ollivant and all those gathered here on 23rd August 1827, this was
‘The King’s College of St David near Lampeter’.”
“…from the outset the College imposed no religious test on
prospective students - …a brave innovation in 1827 – and not
everyone proceeded to Holy Orders. The College was intended,
as Ollivant put it, to be a mother and nurse of holy men. It was to
provide… a liberal and substantial education, give an impulse to...
an enquiring mind, and [open] a path to those intellectual pleasures
for which many, but for its assistance, might have thirsted in vain.
That vision… remained central to what current jargon would term
our ‘mission statement’ down through the years…
Rather impishly, Dr Morgan-Guy added:
“Lampeter had a free hand; Ollivant reminded his audience that
centuries had elapsed since such a college had been founded. The
college could build upon the accumulated experience of Oxford
and Cambridge, but would follow its own plan, its own vision.
From the outset… St David’s College was to be a place of liberal
and humane learning….
He also commented that “Lampeter was not – and never can be
– just another secular university…. God, the things of God, and
the worship of God in Trinity, are what gives this university its
raison d’etre.” He reiterated Ollivant’s remarks that Lampeter’s
degrees must be of the highest standard and pointed out that this
“remains as true today as it was then; university teaching is not a
job, it is a solemn undertaking, a dedicated life, and that is true also
for administrators and managers tasked with facilitating academic
work.”
“[Ollivant] made one final point, which in our long history has
often been forgotten. We tend, and in many respects rightly so,
UWTSD WORLD RANKING
L
ampeter Society member Richard Tunstall drew our
attention to a ranking site for world universities - http://
cwur.org/2014/. Interestingly, UWTSD appears in the
listing as 64th in the UK and 892 out of the top 1000 institutions
in the world…!
FRANK NEWTE – A FINAL TALE
H
aving only recently read Link 2013, with its attached
Link Extra 2012 material about Frankie Newte (who was
for many years a Classics lecturer at Lampeter, and was
also a Bletchley Park code-breaker during WWII), John Coombs
now writes from Sydney, Australia:
I visited Frank Newte in the hospital at Aberystwyth the afternoon
before he died. I think I was the last person from Lampeter to
visit him.
He started talking about how slack the new Principal was. At some
point in his discourse I realised that it wasn’t the recently-arrived
Brinley Rees that he was talking about, but John Roland LloydThomas, who had retired at the end of the previous academic year
and whom I had always thought was anything but slack! I found
this very amusing.
John Coombs (grad. 1977)
[Hard to imagine that anyone would consider Revd. J. R. LloydThomas to be slack…ED.]
“Perhaps if we change our name – again – we should consider
that as a possibility.” (Possibly a reasonable suggestion, given
the name-changes over years, from St David’s College/Coleg
Dewi Sant to St David’s University College/Coleg Prifysgol Dewi
Sant to University of Wales Lampeter/Prifysgol Cymru Llanbedr
to University of Wales Trinity Saint David/Prifysgol Cymru Y
Drindod Dewi Sant.)
COMMEMORATION SERVICE SERMON

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