Seminole County Public - Crooms Academy of Information Technology

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Seminole County Public - Crooms Academy of Information Technology
Seminole County Public Schools
Educational Equity - Notice of Nondiscrimination
The Educational Equity Administrator for Seminole County Public Schools
has the responsibility of assuring compliance with the educational equity
requirements by providing technical expertise, monitoring activities or programs
related to compliance, and responding to equity complaints. One of the
responsibilities is to administer the Educational Equity Complaint/Grievance
Procedures as adopted by the School Board.
It is the policy of the School Board of Seminole County, Florida, that no
employee, student, or applicant shall - on the basis of race, color, national
origin, sex, disability, marital status, age, religion, or any other basis prohibited
by law - be excluded from participating in, be denied the benefits of, or be
subjected to discrimination and harassment under any educational programs,
activities, or in any employment conditions, policies, or practices conducted
by the District. Additionally, the School board of Seminole County provides
equal access to public school facilities for the Boy Scouts of America and other
designated youth groups as required by 34 C.F.R. 108.9.
Every employee, student, or applicant for employment at Seminole County
Public Schools has a solemn right to be treated fairly, equally, equitably, and
with dignity. If for any reason you - the employee, student, or applicant for
employment - find that you have been victimized by acts of discrimination
and or harassment, whether intentional or unintentional, you are strongly
encouraged to file an Educational Equity Complaint or Grievance with the
Educational Equity Administrator, or any county or school-level administrator.
All such complaints must be immediately forwarded to the Educational
Equity Administrator for dissemination, action, and resolution. Forward to:
SCPS Educational Equity Administrator, Seminole County Public Schools,
Educational Support Center, 400 E. Lake Mary Blvd., Sanford, FL 32773-7127,
(407) 320-0198.
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WELCOME TO CROOMS ACADEMY OF INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY
WHERE WE ARE RICH IN TRADITION, PRIDE, AND VISION
Vision Statement: To build a culture of excellence and success for every student.
Mission Statement: The mission of Crooms Academy of Information Technology is to provide
innovative teaching and learning in a technology-enriched environment and to engage students
in an academically challenging curriculum that prepares them for post-secondary education with
industry-validated technology skills.
ADMINISTRATIVE / GUIDANCE STAFF
Mrs. Demetria Hayes Faison, Principal
Ms. Heather Medve, Assistant Principal
Mr. Michael Hunter, Assistant Principal
Ms. Carolina DeGarmo, Guidance Counselor
Ms. Adriana Teague, Guidance Counselor
Mrs. Donna Wood, Guidance Counselor
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Notice of Nondiscrimination ....................................................................................................................................... 2
Important Information for Students and Parents ...................................................................................................... 4
How Do I Register? ..................................................................................................................................................... 5
ePathways Career and Technical Options ................................................................................................................. 6
Crooms Requirements for Graduation .................................................................................................................... 13
Diploma Pathway Requirements .............................................................................................................................. 14
Opportunities for Credit Retrieval............................................................................................................................ 15
Associate of Arts Degree at Crooms ........................................................................................................................ 16
Associate of Arts Proposed Education Plan ............................................................................................................ 18
AA Pathways FAQ ..................................................................................................................................................... 19
How do I Earn College Credit at Crooms?............................................................................................................. 20
Guidance Information................................................................................................................................................ 21
Bright Futures Scholarship......................................................................................................................................... 22
Career Pathways ......................................................................................................................................................... 23
Course Descriptions: Fine Arts/Electives.................................................................................................................. 24
Course Descriptions: World Languages ................................................................................................................... 25
Course Descriptions: Physical Education ................................................................................................................. 26
Course Descriptions: Language Arts ........................................................................................................................ 27
Course Descriptions: Reading................................................................................................................................... 28
Course Descriptions: Mathematics ........................................................................................................................... 30
Course Descriptions: Science .................................................................................................................................... 33
Course Descriptions: Social Studies ......................................................................................................................... 36
Driver Education After School Program.................................................................................................................. 38
How Do I Earn IT Certifications at Crooms? ......................................................................................................... 39
Technology Programs for Gold Seal Scholarship ................................................................................................... 40
Course Descriptions: Technology ............................................................................................................................. 40
Dual Enrollment Offerings at SSC ........................................................................................................................... 46
Index of Courses ........................................................................................................................................................ 49
Four Year Plan............................................................................................................................................................ 53
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IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS AND PARENTS
SCHEDULING
Crooms AOIT operates on a modified, alternating block schedule with 7 periods. The block schedule is designed
to allow for extended periods of time where teachers may direct students to work on labs, group projects or other
extension activities. As part of their school day, students also participate in 20 minutes of silent sustained reading/
guided study time.
FLORIDA STANDARDS ASSESSMENT (FSA) PREP COURSEWORK
Based on Crooms’ school improvement plan, students whose FSA scores indicate they may not meet the FSA
graduation requirement will be automatically registered into an FSA preparation class for one or two class periods,
depending on previous FSA and oral fluency scores. Passing the FSA is a graduation requirement set by the state
legislature, and Crooms AOIT intends to provide all students the opportunity to prepare appropriately for that
requirement.
HIGHER LEVEL COURSE ENROLLMENT CRITERIAA
Seminole County recognizes the benefits students derive from higher level coursee
participation and the importance of fair and equitable standardized criteria for
enrollment in higher level courses. Students may elect to enroll in higher level
courses based on any one of the multiple criteria. Where applicable, prerequisitee
course completion is required. Multiple enrollment criteria include, but are not
limited to, self-selection, teacher consultation, previous academic success, and
standardized or state test scores.
FEE/DONATION NOTIFICATION
In an effort to provide educational enhancements to students beyond the curriculum
lum
routinely offered, donations in certain courses historically have been collected in Seminole County Public Schools on
a voluntary contribution basis. Every encouragement is given to students and parents to assist Crooms Academy of
Information Technology in continuing the practice of course embellishment that these donations make possible. While
such assistance is a practical requirement to maintain current practices, no student shall be denied the opportunity
either to take any course or to participate fully in all aspects of a course in which donations are sought. In such
circumstances, please simply notify your child’s teacher. Thank you for your understanding and commitment to
excellence.
TECHNOLOGY USE IN EDUCATION
Seminole County Public Schools believes technology is a valuable educational tool. All classroom teachers use
technology as an instructional tool. Some examples of such activities are: use of the eCampus learning management
system, Office 365, cloud storage and collaboration with OneDrive and Google Drive, the district’s media/library
catalog, web sites for education projects, on-line district and state classes and to conduct research in preparation for a
project or presentation.
Students are photographed or videotaped for the purposes of daily school news
broadcasts and yearbooks. Photographs or videos of students are also placed
on school/district web pages as a form of recognition for special achievements,
activities, projects and as a motivation to be creative.
Student works are published on the Web (Internet) to share stories, poems,
and other creative works with other students and the school community and to
provide motivations for writing.
If you wish to have your student excluded from any of the preceding activities,
you may opt out in Skyward. Please be aware that opting out of
local use, prohibits publishing your child’s picture in the
school yearbook.
HOW DO I REGISTER?
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Registration information will be distributed by grade level. Students will complete and submit their registration forms
by Wednesday, January 27, 2016. Before selecting elective courses, all students should read this guide carefully to
familiarize themselves with the information it contains. Signatures for elective courses are only required for courses
where a prerequisite is required.
Incoming 9th grade students: Curriculum guides and registration forms will be distributed during the Registration night
for incoming 9th graders on Tuesday, February 9th at 6:30 p.m. Registration procedures and course selection information
will be given at that time. Registration cards are due to the middle school guidance counselor on Friday, February
26th. *All information regarding courses and graduation requirements is subject to change,
pending legislation and state mandates. Courses in this guide may be dropped if there is not
sufficient enrollment for the course.
GUIDELINES FOR CURRENT STUDENTS
1. Study the courses listed and consult with your classroom teachers over course selections.
2. Review the online curriculum guide and discuss your course selections with your parents/guardians.
3. Write down any questions you may have for your counselor and discuss those questions with your counselor at
lunch from Monday, January 25th through Friday, January 29th. The guidance counselor will be available in the
cafeteria during both lunch periods on these dates to answer any registration or course selection questions.
4. Fill in personal information at the top of the registration form.
5. Select your core courses already recommended to you. If you register for an Honors or AP class, obtain a
signature from your current teacher in that subject area.
6. List your selected electives. List at least six alternative electives. Your first choice may not be available.
7. Sign and obtain teacher and parent signatures.
8. Fill out the online registration form in Student Access and turn in the signed registration form to your 4th period teacher
on January 27th.
SCHEDULE CHANGES
Students are expected to remain in a course for its duration. Schedule changes due to failure are not permitted. Courses
may be dropped and/or added during the first five days of each semester if one of the following conditions is met:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
The course to be added is needed for graduation this year.
Computer error.
You already have credit in this course.
You have failed to meet a prerequisite.
Teacher or administrative recommendation.
ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGES
Crooms reserves the right to change individual student schedules to comply with School Board and Department of
Education policies. These changes may occur due to changes in the student population or faculty allocation. Changes
will be made to balance classes and teacher loads and to maintain class size requirements. Every effort will be made not
to disrupt the educational process when such changes become necessary.
REGISTRATION CALENDAR
Tues.–Fri. Jan. 26 – 29
Counselors speak to science classes and registration forms and curriculum guides are handed
out to students grades 9-11.
Mon. Feb. 1
PowerPoint on the registration process in Skyward Student Access presented during
Advisement/Reading
Wed. Feb. 3
Students submit registration forms to their 4th period teachers and register on Student Access.
Mon.–Fri. Feb. 1–5
Guidance counselors available during both lunches to answer registration questions.
Tues. Feb. 9
New student Registration and Open House (6:30 p.m. in Cafetorium)
Thurs. Feb. 18 or
Open Registration for incoming students at Crooms (5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.)
Sat. Feb. 20
Open Registration for incoming students at Crooms (8:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.)
Fri. Feb. 26
Middle School registration cards submitted to middle school counselors if not submitted at
Crooms
Mon.–Fri. Mar. 28–Apr. 1 Review of course selections for 2016-17. Submit schedule changes to Guidance by April 1.
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ePathways is customized learning that results in our students
being prepared for 21st century globally competitive work.
Seminole County Public Schools offers a variety of choice options to empower students to
customize their educational pathway in preparation for college and careers. These options
include Magnet Schools and Programs, Programs of Emphasis, Career and Technical Education,
Virtual School, After School Courses, and School Transfers. Each option has a unique application
process and eligibility requirements.
The following information and program descriptions acquaint students and parents with the
additional high school choices they can consider.
MAGNET SCHOOLS/PROGRAMS
Designed around specialized themes, magnet programs address individual interests and provide
students with educational opportunities that take them beyond traditional instructional experiences.
Acceptance into a magnet school/program is by application only. By signing the required program
application, parents and students agree to commitment statements which include academic
standards, attendance, conduct, and honor code.
ELIGIBILITY: Students must reside in Seminole County and submit a High School Choice Magnet
School/Program Application. Eligibility requirements, timelines, and the application process are
described in detail on the Seminole County Public Schools Choices website at
http://www.seminoleschoolchoices.us
TRANSPORTATION: Transportation for magnet schools and programs is provided to students
living more than two miles from the school.
FOR MORE INFORMATION: Contact the Choices Department 407-320-0329 and view the website
at http://www.seminoleschoolchoices.us
CROOMS ACADEMY OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
([SHULHQFH,7Crooms Academy of Information Technology (AOIT) is Seminole
County’s only districtwide magnet high school. Crooms AOIT provides cutting edge
innovation in teaching and learning through a technology-enriched environment.
Students engage in a rigorous and relevant curriculum that prepares them for postsecondary education with industry-validated technology skills.Students meeting
specific criteria will also have the opportunity to earn the credits required for an A.A.
degree from Seminole State College as part of their high school curriculum.
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ACADEMY OF HEALTH CAREERS
Seminole High School
The Academy of Health Careers offers a comprehensive, rigorous
academic program of college preparation and uniquely relevant
curriculum for students who plan to pursue a career as a health-care
professional. The academic courses are combined with the opportunity to gain the initial “building
blocks” of health care through Health Science education.
Hands-on learning opportunities enable students to preview various careers through job shadowing
and clinical experiences in area hospitals, clinics, medical offices, emergency medical facilities, and
veterinary health care sites.
INSTITUTE FOR ENGINEERING
Lyman High School
The Institute for Engineering through Project Lead the Way: Pathway
to Engineering provides a nationally recognized curriculum that is a
highly creative, technology rich, college preparatory program. Students
are exposed to a rigorous integrated curriculum infused with relevant
industry innovations and technology. This world-class program is
designed for the student who would like to pursue a professional career in any area of engineering.
In addition to core engineering courses that provide the foundation, students may take specialization
courses that include:
x Aerospace Engineering
x Biotechnical Engineering
x Civil Engineering and Architecture
x Digital Electronics
x Computer Modeling and Simulation
INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE DIPLOMA PROGRAM
Seminole High School
Winter Springs High School
The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program is an internationally recognized,
rigorous pre-university course of study that incorporates an extensive liberal arts
curriculum containing humanities, social studies, foreign language, math, and science.
The IB program, affiliated with the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO), is
designed for highly motivated, college-bound students seeking educational challenges. The
curriculum is based on international standards and examinations that are evaluated by international
educators. Students zoned to Hagerty, Lake Howell, Oviedo, and Winter Springs are eligible to apply
for the Winter Springs IB Program. Students zoned to Lake Brantley, Lake Mary, Lyman, and
Seminole are eligible to apply for the Seminole IB Program.
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PROGRAMS OF EMPHASIS
A Program of Emphasis provides a structured study strand centered on a career pathway. Students
who are zoned for the school may select the Program of Emphasis, and a limited number of seats in
some of the programs listed in this guide may be available for 9th grade students who are not zoned
to the school.
Acceptance for out-of-zone students to a Program of Emphasis is by application only. By signing
the required transfer request form, parents and students agree to the commitment statements and
understandings on the form.
ELIGIBILITY: Out-of-Zone seats may be available to incoming 9th grade students only, and seats are
limited. Students must reside in Seminole County and submit a Program of Emphasis Transfer
Request Form. Eligibility requirements, timelines, and the application process are described in detail
on the Seminole County Public Schools Choices website at http://www.seminoleschoolchoices.us
TRANSPORTATION: Transportation is NOT provided for Program of Emphasis transfers. Students
may seek assistance for transportation if it is available through the Ticket to Ride program. Details
may be found on the Choices website.
FOR MORE INFORMATION: In-zone students should contact their guidance counselor, out-of-zone
students may contact the Choices Department 407-320-0329 and view the website at
http://www.seminoleschoolchoices.us
ADVANCED MANUFACTURING & INNOVATION PROGRAM OF EMPHASIS
Lake Mary High School
NEW FOR 2016-17! The Advanced Manufacturing program gives students the opportunity to design and
prototype innovative products using high-tech, industry standard equipment. This program includes industry
certification.
BIOSCIENCE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM OF EMPHASIS
Oviedo High School
The Bioscience Technology Program provides preparation for the career fields of applied biology in industry,
medicine, and agriculture. This program includes industry certification.
CULINARY ARTS PROGRAM OF EMPHASIS
Lake Howell High School
The Culinary Arts Program allows students to explore all facets of the culinary field, including
entrepreneurship, in an industry-standard commercial kitchen. This program includes industry certification.
CYBERSECURITY PROGRAM OF EMPHASIS
Lake Howell High School
NEW FOR 2016-17! The Cybersecurity Program introduces and prepares students for careers in computer
science and cyber-defense in multiple industries. This program includes industry certification.
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ENTREPRENEURSHIP PROGRAM OF EMPHASIS
Lake Howell High School
The Entrepreneurship Program curriculum introduces the broad spectrum of business, industry, and small
business initiatives. This program includes opportunities to earn dual enrollment credit.
FINANCE ACADEMY PROGRAM OF EMPHASIS
Lake Brantley High School
The Finance Academy Program offers a curriculum comprised of finance and business technology including
accounting applications and personal financial planning. This program includes industry certification.
FORENSIC SCIENCE & LEGAL STUDIES PROGRAM OF EMPHASIS
Lake Mary High School
This program of emphasis includes two tracks: Forensic Science uses groundbreaking modern scientific
technology in crime scene investigation and Legal Studies teaches the foundations of our legal system. This
program includes opportunities to earn dual enrollment credit.
MODELING, SIMULATION, AND ANALYSIS PROGRAM OF EMPHASIS
Hagerty High School
The Modeling, Simulation and Analysis Program teaches students the fundamentals of modeling and
simulation, a high-demand, high-wage industry in Central Florida. This program includes industry
certification.
RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OF EMPHASIS
Winter Springs High School
The Renewable Energy Program allows students to study energy technologies and the advantages,
disadvantages, and limitations of renewable energy resources for a sustainable future.
TEACHING, LEARNING, & LEADERSHIP PROGRAM OF EMPHASIS
Lyman High School
The Teaching, Learning, & Leadership Program empowers students to embrace their potential future as
educators and fosters their knowledge of the education profession. This program includes opportunities to
earn dual enrollment credit.
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STUDENT SCHOOL TRANSFER OPTIONS
Information about student transfer options for the 2016-2017 school year is available on the
Seminole County Public Schools Choices website at http://www.seminoleschoolchoices.com
EXITING A MAGNET SCHOOL PROGRAM OR PROGRAM OF EMPHASIS: Any out-of-zone student
who exits a high school choice program will return to his/her zoned school unless there is a
Seminole County Public Schools approved transfer that allows the student to remain at the school
where the choice program is located. In all years of participation in a magnet school/program and
Programs of Emphasis, exits are not permitted during the school year.
ACADEMY OF CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGIES
Don’t leave high school with just a diploma—leave with a JOB! The Academy
of Construction Technologies (ACT) develops a well-trained workforce in the
construction industry by integrating academics and a paid work-site experience
when available. ACT offers students in grades 11 and 12 the opportunity to
begin a career in high school in building construction, which is offered at Lake
Brantley HS, Lake Mary HS, Lyman HS, Seminole HS, and Winter Springs HS.
Students must be on track for graduation and have a 2.0 GPA to participate.
WORKPLACE LEARNING
Students in grades 11 and 12 may have the opportunity to participate in a paid or unpaid internship
in some of our region’s most in-demand fields. Academic credit will be earned upon successful
completion of 136 hours. Students can utilize flexible scheduling to work before, during, or after the
school day to gain exposure to real-world working conditions. For more information about
workplace learning opportunities, visit the ePathways website: http://www.scps.k12.fl.us/epathways
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SEMINOLE COUNTY VIRTUAL SCHOOL
Virtual school provides flexible options to meet the demanding schedule of the 21st century
student. SCPS operates two virtual schools: Seminole County Virtual School (SCVS) is a
franchise of Florida Virtual School, and Seminole Academy of Digital Learning (SADL) features
curriculum created or purchased by SCPS. Additionally, SCPS contracts with another Florida
school district to provide a full-time instruction option.
Student choices include SCVS full-time, SCVS part-time, SADL part-time, or full-time contracted
district franchise.
Part-time options through ePathways allow students to take a mixed schedule of face-to-face and virtual classes. The
virtual classes can be taken at home during the school day, at the student’s school during the school day in a virtual lab
or outside the school day. Part-time enrollment for SCVS and SADL is available throughout the school year.
Additionally, the district may offer virtual course enrollment over the summer (SCVS 365).
Full-time options allow students to earn a regular Florida high school diploma. Full-time enrollment in SCVS for
semester 1 will be open from April 4, 2016 through August 5, 2016.
For more information and a list of available courses please visit http://virtualschool.scps.k12.fl.us/ or call 407-871-7287.
Why should students select a Seminole County Virtual School over other virtual providers?
*schedule flexibility
* full-time local teachers
*no waiting list to start classes
*optional face-to-face sessions
*tax-dollars stay in Seminole County
What high school courses are available through Seminole County Virtual School?
Courses with a * are available at both Standard and Honors level; H = honors class
Math:
Algebra I*, Geometry*, Algebra II*, Pre-Calculus (H), Calculus (H), Liberal Arts
Math 2, Math for College Readiness, AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC, AP Statistics
Language Arts:
English I*, English II*, English III*, English IV*, English IV College Prep,
AP English Language, AP English Literature
Social Studies:
World History*, U.S. History*, AP U.S. History, Economics*, AP Macroeconomics,
AP Microeconomics, U.S. Government*, AP U.S. Government, AP Human
Geography, AP Psychology
Sciences:
Biology I*, AP Biology, Earth Space Science*, Chemistry*, Physics*, Marine
Science*, Physical Science*, Anatomy & Physiology*, Forensic Science
World Languages:
French I & II, Spanish I & II, Spanish for Spanish Speakers I
French III (H) & Spanish III (H) are also available through SADL.
Electives:
22 options, including Personal Fitness/Fitness Lifestyle Design, Art, Guitar,
AP Art History, and much more! See website for complete list.
12
EPATHWAYS AFTER-SCHOOL COURSES
Students at any SCPS high school may enroll in an after-school Career & Technical Education (CTE) program offered at
their high school or any other high school. This class can be taken as either an 8th period or replace one of the student’s
7 classes during the regular school day. The tentative schedule is Tuesday and Thursday afternoons from 3:30-5:30 pm
but subject to change at each school site. Students are responsible for their own transportation.
CourseName
Hosting
School
CourseCode
Aerospace:
Private Pilot
Operations
Seminole
ATF1103XS
Automotive Collision
Repair and
Refinishing
Seminole
8709010XSH
Automotive
Maintenance &
Light Repair 1
Lyman
9504110XL
Oviedo
9504110XO
Seminole
9504110XSH
Lake
Brantley
8757210XLB &
8905120XLB
Lake
Howell
Lake
Howell
8757210XLH &
8905120XLH
8800510XLH
Winter
Springs
8800510XWS
Drafting/Illustrative
Design Technology 1
Lake Mary
8600810XLM
Interior Design
Services Core
Lake
Brantley
8506405XLB
Oviedo
8506405XO
Cosmetology:
Grooming and Salon
Services Core 1 (.5) &
Cosmetology 2 (.5)
Culinary Arts 1
CourseDescription
This course develops the aeronautical knowledge required
for certification as a Private Pilot with an Airplane Single
Engine Land rating. Topics include: regulations, safety,
pre-solo operations, cross-country planning, airspace, chart
use, communications, weather, performance, weight and
balance, aerodynamics, and decision-making. This is a dual
enrollment course with Embry-Riddle University.
The Auto Body Repair and Refinishing program of
instruction covers all the safety, planning, preparation and
painting elements of motor vehicle repairs, with students
often using their own vehicles as their hands-on project.
Program completers will be prepared for employment as
Automotive Body/Related repairers and Automotive Body
Repairers. Students enrolled in auto body classes should
anticipate heavy lifting and high noise levels. ASE Certified
and I-CAR Curriculum.
This course provides the student with the theory and
practical knowledge of basic automotive systems and
principles, including internal combustion engine theory,
shop safety, tool usage, shop measurement, use of shop
manuals, automotive industry history and development,
and preventative maintenance.
The ideal candidate for the Cosmetology program has a
passion for making people feel and look better. Students
will practice performing services of the hair, skin, and nails
thought this course. Upon completion of this program
students will have up to 350 hours towards the state
requirement in post-secondary institutions.
This course is designed for the student who enjoys handson experiences with food and wants to learn about the
food service industry. Students are exposed to commercial
kitchen equipment and procedures and learn the basics of
safety and sanitation, recipe execution, measurement
conversion and cost control.
This course is designed with emphasis on mechanical
drafting. The first three quarters are spent on mechanical
drafting and the last quarter is an introduction to
architectural drafting. The course includes an introduction
to computers and computer aided design (CAD) with work
and drawings completed on the CAD systems. Emphasis is
placed on neatness and accuracy; a basic understanding of
fractions and basic math is essential.
This course includes essential skills, elements, and
principles for working in design services, leadership and
organizational skills, textile characteristics and care,
employability skills, relationship of human factors to design
services, and safe use of tools and equipment. A preview of
technical design, rendering techniques and introduction to
computer aided design (CAD) using Chief Architect will
benefit students interested in any type of design career.
CROOMS REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
To Graduate, Crooms students must have all
of the following:
• 26 Credits
• Passing Score on the FSA and EOC Algebra Exam
• 2.0 unweighted Grade Point Average
• Completion of Required IT Courses
• Complete 1 online Course
SUBJECT
CREDITS
English
4
Science
4
Mathematics
4
Social Studies (World History, American
History, American Government (0.5) &
Economics (0.5))
3
Personal Fitness
0.5
Physical Education
0.5
Electives to include below
9
Fine Arts or practical art (courses that
qualify as a fine art include Digital
Information Technology, Web 1—4,
Digital Design 1—5, 2–D Graphics,
Chorus, Digital Media Fundamentals,
Steel Band, and Game & Simulation
Foundations)
1
Digital Information Technology (9th grade)
1
Technology Support Systems–Client or
A+ Network Concepts (10th grade)
1
World Language suggested for college
bound students (optional)
2
13
OPPORTUNITIES FOR ADDITIONAL CREDIT
Students may earn additional credit toward graduation through any
of the following programs for which they are eligible:
1. Summer School—beginning in the summer after the successful
completion of the 8th grade and each succeeding summer in high
school.
2. Students may be awarded high school credit in middle school
for the following courses:
(a) Algebra I--the student must successfully complete and
demonstrate mastery of the performance standards and pass
EOC. Geometry-–the student must successfully complete and
demonstrate mastery of the performance standards. Any math
credit earned in middle school will serve as a math elective in
high school.
(c) Spanish taught at the middle school or to be taught on the high
school campus--The students must successfully complete the
course and demonstrate mastery of the performance standards.
(d) Biology--The students must successfully complete the course and
demonstrate mastery of the performance standards.
3. Early College / Dual Enrollment
4. Seminole Virtual School
5. Florida Virtual School: www.flvs.net
SEMINOLE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOL’S DIPLOMA PATHWAYS
ADDITIONAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Grade 10 FSA English Language Arts Proficiency
Algebra I EOC: Level 3 and 30% of course grade
ADDITIONAL COURSE ASSESSMENTS
Algebra II EOC: 30% of course grade
Geometry EOC: 30% of course grade
Biology EOC: 30% of course grade
US History EOC: 30% of course grade
In the spring of 2013 the Florida Legislature created new
diploma options for the students of Florida. In doing so, they
have offered students more choice as well as an opportunity to
align their education to their future college and career plans.
In Seminole County we refer to these new choices as Diploma
Pathways. We call them Pathways because we believe that
students should use their time in high school to embark on their
own personal Pathway to success. Students may now choose
a Pathway that will result in a standard high school diploma, a
high school diploma connected with industry certification, or a
diploma designed to rigorously prepare them for the university
setting.
In the chart below you will find the Diploma Pathways and
the corresponding expectations associated with each one. In
addition to those offered by the state of Florida, Seminole
County also offers the Scholars with Distinction Pathway. This
very rigorous Pathway will challenge even the most talented
and dedicated students to an even higher level of academic
accomplishment.
9th Grade
A student who has been promoted from
8th grade.
10th Grade
A student who has earned six (6) credits
beyond the 8th grade.
11th Grade
A student who has earned twelve (12)
credits beyond the 8th grade.
Seminole County will start each and every student on the
Scholars Pathway. We want to ensure that students are setting
their academic goals high as they begin high school. Through
performance and self-selection, students and their families may
opt to change Pathways as they progress through high school.
Our goal is to have all students qualify to earn a Scholars
Pathway diploma. In the end, whether it is a Standard Pathway
diploma, a Merit Designation Pathway (Industry Certification)
diploma, a Scholars Pathway diploma, or a Scholars’ with
Distinction Pathway diploma, we want every student in Seminole
County to exit our school system as a graduate.
12th Grade
A student who has earned nineteen (19)
credits beyond the 8th grade.
Your administrators and guidance counselors are available to
provide further guidance on what each of the Pathways requires.
GRADE LEVEL CLASSIFICATIONS
DIPLOMAPATHWAYREQUIREMENTS
CLASSOF2017Ͳ2020
14
STANDARDDIPLOMAPATHWAY
CR REQUIREMENTS(mustinclude(1)onlinecourse)
4
4
4
3
1
1
9
EnglishCredits(English1–English4)orequivalentacceleratedcourse)
MathCreditsGrades(9Ͳ12)(mustincludeAlgebra1&Geometry)
ScienceCredits(mustincludeBiologyand(3)coursesmustcontainalabcomponent)
SocialStudies(mustincludeUSHistory,WorldHistory,0.5USGovernment&0.5EconomicswithFinancialLiteracy)
FineorPerformingArts,Speech&DebateorPracticalArt
½PersonalFitnessand½PEElective
ElectiveCredits
TESTINGREQUIREMENTS
PassingScoreon:Grade10ELA&Algebra1EOC
EOC’sinAlgebra1*,Geometry*,Algebra2(ifenrolled)*,Biology&USHistorywillcountas30%ofthe
studentsoverallgrade
*SpecialNote:30%notapplicableifenrolledinthe2014Ͳ2015schoolyear
SCHOLARSDIPLOMAPATHWAY
REQUIREMENTSOFASTANDARDDIPLOMAPLUS:
*Earn(1)creditinAlgebra2
*Earn(1)creditinStatisticsorequallyrigorousmathematicscourse
*Earn(1)creditinChemistryorPhysics
*Earn(1)creditinsciencecourseequallyrigoroustoChemistryorPhysics
*Earn(2)creditsinthesameforeignlanguagecourse
*Earn(1)creditinAdvancedPlacement,InternationalBaccalaureate,anAdvancedInternationalCertificate
ofEducation,DualEnrollmentCourse
TESINGREQUIREMENTS
Classof2016and2017:PassingScoreonGrade10ELA,Algebra1EOC,BiologyEOC,&USHistoryEOC
Classof2018and2019:PassingScoreonGrade10ELA,Algebra1EOC,BiologyEOC,USHistoryEOC,
GeometryEOC,andAlgebra2EOC
MERITDIPLOMAPATHWAY
TESTREQUIREMENTS
REQUIREMENTSOFSTANDARDDIPLOMAPLUS:
*AttainoneormoreIndustryCertificationsfromthelistestablishedunderS.1003.492F.S
****IndustryCertificationCourseswhichleadtocollegecreditmaybesubstitutedforuptotwomath
creditsand/oronesciencecreditexcludingAlgebra1,GeometryandBiology***
SAMEASTHESTANDARDDIPLOMA
SCHOLARSWITHDISTINCTION
DIPLOMAPATHWAY
TESTREQUIREMENTS
REQUIREMENTSOFASCHOLARSDESIGNATIONPATHWAYPLUS:
x
CumulativeWeightedGradePointAverageof3.75orhigher
x
(3)ConsecutiveyearsinthesameWorldLanguage
x
(6)creditsinAPorIBclassesearningagradeofAorBor(4)APorIBand(2)DualEnrollmentCredits
x
(1)creditinExperimentalResearchorequivalentwithagradeofAorBor(1)ExtendedEssay,
SeniorPortfolioor4thyearofWorldLanguageor(1)extraAP,IBorDualEnrollmentCredit.
SAMEASTHESCHOLARSDESIGNATIONPATHWAY
15
OPPORTUNITIES FOR CREDIT RETRIEVAL
STUDENT INCENTIVE PROGRAM
This incentive program allows students to improve their semester grades if they have performed poorly. Students who
are eligible for the program must have earned a D or F for the first semester. By completing this program, students can
raise their grade by one letter. Teachers outline what students must do to complete the program, and students must
finish these requirements by the end of the 3rd quarter. Also, students must maintain good attendance and a C average
during the 3rd quarter to be awarded the improved grade. For honor roll purposes, the original 2nd nine weeks grade will
be used to determine who makes 2nd quarter honor roll.
SUMMER SCHOOL 2016
Students are eligible to attend summer school at their zoned high school’s designated summer school site.
•
•
•
•
•
Students zoned for Lyman or Lake Brantley may attend summer school at Lyman.
Students zoned for Seminole, Crooms or Lake Mary may attend summer school at Seminole.
Students zoned for Oviedo or Hagerty may attend summer school at Oviedo.
Students zoned for Lake Howell or Winter Springs may attend summer school at Lake Howell.
Magnet school students may attend summer school at their magnet school summer site
or their zoned high school’s designated summer school site.
HIGH SCHOOL SUMMER SCHOOL SCHEDULE
Semester 1 (1/2 Credit)
June 2—20, 2016
(7:20 a.m.—1:18 p.m.)
Monday—Thursday
**Week 1 of Semester 1 will start on Thursday and students will attend Friday, June 3
Semester 2 (1/2 Credit)
June 21—July 14, 2016
(7:20 a.m.—1:18 p.m.)
SUMMER BOOT CAMP 2016
DATES: To be determined.
Monday—Thursday
16
Earn Your
Associate in Arts (A.A.) Degree
at Crooms Academy
Students at Crooms who meet specific criteria will have the
opportunity to earn the credits required to receive an A.A.
degree from Seminole State College as part of their high
school curriculum.
x
What is a Associates in Arts (A.A.) degree?
An Associates in Arts (A.A.) degree is designed for students to
transfer as a junior to a college or university to continue their
four year degree at Seminole state. Students who earn an
A.A. degree are guaranteed admission to the University of
Central Florida through DirectConnect to UCF.
What courses do I take?
What are the requirements?
x
Every effort will be made to support students to earn
college-ready scores on the Reading, Writing and
Math sections of the PERT assessment, is a
prerequisite to enrollment in General Education dual
enrollment courses. The score requirement must be
completed by the end of 10-th grade.
x
Students will be required to Maintain a 3.0 unweighted cumulative GPA, which is a prerequisite to
enrollment in General Education dual enrollment
courses.
Although each student’s pathway to the A.A. degree will be
slightly different, depending on elective choices and AP
credits, highlights of the course sequence will include:
Preparation Years
x
x
Ninth & Tenth Grades: Crooms students will take
high school courses and dual enrollment technology
electives at the high school. Preferably students
should have 2 years of World Language and 4 dual
enrollment technology electives complete by the end
of 10th grade. Students should take honors and AP
level course work when possible to best prepare for
college level course rigor.
Summers: Students will be encouraged to meet
some high school graduation requirements if needed,
such as World Language through virtual school over
the summer.
Eleventh & Twelfth Grades: Participating students
will take a combination of face to face and virtual
dual enrollment courses at Crooms. Schedule and
transportation permitting, students will also have the
option to take courses not offered at Crooms face to
face on Seminole State campus. Whenever possible,
dual enrollment General Education courses will be
scheduled to keep students in the same cohort
together with the same instructor.
What are the benefits?
The program offers students the opportunity to
complete their first two years of college (toward a
bachelor’s degree) at no cost to them. All fees (tuition,
fees and books) are covered.
Remember, a student does not officially start the AA
Pathways Program until the 11th grade year.
17
General Education
College Courses and
Descriptions
ENC1101 - English I
This is a course in the process of expository
writing. Students will read essays and
compose papers that are unified, organized,
logically developed and supported, clearly
stated and well-focused. Research
techniques are introduced and incorporated
into at least one composition. This course
partially satisfies the writing requirement of
S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Students must pass the
core assignments with a grade of "C" or
higher. Prerequisite: Test scores that indicate
ENC 1101 eligibility.
ENC1102 - English II
In this course students develop the ability to
read literary texts critically, to think logically
and creatively and to write and research
effectively. Students must pass the core
assignments with a grade of "C" or higher.
This course partially satisfies the writing
requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 with a grade of "C"
or higher.
MAC1105 - College Algebra
This course is a study of the fundamental
topics in advanced algebra with emphasis on
applications, the understanding of the
function concept and manipulative skills.
Major topics include operations on algebraic
expressions and complex numbers, solving
polynomial equations and inequalities,
absolute value equations and inequalities
and rational equations and inequalities,
applications, functions, exponents and
logarithms, graphs of polynomial, exponential
and logarithmic functions and systems of
equations and inequalities. The use of
graphing calculators will be incorporated
throughout the course. Prerequisite: MAT
1033 with a grade of "C" or higher or
sufficient score on placement test.
STA2023 - Statistical Methods I
This course introduces descriptive statistics,
probability and probability distributions,
estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis
testing, two-sample inferences, correlation
and regression and nonparametric tests.
This course is a first course in statistical
methods for those students entering a
science or business-related field.
Prerequisite: MAC 1105 or MAT 1033 or
MAT 1100 or equivalent with a grade of "C"
or higher or sufficient score on placement
test.
SPC1608 - Introduction to Oral
Communication
The purpose of this course is to improve the
basic skills of speaking and listening. Class
exercises emphasize preparing and
delivering public speeches, speaking with
clarity and variety and listening with literal
and critical comprehension.
BSC2010C - General Biology I
This course is primarily for science majors or
students with a strong biology background. It
is a study of the molecular and cellular
composition and function of living organisms.
Emphasis will be given to structure, chemical
metabolism and genetic mechanisms.
Laboratory illustrates basic biological
principles. Prerequisites or corequisites:
ENC 1101 and MAT 1033 or MAT 1100 or
higher level mathematics course.
CHM1020 – Contemporary Chemistry
This is a one-semester course for the nonscience major designed to meet the General
Education requirement for the A.A. degree.
Presumes no chemistry or mathematics
background. Basic chemical principles are
covered and related to larger topics that may
include the chemistry of water and the
atmosphere, energy sources, natural and
man-made materials and environmental
issues. Laboratory exercises during the
lecture may be used to complement course
material.
ECO2013 - Principles of Economics
(MACRO)
This is an introductory course covering the
nature, scope and methods of economics,
economic concepts and economic
institutions. Emphasis is placed upon
production, consumption, determination of
prices, distribution of income, fiscal policy,
national income determinants, money and
banking and comparative economic systems.
This course partially satisfies the writing
requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 with a grade of "C"
or higher or corequisite ENC 1101.
POS2041 - United States Federal
Government
In this course basic aspects of the federal
government are studied. Emphasis is placed
upon content and interpretation of the
Constitution, Federalism, the Congress, the
Presidency, the federal court system and the
citizen's connection to the federal
government by means of elections, political
parties, interest groups and public opinion.
This course partially satisfies the writing
requirement of S.B.E. 6A-10.030.
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 with a grade of "C"
or higher or corequisite ENC 1101.
AMH2020 - United States History 1865 to
Present
This course begins with the "Reconstruction"
period and examines the problems of
reunifying America. The nation's industrial
period gets close attention, as does the rise
of American cities and their accompanying
social and political problems. U.S.
Imperialism and the Spanish-American War
are examined. The "Progressive" period,
which includes emphasis on the American
Labor Movement and the demand for
women's rights, are included. World War I
and its aftermath in the "Roaring Twenties"
are analyzed. The Great Depression and
World War II are detailed. The conflicts of the
late twentieth century, including the Cold
War, Korea, Vietnam and the American Civil
Rights Movement are examined. This course
partially satisfies the writing requirement of
S.B.E. 6A-10.030. Prerequisite or
corequisite: ENC 1101.
HUM1020 - Introduction to Humanities
A course designed to promote the
understanding and appreciation of
humanity’s cultural heritage from the
prehistoric period to the 21st century.
Representative works in art, music, literature
and philosophy will be studied, with an
emphasis placed on the interrelationships of
these various art forms. Global culturalism
will be incorporated into the course content.
This course partially satisfies the writing
requirement of S.B. E. 6A-10.030.
Corequisite: ENC 1101.
Other Required General Education
Course:
General Education Humanities Course from
Section B.
18
Earn Your
Associate in Arts (A.A.) Degree
at Crooms Academy
Recommended
Sample Year
Schedule
Preparation
Courses
*specific courses are not required but highly recommended. Honors courses are recommended
9th Grade
10th Grade
English I
1.0
English II
1.0
Math (Algebra, Geometry, Algebra 2)
1.0
Math (Geometry, Alg2, Precalc)
1.0
Science (Biology, Chemistry, *AP Biology)
1.0
Science (Chemistry, *AP Bio/AP Chem)
1.0
World History (*AP option)
1.0
US History (*AP option)
1.0
1.0
PE/Personal Fitness
1.0
Network Concepts
3 credits
Network Maintenance & Repair
4 credits
0.5
Technology Elective – Semester 1
3 credits
Principles of Computer Programming
3 credits
Technology Elective – Semester 2
3 credits
Subtotal *COP 1000 or COP 2830
3 credits
Subtotal
13 credits
Introduction to Information Technology
0.5
AOIT Web Design & Digital Media –
Semester 1
Web Programming I
3 credits
Foundations of Programming –
Semester 1
SCVS Summer School
World Language I
1.0
World Language II
1.0
Official AA Pathways Courses
11th Grade – 1st Term
11th Grade – 2nd Term
English I
3 credits
English II
3 credits
College Algebra
(or higher math course)
3 credits
Statistical Methods I
(or higher math course)
3 credits
3 credits
Chemistry
3 credits
Technology Elective
3 credits
Technology Elective
3 credits
Subtotal
12 credits
Subtotal
12 credits
Biology
Any
G.E. Science – Area A, B, or C
12th Grade – 1st Term
12th Grade – 2nd Term
United States Federal Government
3 credits
Introduction to Oral Communications
3 credits
Principles of Economics MACRO
3 credits
Any G.E. Humanities – Area B
3 credits
Introduction to Humanities
3 credits
U.S. Government 1865 to Present
3 credits
3 credits
Technology Elective
3 credits
Technology Elective
Subtotal
12 credits
Subtotal
12 credits
college level courses in bold
For more information, contact:
Crooms A.O.I.T.
Adriana Teague
407.320.5718
[email protected]
Seminole State College
Cindi Hunter
407.708.2762
[email protected]
19
AAPathwayFAQ:
Q:WhenamIofficiallypartoftheAAPathwayProgram?
A:Notuntilyour11thgradeyearpendingyouhavecollegereadyPERT,SATorACTscoresanda
3.0GPAunweighted.
Q:WhenshouldItakethePERT?
A:YouwillneedtoonlytakethePERTtoparticipateincareer/technicaldualenrollmentcourses.
YouwillneedcollegereadyPERTscoresbytheendofyour10thgradeyeartoenrollinacademic
dualenrollmentcourses.Remember,youwillonlyhavetheopportunitytotakethePERTthree
times.Itcanbebeneficialtowaittotheendofyourtenthgradeyeartoacquireasmuch
knowledgeaspossible.
Q:WhatisanunweightedGPA?
A:AnunweightedGPAdoesnotincludeanybonusqualitypointsfortakingHonors,APorDual
Enrollmentcourses. Itaveragesyourgradesbasedon4.0qualitypointsforanA,3.0quality
pointsforaB,2.0qualitypointsforaC,1.0qualitypointsforaCand0.0qualitypointsforanF.
Q:DoIhavetotaketherecommended9thgradeand10thgradecoursestobeacceptedintothe
officialAAPathwayprogramasan11thgrader?
A:Notnecessarily.TheonlyrequirementstobepartoftheofficialAAPathwayprogramasan11th
graderarecollegereadyPERT,SATorACTscoresanda3.0GPAunweighted. H OWEVER,to
minimizeyourworkloadasanupperclassmenandmaximizeyourchanceofsuccessfully
completingtheprogram,wehighlyrecommendtheclasseslistedforthe9thand10thgrade.
Q:DoIhavetotakehonorslevelEnglish,math,scienceandsocialstudiesclassesmy9thand10th
gradeyearsinordertobeacceptedintotheofficialAAPathwayprogramasan11thgrader?
A:Nobutitishighlyrecommended.Itisimportanttorememberthatifyouareacceptedintothe
AAPathwayProgram,youwillbetakingCOLLEGELEVELEnglish,math,scienceandsocialstudies
classes. Honorsclasseswillbetterprepareyoufortherigorofthesepostsecondarycourses.
Q:IfIearnmyAAdegreeatCrooms,canIstillearnBrightFuturesscholarships?
A:Yes,studentscanstillearnanduseBrightFutureScholarshipsfortheirremainingpostͲ
secondaryeducation.
Q:WillprivateschoolsandoutofstateuniversitiesrecognizemyAAdegree?
A:Mostschoolswillrecognizethedegree,howeverapplicationofcreditstowardsaspecific
bachelor’sdegreewillvarybyuniversity. Wesuggestyoucontactuniversityadmissionsformore
specificanswers.
Q:IfIearnanAAdegreeatCrooms,willIhavetodeclaremymajorwhenIstartata
University?A:Yes.InmostcasesstudentswhohavealreadyearnedanAAdegreestartat
aUniversityasajunior.Mostuniversitiesrequirejuniorstodeclareamajor.
20
HOW DO I EARN COLLEGE CREDIT AT CROOMS?
Advanced Placement
Dual Enrollment
Entrance Requirements
Success in honors-level courses
and pre-requisite coursework
if applicable. Teacher
recommendation is suggested.
None
2.5 unweighted GPA;
Postsecondary Education
Readiness Test (PERT)
3.0 unweighted GPA for AA Pathway
PERT Scores required for
AA by end of sophomore
year: Reading 106; Writing
103; Math 123
Pre-requisites if applicable
Career Pathways
How is College Credit
Earned?
By scoring a 3 or better on the
AP Exam administered in May
Successful completion of the
course
Successful completion of a
sequence of courses and passing
of the Career Pathways exam at
end of the third course.
How does Credit Appear
on Transcript?
As a 1 credit AP course
weighted with the highest
quality points.
As a .5 or a 1.0 credit course
depending on the articulation
agreement on the high school
transcript weighted with the
highest quality points.
As 3 or 4 hours of credit on the
college transcript.
As a 1 credit course on the high
school transcript.
As 3 hours of credit on the
college transcript.
Who Accepts College
Credit?
All 2-year colleges and most
4-year colleges/universities.
All 2-year colleges and most
4-year colleges/universities
All 2-year colleges and most
4-year colleges/universities
Other Course
Requirements
Students must maintain a
passing grade in coursework in
order to sit for the exam.
Courses Offered
AP Psychology
AP World History
AP United States History
AP U.S. Government & Politics
AP Biology
AP Chemistry
AP Physics 1
AP Environmental Science
AP English Language
AP English Literature
AP Calculus AB
AP Computer Science A
AP Computer Science
Principles
AP Comparative Government
and Politics
Digital Information Technology
is the first course in the
sequence.
Including but not limited to:
^ CISCO Network Fund.
^ CISCO Router Technology.
^ CISCO Scaling Networks
^ CISCO Connecting Networks
^ SQL
^ Data Driven Websites
^ Database Management
^ Network Concepts
^ Net Comp Main/Repair
^ Web Applications
^ Web Programming I
^ Web Programming II
^ Bitmap Graphics
^ Intro to Digital Media
^ Office Applications
^ Adv. Office Applications
^ Principles Comp. Program
^ iPhone Programming
^ Android Programming
# C# Programming
# Advanced C#
# Intro. to UNIX
# Intro. to Internet. Security
+ Intro to IP Telephony
+ Intro to Wireless Tech.
*In all of the above courses, students who enroll must remain until the completion of the course.
^ Courses are taught at Crooms by a Crooms instructor
# Courses are online courses taken at Crooms — see Guidance to add to your schedule
+Courses are taken on campus at SSC — see Guidance to add to your schedule
GUIDANCE INFORMATION
GRADE SCALE
The following is the grading system for Crooms Academy
of Information Technology:
Letter
Percentage
A
90–100
B
80–89
C
70–79
D
60–69
F
50—59
21
RECOGNITION OF
ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE
Honor Roll, Dean’s List, and Principal’s List are open to
all students. These lists are prepared as follows:
1.
Grade point averages are weighted and include all
courses for which a letter grade is given.
2.
Students carrying at least three on campus courses are
eligible.
3.
Any grade lower than a “C” automatically disqualifies
a student.
4.
The minimum GPA for Honor Roll is 3.0, for the
Dean’s List is 3.5, and for the Principal’s List is 3.83.
These averages are not rounded off; that is a GPA of
2.99, 3.49, and 3.79 respectively are not sufficient.
EOC/COMPETENCY TESTING REQUIREMENT
According to Florida law, students must meet all academic
requirements in order to receive a standard high school
diploma from a public school. This means that students
must take required courses, earn the correct number
of credits, and maintain a passing grade point average.
Students who meet these requirements, but do not pass
the required assessments for a high school diploma, will
receive a Certificate of Completion. Students are to have
taken and passed the Algebra 1 and 10th grade Reading
FSA. Concordant scores are as follows:
GRADE POINT AVERAGE
CALCULATION
Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) is based on final
grades and determined by dividing the total number of
courses attempted into the total number of quality points
earned. Any other course for which no letter grade is
given, is not included.
Students have a Florida GPA which is unweighted and a
weighted District GPA which is calculated using different
weights for various grades.
Honors, Dual Enrollment and Advanced Placement
courses weight grades of C or better. The chart below
indicates the quality points each grade carriers for both
types of GPA.
Letter
Grade
A
B
C
D
F
Quality
Points
Quality
Points
Quality
Points
Unweighted
Honors
Dual & AP
4
4.5
5
3
3.5
4
2
2.5
3
1
1
1
0
0
0
Algebra 1 - PERT 97
FSA Reading - ACT 19 or SAT 430
22
FLORIDA’S BRIGHT FUTURES SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM
*Subject to change with legislation
2015-16 Award Amounts
Florida Academic
Scholars Award
Florida Medallion
Scholars Award
Florida Gold Seal
Vocational Scholars*
4 Year/Semester Hour
Award—$103.00
4 Year/Semester Hour
Award—$77.00
Career Certificate—$39.00
2 Year/Semester Hour
Award—$63.00
2 Year/Semester Hour
Award—$63.00
Applied Technology
Diploma—$39.00
Technical Degree
Education—$48.00
3.5
Weighted GPA
Opportunities for
Additional Credit
3.0
3.0 cumulative with
a 3.5 in 3 program
courses
4 English
4 English
4 English
4 Mathematics
4 Mathematics
4 Mathematics
3 Science
3 Science
3 Science
3 Social Science
3 Social Science
3 Social Science
2 Foreign Language
2 Foreign Language
1 Practical Art/Fine Art
1 Physical Education
Required Credits
3 sequential technology
classes with 3.5 GPA in
these courses
Community Service
Test Scores
100 Hours
75 Hours
30 Hours
Class of 2016
SAT = 1290 or
ACT = 29
Class of 2016
SAT = 1170 or
ACT = 26
Class of 2016
ACT Scores
Reading 19
English 17
Math 19 or
SAT Scores
Verbal 440
Math 440 or
PERT Scores
Reading 106
Writing 103
Math 114
In order to be eligible for an initial award from any of the three types of scholarships under the Florida Bright Futures
Scholarship Program, a student must:
• Be a Florida resident. Earn a standard Florida high school diploma
• Be accepted by and enrolled in an eligible Florida public or independent postsecondary education institution.
• Be enrolled for at least 6 semester credit hours or the equivalent in quarter hours or clock hours.
• Not have been found guilty of, or entered a plea of no contest to, a felony charge.
• Apply by August 31, 2016 after high school graduation.
The guidance counselors will assist all seniors with applying for Bright Futures Scholarship.
FLORIDA’S BRIGHT FUTURES SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM
The Office of Student Financial Assistance (OFSA) State
Programs, within the Florida Department of Education,
administers a variety of postsecondary educational statefunded grants and scholarships and provides information
to students, parents and high school and postsecondary
professionals. The Florida Bright Futures Scholarship
Program established three lottery-funded scholarships to
reward Florida high school graduates for high academic
achievement. The Florida Bright Futures Scholarship
Program is comprised of the following three awards:
Florida Academic Scholars Award (FAS) (including
Academic Top Scholars); Florida Medallion Scholars
Award (FMS); Florida Gold Seal Vocational Scholars
Award (GSV). Each award level has different academic
criteria for eligibility and receives a different award
amount. Contact OSFA at 1-888-827-2004 or visit www.
floridastudentfinancialaid.org/ssfad/factsheet/BF.htm.
To apply for Initial Eligibility the student will need to:
1. Submit a fully completed (error free) Initial Student
Florida Financial Aid Application during his/her last year
in high school (after December 1 and prior to graduation)
by accessing www.FloridaStudentFinancialAid.org (select
23
State Grants, Scholarships and Applications, then Apply
Here). The application gives the Florida Department of
Education (FDOE) permission to evaluate the student’s
high school transcript and standardized test scores for
eligibility for a Bright Futures Scholarship and other state
scholarships and grants; 2.Apply during his/her last year
in high school, before graduation, or forfeit all future
eligibility for a Bright Futures Scholarship. Application
on the website, from the home or school computer,
provides opportunity to initiate the application, view its
status, update personal information and check application
progress throughout the school year. Early application,
even with only partial information to complete the
application, is recommended. Applications are available
directly on the Florida State Department of Education
website: www.floridastudentfinancialaid.org/SSFAD.
home/uamain.htm. Award amounts for the 2015-2016
academic year will be available on the Bright Futures
website in summer 2015, after the legislative session. www.
floridastudentfinancialaid.org/SSFAD/bf/awardamt.htm.
CAREER PATHWAYS
Career Pathways is a partnership between Seminole
County Public Schools (SCPS) and Seminole State College
of Florida designed to provide at no cost to the students
the opportunity to get a head-start in preparing for college
and a career. How does it work? A student begins
Career Pathways in high school by exploring career
interests through a specified sequence of high school
Career and Technical Education elective courses. Upon
successful completion of the required sequence of courses
(B or above average required in the courses), the student
will be eligible to take a college-level assessment test. If
the student passes the assessment, enrolls in Seminole
State within 24 months after graduating from high school
and passes at least one college credit course, he/she will
Career Pathway
Credits
Earned
College Savings
receive college credit for specified courses which lead
to the completion of an Associate in Science Degree or
Technical Certificate. In program areas that are common
to both Seminole State and Valencia College, Career
Pathways credits may be awarded at either college. There
is no credit-hour fee charged for these Career Pathways
college credits.
Below is a listing of Seminole County Career Pathways
programs, including college credits earned and college
savings at Seminole State (based on 2014 – 2015 fees), for
students successfully passing the assessment test(s). Please
see the Seminole County Public Schools website for
specific programs in each high school.
Career Pathway
Credits
Earned
College Savings
Accounting
9
$939.42
Digital Design
3
$313.14
Allied Health
3-12
$313.14-$939.42
Drafting & Design Tech
3
$313.14
Architectural Drafting
3
$313.14
Early Childhood Ed
3-6
$313.14-$626.28
Automotive Service Tech
3
$313.14
Interior Design
1-4
$313.14-$626.28
Business Software Applic.
6
$626.28
New Media
3
$313.14
Computer Programming
6-9
$626.28-$939.42
Television Production
3
$313.14
Culinary Arts**
6
$626.28
**Articulated through Valencia College
Web Design
3
$313.14
Web Programming
3
$313.14
24
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: FINE ARTS/ELECTIVES
Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4
1303300 (Year 1),1303310 (Year 2), 1303320
(Year 3) 1303330 (Year 4)
Prerequisite: None for Chorus 1
1 Credit
Grades 9-12
Instrumental Techniques 1, 2, 3, & 4
(Steel Band)
1302420 (Year 1), 1302430 (Year 2), 1302440
(Year 3), 1302450 (Year 4)
1 Credit
Grade 9-12
Chorus I is to enable students to develop basic to
advanced individual and ensemble skills in choral
performance through preparation of musical theory, music
history, and varied high school choral literature. Emphasis
will be placed on healthy and expressive singing, accurate
interpretation of notation, and development of critical and
aesthetic response to music.
On and off campus performances are
required.
Students will develop basic performance skills on selected
percussion instruments in small ensemble and solo
settings using a varied repertoire of musical literature.
Performance techniques, music knowledge, critical
analysis, and aesthetic response will be emphasized.
On and off campus performances are
required.
Keyboarding 1, 2 and 3 (Piano)
13011360 (Year 1),
1304370 (Year2), 1304380(Year 3)
1 Credit
Grades 9-12
Fine Arts/Electives
Keyboarding is designed to meet the student’s musical
needs according to his or her level of piano enrolled at
the school as well as the piano skill prior to entering.
The student may work at his/her own pace, while
displaying mastery of skill in the time allotted for each
grading period. However, students may surpass required
piano skills based on level of achievement at any time.
Keyboard classes will address, but are not limited to
intermediate rudiment piano skills/techniques; music
theory; scales/chords; repertoire; style/interpretation and
memorization; music history and technology; performance
recitals and programs.
On and off campus performances are
required.
Leadership Skills Development
2400300 (Year 1), 2400310 (Year 2),
0500520 (Year 3)
Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA and by application only
1 Credit
Grades 10-12
Leadership is comprised of students who hold leadership
positions on campus. Priority is given to student
government and senior class officers, then other club or
organization officers, publications, editors, etc.. The class
is project-focused and offers students the opportunity
to learn about leadership styles and techniques, group
dynamics, and team building. Students participate in
and lead a variety of school and community activities.
Applications are available in guidance and
due by February 26.
Students in keyboarding and chorus perform before
parents and community members at the holidays and in
the spring.
25
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: WORLD LANGUAGES
Spanish 1
0708340
Prerequisite: None
1 Credit
Grades 9-12
This introductory course is for students with little or no
prior knowledge of Spanish. Students are exposed to
authentic materials and text rich in culture and literature.
They will develop listening and speaking skills through
conversation. The present tense of reading and writing
skills will be emphasized.
Spanish 2
0708350
Prerequisite: Spanish 1
1 Credit
Spanish 4 expands the skills acquired by the students in
Spanish 3. Specific content includes, but is not limited
to more advanced language structures and idiomatic
expressions, with emphasis on conversational skills. There
is additional growth in vocabulary for practical purposes,
including writing. Reading selections are varied and taken
from the target language newspapers, magazines, and
literary works.
French 1
0701320
Prerequisite: None
Grades 9-12
This course emphasizes reading and writing at the
intermediate level, with a focus on the past tenses.
Students will continue to develop their speaking and
listening skills as well. Structures taught in Spanish I will
be reviewed prior to the presentation of new material.
Students will gain a better understanding of various
aspects of the Hispanic culture.
1 Credit
1 Credit
Spanish 3 Honors
0708360
Prerequisite: Spanish 2
Grades 10-12
This course focuses on everyday communication and
prepares the students to speak and write appropriately in
the language, in a variety of situations. Listening, speaking,
reading, and writing skills at the advanced level are
learned and applied through the use of authentic materials
from Spain and Latin America. The course offers further
insights into the Hispanic culture.
Spanish 4 Honors
0708370
Prerequisite: Spanish 3
Grades 11-12
1 Credit
Grades 9-12
French 1 introduces students to the target language and
its culture. The student will develop communicative
skills in all three modes of communication and crosscultural undertanding. Emphsis is placed on proficient
communication in the languge. An introduction to
reading and writing is also included as well as culture,
connections, comparisons, and communities.
Virtual options for world languages include:
Latin, German, Japanese, and Chinese.
See FLVS.net for other options but choose
Seminole County’s virtual school option if
available.
World Languages
graphic from inlingua.edu
26
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: PHYSICAL EDUCATION
WELLNESS & TECHNOLOGY
These courses integrate technology into the curriculum.
Wellness education revolves around the total person’s
intellectual, physical, emotional, spiritual, and social
fitness. Each person must develop his or her unique
pathway to wellness. A key factor in achieving wellness
is developing an integrated and balanced lifestyle.
The curriculum for personal fitness and health life
management skills provide students with multiple
opportunities to understand the importance of health
concepts and significance of lifestyle on one’s health
and fitness. Physical Education and Health are the
only subjects which, by the very nature of their content
have the potential to affect how a person will feel every
moment of every day for the rest of his or her life.
.5 Credit
Personal Fitness
Graduation Requirement
1501300
Prerequisite: None
Grades 9-12
The Personal Fitness curriculum focuses on students
learning the benefits of an active lifestyle and how
to become their own personal trainer. Students will
learn how to train using their heart rate as a guide and
measuring tool. Polar heart rate monitors, pedometers,
FX Cycles (virtual workouts), treadmill, recumbent cycle,
Kasier and universal weight training systems are utilized.
Hands on software and hardware (Trifit) packages
are utilized in this course. This course is required for
graduation.
Team Sports 1
1503350
Prerequisite: None
Physical Education
.5 Credit
Grades 9-12
This course focuses on the origin, development of
fundamental skills, techniques, rules and terminology
of selected team sports. Safety practices such as injury
prevention through proper warm-up and cool-down
procedures will be emphasized. Students will learn various
fitness activities and exhibit an improved or maintained
level of health related fitness. Students will describe and
demonstrate strategies utilized in selected team sports.
.5 Credit
Team Sports 2
1503360
Prerequisite: Team Sports 1
Grades 9-12
This course focuses on the development of fundamental
and advanced skills, techniques, rules and terminology, and
offensive and defensive strategies of selected team sports. It
continues to cover topics taught in Team Sports I.
Individual and Dual Sports 1, 2, 3
1502410(Year 1), 1502420(Year 2),
1502430(Year3)
.5 Credit
Grades 9-12
Individual and Dual Sports classes are designed to provide
students with opportunities to acquire the knowledge of
strategies in individual and dual sports play and develop
skill in selected individual and dual sports while maintaining
and/or improving their personal fitness. Examples include
archery, badminton, racquetball, horseshoes, pickleball and
bocce ball..
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: LANGUAGE ARTS
English 1
Graduation Requirement
1001310
1 Credit
English 2 Honors
Graduation Requirement
1001350
Grade 9
This course provides instruction in the fundamentals
of grammar, writing and vocabulary, and literature
(including nonfiction), poetry, and drama. Reading and
writing strategies are based on FSA power benchmarks
as assessed on the 9th grade FSA reading test. These
strategies will be used to enhance higher level thinking
skills. ** All students testing below grade level (levels
1&2) on the 8th and 9th grade FSA Reading test will also be
placed in an Intensive Reading class.
English 1 Honors
Graduation Requirement
1001320
1 Credit
1 Credit
English 2
Graduation Requirement
1001340
Grade 10
This course continues to incorporate reading and writing
skills developed in English 1. Students will be exposed
to world literature through various projects, papers,
presentations, and readings. Emphasis will be placed on
literatures of various cultures (fiction and nonfiction) as
well as a variety of genres. Additionally, students will
complete intensive practice activities reinforcing power
benchmarks needed to succeed on the FSA Writing exam
(given in March) and FSA Reading (given in April).
** All students testing below grade level (levels 1&2) on
the 9th and 10th grade FSA Reading test will also be placed
in an Intensive Reading class.
Grade 10
This course continues to incorporate higher level reading
and writing skills developed in English 1. Students will
be exposed to world literature through various projects,
papers, presentations, and readings. Emphasis will be
placed on literatures of various cultures (fiction and
nonfiction) as well as a variety of genres. Additionally,
students will complete intensive practice activities
reinforcing power benchmarks needed to succeed on the
FSA Writing exam (given in March) and FSA Reading
exam (given in April). Students in this course can expect
outside reading and writing assignments.
English 3
Graduation Requirement
1001370
Grade 9
This course provides advanced instruction in the
fundamentals of grammar, writing and vocabulary, and
literature (including nonfiction), poetry, and drama.
Reading and writing strategies are based on FSA power
benchmarks as assessed on the 9th grade FSA reading
test. These strategies will be used to enhance higher
level thinking skills. Students in this course should expect
outside reading and writing assignments.
1 Credit
27
1 Credit
Grade 11
This course continues to incorporate higher level reading
skills through a survey of American Literature. Writing
exercises become more extensive with emphasis on multiparagraph essays as well as documented papers, position
papers, and research papers. Additionally, students will
complete intensive practice activities reinforcing power
benchmarks needed to succeed on the FSA Writing exam
(given in March) and FSA Reading (given in April). SAT
and college preparation become more focused. ** All
students testing below grade level (levels 1&2) on the 9th,
10th and 11th grade FSA Reading test will also be placed in
an Intensive Reading class.
English 3 Honors
Graduation Requirement
1001380
1 Credit
Grade 11
Language Arts
This course continues to incorporate higher level reading
skills through a survey of American Literature. Writing
exercises become more extensive with emphasis on multiparagraph essays as well as documented papers, position
papers, and research papers. SAT and college preparation
become more focused. Additionally, students will
complete intensive practice activities reinforcing power
benchmarks needed to succeed on the FSA Writing exam
(given in March) and FSA Reading exam (given in April).
Students in this course can expect outside reading and
writing.
28
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: LANGUAGE ARTS
English 4 FL College Prep
Graduation Requirement
1001405
1 Credit
Grade 12
Placement in this course is required for students
requesting a 12th grade level language arts course who
have not demonstrated college readiness as determined
by test scores on the PERT, ACT or SAT. This course
incorporates reading and writing study through writing
a variety of informative text using grade-level writing
craft and through the in-depth reading and analysis
of informational selections in order to develop critical
reading and writing skills necessary for success in college
courses. This course prepares students for successful
completion of Florida college English courses. The
benchmarks reflect the Florida College Competencies
necessary for entry-level college courses and are also
related to the College and Career Readiness (CCR)
anchor standards, the exit standards of Florida’s K-12
Common Core Standards.
English 4 Honors
Graduation Requirement
1001410
1 Credit
Grade 12
AP English Language & Composition
1001420
1 Credit
Grade 11-12
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an
understanding of the semantic, structural, and rhetorical
aspects of the English language. The course is designed to
develop flexible writers who are able to write in various
modes for a variety of purposes. Based on the results of
the Advanced Placement exam, college credit may be
awarded by participating colleges and universities.
AP English Literature & Composition
1001430
1 Credit
Grade 11-12
Students study and discuss great works of literature from
various genres and periods. Designed to develop the
students’ understanding of style, subject,
and audience, frequent reading and writing
assignments focus on the critical analysis of
literature. Based on the results of
the Advanced Placement exam,
college credit may be awarded
by participating colleges and
universities.
In this course the primary emphasis on writing is critical
analysis of literature and refining composition skills.
Writing assignments include an extensive research
paper that pairs with the student’s professional portfolio.
Additional writing projects include the college essay as
well as extensive SAT practice. The literature is a survey
in British literature and the course prepares students for
college programs. Students in this course can expect
outside reading and writing.
Language Arts/Reading
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: READING
High School Reading Placement
ENGLISH 1 CAR-PD OR ENGLISH 2 CAR-PD
Students in grades 9 and 19 who do not meet the
requirements for satisfactory performance in English
language arts, may be enrolled the following year in and
accelerated reading support program.
The District “may serve Level 2 students who do not
need instruction in decoding and text reading efficiency
in content area classes through a content area reading
intervention. Teachers of these classes must complete
the one hundred fifty (150) hour Content Area Reading
Professional Development (CAR-PD) package or complete
the Next Generation Content Area Reading Professional
Development (CAR-PD) package.”
Schools will continue to make decisions that are in the
best interest of each student regarding course enrollment
and instructional support for students entering their
senior year who have not demonstrated college readiness
on the SAT, ACT, or through mastery of standards
in mathematics or English language arts courses.
Acceleration support courses taken in grades 9-12 may be
taken only as elective credits for high school graduation.
Acceleration support instruction may not be in lieu of
English credits required for graduation.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: READING
29
These courses are assigned based on assessment results
9th Grade Intensive Language Arts
1000400
2 credits
Grade 9
This direct instruction course is a 90 minute block
created for students who are not fluent readers and need
an intense level of additional support on reading skills
necessary to pass the FSA. Using the Passport to Reading
Journeys III program, the class provides direct instruction
in decoding, word analysis, fluency, systematic vocabulary
development, and reading comprehension. By working in
the web-based program ReadingPlus, students are assessed
and then receive individualized reading intervention to
build reading efficiency and comprehension. Placement
is based on previous FSA level and analysis of student’s
other assessments.
1 credit
Grade 9
This SOAR I course is a single block created for
fluent readers who need a less intense level of support
of literacy skills necessary to pass FSA reading. The
course uses a variety of texts to teach students strategies to
develop and build literacy strategies and comprehension
and writing skills. Students work on vocabulary and
critical thinking skills while reading both fiction and
non-fiction material. The ReadingPlus software program
provides a computerized supplement for independent
practice for 30 minutes three times per week. Placement
is based on previous FSA level and other individual
assessments.
10th Grade Intensive Reading
1000410
2 credits
1 credit
This SOAR II course is a single block created
for fluent readers who need a less intense level of
additional support on literacy skills necessary to pass the
FSA. The course uses thematic text sets in a literature
circle format to develop and build literacy strategies
and comprehension and writing skills. Students work
on vocabulary and critical thinking skills while reading
both fiction and non-fiction material. The Reading Plus
software program provides a computerized supplement
for independent practice for 30 minutes three times per
week. Placement is based on previous FSA level and other
individual assessments.
11th Grade Intensive Reading
1000410
1 credit
Grade 11
This SOAR III course is a single block created
for fluent readers who need a less intense level of support
of literacy skills necessary to pass FSA reading. The
course uses a variety of texts to teach students strategies to
develop and build literacy strategies and comprehension
and writing skills. Students work on vocabulary and
critical thinking skills while reading both fiction and nonfiction material. In addition, students are focused on the
FSA retake in the fall and ACT prep in the spring. The
Reading Plus software program provides a computerized
supplement for independent practice for 30 minutes three
times per week. Placement is based on previous FSA level
and other individual assessments.
Grade 10
1 credit
12th Grade Intensive Reading
1000410
Grade 11/12
This SOAR IV course is a single block created
for fluent readers who need a less intense level of support
of literacy skills necessary to pass FSA reading. The
course uses a variety of texts to teach students strategies to
develop and build literacy strategies and comprehension
and writing skills. Students work on vocabulary and
critical thinking skills while reading both fiction and nonfiction material. In addition, students are focused on the
FSA retake in the fall and ACT prep in the spring. The
Reading Plus software program provides a computerized
supplement for independent practice for 30 minutes three
times per week. Placement is based on previous FSA level
and other individual assessments.
Reading
This program is a 90 minute block created for
students who are not yet fluent readers and need
additional support on reading skills necessary to pass the
FSA. The course utilizes whole group and small group
individualized instruction, as well as independent learning
opportunities through computer assisted instruction, audio
books and independent reading. This program is wideranging; building fluency, vocabulary and comprehension.
Placement is based on previous FSA level and other
individual assessments. By working in the web-based
program ReadingPlus, students are assessed and then
receive individualized reading intervention to build
reading efficiency and comprehension.
10th Grade Intensive Reading Grade 10
30
Mathematics
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: MATHEMATICS
Intensive Math Algebra
Prerequisite: This course is assigned based on
assessment results
1 Credit
Grades 9-11
Intensive Math Geometry
Prerequisite: This course is assigned based on
assessment results
1 Credit
Grades 9-12
This course helps students to prepare to take and pass the
Algebra 1 EOC.
This course helps students to prepare to take and pass the
Geometry EOC.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: MATHEMATICS
Algebra I
Graduation Requirement
1200310
1 Credit
Grade 9
This course is designed to provide the foundation for
future secondary mathematics courses and develop
skills needed to solve mathematical problems. Topics
shall include, but are not limited to: functions, linear
equations and inequalities, systems of linear equation and
inequalities, polynomials, simplifying radical and rational
expressions, solving and graphing quadratic equations,
exponential functions, linear regression analysis including
residuals and introductory probability. Additionally,
students will work on test taking skills and problem
solving techniques to prepare for the End of Course Exam
(EOC). Algebra I or its equivalent course is required for
high school graduation.
Algebra I Honors
Graduation Requirement
1200320
Prerequisite: Advanced 8th Grade Math, Algebra 1
or teacher recommendation
1 Credit
Grade 9
Algebra I Honors includes a rigorous, in-depth study of
all of the topics included in Algebra I as well as Binomial
theorem, solving radical and rational equations, systems of
nonlinear functions, inverse functions, deeper exploration
of arithmetic and geometric sequences and series. A
graphing calculator is required for Algebra I Honors. It
is strongly recommended that students taking this course
have successfully completed their previous math course.
Additionally, students will work on test taking skills and
problem solving techniques to prepare for the End of
Course Exam (EOC). Algebra I or its equivalent course is
required for high school graduation.
1 Credit
Geometry
Graduation Requirement
1206310
Prerequisite: Algebra I
Grades 9-10
Geometry Honors
Graduation Requirement
1206320
Prerequisite: Algebra I Honors
or teacher recommendation
Grades 9-10
This course includes a rigorous, in-depth study of all of
the Geometry topics as well as, but not limited to: in
depth constructions, Cavalieri’s principle, proving and
applying laws of sines and cosines in non-right triangles,
and conic sections. A graphing calculator is required. It
is strongly recommended that students taking this course
have successfully completed their previous math course.
Additionally, students will work on test taking skills and
problem solving techniques to prepare for the End of
Course Exam (EOC).
1 Credit
Liberal Arts Math 2
1208300
Prerequisite: Geometry
Grades 10-12
Topics include but are not limited to mortgage
calculations, deferred payments with interest, net worth,
remainder theorem, dividing polynomials, solving
quadratic equations and systems of linear and nonlinear
functions, finite geometric series, graphing polynomial,
exponential, piecewise, and step functions, real world
linear and exponential models, conic sections, parallel and
perpendicular lines, complex numbers, simplify radical
and rational expressions, two-way tables and conditional
probabilities, experimental design, margin of error.
Algebra II
1200330
Prerequisite: Geometry
1 Credit
Grades 9-12
This course is designed to continue the study of the
structure of Algebra by providing the foundations for
applying these skills to other math and science fields.
Topics include, but are not limited to: complex numbers,
polynomial functions and their inverses, systems of linear
and nonlinear equations and inequalities, polynomials,
rational and radical functions, reciprocal functions,
exponential and logarithmic functions, and graphing and
transformations of all the previously named functions
along with trigonometry, sequences and series, conditional
probability, normal distributions, introductory inference
and margin of error, categorical and quantitative variable
statistical analysis.
Mathematics
This course is designed to develop critical thinking
skills in mathematical situations using deduction and
discovery. Practical applications of geometric skills and
concepts in the real world are included. Topics include,
but not limited to: logic and reasoning, proofs, the study
of Euclidean geometry of lines, planes, angles, triangles,
similarity, rigid transformations, congruence, geometric
inequalities, explorations with polygons and circles, area
and volume, and constructions. Additionally, students will
work on test taking skills and problem solving techniques
to prepare for the End of Course Exam (EOC).
1 Credit
31
32
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: MATHEMATICS
Algebra II Honors
1200340
Prerequisite: Algebra 1 Honors, Geometry Honors
or teacher recommendation
1 Credit
Grades 9-12
This course includes a rigorous, in-depth study of all
the Algebra II topics except rational expressions and
equations, absolute value equations and inequalities,
recursive formulas for arithmetic and geometric
sequences, and normal distributions, which students are
expected to have a solid understanding in from Algebra I
Honors. Additional topics studied in this course include,
but are not limited to: piecewise functions, binomial
expansion theorem, discontinuities, asymptotic behavior
in rational graphs, non-linear systems of equations, conic
sections and partial sums of arithmetic and geometric
series. A graphing calculator is required. It is strongly
recommended that students taking this course have
successfully completed their previous math course.
Pre-Calculus Honors
1202340
Prerequisite: Algebra II Honors or Analysis of Functions
and Trigonometry, teacher recommendation
1 Credit
Grades 10-12
Pre-Calculus is designed to provide a foundation for the
study of Calculus. Topics include analysis of algebraic,
exponential, polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and
trigonometric functions, intermediate and extreme value
theorems, analytic geometry, vectors, polar and parametric
equations, complex number system, and infinite series,
with an introduction to limits and continuity. A graphing
calculator is required.
Mathematics
Mathematics for College Readiness
1200700
Prerequisite: Teacher and Guidance Recommendation
1 Credit
Grade 12
This course is designed to meet the needs of seniors who
plan to attend college. Projects designed to help students
research and apply to colleges, make a preliminary
two-year course plan, and schedule first semester college
classes will be incorporated throughout the year. Topics
include but are not limited to simplify polynomial
expressions with math properties and exponents, prove
polynomial identities, simplify and solve rational and
radical equations, solve systems of equations graphically
and algebraically, transform polynomial functions,
statistical linear regression analysis, and analyze domain
and range. This course is supplemented with a graphing
calculator. The standards align with the Mathematics
Postsecondary Readiness Competencies deemed necessary
for entry-level college courses.
.5 Credit
Analysis of Functions
1201315
Prerequisite: Algebra II
Grades 10-12
This course is designed to give students the knowledge
and understanding that will enable them to make
appropriate decisions in financial management. Topics
include but are not limited to linear equations and
inequalities, systems of linear equations, exponential
growth and decay, simple & compound interest, future
value, present value, finance charges, deferred payments,
fees associated with a mortgage, balloon mortgage, points,
personal budget, federal income tax, insurance options
and fees, retirement plans, diversification in investments,
stocks and bonds.
Trigonometry
1211300
Prerequisite: Analysis of Functions
.5 Credit
Grades 10-12
This course is a semester-long follow up to Analysis
of Functions prepares students to be successful in
Precalculus. Topics include but are not limited to circular
functions; trigonometric identities; graphs of trigonometric
functions; particular and general solutions of trigonometric
equations; and solutions of right and oblique triangles;
prove Pythagorean identities; using trigonometry in
a complex plane; using trigonometry with vectors. A
graphing calculator is required.
AP Calculus AB or
AP Calculus BC
1202310/1202320
Prerequisite: Pre-calculus, Teacher Recommendation
1 Credit Each
Grade 11-12
AP Calculus is designed for the highly motivated collegebound student who wishes to pursue college level work
while still in high school. These courses are intended
for students who have a thorough knowledge of college
preparatory mathematics and elementary (algebraic,
trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic) functions.
AB (Calculus 1) topics include limits and continuity,
derivatives and integrals, and their applications. BC
(Calculus 1 and 2) includes all AB topics with additional
topics in sequences and series, polars, parametrics, and
vectors. Based on the results of the AP exam, college
credit may be awarded by participating colleges and
universities. A graphing calculator is required.
** Only request either AP Calculus AB or BC
for your math credit. You must take Calculus
AB before Calculus BC.
33
Environmental
Science (2001340)
9th grade
Physical Science Std
(2003310)
11th grade
Physics Std
(2003380)/ Physics
Hon (2003390) or
any Science
12th grade
Chem Std
(2003340)/Chem
Hon (2003350)
11th grade
Biology Std
(2000310E)
10th grade
Chemistry Std
(2003340) or Any
Science
12th grade
SCIENCE PROGRESSION PLAN
2016–2017
Physical Science
Hon (2003320)
10th grade
Physics Hon
(2003390) or any
AP
11th grade
Chemistry Hon
(2003350)
10th grade
AP Biology (2000340)/
Biology Hon (200320)
9th grade
Chem Std
(2003340)/Chem
Hon (2003350)
10th grade
Chem Hon (2003350)
/Physics Hon
(2003390)
11th grade
Biology Std
(2000310)
9th grade
Physical Science Std
(2003310)
10th grade
Physics Std
(2003380)/Physics Hon
(2003390)oranyAP
11th grade
Any Hon/AP
Science
12th grade
Chem Std
(2003340)/Chem
Hon (2003350)
11th grade
Any Std/Hon/AP
Science
12th grade
34
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: SCIENCE
Environmental Science
2001340
Prerequisite: Administrative recommendation
1 Credit
Grade 9
This course will help students strengthen their skills in
the areas of academic performance, learning strategies
and critical thinking, as they study the interactions
between organisms and the environment, biogeochemical
cycles, the evolution of life on earth and energy flow.
Environmental science is the first year of a 2-course
sequence intended to prepare the identified students
for success in Biology 1 (a graduation requirement)
in the second year of the sequence, students will be
administratively enrolled in Biology 1.
Biology I
Graduation Requirement
Grade 9: 200031009
Grade 10 2000310E
Prerequisite: Grade 9—None
Prerequisite: Grade 10—Environmental Science
1 Credit
Grade 9-10
This course is designed to help students develop skills
in the areas of cooperative learning, critical thinking, the
scientific method, and the utilization of technology in
the research of contemporary problems and issues. The
study of life processes will include measurement, cellular
biology, genetics, ecology, animal and plant anatomy and
physiology, as well as an introduction to the structure and
function of the human body. Laboratory activities and
safe laboratory techniques are an essential component of
the course.
Biology I Honors
Graduation Requirement
2000320
Prerequisite: None
Science
1 Credit
Grade 9
In this course students will explore the relationship
between organisms and their environments, and between
individual cells and biological systems. The processes
of life will be approached from the viewpoints of cellular
structure and function, genetics and molecular biology,
classification of organisms, physiology, biochemistry,
and biological changes through time. Students will
be presented scientific concepts at an advanced level.
Laboratory activities are a significant component in the
course and offer students an opportunity to become
familiar with scientific instruments and experimental
methods.
Physical Science
2003310
Prerequisite: Biology and teacher
recommendation. Students that have earned a
chemistry credit are NOT eligible for this course
1 Credit
Grades 11-12
This course will prepare students understand the role
of chemical and physical technology in everyday life
and society. Laboratory activities and safe laboratory
techniques are an essential component and allow students
to become familiar with scientific instruments and methods
as well as provide opportunities to study the concepts
of matter, energy, and forces, and their applications
through exploratory investigations and activities. This
course fulfills the graduation requirement for an “Equally
Rigorous Course” as defined by the Florida Department
of Education.
Chemistry I
2003340
Prerequisite: Physical Science
1 Credit
Grade 10-12
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to
the study of the composition, properties and changes
associated with matter. Some topics include atomic
structure of matter, periodic table as an informational tool,
types of chemical bonding, kinetic molecular theory, and
water solutions. Laboratory activities and safe laboratory
techniques are essential components of the course.
Chemistry I Honors
2003350
Prerequisite: Biology I Honors
1 Credit
Grade 9-12
In this course, students will study composition, properties
and changes associated with matter. The content includes:
measurement, classification and structure of matter, atomic
theory, moles, periodicity, chemical bonding, formula
writing, nomenclature, chemical equations, stoichiometry,
kinetic theory, gas laws, acids and bases, energy
relationships, solids, liquids and solutions. Laboratory
activities and safe laboratory techniques are taught.
1 Credit
Physics I Honors
2003390
Prerequisite: Geometry
Grades 10-12
This course will provide students with an introductory
study of the theories and laws governing the interaction
of matter, energy, and the forces of nature. The content
shall include, but is not limited to, mechanics, wave
phenomena, electricity, magnetism, optics and sound.
Laboratory activities and safe laboratory techniques are
essential components of the course.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: SCIENCE
Earth Space Science
2001310
Prerequisite: None
1 Credit
Grade 12
Earth/Space Science is a laboratory course focusing on the
study of space, geologic structures and force, the waters
on our planet, and the atmospheric forces that shape
our world. Through experimentation and investigation,
students will explore geologic time, space exploration,
the solar system, and the universe. Students will use web
2.0 tools, interactive experiences, higher-order thinking,
collaborative projects, and real-world application through
labs and a variety of assessments. Upon completion of
the course, students will have a clear understanding of
the dynamic forces at work in the world around them,
becoming better caretakers of our planet.
Experimental Science 1 Honors
2002340
Prerequisite: Another science course must be
taken concurrently
1 Credit
Grades 10-12
The Experimental Science course is designed to promote
research experiences for those motivated and inquiring
science students who are willing to commit to the
time and effort that this course requires. This course
is open to students in grades 10—12 but is specifically
developed for interested and creative students who want
an opportunity to acquire research and laboratory skills
through planning and implementing investigations which
may lead to advancing career and educational goals.
Original research that relates to real-world issues will be
encouraged with the supervising science teacher’s help
in facilitating laboratory time and equipment needed.
Research conducted in this course should be suitable for
participation in a variety of individual and team projects
and contests such as local science fairs, SECME, and
NCSSMST. This course does not fulfill the 4
credit science requirement.
1 Credit
AP Biology
2000340
Prerequisite: Biology Honors
Grade 10-12
AP Physics 1
2003421
Prerequisite: Geometry
Grades 11-12
Algebra-based is the equivalent to a first-semester college
course in algebra-based physics. It has been written to
serve as a first physics course for high school students.
The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including
rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work,
energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound. It will
also introduce electric circuits. During the course, students
will prepare for the AP Physics 1 exam.
AP Chemistry
2003370
Prerequisite: Chemistry & Algebra II Honors
1 Credit
Grade 11-12
This course is designed to be equivalent to a twosemester college introductory chemistry class. Topics
covered include structures of atoms, molecules and
ionic compounds, chemical bonding, chemical
reactions, mathematical relationships between chemical
substances, modern atomic theory, trends in the periodic
table, nuclear chemistry, states of matter, solution
chemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry,
thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and organic chemistry.
Emphasis is placed on laboratory-based activities and
extensive use of technology in both the classroom and
the laboratory. Critical thinking and problem-solving
are emphasized as a means of preparing students for
advanced science classes that may be taken at the college
level.
AP Environmental Science
2001380
Prerequisite: Algebra and Chemistry Honors
1 Credit
Grades 10-12
The AP Environmental Science course is designed
to be the equivalent of a one semester, introductory
college course in environmental science. The goal of this
interdisciplinary course is to provide students with the
scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required
to understand the interrelationships of the natural world in
order to identify and analyze environmental problems that
are natural and human-made. Students will evaluate the
relative risks associated with these problems and examine
alternative solutions for resolving or preventing these
issues. Laboratories will support student content mastery
in the course.
Science
This course is designed to be the equivalent of a twosemester college introductory biology course. Students
will engage in an in-depth study of the following three
areas: molecules and cells, heredity and evolution, and
organisms and populations. The two main goals of
AP Biology are to help students develop a conceptual
framework for modern biology and an appreciation of
science as a process.
1 Credit
35
36
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: SOCIAL STUDIES
United States History
Graduation Requirement
2100310
World History
Graduation Requirement
2109310
1 Credit
Grade 10
1 Credit
1 Credit
World History Honors
Graduation Requirement
2109320
Grades 9-10
1 Credit
This course will provide an understanding of the
contemporary world through an overview of the
growth of world religions, the development of political
traditions, contemporary world cultures, and current
international events. While reading and writing strategies
are incorporated in both courses, World History will put
a stronger emphasis on using content to reinforce reading
skills. Whereas, World History Honors will focus on
research and writing methods to further deepen historical
analytical skills.
**AA Pathways students may start their
social studies progression with World History
Honors or AP World History in the 9th grade.
Grade 10-12
This course will develop a greater understanding of
the evolution of global processes and contacts, in
interaction with different types of human societies. This
understanding is advanced by a combination of selective
factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The
course highlights the nature of changes in international
frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well
as comparisons among major societies. The course
is focused on the past thousand years of the global
experience building on the understanding of cultural,
institutional, and technological precedents that along with
geography, set the stage prior to 1000 C.E.
Social Studies
**AA Pathways students may start their
social studies progression with World History
Honors or AP World History in the 9th grade.
Grade 11
This course is designed to help students develop an
understanding of American history. The course begins
with a two week review of colonization to reconstruction
The course continues with an in-depth study of America’s
rise to power, the Populist and Progressive movements,
World War I, and the Crash. This in-depth study
continues with an examination of the Depression, World
War II, the 50’s, 60’s, the Vietnam War, Watergate, and
the new millennium. While reading and writing strategies
are incorporated in both courses. American History will
put a stronger emphasis on using content to reinforce
reading skills. Whereas, American History Honors will
focus on research and writing methods to further deepen
historical analytical skills.
AP United States History
2100330
Prerequisite: None
AP World History
2109420
1 Credit
Grade 11
United States History Honors
Graduation Requirement
2100320
1 Credit
Grade 11
This course includes advanced content in American
history, emphasizing critical essay writing, primary and
secondary source research techniques, and in-depth
interpretations, and analysis of the traditional historical
periods of a chronological survey in American history.
AP Psychology
2107350
Prerequisite: None
1 Credit
Grades 11-12
This course is designed to introduce students to the
systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental
processes of human beings and animals. Students will
study the psychological facts, principles and phenomena
associated with each of the major subfields within
psychology. Students will also learn about the methods
psychologists use in their science and practice.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: SOCIAL STUDIES
U.S. Government and Politics
Graduation Requirement
2106310
Prerequisite: None
.5 Credit
Grade 12
This course provides students the opportunity to acquire
an understanding of American government and political
behavior. Content will include an analysis of documents
which shape our political traditions, a comparison of
the roles of the three branches of government at the
local, state and national levels, a study of state and
local government, an understanding of the evolving
role of political parties, interest groups, and the media
in determining government policy, how the rights and
responsibilities of citizens in a democratic state have
evolved and been interpreted, and the importance of civic
participation in the democratic political process.
Economics with Financial Literacy
Graduation Requirement
2102335
Prerequisite: None
.5 Credit
Grade 12
The grade 9-12 Economics with Financial Literacy course
consists of the following content area strands: Economics
and Geography. The primary content emphasis for
this course pertains to the study of the concepts and
processes of the national and international economic
systems. Content should include, but is not limited to,
currency, banking, and monetary policy, the fundamental
concepts relevant to the major economic systems, the
global market and economy, major economic theories
and economists, the role and influence of the government
and fiscal policies, economic measurements, tools, and
methodology, financial and investment markets, and the
business cycle. This course content will also consist of
consumer and personal finance which includes but is not
limited to the concepts of personal finance, budgeting,
credit reports, personal credit, checking and savings
accounts, consumerism, interest, higher education
financing, insurance policies, employment contracts and
tax forms.
37
AP U.S. Government and Politics
2106420
Prerequisite: None
.5 Credit
Grade 12
This course provides students with a challenging
opportunity to develop the analytical skills and factual
knowledge necessary to deal critically and objectively
with the challenges, content, and materials of American
government. Emphasis is placed on content and
interpretation of the Constitution, federalism, the
congress, the presidency, the federal court system,
citizen involvement, American political traditions, and
responsibilities of citizens.
Economics with Financial Literacy Honors
Graduation Requirement
2102345
Prerequisite: None
.5 credit
Grade 12
The grade 9-12 Economics with Financial Literacy course
consists of the following content area strands: Economics
and Geography. The primary content emphasis for
this course pertains to the study of the concepts and
processes of the national and international economic
systems. Content should include, but is not limited to,
currency, banking, and monetary policy, the fundamental
concepts relevant to the major economic systems, the
global market and economy, major economic theories
and economists, the role and influence of the government
and fiscal policies, economic measurements, tools, and
methodology, financial and investment markets, and the
business cycle. This course content will also consist of
consumer and personal finance which includes but is not
limited to the concepts of personal finance, budgeting,
credit reports, personal credit, checking and savings
accounts, consumerism, interest, higher education
financing, insurance policies, employment contracts and
tax forms.
**Must register for both courses.
**Must register for both classes
Social Studies
38
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: SOCIAL STUDIES
AP Comparative Government and Politics
2106430
Prerequisite: World History Honors
.5 Credit
Grade 11–12
World Religions
2105310
Prerequisite: World History Honors
.5 credit
Grade 11–12
This course introduces students to the rich diversity
of political life outside the United States. The course
uses a comparative approach to examine the political
structures, policies, and political, economic, and social
challenges among six selected countries: Great Britain,
Mexico, Russia, Iran, China, and Nigeria. Additionally,
students examine how different governments solve
similar problems by comparing the effectiveness of
approaches to many global issues. This elective
course will not count towards the U.S.
Government and Politics graduation
requirement. Class readings will be on a college
level. Students that commit to taking this course will
also take World Religions in the second semester
and will be expected to take the AP Comparative
Government and Politics Exam in May.
The primary content emphasis for this course pertains
to the study of major world religious traditions of
Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam,
Judaism, Shintoism and Taoism. Students will identify
criteria upon which religious beliefs are based, analyze
relationships between religious and social and political
institutions, trace the major developments of the
world’s living religions, distinguish the similarities and
differences among the world’s major religious traditions,
synthesize information and ideas from conflicting
religious beliefs, and interpret the development of
a society as reflected by its religious beliefs. Class
readings will be on a college level. Students that commit
to taking this course will also take AP Comparative
Government and Politics in the first semester and will
be expected to take the AP Comparative Government
and Politics Exam in May.
**Must register for both courses.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: DRIVERS EDUCATION
Social Studies/Drivers Ed
Driver Education
(After School Program)
1900310
Prerequisite: Students must be 15 years old and
hold a valid Learner’s permit.
.5 Credit
Grades 9-12
This program provides students with classroom instruction,
range driving and on the road driving experience. The
program is offered at Lyman, Seminole and Winter
Springs High Schools; however, the program is open
to any student in Seminole County. This is a semester
long course. Students attend on either Mondays and
Wednesdays or Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:15-5:15
p.m. Transportation is not provided.
*This program is a collaborative effort between Seminole
County Government, the municipalities; METROPLAN
Orlando and Seminole County Public Schools in an effort
to better prepare our teen drivers and enhance the safety
on our roadways.
Applications are available in the Guidance
Offices at each high school prior to each
semester.
HOW DO I EARN IT CERTIFICATION AT CROOMS?
39
Students earn technology certifications by taking and passing industry certification exams. Certain courses are geared
towards industry certification and help prepare students for specific tests. Below is a list of certification exams and the
courses that prepare student to successfully pass those exams.
Corresponding Course
A+ Essentials
Network Concepts/Computer Maintenance and Repair
Technology Support Services - Network Systems
A+ Practical Application
Network Concepts/Computer Maintenance and Repair
Technology Support Services - Network Systems
Adobe Dreamweaver Associate
User Interface Design
Adobe Flash Associate
2-D Graphic Development
Adobe Photoshop Associate
Digital Imaging 1
Digital Design 2, 3
2-D Graphic Development
Premiere Pro
Digital Media Fundamentals
Digital Media Production Systems
InDesign
Digital Design 1, Introduction to Digital Media
Illustrator
Introduction to Digital Media, 2D-Graphic Development
CCNA
Cisco Networking courses (4)
MOS–Word, Excel, PowerPoint
Digital Information Technology
MOS—Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access
Office Applications and Adv. Office Applications,
Business Software Applications 1
MTA Windows Operating System
Fundamentals
PC Support 1, Network Concepts/Computer Maintenance &
Repair
National Academy Foundation
NAF test administered senior year
Offer 4 classes toward a Web Development
Certificate at Seminole State College
COP2830 Web Programming 1, COP2833 Data Driven
Websites, COP2822 Web Applications,
COP2836 Web Programming II, COP1000 Principles of
Programming
Offer 11 classes toward a Computer
Programming Specialist Technical Certificate
at Seminole State College
CET1179 Network Concepts and Operating Systems,
CGS2100C Office Applications, COP1000 Principles of
Computer Programming, CGS2545C Database Management,
COP2660 Android Programming, COP2360 C# Programming,
COP2830 Web Programming 1
IT Certifications
Certification Exam
40
TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS FOR GOLD SEAL
All programs require Introduction to Information
Technology as the first course of the program followed by
at least two classes within the same vocational program.
Students need to earn a 3.5 gpa in the three classes within
the same program and maintain an overall 3.0 gpa.
Administrative Office Specialist
Web Development
Game/Simulation/Animation Programming
Foundations of Web Design (1 credit)
Introduction to Digital Media (DIG2000)
Digital Design
Digital Design 1
Digital Design 2
Bitmap Graphics (GRA2201)
Introduction to Digital Media (DIG2000)
Digital Design 3 Honors
Office Applications (CGS2100)
Introduction to Programming (COP1000)
Digital Media Technology
Digital Media Fundamentals
Digital Media Production Systems
Technology Support Services
Technology Support Services - Client Systems
Technology Support Services - Network Systems
Business Computer Programming
Business Software Applications
Digital 1
Office Applications (CGS2100)
Game & Simulations Foundations
Game & Simulation Design
Game & Simulation Programming
Game/Simulation/Animation Visual Design
Game
Game
Game
Game
&
&
&
&
Simulations Foundations
Simulation Design
Simulation 2D Graphic Development
Simulation 3D Graphic Animation
Network Support Services (8208000)
Network Concepts and Operating Systems (CET1179)
Cisco Networking Fundamentals(CET1600)
Cisco Router Technology (CET1610)
Cisco Scaling Networks(CET2615)
Cisco Connecting Networks (CET2620)
Introduction to IP Telephony (CET1675)
Introduction to Wireless Technologies (CET1854)
Office Applications (CGS2100)
Introduction to Programming (COP1000)
Office Apps (CGS2100)
Principles of Programming (COP1000)
C# Programming (COP2360)
Advanced C# (COP2362)
Data Driven Websites (COP2833)
Web Sripting (COP2831)
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION
Career & Technical
Education
Required course for all 9th Graders
Digital Information Technology
8207310
Prerequisite: None
1 Credit
Grade 9
This course is designed to provide an introduction to
information technology concepts and careers as well as the
impact information technology has on the world, people,
and industry. Students will also prepare for Microsoft
Office Specialist (MOS) certifications in Word, Excel
and PowerPoint. This is a required course for all AOIT
students. It is also the first course in a vocational program
to qualify for the Gold Seal Vocational Scholarship. This
course replaces Intro to IT and fulfills any of
the Intro to IT prerequisites.
Blue Print for Professional Success*
Prerequisite: None
1 Credit
Grade 9
The purpose of this course is designed to prepare
students for the workplace in the twenty-first century.
The course includes developing human resources, work
ethics, decision making, balancing work and family, as
well as other skills. These skills are often referred to as
“soft skills”. Exploration of a variety of careers is highly
recommended through a job shadowing experience.
Development of a portfolio will provide a personal
file and organizational tool for the student to transfer
knowledge to a real life experience.
**This course is assigned based on assessment
results.
41
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION
REQUIRED COURSE FOR ALL 10TH GRADERS: TECH SUPPORT SERVICES
- NETWORK SYSTEMS OR NETWORK CONCEPTS/NETWORK COMPUTER
MAINTENANCE & REPAIR
Technology Support Services DUAL ENROLLMENT Network Concepts and Operating Systems/
Client Systems Honors
Network Computer Maintenance and Repair (A+)
9001420
CET 1179 & CET 1178C (6 hrs. credit SSC)
Prerequisite: Intro to IT
Prerequisite: Intro to IT
1 Credit
Grade 10
1 Credit
Grades 10-12
This course focuses on basic system support,
maintenance, and entry-level network concepts.
Emphasis is placed on developing and understanding
various computer hardware devices and solutions
including installation, trouble-shooting, diagnostic
techniques, repair of system components, and common
safety and preventative maintenance procedures.
Students will also learn basic networking as well as
customer service skills. This course will prepare students
for the Microsoft Technical Associate certification in
Windows.
This course focuses on system support, maintenance,
and basic network concepts. The content includes
computer software and hardware applications including
installation, troubleshooting, diagnostic techniques, and
repair of system components, operating systems, and
application software; common safety and preventive
maintenance procedures; basic networking including
physical and logical network connectivity, and effective
behaviors that contribute to customer satisfaction.
This course will prepare the student for the Microsoft
Technical Associate certification in Windows and
COMPTia A+ certification exams.
NETWORKING
Technology Support Services Network Systems Honors
9001430
Prerequisite: Technology Support Services Client Systems or PC Support 1
1 Credit
Grades 11-12
This course focuses on the operation of data networks,
differentiating between various network media and
topologies, installing and configuring basic network
devices, using basic network tools, understanding network
IP addressing and associate issues, and understanding
network management tasks and methodologies. Students
will be able to implement a Wireless Local Area Network
and demonstrate an understanding of network security
threats and mitigation techniques.
This course is designed to prepare students to understand
and apply the basics of networking hardware. The course
covers the OSI Model and industry standards; network
topologies; IP addressing, including subnet masks;
Cisco Scaling Networks/
Cisco Connecting Networks
CET 2615C/CET2620C (8 hrs. credit SSC)
Prerequisite: CET1600C and CET1610C
1 Credit
Grades 11–12
DUAL ENROLLMENT
This course is designed to prepare students to apply and
understand the advanced principles and applications
of networking hardware. The course covers the
advanced router configurations; LAN switching; network
management; and advanced network design. Students will
work on advanced network design projects and advanced
network management projects. This is the last course
to prepare students for the Cisco Certified Networking
Associate Exam.
See page 49 for additional networking
courses taught by Seminole State College.
Career & Technical
Education
Cisco Networking Fundamentals (Net+)/
DUAL ENROLLMENT
Cisco Router Technology
CET1600C/ CET1610C (7 hrs. credit SSC)
1 Credit
Grades 10–12
basic network design; beginning router configurations;
routed and routing protocols; and an introduction to
LAN switching. Students will have a complete “handson” program that provides the opportunity to receive
internationally recognized certification in Copper Based
and Fiber Optic Communications Network Cabling. This
is the first of two courses which will prepare students for
the Cisco Certified Networking Associate Exam.
42
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION
OFFICE APPLICATIONS
DIGITAL VIDEO
Office Applications/Advanced Office Applications*
CGS2100C/CGS2108C
(6 hrs. credit SSC)
DUAL ENROLLMENT
Prerequisite: Intro to IT
1 Credit
Grades 10-12
Digital Media Fundamentals Honors
9005110
Prerequisite: Intro to IT or concurrent
1 Credit
Grades 9–12
Semester 1 – course focuses on the concepts and
operation of the main components of word processing,
electronic spreadsheets, database management and
presentation software programs. Students will gain
fundamental knowledge of a major software suite and
learn skills that have practical application in real world
situations. Semester 2 – covers advanced microcomputer
applications including word processing, spreadsheet,
database, presentation and web development. Topics
include form letters, merging, desktop publishing, financial
functions, amortization schedules, data tables, creating
and querying a worksheet database, templates creating
customized reports and forms in a switchboard manager,
embedded visuals importing clips into presentation
and web publishing. Students will complete the MOS
certifications in Word, Excel and PowerPoint.
OR
Business Software Applications 1*
8212120
Prerequisite: Intro to IT
1 Credit
Grades 10–12
This course is designed to develop proficiency in using the
advanced features of software programs to perform officerelated tasks. Students will work on completing the MOS
certification in Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Access.
This class is not for students who already have the MOS
certification.
Career & Technical
Education
*Students may take either the high school
course Business Software Applications
1 or the dual enrollment courses Office
Applications and Advanced Office
Applications but NOT both.
This course introduces students to the essential concepts,
components, terminology and knowledge about digital
media, software applications and delivery systems.
Students will prepare for industry certification in Adobe
Premiere Pro.
Digital Media Production Systems Honors
9005120
Prerequisite: Digital Media Fundamentals
1 Credit
Grade 10-12
This is the second-year course for students interested
in video production. In this course, students will create
computer-generated multimedia images and presentations
that communicate ideas through formal, expressive,
and conceptual elements. Additionally, students will
demonstrate use of collaborative skills to maintain the
studio and to offer multimedia presentations in the school
and/or community. Content includes management aspects
of creating, saving and distributing assets.
INTERNSHIPS
Information Technology Cooperative Education OJT
9000420
Prerequisite: None
1 Credit
Grade 12
This internship course provides students with the
opportunity to stimulate their career interest and to
demonstrate human relations, communications, and
employability skills necessary for entry-level employment
n the information technology industry. Students will
enhance and apply instructional competencies learned
in the classroom through the internship experience. This
internship must be a paid internship.
By application only.
Business Cooperative Education–OJT
8200410
Prerequisite: AOIT Internship/IT OJT
1 Credit
Grade 12
This course is designed to provide the on-the-job training
component when the cooperative method of instruction
is used to prepare students for employment in business
occupations. Students should only enroll in this course
after they have fulfilled the AOIT Internship requirement.
43
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION
DIGITAL DESIGN/YEARBOOK
WEB DESIGN
Digital Design 1
8209510
Prerequisite: Intro to IT or concurrent
1 Credit
Grades 9–12
Foundation of Web Design Honors
9001110
Prerequisite: Intro to IT or concurrent
1 Credit
Grades 9–12
This course is designed to develop entry-level skills
required for careers in the digital publishing industry.
The content includes digital publishing concepts and
operations; layout, design, measurement activities; and
digital imaging as well as communication, collaboration
and decision-making activities; critical thinking; and
problem solving using Adobe InDesign and Photoshop.
This course teaches key skills required to design, author
and publish XHTML pages with CSS. This includes
creating a basic XHTML document, organizing Web
documents, creating links, using advanced XHTML
features, and creating forms to capture and transfer data.
Students will have hands-on experience setting up and
creating Web pages on an Intranet.
Digital Imaging 1/Introduction to Digital Media
OR
GRA2201/DIG2000
Foundation of Web Design Honors
DUAL ENROLLMENT
(6 hrs. credit SSC)
Web Programming I (3 hrs. credit SSC)
Prerequisite: Digital Design 1 or 2D Graphics
9001110 / COP 2830
DUAL ENROLLMENT
1 Credit
Grades 10–12
Prerequisite: Intro to IT or concurrent
First Semester is designed for the graphics individual
1 Credit
Grades 9–12
who wishes to integrate photography with page layouts.
Students will learn the basics of scanning, retouching, color
correcting, proofing and output to printer devices. Students
pursue Adobe Associate certification in Photoshop. Second
Semester explores contemporary digital design, highlighting
the importance of process, innovation and communication.
Students learn to use Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign
to for graphic design projects. Developing and refining the
design concept and execution is emphasized.
Digital Design 2 Honors (Yearbook)
8209520
Prerequisite: Digital 1 and Application
1 Credit
Grade 10 - 12
This course continues the development of skills required
digital publishing careers. Content includes digital publishing
operations; layout, design and measurement activities; and
digital imaging as well as communication, collaboration
and decision-making; critical thinking; and problem solving.
Students will work on all aspects of the yearbook including
writing, photography and marketing/sales. After school
participation and ad sales are required of all
students.
Students continuing in Digital 3, are expected to
take on leadership roles in the writing, photography,
design and marketing of the yearbook. After school
participation/ad sales are required of all
students.
Web Programming 2/Web Applications
COP 2836/COP 2822
(6 hrs. credit SSC)
DUAL ENROLLMENT
Prerequisite: COP 2830
1 Credit
Grade 10-12
First Semester–programming on the Web server enables
a website to interface with databases, access server files
and create dynamic content for websites. This course
introduces the student to a wide variety of server-side
programming and scripting technologies. Examples
include Server Side Includes (SSI), Common Gateway
Interface (CGI), PERL, ASP, Java Servlets, Java Server
Pages (JSP) and JavaScript. Web Applications introduces
students to the art of web development by using industry
standard tools and scripts to construct commercial-grade
web pages. The course covers the software tools available
to create and develop web pages as well as hands-on
experience configuring a variety of software used on a
website.
See page 48 for additional web courses taught
by Seminole State College.
Career & Technical
Education
Digital Design 3 Honors (Yearbook)
8209530
Prerequisite: Digital 2 and Application
1 Credit
Grade 11 - 12
This course focuses on the skills required for Web
application development using XHTML, client-side
scripting and basic server-side scripts. Students explore the
syntax, semantics and limitations of page layout, Cascading
Style Sheets and basic scripting. Implementation of serverside scripting is covered as it pertains to form processing.
Examples of tools, W3 standards and cross-browser
compatibility will also be examined. Upon completion,
the student will be able to design, program and publish a
commercial-grade Web site.
44
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING
AP Computer Science Principles
Course Number
1 Credit
Grades 9–12
The course will introduce students to the creative aspects
of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data
sets, the Internet, cybersecurity concerns, and computing
impacts. AP Computer Science Principles will give
students the opportunity to use technology to address realworld problems and build relevant solutions. Together,
these aspects of the course make up a rigorous and rich
curriculum that aims to broaden participation in computer
science.
AP Computer Science A
0200320
Prerequisite: Foundations of Programming or
administrator approval
1 Credit
Grades 10–12
This course emphasizes programming methodology and
procedural abstraction using object-oriented programming.
The course is taught in the Java programming language
and includes the study of algorithms, data str
Foundations of Programming
9007210
Prerequisite: Digital Information Tech or concurrent
1 Credit
Grades 9-12
This course introduces concepts, techniques, and
processes associated with computer programming and
software development.
OR
Foundations of Programming
Principles of Computer Programming
9007210/COP1000 (3 hrs. credit SSC)
Prerequisite: Algebra I or Intro to IT
1 Credit
Grades 9–12
Career & Technical
Education
DUAL ENROLLMENT
Semester 1 introduces concepts, techniques, and processes
associated with computer programming and software
development. Semester 2 covers the basic concepts
of computer programming. Students use a structured
approach to program/algorithm design and learn logic
techniques such as iteration, initialization, conditional
processing, accumulation and sequencing. Also
considered are programming style and program efficiency.
Logic techniques and data formats are illustrated using
high level programming languages.
Android Programming/iPhone Programming
COP 2660/COP 2654C
DUAL ENROLLMENT
(6 hrs. credit SSC)
Prerequisite: COP 1000
1 Credit
Grades 11–12
COP 2660 is an introduction to creating Android mobile
applications, the Android development environment
and development tools. Significant time is spent learning
Java programming language, Java topics include data
types, variables, expressions, selection, iteration, methods,
classes, objects and object-oriented concepts. Android
applications are developed with basic user interface
objects and layouts. A mobile device is not required. COP
2654C is an introduction to creating iPhone applications.
The student is introduced to the Apple development
environment and development tools. Significant time is
spent learning the Objective-C programming language.
Objective-C topics include data types, expressions,
selection, iteration, methods, classes, objects and
object-oriented concepts. Basic iPhone applications are
developed incorporating features such as touch input and
control of basic user interface widgets. An iPhone is not
required.
Game & Simulation Programming
8208330
Prerequisite: Foundations of Programming
1 Credit
Grades 10–12
This course is focused on students acquiring the
appropriate programming skills for rendering a game or
simulation product, including program control, conditional
branching, memory management, score-keeping, timed
event strategies and methodologies, and implementation
issues.
See page 48 for additional programming
courses taught by Seminole State College.
CYBERSECURITY
Computer and Network Security Fundamentals
9001320
Prerequisite: Intro to IT
1 Credit
Grades 10-12
This course introduces students to cybersecurity and
provides them with essential computer and networking
knowledge and skills, particularly those related to
cybersecurity.
45
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION
GAME AND SIMULATION
Game & Simulation Foundations
8208110
Prerequisite: Intro to IT or concurrent
1 Credit
Grade 9-12
Game & Simulation Programming
8208330
Prerequisite: Foundations of Programming
1 Credit
Grades 10–12
This course is designed to provide an introduction to
game and simulation concepts and careers, the impact
game and simulation has on society and industry, and
basic game-simulation design concepts such as rule
design, play mechanics, and media integration. This
course compares and contrasts games and simulations,
key development methodologies and tools, careers, and
industry-related information. This course also covers
strategies, processes, and methods for conceptualizing a
game or simulation application; storyboarding techniques;
and development tools.
This course is focused on students acquiring the
appropriate programming skills for rendering a game or
simulation product, including program control, conditional
branching, memory management, score-keeping, timed
event strategies and methodologies, and implementation
issues.
Game & Simulation 2D Graphic Development
8208130
Prerequisite: Intro to IT or concurrent
1 credit
Grades 9 - 12
Game & Simulation Design
8208120
Prerequisite: Game & Simulation Foundations
AND ONE of the following: Game and Simulation
Programming, 2–D Graphic Development, or
3–D Graphic Animation
1 Credit
Grade 11-12
Game & Simulation 3D Graphic Animation
8208140
Prerequisite: Intro to IT
1 Credit
Grades 10-12
This course covers fundamental principles of designing
a game or a simulation application, in particular Human
Computer Interface (HCI) principles, rules and strategies
of play, conditional branching, design and development
constraints, use of sound and animation, design tools,
and implementation issues. The content includes market
research, product design documentation, storyboarding,
proposal development, and presentation of a project
report. Emphasis is placed on the techniques needed to
develop well-documented, structured game or simulation
programs. Extensive use is made of evaluating and
analyzing existing games or simulations. Culminating
activity is the creation and presentation of a playable
game with design documentation.
This course is focused on students acquiring skills to
create, refine, and integrate realistic 3D graphics into
a game or simulation product. Students will essentially
learn how to use a 3D Studio Max and other animation
software, file maintenance conventions, and migration
techniques
and issues.
Game, Simulation, & Animation
Advanced Applications
8208400
Prerequisite: Game & Simulation Design
1 Credit
Grades 11-12
This course is focused on students acquiring skills to
create, refine, and integrate realistic 2D graphics into
a game or simulation product. Students will essentially
learn how to use a graphic software package, file
maintenance strategies, and migration techniques and
issues. Software taught: Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and
Flash.
Career & Technical
Education
This is a project-based capstone course to provide Game,
Simulation & Animation students with the opportunity to
develop a project from vision to reality. Students work in
teams to research, plan, design, create, test, redesign, test
again, and then produce a finished game or simulation
product.
46
DUAL ENROLLMENT OFFERINGS – AT SSC
These IT courses are offered through
Seminole State College either on the
campus or online. They are taught by
Seminole State Instructors. Please see
guidance to register.
C# Programming – COP 2360
Prerequisite: COP1000
Offered both fall and spring
.5 Credit SCPS/3 Credits SSC
Grades 10-12
This course provides an introduction to the C# programming
language. Students will learn the basic features of the
language including selection, iteration, data types, and scope.
In addition, the course will cover the object-oriented aspects
of the language including encapsulation, inheritance, and
plymorphism.
Advanced C# Programming – COP 2362
Prerequisite: COP 2360
Offered both fall and spring
.5 Credit SCPS/3 Credits SSC
Grades 10-12
In this course the student will use the more advanced
features of the C# programming language to create complex
applications that utilize graphical user interfaces, databases,
multithreading, Internet communications and multimedia.
Programming in Java – COP 2800
Prerequisite: COP1000 with a C or higher
Offered both fall and spring
.5 Credit SCPS/3 Credits SSC
Grades 10-12
This course provides an introduction to object-oriented
programming and the java programming language.
Students will design, build, implement and debug computer
applications and web applets using the Java language.
Career & Technical
Education
Advanced Java Programming – COP 2805
Prerequisite: COP 2800 with a C or higher
Offered both fall and spring
.5 Credit SCPS/3 Credits SSC
Grades 10-12
In this course the student will learn the more advanced
features of the Java programming language to create complex
applications and applets that utilize graphical user interfaces,
databases, multithreading, Internet communications,
JavaBeans and multimedia.
Advanced Android Programming – COP 2662
Prerequisite: COP 2660
Offered both fall and spring
.5 Credit SCPS/3 Credits SSC
Grades 11-12
This course focuses on developing applications for the
Android mobile application platform. It assumes the
student has a basic understanding of Java gained through
the prerequisite course. User interface widgets (views)
and advanced layout options will be covered. Medium-toadvanced features such as using graphics, images, audio,
and video in apps will be covered. In addition, apps saving
data using a database, using location-based services and
tracking motion using the accelerometer will be developed.
The business of distributing, marketing and selling Android
applications will be addressed. A mobile device is not
required.
Data Driven Web Sites – COP 2833
Prerequisite: COP 2836
Offered in the fall
.5 Credit SCPS/3 Credits SSC
Grade 11-12
Databases drive today’s e-commerce websites. This course
demonstrates how to leverage the power of a relational
database through the use of SQL and server-side scripting.
The student will explore server-side scripts in a variety of
languages to provide dynamic website content. The course
will demonstrate how to connect to data from standard
ODBC-compliant databases and create database-driven
websites. Upon successful completion of this course,
students will be able to design, develop and publish a
dynamic database-driven application suitable for use in
business or e-commerce.
Web Scripting and AJAX – COP 2831
Offered in the spring
Prerequisite: COP 2830
.5 Credit SCPS/3 Credits SSC
Grade 10-12
This course will teach the student how to modify a
document’s structure, styling and content in response to
user actions and make AJAX requests to get data from
the server without reloading the page. Today’s web
applications, such as Google Maps and Web 2.0 sites,
such as Twitter, are powered by JavaScript and AJAX.
DUAL ENROLLMENT OFFERINGS – AT SSC
47
Introduction to Internetworking Security (Security+)
CTS 1120
Prerequisite: CET1179
Offered both fall and spring
.5 Credit SCPS/3 Credits SSC
Grade 11-12
Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2012
CTS 2390C
Prerequisite: CET1179
Offered both fall and spring
.5 Credit SCPS/4 Credits SSC
Grade 11-12
This course examines the principles, mechanisms
and implementation of network security and data
protection. The topics presented will help students gain
the fundamentals of network security and explain what
happens behind the scenes and from the point of view of
a computer. Topics include definition and use of password
crackers, operating system exploits, what is a Hacker, IP
Spoofing, Session Hijacking, Denial of Service attacks
(DOS), Buffer Overloads, general concepts of password
security, how to create a company-wide security policy,
how to perform security audits and how to recover from
such attacks.
This course is the first of three courses designed to build
the knowledge and skills necessary to implement a
core Windows Server 2012 infrastructure in an existing
enterprise environment. The course covers implementing,
managing, maintaining and provisioning services and
infrastructure in a Windows Server 2012 environment.
Configuring Windows 8 (70-687 exam/MCSA)
CTS 1327C
Prerequisite: CET1179
Offered both fall and spring
.5 Credit SCPS/4 Credits SSC
Grade 11-12
This course is designed to provide students with the
knowledge and skills necessary to perform installation,
post installation, configuration and day-to-day
administrative tasks in enterprise systems in asingle
domain or multiple domain environments using Windows
8.
Information Technology Project Management
CTS 2142
Prerequisite: CET1179
Offered both fall and spring
.5 Credit SCPS/3 Credits SSC
Grade 11-12
This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the
skills, knowledge and tools needed to effectively manage
projects with special emphasis on the unique challenges of
the computing and information technology industries. The
course will cover all nine areas of A Guide to the Project
Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide)
established by the Project Management Institute as the
industry standard for project management instruction.
Oracle Structured Query Language (SQL) –
CTS 2445
Prerequisite: CGS 2545C
Offered both fall and spring
.5 Credit SCPS/3 Credits SSC
Grade 11-12
This class covers the industry standard Structured Query
Language (SQL) and additional SQL features specific
to Oracle relational databases. Students learn to create
and maintain database objects and to store, retrieve and
manipulate data. Classroom lecture and hands-on lab
assignments reinforce the fundamental concepts. This
course prepares students for the Oracle Application
Developer and Database Administrator exams.
Introduction to UNIX (Linux+) – CET 1526C
Prerequisite:CET 1179
Offered in fall
.5 Credit SCPS/3 Credits SSC
Grades 11–12
This course introduces students to the UNIX
Operating System. The course includes an overview of
UNIX, simple commands, the VI Editor, file system,
shell, communication, program development, shell
programming and shell scripts.
Introduction to Wireless Technologies – CET 1854C
Prerequisites: CET1600C or CCNA certification
Offered both fall and spring
.5 Credit SCPS/4 Credits SSC
Grades 11–12
Dual Enrollment
This course is designed to provide students with a
complete foundation of knowledge for entering into or
advancing in the wireless networking industry. It covers
basic RF theory to link budget math, including topics from
troubleshooting to performing a site survey. This course
delivers hands-on training that will benefit the novice as
well as the experienced network professional.
48
DUAL ENROLLMENT OFFERINGS – AT SSC
Database Management – CGS 2545C
Prerequisite: COP1000 or CGS2100C
Offered both fall and spring
.5 Credit SCPS/3 Credits SSC
Grade 11-12
Introduction to IP Telephony – CET 1675C
Prerequisites: CET 1600C
Offered in the spring
.5 Credit SCPS/4 Credits SSC
Grade 11-12
This course is a study of database design and
management. Topics include the relational model, Entity
Relationship Diagrams (ERDs), database design and
normalization, query languages, multi-user and distributed
databases and data warehouses.
This course explains how companies are using IP
Telephony equipment and software to efficiently upgrade
existing telephone systems. In addition, the course will
give the student a fundamental understanding of the
architecture of voice communication and how signaling,
call quality and public switched telephone networks
operate in a LAN/WAN networking environment. The
use of IP Telephony products will be discussed and how
software allows companies to cost-effectively upgrade and
eventually replace existing (legacy) telephone systems with
more cost-effective and easy-to-use telephone equipment.
CROOMS
ACADEMY OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Students
0.16%
2.86%
Native Multiracial 4.92%
Asian
American
Early College
High School
• AA Pathway allows students to
12.54%
Black
earn a high school diploma and
an Associate of Arts degree in
54.44%
White
25.08%
Hispanic
Information Technology at
Seminole State College
• Early College coursework
offered on site and at Seminole
630
State College
students
Network
Systems
Specializations
Multimedia
Design
Network Support Services
Technology Support Services
Database Technology
Dual Enrollment
Business Software Applications
Digital Media Technology
Game and Simulation
Graphic Design
3-D Modeling
croomsaoit.org
Web Design
Computer
Science
Visual Basic SQL
UNIX/Linux C#
Java C++
CROOMS AOIT GRADUATES
Scholarships
$1,908,550
scholarship dollars earned by the class of 2015 graduates
1 National Merit Finalist
17 Florida Academic Scholars
18 Florida Medallion Scholars
17 Gold Seal Scholars
Future Plans
91%
of graduates plan to
go to college
7%
of graduates plan to
go into the military
2%
of graduates plan to
go into the work force
Success
100%
of seniors graduated
in 2015
261
students earned industry
certifications in 2015
44
student internships
completed
Crooms Infographic for 2015 - designed by former Crooms
student, Casey Brown.
49
INDEX
Number
1000400
Course
9th Grade Intensive Language Arts
1000400
9th Grade Intensive Reading Soar
1000410
1000410
1000410
Prerequisite
th
10 Grade Intensive Reading
th
10 Grade Intensive Reading Soar
th
11 Grade Intensive Reading Soar
Credit Term Page
1-2
YR
29
1
YR
29
1-2
YR
29
1
YR
29
1
YR
29
1
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
YR
SEM
SEM
SEM
SEM
29
46
46
46
42
12th Grade Intensive Reading Soar
1000410
COP2362 Advanced C# Programming
COP2662 Advanced Android Programming
COP2805 Advanced Java Programming
CGS2108C Advanced Office Applications
C# Programming
COP2660
COP2800 with a C or better
Office Applications
1200310
Algebra I
Adv. 8th Grade Math or Pre Algebra
1
YR
31
1200320
Algebra I Honors
Adv. 8th Gr. Math, Pre Algebra, or
recommendation
1
YR
31
1200330
Algebra II
Geometry
1
YR
31
1200340
Algebra II Honors
Algebra 1 Hon, Geometry Hon, Recom.
1
YR
32
1201315
Analysis of Functions
Algebra II
0.5
SEM
32
COP2660
Android Programming
COP1000
0.5
SEM
44
2000340
AP Biology
Biology I Honors
1
YR
35
1
1
1
0.5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0.5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0.5
1
1
1
1
YR
YR
YR
SEM
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
SEM
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
SEM
YR
YR
YR
YR
32
32
35
38
44
44
28
28
35
35
36
36
37
37
34
34
34
40
42
42
46
31
34
34
24
1202310
1202320
2003370
2106430
AP Calculus AB
AP Calculus BC
AP Chemistry
AP Comparative Government and Politics
AP Computer Science Principles
0200320
AP Computer Science A
1001420
AP English Language & Composition
1001430
AP English Literature & Composition
2001380
AP Environmental Science
2003420
AP Physics 1
2107350
AP Psychology
2109420
AP World History
2106420
AP U.S. Government and Politics
2100330
AP United States History
20003109 Biology I (9th grade)
2000310E Biology 1 (10th grade)
2000320
Biology I Honors
Blue Print for Professional Success
8200410
Business Cooperative Education - OJT
8212120
Business Software Applications 1
COP2360 C# Programming
1202300
Calculus Honors
2003340
Chemistry I
2003350
Chemistry I Honors
1303300
Chorus I
Pre-Calculus, Recom. ,Agreement
AP Calculus AB
Chemistry 1 Honors & Algebra 2 Honors
World History Honors
Foundations of Programming
Algebra and Chemistry Honors
Geometry
Environmental Science
Information Tech Cooperative Ed. OJT
Intro to IT & do NOT hold a MOS Cert.
COP1000
Pre-Calculus
Physical Science
Biology I Honors
50
INDEX
Number
1303310
1303320
1303330
CET1600C
CET2620C
CET1610C
CET2615C
9001320
CTS1327C
CGS2545C
COP2833
8209510
8209520
8209530
GRA2201
8207310
9005110
9005120
Course
Chorus II
Chorus III
Chorus IV
Cisco Networking Fundamentals
Cisco Connecting Networks
Cisco Router Technology
Cisco Scaling Networks
Computer & Network Security Fundamentals
Configuring Windows 8
Database Management
Data Driven Web Sites
Digital Design 1
Digital Design 2 Honors - Yearbook
Digital Design 3 Honors - Yearbook 2nd Year
Digital Imaging 1
Digital Information Technology
Digital Media Fundamentals Honors
Digital Media Production Systems Honors
Prerequisite
Chorus I
Chorus II
Chorus III
Intro to IT
CET2615C
CET1600C
CET1610C
Intro to IT
CET1179
COP1000 or CGS2100C
COP2836
Intro to IT or concurrent w/ Dig. Info Tech
Digital Design 1
Digital Design 2 (Yearbook)
C or bet. in Dig. Design I or 2D Graphics
1900310
DriversEducation
15yearsandvalidLearner'sPermit
2001310
2102335
2102345
1001310
1001320
1001310
1001340
1001350
1001340
1001370
1001380
1001405
1001410
2001340
2002340
9007210
9007210
9001110
9001110
0701320
8208130
8208140
8208120
8208110
8208330
8208400
Earth Space Science
Economics with Financial Literacy
Economics with Financial Literacy Honors
English 1
English 1 Honors
English 1 CAR-PD
English 2
English 2 Honors
English 2 CAR-PD
English 3
English 3 Honors
English 4 FL College Prep
English 4 Honors
Environmental Science
Experimental Science 1 Honors
Foundations of Programming (Dual Enr)
Foundations of Programming
Foundation of Web Design Honors (Dual Enr)
Foundation of Web Design Honors
French 1
Game & Simulation 2D Graphic Development
Game & Simulation 3D Graphic Animation
Game & Simulation Design
Game & Simulation Foundations
Game & Simulation Programming
Game, Simulation & Animation Adv. Apps.
Intro to IT or concurrent w/ Dig. Info Tech
Digital Media Fundamentals
must take AP Government
Administrative Recommendation
Another science course taken concurrently
Algebra 1 or Intro to IT
Intro to IT or concurrent w/ Dig. Info Tech
Intro to IT or concurrent w/ Dig. Info Tech
Intro to IT or concurrent w/ Dig. Info Tech
Intro to IT
G & S Found., and 1 other G & S course
Intro to IT or concurrent w/ Dig. Info Tech
Foundations of Programming
Game & Simulation Design
Credit Term Page
1
YR
24
1
YR
24
1
YR
24
0.5
SEM 41
0.5
SEM 41
0.5
SEM 41
0.5
SEM 41
1
YR
44
0.5
SEM 47
0.5
SEM 48
0.5
SEM 46
1
YR
43
1
YR
43
1
YR
43
0.5
SEM 43
1
YR
40
1
YR
42
1
YR
42
0.5 SEM
1
0.5
0.5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0.5
1
0.5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
YR
SEM
SEM
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
SEM
YR
SEM
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
YR
38
35
37
37
27
27
28
27
27
28
27
27
28
28
34
35
43
44
43
43
25
45
45
45
45
45
45
51
INDEX
Number
1206310
1206320
1502410
1502420
1502430
9000420
CTS2142
8207310
CTS1120
CET1526C
DIG2000
CET1675C
CET1854C
CTS2390C
1302420
1302430
1302440
1302450
COP2654C
1301360
1304370
1304380
2400300
2400310
0500520
1208300
1200700
CET1178C
CET1179
8207410
CGS2100C
CTS2445
1501300
2003310
2003390
Course
Geometry
Geometry Honors
Individaul and Dual Sports 1
Individaul and Dual Sports 2
Individaul and Dual Sports 3
Information Tech Cooperative Education OJT
Information Technology Project Management
Intensive Math Algebra
Intensive Math Geometry
Intro to Information Technology
Introduction to Internetworking Security
Introduction to UNIX (Linux+)
Introduction to Digital Media
Introduction to IP Telephony
Introduction to Wireless Technologies
Install & Configure Windows Server 2012
Instrumental Techniques 1 (Steel Band)
Instrumental Techniques 2 (Steel Band)
Instrumental Techniques 3 (Steel Band)
Instrumental Techniques 4 (Steel Band)
iPhone Programming
Keyboarding 1 (Piano)
Keyboarding 2 (Piano)
Keyboarding 3 (Piano)
Leadership 1
Leadership 2
Leadership 3
Liberal Arts Math 2
Math for College Readiness
Network Computer Maintenance & Repair
Network Concepts & Operating Systems
New Media and Digital Imaging Fund.
Office Applications
Oracle Structured Query Language (SQL)
Personal Fitness
Physical Science
Physics I Honors
1202340
Pre-Calculus Honors
COP1000
COP2800
1000400
1000400
1000400
1000400
Principles of Computer Programming
Programming in Java
SOAR I - Grade 9 Reading
SOAR II - Grade 10 Reading
SOAR III - Grade 11 Reading
SOAR IV - Grade 12 Reading
Prerequisite
Algebra I
Algebra I Honors
Individual and Dual Sports 1
Individual and Dual Sports 2
CET1179
CET1179
CET1179
C or bet. in Dig. Design I or 2D Graphics
CET1600C
CET1600C or CCNA Certification
CET1179
Instrumental Techniques 1
Instrumental Techniques 2
Instrumental Techniques 3
COP1000
Keyboarding I
Keyboarding II
3.0 GPA & Application
3.0 GPA & Application
3.0 GPA & Application
Geometry
Teacher & Guidance Recommendation
CET1179
Intro to IT
Intro to IT or concurrent w/ Dig. Info Tech
Intro to IT
CGS2545C
Biology I & teacher recommendation
Geometry
Algebra II hon, or Analysis of Functions,
Trigonometry, Recommendation
Algebra I & Intro to IT or concurrent
COP1000 with a C or higher
Credit Term Page
1
YR
31
1
YR
31
1
YR
26
1
YR
26
1
YR
26
1
YR
42
0.5
SEM 47
1
YR
30
1
YR
30
1
YR
40
0.5
SEM 47
0.5
SEM 47
0.5
SEM 43
0.5
SEM 48
0.5
SEM 47
0.5
SEM 47
1
YR
24
1
YR
24
1
YR
24
1
YR
24
0.5
SEM 44
1
YR
24
1
YR
24
1
YR
24
1
YR
24
1
YR
24
1
YR
24
1
YR
31
1
YR
32
0.5
SEM 41
0.5
SEM 41
1
YR
32
0.5
SEM 42
0.5
SEM 47
0.5
SEM 26
1
YR
34
1
YR
34
1
YR
32
0.5
0.5
1
1
1
1
SEM
SEM
YR
YR
YR
YR
43
46
27
27
27
27
52
Number
0708340
0708350
0708360
0708370
CTS2445
1302420
1503350
1503360
9001420
9001430
1211300
2100310
2100320
2106310
COP2822
COP2830
COP2836
COP2831
2105310
2109310
2109320
INDEX
Course
Spanish 1
Spanish 2
Spanish 3 Honors
Spanish 4 Honors
SQL - Oracle Structured Query Language
Steel Band 1 (see Instrumental Techniques 1-4)
Team Sports 1
Team Sports 2
Technology Support Services-Client Sys. Hon.
Technology Support Services Network Sys. H.
Trigonometry
United States History
United States History Honors
U.S. Government and Politics
Web Applications
Web Programming I
Web Programming II
Web Scripting and AJAX
World Religions
World History
World History Honors
Prerequisite
Spanish 1
Spanish 2
Spanish 3
CGS2545
Team Sports 1
Intro to IT
Client Systems
Analysis of Functions
COP2830
Intro to IT or concurrent w/ Dig. Info Tech
COP2830
COP2830
World History Honors
Credit Term Page
1
YR
24
1
YR
25
1
YR
25
1
YR
25
0.5
SEM 45
1
YR
24
0.5
SEM 26
0.5
SEM 26
1
YR
41
1
YR
41
0.5
SEM 32
1
YR
36
1
YR
36
0.5
SEM 37
0.5
SEM 43
0.5
SEM 43
0.5
SEM 43
0.5
SEM 46
0.5
SEM 38
1
YR
36
1
YR
36
English
Math
Science
Social
Studies
Physical
Education
4
4
4
4
Four Year Plan
Grade 9
Grade 10
English I
(standard or honors)
English II
(standard or honors)
4
4
Environmental
Science
3
World History
(standard or honors)
3
.5
.5
Physical Education
.5
.5
Personal Fitness
1
(Intro to Information
Technology)
Fine Arts
1
World
Language
Grade 12
English III
(standard or honors)
English IV
(standard or honors)
AP Lang. & Comp.
AP Lit. & Comp
Biology, Chemistry,
or Physical Science
AP World History
1
Grade 11
Algebra I, Geometry
or Algebra II
Biology
(standard or honors)
Virtual
Course
IT Elective
Recommended
for College
Subjects
Graduation
Requirement
53
United States
History
(standard or honors)
AP American History
U.S. Govt./Economics
AP U.S. Govt./
Honors Economics
2
2
Intro to Information
Technology
Tech. Support Sys.Client Systems or
Network Concepts
/Network Computer
Maint. & Repair
26
7
7
IT Elective
IT Elective
Total
7
*SomeadvancedplacementcourseworkisalsorecommendedforcollegeͲboundstudents.
7