AIR FORCE JUNIOR ROTC REFERENCE GUIDE July 2012

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AIR FORCE JUNIOR ROTC REFERENCE GUIDE July 2012
AIR FORCE JUNIOR ROTC
REFERENCE GUIDE
July 2012
This guide is in effect until superseded. It supersedes all previous AFJROTC guides.
Holm Center/JRO
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Introduction
Use of the information contained in this guide is crucial to the optimum performance of your unit
and your unit’s compliance with all applicable federal laws and guidelines.
The Air Force Junior ROTC Reference Guide Book is designed to provide you an allencompassing guide to all things AFJROTC. The Reference Guide Book reinforces and
provides guidance on how to implement the policy provided in the AFJROTC instructions. It
has been developed to enhance your understanding of AFJROTC operations and help provide
solutions for handling the variety of issues that arise daily in your unit.
The new Reference Guide Book provides the latest guidance on Finance, CIA trips, SLS,
Logistics, and Uniforms and Awards. It also provides an overview of several AFJROTC special
programs and extracurricular activities. It has been designed to provide the latest guidance from
HQ, and will be updated regularly to provide you the most current information in one easily
accessed location. The Guide Book was compiled from Best Practices learned from units around
the world as well as input from instructors currently working in the field.
We hope you will find the Air Force Junior ROTC Guide Book an extremely useful reference
tool for your unit. If you cannot find the answers you need, do not hesitate to contact the
AFJROTC help desk or email [email protected] for clarification. Likewise, if you
feel there are issues that should be covered in future updates of this Guide Book, let us know.
// Signed //
Director, Air Force JROTC
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Table of Contents
CHAPTER 1—CADET OPERATIONS GUIDE ........................................................................... 9
FORMULATION OF CADET GOALS ................................................................................. 9
USING & DOCUMENTING GOAL ACCOMPLISHMENT .............................................. 11
PLANNING & EXECUTING CADET PROGRAMS ......................................................... 12
CADET-RUN FUNCTIONAL AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY ........................................ 13
CADET PROMOTIONS, AWARDS, & DISCIPLINE ........................................................ 14
CADET COMMUNITY SERVICE ...................................................................................... 15
CORPS EXCELLENCE ........................................................................................................ 15
CADETS ASSESSMENTS AND EVALUATIONS ............................................................ 16
UNIT ORGANIZATION ...................................................................................................... 18
CADET RANK AND ROTATION ...................................................................................... 18
CADET STANDARDS ......................................................................................................... 19
CHAPTER 2—AFJROTC FINANCE GUIDE ............................................................................ 20
UNIT ANNUAL ALLOTMENT OF FUNDS ...................................................................... 20
COMMON ERRORS TO AVOID ON REIMBURSEMENT REQUEST ........................... 21
UNIT OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE (UNIT O&M) ................................................ 22
EQUIPMENT PURCHASE AND MAINTENANCE (UNIT O&M) .................................. 23
ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPLIES (UNIT O&M) .................................................................. 24
PHOTO DEVELOPMENT & PHOTO STATIC COPIES (UNIT O&M) ........................... 25
POSTAGE (UNIT O&M) ..................................................................................................... 25
INTERNET/TELEPHONE TOLL CHARGES (UNIT O&M) ............................................. 26
INSTRUCTOR TRAVEL AND LODGING (UNIT O&M) ................................................. 26
CADET HEALTH AND WELLNESS PROGRAM (UNIT O&M) ..................................... 27
CADET TRANSPORTATION AND LODGING (UNIT O&M) ........................................ 28
ENTRANCE AND ADMISSION FEES (UNIT O&M) ....................................................... 28
MILTARY PERSONNEL (MILPER) ......................................................................................... 30
CADET MEALS (MILPER) ................................................................................................. 30
UNIFORM ALTERATION AND MAINTENANCE (MILPER) ........................................ 31
SUMMER LEADERSHIP SCHOOLS (O&M AND MILPER) .............................................. 32
EXAMPLE OF A PROPERLY PREPARED REIMBURSEMENT REQUEST ..................... 33
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CHAPTER 3—CURRICULUM IN ACTION ............................................................................. 52
CIA DEFINITION AND GUIDELINES .............................................................................. 52
CIA PLANNING ................................................................................................................... 52
CHECKLISTS AND FORMS ............................................................................................... 54
CHAPTER 4—LOGISTIC QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE ........................................................ 55
DD FORM 1131, CASH COLLECTION VOUCHER (CCV) ............................................. 55
DD FORM 200, FINANCIAL LIABILITY INVESTIGATION OF PROPERTY LOSS.... 56
SPECIAL MEASUREMENT OF CADETS ......................................................................... 57
CHAPTER 5—AFJROTC SUMMER LEADERSHIP SCHOOL (SLS) GUIDE ....................... 58
SUMMER LEADERSHIP SCHOOL OVERVIEW ............................................................. 58
SLS PLANNING ................................................................................................................... 60
SLS PLANNING ELEMENTS ............................................................................................. 61
SLS OPERATIONS .............................................................................................................. 68
CHAPTER 6—UNIFORM AND AWARDS ............................................................................... 72
ACCOUTREMENTS (GENERAL) ...................................................................................... 72
AWARDS AND DECORATIONS ....................................................................................... 75
CADET APPEARANCE AND GROOMING GUIDELINES ............................................. 91
EXTRACURRICULAR CHAPTER 1—KITTY HAWK AIR SOCIETY (KHAS) ................. 109
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 109
HISTORY OF KITTY HAWK SOCIETY ......................................................................... 110
SAMPLE CONSTITUTION ............................................................................................... 112
SAMPLE—AFJROTC NC-023 .......................................................................................... 115
SAMPLE KITTY HAWK AIR SOCIETY PLEDGE PROGRAM .................................... 121
MEMORY WORK .............................................................................................................. 122
AIR FORCE SONG: ........................................................................................................... 124
SAMPLE KITTY HAWK AIR SOCIETY PLEDGE PROGRAM INVITATION TO JOIN
............................................................................................................................................. 125
SAMPLE KITTY HAWK AIR SOCIETY PLEDGE PROGRAM CHECKLIST ............. 126
THREE OF THE FOLLOWING FIVE TASK COMPLETED: ......................................... 127
KHAS SIGNATURES FROM ACTIVE CHAPTER MEMBERS ..................................... 128
KHAS SIGNATURES FROM STAFF MEMBERS........................................................... 129
EXTRACURRICULAR CHAPTER 2—MODEL ROCKETRY PROGRAM.......................... 130
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MODEL ROCKETRY PROGRAM .................................................................................... 130
LEADERSHIP PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS (LPR) ........................................... 130
PROGRAM GUIDANCE.................................................................................................... 131
POSITIONS AND RESPONSIBILITIES ........................................................................... 132
SUGGESTED 6-WEEK PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION FOR MODEL ROCKETS .... 134
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF ROCKETRY ................................................................ 135
MODEL ROCKETRY BADGE .......................................................................................... 137
ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION .............................................................. 137
EXTRACURRICULAR CHAPTER 3—NATURAL DISASTERS .......................................... 139
NATURAL DISASTERS .................................................................................................... 139
HURRICANE PREPARATION EMAIL (SAMPLE) ........................................................ 140
ASSISTANCE CENTERS .................................................................................................. 141
EXTRACURRICULAR CHAPTER 4—RADIO CONTROLLED AND FLYING MODEL
AIRCRAFT PROGRAM ............................................................................................................ 142
GETTING STARTED ......................................................................................................... 142
R/C AIRCRAFT .................................................................................................................. 145
TRAINING .......................................................................................................................... 149
THE ACADEMY OF MODEL AERONAUTICS .............................................................. 152
EXTRACURRICULAR CHAPTER 5—AFJROTC MARKSMANSHIP PROGRAM
GUIDANCE ................................................................................................................................ 158
MARKSMANSHIP PROGRAM GUIDANCE .................................................................. 158
EXTRACURRICULAR CHAPTER 6—AFJROTC AEROSPACE STATIC MODEL
PROGRAM ................................................................................................................................. 164
STATIC MODEL PROGRAM ........................................................................................... 164
ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION .............................................................. 165
EXTRACURRICULAR CHAPTER 7—AFJROTC AIR FORCE WEATHER AGENCY
PROGRAM ................................................................................................................................. 166
AIR FORCE JROTC-AIR FORCE WEATHER AGENCY PROGRAM .......................... 166
EXTRACURRICULAR CHAPTER 8—CADET ORIENTATION FLIGHT PROGRAM ...... 174
REQUIREMENTS .............................................................................................................. 174
ORIENTATION FLIGHTS ................................................................................................. 177
ORIENTATION FLIGHTS – ADVANCED FLIGHT MANEUVERS ............................. 179
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GUIDE TO CHAPERONING ………………………………………………………………..184
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AFJROTC Cadet Creed
I am an Air Force Junior ROTC Cadet.
I am connected and faithful to every Corps of Cadets who served their community and nation
with patriotism.
I earn respect when I uphold the Core Values of Integrity First, Service Before Self, and
Excellence In All We Do.
I will always conduct myself to bring credit to my family, school, Corps of Cadets, community,
and to myself.
My character defines me. I will not lie, cheat, or steal. I am accountable for my actions and
deeds.
I will hold others accountable for their actions as well. I will honor those I serve with, those who
have gone before me, and those who will come after me.
I am a Patriot, a Leader, and a Wingman devoted to those I follow, serve, and lead.
I am an Air Force Junior ROTC Cadet.
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AIR FORCE SONG
Off we go into the wild blue yonder,
Climbing high into the sun;
Here they come zooming to meet our thunder,
At 'em boys, Give 'er the gun! (Give 'er the gun now!)
Down we dive, spouting our flame from under,
Off with one helluva roar!
We live in fame or go down in flame. Hey!
Nothing'll stop the U.S. Air Force!
Additional verses:
Minds of men fashioned a crate of thunder,
Sent it high into the blue;
Hands of men blasted the world asunder;
How they lived God only knew! (God only knew then!)
Souls of men dreaming of skies to conquer
Gave us wings, ever to soar!
With scouts before And bombers galore. Hey!
Nothing'll stop the U.S. Air Force!
Bridge: "A Toast to the Host"
Here's a toast to the host
Of those who love the vastness of the sky,
To a friend we send a message of his brother men who fly.
We drink to those who gave their all of old,
Then down we roar to score the rainbow's pot of gold.
A toast to the host of men we boast, the U.S. Air Force!
Zoom!
Off we go into the wild sky yonder,
Keep the wings level and true;
If you'd live to be a grey-haired wonder
Keep the nose out of the blue! (Out of the blue, boy!)
Flying men, guarding the nation's border,
We'll be there, followed by more!
In echelon we carry on. Hey!
Nothing'll stop the U.S. Air Force!
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CHAPTER 1—CADET OPERATIONS GUIDE
Foreword
This guidebook provides a reference on how to build a strong cadet corps with cadet leaders that
fully own their unit through setting organizational goals; developing programs to support those
goals; planning and executing their programs; measuring, monitoring, recording and reporting
progress toward the unit goals; and operating and controlling the functional areas of day-to-day
unit operations (e.g. cadet personnel records, logistics/inventory control, health and wellness,
administrative functions, unit discipline, etc.).
Section 1
FORMULATION OF CADET GOALS
1.1. HQ AFJROTC provides a template for building six organizational goals that support our
mission to “Develop citizens of character, dedicated to serving their nation and community.” Why
only six goals? More than six goals would be difficult to track and use. This goal must be tailored
and unique to the school and community while steering cadet’s goals support the overall JROTC
mission. Where cadets create goals for their functional areas, they should attempt to link their
individual goals to one of the overall unit goals. In fact, the instructors should encourage cadet
leaders to do this.
1.1.1. Goal Setting Template: Goals are divided into three broad categories: two goals
are related to the cadet corps itself, two related to the school, and two related to the local
community. One of the two cadet goals will be related to the quest for academic
excellence within the cadet corps itself. One of the two school goals will address
recruiting and retention of cadets in the unit. One of the two community goals will be
oriented to providing service and getting cadets involved in service related programs.
The other goal in each category may address specific, unique unit challenges or
aspirations based on local conditions.
1.1.2. Suggested Goal Setting Process
1.1.2.1 The goals will be cadet inspired not instructor inspired. Instructors will
not direct or write the goals for the cadets and then submit them in WINGS.
Cadets will take the lead in goal formulation and writing. The cadet
leadership’s effort to achieve their own goals is much stronger than if the goals
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were written by the instructors. We want them to own their goals. Therefore, the
goals need to come from them.
1.1.2.2. The more people you get involved in goal formulation the better. It is
call “buy in.” The time your unit begins to think about goals could be as early as
the late spring of the academic year before the goals will be submitted. Start out
the process by possibly teaching a leadership education lesson on the importance
of goal setting and their use. Then use the actual process as the laboratory where
you put the formal education into practice.
1.1.2.3. You want as many ideas as you can possibly get on what the cadets feel
is important to them. Suggest using a brainstorming session in each class to get
those ideas. Ask some leading questions to get them thinking like:
1.1.2.3.1. “What is our greatest challenge in our cadet corps?”
1.1.2.3.2. “How can we (our corps) truly make a difference in our
school?”
1.1.2.3.3. “What could we do to help make things better in our
community?”
1.1.2.3.4. “What would you like to see us doing that you’ve seen in other
JROTCs or school programs?”
1.1.2.4. Once your ideas are collected from all your classes, ask your cadet
leadership (your senior staff), to group the ideas. Some ideas may be duplicates
or very similar in nature. Categorize each idea as to which of the major categories
it supports (cadet, school, community).
1.1.2.5 Prepare a ballot for the cadet corps whereby the cadets in the corps are
asked to rank order the most to least important ideas for next year. The next class
period, have every cadet vote and submit a ballot with what he or she thinks is
most important to the least important. Let your leaders review the ballots and
select the highest ranked idea in each of the categories above (cadet, school, and
community).
1.1.2.6. Now it’s time for the cadet leaders to write their goals. Using the corpsselected ideas, written goals need to have several essential (SMART) components.
Make your goal Specific, not written in general terms. What exactly do they want
to accomplish? Make your written goal Measurable. You need a way to
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qualitatively evaluate your goal accomplishment. Your goal must require Action
or effort on the part of the members of your corps. It should not be something
that will happen as a result of some outside-the-unit action or decision by the
school administration. The goal should be Realistic. Is it within the ability of
your cadet corps to reach? Does your corps have the ability to control the
outcome or is this something imposed from outside the organization? The goal
must have a Time constraint. When do you hope to complete successfully the
goal? Try to avoid setting goals that would roll into the next academic year. It
should be something you can measure during the academic year your goals are
written for.
1.1.2.7. After the cadet leadership writes their goals, you can help edit them or
ask questions that would clarify what they are trying to accomplish. Let them
enter/type their goals into WINGS. Have them save them in draft until you finish
the final edit. Then submit them final before 10 Oct.
Section 2
Using & Documenting Goal Accomplishment
Your goals are meant to guide where your organization goes and they emphasize what is
important to your cadets, then your programs will support your goals. There must be continuous
measuring of how you are doing in getting to your desired outcome. Mid-course changes may be
needed to accomplish what you set out to accomplish.
2.1. When your cadet staff plans their activities for the year, suggest you require they tie each
activity to at least one or more of your six goals. That way, going into the year, your leadership
knows which activities are supporting which goal. If they are not addressing one of the things
they thought was important with an activity or a program, they may need to plan something or
rethink the importance of the goal in the first place.
2.2. Have your corps commander assign members of his/her senior staff to be responsible for
keeping records for each goal. This could be six people with one goal assigned to each member.
When an activity is accomplished that supports a goal; the staff member will record the measures
of success. These records may be kept in a notebook or a computer spreadsheet.
2.3. At least every 6-9 weeks, have a special staff meeting (a self-check-up) where each staff
officer responsible for a goal, presents to the staff how the unit is doing in relation to
accomplishing their goal. Depending on success or lack thereof on each goal, the staff discusses
changes or corrections they may need to make to complete the organizational goal by year’s end.
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2.4. On 5 April, if the unit desires to compete for a Distinguished Unit Award, the cadets should
enter impact statements for each of their goals into WINGS. Again, the instructor should allow
the cadet leadership to write these impact statements and then edit them before submitting the
impacts as final.
2.5. After using this process, hopefully, cadets will understand the importance of goal setting to
an organization and how to use them to guide the organization throughout the year. This is an
outstanding leadership tool and part of putting our classroom leadership education into practice.
Section 3
Planning & Executing Cadet Programs
All programs in the corps should be cadet initiated, planned, led, executed and documented.
This includes all your social functions like Military Ball, CIA trips (even overnight), all your
teams (Drill Team, Color Guard, Orienteering, Model Rocketry, etc.), Awards Banquet, and all
your community service projects. All programs should be cadet initiated, not instructor initiated.
The ability of the cadets to do all this is not gained overnight and must be taught and mentored
by the instructors. It’s a process that may take several years to get to the point where cadets
“own” their unit. For newly established units the process may take longer.
3.1. Once the cadets have their plan for the year, allow your commander to assign project
officers for each activity/program. The SASI should monitor this process to make sure the
commander’s selections are within the ability of the cadet being selected. Before announcements
are made, the corps commander and the SASI should discuss the selections. The project officer
should be mature, a self-starter, and usually a junior or senior with at least two years’ experience
in JROTC. An assistant project officer or NCOIC, should also be selected (normally at least a
sophomore with one full year experience in JROTC).
3.2 With the cadet project officers and NCOs develop a chronological checklist of things that
need to be done to execute the project/program. Let the cadets develop the check list. Ask
leading questions that take them in the direction they need to go. Don’t spoon-feed them all the
steps. Have them think for themselves. Have each project officer keep a continuity book that
can be used by later cadets if they have similar projects or reoccurring projects in subsequent
years. Make sure they accurately record what they did and who they had to work with to make
the project come off successfully. Depending on the cadet’s ability, the amount of assistance
you have to give may vary. Try to avoid telling them what to do—use questioning to lead them
in the right direction.
3.3. Meet weekly and let the project officer and NCO back-brief you on their progress. Discuss
problems. Again, use questions to lead them in the proper direction.
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3.4. The cadets, under the supervision of the OIC and NCOIC (with the SASI or ASI present)
should do all the work of the planning, establish the funds or resources needed, finding volunteer
cadets to help, setup, execution, clean-up and reporting to the cadet staff. Make sure their
planning and execution is recognized by you publically.
Section 4
Cadet-run Functional Areas of Responsibility
Cadet leadership is responsible for leading and maintaining all the functional jobs keeping the
corps of cadets operating effectively. These areas of responsibility may be (but are not limited
to) logistics inventory control and record keeping (to include uniform issue and return), cadet
personnel records maintenance and upkeep (to include keeping unit records on community
service; individual cadet awards and decorations, jobs, ranks and promotions, health and
wellness activity documentation, and individual participation in unit activities and community
service; financial records; etc.).
4.1. You may allow your corps commander to select his key staff members to fill these
functional jobs. They are always subject to the SASI’s approval. Discuss the cadet commander
recommendations before the announcement. The SASI must know the capability of the cadets.
Don’t allow the commander to select his/her friends that may not be able or would not be willing
to perform the job in question. Discuss what action the commander would take if the individual
being selected fails to do the job properly or adequately.
4.2. Your functional leaders will be responsible for training their staff. Your corps needs to be
structured to facilitate cadets training their potential replacements in following years. Initially,
the instructor may have to train the functional leader and then allow them to train their staff. An
example of a corps structure that allows for cadets to train cadets in logistics may be: Logistics
officer has a logistics NCOIC working with him that is a year behind him in JROTC. Each flight
(or classroom period) would have a logistics specialist that works for the logistics officer and
NCOIC. The same structure may be true of a personnel staff and health and wellness staff.
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Section 5
Cadet Promotions, Awards, & Discipline
For the cadets to be true owners of their corps they must play key roles in promotions, giving
awards and administering discipline. Therefore, there needs to be written procedures in the cadet
guide or operating procedures on how these boards or activities are conducted. Cadet leaders
should be primarily responsible for disciplining the other cadets in the corps. The instructors
should provide tools that would allow the cadet leadership to participate in these activities.
5.1. Special Boards for awards nominations, promotion boards, and disciplinary board
procedures will be written in the cadet guide. Instructors must be present when any board is
being conducted to ensure cadets abide by these rules and that the board action is fair and just.
Board actions are only recommendations, and the SASI is the final approving authority for
actions recommended.
5.2. Daily discipline can be cadet administered through the use of a merit/demerit system.
Merit/Demerit systems have worked well in some units and not well in others. This, like many
recommendations in this guide, is optional. If used, procedures for using such a system also
must be in writing in the cadet guide. To preclude abuse of the system, instructors should
monitor it closely. There must be a SASI final review of all merits and demerits before any final
action. The cadet receiving merits or demerits must be fully aware of the pending action on the
merit/demerit form. This must be documented on the form or by other means. Care should be
taken to make sure the system is not just a punitive system which fails to recognize good cadet
actions. There should be a published table for recommending graduated number of merits or
demerits depending on the gravity of the cadet action. There also has to be a procedure whereby
a cadet receiving a demerit slip can appeal the action if he or she feels it is unfair. The Group or
Squadron Senior Enlisted Advisor or Command Chief may be the person used to oversee this
program.
5.3. All these actions and programs are benchmarks of cadet ownership of their unit. You may
not be able to incorporate everything or you may need to implement these programs gradually as
your unit and cadet mature over time. For newly established units, this may take three to four
years before mature ownership is realized. Ownership may vary from year to year depending on
the strength of your senior class leadership. The idea is to start the process and develop a
tradition of excellence perpetuated by each class coming through your corps of cadets.
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Section 6
Cadet Community Service
Community service by the cadets is a key tenant of good citizenship. Cadet leadership should be
encouraged to make this area one of their priorities. The more cadets participate, the better. The
higher participation rate in community service means we are influencing more of the cadets in
our program.
6.1. Cadets should be encouraged to look for opportunities to provide service to both the school
and their local communities. Cadet leadership should take the initiative in developing programs
throughout the academic year that provides opportunities for every cadet enrolled in the program
to participate.
6.2. A technique that improves the image of the cadet corps in the school and community is to
recommend the cadet leaders approach the principal and community leaders asking, “What can
we do for our school/community that will help out?”
6.3. Cadets should not only be responsible for looking for opportunities but they also should be
planning, recruiting volunteers to participate, executing, and developing rewards within the corps
that recognizes cadets who participate (e.g. linking community service as one of the criteria for
promotion).
6.4. Cadets should record participation hours for each individual. Based on cadet records, the
leadership would recommend cadets who have earned the Service Ribbon. Cadet leadership
should also keep a yearly tally of service projects and total hours contributed. This can be done
in the Events section of WINGS. Recommend this be updated weekly.
Section 7
Corps Excellence
Instructors need to set and model the standard for excellence in the JROTC unit. A “do it right
the first time” must be emphasized because that saves time and effort. Cadets in the corps should
be the model citizens on the high school campus. Successful units exceed school averages in
attendance, academics, graduation, and discipline rates. There should be evidence of lower
number of disciplinary referrals in every class among cadets as compared to the general student
body. The JROTC should be regarded by faculty and students as the best student organization
on campus. Finally, cooperative/joint efforts with other school organizations, clubs, and
programs help bond cadets throughout the school and community while expanding visibility of
their program.
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7.1. Academic success is given high priority by cadets and factored into promotions and job
advancement. Cadets in need of are identified and supported through study tables/tutoring.
Academic recognition programs are evident (e.g. KHAS) identifying academic “top guns”.
7.2. In your Health and Wellness Program, physical fitness is led and managed by the cadets to
include planning and leading exercises to documentation and assessment. Program
modifications are made to strengthen cadet weaknesses. Warrior or elite PT programs are
encouraged.
7.3. In recruiting and retention of cadets, cadet leaders must be involved in promoting the
viability of a unit—simply stated: cadets who help recruit and retain cadets are the foundation
of a viable unit.
7.4. Cadets should be encouraged to be active participants in other student organizations. The
goal of your unit should be to mirror the student body and be an integral part of the student body.
A way to reward that participation should be developed. The ASI and SASI should actively
recruit students across the entire student body: honor students, varsity athletes, band and chorus
members, Key Club members, special needs students, etc. You don’t want your corps
stereotyped as a place where the “students who cannot do anything else join JROTC.”
7.5. Cadets should take pride in their facilities. Cadets should be actively involved in keeping
the JROTC area clean and neatly organized all the time (not just when a visitor is coming). They
should be allowed to decorate their area to reflect their originality and the spirit of the unit. They
should be encouraged to keep bulletin boards neat, organized, and up-to-date.
7.6. The instructors should encourage the principal and other administrators to publically
applaud the cadets’ contributions and awards at every opportunity. Suggest that when a cadet
excels, a 3x5 card with a short narrative be given to the principal for announcements. Keep the
activities and corps excellence in front of the entire student body. This helps in recruiting, unit
pride, and JROTC reputation on campus. Remember, the principal has many activities going on
all the time and may not always see what your cadets do. Your 3x5 cards will help him help you.
Section 8
Cadets Assessments and Evaluations
Everything in the chapter leads to this point: Determining how well the cadets are doing in the
various areas addressed in the proceeding sections will tell you how well you are doing your job
as a mentor and achieving our mission of citizen development in JROTC. It is because of this
that this section of your Unit Evaluation is weighted heavier than any of the others. The
Department of Defense Instruction and HQ requires an Inspection be accomplished annually.
You receive a formal external assessment from HQ every third year, and you must conduct a
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self-inspection in the other two years. Each leadership group (every year) should have the
opportunity to prepare their unit for inspection—this is a great learning tool. It is strongly
recommended that a unit prepare and execute an inspection every year just as they would for an
external unit evaluation from HQ. This should be part of the unit’s yearly planning calendar.
8.1. Some units appoint their cadet Vice Commander as the one responsible for preparing the
unit for inspection. He or she may want to farm out the parts of the Assessment checklist
(Attachment 1) to the functional leaders in the unit. Involve everyone in the preparation.
8.2. The SASI may want to find someone of importance to be the Inspecting Officer for your
self-inspection. This could be a local National Guard Commander, the Superintendent of
Schools for your district, your principal, etc. Tell the cadets to plan the day of the inspection just
as if HQ was the inspecting offer. Hype it up just like an external visit.
8.3. Adherence to dress and appearance standards and uniformity define the pride and
professionalism of a unit. Cadet leaders that take individual pride in wearing their uniform but
also inspect, correct, and help others wear the uniform properly demonstrate teamwork. Staff
level cadets should be involved in the uniform inspection process and provide feedback to
younger cadets. The first item in the Cadet Ops portion of the Assessment is centered on
uniform wear—everyone is in the same uniform, the uniforms are clean and pressed, and
individuals are properly groomed. The grade in this area is dependent on whether all or only a
portion of the unit is in compliance.
8.4. Cadets must develop a promotional unit mission presentation that describes their unit
demographics (introduces the unit to the evaluator and discusses special conditions that unit may
face), goals and goal progress, other unit achievements not addressed in their unit goals, and
future challenges. The presentation must also address the unit health and wellness program
(how it operates, assessments, progress to date). Units are encouraged to include pictures of their
activities. The cadets may include activities that go back to the last external evaluation they
received. After the cadets have rehearsed their briefing, the SASI may want to roll-play as the
inspector and have the cadet leaders field questions from the evaluator.
8.5. The cadet-led 30 command drill sequence will be accomplished by 2nd year cadets ( 4 year
program) or 1st year cadets (3 year program). Ensure cadets have the opportunity to practice in
the area they may have to use if the weather is not suitable to perform the demonstration
outdoors.
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Section 9
Unit Organization
9.1. Organization of the Cadet Corps. A unit’s organizational structure should be appropriate
to the number of cadets enrolled. Units with 250 or less cadets may be organized as a cadet
group and units with 251 or more cadets as a cadet wing. Units are authorized to deviate from the
recommended organizational structure criteria to ensure an efficient organization and effective
program, e.g., units with less than 175 cadets may desire a small organization structure such as a
squadron.
9.1.1. A wing is comprised of two or more groups. A group is comprised of two or more
squadrons. A squadron is comprised of two or more flights. A flight is comprised of two or
more elements. Elements will consist of three or more cadets (including element leader).
9.1.2. The organizational structure must reflect the actual functions of the corps with
command, staff, and rank identified. The functional organization can be any logical form
consistent with military organizational principles. Each unit may add appropriate positions
within the cadet corps organization as required.
9.1.3. Job descriptions are required for each cadet corps position. Titles and office symbols
will conform to standard Air Force nomenclature. Each unit will develop an organizational
structure chart that clearly indicates unit structure and chain of command. Additionally,
provide a unit detailed listing showing all designated cadet corps positions and job
descriptions in a location accessible to the entire cadet corps.
9.1.4. Instructors will select the cadet corps commander, subordinate commanders and key
staff members required by the organizational structure of the unit. Instructors may allow
cadet commanders and key staff members to propose remaining cadet staff members.
9.1.5. Units are required to have a Cyber Officer position. The position can be aligned under
the Mission Support Group, the Operations Group or report directly to the Wing
Commander. The primary duties of this position are coordinate Cyber Patriot issues, to serve
as POC for the unit web-site, help provide information security for unit information systems
and handle any other cyber or information technology issues for the unit.
Section 10
Cadet Rank and Rotation
10.1. Cadet Rank and Rotation. Consider the strengths and shortcomings of the individual
cadets when assigning them to positions to ensure they gain the greatest leadership benefits.
Promotions are a motivational tool that are unavailable if rank structure is not managed properly;
i.e., avoid promoting cadets to the maximum authorized rank too quickly to ensure proper
progression and promotion opportunities.
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10.1.1. New units should limit cadet rank during the beginning years to allow for unit
growth.
10.1.2. The word “cadet” or an abbreviation must be a part of all references to cadet ranks.
10.1.3. All cadets are assigned a permanent grade commensurate with the number of
AFJROTC years satisfactorily completed; i.e., the permanent grade for first-year cadets is
Airman; second-year, Airman First Class; third-year, Senior Airman; and fourth-year, if
offered, Staff Sergeant. Permanent grades may be awarded during the second semester of
each year. Retention of permanent grades is contingent upon satisfactory performance and
behavior as determined by the AFJROTC Instructors. Permanent officer status will be
awarded to cadets holding officer positions for two or more grading periods. Exceptions are
authorized at the discretion of the AFJROTC Instructors and in accordance with published
unit guidance.
10.1.4. Cadets may be assigned a temporary grade based on a specific position. Use of a
temporary-permanent grade pattern is optional and intended to serve as an administrative
vehicle for rotation of responsibility and to avoid imbalances in grade structure. Cadets
serving in a temporary grade may revert to their permanent grade upon completion of these
duties. At the discretion of the AFJROTC Instructors, cadets in their final term of AFJROTC
may retain the highest rank to which they have been promoted, regardless of course level.
Section 11
Cadet Standards
11.1. Importance of Standards. The nature of the JROTC mission, as well as its high visibility
within the school and the community, requires its members to adhere to higher standards than
might normally be found among the student population.
11.2. Merit and Demerit System. Merit and demerit systems are not required, but may be used
at the discretion of the AFJROTC instructors and school officials.
11.3. Cadet Evaluation Boards. The use of cadet boards is not required, but can serve as a tool
for cadet involvement and leadership training.
11.4. Unauthorized Clubs. No unit, or school sponsoring an AFJROTC unit, may encourage,
facilitate, or otherwise condone secret societies, private clubs, or “special operations/combat
training” as part of the AFJROTC program.
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CHAPTER 2—AFJROTC FINANCE GUIDE
Foreword
Units receive financial support only by either reimbursement of authorized expenses or through
the pre-coordinated use of the HQ’s Government Purchase Card (GPC) or Government Travel
Card (GTC).
Units will use this guide to plan activities for the fiscal year by first determining the level of
O&M and MILPERS support the unit is allotted. Every unit should know what they can expect
to receive in terms of Holm Center support. Likewise, units are expected to stay within their
budget.
The Finance Guide also outlines the process units need to follow to be reimbursed for authorized
expenses or for requesting HQ credit card support. Paying particular attention to the instructions
will speed the processing of the unit’s reimbursement request. Failure to follow the instructions
or the unit’s poor attention to detail will greatly delay the entire process. As you prepare your
vouchers, be sure to avoid the list of common errors.
Finally, the list of authorized and unauthorized items found in this guide is not all inclusive; it is
intended to provide additional information to help units correctly interpret and implement the
financial regulatory guidance. The list is also intended to help units understand their options
prior to committing unit or district funds. If you have additional questions concerning a specific
expenditure please contact HQ AFJROTC for further guidance before you incur the expense.
Hopefully, you will find the Finance Guide to be a very handy reference tool. If you cannot find
the answers you need, do not hesitate to call Holm Center/SDF at 334-953-5267 or Email [email protected] for clarification.
UNIT ANNUAL ALLOTMENT OF FUNDS
Each fiscal year (1 Oct – 30 Sep), each unit will have an allotment of funds available at the HQ
to pay for authorized expenses. Each unit will have a separate allocation of Operation and
Maintenance (O&M) funds and Military Personnel (MILPER) funds. Units have access to these
funds by either submitting a reimbursement request or by pre-coordinating HQ credit card
support. Regardless of the method of funding, a unit will not receive more O&M and MILPER
support in one fiscal year than what they have been allocated without prior approval. Exceptions
will be rare. Such exceptions can only be granted by the Deputy Director or the Director of
AFJROTC.
Each unit will receive O&M and MILPER funding each fiscal year based on the unit’s annual
Program Status Report (PSR). No funds will be available unless the PSR and Class Roster have
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been completed in WINGS. If any changes in these rates occur, it will be announced via all unit
email.
Unit allocated funds will be available throughout the fiscal year. However, by 10 March each
year, units will be required to have prepared their Year-End Spend Plan (YESP) in WINGS. The
YESP will identify all of the different types of expenditures the unit expects to file
reimbursement or request HQ credit card support for in each funding category for the remainder
of the fiscal year. Headquarters will set aside the necessary funds for that unit. It is extremely
important units make the best estimate possible. Holm Center sets 10 March as the cut off for
the Year-End Spend Plan to allow Holm Center/SDF time to process the remaining
reimbursements from the school year, ensure sufficient funds are available within the program to
cover the requirements, and allow a reallocation of excess funds to other Holm Center and
AFJROTC requirements. This is the normal EOY closeout procedure used throughout the
USAF.
COMMON ERRORS TO AVOID ON REIMBURSEMENT REQUEST
Avoiding these errors will speed the processing of your reimbursement request. Unauthorized
expenses will be discussed later in this reference guide.
a. Not entering your request into WINGS. Requests received outside of WINGS will not be
processed.
b. Reimbursement requests can not cross fiscal years. For example, HQ cannot process a
reimbursement for a period of service of 09/21/2010 – 11/08/2010. Fiscal years run from 1 Oct –
30 Sep and represent different accounts of funds. If a unit has receipts dated 09/21/2010 –
11/08/2010, the correct action would be to submit two reimbursement requests, one covering the
period 9/21/2010 – 9/30/2010, and another covering the period 10/1/2010 – 11/08/2010.
c. Requesting reimbursement in the wrong category on the Original Invoice will slow the
process down. Please make sure you have entered the correct amount of Curriculum-in-Action
(CIA) Transportation, Curriculum-in-Action (CIA) Lodging, Uniform Alterations, Other O&M
Reimbursable Expenses, etc. into WINGS.
d. Lacking two signatures. The original signed invoice must be signed by either instructor and
a school official. Only an invoice generated by WINGS is authorized.
e. Missing receipts. We can’t reimburse without a receipt.
f. No Original Signed Invoice. This contains information we require for reimbursement
processing. If the directions are correctly followed, WINGS will produce the proper letterhead
on the invoice and the invoice itself. The WINGS generated letterhead is the only letterhead
authorized and must appear on the invoice. Your demographics data is used to generate the
letterhead. Before starting the reimbursement process, ensure your school’s name, address,
phone number, and fax number are up-to-date in WINGS
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g. Unable to read copy of receipt. We can’t reimburse unreadable receipts.
h. Making multiple submissions for the same reimbursement. If multiple payments occur, the
process slows down as the Holm Center collects back the extra payments.
i. Submitting for reimbursement on receipts totaling less than $100 or more frequently than
every 30 days. Regardless of the amount of a reimbursement request, each request generates a
minimum investment in manpower at the Holm Center. Please wait until you have accumulated
$100 in receipts and 30 days has passed since your last request for reimbursement. WINGS
programming will not permit reimbursements more frequently than every 30 days.
j. Not Submitted Final. (Just printing the form does not create the reimbursement request in
WINGS. Units must hit the Submit to HQ button or their request for reimbursement won’t be
entered into WINGS)
k. Receipts should be marked as a MILPER or O&M. This will allow HQ to charge the correct
account.
l. Not identifying the number of cadets who participated to help determine if the unit stayed
within the $25 per cadet per day limit for lodging or $12 per cadet per day limit for meals.
m. No date of service on receipt.
n. Scanned document must be in *.doc, *.pdf, or *.jpg formats.
o. Receipt/invoice does not meet at least one of three following conditions:*
1. must be marked "PAID"
2. show a zero balance remaining
3. the total amount due was settled using a credit card or cash
UNIT OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE (Unit O&M)
These funds are used to support the administrative and educational needs of operating the unit.
O&M funds are authorized to cover cadet travel and lodging during Curriculum-in-Action (CIA)
trips and Summer Leadership Schools (SLS). Unit O&M can also cover office supplies,
including the maintenance and purchase of office and classroom equipment (excluding
computers). Further, it includes curriculum support materials, making photo static copies, long
distance phone charges, and instructor POV travel in direct support of authorized JROTC
activities or events, instructor lodging for Curriculum-in-Action (CIA), postage expenses, shoe
sizing devices, and plastic garment bags--for storage purposes only. (Drill team garment travel
bags are not authorized).
O&M funds are also authorized for cadet orientation flights.
Drill teams and color guards are extracurricular activities and unit O&M funds are not authorized
for drill team/color guard equipment and accessories.
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NOTE: While unit O&M funds are authorized to support instructor lodging while participating
in CIA trips and/or SLS encampments, units will not receive additional unit O&M funds to cover
instructor lodging expenses. SLS Instructor lodging must come out of the unit O&M funds, not
SLS O&M funds which are to only support the cadets. When in doubt, call Holm Center/SDFB
EQUIPMENT PURCHASE AND MAINTENANCE (Unit O&M)
AUTHORIZED
1. The following are authorized: TVs, VCR/DVD player, camcorder, digital camera, overhead
projector (check w/HQ prior to purchase), projector screen, printers, fax machines, shredders,
scanners, portable stereos, PA systems, and computer peripherals (connection cords/data storage
devices, etc). (NOTE: New units contact HQ Logistics for their initial equipment.)
2. Repair and maintenance of AF property (contact Holm Center/SDC for repair/replacement /
warranty information on government computers and laptops).
3. Installation and/or delivery charges of equipment.
4. Parts to repair Daisy Replica rifles.
5. Engraving USAF property. Units can either pay to have the AF property etched, or can
purchase an engraving tool and engrave the equipment themselves.
6. Picture/Poster frames and/or framing services.
7. Additional items including instructional materials may be purchased with JRO approval.
NOT AUTHORIZED
1. Purchasing laptop/desktop computers, SMART BOARDS, or Classroom Performance
Systems (CPS) without HQ AFJROTC prior approval.
2. Repairing non-AF owned or donated/fundraised equipment (e.g., maintenance plans).
3. Software, simulators, joysticks, etc.
4. PDA or Blackberry, telephones, cell phones, or walkie-talkies.
5. Office furniture such as chairs, desks, podiums, filing cabinets, shelving, display cases, work
benches, banners, magnetic signs, uniform storage racks or stands, cabinetry, items for weapon
storage, etc. (School is responsible for providing furniture and securing AF property.)
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6. Any fitness equipment such as treadmills, exercise bikes, weight sets, etc.
7. State, other service and historical flags, poles, and stands.
8. Plaques, trophies, and medals.
9. Banquet fees and expenses (entertainment, decorations, etc.)
10. Supplies for and maintenance of equipment of unit’s marksmanship program.
ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPLIES (Unit O&M)
AUTHORIZED
1. Miscellaneous supplies are defined as administrative office supplies and supplies required to
operate AF equipment, e.g., pens, pencils, paper, staplers, scissors, paper clips, glue, etc.
2. Inkjet and toner printer and copier cartridges. Units may purchase toner for printers that the
school owns as long as they are being used strictly for AFJROTC.
3. Blank CD/DVDs or other document storage devices.
4. Items to protect the uniforms and uniform equipment (storage only)
5. Shoe measuring device.
NOT AUTHORIZED
1. The purchase of Awards and Plaques.
2. Providing guest speakers or honored guests Honorariums.
3. Yearbooks
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PHOTO DEVELOPMENT & PHOTO STATIC COPIES (Unit O&M)
AUTHORIZED
1. Film or digital photo development documenting authorized AFJROTC activities.
2. Photo static copies provided by commercial vendor, school, or district. To include, copies
for items such as: cadet folders, cadet guides, invitations to JROTC functions, letterhead
stationery, program information, letters to parents & prospective cadets, etc.
NOT AUTHORIZED
1. Instructor and cadet business cards.
2. Professional/Custom made invitations, programs, stationery, rubber stamps, etc.
POSTAGE (Unit O&M)
AUTHORIZED
1. Postage expenses incurred in mailing official business documents to include certified mail
used for uniform and equipment recovery.
2. When purchasing stamps from the US Postal Service, obtain a receipt.
3. When mass-mailing through the US Postal Service, obtain a receipt.
4. When using a school postage meter, obtain a receipt from the school. Receipt must be on
school letterhead and state the amount of postage used for the period of reimbursement.
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INTERNET/TELEPHONE TOLL CHARGES (Unit O&M)
AUTHORIZED
Long distance toll charges incurred in the support of AFJROTC. NOTE: School receipt for
telephone toll charges must state: “Charges are for long distance calls only and do not include
any miscellaneous telephone expenses.”
NOT AUTHORIZED
1. Cell phone charges.
2. Any phone line/monthly rental/installation charges/surcharges.
3. Telephone device charges.
4. Additional internet connections (i.e., beyond that provided by the school, which already
allows full access to WINGS).
INSTRUCTOR TRAVEL AND LODGING (Unit O&M)
AUTHORIZED
1. POV mileage for AFJROTC instructor travel to the designated Air Force support base, senior
ROTC unit, closest ANG/AFRES base, Civil Air Patrol (CAP) unit, or other authorized location
to pick up or turn in equipment, training aids, uniforms, textbooks, and other supplies in support
of the AFJROTC program. In addition, instructors may file for POV mileage to support base for
equipment custodian training; and for instructor or cadets to make community service
presentations (e.g., Color Guard / Honor Guard) to local civic organizations or service clubs
(e.g., Veterans of Foreign Wars, Chamber of Commerce, Lions Club, American Legion, etc.) or
within local vicinity in direct support of the AFJROTC program.
2. Logistical support trips to installations other than the unit’s designated support base must
have Holm Center/JRO prior approval for reimbursement.
3. The school mileage rate is used when calculating trip expense, not US Government mileage
rates.
4. Cost of a rental vehicle and fuel to pick up uniforms or equipment from the support base due
to the size of the load.
5. Receipt for vehicle rental must include destination and purpose. If not included, annotate on
receipt.
6. Tolls; provided receipts are furnished.
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7. Instructor lodging for CIA trips and SLS (will count against unit’s O&M entitlement). The
cost of lodging payable or reimbursable by the AF will be capped at the current max lodging rate
set by the DoD at the location of the lodging. Current lodging rates can be found at
http://www.defensetravel.dod.mil/perdiem/perdiemrates.html
NOT AUTHORIZED
1. Instructor travel to locally/area organized "instructor meetings."
2. Instructor travel for any activities not already authorized above.
CADET HEALTH AND WELLNESS PROGRAM (UNIT O&M)
AUTHORIZED
1. Safety vests
2. Fluorescent belts
3. CPR and First Aid Certification (for instructors only)
NOT AUTHORIZED
1. Bottled water or power drinks such as Gatorade and Red Bull.
2. Renting a weight room or purchase physical fitness/athletic equipment.
3. Items for water storage such as a cooler or Camel Pak.
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CADET TRANSPORTATION AND LODGING (UNIT O&M)
AUTHORIZED
1. CIA trips must be in direct support of AFJROTC and support curricular and authorized
extracurricular activities. Authorization includes transportation and lodging of cadets to military
and civilian educational facilities and functions/events such as: Aerospace industries, military,
historical and science museums, NASA facilities, commercial airports, military bases, color
guard performances, drill competitions, participating in parades, senior ROTC units, Civilian
Marksmanship Program, rocketry, orienteering, ropes, obstacle course, Leadership Reaction
Course (LRC), Military Ball/Dining Out/ and Awards Banquet and local community service
events, etc. Travel to/staying on an aircraft carrier converted into a museum is authorized.
2. Units may spend a maximum of $25.00 per cadet per day for lodging.
3. Any vendor where a unit is receiving a combination of MILPER and O&M chargeable
services, a price breakout of each service must be included on the receipt. For example, an
overnight stay on an aircraft carrier comes with a meal. While the vendor typically charges
customers a single fee, AFJROTC units must obtain a receipt with lodging (O&M) and a meals
(MILPER) breakout.
NOT AUTHORIZED
1. Chaperone or bus driver lodging and transportation.
2. Transportation and lodging in support of a paintball, canoe or white water rafting, skiing,
bowling, movies, theme park activity, etc.
EXAMPLE: Traveling to an amusement park as a demonstration of physics at work is NOT
authorized.
ENTRANCE AND ADMISSION FEES (UNIT O&M)
Entrance fees can only be reimbursed for curriculum enhancing activities. The Holm Center/CC
has delegated approval authority to the AFJROTC Director and the Holm Center/SDF.
Note: Contact the HQ AFJROTC Deputy Director (via email) first for clarification before going
to the venue or requesting HQ credit card support. Holm Center will not reimburse or use HQ
credit cards to cover ANY entrance/admission fees without this pre-authorization and email
documentation.
AUTHORIZED FEES
Authorized venues include military and civilian educational facilities and functions/events such
as:
a. Military, historical, and science museums
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b. IMAX presentations which are space or flight related
NOT AUTHORIZED FEES
Entrance fees for instructors, teachers, chaperones, bus drivers, etc., regardless of the venue.
Some venues where reimbursement will not be authorized include, but are not limited to*:
amusement parks
paintball
movie theaters
rope courses
drill competitions
sporting events
marksmanship competitions
registration fees
orienteering events
facility rental fees
canoe trips
* This list is not exhaustive. Call the Deputy Director before committing the funds.
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MILTARY PERSONNEL (MILPER)
These funds are used to cover cadet meals during authorized activities, purchasing certain
uniform items, and the tailoring and alteration of uniforms. Uniforms are to be cleaned by cadets
prior to turn-in. If a student doesn’t have the uniform cleaned, it is an authorized expense.
CADET MEALS (MILPER)
AUTHORIZED
1. Cadet meals for all CIA trips and SLS activities. (Units can spend a maximum of $12 per
cadet per day). Pay vouchers where cadet signs for meals with cost of meals are acceptable
receipts and can be attached to request for reimbursement.
2. If food products to build a meal are purchased from a grocery store, a memo must be
submitted with the reimbursement request explaining how the receipt represents a meal, which
meal, and how many cadets were fed.
3. Bottled water and Gatorade may be reimbursed if the receipt clearly shows they were part of a
meal.
NOT AUTHORIZED
1. Meals for military balls, dining-outs, awards banquets, social functions, pizza parties, etc.
2. Meals for instructors, teachers, chaperones, bus drivers, etc.
3. Snacks (including, but not limited, to milkshakes, cookies, sodas, etc. which are not clearly
part of a meal)
4. Purchasing restaurant gift cards to pay for cadet meals
5. In-school meals
6. Tips
EXAMPLES:
Holding a pizza party at school after a lengthy practice to prepare for a drill competition is NOT
authorized.
A $200 receipt from Wal-Mart showing bottled water, meat, cheese, mayonnaise, bread, and
chips accompanies a memo stating the receipt represents lunch for 10 cadets. Since this receipt
exceeds the $12/cadet per day limitation. ONLY $120 would be reimbursed and all other meal
receipts for that day would be ignored.
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UNIFORM ALTERATION AND MAINTENANCE (MILPER)
AUTHORIZED
1. Alterations, end of year uniform cleaning and pressing (only as a last resort; student is
responsible for cleaning and pressing before turn-in), and sewing JROTC and/or unit patches on
AFJROTC blue uniforms.
2. Cleaning of designated drill team and color guard items and uniforms.
3. Units may purchase combat boots for color guard or drill team members (maximum
authorized 24 pairs). Replacement boots may be purchased if a cadet who was issued a pair of
boots leaves the team.
4. Aeronautical Model Aviation silver wings, button clasps, button toggles, buttons, clutch
fasteners, First Sergeants’ diamonds, oak leaf clusters and stars (bronze, silver, and gold), ribbon
star attachments, saber team devices.
5. Plastic blue name tags for shirts/blouses and silver nametags for service dress. Each cadet
gets only two blue and one silver nametag (includes engraving or embossing tape) during their
time in high school. The cost of any replacement nametags must be borne by the student.
6. Ribbon bars, ribbons holders, or racks not available thru EMALL.
7. Female belts and any special order item not readily available through EMALL must have
prior permission of HQ AFJROTC Logistics, and will be deducted from unit’s MILPER budget.
8. Units are authorized to purchase unit unique PT shorts and shirts (color / school logo) from
local vendors. Units cannot spend more than what it would normally cost to order from EMALL
per cadet, and can only purchase for first-year cadets or those cadets who either wore out or
outgrew their PT uniform. Units may use either HQ credit card (highly preferred) to buy these
items or file for reimbursement. Local purchase of PT uniforms will come out of the unit’s
MILPER funding baseline.
NOT AUTHORIZED
1. Other uniform items to include, but not limited to, unit patches, corfam shoes, wheel hats,
maternity uniforms, BDUs, ABUs, color guard and drill team accessories, position and team
cords, berets, etc.
2. Alterations, cleaning, pressing, and sewing on of patches on BDUs/ABUs.
3. Recurring cleaning of uniforms throughout the school year.
4. Local purchasing PT uniforms for the purpose of standardization.
5. Local purchasing of PT sweatshirts and sweatpants.
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SUMMER LEADERSHIP SCHOOLS (O&M and MILPER)
AUTHORIZED
For SLS cadet transportation (SLS O&M), each unit individually requests reimbursement from
HQ to transport their cadets to and from the SLS location and for any meals (SLS MILPER) en
route. Cadet lodging (SLS O&M) and cadet meals (SLS MILPER) at the SLS site are
reimbursed to the host or sponsoring unit on behalf of all units participating in the SLS.
Typically, HQ does not fully fund the cadet lodging (SLS O&M) and transportation (SLS O&M)
requirement. Units may use reimbursement or HQ credit card support to cover ONLY the
lodging (SLS O&M), transportation (SLS O&M) and meal expenses (SLS MILPER) approved
by HQ (not the entire amount). WINGS will reject any request which exceeds the unit’s SLS
budget. Units must cover any other SLS expenses beyond their approved SLS budgets through
individual cadet tuition and/or unit fundraising/booster club support.
Allocated SLS funds are separate from the funds units are allocated for normal school year
operations.
NOT AUTHORIZED
1.
Specialized SLS clothing, SLS PT uniforms, BDUs/ABUs, awards/honorariums,
entertainment, communication devices, athletic equipment or rental of equipment, usage charges,
etc.
2. Instructor meals at SLS.
3. Bottle water is NOT authorized.
Note: Cadet meals are restricted to $12 per cadet per day.
Note: Cadet lodging is restricted to $25 per cadet per day.
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EXAMPLE OF A PROPERLY PREPARED REIMBURSEMENT REQUEST
Here are the key elements in this request which make a proper submission. As you read, please
refer to the attached examples of a complete submission. The elements within the examples are
highlighted with the same number as descriptions below.
Element #1 – Proper Letterhead. If the directions are correctly followed, WINGS will produce
the proper letterhead on the invoice. The WINGS generated letterhead is the only letterhead
authorized and must appear on the invoice. Your demographics data is used to generate the
letterhead. Before starting the reimbursement process, ensure your school’s name, address,
phone number, and fax number are up-to-date in WINGS.
Element #2 – Correct Period of Service. This invoice correctly reflects a period of service within
the same fiscal year (1 Oct – 30 Sep).
Element #3 – Do not alter WINGS generated invoice number.
Element #4 – Correct Category Entries. As you review the attached receipts, you’ll see the
correct total has been entered into each category of funds requested for reimbursement.
Element #5 – Required Signatures. The required signatures are present.
Element #6 – Type of Reimbursement. The receipt is marked as a MILPER or O&M
reimbursement. This will allow HQ to charge the correct account.
Element #7 – Date of Service. The date of service will help HQ ensure the correct fiscal year
funds are used.
Element #8 – Name of vendor/store.
Element #9 – Clear description of the service provided. This will help HQ determine if this was
a reimbursable expense.
Element #10 – Total cost of service. This will speed HQ’s validation of the total presented on
the original invoice.
Element #11 – Unit is requesting reimbursement for an amount which is less than the total
indicated on the receipt. Include explanation as to why request is less than total receipt.
Element #12 – The specific meal was indicated. No tips.
Element #13 – Number of cadets will help determine if the unit stayed with the $12 per cadet per
day limit for meal and $25 per cadet per day for lodging.
Element #14 – Amount spent per cadet will help determine if the unit stayed with the $12 per
cadet per day limit.
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Element #15 – No sales tax.
Element #16 – Divider sheet used to separate different categories of receipts.
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CHAPTER 3—CURRICULUM IN ACTION
Foreword
Units are directed to take at least one Curriculum in Action (CIA) field trip per year; two trips
are recommended. This chapter provides direction for Headquarters Air Force Junior Reserve
Officer Training Corps (AFJROTC) units to conduct CIA field trips. It defines CIA and offers
advice on planning the trip and actions to take before, during and after a trip. It details the
responsibilities involved in conducting the trips; provides guidance on funding, chaperones,
clothing and grooming; and gives some suggestions on where to go and what to do. It also
provides checklists and forms to be used every step of the way.
Instructors should familiarize themselves with all policies and procedures associated with CIA
events.
Section 1
CIA DEFINITION AND GUIDELINES
1.1. Definition. CIA is a term used to describe school-sponsored activities (field trips) that
directly support or serve as an extension of the AFJROTC curriculum.
1.2. Guidelines.
1.2.1. If the school district allows field trips, units are directed to take one CIA trip per
academic year. Two trips are preferred.
1.2.2. Maximum participation is highly recommended.
1.2.3. Cadet participation in CIA planning is highly encouraged, but the SASI or ASI is
ultimately responsible for the supervision and control of these activities.
1.2.4. Ensure school district policy for field trip participation is followed. Cadets must be in
good academic and disciplinary standing to participate in CIA activities.
Section 2
CIA PLANNING
2.1. Planning considerations. Plan your CIA trips carefully.
2.1.1. Plan CIA trips several months in advance.
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2.1.2. Ensure all funding for the trip falls inside of HQ AFJROTC guidelines as detailed in
the AFJROTC finance instruction and guidebook.
2.1.3. Suggest involving the cadet leadership to the maximum extent possible in the planning
and execution of the trip. This will give them a vested interest in making sure it goes well
and that the cadets have fun and learn.
2.1.4. If possible, plan the trips before the school year begins and make changes as necessary.
2.1.5. Reminder: Some school districts require all field trips be approved by a board or
committee. This board or committee might meet once a month or once every other month. It
is important to know who can approve CIA trips and to get the plans to the decision maker(s)
in a timely fashion.
2.1.6. If you are doing an overnight trip or going out-of-state, you might have to include the
following items with your initial request:
2.1.6.1. List of all travel arrangements.
2.1.6.2. Detailed daily itinerary.
2.1.6.3. Roster of chaperones, cadets, and instructors.
2.1.6.4. Information on the academic value of the field trip.
2.1.6.5. Field trip request forms
2.1.6.6. Insurance information if needed.
2.1.6.7. Medical forms.
2.1.6.8. Communication requirements (how to reach you before and during the trip).
2.1.7. CIA trips may also require cadets to be absent from other classes, so plan ahead.
2.1.7.1. Application for the privilege of absence from classes for school-related activities
must be filed with the attendance office two days in advance of the absence or within the
school/district guidelines.
2.1.7.2. Use the Teacher’s Permission Form to ensure cadets meet academic and
disciplinary requirements.
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Section 3
CHECKLISTS AND FORMS
3.1. Checklist and Forms. If your school has approved checklists and forms that you must
complete for a CIA trip, use them. However, instructors should still check the sample checklist
and forms provided as attachments in AFJROTCI 36-2001. There might be important
information in these documents that is not on the school’s documents that can be used to
augment the school’s documents. If your school does not have a checklist and forms for field
trips it is highly recommended that you use the ones in this guide.
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CHAPTER 4—LOGISTIC QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE
Foreword
This guidebook provides a quick reference point for basic supply and logistical procedures for
Air Force Junior ROTC units. AFJROTCI 36-2001, is the proper reference of logistical
procedures.
DD Form 113, Cash Collection Voucher (CCV)
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DD Form 200, Financial Liability Investigation of Property Loss
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Special Measurement
HQ AFJROTC/Logistics along with Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) and EMALL has
implemented a new process to streamline the special measurement ordering process.
Normal size items that are available through EMALL ordering only goes to a maximum size
(example Coat All Weather Man, Size 54 X-Long).
If you need a special measurement item you will email HQ-Logistics the cadet's first and last
name, size and your (DODAAC,FY#, Supp Address).
If you are ordering a male or female coat, jacket or long sleeve shirt, you will need to add the
sleeve length and height of cadet. If it's a female coat, slacks, or skirt include if it's a women's or
misses size.
Once you receive the item and it needs to be altered, use your MILPER funds.
This new method will speed up the process of you getting your special measurement in a timely
manner and decrease Logistics time processing your request.
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CHAPTER 5—AFJROTC SUMMER LEADERSHIP SCHOOL
(SLS) GUIDE
Foreword
This Summer Leadership School (SLS) Planning Guide is designed to provide AFJROTC
instructors direction in the planning and execution of a SLS. In addition to following this guide
and the applicable Holm Center, AFJROTC Instructions, and AFJROTC Policy Letters, units
should tailor SLS objectives and curriculum to meet their school’s JROTC program needs. This
guide is not intended to meet every condition of every school and every SLS event.
The planning and execution guidance presented in this guide are core components of a well-run
and effective SLS program. It establishes procedures for the planning and execution of a
smooth, successful SLS event. The information contained in this guide is provided to assist you
with your SLS. The information is compiled from the field and is intended to minimize
confusion and provide guidance.
Together we can enjoy the SLS experience. Your Regional Directors and COAR members are
ready to assist you at any time. Please use their valuable expertise and mentorship.
Funding is a growing concern for all of us. HQ AFJROTC is receiving less funding each year.
The Air Force should not be your primary source for SLS funding. All units using USAF funds
to support their SLS will submit all reimbursement requests within 10 days of expenditure if the
unit expects reimbursement. Late reimbursement requests may result in non-payment. If you
cannot submit a reimbursement requests within 10 days of expenditure please ensure someone at
HQ JROTC or Holm Center SDF confirms that you have a compelling reason to send in a late
reimbursement. SLS funding is separate from the normal JROTC funding line and must be
separately documented and be audit ready.
We value and need your input to make every SLS successful. Each year the window to provide
recommended improvements to this guide will be from 1 Sept until 30 Oct only. Please address
any recommendations for changes or improvements to this guide to HQ-OpsSupport
@afjrotc.com with the email titled “SLS Guide recommendation”.
After 30 Oct the suggested changes will be staffed and published in the next years’ SLS guide
before 1 Dec. This is will allow units in the field to understand the issues and conditions we are
facing for planning each year’s SLS. Best wishes for a successful SLS.
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Section 1
SUMMER LEADERSHIP SCHOOL OVERVIEW
1.1. Program Overview.
1.1.1. Summer Leadership School (SLS) is an optional extracurricular program that
teaches AFJROTC cadets aspects of citizenship and leadership in a highly structured and
focused instructional environment. Its mission is to promote this development by
preparing cadets for leadership roles in their units, schools, and local communities. As
such, the activities during SLS should stress the following: team building, leadership,
respect for authority, responsible citizenship, personal character, academic achievement,
health, and community service.
Teambuilding
Leadership
Citizenship
SLS
Health/Wellness
Academics
Service
SLS is normally conducted during the summer months. However, there are no
restrictions on conducting a SLS equivalent at other times during the year.
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Section 2
SLS PLANNING
2.1. Planning for an SLS.
2.1.1. Because planning can sometimes be fairly complex, we recommend you start planning
up to a year in advance--especially if you are considering hosting cadets outside your school
district.
2.1.2. Some factors driving a SLS planning schedule include: the local school district budget
cycle; reservation timelines for lodging, subsistence and transportation; invitation/acceptance
quotas and timelines if other schools are invited to participate; fundraising time to defray the
tuition cost, fees, etc.
2.1.3. The best way to start is to put together a draft proposal addressing most of the elements
above that capture the core of what you want the SLS to be. Take that proposal forward to
your principal (or other school district authority) for approval.
2.1.4. Once you get your school’s approval, you should start planning the SLS in earnest. At
this time, if you are inviting outside schools to participate, you should start a formal planning
group with the other SASIs/ASIs and delegate SLS responsibilities. The order in which you
accomplish the remaining tasks is up to you since it will be driven by the specific
circumstances of your SLS.
2.1.5. There are approximately 450 SLS events each year. Calling your AA, COAR member
or other units to obtain information regarding an SLS question may alleviate some anxiety.
The current HQ AFJROTC Staff has no SLS expertise.
2.1.6. If you are considering a Ropes or Obstacle course during your SLS you must
meet all of the requirements outlined in AFI 36-2202, dated 7 August 2007 and submit
your request to [email protected] . Go to WINGS and review AFI 36-2202
and submit your request using the template provided in the WINGS Obstacle Course
Folder NLT 1 Mar.
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Section 3
SLS PLANNING ELEMENTS
3.1. Local School Approval.
You must comply with school district event permission, medical (to include medications),
physical fitness limitations, emergency notification, safety, and legal requirements of not only
your own school district but also all other participating school districts attending your SLS. Be
sure to contact your school (and others, if necessary) to find out what those requirements are.
The SLS is an extra-curricular activity. You must verify school liability and medical insurance
coverage for participating cadets and instructors. If other unit cadets are involved, the
participating school districts will need to coordinate liability and medical insurance requirements
with the host unit. There may also be additional liability insurance requirements for the selected
site of your SLS (e.g., some military installations require proof of additional liability event
insurance).
3.2. SLS Size.
The most likely factor influencing the size and scope of your SLS will be whether or not you
decide to open it up to participation from other units. Doing so will give the participants a
chance to interact with cadets from other programs and will most likely enhance the camp
experience for everyone. It also opens up the opportunity to draw camp faculty from the JROTC
staff of those schools.
You may need to set a participation limit when inviting outside units to participate. This should
be done for two reasons:
1) To keep your SLS at a manageable size, and
2) To ensure an adequate faculty-to-student ratio for safe operations
You could entice outside assistance by allocating cadet slots according to accompanying
SASI/ASI participation. This will help preserve your student-to-faculty balance.
3.3. SLS Length.
The length of your SLS should allow you to accomplish the objectives of your theme in a safe
and effective academic environment. It should actively engage the cadets with activities without
overtaxing them and detracting from the learning experience. It should also allow adequate
travel time for both the cadets and faculty who may be arriving from other than the local area.
Your SLS should be scheduled with the following factors in mind:
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Some of your faculty may have employment restrictions based on their individual school district
contracts. It will generally be easiest to use them in their scheduled employment months.
Not all schools begin or end their school year at the same time--make sure all participating units
will be recessed during your SLS.
You will be competing against family vacations and other summer activities. Exceptionally long
SLSs may have difficulty attracting cadets. Optimally, schedule your SLS as close as possible to
the end of the regular school year. Historically, this has helped increase cadet availability and
participation. In most instances, the minimum SLS length should be one week (5 days).
Finally, time is money. The length of your SLS will be a major driver in its expense. HQ has
traditionally helped offset the expense of transportation, food, and lodging for cadets. There is
no guarantee HQ AFJROTC can provide funds in the future.
3.4. Site and Facility Selection.
Your selection of a site can set the tone for your entire SLS program. It is perhaps the single
most important planning decision you will make. At attachment A is a detailed simple checklist
to help with factors you should consider.
Based on the checklist provided, below are some suggestions for places that could make good
SLS facilities:
Schools—Usually school facilities are available in the summer. Most of the items described in
the checklist are probably readily available right on your high school campus.
College Campuses—College campuses have all of the attraction of your high school campus
plus a dormitory and food service structure. This may be an opportunity to partner with your
local SROTC unit and the Civil Air Patrol.
Retreat Centers—These could include religious, business, or leadership centers, usually with
the meal and dormitory amenities.
Summer Camps—These could include Boy Scout camps, private camps, YMCA camps, etc.
They typically provide a more rustic, survival type outdoor environment.
Air Force and other Services Military Installations—Many bases enjoy hosting events like a
SLS and can provide you some very able staff assistance. This is especially true if your cadets
reciprocate with the local bases in supporting their civic events. Don’t rule out using bases from
another service or your local Reserve/Guard installations.
State and Local Parks—They may have private campgrounds for use or other general use
facilities that adequately meet your needs.
3.5. Faculty and Chaperoning Requirements.
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Faculty planning is a major part of your overall SLS preparation. In brief, you will need to first
determine your staff needs and second recruit qualified instructors and other supporting
personnel to fill those needs.
Here are some pointers on how you should go about determining the amount of staff necessary:
Start by considering your overall SLS theme. That theme should begin to structure the
types of cadet activities you want your SLS to include. You will need instructors with
skills in those areas.
Determine your cadet-to-faculty ratio, including administrative support. This will
determine the number of staff positions you require. Coordinate this carefully with your
school district. However, the minimum will be a 15:1 cadet to chaperone ratio. Chaperones
must be a least 21 years old.
Look at your mix of male to female students. As a minimum, you must have at least one
female chaperone if females attend the SLS.
Remember, you will need an Emergency Medical Technician or nurse if the site you select
does not have a medical clinic open during your SLS. You should also have emergency
action data (to include SSN, allergies, medication history, and parental contact information)
on all cadets at your SLS.
Other area SASIs/ASIs may be willing to assist as well. This is a good idea if you’re
allowing outside units to participate since their SASI or ASI is required to participate if
they send cadets. Remember though, that they are not employees of your school district.
Check with your school district for guidance.
You may be able to recruit volunteers from nearby AFRES/ANG or SROTC Units, other
teachers or cadet parents and guardians. This can be particularly useful in fulfilling
chaperoning requirements.
You may be able to gather assistance directly from your encampment facility for both
administrative and actual SLS activities. Park rangers, camp counselors, and retreat house
staff may be able to assist you.
There may be instances where the use of Cadet Training Officers (CTOs) or Cadet Training
Instructors (CTIs) is appropriate. CTOs/CTIs are intended to augment the instructors at a
SLS. These CTOs/CTIs can come from a variety of sources such as the unit’s advanced
cadets who are prior SLS graduates, or Sr. AFROTC cadets. If you use AFROTC cadets, a
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) will be required between the SASI and the PAS of
the AFROTC Detachment. This MOU will include, at a minimum, the responsibilities and
conduct of the AFROTC cadet. Ensure the following:

CTOs/CTIs will be briefed on the prohibition of fraternization and hazing.
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
CTOs/CTIs will not administer discipline.
 CTOs/CTIs will not be placed in a position to chaperone cadets – JROTC
instructors must be in the vicinity at all times.
 CTOs/CTIs will not be considered in the required/recommended cadet to adult
chaperone ratio.
After you recruit your staff, you will need to assign them their responsibilities and possibly
train them as well.
3.6. Funding Issues.
To run a successful SLS program, you will need to build and manage a budget. In putting that
budget together, an important consideration is the primary participants are minors and may have
limited financial resources. Cost may be the single determining factor in whether they
participate.
Cadet lodging and in-residence SLS transportation funds and cadet meal funds may be requested
by the host unit on behalf of all units participating in the SLS. Each participating unit
individually requests funds to transport their cadets to and from the SLS location. Typically, if
Air Force funding is available, the AF funding is less than requested and should not be expected.
In assessing a “SLS fee/tuition,” SLS host units must break out their SLS fee by amount and
funding category and provide participating units receipts reflecting any excess cadet meal and
lodging costs over and above Air Force funding.
The window for requesting SLS funds is 10 Jan to 10 Mar each year. No exceptions. It is
critical that you meet this suspense as funding will not be available for late requests. It is
imperative that you review the Holm Center HQ AFJROTC Reference Guide | Financial
Management section prior to requesting SLS funds. Unauthorized expenditures will not
be reimbursed. Please carefully review the guide.
Operating Expense Considerations: The type of SLS you run will decide most of your expenses
(i.e., your facility, its location, the length of stay, and whether it will require overnight stays).
Please keep in mind HQ AFJROTC’s operating budget may not be sufficient to support SLS
Requirements. If you decide to conduct or participate in a SLS, be prepared to not have your
SLS funding augmented by HQ AFJROTC. Here are the primary factors likely to drive your
expenses:
Cadet Travel to and from the SLS. This is not a SLS host responsibility; it is the
responsibility of the unit sending cadets. Therefore, running a local SLS is a great way to
control travel expenses. However, hosting a SLS may involve in-residence travel funding
depending on the activities planned.
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The maximum amount you may request from HQ AFJROTC for cadet travel will be
$50.00 for each cadet regardless of distance traveled. Again, there is no guarantee any
funds will be available.
Lodging -- These expenses can vary considerably depending on the facilities used. You
could control lodging expenses by running a day-only SLS (local option only) where the
cadets return home every evening. Places like summer camps, state parks, and military bases
may have cabins or dormitories that provide relatively low cost lodging options as well.
The maximum amount you may request from HQ AFJROTC for cadet lodging will be
$25 per day per cadet. Again, there is no guarantee any funds will be available.
Meals -- If you run a day-only SLS, you can also save considerably in meal costs. Military
bases and college campuses may have low cost meal plans available. Some sites like retreat
houses may include the lodging and meal costs as part of the facility usage fees.
The maximum amount you may request for cadet meals will be $12 per day per cadet.
Again, there is no guarantee any funds will be available.
When planning your SLS plan for other than Air Force funds as the primary provider
of SLS funding.
Activities Fees (O&M/Non-AF funds, as appropriate) -- As part of SLS, the cadets may get
the opportunity to participate in outside civic events that require a fee. You must get priorHQ Deputy Director authorization to commit O & M funds for your specific entrance fees.
Instructor Contracts and Paid Staff Charges (Non-AF funds) -- Not all instructors on your
staff may be covered by school contracts over their summer recess months. You may need to
compensate some of them for their participation in those cases. In addition, you also might
want to defray the participation expenses of your volunteer support staff.
Revenue Sources: There are a number of revenue sources you can tap into that can offset your
SLS expenses. Together, inputs from all these sources can significantly reduce your final bottom
line costs to the cadets:
Start with your school first. They may be willing to provide some budgetary assistance via
activity funds or even allow you to directly budget for SLS within the school district
financial plan. In the latter case, you need to make sure you begin your planning early
enough to get your budget submittals in to the school district within their submittal deadlines.
They may also be able to provide some SLS support such as school district busing or use of
facilities.
Your unit may be able to raise cadet funds for SLS activities via school or community
fundraisers. Often, providing assistance at community events is a good way to do this. It
will give you a way to raise unit funds while simultaneously serving your community and
promoting AFJROTC visibility within your local community.
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Some civic or military association organizations (example VFW, American Legion, FEMA,
AFA, NRA, NASA, CMP) may be able to assist you with donated funds for cadet SLS
scholarships or subsidized facilities, or loaned use of other supplies you may need.
In the end, whatever costs you can’t subsidize will have to be passed on to the cadets as a
participation or tuition fee. Plan Early.
3.7. SLS Theme.
Before you begin planning an actual curriculum for your SLS, you should establish a theme.
The theme is merely a central topic or direction to your curriculum. A concise and welldefined theme provides two primary benefits:
It helps you identify activities that should or should not be included in your curriculum and
may be a source of funding.
It helps your potential students choose a SLS that best matches their particular interests. In
summary, a SLS curriculum built around a central theme will provide the students a learning
vector that is easy to follow and a sense of finality that a specific skill was learned or
developed as a result of having attended the SLS. Here are some theme ideas you could use:
Being an Aviation Pioneer
Active Citizenship in the 21st Century
Military Tradition in Civil Affairs
How to Organize a Civic Event
Community Emergency Response Teams
Military Traditions in Aviation
Patriotic Customs and Courtesies as an American Citizen
Developing Effective Team Skills
Management of a Cadet Corps
Goal Development and Evaluation
NASA Space Camp
Cultural Awareness
Technology Applications
Health and Wellness
Combating Terrorism
Civilian Marksmanship Program
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3.8. Building your SLS Curriculum.
Once you’ve selected a theme, you’ll be ready to plan the SLS curriculum in detail. You should
build your curriculum around these six tenets:
Academic Studies
Health and Wellness
Leadership and Character Development
Civic Respect and Military Tradition
Community Service and Civic Involvement
Social/Cadet Recognition
Academics: The academic portion of your curriculum should focus on the aspects of your
theme that are best learned in a classroom or independent study environment. We recommended
you focus on hands-on training activities that normally could not be accomplished in a traditional
school environment.
Health and Wellness: A healthy lifestyle, including physical fitness and athletic development,
is important to a healthy and well-balanced character and should be a part of your curriculum in
general.
Leadership and Character Development: Incorporate the opportunity for leadership roles and
responsibilities into your SLS, as well as the opportunity for character development. Try to
incorporate into your SLS some aspects of competition among the cadets for “pride of
encampment ownership” and recognition for setting the standards when adhering to rules and
policies.
Civic Respect and Military Tradition: There are a number of military traditions and protocols
that may fit your theme as well. This curriculum block could include activities like parades, flag
reveille and retreats, marching formations, other drill and ceremony services, dining-ins, etc.
Community Service and Civic Involvement: Your SLS could include an ethic of service to the
community. One way you could include this into your curriculum would be to propose an SLS
service project. Provide the cadets a few alternatives to get them started but let them select their
final project--you’ll want them to buy into ownership.
Social/Cadet Recognition: Finally, you may want to include one or two social or just plain
“let’s go out and have fun” events to allow the cadets to relax and mix it up a little. Remember
that this is not a military training camp.
To conclude the SLS there should be an
awards/graduation ceremony (nice to do with parents if possible). This can take many forms—
formal or informal dinner, picnic, guest speaker, etc. Recognition of our cadets is also important
after returning to the unit, where SLS cadets may be recognized again.
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If you combine events from all six curriculum areas listed above, you’ll find your SLS calendar
filling up quickly with a fun and challenging curriculum theme that will bring out the best in
your cadets while providing them opportunities to lead, serve, and excel.
As you pull this schedule together, leave time for meals and travel to the curriculum sites.
You’ll want to schedule just enough time for them to travel safely between sites without
allowing too much idle time for lingering.
Section 4
SLS OPERATIONS
This section of the SLS guide will provide you ideas on how to execute your SLS with emphasis
on keeping the cadets safe, keeping the cadets under supervision and control, accomplishing your
scheduled learning objectives with a minimum of incidents, and dealing with incidents if they do
occur.
4.1. Starting the SLS.
This includes development of a SLS Cadet Guide to establish camp rules, expectations and
consequences. The SLS guide should be published, distributed, and briefed to each cadet before
the SLS. The guide should also establish equipment and uniform requirements, awards and
grading criteria, leadership opportunities, and emergency contact information. Upon camp
arrival, an SLS in processing and set up time should be established. The first activity should be
an in brief by the SLS Commandant to outline the schedule, cadet expectations, dos and don’ts
for the SLS, etc. An initial fire drill and disaster response drill should be conducted within 24
hours of being on site. Other considerations:
Suggestions to help keep your cadets supervised:
Break the cadets into sections or mission teams for special projects and camp award
competitions. Assign each cadet team an adult mentor. The mentors make the appearance of
providing adult advice, while having the additional benefit of providing supervision in a nonintrusive way. Here is an opportunity to utilize CTOs/CTIs. However, their specific role
must be clearly outlined and they need to be closely supervised.
Have pre-made roll call rosters for all classes and activities on your camp schedule,
especially when using volunteer assistance cadets.
Have an excusal system for cadets that will miss roll call. Cover this policy up front with
cadets. Also cover disciplinary actions for an unexcused roll call miss. This policy should
encourage cadets to inform their adult supervision upfront when they expect to deviate from
scheduled activities.
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Have an in-processing control point and system for all cadets as they arrive for your SLS.
You should know their travel plans ahead of time--when they will arrive, mode of
transportation, and point of arrival. Make sure all cadets are checked as they pass this entry
point to your supervision.
Have an out-processing control point for cadets departing your supervision and make sure
parents know when to resume control. Contact parents by phone at those points if
appropriate.
4.2. Emergency Actions and Procedures.
Severe weather, sports injuries, or severe cadet misbehavior can come up unexpectedly and must
be dealt with on the spot. While these things are sure to cause disruption when they occur, your
goal should be to minimize that disruption by having emergency action plans in place. As a
minimum, you should have the following:
An emergency action data and parental contact information on all cadets at your
encampment. It should be readily accessible in a designated area. You may want to require
cadets to furnish this information at in-processing.
Local fire, police, medical, and weather advisory phone numbers on hand for all supervisory
staff. Brief the staff ahead of time on what actions to take should an incident occur requiring
those services. A good reference is the AFJROTC Quick Reaction Checklist on WINGS
An emergency supervision plan. If you have an incident requiring emergency action, part of
your staff may be preoccupied with the situation and away from their normal supervisory
roles. You may need to relocate cadets and combine some teams to keep all the cadets under
supervision.
An emergency action plan should be in place in case of pandemic flu / illness outbreaks.
4.3. Expected Cadet Behavior and Rules of Conduct.
While most cadets will be well behaved and follow established rules, you may have a few who
choose to deviate requiring you to take disciplinary action. Having a SLS Cadet Guide will
provide cadet behavior expectations.
First and foremost, make sure the cadets understand that while at the SLS, they are wards of
both the hosting and their home school districts and are guests at the SLS location and as
such are subject to the same rules and disciplinary penalties for truant behavior as normal
school students. If there are cadets from outside your school district, you should review
some of those rules such as smoking, drug use, profanity, or other actions you wish to curtail
up front.
Second, the cadets may also be under the additional jurisdiction of the hosting facility and its
rules. Sites like military bases, college campuses, and state parks may have additional
penalties for certain truant behavior. Cadets and staff should be briefed up front.
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Third, for cases like underage drinking, tobacco use, or illegal drug use, the cadets may be
subject to local law enforcement jurisdiction. The point is not to frighten the cadets but
rather to make them aware up front of the consequences of dishonorable or illegal behavior.
Off-Limit Areas: Establish boundary areas that are off limits to cadets. Good examples
would be your administrative support area, opposite sex dormitories, areas that interfere with
the safe operation of other missions or events that may be concurrently occurring at your
encampment site, and areas that are not easily supervised. In addition, you should define to
the cadets exactly what areas constitute your SLS site and what areas do not. All areas
outside your defined site are automatically off limits.
Shower Arrangements: Cadets often stay in dorm facilities with community baths. This
arrangement, while perhaps not ideal, is acceptable and appropriate. It may necessitate the
adaption of a modified shower schedule—where instructors and chaperones plan their
shower time when the cadets are occupied elsewhere, or after hours.
Curfew Times: Establish mandatory lights out / no roaming periods where cadets are
expected to be in their dormitories. Assign one or two chaperones to night patrol during this
time.
Unauthorized Outside Contact: In order to enhance camp discipline, you should consider
restricting the use of items like cell phones and pagers. Many cadets, particularly the ones
traveling from out of state, may be carrying them for travel safety and contact with home.
You don’t necessarily need to restrict this. You may want to have them checked in during inprocessing or put restrictions on their use during SLS activity periods. The point is, if you
limit cadet contact with outside peers, you limit the ability of students who are not part of
your SLS to breach your camp security and establish unauthorized personal contact with your
cadets.
4.4. Disciplinary Actions.
In the event the above rules or any other rules laid down by your staff are breached, you may
have to administer disciplinary actions. We leave the specific actions taken to the policies of
your school district, your hosting facility, and the judgment of your staff. However, as an
example, if a cadet shows up to camp and is out of AFI 36-2903 hair cut standards, buzz cutting
the cadet is inappropriate. Per AFJROTCI 36-2001, if the incident involves news media coverage
that reflects negatively on the Air Force, it needs to be reported immediately to Holm
Center/JRO.
4.5. Other Policies.
You should review all AFJROTC policies prior to your SLS and ensure they are enforced
throughout.
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4.6. Summary.
After the SLS, remember your planning begins for the next year. An instructor hot wash,
reservations for the next year’s SLS, revision of the SLS guide, review of the RD assessment (if
one was conducted), review of the SLS finances, and the recommendation for improvement of
the SLS guide should be completed in a timely manner. Feedback is very important to
continually improve your SLS efforts.
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CHAPTER 6—UNIFORM AND AWARDS
Foreword
AFJROTC cadets wear the same basic uniform as the active duty Air Force, and they should be
expected to honor and wear the uniform properly and with pride. This chapter provides the latest
guidance and clarification on AFJROTC uniform wear for instructors and cadets. It also provides
guidelines for cadet appearance and grooming.
The AFJROTC Awards and Decorations Program recognizes the achievements of AFJROTC
cadets and fosters increased morale and espirit de corps. This chapter outlines the proper
execution of a successful unit Awards and Decorations Program.
Section 1
ACCOUTREMENTS (GENERAL)
1.1. Insignia Placement. Insignia on the AFJROTC uniform will be worn according to the figures
contained in this guide. Holm Center/JROS is the review/approval authority for waivers and for
situations not specifically addressed by this guide.
1.2. Badges.
1.1.1. Ground School Badge. Awarded for successful completion of the AFJROTC aviation
honors ground school curriculum or successful completion of another aviation ground school
program prescribed by the FAA. To order the badge go to WINGS | Logistics | Create Display
Orders.
1.1.2. Flight Solo Badge. Awarded to any cadet possessing a solo flight certificate signed by a
FAA certified flight instructor for either powered or non-powered aircraft. Email [email protected] a copy of the Cadets Flight Solo Certificate, and then go to WINGS |
Logistics | Create Display Orders and order the Flight Solo Badge.
1.1.3. Pilot Certificate Badge. Awarded to any cadet who possesses a valid FAA pilot’s
certificate for either powered or non-powered aircraft. Email [email protected] a
copy of the Cadets Flight Solo Certificate, and then go to WINGS | Logistics | Create Display
Orders and order the Pilot Certificate Badge.
.
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1.1.4. Awareness Presentation Team Badge. Awarded for participation on an Awareness
Presentation Team. Criteria for becoming a member of the team should be published in the
Cadet Guide or the Unit Operating Instructions. Go to WINGS | Logistics | Create Display
Orders and order the Awareness Presentation Team Badge.
1.1.5. Kitty Hawk Air Society Badge. Awarded to cadets who are members of the Kitty Hawk
Air Society. The unit’s Kitty Hawk charter should spell out the requirements for entry into the
society. Go to WINGS | Logistics | Create Display Orders and order the Kitty Hawk Air
Society Badge.
1.1.6. Academy Modeling of Aeronautics (AMA) Wings. Awarded to cadets who are
members of a local AMA chartered model airplane club. Contact the AMA to obtain badge for
qualifying cadets.
1.1.7. Distinguished AFJROTC Cadet Badge. This annual award consists of a certificate and
the Distinguished AFJROTC Cadet badge. The award recognizes one outstanding second-year
cadet (third-year cadet in a 4-year program) selected at the end of each school year. This
allows the recipient to wear the award their final year in the AFJROTC program. The recipient
must be of high moral character, demonstrate positive personal attributes, display outstanding
military potential, and maintain consistent academic and military excellence.
The SASI, in coordination with the ASI and with the concurrence of the principal, selects the
recipient of this award. The Holm Center Form 308, Certificate of Recognition, is located in
WINGS | Published Files | Directory | Certificates folder. The certificate is used to present with
the badge. The unit must purchase the badge from a vendor. The recipient should hold the
following awards prior to selection:
Leadership Ribbon
Achievement Ribbon
Superior Performance Ribbon
Academic Ribbon
Cocurricular Activities Leadership Ribbon
Service Ribbon
1.1.8. Aerospace Education Foundation (AEF) Academic Cadet Badge. Awarded to rising
Junior and Senior cadets for academic excellence as signified by attaining an overall 3.3 grade
point average with no grade below “C” on their transcript. The individuals must be
recommended by the SASI. Go to WINGS | Logistics | Create Display Orders and order the
AEF Badge.
1.1.9. Model Rocketry Badge. Awarded to cadets who have fulfilled model rocketry program
requirements. Program requirements are listed in the Model Rocketry Handbook available in
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WINGS | Published Files | Directory | JROTC | Instruction and Guides | Model Rocketry
Handbook. OPR: Holm Center/JROSL.
1.1.10. Other Badges. Wearing badges from other services beyond their intended purpose,
badges from the regular Air Force, or other organizations on the AFJROTC uniform is
prohibited. Example: Unit cannot designate Army Signal Corps or Infantry badges to signify
membership in the unit color guard or drill team. However, badges earned by cadets enrolled
in a sister service JROTC program may be worn on the AFJROTC uniform in the location
specified by the sister service. The AFJROTC badge location will always take precedence
over the sister service badge.
1.1.11. Marksmanship Awards. Marksmanship competition awards/badges may be worn on
the AFJROTC uniform. Males wear the badges under the ribbons on the left pocket flap of the
light blue shirt or below the ribbons on the service dress uniform. Females wear the badges
above the ribbons on both uniforms.
1.3. AFJROTC Shoulder Patch. Wear of the AFJROTC official shoulder patch is mandatory on
all uniforms except the raincoat, overcoat, and all-weather coat. Cadets enrolled in Civil Air Patrol
(CAP) and AFJROTC who use the same uniform for both activities may wear the CAP wing patch
on the right shoulder and the AFJROTC patch on the left shoulder with the AFJROTC shoulder
patch taking precedence.
1.4. Shoulder Cords. Cadets are authorized to wear one shoulder cord on the left shoulder.
Wear the shoulder cord only on light blue shirt and the service dress coat. The SASI will designate
criteria on who may wear shoulder cords. Colors to denote different honors or leadership positions
may be used. Criteria and shoulder cord colors should be described in the Cadet Guide or Unit
Operating Instructions. On the service dress coat, cords should be pinned to the shoulder with the
pin hidden beneath the cord.
1.5. Shoulder Tabs. Shoulder tabs are cloth arches denoting participation in a JROTC activity.
Cadets are authorized to wear one shoulder tab on the right shoulder of the service dress coat,
lightweight blue jacket and the light blue shirt, centered between the unit patch and the shoulder
seam. Tabs will have the name of the activity on them (e.g., drill team, saber team, honor guard,
etc.). If no unit patch is worn, tab should be worn 1 inch below the shoulder seam. If a unit patch
is worn, shoulder tab should be centered between the unit patch and the shoulder seam. Only cloth
shoulder tabs are authorized. Shoulder tabs are optional. The SASI will designate which activities
will be denoted by shoulder tabs and set the criteria for each.
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Section 2
AWARDS AND DECORATIONS
2.1. Awards and Decorations. The Cadet Awards and Decorations Program fosters morale,
esprit de corps, and recognizes achievements of AFJROTC cadets. Awards sponsored by national
organizations are funded by the sponsoring organization and donated through local chapters where
available. Only Awards and Decorations approved by HQ AFOATS/JR and listed in this guide
may be worn. Units may not create local awards for wear on the uniform. See Attachment 11 for
Award POCs.
2.1.1. Medals and ribbons may be worn simultaneously for formal, semiformal, and/or
special occasions of a limited nature (as specified by the SASI). Place medals on the
mounting rack in the proper order of precedence. The top row of medals should be
positioned 1/2 inch below bottom row of ribbons.
2.1.2. Refer to AFI 36-2903 for instructions on stacking multiple medals, and wear of
devices on ribbons and medals. When awarding a ribbon in WINGS the system will let you
choose the devices allowed to be worn on that ribbon. The routine wear of both medals and
ribbons is prohibited.
2.1.3. Minimum criteria are prescribed to preserve the integrity of decorations. Units are
authorized to impose additional criteria to meet local standards and needs without
diminishing minimum standards (example: limiting the amount of cadets who may earn the
award where no guidance is stated, or below stated limits). If such additional criteria are
imposed, they must be specifically stated in the Cadet Guide or Unit Operating Instructions.
2.1.4. Present awards at appropriate ceremonies. Invite school officials and local civil
authorities when practical. Representatives from organizations sponsoring awards should be
offered the opportunity to make the award presentation. Display awards when possible for
the benefit of the cadet corps. The SASI will ensure that Air Force endorsement of any
agency’s product or service is neither stated nor implied.
* ADD: Guidelines for National Awards should be followed to the fullest extent possible;
however, SASIs have latitude to approve awarding of National Awards to deserving cadets
that do not meet award criteria (i.e., a deserving sophomore instead of a junior, there is not a
deserving cadet who meets an awards class standing percentage criteria established for the
award, etc.). If there are deviations from established award criteria, the “spirit of intent” of
an award’s must be maintained. Whenever possible, obtain approval from the sponsoring
organization’s local chapter for any deviations from established criteria.
2.1.5. An award’s sponsoring organization may require a written report before final cadet
selection or after presentation is made. Reports may include information such as: name of
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the award; name(s) of recipient; place and date of presentation; occasion (graduation, award
banquet, etc.,); and name, title, and organization of award presenter. The SASI is responsible
to ensure any required reports are accomplished.
2.1.6. Order of Precedence (an * represents a new ribbon or a name change).
2.1.6.1. Special Awards.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Gold Valor Award
Silver Valor Award
Cadet Humanitarian Award
Community Service with Excellence Award
2.1.6.2. National Awards.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
Air Force Association Award
Daedalian Award
American Legion Scholastic Award
American Legion General Military Excellence Award
Daughters of the American Revolution Award
American Veterans Award
Reserve Officers Association Award
Military Order of World Wars Award
Military Officers Association Award (formerly called
“The Retired Officers Association Award”)
Veterans of Foreign Wars Award
National Sojourners Award
Sons of the American Revolution Award
Scottish Rite, Southern Jurisdiction Award
Military Order of the Purple Heart Award
Air Force Sergeants Association Award
Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War Award
Sons of Confederate Veterans H.L. Hunley Award
Tuskegee Airmen Incorporated Air Force Junior
ROTC Cadet Award
The Retired Enlisted Association Award
The Celebrate Freedom Foundation Award
National Society United States Daughter of 1812
Air Commando Association Award
Non-Funded National Awards (i.e., NCOA, National Society,
Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America, etc.) (Organization
must be submitted to and approved by HQ AFJROTC: award
criteria must be published in Cadet Guide or Unit Operating
Instruction)
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2.1.6.3. AFJROTC Awards.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
Distinguished Unit Award and Distinguished Unit Award w/Merit
Outstanding Organization Award
Aerospace and Technology Honors Camp Ribbon
(use the same ribbon as the Leadership School Ribbon
and add the H device: Order the H device from Vanguard item
#7653600)
Outstanding Flight Award
Top Performer Award
Outstanding Cadet Ribbon
Leadership Ribbon
Achievement Ribbon
Superior Performance Ribbon
Academic Ribbon
Leadership School Ribbon
Special Teams Competition
Orienteering Ribbon
Cocurricular Activities Leadership Ribbon
Drill Team Ribbon
Color Guard Ribbon
Saber Team Ribbon
Marksmanship Ribbon
Good Conduct Ribbon
Service Ribbon
Health and Wellness
Recruiting Ribbon
Activities Ribbon
Attendance Ribbon
Dress and Appearance Ribbon
Longevity Ribbon
2.1.6.4. Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Awards.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
General Carl Spaatz Award
General Ira C. Eaker Award
Amelia Earhart Award
General Billy Mitchell Award
General J.F. Curry Achievement Award
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2.1.7. AFJROTC cadets are authorized to wear ribbons earned while enrolled in United
States Army, United States Navy, or United States Marine Corps JROTC. AFJROTC cadets
will wear AFJROTC ribbons above and to the left of other service JROTC ribbons or awards
(see exception in para 3.1.9). Group ribbons according to service with the order of
precedence determined by the regulations of each service. Other services’ ribbons are
grouped by service in the following order: Army, Navy, and Marine Corps.
*2.1.8. Badges or insignia from Active Duty, Guard, Reserve, or any other non-AFJROTC
group are not authorized on the AFJROTC uniform. Badges, ribbons or insignia from middle
school programs such as Youth Leadership Corps are not authorized on the AFJROTC
uniform.
2.1.9. Valor awards from all services are worn ahead of all other ribbons from any service.
The AFJROTC Valor Awards will be worn first, with other services’ Valor Awards worn in
the following order: Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard.
2.2. Descriptions and Criteria.
2.2.1. Gold Valor Award. Awards consist of a medal, ribbon, and certificate. The Gold
Valor Award recognizes the most outstanding voluntary acts of self-sacrifice and personal
bravery by a cadet involving conspicuous risk of life above and beyond the call of duty.
Forward recommendations for valor awards through [email protected] for
review and approval within 6 months of the incident. Include a detailed description of the
situation, newspaper clippings (if available), statements by victims and observers, and any
other information deemed appropriate to validate eligibility. In addition, submit a proposed
citation to accompany the award. Hq-OpsSupport will forward the valor award to the HQ
AFJROTC Director for final approval. Upon approval, Operation Support will distribute the
citation, medal, and ribbon for presentation.
2.2.2. Silver Valor Award. Awards consist of a medal, ribbon, and certificate. The Silver
Valor Award is awarded to a cadet for a voluntary act of heroism which does not meet the
risk-of-life requirements of the Gold Valor Award.
Forward recommendations for valor awards through [email protected] for
review and approval within 6 months of the incident. Include a detailed description of the
situation, newspaper clippings (if available), statements by victims and observers, and any
other information deemed appropriate to validate eligibility. In addition, submit a proposed
citation to accompany the award. HQ-OpsSupport will forward the valor award to HQ
AFJROTC Director for final approval. Upon approval, [email protected]
distributes the citation, medal, and ribbon for presentation.
2.2.3. Cadet Humanitarian Award. Award consists of a ribbon and certificate. It is
intended to recognize cadets who provide aid in response to a singular extraordinary event
78
such as a natural disaster or other catastrophe that has placed or has the potential to place a
hardship on their fellow citizens. This award is not to be used to recognize day-to-day
service in the community.
Forward recommendations for humanitarian awards to [email protected] for
review and approval within 6 months of the incident. Include a detailed description of the
situation, newspaper clippings (if available), statements by victims and observers, and any
other information deemed appropriate to validate eligibility. In addition, submit a proposed
citation to accompany the award. Upon approval, HQ-OpsSupport distributes the citation
and ribbon for presentation.
*2.2.4. Community Service with Excellence Award. Award consists of a ribbon and
certificate. It is intended to recognize those individual cadets who provide significant
leadership in the planning, organizing, directing, and executing of a major unit community
service project that greatly benefit the local community. This is not an award given to
participants but to the key leader(s) of the project.
Forward recommendations for Community Service with Excellence Award to [email protected] for review and approval within 6 months of completion of the
project. Include a detailed description of the contributions of the individual(s) along with
newspaper clippings (if available) describing the outcome of the project, letters of
appreciation from civic leaders, or other information deemed appropriate to validate
eligibility. Ribbon must be purchased from a local vendor using MilPer funds.
2.2.5. Air Force Association (AFA) Award. This AFA-sponsored award consists of a
medal and ribbon and is presented annually at each unit to the outstanding second-year (in a
3-year program) or third-year cadet (in a 4-year program).
2.2.5.1. The award recipient must
characteristics and eligibility criteria:
possess/meet
the
following
personal
Positive attitude (toward AFJROTC and school).
Outstanding personal appearance (uniform and grooming).
Display personal attributes such as initiative, judgment, and self-confidence.
Courteous demeanor (promptness, obedience, and respect for customs).
2.2.6. Daedalian Award. The Order of Daedalians is a fraternity of commissioned pilots from
all military services. It is named after the legendary figure, Daedalus, and was organized by
WWI military pilots who sought to perpetuate the spirit of patriotism, love of country, and the
high ideals of self-sacrifice which place service to the nation above personal safety and
position. This award is offered to encourage the development of these traits in cadets and to
interest them in a military career. The medal is fashioned after an ancient Grecian plaque
discovered by a Daedalian in the village of Lavadia, Greece and depicts Daedalus and his son
79
Icarus fabricating their legendary wings of wax and feathers. The award also includes a
ribbon.
2.2.6.1. This annual award recognizes one outstanding third-year cadet at each unit that
meets the following criteria:
Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of patriotism, love of country,
and service to the nation.
Indicate the potential and desire to pursue a military career.
Rank in the top 10% of their AS class.
Rank in the top 20% of their school class.
2.2.6.2. The SASI selects the recipient and requests the award from the nearest Daedalian
Flight. A minimum of 90 days notice is required to allow the local chapter to obtain the
award from their national headquarters and to schedule a Daedalian Flight presenter for the
award. See Attachment 11 for list of award points of contact.
2.2.7. American Legion Scholastic Award. This award consists of a bronze medal
accompanied by a ribbon with a distinctive miniature attachment depicting a scholastic scroll.
2.2.7.1. This award is presented annually to one second- or third-year cadet (in a 3-year
program) or a third- or fourth-year cadet (in a 4-year program) based on the cadet’s overall
scholastic achievements. Each cadet must:
Rank in the top 10% of the high school class.
Rank in the top 25% of their AS class.
Demonstrate leadership qualities.
Actively participate in student activities
2.2.7.2. The SASI, as chairman, with the ASI and at least one faculty member, selects the
recipient and must request the award not later than 15 April. The award devices and
presenter can be requested from the nearest American Legion Post. If there is no local
post, contact the American Legion Headquarters. See Attachment 6-11 for list of award
points of contact.
2.2.8. American Legion General Military Excellence Award. This award consists of a
bronze medal accompanied by a ribbon with a distinctive miniature attachment depicting a
torch.
2.2.8.1. This award is presented annually to one second- or third-year cadet (in a 3-year
program) or a third- or fourth-year cadet (in a 4-year program) based on the cadet’s general
military excellence. Each cadet must:
Rank in the top 25% of their AFJROTC class.
80
Demonstrate outstanding qualities in military leadership, discipline, character, and
citizenship.
2.2.8.2. The SASI, as chairman, with the ASI and at least one faculty member, selects the
recipient and must request the award not later than 15 April. The award devices and
presenter can be requested from the nearest American Legion Post. If there is no local
post, contact the American Legion Headquarters. See Attachment 6-11 for list of award
points of contact.
2.2.9. Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) Award. This award consists of a
bronze medal and ribbon.
2.2.9.1. This award is presented annually to one third-year (in a 3-year program) or fourthyear cadet (in a 4-year program) that meets the following criteria:
Rank in the top 25% of their AS class.
Rank in the top 25% of their high school class.
Demonstrate qualities of dependability and good character.
Demonstrate adherence to military discipline.
Possess leadership ability and a fundamental and patriotic understanding of the
importance of JROTC training.
2.2.9.2. The SASI and principal select the recipient and must request the award and a
presenter not later than 1 March. The award devices and presenter can be requested from
the nearest DAR chapter. See Attachment 6-11 for list of award points of contact.
2.2.10. American Veterans (AMVETS) Award. This award consists of a medal pendant and
ribbon.
2.2.10.1. This award is presented annually to one qualified cadet that possesses individual
characteristics contributing to leadership such as:
A positive attitude toward AFJROTC programs and service in the Air Force.
Personal appearance (wearing of the uniform, posture, and grooming, but not
physical characteristics per se).
Personal attributes (initiative, dependability, judgment, and self-confidence).
Officer potential (capacity for responsibility, adaptability, and maintenance of
high personal standards).
Obtained a grade of “A” (or the numerical equivalent) in their AS class.
Be in good scholastic standing in all classes at the time of selection and at the
time of presentation.
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2.2.10.2. The SASI selects the recipient of the award and submits a brief nomination letter
and biographical sketch of the cadet to the state AMVETS department where the school is
located. An AMVETS representative should make the presentation if a participating local
post or department representative is available. See Attachment 6-11 for list of award points
of contact.
2.2.11. Reserve Officers Association (ROA) Award. This award consists of a bronze medal,
ribbon, and certificate.
2.2.11.1. This award is presented annually for military and academic achievement to an
outstanding third-year cadet (fourth-year cadet in a 4-year program). The recipient must
possess individual characteristics contributing to leadership such as:
Positive attitude toward the AS curriculum.
Outstanding personal appearance (wear of the uniform, posture, and grooming).
Attributes of initiative, judgment, and self-confidence.
Courtesy (promptness, obedience, and respect).
Growth potential (capacity for responsibility, high productivity, adaptability to
change).
Demonstrate the highest personal, ethical standards & strong positive convictions.
Rank in the top 10% of their AS class.
2.2.11.2. The SASI, as chairman, with the ASI and at least one faculty member, selects the
recipient of the award. The local ROA chapter contacts each ASI before 15 Sept and
furnishes the name of the ROA representative for presentation purposes. If no contact is
made by 15 Sept, the SASI must communicate directly with the National Headquarters of
the Reserve Officers Association. See Attachment 6-11 for list of award points of contact.
2.2.12. Military Order of World Wars Award. This award consists of a bronze medal
pendant, certificate, and ribbon.
2.2.12.1. This award is presented annually to an outstanding cadet who has committed to
continue the aerospace science program the following school year. Selection is based on
outstanding accomplishments or service to the AFJROTC unit.
2.2.12.2. The SASI, with the concurrence of the principal, selects the recipient and
completes the Military Order of the World Wars (MOWW) citation by summarizing the
cadet’s outstanding accomplishments or service to the unit. The citation and request for the
medal, certificate, and ribbon are sent to the nearest local chapter of the MOWW. The
SASI will make arrangements for a MOWW representative to make the presentation at an
appropriate ceremony. If a local chapter is unavailable, contact the MOWW National
Headquarters. If a member is not available, any active, reserve, or retired commissioned
officer may present the award.
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2.2.13. Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) Award. This award, formerly
known as The Retired Officers Association Award, consists of a medal pendant with ribbon.
2.2.13.1. This award is presented annually to an outstanding second-year cadet (third-year
cadet in a 4-year program) who shows exceptional potential for military leadership. Each
cadet must:
Be a member of the junior class.
Be in good academic standing.
Be of high moral character.
Show a high order of loyalty to the unit, school, and country.
Show exceptional potential for military leadership.
2.2.13.2. The SASI selects the recipient subject to the final approval of the sponsoring
MOAA chapter. The SASI requests the award devices from the nearest MOAA chapter. A
MOAA representative will make the award presentation. If a MOAA chapter is not
available in the area, the SASI sends the request to the MOAA headquarters.
2.2.14. Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Award. This award consists of a medal pendant
with ribbon.
2.2.14.1. This award presented annually to an outstanding second- or third-year cadet in a
3-year program (third- or fourth-year cadet in a 4-year program) who is actively engaged in
the AFJROTC program and who possesses individual characteristics contributing to
leadership. Each cadet must:
Have a positive attitude toward AFJROTC.
Have outstanding military bearing and conduct.
Possess strong positive personal attributes (such as courtesy, dependability,
punctuality, respect, and cooperation).
Demonstrate patriotism (being a member of the color guard or drill team) and
actively promote Americanism.
Demonstrate leadership potential.
Attain a grade of “B” in AFJROTC with an overall average grade of “C” in all
subjects for the previous semester.
Be active in student activities.
Not have been previous recipients of this award.
2.2.14.2. The SASI selects the recipient subject to the final approval of the sponsoring
VFW chapter. The SASI requests the award from the nearest local post in February for
presentation in April or May. A VFW representative will present the award at an
appropriate ceremony. If no local post is available, or if the local post does not offer the
award, obtain information by contacting the headquarters of the Veterans of Foreign Wars
of the United States.
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2.2.15. National Sojourners Award. This award consists of a ribbon, medal pendant, and
certificate.
2.2.15.1. This award is presented annually recognizing an outstanding first- or second-year
cadet (second or third-year cadet in a 4-year program) who contributed the most to
encourage and demonstrate Americanism within the corps of cadets and on campus. Each
cadet must:
Be in the top 25% of their academic class.
Encourage and demonstrate ideals of Americanism.
Demonstrate potential for outstanding leadership.
Not have previously received the award.
2.2.15.2. The SASI selects the recipient subject to the final approval of the sponsoring
National Sojourners chapter. The SASI requests the award from the nearest local chapter
in February for presentation in April or May. A representative from the National
Sojourners will make the award presentation at an appropriate ceremony. If no local
chapter is available or if the local chapter does not offer the award, contact the headquarters
of the National Sojourners.
2.2.16. Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) Award. This award consists of a bronze
medal with ribbon.
2.2.16.1. This award recognizes an outstanding second-year cadet in a 3-year program or
third-year cadet in a 4-year program who is enrolled in the AFJROTC program. The
recipient must exhibit a high degree of leadership, military bearing, and all-around
excellence in AS studies and not have previously received the award. Each cadet must:
Be currently enrolled in the AFJROTC program.
Be in the top 10% of their AFJROTC class.
Be in the top 25% of their overall class.
2.2.16.2. The SASI and the Principal select the recipient of the award not later than 1
March. The SAR national headquarters furnishes the secretary of each applicable SAR state
organization a list of the AFJROTC units in their state. A representative of SAR will
present the award and correspond directly with each unit within their area. The SASI
makes arrangements for presentation with the applicable state society or local chapter
2.2.17. Scottish Rite, Southern Jurisdiction Award. This award consists of a medal, ribbon,
and certificate.
2.2.17.1. This award annually recognizes an outstanding second-year cadet in a 3-year
program or third-year cadet in a 4-year program. Each cadet must:
84
Contribute the most to encourage Americanism by participation in
extracurricular activities or community projects.
Demonstrate academic excellence by being in the top 25% of class.
Demonstrate the qualities of dependability, good character, self-discipline,
good citizenship and patriotism.
Not have been a previous recipient of this award.
2.2.17.2. The SASI selects the recipient and requests the award from the nearest Scottish
Rite Valley of the Southern Jurisdiction at any time during the calendar year. With a 30day notice, a representative of the Scottish Rite Valley of the Southern Jurisdiction will
make the presentation at an appropriate ceremony. If no local unit is available, or if the
local unit does not offer the award, obtain information by contacting the national
headquarters of the Scottish Rite Valley of the Southern Jurisdiction. The star worn on the
ribbon must be procured with private or unit funds and will not be furnished by the
sponsoring organization.
2.2.18. Military Order of the Purple Heart Award. This award consists of a medal pendant
with a ribbon.
2.2.18.1. This award annually recognizes an outstanding second- or third-year cadet (thirdor fourth-year cadet in a 4-year program) who is enrolled in the AFJROTC program and
demonstrates leadership ability. Each cadet must:
Have a positive attitude toward AFJROTC and country.
Hold a leadership position in the cadet corps.
Be active in school and community affairs.
Attain a grade of “B” or better in all subjects for the previous semester.
Not have been a previous recipient of this award.
2.2.18.2. The SASI selects the recipient and requests the award from the nearest Military
Order of the Purple Heart unit in February for presentation in April or May. A
representative of the Military Order of the Purple Heart will make the presentation at an
appropriate ceremony. If no local unit is available, or if the local unit does not offer the
award, obtain information by contacting the national headquarters of the Military Order of
the Purple Heart.
2.2.19. Air Force Sergeants Association (AFSA) Award. This annual award consists of a
medal pendant with a ribbon.
2.2.19.1. This award recognizes an outstanding second- or third-year cadet in a three-year
program (third- or fourth-year cadet in a 4-year program). The recipient must demonstrate
outstanding qualities in military leadership, discipline, character, and citizenship. Each
cadet must:
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Be in the top 25% of the AFJROTC class.
Demonstrate outstanding qualities in military leadership, discipline, character, and
citizenship.
Not have been a previous recipient of this award.
2.2.19.2. The SASI, as chairperson, with the ASI, recommends the recipient of the award at
least 60 days prior to the desired presentation date, but not later than 15 April. The SASI
requests the award and an AFSA presenter from the nearest AFSA chapter. If information
on the nearest chapter is not available, or if there is no active AFSA chapter in the area, the
SASI will contact the AFSA international headquarters to obtain the name and address of
the division president whose area of responsibility is nearest the requesting school.
2.2.20. Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War (SUVCW) Award. This award consists
of a medal pendant with a ribbon.
2.2.20.1. This award recognizes one deserving cadet annually (may be first, second,
third, or fourth year cadet). The recipient must display a high degree of patriotism
and have demonstrated a high degree of academic excellence and leadership ability.
2.2.20.2. The SASI and ASI select the recipient and must request presentation
materials from a local camp or the respective SUVCW state department. The contact
information for the state departments or local camps is located on the SUVCW
website.
2.2.21. Sons of Confederate Veterans H. L Hunley Award. This award should go to a
rising second year cadet who has demonstrated the qualities of Honor, Courage and in
particular Commitment to his/her unit throughout the school year. This award consists of a
Medal ribbon and a certificate. One month prior to awards program unit should submit
application to point of contact with deserving cadet’s name and rank and a check for $30
(Unit cannot use AF Funds to pay for this award)
2.2.22. Tuskegee Airmen Incorporated (TAI) Air Force JROTC Cadet Award. This
TAI sponsored award consists of a ribbon and a certificate.
2.2.22.1. This award is presented annually to two cadets. Cadets may be first-year,
second-year, or third-year cadets (in a 3- or 4-year program) and must meet the
following criteria:
Attain a grade of “B” or better in their AS class.
Be in good academic standing.
Actively participate in cadet corps activities.
Participate in at least 50% of all unit service programs.
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2.2.22.2. The SASI and ASI select the recipients. This award is mailed to all units
proactively by AFJROTC Unit SC-065, C.A. Johnson Preparatory Academy not later
than 1 March. AFJROTC Unit SC-065, C.A. Johnson Preparatory Academy will mail
all award devices and certificates in one mass mailing. A follow-up report is required
after the award is presented. Provide SC-065 the names and grades of the recipients
and date award was presented on the supplied mail back form.
*2.2.23. The Retired Enlisted Association (TREA) Award. Awarded annually, at the
SASI’s discretion, for exceptional leadership to the most outstanding AFJROTC cadet while
serving in an Enlisted Rank. The selected enlisted cadet must have shown outstanding
leadership throughout the course of the school year. This award consists of a medal set with
ribbon and a certificate from TREA.
2.2.24. The Celebrate Freedom Foundation. Awarded annually, at the SASI’s discretion,
for outstanding performance in academics and cadets corps activities as a first or second year
JROTC cadet. This award consists of a ribbon and a certificate.
2.2.25. National Society United States Daughters 1812 Award. Awarded annually, at the
SASI’s discretion, for academic excellence, leadership, military discipline, dependability,
patriotism and upright character in speech and habits. This award consists of a ribbon, medal
and certificate.
2.2.26. Air Commando Association Award. Awarded annually at the SASI’s discretion
for completing a one page essay based on a historical AF Special Operations Mission
possessing the thirteen critical attributes of success: integrity, self-motivation, intelligence,
self-discipline, perseverance, adaptability, maturity, judgment, selflessness, leadership,
skilled, physical fitness and family strength. This award consists of a ribbon and certificate
2.2.27. Non-Funded National Awards. (i.e., NCOA, National Society, Daughters of
Founders and Patriots of America, etc.) (Organization must be submitted to and approved by
HQ AFJROTC: award criteria must be published in Cadet Guide or Unit Operating
Instruction)
2.2.28. Distinguished Unit Award (DUA). Awarded to cadets enrolled during the
academic year when a unit is selected by HQ AFJROTC to receive the DUA. The unit will
receive a congratulatory letter and a certificate of recognition which will be posted in
WINGS. The DUA ribbon is ordered through EMALL
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2.2.29. Outstanding Organization Award. Awarded to cadets enrolled during the
academic year when a unit is selected by HQ AFJROTC to receive the OOA. The unit will
receive a congratulatory letter and a certificate of recognition which will be posted in
WINGS. The OOA ribbon is ordered through EMALL. OOA recipients do not receive a
streamer
2.2.30. Outstanding Flight Ribbon. Awarded each academic term to members of the
outstanding flight under criteria determined by the SASI.
2.2.31. Top Performer Award. The Cadet Top Performer Award is a Headquarters,
AFJROTC award presented to a maximum of 2% of the current unit cadet corps population
(unduplicated headcount). All currently enrolled cadets may be considered. Specific
consideration should be given to cadets not previously recognized for superior performance
2.2.32.1. The award will recognize a cadet’s performance in the following key areas:
Leadership and job performance: in primary duty and specifically in preparation for
the unit’s annual assessment. Leadership qualities: involvement and positions held
in extracurricular activities. Academic performance: nominee must be in good
academic standing in all high school course work. Significant self-improvement.
Community involvement. Other accomplishments.
2.2.32.2. A SASI may nominate candidates to their respective Area Administrator.
Area Administrators will present awards to nominees during their visit unless
personal observation of the cadet warrants otherwise. SASIs may select recipients
and present award in years that unit does not receive AA visit.
2.2.32.3. Ribbons will be available from HQ AFJROTC and distributed to the Area
Administrators for presentation. The award consists of a certificate and a ribbon,
which may be presented by the Area Administrator during the visit or the SASI if the
cadet(s) is unavailable due to class scheduling conflict, etc. The ribbon may be worn
for the duration of a cadet’s tenure in AFJROTC.
2.2.32. Outstanding Cadet Ribbon. Awarded annually at the SASI’s discretion to the
outstanding first-year, second-year, third-year, and fourth-year cadet. The recipient from
each class must be of high moral character, demonstrate positive personal attributes, display
outstanding military potential, and attain academic and military excellence.
2.2.33. Leadership Ribbon. Awarded at the SASI’s discretion for outstanding performance
in a position of leadership as an AFJROTC cadet in corps training activities. Ensure
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recognition of cadets who have consistently displayed outstanding leadership ability above
and beyond expected performance.
2.2.34. Achievement Ribbon. Awarded for a significant achievement as deemed
appropriate by the SASI. Individuals may not receive more than one ribbon during a 1-year
period.
2.2.35. Superior Performance Ribbon. Awarded annually at the SASI’s discretion for
outstanding achievement or meritorious service rendered specifically on behalf of
AFJROTC. Present the ribbon for a single or sustained performance of a superior nature.
Ensure award is presented in recognition of achievements and services which are clearly
outstanding and exceptional when compared to achievements and accomplishments of other
cadets.
2.2.36. Academic Ribbon. Awarded for academic excellence as signified by attaining an
overall grade point average of at least “B” for one academic term, in addition to an “A”
average in AFJROTC.
2.2.37. Leadership School Ribbon. Awarded for completion of an approved leadership
school program of at least 5 days duration. Leadership ribbon as well as the Bronze Star can
be ordered through EMALL. For each additional Leadership School completion additional
bronze star will be awarded. Silver star will be awarded for outstanding performance or
leadership ability at a Leadership School instead of the Bronze Star. Limit the Silver star to
10 percent of the class.
2.2.38. Special Teams Competition Ribbon. Awarded to team members for placing 1st, 2nd
or 3rd in an Air Force or Joint Service Competition to include Color Guard Teams, Rifle
Teams, Drill Teams, Saber Teams, Academic Bowl Teams, CyberPatriot, etc.
2.2.39. Orienteering Ribbon. Awarded to team members for completing unit specific
Orienteering Program as part of unit curriculum
2.2.40. Cocurricular Activities Leadership Ribbon. Awarded at the SASI’s discretion for
leadership in AFJROTC cocurricular activities (such as dining-in chairperson, military ball
chairperson, etc.). The recipient must have demonstrated exceptional leadership in achieving
objectives through the coordinated efforts of others. This award may be earned a maximum
of four times. An oak leaf cluster should be added to this ribbon for each additional award.
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2.2.41. Drill Team Ribbon. Criteria for this award will be established by SASI and
published in Cadet Guide or Unit Operation Instruction. An oak leaf cluster should be added
to this ribbon for each year of qualifying membership beginning with the second year.
2.2.42. Color Guard Ribbon. Criteria for this award will be established by SASI and
published in Cadet Guide or Unit Operation Instruction. An oak leaf cluster should be added
to this ribbon for each year of qualifying membership beginning with the second year.
2.2.43. Saber Team Ribbon. Criteria for this award will be established by SASI and
published in Cadet Guide or Unit Operation Instruction. An oak leaf cluster should be added
to this ribbon for each year of qualifying membership beginning with the second year.
2.2.44. Marksmanship Team Ribbon. Criteria for this award will be established by SASI
and published in Cadet Guide or Unit Operation Instruction. An oak leaf cluster should be
added to this ribbon for each year of qualifying membership beginning with the second year
2.2.45. Good Conduct Ribbon. Criteria for this award will be established by SASI and
published in Cadet Guide or Unit Operation Instruction.
2.2.46. Service Ribbon. Awarded at the SASI’s discretion for distinctive performance in
school, community, or AFJROTC service projects. Limit to members whose active
participation in a service project contributed significantly to the goals of the organization.
* Participation in Drill Teams, Saber Teams or Color Guard Teams does not qualify for the
Service Ribbon (see above criteria for Drill Team Ribbon) unless community service hours
are awarded within established local criteria.
2.2.47. Health and Wellness Ribbon. Awarded by the SASI for participation in the health
and wellness physical fitness program. All cadets who participate in the wellness program
will receive the Health and Wellness Ribbon. All cadets who participate in the Presidential
Physical Fitness Program and score in the 75-84 percentiles will receive a second Health and
Wellness Ribbon and a Bronze Star device. If a cadet earns a percentile score of 85-95 they
will receive a second Health and Wellness Ribbon and wear a Silver Star. If they receive a
96-100 percent they will receive a second Health and Wellness Ribbon and they will wear
the Gold Star on the ribbon. The percentiles are computed automatically under Presidential
Physical Fitness Program Assessment in WINGS.
2.2.48. Recruiting Ribbon. Awarded for outstanding effort in support of unit recruiting
activities. The SASI awards this ribbon based on locally developed criteria, which must be
included in the unit Cadet Guide or unit Operating Instructions.
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2.2.49. Activities Ribbon. Awarded for participation in co-curricular activities other than
those that qualify for the Color Guard, Drill Team, and Special Teams Competition ribbons.
These include, but are not limited to orienteering teams, model rocketry clubs, AFJROTC
academic teams, and AFJROTC sports teams. An oak leaf cluster should be added to this
ribbon for each year of membership beginning with the second year. The SASI awards this
ribbon using locally developed criteria which must be included in the Cadet Guide or unit
Operating Instruction.
2.2.50. Attendance Ribbon. Criteria for attendance ribbon will be established by SASI
and published in Cadet Guide or Unit Operation Instruction.
2.2.51. Dress and Appearance Ribbon. Criteria for dress and appearance ribbon will
be established by SASI and published in Cadet Guide or Unit Operation Instruction.
SASI will also include uniform inspection scoring as applicable.
2.2.52. Longevity Ribbon. Awarded for completion of each AS year.
2.2.53. CAP Awards. Only five CAP ribbons (General Carl Spaatz Award, General Ira C.
Eaker Award, Amelia Earhart Award, General Billy Mitchell Award, and the General J. F.
Curry Achievement Award) may be worn on the AFJROTC uniform. Units should contact
the nearest CAP unit to obtain awards, invite presenters, or obtain any guidance on criteria or
presentation. A unit locator can be found at http://www.cap.gov/join/unitlocator/html.
Section 3
CADET APPEARANCE AND GROOMING GUIDELINES
3.1. Appearance and Grooming. When a cadet wears the uniform, he/she is responsible for
presenting a neat, clean, and professional military image. Appearance and grooming standards
help cadets present the image of disciplined cadets who can be relied upon to do the job they are
called on to do. A professional military image has no room for the extreme, the unusual, or the
faddish. The standards for wearing the uniform consist of four elements: neatness, cleanliness,
safety, and military image. The first three are absolute, objective criteria for the efficiency,
health, and well-being of the force. The fourth standard, military image is also a very important
aspect of military appearance. People, both military and civilian, draw conclusions as to the
military effectiveness of the Air Force by how they perceive those in uniform.
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The uniform standards in AFI 36-2903 are influenced to some extent by military tradition, and
they reflect the image the Air Force desires to project to the civilian community. The basic
concept of the Air Force uniform is that it is plain but distinctive dress, with an absolute
minimum number of badges, insignia, and devices authorized for wear on it.
3.1.1. Special Uniform and Appearance Rules. Here are some additional guidelines about
uniform and appearance.
3.1.1.1. Jewelry. While in uniform, you may wear a wristwatch and rings, but no more
than three rings at any one time. You may wear one bracelet if it is neat and conservative.
However, the bracelet must not detract from military image, must not be wider than onehalf inch, and must not subject anyone to potential injury. You may not wear ornaments
on your head or around your neck. Thumb rings are not allowed in uniform. Colored
bracelets that support a cause are also not allowed.
Female cadets in uniform may wear earrings if the earrings are conservative and kept
within sensible limits. For example, you may wear one small spherical (diamond, gold,
white pearl, or silver) pierced or clip earring on each earlobe. The earring worn in each
earlobe must match. Earrings should fit tightly without extending below the earlobes,
unless they are clip earrings. Male cadets in uniform may not wear earrings.
3.1.1.2. Eyeglasses or Sunglasses. If you wear glasses, they must not have any ornaments
on the frames or lenses. Eyeglass lenses that are conservative, clear, slightly tinted, or
have photosensitive lenses may be worn in uniform while indoors or while in military
formation. When outdoors and in uniform, sunglasses and eyeglasses must have lenses
and frames that are conservative; faddish or mirrored lenses are prohibited. Sunglasses
are not allowed while in a military formation. Neither eyeglasses nor sunglasses can be
worn around the neck while in uniform.
3.1.1.3. Tattoos or Brands. Whether you are in or out of uniform, tattoos or brands
anywhere on the body are not allowed if they are obscene or if they advocate sexual,
racial, ethnic, or religious discrimination. Tattoos or brands that might harm good order
and discipline or bring discredit upon the Air Force are also barred, whether you are in or
out of uniform.
Excessive tattoos or brands, even though they do not violate the prohibitions in the above
paragraph, will not be exposed or visible (including visible through the uniform) while in
uniform. Excessive is defined as any tattoo or brands that exceed one-quarter of the
exposed body part, and those above the collarbone and readily visible when wearing an
open collar uniform.
The SASI may exercise discretion if a new cadet arrives with a tattoo that may not be in
full compliance with the above guidance. The tattoo may be covered up with a skincolored bandage while in uniform and still participate in the program. However, tattoos
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and brands should be discouraged. The cadet should be counseled on the fact that tattoos
and brands may preclude him or her from serving in the military.
3.1.1.4. Body Piercing. Cadets in uniform are not allowed to attach or display objects,
articles, jewelry, or ornamentation to or through the ear, nose, tongue, or any exposed
body part (including anything that might be visible through the uniform). Female cadets
in uniform, however, are allowed to wear conservative earrings, pierced or clip style, in
their earlobes.
3.2. Specific Female Cadet Grooming Guidelines.
3.2.1. Hair. Your hair should be no longer than
the bottom of the collar edge at the back of the
neck. Your hairstyle must be conservative—no
extreme or faddish styles are allowed. It should
also look professional and allow you to wear
uniform headgear in the proper manner, so your
hair must not be too full or too high on the head.
In addition, your hairstyle shouldn’t need many
grooming aids. If you use pins, combs, barrettes,
elastic bands or similar items, they must be plain,
similar in color to your hair, and modest in size.
Wigs or hairpieces must also conform to these
guidelines.
Hair will not contain excessive amount of grooming aids, touch eyebrows. Hair color/
highlights/frosting (must not be faddish). Examples of natural looking for human beings:
Blonde/Brunette/ Red/Black/Grey. No shaved heads or flat-top hairstyles for women.
Micro-braids and cornrows are authorized for women.
EXCEPTION: Hair may be visible in front of women's flight cap. However, long hair will
be secured with no loose ends.
3.2.2. Skirts. The length of your skirt may not vary beyond the top and bottom of the
kneecap. Your skirt should fit smoothly, should hang naturally, and must not be excessively
tight. You must wear hosiery with the skirt. Choose a sheer nylon in a neutral dark brown,
black, off-black, or dark blue shade that complements the uniform and your skin tone.
3.3. Specific Male Cadet Grooming Guidelines.
3.3.1. Hair. Keep your hair clean, neat, and trimmed. It must not contain large amounts of
grooming aids such as greasy creams, oils, and sprays that remain visible in the hair. When
your hair is groomed, it should not touch your ears or eyebrows, and only the closely cut or
shaved hair on the back of your neck should touch the collar.
Your hair should not exceed 1 1⁄4 inch in bulk regardless of the length. Bulk is the distance
that the hair projects from the scalp when groomed (as opposed to length of the hair). The
bulk and length of your hair must not interfere with wearing any Air Force headgear
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properly, and it must not protrude below the front band of the headgear. Your hair must have
a tapered appearance on both sides and back, both with and without headgear. A tapered
appearance means that, when viewed from any angle, the outline of the hair on the side and
back will generally match the shape of the skull, curving inward to the end point.
Your hair may not contain or have attached to it any visible foreign items. If you dye your
hair, it should look natural. You may not dye your hair an unusual color or one that contrasts
with your natural coloring. You may have sideburns if they are neatly trimmed and tapered in
the same manner as your haircut. Sideburns must be straight and of even width (not flared)
and end in a clean-shaven horizontal line. They may not extend below the lowest part of the
outer ear opening. No extreme of faddish hair styles are allowed. Hair may not protrude
below the front band of properly worn headgear.
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Attachment 6-1 AFJROTC Badges
95
Attachment 6-2 AFJROTC Insignia
96
Attachment 6-3 Cadet Male Headgear
* Enlisted Ranks will have no
hat insignia on the flight cap
Note 1
97
Attachment 6-4 Cadet Female Headgear
* Enlisted Ranks will have no
hat insignia on the flight cap
Note 1
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Attachment 6-5 Cadet BDU
Note 3
Note 2
Note 4
Note 1
1. Unit patch worn on right pocket and centered.
2. Tapes grounded and centered on pockets.
3. Grade insignia (officer or enlisted) is worn on both left and right collars, centered on collar and parallel
with bottom of collar. Airman Basic have no collar insignia.
4. AFJROTC patch worn on left pocket and centered.
99
Attachment 6-6 Cadet Lightweight Blue Jacket
Note 1
Note 4
Note 5
Note 2
Note 6
Note 3
Note 7
LIGHTWEIGHT BLUE JACKET
COLLAR INSIGNIA
Outer edge
Note 8
Outer edge
Inner edge
Inner edge
1. (Officers only) When placing rank on epaulet instead of collar, use standard size metal rank, center on epaulet 5/8 in from
shoulder seam.
2. Shoulder tabs are centered between unit patch and shoulder seam. If no patch, then 1” below shoulder seam.
3. Unit patch on right sleeve ½ to 1 inch below shoulder seam and centered.
4. Grade insignia (officer and enlisted) is worn on both left and right collar. Airman Basic have no collar insignia.
5. Optional item: center vertically between the shoulder seam and where the underarm side seam joins the armhole sleeve
and center horizontally between the center zipper and the sleeve armhole seam.
6. AFJROTC patch on left sleeve ½ to 1 inch below shoulder seam and centered.
7. Jacket will be closed to at least the halfway point.
8. Center insignia horizontally on collar. Place 1 inch from bottom of collar and parallel to the outer edge of the collar.
100
Attachment 6-7 Cadet Male 1620 Service Dress
Note: Cadets may wear the rank on both coat and shirt at the same time or only on the
coat. The cadets must be in proper uniform at all times. If they have the coat on, the
rank insignia must be on the coat. If they remove the coat, the rank must be on the shirt.
Note 8
Note 7
Note 6
Note 5
Note 9
Note 10
Note 4
Note 11
Note 3
Note 12
Note 2
Note 13
Note 14
Note 1
1. Awareness Presentation Team (APT) badge: Center on welt pocket 3 inches below the top.
2. Name tag: Center between arm seam and lapel with bottom edge parallel to top of welt pocket
3. Kitty Hawk Badge: see note 15.
4. Unit patch: Placed ½ to 1 inch below shoulder seam and centered.
5. Shoulder tabs: Center between unit patch and shoulder seam. If no patch, then 1 inch below shoulder seam.
6. Aerospace Education Foundation (AEF) Badge: see note 15.
7. Distinguished Cadet Badge: see note 15.
8. Grade insignia (officer or enlisted) worn on both lapels. Place insignia halfway up the seam, resting on but not over it.
Bottom of insignia is horizontal with the ground. *(The lapel insignia (eagles non-chrome) will no longer be worn on the
lapels by Airmen Basics.)
9. AFJROTC Patch: Placed ½ to 1 inch below shoulder seam, and centered.
10. Flight Solo or Flight Certificate Badge: see note 15.
11. Ground School Badge: see note 15.
12. Ribbons: Center, on but not over edge of pocket. Wear 3 or 4 in a row. Wear all or some.
13. Academy of Model Aeronautic Wings: worn 1 inch below pocket.
14. Model Rocketry Badge: worn 2 inches below AMA Wings or 3 inches below pocket if no AMA Wings are worn.
15. First badge placed ½ inch above name tag or ribbons and is centered horizontally. Additional badges placed ½ inch
above previous badge.
101
Attachment 6-8 Cadet Female 1620 Service Dress
Note: Cadets may wear the rank on both coat and shirt at the same time or only on the
coat. The cadets must be in proper uniform at all times. If they have the coat on, the rank
insignia must be on the coat. If they remove the coat, the rank must be on the shirt.
Note 8
Note 6
Note 7
Note 5
Note 4
Note 9
Note 10
Note 11
Note 3
Note 2
Note 12
Note 13
Note 1
Note 14
1. Name tag: authorized for wear and is to be centered on right side, even with to 1 1/2 inches higher or lower
than the first exposed button.
2. Awareness Presentation Team Badge: see note 15.
3. Unit patch: center ½ to 1 inch below shoulder seam.
4. Shoulder tab: centered between unit patch and shoulder seam. If no patch, then 1 inch below shoulder seam.
5. Kitty Hawk Badge: see note 15.
6. Aerospace Education Foundation (AEF) Badge: see note 15.
7. Distinguished Cadet Badge: see note 15.
8. Grade insignia (officer or enlisted) worn on both lapels. Place insignia halfway up the seam, resting on but not over it.
Bottom of insignia is horizontal with the ground. *(The lapel insignia (eagles non-chrome) will no longer be worn on the
lapels by Airmen Basics.)
9. Flight Solo or Flight Certificate Badge: see note 15.
10. Ground School Badge: see note 15.
11. AFJROTC Patch: center ½ to 1 inch below shoulder seam.
12. Academy of Model Aeronautic (AMA) Wings: see note 15.
13. Model Rocketry Badge: see note 15.
14. Ribbons: center ribbons resting on but not over edge of welt pocket. Wear 3 or 4 in a row. Wear all or some.
15. First badge placed ½ inch above name tag or ribbons (whichever is appropriate) and is centered horizontally.
102
Additional badges placed ½ inch above previous badge.
Attachment 6-9 Cadet Male Blue Shirt
Note 8
Note 6
Note 7
Note 9
Note 5
Note 4
Note 10
Note 11
Note 3
Note 12
Note 2
Note 13
Note 14
Note 1
1. Awareness Presentation Team (APT) and Model Rocketry Badge are centered on the pockets on the
appropriate sides as displayed above.
2. Name tag: authorized for wear and is to be grounded and centered over wearer’s right pocket.
3. Unit patch: center ½ to 1 inch below shoulder seam.
4. Shoulder tab: center between unit patch and shoulder seam. If no patch, then place 1 inch below shoulder
seam.
5. Kitty Hawk Badge: see note 15.
6. Aerospace Education Foundation (AEF) Badge: see note 15.
7. Distinguished Cadet Badge: see note 15.
8. Grade insignia (officer or enlisted) worn on both left and right collar, centered side to side and top to
bottom. Enlisted rank’s bottom point of torch points toward the point of the collar. Officer top point of rank
aligned with point of collar. Airman Basic have no insignia of any kind on the collar.
9. (Officers only) When using officer cloth rank on epaulets versus miniature metal rank on collar, place as
close as possible to shoulder seam.
10. Flight Solo or Flight Certificate Badge: see note 15.
11. Ground School Badge: see note 15.
12. Academy of Model Aeronautic (AMA) Wings: see note 15.
13. AFJROTC Patch: center ½ to 1 inch below shoulder seam.
14. Ribbons: ground and center on pocket.
15. First badge placed ½ inch above name tag or ribbons and is centered horizontally. Additional badges
placed ½ inch above previous badge.
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Attachment 6-10 Cadet Female Blue Shirt
Note 8
Note 7
Note 5
Note 6
Note 4
Note 9
Note 10
Note 3
Note 11
Note 12
Note 13
Note 2
Note 14
Note 1
Note 15
1. Name tag: authorized for wear and is to be centered on right side, even with to 1 1/2 inches higher or
lower than the first exposed button.
2. Awareness Presentation Team Badge: see note 16.
3. Unit patch: center ½ to 1 inch below shoulder seam.
4. Shoulder tab: centered between unit patch and shoulder seam. If no patch, then 1 inch below shoulder
seam.
5. Kitty Hawk Badge: see note 16.
6. Aerospace Education Foundation (AEF) Badge: see note 16.
7. Distinguished Cadet Badge: see note 16.
8. Grade insignia (officer or enlisted) worn on both left and right collar, centered side to side and top to
bottom. Enlisted rank’s bottom point of torch points toward the point of the collar. Officer top point of
rank aligned with point of collar. Airman Basic have no insignia of any kind on the collar.
9. (Officers only) When using officer cloth rank on epaulets versus miniature metal rank on collar, place as
close as possible to shoulder seam.
10. Flight Solo or Flight Certificate Badge: see note 16.
11. Ground School Badge: see note 16.
12. Academy of Model Aeronautic (AMA) Wings: see note 16.
13. AFJROTC Patch: center ½ to 1 inch below shoulder seam.
14. Model Rocketry Badge: see note 16.
15. Ribbons: Center, parallel with ground. Align with bottom of name tag. Or, if no name tag, align bottom of ribbons
even with to 1 ½ inches higher or lower than the first exposed button.
16. First badge placed ½ inch above name tag or ribbons (whichever is appropriate) and is centered
horizontally. Additional badges placed ½ inch above previous badge.
Attachment 11
AFJROTC Award Contacts
Air Force Association Award
Manager of National Aerospace Awards
Air Force Association
1501 Lee Highway
Arlington VA 22209-1190
Phone: 703-247-5800 ext 4807
Fax: 703-247-5853
Email: [email protected]
Web Site: www.afa.org
POC: Lynette Cross
America Veterans (AMVETS) Award
If state chapter not available, contact:
AMVETS National Headquarters
ROTC Programs Coordinator
4647 Forbes Blvd
Lanham MD 20706-9961
Phone: 301-459-9600
Fax: 301-459-7924
Web site: www.amvets.org/
Air Force Sergeants Association (AFSA) Achievement
Award
If no local chapter, contact
AFSA International Headquarters
5211 Auth Road
Suitland MD 20746
Phone: 800-638-0594 ext 288
Fax: 301-899-8136
Email: [email protected]
Web site: www.afsahq.org/
POC: Member and Field Relations
Daedalian Award
If local flight not available, contact
Order of Daedalians
PO Box 249
Randolph AFB TX 78148-0249
Phone: 210-945-2111
Fax: 210-945-2112
Email: [email protected]
Web site: www.daedalians.org/
POC: Maureen DeFelice
American Legion Scholastic Award
If local post not available, contact
American Legion National Headquarters
National Security Division
1608 K Street NW
Washington DC 20006-2847
Phone: 202-861-2700 ext: 1503
Fax 202-861-2728
Web site: www.legion.org/
POC: Roshawn Treadwell
Reserve Officers Association (ROA) Award
Local ROA chapter contacts each ASI before 15 Sep and
furnishes name of ROA representative. If contact is not
made by 15 Sep, SASI must contact
National Headquarters, Reserve Officers Association
1 Constitution Avenue NE
Washington DC 20002-5655
Phone: 800-809-9448 ext 731
Web site: www.roa.org/
POC: Richard Booth
Email: [email protected]
American Legion General Military Excellence Award
If local post not available, contact
American Legion National Headquarters
National Security Division
1608 K Street NW
Washington DC 20006-2847
Phone: 202861-2700 ext: 1503
Fax: 202-861-2728
Web site: www.legion.org/
POC: Roshawn Treadwell
Military Order of World Wars (MOWW)
If no local unit available, contact
National Headquarters, Military Order of the World Wars
435 N Lee Street
Alexandria VA 22314-2301
Phone: 730-683-4911
Fax: 703-683-4501
Email: [email protected]
Web site. www.militaryorder.net
The Military Officers Association Award
If local chapter not available, contact
The Retired Officers Association
201 N Washington Street
Alexandria VA 22314-2529
Phone: 800-234-6622
Web site: www.troa.org/
Email:[email protected]
Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) Award
If local chapter not available, contact
National Defense Committee, NSDAR
1776 D Street NW
Washington DC 20006-5392
Phone: 202-628-1776 ext 292
Web site: www.dar.org/
Email: [email protected]
POC: Valerie Holmes
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Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Award
If no local unit available, contact Veterans of Foreign Wars
of the US
406 West 34th Street
Kansas City MO 64111-2736
Phone: 816-756-3390 ext 220
Fax: 816- 968-1149
Email: [email protected]
Web site: www.vfw.org/
POC: Susan Wilson
Email: [email protected]
Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge (FFVF) National Awards
Program (Essay Contest)
Awards Department
Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge
1601 Valley Forge Road
Valley Forge PA 19482-0706
Phone: 800-896-5488 ext 234
Comm: 610-933-8825
FAX: 610-935-0522
Email: [email protected]
Web site: www.ffvf.org/
POC: Carolyn Santanjelo
Email: [email protected]
National Sojourners Award
If no local chapter or local chapter does not offer award,
Contact National Sojourners
8301 E Blvd Drive
Alexandria VA 22308-1399
Phone: 703-765-5000
Fax: 703-765-8390
Email: [email protected]
Web site: www.nationalsojourners.org/
POC: Renee Malzahn
American Modeling Association Wings
5161 E Memorial Drive
Attn: Supply & SVC (Item #2088)
Muncie IN 47302
The wings must be purchased with your own funds. The
last quoted price we had was 1-24 Wings $2.00 each; 2599 Wings $1.75; 99 and more lower cost
Phone: 800-435-9262 ext 522
Web site: www.modelaircraft.org/
POC: Steve Weaver
Email: [email protected]
Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) Award
The National Headquarters,
Sons of the American Revolution
1000 S 4th Street
Louisville KY 40203-3292
Phone: 502-589-1776
Fax: 502-589-1671
Voice mail: 502-589-1779
Web site: www.sar.org/
The Scottish Rite of Freemasonry
If local chapter does not offer award, contact Scottish Rite
JROTC Americanism Medal Ancient and Accepted
Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, Southern Jurisdiction, USA
1733 Sixteenth Street, NW
Washington DC 20009-3103
Phone: 202-232-3579
FAX: 202-387-1843
Web site: www.srmason-sj.org/
Military Order of the Purple Heart Award
If no local unit available, contact
Military Order of the Purple Heart
5413-B Blacklick Road
Springfield VA 22151
Phone: 703-642-5360
Fax: 703-642-2054
Email: [email protected]
Web site: www.purpleheart.org/
POC: Stewart McKeown
Email : [email protected]
Sons of the Union Veterans of the Civil War (SUVCW)
Award
If local chapter does not offer award, contact Sons of the
Union Veterans of the Civil War
P.O. Box 1865, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17105 Phone:
717-232-7000
Website: www.suvcw.org
Sons of the Confederate H.L. Hunley Award
NCCM(SS/AW) A.C. Wilson, III U.S. Navy(retired)
SCV, H.L Hunley JROTC Awards Program Coordinator
P.O Box 1290
Florence, SC 29504-2920
Email [email protected]
Aerospace Education Foundation
(AEF) JROTC Video Contest
1501 Lee Highway
Arlington VA 22209-1198
Phone: 800-291-8480
Fax: 703-247-5853
Email: [email protected]
Web site: www.aef.org/
POC: Lynette Cross
Email: [email protected]
Celebrate Freedom Foundation Award
Celebrate Freedom Foundation
1300 Pickens Street, Suite 200
Columbia, SC 29201
Phone: 800-708-4752
Fax: 803-708-4815
Email: [email protected]
Web site: www.celebratefreedomfoundation.org
106
National Society United States Daughters of 1812
1286 Riverside Ave
Baltimore, MD 21230
Phone: 410-530-7083
Web site: http://www.usdaughters1812.org/chapters.html
Retired Enlisted Association (TREA) Award
If no local chapter exists contact TREA and speak to Mr.
Bob Rolloff at 1-800-338-9337 or write to:
1111 South Abilene Court
Aurora, CO 80012-4909
FAX: 303-752-0835
WEB Site: www.trea.org
TREA email: [email protected]
Tuskegee Airmen Incorporated (TAI) Air Force Junior
ROTC Cadet Award AFJROTC Unit
SC-065, C.A. Johnson High School will provide this award
without units requesting. Do not e-mail, fax, telephone or
write for the award. Contact the SC-065 if award is not
received by 15 March. Only two award devices and
certificates will be provided.
Air Commando Association Award
Air Commando Association
P.O. Box 7
Mary Easter, FL 32569
AFJROTC Unit PA-20091 will mail ribbon and certificate
template to each AFJROTC unit no later than the last day
of month of each calendar year as national service project.
107
108
EXTRACURRICULAR CHAPTER 1—KITTY HAWK AIR
SOCIETY (KHAS)
Foreword
The Kitty Hawk Air Society is the academic honor society of AFJROTC. Its purpose is to
promote high academic standards and achievement, school and community service, selfconfidence and initiative. KHAS also develops leadership abilities, recognizes academic
excellence, and furthers members’ knowledge of the Air Force role in aerospace.
This Chapter introduces the Kitty Hawk Air Society, details its history and provides all
the sample documents needed to begin a KHAS at your unit, or help improve your
existing society.
KITTY HAWK AIR SOCIETY (KHAS)
INTRODUCTION
KHAS is the academic honor society of AFJROTC that promotes high academic
standards, school and community service, self-confidence, and initiative. KHAS also
develops leadership abilities, recognizes academic excellence, and furthers members’
knowledge of the Air Force role in aerospace. KHAS has the flexibility to include
objectives of local unit chapters under a single umbrella with the advantages of national
stature. Consult WINGS for complete details.
To establish a chapter of Kitty Hawk Air Society, you should write by-laws to the
Constitution of your National Association of Kitty Hawk Air Society and keep it on file.
You can use the enclosed constitution and by-laws as a guide because the constitutions of
all state associations are much the same. You may print your charter certificate along
with the recognition and membership certificates from WINGS/Certificates
Badges may be ordered on WINGS| Logistics | Locate the item | Enter the quantity| Click
Submit Final.
Membership certificates and badges are awarded to each qualified cadet. Active
members may wear a light blue cord with their AFJROTC uniform. Recognition
certificates are awarded to honorary members e.g., instructors, school administrators, Air
Force Association officials, and distinguished visitors.
We encourage each unit to set up their own requirements so that about 20% of their
cadets qualify for membership. Chapters need to review and revise their requirements to
keep the membership at about that level.
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HISTORY OF KITTY HAWK SOCIETY
During Academic Year (AY) 1971-72, AFJROTC NC-023 initiated a Junior ROTC Air
Society to further academic achievement. Lt Col E. H. Cryer, USAF (Ret), Senior
Aerospace Science Instructor (SASI), noted a need for a cadet organization to function as
a club within the high school activities program. Lt Col Cryer designed the Constitution
for the high school level organization in such a way that it would be an academic society
with the following board objectives:
An incentive for academic excellence
Develop an interest in a college education
A means for cadets to participate as a club in school activities
To provide additional areas for leadership experiences and development
The name Kitty Hawk Air Society was chosen for the organization since it, like
AFJROTC, relates to the beginning of aerospace activities. Thirteen above average
cadets, from AE-II and AE-III were identified during the first semester and were ready to
identify and invited new AE-I cadets to join. Sixteen of thirty cadets invited to join
completed a pledge program under a “Big Brother” leadership assistance system. The
sixteen successful pledges became active members at a formal “Dining-In” held in April
1972. The Dining-In was extremely popular with the group and it has become an annual
affair.
During the organizational phase of development, benevolence, as well as leadership
growth, were established as aims of the group. As an example, each year a needy family
in our community was given support.
Since initial organization the membership criteria, the objectives, and the aims of the
KHAS have remained basically the same. Headquarters AFROTC was advised of the
establishment of KHAS by letter dated 25 July 72. Annual membership exceeded 40
cadets each year since the first year.
During the AFJROTC Workshop in conjunction with the Air Force Association Annual
National Convention 16-20 September 1973 in Washington DC, a briefing regarding the
Kitty Hawk Air Society was given by Lt Col Cryer to the JROTC group. All participants
indicated an interest in the organization and detailed information was sent to them
following the workshop.
During an AFJROTC workshop held at Pope AFB in August 77, Lt Col Cryer gave a
briefing regarding KHAS and all participants indicated a sincere interest in forming a
similar organization. Each unit represented at the conference was given a detailed
information packet.
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Announcements regarding KHAS in the AFJROTC Newsletter prompted information
packets to be sent to units nationwide
Enthusiastic support for the organization displayed by Lt Col Robert Tickle and Maj
Joseph Cafazzo of the Middle Atlantic Area of ROTC was largely responsible for eleven
active chapters in the area.
As new units were formed it became appropriate to identify groups as chapters of KHAS.
During AY 76-77, the members of the unit at Southern Wayne Senior High School
selected “Kill Devil Hill” as the Chapter name to continue the relationship with the origin
of powered flight. Also using the letter symbol of the organization, the motto “Keep
Honor Above Self” was adopted.
Colonel Lindy C. Gunderson, Commandant, Middle Atlantic Area, AFROTC, contacted
Colonel William Bowden, USAF (Ret), President, North Carolina Air Force Association
and Colonel Bowden was most agreeable to place it on the agenda of a meeting of North
Carolina AFA chapter representatives to be held at Seymour-Johnson AFB on 11 Feb 78.
On 9 Feb 78, Colonel Gunderson organized a luncheon meeting with high school
administrators involved with the charter chapter (Kill Devil Hill Chapter) of KHAS. Dr.
John K. Wooten, Superintendent of Wayne County Schools, and Mr. Walter G. Fulcher,
Principal of Southern Wayne Senior High School attended the meeting and repository for
records of the organizations. Also in attendance at the meeting were Lt Col Robert
Tickle, Major John G. Rylee of the middle Atlantic Area office and Lt Col Cryer, SASI,
Southern Wayne Senior High School.
Colonel Lindy Gunderson introduced the matter of interest of AFJROTC Honor Societies
to the North Carolina AFA Executive Council assembled on 11 Feb 78 and Lt Col Cryer
presented a detailed briefing on the topic. Mr. Bob Gill, President of the Scott Berkley
Chapter of AFA, presented a motion for affiliation with the KHAS. The assembled group
was unanimous in their response to a motion to help organize and support a statewide
KHAS. Dr. Daniel F. Callahan, National Vice President of AFA, noting the enthusiastic
support, suggested that a briefing be prepared for the National Board of AFA. He
suggested that national AFA support be solicited stating that the time had arrived for
national consideration. Dr. Callahan forwarded a letter to National Air Force
Association. Colonel Gunderson confirmed telephonic approval had been received from
Brigadier General David B. Easson, Commandant, AFROTC, to proceed in planning a
national KHAS.
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SAMPLE CONSTITUTION
Preamble
We, the members of the Kitty Hawk Air Society (KHAS), in order to uphold academic
standards and promote further interest in academic achievement, create a closer and more
efficient relationship within the Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps, (ROTC), serve
the high school and community, support airpower in its role in national security, and
develop patriotism and good citizenship, do hereby establish this constitution. We
acknowledge our affiliation with the Air Force Association and will support their efforts
to further aerospace education.
Article I
Section 1 - Name. This organization will be known as the KHAS. The name of each
individual chapter will become part of the bylaws.
Section 2 - Objectives. The objectives of KHAS shall be to promote higher academic
standards, to be of service to the school and community, promote self-confidence and
initiative, develop leadership abilities, and to encourage academic excellence and
continued educational development in the post high school years. Additionally, an
objective of the KHAS will be to further knowledge of the Air Force role in aerospace
education.
Article II
Section 1 - Membership. There will be three classes of membership: active, honorary,
and probationary.
a. Active: An active or reserve member in the Air Force Junior ROTC
(AFJROTC) unit as a full time high school student. An invitation to join KHAS
will be extended only to those students who have a minimum academic average of
a “B” in AFJROTC and an overall “C” average without any failing grades during
the preceding grading period. Local chapter bylaws may equate the minimum
letter grades to numerical grades in order to provide members with clearly defined
academic standards. Higher standards are encouraged and other restrictions may
be established in the bylaws. A member must maintain these standards to remain
active.
b. Honorary: The superintendent, principal, the State President of AFA and Air
Force Junior ROTC instructors will automatically be honorary members. Other
individuals will be elected from those recommended by the membership
committee.
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c. Probationary: Any member who fails to meet the standards set forth in Article
II, Section 1a, and any other standards established in the bylaws will be placed on
probationary status. Such individuals will not be permitted to vote or hold office.
Probationary members who meet the requirements for active membership during
the next grading period will return to active status. Those who fail to meet
standards on the next grading period will be expelled. Any member who is
expelled or suspended from school will be expelled from the organization.
Section 2 - Membership Procedures. Individuals who wish to become active members
must meet the criteria of Article II, Section 1a. These individuals must be recommended
to the membership committee. The membership committee will be responsible for
ascertaining that prospective members have met all membership eligibility requirements.
The membership committee and the KHAS advisors must approve membership. The
membership committee will also nominate individuals who have made outstanding
contributions to KHAS for honorary membership.
Section 3 - Induction. Requirements for induction into KHAS will be set forth in the
bylaws. Hazing and degradation are prohibited. Induction ceremonies should be
planned for the fall semester and/or spring semester.
Section 4 - Due Process. Members who have been expelled from the organization for
other than academic reasons may protest by notifying the commander, in writing, within
ten days after change of status. The commander, within five days, along with the
membership committee will discuss the protest and make recommendations to the
advisors. The advisors and school principal will determine final action.
Section 5 - Discipline. Any officer, who misses two consecutive meetings without the
approval of the advisors, will be required to resign from office. Any member who misses
two or more consecutive meetings without an excuse will be referred to the membership
committee for disciplinary action. Advisors will determine final action.
Article III
Section 1 - Organization. The KHAS will be organized so as to conform to school
policies concerning other like organizations. As a minimum there will be a Commander
(President), Vice Commander (Vice President), Administration Officer (Secretary) and
Finance Officer (Treasurer). New Officers will be elected at least once per academic
year by a majority vote of the organization's general membership.
Section 2 - Commander. It shall be the duty of the commander to preside at all meetings
of the organization and to further with all due earnestness the interests thereof. The
commander will be an ex officio member of all committees. The commander will be a
special assistant to the corps commander and will ensure that the activities of KHAS do
not conflict with those of the corps.
113
Section 3 - Vice Commander. It shall be the duty of the vice commander to perform the
duties of the commander in his absence or inability to act. The vice commander will be
assigned additional responsibilities as determined by the commander. The vice
commander will be the chairperson of the membership committee.
Section 4 - Administration Officer. The administration officer will record all meetings,
maintain necessary files, and handle routine correspondence.
Section 5 - Finance Officer. The finance officer will oversee all financial matters related
to the society and if applicable will serve as the chairperson of the finance committee.
Faculty advisors will annually review the financial control procedures to ensure that all
funds are accountable.
Section 6 - Advisors. Faculty advisors or sponsors for the Kitty Hawk Air Society will
be SASI and the Aerospace Science Instructor (ASI). In special situations, the principal
may also select additional non-AFJROTC faculty advisors who have a high interest in
aerospace activities and the improvement of citizenship. The local AFA chapter will be
invited to name an advisor.
Section 7 - Committees. There will be at least one permanent standing committee, that
being the membership committee. Other permanent standing committees may be formed
by a majority vote of the general membership. The commander with the approval of the
advisors will select members for permanent committees. The commander may also
appoint other temporary committees as the need arises.
Section 8 - Meeting Procedures. The rules of order contained in ROBERTS RULE OF
ORDER shall govern the organization in all cases to which they are applicable and in
which they are not inconsistent with the rules of order of this organization.
Article IV
Section 1 - Chapter Dues. In order to promote the objectives of this organization, dues
will be required of the members. Dues will be determined by a majority vote of the
general membership. Dues will be used to support each local chapter of the KHAS.
Section 2 - Fund Raising Projects. Fund raising projects are permitted so long as they are
in accordance with school policy. All fund raising activities must have the approval of
the school principal.
Article V
Section 1 - Bylaws. All proposed bylaws must be presented to and read before the
membership in a general meeting at least 10 school days before it can be adopted or
rejected. Adoption will require a majority vote of all active members and the approval of
the advisors.
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SAMPLE—AFJROTC NC-023
SOUTHERN WAYNE HIGH SCHOOL
DUDLEY NC 28333
CADET POLICY GUIDANCE NUMBER TWELVE
REVISED 24 AUGUST 1993
KILL DEVIL HILL CHAPTER BYLAWS
TO THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE CONSTITUTION
OF THE KITTY HAWK AIR SOCIETY
1. PURPOSE: This cadet policy guidance briefly outlines the objectives of the Kill
Devil Hill Chapter, of the North Carolina Kitty Hawk Air Society, for the information
and action of all cadets. This policy guidance supersedes and replaces previously
adopted bylaws to the North Carolina State Constitution of Kitty Hawk Air Society.
2. GENERAL: The Kitty Hawk Air Society (KHAS) Chapter at NC-023 AFJROTC will
be known as the Kill Devil Hill Chapter. This chapter is organized at Southern Wayne
High School, Dudley, North Carolina.
3. OBJECTIVES: KHAS shall promote higher academic standards, be of service to the
school and community, promote self-confidence and initiative, develop leadership ability,
encourage academic excellence, and further educational development in the post high
school years.
4. MEMBERSHIP: The members of the organization must be enrolled at Southern
Wayne High School as full time high school students and must be registered for at least
one Aerospace Science Course during the school year.
4.1. All cadets enrolled in the AFJROTC program are considered for an invitation
to join this honor society. An invitation to join will be extended only to those
students of good character who earn a minimum academic grade of 93 in their
Aerospace Science course and earn no grade below 85 for any course in which
they are enrolled. The decision to extend or not extend an invitation will be based
primarily upon three factors. First, the comments of a school official who has
access to student discipline records will be considered. Second, each cadet's
record of behavior and duty performance in AFJROTC and other school classes
and activities will be considered. Third, each potential member must achieve the
currently established grade standards for Aerospace Science and other courses.
The grade standards must be achieved for the most recent grading period prior to
induction. Exam grades will not be considered.
4.2. Members must maintain Kitty Hawk standards. The performance of each
member will be evaluated at the end of each grading period. Factors considered
in evaluating members will be the same as those used to evaluate potential
members. Any member who fails to maintain the grade standards and all other
115
standards of the Honor Society will be placed on probationary status until they
again satisfy established standards.
4.2.1. Members on probationary status may not wear the accouterments
associated with Kitty Hawk membership.
4.2.2. Members on probationary status may attend Kitty Hawk meetings
and activities; but, they may not hold office in the Kill Devil Hill Chapter,
vote on any club business, or serve as a big brother or big sister in the
pledge program, during their probationary period.
4.3. Adults, such as school officials and distinguished visitors, may be made
honorary members from time to time. They will be presented with a badge and a
certificate of honorary membership.
4.4. Induction: Cadets desiring to become members shall complete a pledge
program composed of reasonable tasks established by the membership and
approved by the SASI. Induction ceremonies will be conducted as soon as is
practical following completion of a pledge program. Induction will normally be
held during a formal Dining-In or other appropriate ceremonial event.
4.5. Insignia: Active members in good standing are authorized to wear the Kitty
Hawk badge and blue shoulder cord while in uniform.
4.5.1. Active members and honorary members may wear the Kitty Hawk
badge when not in uniform.
4.5.2. Graduating seniors who are active members in good standing are
authorized a blue honor cord for wear with their cap and gown.
5. ORGANIZATION: The organization will be organized in accordance with NC-023
AFJROTC Cadet Policy Guidance Number Three, Organization of the Cadet Corps.
5.1. Commander: It shall be the duty of the Commander to preside over all
activities of the organization and to serve as the Cadet Evaluation Reporting
Official for each member serving in a leadership or staff position in the
organization. It shall also be the duty of the Commander to accomplish the duties
associated with any position in the organization if the position is vacant or the
incumbent does not accomplish those duties.
5.2. Deputy Commander: It shall be the duty of the Deputy Commander to
preside in the absence of the Commander and to ensure that all staff actions are
properly accomplished in a timely fashion that complies with the suspenses and
deadlines that are imposed upon or generated by the organization.
116
5.3. NCOIC Operations: It shall be the duty of the NCOIC Operations to plan and
organize all training and activities of the organization. It shall be the duty of the
NCOIC Operations to prepare a calendar of scheduled training and activities for
approval by the Commander and to provide copies of the approved calendar to the
NCOIC Information Management for distribution within the organization and to
the Wing Deputy for Operations for approval and inclusion in the Wing Calendar
of events. It shall also be the duty of the NCOIC Operations to prepare
Operations Plans for all activities and training, indicating required resources, all
required actions, the target dates and persons responsible for accomplishment of
the actions. It shall be the responsibility of the NCOIC Operations to prepare
Operations Plans for approval and implementation by the Commander no later
than ten school days prior to when action must be taken to meet the earliest target
date included in each plan.
5.4. NCOIC Information Management: It shall be the duty of the NCOIC
Information Management to record meetings and activities of the organization. It
shall be the duty of the NCOIC Information Management to maintain
publications, computer records, files, and stocks of forms for the organization. It
shall be the duty of the NCOIC Information Management to publish orders and
plans generated by and for the organization. It shall be the duty of the NCOIC
Information Management to process the correspondence and other
communications of the organization. It shall be the duty of the NCOIC
Information Management to control and keep a record of all communications
going out of and coming into the organization.
5.5. NCOIC Personnel: It shall be the duty of the NCOIC Personnel to assure that
the assignments, training, accomplishments, and awards, pertaining to the
members of the organization, are properly documented in the unit records of the
members. It shall also be the duty of the NCOIC Personnel to provide properly
headed Cadet Evaluation Forms for accomplishment by the Commander, at least
twenty school days prior to the evaluation suspense date established by the Wing,
and to assure that evaluations are accomplished and forwarded to the Flight
Commanders of the evaluated members prior to the evaluation suspense date
established by the Wing.
5.6. NCOIC Public Affairs: It shall be the duty of the NCOIC Public Affairs to
publicize the activities of the organization. The NCOIC Public Affairs will
prepare an advance publicity news release for any news worthy organizational
activity and forward it to the Wing Deputy for Public Affairs, for public release,
at least 20 school days prior to the scheduled activity. The NCOIC Public Affairs
will ensure the accomplishment of photo and video coverage of news worthy
organizational activities. The NCOIC Public Affairs will prepare a news release
following any news worthy organizational activity and forward it with photos, to
the Wing Deputy for Public Affairs, for public release, no later than the close of
the second school day following the activity. The NCOIC Public Affairs is
responsible for internal information and will forward news releases concerning
assignments, awards, accomplishments, and activities of the members, to the
117
Wing Deputy for Public Affairs, for inclusion in the Wing Newsletter. At least
one internal information news release will be forwarded prior to the suspense date
for each issue of the Wing Newsletter and if there is no news worthy activity of
internal interest to support, the NCOIC Public Affairs will generate and forward a
feature story pertaining to the organization or its members. It shall also be the
duty of the NCOIC Public Affairs to serve as the historian of the organization and
to maintain a scrapbook of photos, news stories, and other memorabilia for the
organization. It shall also be the duty of the NCOIC Public Affairs to forward an
appropriately labeled copy of any video tape which pertains to the organization, to
the SASI, no later than the close of next school day following the taping.
5.7. NCOIC Finance: It shall be the duty of the NCOIC Finance to oversee all
financial matters related to the organizations and to serve as chairperson of the
finance committee of the organization. It shall be the responsibility of the NCOIC
Finance to coordinate with other staff members in the organization to project all
expenditures and income which will be generated by and for the organization and
to prepare a budget request for the organization for approval by the Commander.
It shall be the responsibility of the NCOIC finance to forward the approved
budget request to the Wing Comptroller for approval and inclusion in the Wing
budget no later than the budget suspense date established by the Wing
Comptroller. It shall be the duty of the NCOIC Finance to prepare school
purchase order requests for any proposed purchases by and for members of the
organization. It shall also be the duty of the NCOIC Finance to instructor the
members in purchase discipline to assure that no expenditures are made by and
for members of the organization unless an approved school purchase order for no
less than the dollar amount of the purchase has been obtained. It shall also be the
duty of the NCOIC finance to monitor the expenditures and income of the
organization and to inform the Commander and the Wing Comptroller of any
deviation from the budget (schedule of income and expenditures) which has been
approved by the Wing for the organization.
5.8. NCOIC Logistics: It shall be the duty of the NCOIC Logistics to serve as the
custodian of all equipment and supplies possessed by the organization. It shall be
the duty of the NCOIC Logistics to maintain an accurate inventory of equipment
and supplies and to maintain stock levels to satisfy anticipated requirements. It
shall be the responsibility of the NCOIC Logistics to coordinate with the
Commander and staff to determine anticipated requirements. It shall be the duty
of the NCOIC Logistics to obtain purchase orders from the NCOIC Finance and
to make required purchases or otherwise procure needed equipment and supplies
for the organization well in advance of anticipated requirements. The NCOIC
Logistics, the Commander, and the AFJROTC instructors are the only persons
who are authorized to make purchases or commit funds on behalf of the
organization.
6. DUES: Members and pledges are not required to pay dues; but they are expected to
participate in fund raising projects which the Cadet Wing conducts. Members and
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pledges are expected to raise a fair quota of required funds through the sale of fund
raising merchandise, or pay an equivalent amount in cash, once each school year.
6.1. Once each school year, members need to turn in 30 dollars from the sale of
NCOIC fund raising merchandise, or pay 15 dollars in cash. The 15-dollar
requirement is reduced by half of any sales money turned in. Members
participating in KHAS during the fall semester must satisfy this requirement prior
to the fall semester dining-in. Members not participating in KHAS until the
spring semester must satisfy this requirement prior to the spring semester diningin. Members who fail to meet these deadlines will be placed on probation until
the requirement is satisfied.
6.2. Pledges need to turn in 60 dollars from the sale of ROTC fund raising
merchandise, or pay 30 dollars in cash. The 30-dollar requirement is reduced by
half of any sales money turned in. Pledges must satisfy this requirement prior to
induction into active membership. Pledges will have satisfied their fund raising
obligations for the remainder of the current school year when they satisfy this
requirement.
7. FUND RAISING: Fund raising by and for this organization will normally be done as
part of a Wing wide fund raising effort. Normally, all funds required by the organization
will be raised by the major Wing sponsored fund raising projects and funds will be
allocated by the Wing to cover the authorized expenditures which are included in the
budget approved for the organization by the Wing. All fund raising must be approved by
the SASI and the school administration and be scheduled on the school calendar to avoid
conflicts with other school organizations.
8. CALENDAR: All meetings, activities, and events conducted by and for organization
members will be approved by the SASI and school administration and scheduled on the
school calendar to avoid conflicts with other organizations and to assure coverage by
school insurance.
8.1. Activities: Some of the activities planned annually include:
8.1.1. Participation in school club activities, striving to achieve the
distinction of being designated a "gold star” club.
8.1.2. Sponsorship of the military ball.
8.1.3. Sponsorship of dining-in.
8.1.4. Sponsorship of a cook out.
8.2. Service: Annual service projects include:
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8.2.1. Sponsorship of school service projects, such as campus clean-up,
or providing peer tutoring for students.
8.2.2. Participation in community service activities such as Thanksgiving
basket, Christmas stocking fund, and empty stocking fund, as a school
club.
8.3. Trips: Annual trips include:
8.3.1. A visit to a senior AFROTC detachment on a college campus.
8.3.2. Visits to the site of the Wright Brothers first flight or other
locations significant to the heritage of aerospace achievements.
9. INSURANCE: Each member and pledge must have insurance which will cover the
cost of emergency medical treatment of purchase school insurance each school year prior
to participating in any functions of the organization.
APPROVED
ROBERT E. ARMBRUST, Lt Col, USAF (Ret)
Senior Aerospace Science Instructor
3 Attachments
1. Invitation to Join
2. KHAS Pledge Program
3. Certificate on Form
120
SAMPLE KITTY HAWK AIR SOCIETY PLEDGE PROGRAM
__________________________________________
(First and Last Name of Cadet Pledge)
__________________________________________
(Name of Big Brother or Big Sister)
The pledge program is designed as an opportunity for cadets to display initiative,
cooperation, and enthusiasm for the KHAS pledge program and the ideals of the Society.
The KHAS Commander has overall responsibility for the pledge program. Each pledge
is individually responsible for completing the required elements of the pledge program.
Each pledge is assigned a KHAS Big Brother or Big Sister who provides encouragement
and advice and presents the pledge for membership at the induction ceremony.
Each pledge is required to accomplish the following:
Get the signature of each active member of KHAS.
Get signatures of KHAS staff 3 times at different times.
Memorize and recite:
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
The Preamble of the KHAS Constitution
Purpose of the Pledge Program
What to Say When You Don't Know
Definition of Duty
Definition of a Salute
Scholfield's Quotation
Air Force Song
Complete three of the following five items:
o Help with a KHAS student council project such as the homecoming
banner, the pumpkin carve up, or the Christmas Door.
o Participate in Campus Beautification or other KHAS service project.
o Complete an individual task assigned by the KHAS Commander.
o Perform a voluntary 2-hour task for your parents.
o Perform a voluntary 2-hour task for any teacher.
Turn in your completed Pledge Checklist no later than the established
deadline date. Present yourself for membership at an induction ceremony.
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MEMORY WORK
Preamble to the Constitution of the Kitty Hawk Air Society:
"We the members of the Kitty Hawk Air Society, in order to uphold academic standards
and promote further interest in academic achievement, create a closer and more efficient
relationship within the Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps, serve the high school and
community, support airpower in its role in national security, and develop patriotism and
good citizenship, do hereby establish this constitution.
Purpose of the Pledge Program:
"The purpose of the pledge program is to lay the foundation for the development of those
qualities of character and discipline which will be expected of a member of the Kitty
Hawk Air Society. These qualities must be so deeply instilled in the individual's
personality that no stress or strain will erase them."
What to Say When You Don't Know:
“Sir/Ma'am, I hesitate to articulate for fear that I might deviate from the true course of
rectitude, in other words, I do not know, Sir/Ma'am.
Definition of Duty:
“Duty then is the most sublime word in the English language. You should do your duty
in all things. You can never do more. You should never wish to do less." (General
Robert E. Lee)
Definition of a Salute:
“Sir/Ma'am, a salute is not an acknowledgment of subservience; it is a greeting showing
delicious affection for the person being saluted. A salute is not granted the rank; it is
given in respect for the rank and the nation for which it stands. A salute is not granted in
deference to a person or bright red, white and blue cloth, but for the nation which they
represent and the ideas of that nation. I salute, Sir/Ma'am, because I am an American and
I believe in and uphold our way of life, Sir/Ma’am.”
122
Scholfield’s Quotation:
"The discipline which makes the soldiers of a free country reliable in battle is not to be
gained by harsh or tyrannical treatment. On the contrary, such treatment is far more
likely to destroy than to make an army. It is possible to impart instruction and give
commands in such a manner and such a tone of voice as to inspire in the soldier no
feeling but an intense desire to obey, while the opposite manner and tone of voice cannot
fail to excite strong resentment and desire to disobey. The one mode or the other of
dealing with subordinates springs from a corresponding spirit in the breast of the
commander. He who feels the respect which is due to others cannot fail to inspire in
them respect for himself while he who feels, and hence manifests disrespect toward
others, especially his subordinates, cannot fail to inspire hatred against himself." (Major
General John M. Scholfield's graduation address to the graduating class of 1879 at West
Point)
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AIR FORCE SONG:
Air Force Song:
Off we go into the wild blue yonder,
Climbing high into the sun
Here they come zooming to meet our thunder
At'em boys, giv'er the gun!
Down we dive spouting our flaming from under
Off with one helluva roar!
We live in flame or go down in flame
Nothing'll stop the US Air Force!
Minds of men fashioned a crate of thunder
Sent it high into the blue
Hands of men blasted the world asunder,
How they lived God only knew!
Souls of men dreaming of skies to conquer
Gave us wings ever to soar.
With scout before and bomber galore,
Nothing can stop the US Air Force!
Here's a toast to the host of those who
love the vastness of the sky,
To a friend we send this message
of his brother men who fly.
We drink to those who gave their all of old
Then down we roar to score the rainbow's
pot of gold.
A toast to the host of men we boast
The US Air Force!
Off we go into the wild sky yonder
Keep the wing level and true
If you'd live to be a gray haired wonder
Keep the nose out of the blue
Flying men, guarding our nation's borders
We'll be there followed by more
In echelon, we carry on
Nothing can stop the US Air Force!
124
SAMPLE KITTY HAWK AIR SOCIETY PLEDGE PROGRAM INVITATION
TO JOIN
REPLY TO: (Name of Chapter) Chapter, Kitty Hawk Society
(Unit Number) (High School Name)
SUBJ: Invitation to Join the Kitty Hawk Air Society
TO: _____________________________
(Cadet's First and Last Name)
A review of your records indicates that you are qualified for membership in the (Chapter Name)
Chapter of Kitty Hawk Air Society and you are cordially invited to join us.
The high ideals of this organization are stated in the Constitution of Kitty Hawk Air Society and
the Bylaws of the (Chapter Name) Chapter.
Preamble to the Constitution of Kitty Hawk Air Society:
"We, the members of the Kitty Hawk Air Society, in order to uphold academic standards and
promote further interest in academic achievement, create a closer and more efficient relationship
with the Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps, serve the high school and community, support
airpower in its role in national security, and develop patriotism and good citizenship, do hereby
establish this constitution.
(Chapter Name) Chapter Bylaws to the Constitution of the Kitty Hawk Air Society:
"Objectives: KHAS shall promote higher academic standards, be of service to the school and
community, promote self-confidence and initiative, develop leadership ability, encourage
academic excellence, and further educational development in the post high school years."
With the understanding that membership is voluntary, you are cordially invited to join KHAS as a
pledge. Active membership status will be awarded to you upon completion of the prescribed
pledge program of indoctrination and formal induction. Active membership will entitle you to
wear the Kitty Hawk Air Society Badge and to wear the prescribed Kitty Hawk Cord with your
uniform, so long as you maintain Kitty Hawk standards.
Please indicate your response below and return this letter to the SASI.
_______________________________
_______________________________
(Commander, Kitty Hawk Air Society)
(Senior Aerospace Science Instructor)
_______Yes, I want to join KHAS.
_______No, I do not want to join KHAS.
____________________
(Date of Your Signature)
_______________________________
(Please Sign Your Name on This Line)
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SAMPLE KITTY HAWK AIR SOCIETY PLEDGE PROGRAM CHECKLIST
_______________________________
(First and Last Name of Pledge)
_______________________________
(Name of Big Brother/Big Sister)
This checklist is to be completed and turned in to SASI not later than
_____________________
(Deadline Date)
Pledges are responsible for completion of pledge program requirements no later than the
close of school on the established deadline date. Pledges are responsible for turning in
their completed checklist, to the SASI, no later than the established deadline.
Big Brothers and Big Sisters are responsible for contacting their pledges on a regular
basis and monitoring their progress. Big Brothers and Big Sisters are to advise and
encourage their pledges and to make themselves available to listen to and evaluate their
pledges as they recite their memory work.
Kitty Hawk staff and active members are required to sign the signature forms for all
pledges without delay. The purpose of the signing is to give the pledges a chance to meet
you. It is not acceptable for KHAS staff or active members to fail to honestly identify
themselves to the pledges or to harass pledges in anyway. Staff/Active members and
pledges are to demonstrate mutual respect for each other. If time permits, a pledge may
be asked to recite one memory passage at the time a signature is requested; but the
signature should be provided even if the pledge is unable to recite the requested passage.
KHAS staff/members signatures completed ___________________________________
(Big Brother/Sister Certify)
Turn in money from fund raising and/or cash __________________________________
(ASI or AASI Certify)
Preamble to KHAS Constitution recite _______________________________________
(Big Brother/Sister Certify)
Purpose of Pledge Program recited __________________________________________
(Big Brother/Sister Certify)
What to say when you don’t know recited ____________________________________
(Big Brother/Sister Certify)
Definition of Duty recited _________________________________________________
(Big Brother/Sister Certify)
Scholfield's Quotation Recited _____________________________________________
(Big Brother/Sister Certify)
Air Force Song sung or recited _____________________________________________
(Big Brother/Sister Certify)
126
THREE OF THE FOLLOWING FIVE TASK COMPLETED:
1. Help with KHAS student council project _____________________________________
(Project supervisor Certify)
2. Participate in KHAS service project __________________________________________
(Project supervisor Certify)
3. Complete assigned individual task ___________________________________________
(Task supervisor Certify)
4. Voluntarily work two hours for parent _______________________________________
(Parent Certify)
5. Voluntarily work two hours for teacher ______________________________________
(Teacher Certify)
I certify that the pledge named above has satisfactorily completed the Kitty Hawk Air
Society, (Charter name) Chapter, pledge program and I heartily recommend this pledge
for active membership.
____________________________________
(Big Brother/Sister Certify)
Keep Honor Above Self
127
KHAS SIGNATURES FROM ACTIVE CHAPTER MEMBERS
NAMES OF ACTIVE MEMBERS
SIGNATURES OF ACTIVE MEMBERS
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
128
KHAS SIGNATURES FROM STAFF MEMBERS
KHAS staff member should sign this sheet at three different times.
COMMANDER
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
DEPUTY COMMANDER
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
OPERATIONS
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
PERSONNEL
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
PUBLIC AFFAIRS
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
FINANCE
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
129
EXTRACURRICULAR CHAPTER 2—MODEL
ROCKETRY PROGRAM
Foreword
Model rocketry is the designing, building, and flying of small rockets that are made of
paper, plastic, balsa wood, or any other lightweight material. A model rocketry program
can provide an exciting introduction for cadets to concepts of aerospace engineering and
design and the basic concepts of flight and space. It can motivate cadets to attain a
greater knowledge of aerospace studies and arouse interest in aerospace careers. This
chapter details model rockets constructed in this manner are approved for use by
AFJROTC cadets. Obtain approval of school authorities before establishing a program.
MODEL ROCKETRY PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS (OPR)
OPR 1. Construct, launch, and evaluate at least one model suitable for the altitude
competition described in the NAR United States Rocketry Sporting Code (NARUSRSC).
OPR 2. Construct, launch, and evaluate at least one model rocket suitable for the scale,
plastic scale, or payload competition described in the NARUSRSC.
OPR 3. Construct, launch, and evaluate at least one model rocket suitable for the drag
race, parachute duration, boost, or glide competition described in the NARUSRSC.
OPR 4. Construct, launch, and evaluate at least one model rocket suitable for the
aerospace systems or research and development competition described in the
NARUSRSC (Optional for advanced rocketry program only).
OPR 5. Prepare a diagram of a typical model rocket launch site. This diagram may be as
elaborate as desired, but must include: launcher, model rocket, igniter, and land area
requirements.
OPR 6. Submit for evaluation a journal of all activities completed in the model rocketry
program. The journal must indicate completion of all OPRs.
LEADERSHIP PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS (LPR)
LPR 1. Demonstrate a knowledge of the AFJROTC model rocketry program and its
concepts and techniques by satisfactorily implementing, administering, supervising, and
evaluating model rocketry activities.
LPR 2. Demonstrate a knowledge of the organization of AFJROTC model rocketry
program activities, including personnel required, skills necessary, and the job
responsibilities of cadets and adult supervisors for rocketry activities.
130
LPR 3. Demonstrate knowledge of the physical facilities required for all model rocketry
operational activities, to include facilities for storage, handling, and building static
models, flying and safety precautions, and spectator protection.
LPR 4. Demonstrate the leadership skills necessary to conduct an individual test, group
test, and NAR-sanctioned model rocketry competitive meet.
LPR 5. Serve successfully as the safety officer in addition to a minimum of three of the
remaining positions listed in para 2.4.2.6.
LPR 6. Pass an oral examination covering the topics of model rocketry techniques,
procedures, operations, and safety precautions.
PROGRAM GUIDANCE
1. Guidance:
4.13. Model Rocketry. Model rocketry is the designing, building, and flying of small
rockets that are made of paper, plastic, balsa wood, or any other lightweight material.
Model rockets constructed in this manner are approved for use by AFJROTC cadets.
Model rocket engines are solid propellant engines made by commercial manufacturers
intended for use in model rockets of the construction indicated. The manufacturer
furnishes these "safe" engines ready for use; there is no need for the user to mix
potentially dangerous chemical ingredients. Commercially produced engines are the only
type approved for use by AFJROTC cadets. Obtain approval of school authorities before
establishing a program. Reference WINGS for more details.
4.13.1. Units will develop a training plan for cadets desiring to qualify for the
Model Rocketry badge. The plan will provide for the completion of the Operational
Performance Requirements and the Leadership Performance Requirements.
4.13.2. If your unit participates in the Model Rocketry Program, you must ensure
the school’s liability policy covers accidents associated with launching rockets. If not,
you will need to purchase separate coverage to cover the launchings. For more
information, check www.modelaircraft.org.
4.13.3. Contact Holm Center/JROL for students who satisfactorily complete both
sets of requirements for issue of the Model Rocketry badge.
2. Particular attention should be given to the selection of instructional personnel.
Although desirable, it is not necessary that instructors be experts. Before a program has
begun, units should decide how many instructors are needed and provide enough time for
them to become knowledgeable in the specialties they will teach.
3. Units will conduct the model rocketry program according to the provisions of this
instruction and the following guidelines:
National Association of Rocketry (NAR)
United States Model Rocket Sporting Code
NAR Model Rocket Safety Code
131
Contest rules and safety regulations of the National Aeronautics Association
(NAA) and the Federation Aeronautique Internationale (FAI)
Federal Aviation Regulations, Part 101, Manned Balloons, Kits, and Unmanned
Rockets.
Federal Communications Commission, Part 95, Citizens Radio Service.
State and local governments.
4. Cadets will keep a record of their rocket launchings to include aircraft flown on an
individual, group, or competitive basis. Flight records will include duration of flight,
fuel, repairs (if any), type of aircraft, and whether the operation is under supervision of a
qualified flight instructor. Cadets should be prepared to provide flight information to the
SASI.
5. Conduct individual model rocketry program activities involving launchings or flying
under the supervision of the range officer, safety officer, and first aid officer.
POSITIONS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Minimum positions and responsibilities necessary to supervise an AFJROTC model
rocket competitive meet include:
Range Officer or Contest Officer. The range or contest officer takes complete charge
of the range or flying field, directs all action, gives all orders, makes all decisions,
supervises all operations, and is normally positioned at the control center. For AFJROTC
launches or meets sponsored by AFJROTC, the range officer will be an AFJROTC
instructor.
Safety Officer. The safety officer is responsible for checking all critical points of the
operation in advance to ensure safety regulations are followed. The safety officer
conducts safety briefings prior to launches and instructs all personnel in safety
procedures. No launching or flying will take place until the safety officer issues
clearance to the range officer.
First Aid Officer. The first aid officer administers first aid to participants and spectators
as required. The first aid officer will be an individual who qualifies for the job by
completing a Red Cross first aid course or similar training required by school officials.
Launch Supervisor, Flight Line Officer, or Contest Security Officer. Ensures
established procedures are followed at the launch site/flying field, monitors launches and
landings, and certifies a clear launch/flight area to the range officer before activity
begins. This officer is responsible for ensuring the security of displayed static models.
Spectator Control Officer. The spectator control officer is responsible for clearing
launch areas of all personnel not assigned to specific posts and ensuring spectators and
personnel are at a safe distance before giving clearance for activity to the range officer.
Range Guards. Range guards are responsible for keeping passers-by out of the area,
scanning the sky for aircraft, and certifying to the range officer that it is safe to launch
rockets.
132
Observers and Trackers. Observers and trackers are responsible for tracking the path
of the rocket and taking observations on the azimuth and angle of the elevation at the
peak of the trajectory for plotting. They are also responsible for advising the range
officer of in-flight emergencies and dead-stick landings, assisting in the safe recovery of
downed aircraft, and reporting all pertinent data to the control center.
Public Affairs Officer. The public affairs officer arranges for advance publicity and
provides for newspaper, radio, television, and magazine coverage of the activities,
seeking favorable public relations. The public affairs officer is also responsible for
maintaining lines of communication with supporting organizations, parent booster clubs,
and school authorities as to the current activities of the program.
Units conducting model rocketry programs are encouraged to establish a NAR section or
have interested cadets apply for membership in local NAR sections. AFJROTC units or
cadets may then enter into competitive meets with other NAR units on section, area,
regional, and national levels. Applications for membership or establishment of an NAR
Model Rocketry Section may be obtained from the National Association of Rocketry.
133
SUGGESTED 6-WEEK PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION FOR MODEL
ROCKETS
Week #
Classroom/Period/Activities
Laboratory Period/Activities
1
a. Introduce basic model rocketry
glossary
b. Discuss construction of body tubes,
nose cones, and fins
c. Explain construction of commercial
model rocket engines and their
principles of operation
d. Present the Model Rocketry Safety
Code
e. Explain techniques of constructing
recovery devices
f. Explain rocket aerodynamics
g. Explain rocket ignition techniques
h. Explain paints and finishes suitable
for rockets being constructed
i. Explain launching devices suitable
for launching rockets
j. Decide which launching device
a. Demonstrate the tools and materials
needed to construct a simple singlestate rocket
b. Demonstrate types of engines available
(borrow from model shops)
c. Provide lists of tools and materials
needed to construct a single-stage
rocket; provide plans for a rocket
a. Explain basic techniques of altitude
determination and the type of
tracking device used at unit rocket
launching activity
b. Get volunteers to construct or
obtain a suitable tracking device
c. Plan rocket launching activity
d. Make assignments (range officers,
special details, etc.)
e. Review safety code
Unit model rocket launching
a. Complete construction of rockets
b. Continue construction of launching
device
2
3
4
5
6.
134
Begin construction of single-stage rocket
(all cadets use same basic plan
a. Continue construction of rockets
b. Begin construction of a launching
device from materials available;
procure remainder of needed materials
before next meeting
c. Complete launching and tracking
devices
d. Inspect completed model rockets
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF ROCKETRY
MODEL ROCKET SAFETY CODE
1. Materials. I will use only lightweight, non-metal parts for the nose, body, and fins of
my rocket.
2. Motors. I will use only certified, commercially-made model rocket motors, and will
not tamper with these motors or use them for any purposes except those recommended by
the manufacturer.
3. Ignition System. I will launch my rockets with an electrical launch system and
electrical motor igniters. My launch system will have a safety interlock in series with the
launch switch, and will use a launch switch that returns to the "off" position when
released.
4. Misfires. If my rocket does not launch when I press the button of my electrical launch
system, I will remove the launcher's safety interlock or disconnect its battery, and will
wait 60 seconds after the last launch attempt before allowing anyone to approach the
rocket.
5. Launch Safety. I will use a countdown before launch, and will ensure that everyone is
paying attention and is a safe distance of at least 15 feet away when I launch rockets with
D motors or smaller, and 30 feet when I launch larger rockets. If I am uncertain about the
safety or stability of an untested rocket, I will check the stability before flight and will fly
it only after warning spectators and clearing them away to a safe distance.
6. Launcher. I will launch my rocket from a launch rod, tower, or rail that is pointed to
within 30 degrees of the vertical to ensure that the rocket flies nearly straight up, and I
will use a blast deflector to prevent the motor's exhaust from hitting the ground. To
prevent accidental eye injury, I will place launchers so that the end of the launch rod is
above eye level or will cap the end of the rod when it is not in use.
7. Size. My model rocket will not weigh more than 1,500 grams (53 ounces) at liftoff and
will not contain more than 125 grams (4.4 ounces) of propellant or 320 N-sec (71.9
pound-seconds) of total impulse.
8. Flight Safety. I will not launch my rocket at targets, into clouds, or near airplanes, and
will not put any flammable or explosive payload in my rocket.
9. Launch Site. I will launch my rocket outdoors, in an open area at least as large as
shown in the accompanying table, and in safe weather conditions with wind speeds no
greater than 20 miles per hour. I will ensure that there is no dry grass close to the launch
pad, and that the launch site does not present risk of grass fires.
10. Recovery System. I will use a recovery system such as a streamer or parachute in my
rocket so that it returns safely and undamaged and can be flown again, and I will use only
flame-resistant or fireproof recovery system wadding in my rocket.
135
11. Recovery Safety. I will not attempt to recover my rocket from power lines, tall trees,
or other dangerous places.
LAUNCH SITE DIMENSIONS
Installed Total Impulse (Nsec)
Equivalent Motor
Type
Minimum Site Dimensions
(ft.)
0.00--1.25
1/4A, 1/2A
50
1.26--2.50
A
100
2.51--5.00
B
200
5.01--10.00
C
400
10.01--20.00
D
500
20.01--40.00
E
1,000
40.01--80.00
F
1,000
80.01--160.00
G
1,000
160.01--320.00
Two Gs
1,500
Revision of March, 2009
136
MODEL ROCKETRY BADGE
The Model Rocketry Badge is awarded to cadets who have fulfilled model rocketry
program requirements listed in this handbook. OPR: Holm Center/JROL.
ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION
1. NASA’s Beginner’s Guide to Rockets:
http://exploration.grc.nasa.gov/education/rocket/bgmr.html
2. National Association of Rocketry’s "Successful Rocketry for Scouting, 4-H, and Other
Youth Groups"
http://www.nar.org/pdf/youthprogs.pdf
3. NASA’s Adventures in Rocket Science Educator Guide
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Adventures_i
n_Rocket_Science.html
4. National Association of Rocketry Certified Motors:
http://www.nar.org/SandT/NARenglist.shtml
5. National Association of Rocketry United States Model Rocketry Sporting Code:
http://www.nar.org/pdf/pinkbook.pdf
137
6. Most control of model rocketry is on the state and/or local level. 48 states adhere to a
common code of regulation for model rocketry known as National Fire Protection
Association (NFPA) Code 1122. This code defines the power, weight, and other limits to
which a rocket must comply in order to be classified as a (relatively unregulated) "model
rocket." http://www.nfpa.org/index.asp?cookie%5Ftest=1
7. Forty Years of Model Rocketry A Safety Report Prepared for the National Association
of Rocketry by G. Harry Stine:
http://www.nar.org/pdf/40years.pdf
138
EXTRACURRICULAR CHAPTER 3—NATURAL
DISASTERS
Foreword
This chapter deals with AFJROTC response to natural disasters, especially at the unit
level. It deals primarily with hurricanes, but can be applied to any natural disaster—
earthquake, tornado, flood, blizzard, etc. This chapter provides a sample checklist,
sample email from headquarters, and information on assistance centers. Our primary
concern during natural disasters is your safety. It is vitally important that we are able
to reach you and that you contact us as soon as possible to update your status. The
toll free number is 1-866-235-7682 (ext 3-1178).
This chapter only provides the basics of a natural disaster program. Additional
information can be obtained from your nearest military base or your local Disaster
Preparedness Office.
NATURAL DISASTERS
NATURAL DISASTER CHECKLIST
SASI/ASI ensure cell phone numbers are input in WINGS.
If instructors evacuate prior to storm, contact HQ Operations Support to report
your temporary location. Contact HQ Operations Support after returning to unit
to report status of school/equipment/uniforms/cadets.
If disaster strikes, contact HQ Operations Support as soon as possible after the
emergency to provide us with status and any updated contact information.
Ensure that equipment/uniform items are input into WINGS. If possible, store
items off the floor so if flooding occurs they will be better protected.
If your school is closed or destroyed, Instructor Management will work with
displaced instructors to relocate them to surrounding units to keep instructors
employed.
After the disaster, HQ Operations Support will work with instructors on cost to
replace equipment, uniform items.
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HURRICANE PREPARATION EMAIL (SAMPLE)
We are now facing Hurricane XXXX and it appears some of you may be in harm's way.
For those units located in the path of the hurricane and being evacuated, obviously our
main concern is for the safety and well being of you and your family.
We have learned valuable lessons from previous year's hurricane season. Very
importantly, we need the ability to contact you. Phone or email us (see below) with your
contact information (city, state, and phone numbers) so we can reach you if necessary. If
you cannot provide this to us prior to your departure, please do so within 24 hours of your
arrival to the safe location.
In preparation for evacuating the school, we ask that you ensure all Air Force equipment
is elevated off the floor and secured to the best of your ability. This will minimize the
damage caused by "minor" flooding
Please contact the HQ Hurricane Response Team to provide updates or if you need
information concerning recovery operations. If you are calling after hours, please leave a
message with a phone number to reach you. We will check our voice messages
continually and will return your call. We will also be checking our email messages, so
you may also email the HQ org box ([email protected]).
Toll Free
866-235-7682
(334) 953-1178 or 2675
We intend to keep everyone posted via WINGS on the status of units/instructors affected
by Hurricane XXXXXXX.
Sincerely,
Headquarters Staff
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ASSISTANCE CENTERS
Tailor the following list to your local area:
Barksdale AFB LA – Family Assistance Center (318)456-8400/8511 Theresa Marvin
(FSC Director)
Financial Assistance, Referral, Crisis Counseling Support, Hot Meals, Free Calling Cards
(They don’t have adopt a family)
Columbus AFB MS – Evacuee Service Center (662)434-2790 (24 hrs) MSgt Coleman
(Family Readiness NCO)
Financial Assistance, Referral, Adopt-a-Family Program, Temp Lodging (have room for
200-300 additional evacuees)
Eglin AFB FL - Family Assistance Center (850)885-4673 (24 hrs) Lisa Splinter (FSC
Director)
Financial Assistance, Referral, Crisis Counseling Support and Family Assistance
Maxwell AFB AL – Evacuee Reception Center (334)953-4560 (0900-1900) Mr. John
Harris
Financial Assistance, Referral, Adopt-a-Family Program, Adopt-a-Pet, Lodging, Crisis
Counseling Support,
Randolph AFB TX – Family Assistance Center (210)652-5321 MSgt Todd Remington
(Family Readiness NCO)
Financial Assistance, Crisis Counseling Support, Family Assistance, Referral, Lodging,
Adopt-a-Family Program
**Financial assistance is available via Air Force Aid to retirees. In order to apply,
contact the Family Support Center at any active Air Force, Army or Navy Installation.**
Other Agencies
FEMA (800)621-3362 (www.fema.gov)
American Red Cross (877)568-3317 (www.redcross.org)
Salvation Army (888)363-2769 (www.salvationarmyusa.org)
New Orleans Public Schools Crisis Hotline (877)771-5800 (www.alvarezandmarsal.com)
Mississippi Department of Education Response Help Desk (601) 359-3764
(http://www.mde.k12.ms.us/)
Air Force Aid Society, 703-607-3073 (http://www.afas.org).
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EXTRACURRICULAR CHAPTER 4—RADIO
CONTROLLED AND FLYING MODEL AIRCRAFT
PROGRAM
Foreword
The purpose of this guide is to provide guidance to HQ AFJROTC, Area Administrators,
and AFJROTC units regarding the administration of a Radio Controlled Aircraft or
Flying Model Aircraft program. Where appropriate, this guidebook includes discussion
of the benefits of establishing an Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA) Charter Club
and the AMA Safety Code.
This guidebook includes information and supplies needed to start a program, discusses
suggested airfield requirements in detail and provides helpful administrative guidelines
and practices related to training. In general, this guide includes chapters about facilities
and supplies; types of R/C aircraft, engines and radios; training and information on the
Academy of Model Aeronautics.
Section 1
GETTING STARTED
1.1. Facilities
1.1.1. The facilities in which your unit stores its Radio Controlled (R/C) Aircraft
and supplies must be secure and large enough to store airplanes with minimal risk
of damage when retrieving them.
1.1.2. Dedicate a supply cabinet to keep all items safe, secure, and organized.
1.2. Supplies
1.2.1. When starting your program, the following supplies are needed:
Field Box to conveniently carry the following supplies to the field. A
locally obtained toolbox will work best
Screwdrivers (Phillips head and standard)
Allen Wrenches
4-Way Wrench
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Radio Controller
Spare Props/Spinners
Spare Tires
Rubber Bands
Safety Goggles
Superglue (epoxies recommended) for repairs
Monocot (for repairs)
Balsa Wood (for repairs)
1.2.2. Note that all of the above is a minimal supply list. Your unit will discover
what you need to keep on hand with time, including replacement parts for each of
your airplanes. These should include tails, props, nosecones/spinners, etc.
1.2.3. You should have some method of organizing small items such as screws, bolts,
nuts, etc.
1.2.4. Each month an inventory should be taken of all supplies and aircraft. Your
program should have some method of noting when supplies are used to insure that all
are being efficiently used and none are lost.
1.3. The Airfield
1.3.1. The suggested specification detailed below has been developed by
Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA) to promote improved field management
provide added margins of safety for the ever-increasing numbers of fliers
spectators. Most clubs should be able, with reasonable effort, to comply with
suggested layout for general field arrangement and conditions for sport flying.
the
and
and
this
1.3.2. The suggested specifications are not intended as mandatory requirements, and
compliance with these suggestions does not guarantee that no accident will occur.
Your unit should design their flying sites based not only on the suggested
specifications below, but also upon the individual characteristics of the flying site and
the type of R/C activity anticipated.
1.3.3. TAXI AREA: No landings or takeoffs from this area. This area provides
additional open space between pilots and aircraft during times when most out of
control accidents happen, and allows taxi room in front of other pilots reducing the
chance of other radio frequencies disturbing taxiing aircraft.
1.3.4. BARRIER: Designed to stop taxiing models from veering into pilot’s and/or
spectator’s areas (plastic or chain link fencing, hay bales, shrubbery, etc.).
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1.3.5. PILOT LINE: Set back from runway edge to keep pilots away from aircraft.
1.3.6. PERSONNEL SIDE OF FLIGHT AREA:
LOCATIONS
DISTANCE FACTOR
Runway edge is the basic
Pilot line a minimum of
Pit line a minimum of
Spectator line a minimum of
Parking lot a minimum of
Reference line or 0
25 feet from reference
45 feet from reference
65 feet from reference
80 feet from reference
1.3.6.1. SAFETY ZONE: An additional 250 feet safety zone, added to the
OVERFLY AREA, is desirable if any major roads, buildings, or personal
activities are in the general area.
Fig. 1 Safety Zone
1.3.7. FLIGHT SECTOR: Most flying is contained within 1,000 feet of either end
from field center reference point and 500 feet in front of reference point. At least
1,000 feet left and right and 500 feet in front of the pilot must be used to cover the
180 degree sweep of the flying side of the reference line Flight area to clear a
potential hazard. Field center reference point is located in Fig. 1, but essentially is
the edge of the runway at the center of the field.
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Fig. 2 Flight Sector
1.3.8. SIGNS—SUGGESTED MINIMUM POSTING REQUIREMENTS FOR
PUBLIC NOTICE:
Flying Site
Field Rules
Current AMA Safety Code
“No spectators beyond this point without escort”
Park Area (signs at boundaries)
Warning Sign
Section 2
R/C AIRCRAFT
2.1. Types
2.1.1. As your program progresses you will become knowledgeable on all types of
radio controlled model aircraft.
2.1.2. All radio controlled aircraft you buy can be divided into generally two
categories:
2.1.2.1. ARF: Almost Ready to Fly -- A kit which is mostly preassembled, usually requiring installation of a few parts, engine, and radio
gear. ARF kits are generally cheaper than RTF kits.
2.1.2.2. RTF: Ready to Fly – A kit which is assembled and “ready to fly”
out of the box.
2.1.3. You may also divide R/C aircraft into these categories:
2.1.3.1. Trainer - A model designed to be inherently stable and fly at low
speeds, to give first-time modelers time to think and react as they learn to
fly. These are the airplanes your program should purchase FIRST!
2.1.3.2. Sport - Generally, this is a model designed to fly acrobatically.
Sport may describe an aircraft that is a scale, flying model of an actual
airplane or an airplane designed to fly at high-speeds. A good sport
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airplane can fly “3D,” which is a term describing a type of flight pattern,
which is characterized by the performance of very specialized aerobatic
maneuvers below the model's normal stall speed. Examples include
torque rolls, 'walk in the park', harriers, hangers, etc.
2.1.3.3. Park Flyer -- A park flyer is any electric model airplane that can
be flown in a small area such as a football stadium, parking lot, or a park.
2.1.3.4. Gliders and Sailplanes -- Gliders are slow, elegant planes that do
not usually have a power plant (motor). They are launched with a bungee
cord catapult, winches, aero tow, towing aloft using a second powered
aircraft and even hand launched (like a javelin). The newer "discus" style
of wingtip hand-launching has largely supplanted the earlier "javelin"
launch. As most gliders are unpowered, flight must be sustained through
exploitation of the natural wind in the environment. A hill or slope will
often produce updrafts of air which can sustain the flight of a glider. This
is called slope soaring. When piloted skillfully, RC gliders can remain
airborne for as long as the updraft prevails. Another means of attaining
height in a glider is exploitation of thermals, which are bubbles or
columns of warm rising air created by hot spots on the ground.
Lift is obtained by the forward movement of the wings through the air, but
a glider can also gain height by flying through air that is rising faster than
the aircraft is sinking. Sailplanes are flown using available thermal lift.
As thermals can only be indirectly observed through the reaction of the
aircraft to the invisible rising air currents, pilots find sailplane flying
challenging yet rewarding. Wind traveling over a sharp peek of a hill or
mountain leaves a vortex on the back side. Flying in the vortex is tricky
and the pilot needs to use extreme care for safety, speeds of over 200mph
are not oncoming.
2.1.4. Undercarriages –There are two types of undercarriages.
2.1.4.1. Nose wheel (or tricycle) gears are the most common types of
undercarriages on R/C trainer aircraft. Nose wheel airplanes have a wheel
in front of the main landing gear, usually under the nose.
2.1.4.2. Tail wheel (or conventional) airplanes have a third wheel under
the tail.
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2.1.4.3. Some airplanes have retractable undercarriages, which use a
retract servo to pull the landing gear up into the airplane in flight for
reduced drag and better performance. Retractable may be tricycle gear, or
conventional gear. Most retractable gear aircraft are sport airplanes.
2.2. Engines
2.2.1. Your airplane may be powered by two types of engines; an electric or gas.
2.2.2. Electric engines are powered by battery packs that can be recharged.
2.2.2.1. Brushed motors are the most common and least expensive form of
electric motor. Brushes are a part of electric motors that convey current to
the rotating element (the armature) and mechanically affect the switching
on and off of these magnets, which, in turn, cause the armature to rotate.
2.2.2.2. Brushless motors are a form of electric motor which do not
contain brushes. They are favored because of their greater power-toweight ratio, longevity, and higher efficiency than electric motors that
have brushes.
2.2.3. Gas engines propel your airplane with a special methanol/nitromethane/
lubricant fuel.
2.2.3.1. Gas engines are separated by the size of their case. The larger the
case, the more power produced from the engine. Most trainers you buy
will either be a .40 or a .60, but there is a wide range of sizes you can buy.
2.3. Radios
2.3.1. Radios – control R/C airplanes. Beware some airplanes require the radios
to be installed separately.
2.3.2. R/C airplane control surfaces are moved with servos.
2.3.2.1. Servo output arms are a removable arm or wheel which bolts to the
output shaft of a servo and connects to the pushrod.
2.3.1.2. The pushrod is connected to a control surface and connects it to the
servo to move it.
2.3.3. When flying around multiple R/C’s, such as at a local flying club, you
should be careful to make sure there is not another airplane with the same
frequency in range. The frequency your airplane flies with can be changed easily
by replacing the chip in the receiver (Rx) and chip in the back of the transmitter (Tx).
147
If you fly in a configuration in which frequency mixing is more likely, then it is a
good idea to carry along two or more alternative frequencies.
2.3.4. Each of the control surfaces of an RC airplane is controlled on the same
frequency, but on different channels. One channel controls each of the control
surfaces.
2.3.4.1. A two channel airplane is controlled by throttle and rudder.
2.3.4.2. A three channel airplane is controlled by elevator, rudder and throttle.
Airplanes with retractable landing gears may fly like this because the retract servo
takes the place of the aileron servo.
2.3.4.3. Four channel airplanes are the most controllable with elevator, aileron,
rudder and throttle. These are the highest quality radio systems.
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Section 3
TRAINING
3.1. Training
3.1.1. Training should be taken very seriously. RC airplanes can be dangerous and
expensive to repair. A typical training program consists of a five-day academic
course followed by simulator time and actual flight training. Training should be
conducted by someone with experience. It is recommended that you contact a “local
flying club” for assistance.
3.1.2. If developing your own academic syllabus, the AFJROTC Science of Flight
Textbook is a good place to start.
3.2. Academic Syllabus (Suggested 6-Week Program of Instruction for Flying Models)
Week
No.
Classroom/Period/Activities
Laboratory Period/Activities
1
a. Introduce basic modeling glossary
b. Discuss materials used in
construction of aerospace models.
c. Explain the availability of
commercial (flying and static) kits
and scratch building of aerospace
models
d. Present the aerospace model Safety
Code
e. Explain techniques of construction of
each major section of an aerospace
model (wings, tails, fuselage,
covering, and radio installation)
f. Explain model aerodynamics and
stability
g. Explain and discuss FAA, FCC, and
local regulations pertaining to model
flight
h. Explain motor operation (batteries,
glow plugs, etc.)
i. Explain paints, finishes suitable for
models being constructed
j. Decide which type of launching
device will be used for unit’s first
activity
a. Demonstrate the tools and materials
needed to construct a simple trainer
b. Demonstrate types of engines and
power sources available (electric,
glow diesel, gasoline, thermal,
rubber)
c. Provide lists of tools and materials
needed to construct a trainer-type
aerospace model
Begin construction of aerospace models
(all cadets use the same basic plan)
2
3
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Continue construction of models
4
Explain basic techniques of flying
Continue construction of models
5
a. Plan flying activity
b. Make assignments (range officers,
special details, etc.)
c. Review safety code
Unit model flight training
a. Complete models
b. Inspect completed models
6
3.3. Simulator Training
3.3.1. Your unit should invest in a R/C simulator. Simulators are very good to
familiarize yourself with the R/C controls and the notion of flying an airplane from
the ground. We recommend hooking the simulator computer up to a projector and
viewing the simulator on a larger screen to get the full effect of R/C flying. If nothing
else, R/C simulators improve hand-eye coordination.
3.3.2. There is a great selection of simulators on the market. When selecting a
simulator make sure that you can at least change wind speed and direction and add
fog or change visibility. Take full advantage of the simulator. The RealFlight G3 RC
Simulator with Interlink MD2 gives you real world flying experiences from your PC.
The program includes over 41 aircraft including 3D aerobats, sailplanes, electric park
flyers and more. There are 10 new flying sites with over 5,000 square miles to
explore. The 3D programming realistically recreates the experience of flying an RC
model at the flying field.
Total 480 minutes (8 hours) Simulator Time
60 Minutes in 0 wind environment
210 Minutes in 5 knot winds:
105 minutes good visibility
Up wind takeoffs/landings
Downwind takeoffs/landings
Crosswind takeoffs/landings
Engine-out practice
105 minutes low visibility
Up wind takeoffs/landings
Downwind takeoffs/landings
150
Crosswind takeoffs/landings
Engine-out practice
210 Minutes in 10 knot winds:
105 minutes good visibility
Up wind takeoffs/landings
Downwind takeoffs/landings
Crosswind takeoffs/landings
Engine-out Practice
105 minutes low visibility
Up wind takeoffs/landings
Downwind takeoffs/landings
Crosswind takeoffs/landings
Engine-out practice
3.4. Flight Training
3.4.1. This aspect of training is done through actual flying. This training should be
conducted by an experienced R/C pilot. This is the final stage to insure that the
student is ready to solo.
3.4.2. A solo flight is defined as a flight in which one individual takes off, flies, and
lands the aircraft for the entire duration of the flight.
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Section 4
THE ACADEMY OF MODEL AERONAUTICS
4.1. The Academy of Model Aeronautics
4.1.1. The Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA) is a self supporting, non-profit
organization whose purpose is to promote development of model aviation as a
recognized sport and worthwhile recreation activity.
4.1.2. AMA is the chartering organization for more than 2,500 model airplane clubs
across the country. AMA offers its chartered clubs official contest sanction,
insurance, and assistance in getting and keeping flying sites.
4.1.3. AMA is an associate member of the National Aeronautic Association (NAA).
Through NAA, AMA is recognized by the Federation Aeronautique Internationale
(FAI), the world governing body of all aviation activity, as the only organization
which may direct US participation in international aeromodeling activities.
4.2. Benefits of a Charter Club
4.2.1. Benefits of an AMA charter club include frequency monitoring and sound
measuring equipment, national newsletter for clubs, field safety and frequency
posters, club officer recognition, introductory pilot program and primary site owner
insurance. Most importantly, AMA provides $2,500,000 per occurrence of general
liability coverage to members, clubs and site owners.
4.3. Starting an AMA Charter Club
4.3.1. Your first step in starting an AMA charter club is to go to AMA’s website
(http://www.modelaircraft.org/) and download the most recent AMA Club Charter
Kit.
4.3.2. Print this packet out and fill out the Club Chartering Remittance Sheet, Club
Officers Sheet, and the club officer information sheet.
4.3.3. There must be five club officers; three of them must be over 19 years of age. In
addition, all officers MUST be current AMA members. You might have to sign your
future club officers up for AMA beforehand.
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4.4. AMA Safety Code
4.4.1. General
4.4.1.1. A model aircraft shall be defined as a non-human-carrying device capable
of sustained flight in the atmosphere. It shall not exceed limitations established in
this code and is intended to be used exclusively for recreational or competition
activity.
4.4.1.2. The maximum takeoff weight of a model aircraft, including fuel, is 55
pounds, except for those flown under the AMA Experimental Aircraft Rules.
4.4.1.3. AMA members will abide by this Safety Code and all rules established
for the flying site. Members will not willfully fly their model aircraft in a reckless
and/or dangerous manner.
4.4.1.4. AMA members will not fly their model aircraft in sanctioned events, air
shows, or model demonstrations until it has been proven airworthy.
4.4.1.5. AMA members will not fly their model aircraft higher than approximately
400 feet above ground level, when within three (3) miles of an airport without
notifying the airport operator. AMA members will yield the right-of-way and
avoid flying in the proximity of full-scale aircraft, utilizing a spotter when
appropriate.
4.4.1.6. AMA members will not fly any model aircraft unless it is identified with
their name and address, or AMA number, inside or affixed to the outside of the
model aircraft. This does not apply to model aircraft flown indoors.
4.4.1.7. AMA members will not operate model aircraft with metal-blade
propellers or with gaseous boosts (other than air), nor will they operate model
aircraft with fuels containing tetranitromethane or hydrazine.
4.4.1.8. AMA members will not operate model aircraft carrying pyrotechnic
devices which explode, burn, or propel a projectile of any kind. Exceptions
include Free Flight fuses or devices that burn producing smoke and are securely
attached to the model aircraft during flight. Rocket motors up to a G-series size
may be used, provided they remain firmly attached to the model aircraft during
flight. Model rockets may be flown in accordance with the National Model
Rocketry Safety Code; however, they may not be launched from model aircraft.
Officially designated AMA Air Show Teams (AST) are authorized to use devices
and practices as defined within the Air Show Advisory Committee Document.
4.4.1.9. AMA members will not operate their model aircraft while under the
influence of alcohol or within eight (8) hours of having consumed alcohol.
153
4.4.1.10. AMA members will not operate their model aircraft while using any
drug which could adversely affect their ability to safely control their model
aircraft.
4.4.1.11. Children under six (6) years old are only allowed on a flight line or in a
flight area as a pilot while under flight instruction.
4.4.1.12. When and where required by rule, helmets must be properly worn and
fastened. They must be OSHA, DOT, ANSI, SNELL or NOCSAE approved or
comply with comparable standards.
4.4.2. Radio Control
4.4.2.1. AMA members will have completed a successful radio equipment
ground-range check before the first flight of a new or repaired model aircraft.
4.4.2.2. AMA members will not fly any model aircraft in the presence of
spectators until they become a proficient flier, unless assisted by an experienced
pilot.
4.4.2.3. At all flying sites a straight or curved flight line must be established, in
front of which all flying takes place. Only personnel associated with flying the
model aircraft are allowed at or in front of the flight line. In the case of air shows,
demonstrations, or competitions, straight lines must be established. An area away
from the flight line must be maintained for spectators. Intentional flying behind
the flight line is prohibited.
4.4.2.4. AMA members will operate their model aircraft using only radio-control
frequencies currently allowed by the Federal Communications Commission
(FCC). Only individuals properly licensed by the FCC are authorized to operate
equipment on Amateur Band frequencies.
4.4.2.5. AMA members will not knowingly operate their model aircraft within
three (3) miles of any preexisting flying site without a frequency-management
agreement. A frequency-management agreement may be an allocation of
frequencies for each site, a day-use agreement between sites, or testing which
determines that no interference exists. A frequency-management agreement may
exist between two or more AMA chartered clubs, AMA clubs and individual
AMA members, or individual AMA members.
Frequency-management
agreements, including an interference test report if the agreement indicates no
interference exists, will be signed by all parties and copies provided to AMA
Headquarters.
4.4.2.6. With the exception of events flown under official AMA Competition
Regulations rules, after launch, no powered model may be flown outdoors closer
154
than 25 feet to any individual, except for the pilots and helpers located at the
flight line.
4.4.2.7. Under no circumstances may a pilot or other person touch a model
aircraft in flight while it is still under power, except to divert it from striking an
individual.
4.4.2.8. Radio-controlled night flying is limited to low-performance model
aircraft (less than 100 mph). The model aircraft must be equipped with a lighting
system which clearly defines the aircraft's altitude and direction at all times.
4.4.2.9. The operator of a radio-controlled model aircraft shall control it during
the entire flight, maintaining visual contact without enhancement other than by
corrective lenses that are prescribed for the pilot. No model aircraft shall be
equipped with devices which allow it to be flown to a selected location which is
beyond the visual range of the pilot.
4.4.3. Free Flight
4.4.3.1. AMA members will not launch their model aircraft unless they are at least
100 feet downwind of spectators and automobile parking.
4.4.3.2. AMA members will not fly their model aircraft unless the launch area is
clear of all individuals except mechanic, officials, and other fliers.
4.4.3.3. AMA members will use an effective device to extinguish any fuse on the
model aircraft after the fuse has completed its function.
4.4.4. Control Line
4.4.4.1. AMA members will subject their complete control system (including the
safety thong where applicable) to an inspection and pull test prior to flying. The
pull test will be in accordance with the current Competition Regulations for the
applicable model aircraft category. Model aircraft not fitting a specific category
shall use those pull-test requirements as indicated for Control Line Precision
Aerobatics.
4.4.4.2. AMA members will ensure that their flying area is clear of all utility
wires or poles and they will not fly a model aircraft closer than 50 feet to any
above-ground electric utility lines.
4.4.4.3. AMA members will ensure that their flying area is clear of all
nonessential participants and spectators before permitting their engine to be
started.
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Attachment EC4-1
FLYING MODEL OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS (OPR)
OPR 1. Construct, fly, and evaluate at least one model under the supervision of an
AMA-qualified flight instructor.
OPR 2. Make at least three solo flights under the supervision of an AMA-qualified flight
instructor.
OPR 3. Demonstrate ability to land and take off from both directions.
OPR 4. Prepare a diagram of a typical aerospace flying model site. (Type of site may
depend on unit orientation, i.e., U/C, R/C, or glider.) This diagram may be as elaborate
as desired, but must include a minimum of: flight line, runway, spectator area, pits,
frequency requirements, and total land area requirements.
OPR 5. Construct, fly, and evaluate at least one model suitable for competition in one of
the following categories: pattern, semi-scale (sometimes called stand-off scale), or scale.
Consult the AMA Competition Rule Book for complete details.
OPR 6. Submit for evaluation a journal of all activities completed in the aerospace flying
model program. The journal must indicate completion of all operational performance
requirements for each flight.
Attachment EC4-2
FLYING MODEL LEADERHIP PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS (LPR)
LPR 1. Demonstrate a knowledge of the AFJROTC aerospace flying model program and
its concepts and techniques by satisfactorily implementing, administering, supervising,
and evaluating flying model activities.
LPR 2. Demonstrate a knowledge of the organization of AFJROTC flying model
program activities, including the personnel required, the skills necessary, and the job
responsibilities of cadets and adult supervisors in individual, group, and competitive
flying activities.
LPR 3. Demonstrate a knowledge of the physical facilities required for all flying model
operational activities to include: facilities for storage, handling, flying, and building
flying models, flying and safety precautions, and spectators' protection.
LPR 4. Demonstrate the leadership skills necessary to conduct an individual test, group
test, and AMA-sanctioned aerospace flying model competitive meet or contest.
LPR 5. Serve successfully as the safety officer and in a minimum of three of the
remaining nine positions listed in paragraph 2.4.2.6.1. through 2.4.2.6.7.
LPR 6. Pass an oral examination covering the topics of aerospace flying model
techniques, procedures, operations, and safety precautions and procedures.
156
Attachment EC4-3
PROGRAM GUIDELINES
1. Units will conduct the static and flying model programs according to the provisions of
this Guide and the following guidelines:
Contest rules and safety regulations of the National Aeronautics Association
(NAA) and the Federation Aeronautique Internationale (FAI)
Federal Aviation Regulations, Part 101, Manned Balloons, Kits, and Unmanned
Rockets
Federal Communications Commission, Part 95, Citizens Radio Service
Official AMA Safety Code
AMA Safety Recommendations
State and local governments
2. Cadets will keep a record of their modeling activities to include aircraft flown on an
individual, group, or competitive basis. Flight records will include duration of flight,
fuel, repairs (if any), type of aircraft, and whether the operation is under supervision of a
qualified flight instructor. Cadets should be prepared to provide flight and modelbuilding information to the SASI.
3. Units conducting a model aerospace program are encouraged to establish an AMAchartered organization or have interested cadets apply for membership in local AMA
organizations. AFJROTC cadets may then enter competitive meets with other AMA
organizations on local, area, regional, and national levels. Applications for membership
or establishment of an AMA organization may be obtained from the Academy of Model
Aeronautics.
4. Units desiring to purchase American Modeling Association Wings can contact AMA
Wings, 5151 E Memorial Drive, Attn: Supply & SVC (Item #2088), Muncie IN 47302 or
phone 1-800-435-9262. The web site is http:www.modelaircraft.org.
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EXTRACURRICULAR CHAPTER 5—AFJROTC
MARKSMANSHIP PROGRAM GUIDANCE
Foreword
AFJROTC units are authorized to conduct training in marksmanship and the safe
handling of an air rifle. Participation in this program is optional at the discretion of the
school authorities. This guide provides an outline for conducting a marksmanship
program in your unit.
Marksmanship Program Guidance
General
AFJROTC units are authorized to conduct training in marksmanship and the safe
handling of an air rifle. Participation in this program is optional at the discretion of the
school authorities. Only .177 caliber air rifles are authorized for marksmanship training
and competition in the AFJROTC program. Details regarding allowance, procurement,
inventory, security, and repair of air rifles are contained in the AFJROTC Operating
Instruction.
Range Safety
a. All individuals using firing range facilities will receive training on rules, safety
precautions, and commands for the firing range. This training is to be documented in
the cadet’s training record and maintained for the period the cadet is enrolled.
b. The SASI or ASI will be designated as the Range Officer, regardless of rank or
employment position, and is the senior authority in control of the range during live
firing operations.
c. The down range perimeter of the range shall contain any pellet that misses a trap
or a backstop. Doors/hatches shall be locked and marked with a warning to prevent
down range entry to the range. Pellet traps/backstops shall be designed to stop all
pellets and prevent their return to the firing line.
d. HQ AFJROTC strongly recommends using non-lead pellets.
e. The safe and proper handling of all used pellets is to be done in accordance with
local school district procedures for the storage and disposal of hazardous waste.
SASI’s are to maintain documentation of the methods used.
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Shooter Safety Rules
Competitive shooting has one of the best safety records of any organized sport. This is
because each shooter is expected to know and practice the safety rules and because range
safety is strictly enforced. The following safety rules are strictly enforced on all properly
managed ranges:
a. Treat every air rifle as if it were loaded.
b. Follow all commands given by the range safety officer.
c. Be aware of where the muzzle is pointed at all times. Keep the muzzle of the air
rifle pointed in a safe direction; this is usually up toward the ceiling or downrange
toward the target. Have muzzle awareness at all times. Only point the air rifle at
targets at which you intend to fire.
d. Load/Unload the air rifle only when on the firing line and only when authorized
by the Range Officer.
e. Be sure that the bolt is open and to the rear when actually firing a shot.
f. Keep your finger straight and off the trigger until you are ready to fire in your
firing position.
g. Never handle a rifle at the firing line when someone is down range.
h. When given the command “cease fire,” or “stop,” immediately open the bolt of
your rifle and place the rifle on your shooting mat so that the open bolt is visible.
Inform the Range Officer in the event a rifle is loaded after the command “cease fire,”
or “stop”.
i. No one may go down range until authorized by the Range officer. Prior to going
down range, all rifles must be unloaded and the bolts open.
j. Insert a clear barrel indicator (CBI) when the air rifle is not in use and when
directed by the Range Officer to insert or remove the CBI.
k. Eye protection is required. Hearing protection is recommended.
l. Think about what you are doing and be careful. Think and practice safety at all
times.
m. Wash hands after handling pellets.
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n. Never horseplay in or near the range. Treat the air rifles as weapons that are
capable of causing serious bodily harm.
AFJROTC Air Rifle Postal Competition
The AFJROTC Air Rifle Postal Competition is held to promote training, good
sportsmanship, and a high standard of performance in the safe use of an air rifle.
Competition will be conducted in the Sporter Air Rifle and Precision Air Rifle divisions,
as governed by the current National Standard Three-Position Air Rifle Rules. All rules
referenced herein may be found in the applicable rulebook. It is the responsibility of each
participating unit to have a current copy of the rules and to comply with all applicable
provisions. Copies of the CMP rulebook are posted on WINGS.
Note: The ten (10) highest scoring Sporter teams/individuals and the five (5) highest
scoring Precision teams/individuals will qualify to participate in the AFJROTC Air
Rifle Competition.
a. Eligibility. All AFJROTC cadets are eligible to participate in the postal
competition. This is a team match, each team consisting of four shooting members.
No competitor may be a member of more than one team.
b. Equipment. Sporter air rifles include the following: Daisy Model M853/953/753
(pneumatic), Daisy M887/M888 (CO2), Daisy XSV 40 Valiant (compressed air),
Crosman M2000 (CO2) or equivalent rifle that conforms to the
specifications/restrictions of the National Standard Three-Position Rules may be used.
Precision air rifles include any type of .177 caliber (4.5mm) pneumatic, spring air,
compressed air, or CO2 rifle that conforms to the specifications/restrictions of the
National Standard Three-Position Rules may be used. Any modifications to a Sporter
or Precision air rifle must be in accordance with the current edition of the National
Standard Three-Position Air Rifle Rules.
c. Targets. The targets used for the AFJROTC Air Rifle Postal Competition will be
the 12-bull, National Three-Position Air Rifle Council 10 Meter Air Rifle target. The
targets will be provided by the Area Manager for the competition.
d. Range Specifications. In addition to ensuring that a safe marksmanship
environment is established and maintained, SASI’s must establish the following
minimum standards:
(1)
The distance from the firing line is 10 meters (33 feet.)
(2)
Target heights (measured from the center of the sighting targets); prone
19.7in. +4 in., standing 55 in. +2 in., kneeling 31.5 in. +4 in.
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e. Course of Fire and Time Limits. The course of fire will be according to the
National Standard Three-Position rules shown below.
National Standard Three-Position, Individual Event (3x10)
10 shots in each position: prone, standing, and kneeling (in that order)
Air rifle targets for 10 meters
Preparation period of 10 minutes
Shooting time, including sight shots, is 15 minutes prone, 20 minutes standing,
and 15 minutes kneeling with a 5-minute change-over period between positions.
Dry firing is allowed during the preparation period and during the competition.
f. Competition Regulations and Range Operation. Once firing has started, the match
must be completed following the National Standard Three-Position Rules and Time
Schedule. There are no provisions for re-firing the match. An incomplete match will
be considered a non-entry in the competition.
g. Range Controls and Commands. All National Three-Position Rules for range
control and commands apply.
h. Team Officer’s Duties and Positions. Designation of team captains and coaches
by the SASI is encouraged. If so designated, they will perform their duties following
the National Three-Position Air Rifle Rules.
i. Statistical Office Operation, Scoring, and Decision of Ties. Targets shall not be
scored or plugged by anyone other than the scoring agent. Targets that have been
plugged prior to receipt by the designated scoring agent will be disqualified.
j. Competitor’s Duties and Responsibilities. All rules apply except those regarding
age eligibility and scoring.
AFJROTC Air Rifle Competition
Units qualifying for AFJROTC Air Rifle Competition (shoulder-to-shoulder) will be
notified immediately with information to participate in the shoulder-to-shoulder
championship.
Note: The three (3) highest Sporter teams/individuals and three (3) highest Precision
teams/individuals will qualify to represent AFJROTC in the Civilian Marksmanship
Program JROTC National Competition.
Awards
The first, second, and third place teams in the Sporter and Precision divisions will be
awarded a plaque, and each team member will be awarded a medal. Individual medals of
gold, silver, and bronze will be awarded to the top three shooters (total score) in both
divisions.
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OFFICIAL AFJROTC POSTAL SCORE SHEET REPORT
Name of School
________________________________________ UIC _________
Area ____
Team Name ______________________________________
Name of Postal: AFJROTC NATIONAL AIR RIFLE POSTAL COMPETITION
Sporter: ( )
Team: ( )
Precision: ( )
Individual: ( )
Date Match Fired: ____________
Range Officer Name: ______________________________
NAME OF SHOOTER
AGE
TARGET#
PRONE
STANDING
KNEELING
TEAM TOTAL
CHECK RIFLES USED:
Sporter Division
Daisy 753 (pneumatic) ____
Daisy 853 (pneumatic) ____
Daisy 953 (pneumatic) ____
Daisy M888 (CO2): ____
Daisy XS 40 (comp air) ___
Crosman M2000 (CO2): ___
Other: _________________________
(list make & model)
Precision Division
(list make and model)
INSTRUCTIONS:
1. Please print name and age of competitor and their assigned target number.
2. Do not put any scores on this sheet.
3. Keep a copy of the report sheet for your records and send the original with the targets to the
Area Manager by traceable means to arrive no later than 18 December.
4. Witness certification that targets were fired within the guidelines of the match program.
____________________________
Witness signature
____________________________
Witness phone #
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TOTAL
MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING
BETWEEN
AF JROTC UNIT (AA-####)
AND
XXXXXXX HIGH SCHOOL
SUBJECT: Memorandum of Understanding between Air Force Junior ROTC
(AFJROTC) unit AA-#### and XXXXXX High School
1. The purpose of this memorandum is to document an understanding between the
parties involved. Parties include AFJROTC Unit AA-#### and XXXXX High School.
2. A partnership between the parties mutually supports the mission and goals of each
organization and will provide additional resources to accomplish training events without
additional liability concerns. Participation in any Civilian Marksmanship Program
(CMP) sanctioned event by an AFJROTC cadet requires signed parental release of
liability forms. Additionally, parental consent forms are required for ALL participants.
Both signed parental consent forms and parental release forms must be completed and
submitted prior to participation in the event. It is understood that HQ AFJROTC will
initially supply funds to purchase air rifles, goggles, shooting mats, backstops, and pellet
traps; sustainment costs will be the responsibility of Unit AA-####.
3. XXXX High School will create opportunities for cadets to participate in
marksmanship activities in conjunction with the AFJROTC curriculum.
4. AFJROTC Instructors will support marksmanship activities to include classroom
instruction and participation in marksmanship training involving firing on ranges.
5. The following controls will be established with regards to the rifle range:
a. Use (defined locally)
b. Access Control (defined locally, but must, at a minimum, comply with SOP
discussing two lock minimum)
c. Maintenance of the Range (defined locally)
d. Hours the range may be used (defined locally)
e. Caliber of ammunition: .177 pellet
f. Types of rifles to be used: Daisy Model M853CM
g. Maintenance responsibilities: (defined locally)
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EXTRACURRICULAR CHAPTER 6—AFJROTC
AEROSPACE STATIC MODEL PROGRAM
Foreword
Static Modeling is the designing and/or building of small model rockets or planes. This
chapter provides a brief introduction to the AFJROTC Aerospace Static Model Program.
It provides a suggested program of instruction as well as the OPRs and LPRs for a static
model program. A static model program can provide an exciting introduction for cadets
to concepts of aerospace engineering and design and can motivate cadets to attain a
greater knowledge of aerospace studies and arouse interest in aerospace careers.
STATIC MODEL PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS (OPR)
OPR 1. Construct, provide appropriate documentation, evaluate, and enter into
competition at least one aerospace static model.
OPR 2. Document the ability to procure appropriate documentation relating to one
aerospace vehicle, which may include photographs, three-view drawings, and color
sources.
OPR 3. Prepare a diagram of a typical aerospace static model meet, including judging
criteria and spectator viewing areas.
OPR 4. Submit for evaluation a journal of all activities completed in the aerospace static
model program. The journal must indicate completion of all operational performance
requirements.
LEADERSHIP PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS (LPR)
LPR 1. Demonstrate a knowledge of the AFJROTC aerospace static model program and
its concepts and techniques by satisfactorily implementing, administering, supervising,
and evaluating static model activities.
LPR 2. Demonstrate a knowledge of the organization of AFJROTC static model program
activities, including the personnel required, the skills necessary, and the job
responsibilities of cadets and adult supervisors in individual, group, and competitive
activities.
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LPR 3. Demonstrate the leadership skills necessary to conduct an individual test, group
test, and International Plastic Modelers’ Society (IPMS)-sanctioned aerospace static
model competitive meet or contest. Address for IPMS is 5151 E Memorial Drive,
Muncie IN 47302 or phone 317-289-2436.
LPR 4. Pass an oral examination covering the topics of aerospace static model
techniques, procedures, operations, and safety precautions.
SUGGESTED 6-WEEK PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION FOR STATIC MODELS
Week
Classroom/Period/Activities
Laboratory Period/Activities
1
a. Introduce
basic
modeling
glossary
b. Discuss materials used in
construction of aerospace models
c. Explain the availability of
commercial kits and scratch
building of aerospace model
Explain techniques of construction of
each major section of an aerospace
model (wings, tails, fuselage)
a. Demonstrate the
materials needed to
simple model
b. Provide lists of
materials needed to
basic model
2
3
4
5
6
tools and
construct a
tools and
construct a
Begin construction of aerospace
models (all cadets use the same
basic plan)
a.
Explain paints, finishes, and Continue construction of models
coverings suitable for models
being constructed
b.
Explain display devices suitable
for models being constructed.
c. Decide which type of display
device will be used for unit’s first
activity
Explain
basic
techniques
of Continue construction of models
weathering
a. Plan static competition activity
b. Review competitive rules
Construct model flight training
a. Complete models
b. Inspect completed models
ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION
The International Plastic Modelers’ Society (IPMS) provides a wealth of information on
scale static modeling on their website: http://www.ipmsusa.org/
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EXTRACURRICULAR CHAPTER 7—AFJROTC AIR
FORCE WEATHER AGENCY PROGRAM
Foreword
This section establishes weather education activities sponsored by the Headquarters
USAF Directorate of Weather, as an authorized activity in the Air Force Junior ROTC
program. The activities presented in the Air Force Weather Agency Program (AFWA)
should supplement and enrich the aerospace education now presented in Aerospace
Science courses, and should enhance the cadets’ knowledge and increase their
appreciation for the important role weather plays in the operational world of aviation and
safety. This chapter also details the eligibility and awarding of the Losey Award.
AIR FORCE JROTC-AIR FORCE WEATHER AGENCY PROGRAM
PROGRAM PURPOSE AND GOALS
Purpose:
This section establishes weather education activities sponsored by the Headquarters
USAF Directorate of Weather, as an authorized activity in the Air Force Junior ROTC
program. Cadet activities in weather will supplement and enrich aerospace education
now presented in Aerospace Science courses. Cadets who desire to take part in weather
activities may do so as an additional supervised project. Cadets who complete this
program are eligible for the Losey Award.
The AFJROTC-AFWA Program provides a stimulating activity-based program which
introduces weather terms, elements, and concepts to AFJROTC cadets. This program
enhances the cadets’ knowledge and increases their appreciation for the important role
weather plays in the operational world of aviation and safety.
Goals:
The AFJROTC-AFWA Program for AFJROTC cadets is designed to:
Teach cadets the significance of weather as it impacts the Air Force mission and
aerospace in general.
Create a cadre of knowledgeable cadets and future citizens who have additional
training in weather data collection and dissemination to be used as a resource for
activities, especially aviation.
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Cultivate an interest in weather to enrich the total development of AFJROTC
cadets toward aerospace education.
Develop interest in aerospace careers that require a knowledge of weather or
contribute to a better aviation system.
ESTABLISHING THE AFJROTC-AFWA PROGRAM
Establish the AFJROTC-AFWA Program:
Each unit desiring a program should:
Ensure every cadet member who desires to participate in the weather program has
the opportunity.
Know where to find local weather resources to implement the program.
Maintain a list of qualified people in the local area who have volunteered to
participate in this program.
Establish a program at the unit which provides the appropriate training to fulfill
the program requirements.
Program Requirements:
The quality of the weather program depends on the availability of equipment and
qualified personnel. Having the available equipment will require cooperation between
the unit and your local resources. The quality of the personnel will determine the level of
understanding received by the participating cadets. It is imperative that we use the most
qualified volunteers available. These volunteers could be members of the Air National
Guard Weather Flights, USAF and USAFR observers or forecasters, or any professional
weather forecaster or observer from the industry. (It is important to note Air Force
Weather Agency sponsorship cannot guarantee military volunteers for the program). A
college instructor teaching in an accredited department with a program in Atmospheric
Science, Meteorology, Climatology, or Physical Geography can be a valuable resource.
A high school instructor who has participated in the American Meteorological Society’s
education efforts can also be used. The ideal situation would be a mentor or counselor
who would be available on a recurring basis.
Prerequisites for Cadet Participation:
All cadets participating in the AFJROTC-AFWA Program must have completed or be
enrolled in Aerospace Science: The Science of Flight.
167
Enrolled cadets should have completed the atmosphere and weather portion of The
Science of Flight (Unit 1) before beginning the AFJROTC-AFWA Program.
Procedures:
Follow the procedures outlined in this instruction for successful completion of this
program. The following objectives must be accomplished to meet the program
requirements.
a. Define and be able to use numerous weather vocabulary words.
b. Demonstrate the ability to gather weather information from common aviation and
weather chart data.
c. Demonstrate the ability to gather weather information from common aviation and
weather coded data.
d. Know how the atmosphere changes with altitude.
e. Know how the atmosphere changes with horizontal distance.
f. Be familiar with the information and the limitations of observing and describing the
atmosphere to aviators.
g. Know here to get weather information for aviation operations.
h. Be familiar with new technologies for obtaining weather information.
i. Know the types of weather information important to aviation operations.
j. Know where to get operational weather during all phases of aviation missions.
RESOURCES
The following material may assist cadets and supervising seniors in planning and learning
more information about weather and the weather activities mentioned above.
Surface Weather Observations, AFMAN 15-111.
Upper Air Observations, AFMAN 15-112.
Weather Radar Observations, AFMAN 15-113.
Weather Station Operations, AFM 15-125.
168
THE LOSEY AWARD
The Losey Award:
The Losey Award is given to those cadets who successfully meet the requirements of this
weather program. The award is a certificate from the Pentagon, HQ USAF Director of
Weather. Cadets should submit an application package to their Senior Aerospace Science
instructor with a cover letter (sample attached). The application package should include
copies of the products produced in accomplishing objectives d, e, and f.
Applying for the Losey Award. Cadets who complete all requirements for the Losey
Award should submit an application package certified by their project counselor to their
SASI with the cover letter (attachment). The application package should include copies
of the products produced accomplishing objectives d, e, and f. The SASI will then mail
the completed application to:
HQ AFROTC/JROS
551 East Maxwell Blvd
Maxwell AFB AL 36112-6106
REQUIREMENTS FOR LOSEY AWARD
Cadets can earn the Air Weather Service sponsored Losey Award for accomplishing the
following objectives under the instruction and observation of a trained weather
professional.
1. Be able to define and use the following words. This objective can be accomplished by
an oral quiz or a written exercise.
Advection
Contour
Air mass (tropic, polar, continental,
Convection
maritime)
Convergence
AIRMET
Density altitude
Anticyclone
Dew point
Barometer
Divergence
“Broken” sky cover
Evaporation
Ceiling
“Few” clouds
Circulation
Fog (know different causes)
Clear Air Turbulence (CAT)
Front (warm, cold, stationary, occluded)
Climate
Frost
Cloud (strato-, alto, cirro-, cumulus,
Funnel cloud
stratus)
Gust front
Condensation
Haze
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High pressure cell
Humidity
Hurricane/typhoon/cyclone
Hygrometer
Icing (rime, mixed, clear)
Indefinite ceiling
Inversion
Isobar
Isolated thunderstorms
Jet stream
Knot (NM/hour)
Lapse rate
Lightning
Low pressure cell
Microburst
Millibar
Obscured sky
“Overcast” sky cover
Precipitation (rain, snow drizzle, sleet hail,
freezing rain)
Pressure
Saturation
“Scattered” (clouds and thunderstorms)
Sea-level pressure
Shower
SIGMET
Squall line
Stability
Static discharge
Stratosphere
Sublimation
Temperature (convert scales from memory)
Thunderstorm (know the life cycle)
Tornado
Tropopause
Troposphere
Trough
Turbulence
Virga
Visibility (prevailing, runway)
Wake vortex turbulence
Weather warming
Weather watch
Wind (geostrophic and local winds)
Wind shear
2. Show your ability to gather data from weather sources in your area to include:
DUAT
Flight Service Stations
TWEB
Ensure that the weather information includes terminal observations, terminal forecasts, area
forecasts, pilot reports, SIGMETS, AIRMETS, upper-air soundings, and sources of graphical
weather information for your location.
3. Demonstrate the ability to read the following charts through an oral or written quiz developed
by the counselor:
Surface Analysis Chart
Constant Pressure Charts
Radar Summary Charts
Weather Depiction Chart
Weather Prognostic Charts
Winds Aloft Charts
4. Plot and label three (3) Skew-T Log P diagrams using data gathered from three different days.
Annotate the following information on each diagram.
170
Wet line
Dry line
Wind data
Altitudes of clouds
Altitudes of potential icing
5. Gather surface observations for your state and plot them using any charting plot available to
you. Annotate and mark the following items.
Station plots
High and low pressure centers
Weather fronts (warm, cold, stationary, occluded)
IMC and VMC locations
6. Make three (3) supervised observations and compose the coded observation. Cadets should be
familiar with the operation of instruments necessary to observe temperature, dew point, wind
speed and direction, pressure, ceiling, visibility, cloud cover, precipitation type and amount, and
weather types.
7. Be familiar with the following weather information sources:
Runway Visual Range (RVR)
ASOS
AWOS
Wind profile network
Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) and ASR-9
8. Gather the data for and deliver a pilot-oriented weather briefing for a simulated or actual flight
for a low-altitude mission in your area.
9. Know the sources to update weather information while in flight in your state.
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EXAMPLE OF AWARD APPLICATION COVER LETTER
Date
MEMORANDUM FOR AFJROTC AWARD
FROM: Cadet (name), (telephone number)
(street address)
(city, state, zip code)
SUBJECT: Completion of the AFJROTC AWARD
1. I have completed all the requirements of the AFJROTC AWARD Program as outlined in this
guide. I am now applying for the Award.
2. I am a current member of (unit number) at (school name).
3. All required endorsements are attached as well as the work required by the AFJROTC
Instruction.
(You signature)
(NAME, Rank, AFJROTC)
3 Attachments:
1. Skew-T/Log P diagrams
2. Weather observations
3. Plotted weather
Date
1st Ind, AFJROTC AWARD/ (name and organization of counselor)
MEMORANDUM FOR (Unit Number), Senior Aerospace Science Instructor
I certify that I supervised the work of Cadet (name) during the AFJROTC AWARD Program and
consider his (her) effort complete.
(counselor’s signature)
(counselor’s printed name)
(counselor’s printed title)
172
Date
2nd Ind, (unit number), Senior Aerospace Science Instructor/ (name)
MEMORANDUM FOR AFROTC/DOJO
I certify that Cadet (name) completed all requirements of the AFJROTC AWARD Program.
(SASI’s signature)
(Printed name, rank), USAF Ret.)
Senior Aerospace Science Instructor
Sent to:
MR. FRED P LEWIS DIRECTOR OF WEATHER
DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE
1480 AIR FORCE PENTAGON
WASHINGTON DC 203301480
703-614-8175
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EXTRACURRICULAR CHAPTER 8—CADET ORIENTATION
FLIGHT PROGRAM
(FY 2011 Program)
REQUIREMENTS
The goal of the cadet orientation flight program is to introduce youth to flying.
The Cadet Orientation Flight Program is designed to introduce our cadets to general aviation
through hands-on familiarization flights in single-engine aircraft. The program is open to active
AFJROTC cadets. Senior Aerospace Science Instructors (SASI) or the Aerospace Science
Instructor (ASI) should try to arrange an orientation flight as soon as possible after the cadet
joins the program. (Cadets who have graduated from the AFJROTC program (3 or 4 year cadet)
may fly during the summer after graduation if the prospect of an orientation flight was used as
an incentive to keep the cadet in AFJROTC during the cadet’s junior or senior year.) The
program is voluntary and primarily motivational and it should stimulate an interest in general
aviation and aerospace activities. At no time will cadets sustain any cost associated with this
program.
Cadet orientation flights are considered school-sponsored activities similar to any other
AFJROTC activity and must be approved by the principal according to local guidelines. *Units
can not use appropriated funds to purchase flight insurance for cadets participating in this
program. If a unit chooses to procure flight insurance for cadets, funds must come out of non
appropriated funds and are not reimbursable. Cadets must have signed parental and principal
permission. Orientation flights are flown in the local flying area and may consist of a single
sortie for one cadet or an out-and-back flight to a nearby airport with two cadets who swap front
and rear seats for the return flight.
There are two Orientation Flight Programs recognized by headquarters AFJROTC. The first is a
familiarization flight arranged for by the SASI or ASI during the academic year or summer
break. The second is a familiarization flight conducted as part of a Summer Leadership School.
Both programs will follow the guidance and requirements contained in this syllabus.
Flight
A successful orientation fight will include at least 80% of the syllabus objectives. The duration
of each flight depends upon the local conditions and the ability of both the pilot and aircraft. The
actual flight time for each flight will vary. However, all syllabus objectives can be safely
accomplished in .75 to 1.0 flight hours. Headquarters may limit or curtail unit funding if the
flights are over 1.2 hours.
Every flight will be IAW Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) Part 91, General Operating and
Flight Rules, and conform to the syllabus and be consistent with safety, aircraft/aircrew
capabilities, and available resources. Cadet orientation flights will only be conducted in daylight
and in visual meteorological conditions (VMC). Cadets may occupy either a front right or rear
seat.
174
Pilots will not perform aerobatic maneuvers as defined in FAR 91.303, formation flying, spins or
emergency procedures (unless, of course, there’s an emergency). Cadets are encouraged to
handle the flight controls except during the critical phases of the flight (like takeoff and landing
or in an emergency). Cadets may handle the flight controls when flying with an FAA
Certificated Flight Instructor (CFI) or with a retired military pilot with experience as an
instructor pilot while serving in the military. SASI/ASI pilots with no military instructor
experience or CFI rating are encouraged to earn a CFI rating before allowing cadets to handle the
flight controls.
When trying to arrange orientation flights, the SASI or ASI may consider a number of options.
Possible sources for flights include the Civil Air Patrol, Experimental Aircraft Association of
Young Eagles, Fixed-Base Operators, base aero clubs, and privately owned aircraft. Units are
authorized to use unit Operation and Maintenance (O&M) funds to procure flights for cadets.
Cadets may participate in orientation flights only under the following conditions:
- Cadets (parents/guardian if cadet is a minor) must sign a release absolving the
AFJROTC unit, school, school district, and the Air Force from liability in case of mental
or physical injury or death.
- Flights must be in a Federal Aviation Administration certified aircraft (includes
experimental aircraft with an FAA air worthiness certification).
- Aircraft must be registered, have appropriate airworthiness certificate, and contain all
instruments and equipment specified for the particular type of operation (i.e., VFR or
IFR) per FAR 91.
- If privately-owned aircrafts are used, only fuel and oil expenses may be reimbursed.
- All flights must be conducted in accordance with (IAW) FAR 91.
Pilot
It is the responsibility of the pilot to carefully brief all cadets on the proper ways to operate
around aircraft. The pilot is also responsible for following the flight syllabus. At all times,
SAFETY is the overriding concern.
The Pilot in Command (PIC) must meet the following criteria:
- Appropriate category, class, and type rating for the aircraft to be flown. (FAR 61.31,
Certification: Pilots and Certificated Flight Instructors; Current Class I, II or III FAA
Medical Certificate (FAR 61.23))
- Current flight review (FAR 61.56)
- Recent flight experience. (FAR 61.57)
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- An AFJROTC instructor who meets these requirements may serve as PIC; however,
they may not accept payment for their time even if they hold a commercial rating.
Safety
AFJROTC offers cadets a well-organized, wholesome and safe environment to experience the
fun of flying. The overarching objective with the highest priority is the safety of our members.
During all of AFJROTC’s cadet activities, parents worldwide trust our organization with the care
and protection of the most cherished treasure of their life – their child. This responsibility cannot
be taken lightly. With just a little planning, preparation and vigilance, cadets can experience a
safe, rewarding activity.
Everything we do involves risk. While risk cannot always be eliminated, it can be managed
through a process known as Operational Risk Management or ORM. ORM is a logic-based
common sense approach to detect, assess, and control risk. It is a decision-making tool that can
be used in a split-second, or employed by a group in advance of an activity. Your mother was
doing, Time-Critical ORM, when she told you not to run with scissors in your hand. A better
process to use in preparation for a cadet activity would be a Deliberate ORM. This process
usually consists of a small group of people examining the proposed facilities and activities well
ahead of the start date to identify hazards, assess the risks and decide on risk controls. These risk
controls can then be included in the operational plan and become transparent to the activity
participants.
Supervision is the key to protecting our cadets. Most cadet injuries occur when they are
unsupervised or during “horseplay.” It is vitally important to ensure sufficient numbers of senior
members are available to guide and assist cadets during all facets of an activity. Our
responsibility to the cadets and their parents is a commitment we cannot compromise. The only
way to keep cadets having fun is to keep them safe.
Reporting
The SASI or ASI is responsible for consolidating all information concerning orientation flight
activity and forwarding it to headquarters AFJROTC, Director of Operations. Be prepared to
provide the following information when making a mishap notification IAW AIM Chapter 6-2
and FAR 830:
- Name and location of flight provider
- Number of Cadets flown
- Total number of flight hours
- Amount of O&M funds expended
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In the event of a mishap, the SASI or ASI senior will notify Headquarters AFJROTC as soon a
possible following the event. During duty hours, units will contact either the Director or Deputy
Director of AFJROTC at 1-866- 235-7682, Ext. 3-7593 or 3-4645, or Commercial: (334) 9537513, or 4645, or DSN: 493-7513 or 4645. After Duty hours contact the Maxwell AFB
Command Post at Commercial (334) 953-7333 or DSN: 493-7333 and request patch to the
Director or Deputy Director AFJROTC
Be prepared to provide the following information when making a mishap notification:
- Nature of the mishap or accident – date and time
- Number and names of instructors or cadets involved
- If injuries were sustained, nature and severity
- Local authority response
- Current status update
See Attachment II for Mishap Report Checklist
ORIENTATION FLIGHTS
Each year, over 1,000 AFJROTC cadets experience the joy of flight
Familiarization flights have been a part of AFJROTC since the program’s early inception.
Because of the program’s success, headquarters will attempt to provide O&M funds to support
cadet Orientation Flights. The amount of support available each year may vary depending upon
program funding. Each spring, headquarters will ask units to report their intentions to participate
in the Flight Orientation Program. If funds are available, headquarters will distribute funds on a
fair-share basis to those units requesting support.
Orientation Flights – Preflight
The fundamental nature of flight, ground handling, and preflight inspection, before takeoff
checklist, takeoff and landing.
Syllabus #1
Estimated time: 0.5 hour
1. Fundamental Nature of Flight:
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Cadets should receive classroom instruction covering the fundamentals of flight prior to
participating in an Orientation Flight. This can be covered as part of the AS 100, Introduction to
Flight, and curriculum. As a minimum, cadets should receive instruction on the fundamentals of
thrust, drag, lift, wing dynamics, and flight controls.
2. Ground handling:
Demonstrate the proper way to ground handle the airplane. Emphasize surface areas of the
airplane that should not be touched during ground handling.
3. Preflight inspection:
a. Using the appropriate checklist, demonstrate a routine preflight inspection of the
airplane.
b. Discuss the required documents that must be on board the airplane.
c. During the airplane preflight inspection, point out specific parts of the airplane and
identify its function.
4. Before takeoff:
a. Using the checklist, show cadets the routine cockpit checks prior to takeoff.
b. Explain the sequence of events prior to takeoff.
ORIENTATION FLIGHTS – Takeoff, Normal Flight Maneuvers, Landing
Fundamental aircraft control and flight maneuvers
Syllabus #2
Estimated time: 1.0 hour
1. Takeoff:
a. Discuss airplane position during takeoff roll and initial climb and demonstrate rudder
controls.
b. Describe emergency actions to be taken at different altitudes as discussed during while
reviewing the before takeoff checklist.
2. In-flight. The orientation pilot will perform the following maneuvers at a minimum altitude
of 2,500 feet AGL:
a. Discuss the use of flight controls in-flight.
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b. Point out the attitude of the airplane in relation to the horizon and at different
airspeeds.
c. Point out familiar landmarks, prominent ground features, and the position of the airport
with respect to airplane’s altitude and position.
d. Demonstrate use of trim controls and straight flying to a checkpoint using visual
references.
e. After trimming for level flight, point out the stability of the airplane in hands-off flight.
f. Discuss the effects of lift, drag, and gravity on the airplane.
g. Discuss the relationship of lift, angle of attack, and relative wind.
h. Demonstrate a shallow banked turn and point out how the airplane will maintain the
turn with controls neutral.
i. Explain load factor during turns.
3. Approach to landing:
a. Explain the approach to the traffic pattern. Explain the reasons for a standardized entry
procedure and perform the before landing check.
b. Point out the correct procedure for landing rollout.
4. Post flight. Answer questions pertaining to the flight and stress safety.
ORIENTATION FLIGHTS – Advanced Flight Maneuvers
Advanced aircraft control and flight maneuvers for cadets with previous flight experience
Syllabus #3
Estimated time: 1.0 hour
1. Preflight. Discuss previously completed syllabus flights as appropriate.
2. In-flight. The orientation pilot will perform the following maneuvers at a minimum altitude
of 2,500 feet AGL.
a. Perform climbing turns emphasizing collision avoidance.
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b. Demonstrate slow flight (minimum controllable airspeed (MCA)).
c. Demonstrate straight ahead and turning approach to stalls as appropriate emphasizing
stall recognition and recovery. Demonstrate imminent stalls (first aerodynamic
indication of an oncoming stall, which is usually the stall warning alarm). Back seat
passengers are not allowed during stall demonstrations.
d. Demonstrate medium and steep bank turns as appropriate and discuss proper rudder
coordination and control stick requirements to keep the nose up.
e. Explain load factor during turns.
f. Discuss steep spirals and spins. Emphasize the differences and the dangers of
excessive load factors in steep spirals. Actual spirals are not authorized.
3. Post flight. Answer questions pertaining to the flight and stress safety.
ATTACHMENTS
Attachment 1: FIRST FLIGHT CERTIFICATE
Attachment 2: MISHAP CHECKLIST
Attachment 3: SAMPLE HOLD HARMLESS AGREEMENT
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ATTACHMENT 1 – FIRST FLIGHT CERTIFICATE
First Flight Certificates are available in WINGS Certificates
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ATTACHMENT 2 – MISHAP CHECKLIST
AFJROTC Orientation Flight Mishap Report Checklist
Date of Occurrence
Time Of Occurrence
Aircraft Make and Model
Location and Nature of Mishap
Local authority response
Pilot's Name
Name(s)
Injuries Sustained (Nature and
Severity)
Passenger's (AFJROTC Instructor)
Passenger's (AFJROTC Cadet)
Current status (provide continuous updates)
In the event of a mishap, the Senior Aerospace Science Instructor or Aerospace Science Instructor senior will
notify Headquarters AFJROTC as soon a possible following the event. During duty hours, units will contact
either the Director or Deputy Director of AFJROTC at 1-866- 235-7682, Ext. 3-7593 or 3-4645, or Commercial:
(334) 953-7513, or 4645, or DSN: 493-7513 or 4645. After Duty hours contact the Maxwell AFB Command
Post at Commercial (334) 953-7333 or DSN: 493-7333 and request patch to the Director or Deputy Director
AFOATS/JR (AFJROTC)
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ATTACHMENT 3 – SAMPLE HOLD HARMLESS AGREEMENT
CADET ORIENTATION FLIGHT
Release, Indemnity, and Assumption of Risk
Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps and
(Flight Provider)
will arrange for and provide a Cadet Orientation Flight activity. The purpose of the activity is to
introduce the cadet to basic flight procedures to include straight and level flight, turns, constant
rate turns, basic aerial navigation procedures, and traffic patterns. The academic (ground) phase
of instruction will include basic flight planning procedures, aerodynamics, aircraft structures, and
aviation safety procedures.
Name of Child:
Unit / School
By signing below, I grant permission for my child to participate in the Activities described
above. This release, Indemnity and Assumption of Risk Statement covers all events associated
with the Activities. If I have any concerns about my child’s ability to participate, I agree to
discuss my concerns with my child’s instructor or, if appropriate, with my child’s physician
before signing this form.
I agree to assume the risk that unexpected events may occur and result in harm, injury or illness
to my child or damage to my property or my child’s property while my child is participating in or
observing the Activities, or traveling to or from the Activities. I agree, on my behalf and on
behalf of my child, to indemnify Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps, and
(Flight Provider)
and each of their employees, agents, affiliates, successors
and assigns (collectively, the “Indemnified Parties”) and not to sue the Indemnified Parties for
any harm or damage associated with my child’s participation, observation, or travel if the harm
or damage is not due to the negligence or fault of any of the Indemnified Parties. I understand
that my child’s participation in these Activities is voluntary.
If my child requires emergency medical treatment, please contact:
Name of Emergency Contact Person:
Home Phone:
Work Phone:
If the Emergency Contact Person I have listed is not available, please contact:
Doctor:
Phone:
I consent to the provision of emergency medical treatment for my child to the extent that the
treatment is necessary in the medical opinion of the doctor rendering the treatment.
In this agreement, Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps, and
and their employees are agents.
(Flight Provider)
Signature of Parent or Legal Guardian:
Date:
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PHYSICAL DISCIPLINE
Initiation is a rite of passage marking
entrance or acceptance into a group or
society and can be a positive
experience if done correctly.
Here are some examples of positively
impacting initiations:
Present new members with
pledge cards with the rules and
regulations of your organization.
Have new members announced
at public events or in local
newspapers.
Hold ceremonies in which the
new member receives a
certificate of accomplishment or
admittance, special uniform,
badge, or other device.
Requiring cadets to perform any physical
activity as punishment isn’t allowed.
These activities may only be performed
as part of a regular physical fitness
program.
AFJROTC
A Guide to
Chaperoning
PHYSICAL CONTACT
There will be no physical contact
(touching) between chaperones and
students and between students, except
for contact that’s necessary to protect
the health or safety of an individual. For
example, contact to provide first aid is
allowed.
Standards of
Conduct
Examples of prohibited initiations:
Tying someone up to cover them
with silly string, or other
substances, etc.
Forcing someone to consume
food/drink not normally eaten.
Ceremonies that include physical
contact with the new members.
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INTRODUCTION FROM THE
COMMANDER
First and foremost, thank you for
volunteering to help us chaperone
the cadets. Your primary
responsibility is to help ensure the
cadets’ health, safety, and well
being.
As a chaperone, it’s essential to
ensure that the cadets follow all unit,
school district, and Air Force
guidelines concerning student
behavior. Our goal is for every
cadet to be a positive reflection on
their community, school, and the Air
Force. The lead instructor will
inform you of these and any other
expectations.
If you see any misconduct on the
cadets’ part, correct it on the spot
and report it to the lead instructor
immediately. Also report any
rumored or planned misconduct to
the lead instructor as soon as
possible.
Once again, thank you for helping
AFJROTC achieve its mission to
"Develop citizens of character
dedicated to serving their nation
and community.”
INAPPROPRIATE BEHAVIOR
Inappropriate behavior is prohibited while
participating in AFJROTC activities.
Here are some examples:
Disobeying instructions
Disrespect
Horseplay
Public display of affection
Disparaging remarks
Verbal threats
Physical attacks
Consuming alcohol
Tobacco use
Damaging public or private
property
Verbal Maltreatment
Hazing / Initiations
VERBAL MALTREATMENT
Any statement that degrades an
individual based on color, national origin,
race, religion, age, ethnic group, gender,
or physical appearance isn’t allowed.
Use of profanity and any language that
condones immoral, unethical, or illegal
behavior, promotes sexual harassment or
other unprofessional conduct isn’t
allowed.
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HAZING / INITIATIONS
Hazing is where anyone is made to
experience something which is
cruel, abusive, or harmful,
regardless if the activity is common
in your community. Asking or
forcing someone to assist is also
hazing. Hazing doesn’t have to
have physical contact to occur. It
doesn’t matter if the victim agreed to
participate; those inflicting the
hazing can still be held responsible.
Some examples of hazing can
include:
Striking someone on any part of the
body
Performing unnecessary tedious
chores
Eating or drinking from an unusual
container (e.g. dog bowl) or food
fights
Wearing symbols, drawings, or text
on clothing or bare skin, regardless
of how applied.
Restraining someone with ropes,
chains, handcuffs, or duct tape
Forcing someone to pay respect to
another by kneeling or groveling
Exposure to extreme temperatures
or weather
Dares
Abandoning someone in the middle
of nowhere
Forcing someone to break any law
or do something harmful to the
image of the school or Air Force