November 2015 - Marquette Manor

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November 2015 - Marquette Manor
arquette
irror
honor
November 2015
of
the
FREE
SACRIFICE
Land
FREEDOM
Liberty
VETERANS
Home
&
COURAGE
BRAVE
VICTORY
AMERICA
SERVICE
THANK YOU
November 2015
3
Amenities
4
Lectures
5
Discussions
6
Campus Events
7
Lead Article
continued
8
Excursions
9
Knife & Fork
9
Night at the
Movies
10
Health & Fitness
12
Hobbies
13
Religion
14
Pictures
15
Pictures
16
Staff/History
Programs and events
marked with a
require registration
(beginning the 26th of
each month) in the
Programs, Events and
Transportation Book
located in the Resident
Business Center.
MILITARY HUMANE RELIEF SERVICE
By Davy Kneessy
Seoul—At 1700 hours, 13
August 1954, my unit, the
37th Preventive Medicine
Company, was alerted to recall
its dispersed elements to move
on 24 hours notice with TO&E
gear. Confirmation at 2330
was an order to move by air to
East Pakistan
(now
Bangladesh).
That country
was being
ravaged by
extreme flooding
of the
Bramaputra,
Ganges and
Meghna Rivers,
all of which
terminate in the
Ganges Delta (then the Bay of
Bengali).
The 37th, augmented by 80
additional enlisted medics and
two field grade physicians (for
technical advice and
coordination), now called the
“American Medical Unit,” was
moved by five C-124
Globemasters.
The first departed 0230, 15
August (33 hours after the
initial alert!). By 1200,
18 August, all planes were in
Dacca, having stopped in Japan,
Iwo Jima, Clark Field (in the
Philippines) and Bangkok.
We learned that our primary
mission was to assist in a massive
cholera inoculation
program among the
population (a change
from our normal
mission of
environmental
control).
Forty teams were
used in the
operation. Each
team had two
American medics,
two Pakistan army
nursing orderlies, one
literate Pakistan enlisted record
keeper and one local army
provost.
Phase one in the Dacca
(capital) and Narayanganj (jute
center) population centers
employed 25 and 15 mobile
teams, respectively. The latter
group living on river boats. Phase
one began on the 21st and
continued until the 28th.
(continued, page 7, Humane)
MEMORY SCREENING INSIGHT
By Tom and Ann Lunsford
National Memory
Screening Day is yet another
service that Marquette offers
to enable us to be more
proactive about our health.
We both took advantage of
this opportunity last year and
plan to do so again this year.
It’s a simple test, involving 5
or 6 questions and takes very
little of your time. Our tests
and the scoring were entirely
confidential (you are given a
number—not a name) and
there is absolutely no
follow-up. With the results we
were given, we were able to do
(continued, page 11, Memory)
3
THE CORNER SHOPPE
TECH TALK
BY MIKE CHESTER
BY MARION HARCOURT
Wake up! The Holiday Season is upon us. In
the spirit of the season, The Corner Shoppe is
offering some very special holiday items. The
Shoppe is now offering the creative work of
Cheryl Sparks (Cottage 2435A). She creates
beautiful fabric banners on which those attractive holiday greeting cards you receive can be
displayed for all to enjoy. Just in time for the
holiday season, The Shoppe is offering the
unique and colorful handcrafted Chain Maille
jewelry fabricated by Linda and then gift-boxed
and bowed. Who is Linda? She happens to be
the daughter of our June Hess (4309). You
never heard of Chain Maille jewelry? Then,
come visit The Corner Shoppe and we’ll tell
you all about it. While you are at The Shoppe,
take a look at the wonderful selection of
holiday greeting cards offered. If you plan to
send out some holiday cards this year, now is
a good time to select them. These cards are
selected especially for Marquette residents, so
they get picked-over, quickly. Remember that
The Shoppe also has stamps and other mailing
necessities that you may need. While you are
here, check out what we carry in the way of
sundries, both medicinal and otherwise. That
may some day save you an unnecessary trip to
a nearby store. Before you leave, treat
yourself to one of the delicious and traditional
candy bars—the kind you grew up with. I
always find something rewarding, refreshing
and reassuring in a Snickers bar!
Should you upgrade to Windows 10? If you
have Win 7 or 8, it is free until next July.
Pros: The “start” button, which disappeared
in the disastrous Windows 8, is back. One
commentator said, “it’s almost funny how
relieving that is.” The Download and Install
(two different actions) are easy. The programs
you have, like your email, Quicken and Word,
will work just fine. Internet Explorer has been
replaced by Edge, which reviewers seem to
like. There is a voice controlled ’Personal
Assistant’ named Cortana, sort of like Siri for
the Apple, only better. They have bridged the
technology for touch and non-touch devices, so
the same Operating System (OS) will serve
your desktop, laptop and phone. Nice (like
Apple)! Windows welcomes the development
of Apps (Applications) which they have
discouraged in the past. Facial Recognition.
They SEE you, so you don’t have to enter those
passwords. Updates are automatic, whether
you want them or not which is probably a good
thing.
Cons: There are always bugs. You just
don’t know. At our level of use they are
probably ok. In the middle of October,
Microsoft began aggressively intruding on your
computers. Either you upgrade or they won’t
upgrade security patches on Win 7. That is not
ok. There is no ’correct’ answer.
Mac, anyone?
THE LIBRARY BOOKSHELF
You will all be happy to hear that the Library Committee has ordered 14 new
books—they should be here by the time you get this message! Half are fiction and
half, non-fiction. There will be some in large print and audio cd.
I’d like to mention a few that you will want to explore. One is Come Rain or
Come Shine by Jan Karon. The story illustrates the further adventures of Dooley
Kavanaugh and his family, which will be fun to follow. In the non-fiction column is
Four-Legged Miracles by Brad and Sherry Hansen Steiger. Read heartwarming tales
of lost dogs’ journeys home. The stories are true, some are tear-jerkers, some will
make you laugh aloud! Also, check out author and surgeon Atul Gawande’s #1 New
York Times bestseller from 2014: Being Mortal. The book profiles medicine, the
inescapable realities of aging and what matters in the end. Good reading!
Amenities
BY SALLY PECK
4
A T THE P ODIUM : I NDIANA M ILITARY
H ISTORY
Wednesday, November 4
7:00 pm
Foundation Hall
Retired Brigadier General J. Stewart Goodwin,
Executive Director of the Indiana War Memorial
Commission, shares stories of Indiana’s
military past. Indiana has the most war
memorials of any state (including Washington,
D.C.)! As a historian, he will share his research and answer any questions the audience
may have. Save the date!
Y OUR G OURMET G IRLFRIENDS
P RESENT H OLIDAY G IFTS FROM
K ITCHEN
THE
Tuesday, November 17
1:30 pm
Foundation Hall
Season’s cravings! Pam and Jan return with
fun demonstrations for holiday decorations,
simple recipes and crafts to make as gifts.
You will receive a booklet which includes all
the recipes, directions and gift tags for
everything presented. Mark your calendar for
a jolly good time!
M ARQUETTE M ANOR F OUNDATION
P RESENTS AN I NCOME AND E STATE
T AXES P RESENTATION
Tuesday, November 10
1:30 pm
Foundation Hall
Are you confused or in a fog regarding 2015 or
2016 taxes and estates? Circle your calendar
for this date and time! The Marquette Manor
Foundation Board of Directors will offer a short
presentation with time for questions and
answers. Submit your rsvp and questions for
consideration ahead of time to Mike McGinley
(524-6544).
W ELLNESS S ERIES : S ERVING
Y OURSELF W HILE C ARING FOR
O THERS
Lectures
Wednesday, November 18
2:00 pm
MAC Aerobic Studio
Caregivers come in all sizes, shapes, genders
and ethnicities! They often have one thing in
common: they are usually not prepared for
this new role. When it comes to finding help,
many caregivers do not know where to turn.
Diane Bratten, Director of Social Services,
leads our discussion about caregiver support
and why it is so important for the caregiver to
take care of their own needs, too.
5
C OFFEE C LIPS
AND
C ONVERSATION
W OMEN
ON THE
H OMEFRONT
Thursdays, November 5, 12, 19
10:30 am
5th Floor Card Room
Monday, November 23
1:30 pm
Foundation Hall
Just clip an article of interest to you from a
current newspaper. Grab a cup’a. Then join
the table for 45 minutes of friendly
conversation. One person reads his/her article
aloud and discussion follows. Then another
article is read.
Only requirements… a curious mind, a desire to
discuss current events, an eagerness to talk,
listen and respect other points of view.
Many women had two roles during WWII:
the traditional homemaker and as active
participants in industry, agriculture, civil
defense and community welfare. Relive
and reminisce a time of varied service from
those who stayed at home with your
Marquette neighbors and friends.
B OOK R EVIEW
Tuesday, November 24
10:00 am
2nd Floor Card Room
C ONTEMPORARY I SSUES
Monday, November 9
7:00 pm
Foundation Hall
Join in the discussion! Everyone is welcome to
attend! Marquette resident, Barbara Furlow, will
moderate.
This month’s title is Michael Shaara’s Killer
Angels. This classic, historical novel of the
Civil War won the 1975 Pulitzer Prize for
fiction. To obtain a copy of the book,
contact Larry Treadwell (872-0859) or
Charlotte Chadwick (492-9995).
C AREGIVERS S UPPORT G ROUP
Monday, November 30
1:30 pm
Board Room
Tuesday, November 10 (no meeting November 24)
1:15 pm
4th Floor Card Room
Join the poetry lovers at our next meeting to
explore the beauty of autumn through the eyes
of some of the best known poets. Robert Louis
Stevenson’s Autumn Fires, William Butler Yeats’
The Wild Swans at Coole, Carl Sandburg’s
Autumn Movement, Robert Frost’s October, Walt
Whitman’s A Carole of Harvest for 1864, Percy
Bysshe Shelley’s Ode to the West Wind, just to
name a few who have penned lines praising
autumn. All are welcome. Bring poems to share
with the group or come just to listen as we read.
Questions? Call Margaret Simpson, 251-6976.
Marquette Social Worker, Diane Bratten, will
lead an open group discussion with residents
who are also caregivers. Share your
experiences and learn new ways to cope.
Discussions
P OET ’ S C ORNER
6
Resident Association
Meeting
Tuesday, November 10
10:00 am
Foundation Hall
You may also watch Channel 91
on your home television.
(Cable Users Only)
V ETERANS D AY P ROGRAM
Wednesday, November 11
1:30 pm
Foundation Hall
Everyone is invited to participate in a
service to honor our Marquette war
veterans. Prelude and service music
provided by Greg Gibson. Featured
speaker will be Reverend Glenn McDonald
(son of Marquette residents Wick and Jean
McDonald). His keynote presentation:
Turning Points: Decisions That Changed
the Course of WWII.
L IBRARY H OLIDAY B OOK S ALE
P AVILION B AZAAR
Tuesday, November 10
9:00 am-Noon
Fireside Grille Lobby
Thursday, November 12 & Friday, November 13
9:00 am-4:00 pm
Pavilion Activities Room
Looking for a last-minute gift? The Marquette
Library will offer hardcovers, paperbacks, cds and
dvds at bargain prices.
Shop for one-of-a-kind gifts! Choose from
handmade to garage sale items. Enjoy
homemade brownies and caramel puffed
corn while you shop. All proceeds will
provide for future programming in Assisted
Living.
D AY
TO
H ONOR
Monday, November 16
1:30 pm
Foundation Hall
Campus Events
Residents, staff and families of the deceased
are welcome to come together to remember
those Marquette residents who have passed
since June, 2015.
TGIF
Friday, November 13
4:30 pm
Foundation Hall
Marquette resident and star accordionist
Fred Hecker returns! Enjoy music, hors
d’oeuvres and friendly conversation!
H ARMONIE O PERA C LUB
Saturday, November 21
1:00 pm
Foundation Hall
Selections from Donizetti’s Don Pasquale
will be featured by the club’s singers.
7
CONTINUED FROM PAGE
2
The planes departed at
1300 and 1500 arrived at
K-16 (Seoul) at 2215, 23
September, completing 39
days away from the Eighth
Army Area. Job well done!
Total inoculations given
during the first phase:
284,897!
After a brief rest, phase
two began on 31 August.
Thirty-seven of the teams
were sent to outlying
Provinces. Teams were
allotted to towns based on
populations. Fifteen centers
were grouped into four
sectors overseen by one
Pakistan medical officer and
one American officer.
Due to the widespread
flooding, transportation was a
problem. All forms of
transport were used
(including two H-19B
helicopters). These
helicopters were used for the
distribution of mail, rations
and additional medical
supplies. With some teams
totally isolated 200 or more
miles from Dacca, the
helicopters were a pivotal
part of the team.
U NLOADING
RELIEF SUPPLIES .
1 ST L T . A. D. K NEESSY
C OMMANDED THE 37 TH
Operations ran from 2
September through the 18th. T HIS OPERATION .
Total inoculations for phase
two: 581,811! Over 25,000
individuals also received
some form of medical
treatment.
DURING
Return of the mission
was started on 21
September. Sufficient
number of C-124s were not
available so movement was
by one C-124 and a C-54,
T HE 37 TH OFFICERS AND 11
necessitating leaving vehicles AMBULANCE OFFICERS POSING
and most of the heavy
BEFORE DINNER .
equipment behind.
In retrospect, this saga
says very much about the
resilient G.I. in this era. The
80 enlisted men added to the
unit had never met the officers
before boarding planes.
Although sufficient canned
rations were brought—cooks
learned to prepare sides of
goat, duck eggs and live
chickens for a fresh break.
Individual medics, in isolated
locations, paired with Pakistan
military of a different race,
language (though some spoke
the “King’s” English),
nationality and customs. The
unit (and field teams) had no
available hospitalization
resources (heat stress and
moth rash were two common
complaints). The length of the
mission was unknown on
arrival! Driving on the wrong
side was crazy—but only one
vehicle accident!
For those who participated,
the mission was a revelation—
this small group of men had
actually been the “tip” of
American power providing
help without any concern for
reciprocity—there were
people elsewhere who had
needs we didn’t understand,
but would care about—we
were all in this together!
60 years later we still
are!
Lead Article
H UMANE ,
8
L UNCH O UTING /E DINBURGH O UTLETS
S HOPPING T RIP
Thursday, November 5
Bus leaves 10:00 am
Many stores to shop! Have lunch at Ruby
Tuesday, first, then it’s off to the mall!
M OVIE O UTING —B RIDGE
(2015, PG-13)
OF
S PIES
Friday, November 13
Time TBA/Theatre TBA
During the cold war, the Soviet Union captures
U.S. pilot Francis Gary Powers, after shooting
down his U-2 spy plane. Sentenced to 10 years
in prison, his only hope is New York lawyer
James Donovan (Tom Hanks). Recruited to
negotiate Powers’ release through a prisoner
exchange, Donovan boards a plane to Berlin
hoping to win the young man’s freedom.
L UNCH O UTING —H OLLYHOCK H ILL
R ESTAURANT
Friday, November 20
Bus leaves 11:15 am
Excursions
An Indianapolis tradition in family-style dining
since 1928! While known for fried chicken, the
restaurant offers steaks and seafood, too.
Enjoy the experience of a country homestead
from a bygone era!
9
S UNDAY B RUNCH
U NBROKEN
Sundays, November 1, 8, 15, 22, 29
11:30 am—3:00 pm
Legacy Dining Room
(2014, PG-13)
Saturday, November 7
7:00 pm
Foundation Hall
Reservations (524-6549) are a
must!
After a near-fatal plane crash in
WWII, Olympian Louis
Zamperini spends 45 days in a raft before
being caught by the Japanese navy and sent
to a prisoner-of-war camp.
E ARLY B IRD S PECIAL
Tuesdays, November 3, 10, 17, 24
4:30 pm—5:30 pm
Legacy Dining Room
T HE I MITATION G AME
Enjoy a catfish dinner: a main
course with all the fixin’s!
Call 524-6549 for reservations.
(2014, PG-13)
Saturday, November 14
7:00 pm
Foundation Hall
L OBSTER N IGHT !
Cambridge mathematics
alumnus Alan Turing is
recruited to crack Nazi codes during WWII.
His team succeeds and are heroes.
Then, in 1952, he is arrested on indecency
charges which change his life forever.
Wednesday, November 4
4:00 pm
Legacy Dining Room
Reservations required.
Please call 524-6549.
T HE W OMAN IN G OLD
B IRTHDAY D INNER
Saturday, November 21
7:00 pm
Foundation Hall
Residents with a birthday in
November are invited to the
complimentary Birthday Dinner.
A spouse is also welcome; his or
her dinner will be charged to food
account. Please make your
reservation no later than
November 7th by calling
524-6549. Due to space
limitations, only residents with
November birthdays, please.
Sixty years after fleeing
Vienna, an elderly Jewish
woman attempts to reclaim
family possessions seized by
the Nazis.
T HANKSGIVING B UFFET !
Thursday, November 26
11:00 am, 1:00 pm, 3:00 pm
Legacy Dining Room
Reservations (524-6549) are
mandatory.
Knife & Fork
Tuesday, November 10
5:00 pm
Legacy Dining Room
A NNE F RANK R EMEMBERED
(1995, D OCUMENTARY , PG)
Saturday, November 28
7:00 pm
Foundation Hall
Academy award-winning
documentary about Anne
Frank and her family and the
people who risked death to
shelter and protect them in
hiding.
Night at the Movies
(2015, PG-13)
3:00p
2:30p
2:00p
1:30p
12:00p
11:30a
11:00a
10:30a
10:00a
9:30a
9:00a
2-2:45 pm
Linda
Gentle Yoga
Core Crunch
11-11:45 am
Janet
Core Crunch
11-11:30 am
Balance
Rachel
Balance
Cara
11-11:30 am
10-10:45 am
10-10:45 am
Gentle Pilates
Rachel
Rachel
9-9:45 am
9-9:45 am
9-9:45 am
Rachel
2-2:45 pm
Janet
Active Older
Adults (AoA)
11-11:30 am
Linda
Balance & Breathe
10-10:45 am
Linda
Core Crunch
11-11:30 am
Balance
Rachel
10-10:45 am
Janet
Gentle
Aqua
Aqua Total Fit
Yoga Strength
Cara
Cara
Janet
Aqua Total Fit
Cardio Step
Cardio Step
FRI
Aqua Strength
THUR
Medium
WED
Low
TUES
Intensity of Class:
Aqua Total Fit
MON
Health & Fitness
Janet
10-10:45 am
Active Older
Adults (AoA)
SAT
High
10
11
M EMORY ,
CONTINUED FROM PAGE
2
with them what we chose and could decide
whether we wanted to share them with our
doctor.
As we have watched several close friends
develop dementia over the years, we have
seen how early diagnosis and treatment
delays the worsening of their symptoms and
gets them appropriate resources more
quickly. If this simple test can point us
towards seeking further medical advice, we
will be forever grateful.
T HE D AKIM C OMPUTER !
In an effort to make available more
opportunities to challenge the brain and keep
it active, Marquette has the Dakim computer
located in the MAC Cove area. With your own
account, the Dakim quizzes your long and
short-term memory and tailors the provided
activities to your individual needs. Interested
in trying out the Dakim? Stop by the MAC to
get your own account started today. You
absolutely do not have to be computer-savvy
to enjoy its benefits.
T HANKSGIVING C ANCELLATIONS
There will be no MAC classes or appointments
on Thursday, November 26 or Friday,
November 27 due to the holiday.
Happy Thanksgiving!
F LOOR W ARS D AY
Wednesday, November 18
All Day
MAC
Kick-off the holiday season with a one-day
challenge—flock to the MAC! On this day,
each floor will compete to get the most
participation, whether it be in a class or the
fitness center, wellness series, lecture, water
walking in the pool. Be on the lookout for a
colored feather in your mailbox. When you
visit the MAC on Floor Wars Day, bring your
feather to the MAC front desk. The floor with
the highest percentage of participants will
receive a treat on Thursday, November 19.
N ATIONAL M EMORY S CREENING D AY
This is your opportunity to take action and
receive a free, confidential memory
screening. This screening is not used to
diagnose any particular illness and does not
replace a consultation with a physician or
other healthcare professional, but is very
helpful. A screening can check your memory
and other thinking skills and can indicate if
you may benefit from a more complete
medical visit. The screenings are conducted
by qualified healthcare professionals and will
take approximately 30 minutes to complete.
Please stop by or call the MAC Front Desk
(524-6550) if you are interested in a
screening.
H EALTH S ERVICES
Health at Home—
Blood Pressure Clinic
Tuesdays
8:30-11:00 am
MAC Cove
Kroger—
Ask the Pharmacist
Wednesday, November 11
9:00-11:00 am
Health & Fitness
Friday, November 6
9:00 am-3:30 pm
Foundation Hall
12
M AGIC M OMENTS
B Y C HARLES H INDERSMAN
We are fortunate to live in a
community in which there are
many residents who have
talents and who are willing to
share their experiences with
their fellow residents.
In the past, programs were given on topics
such as Wine Appreciation, Mathematics, Art
Appreciation, Shakespeare and instruction in
the French and Spanish languages. We were
entertained by musical programs, plays, clown
shows, as well as lectures about famous writers
and poets and travelogues (many given by Bill
and Lou Stanley). More recently, we were
treated to a Minnie Pearl impersonation and the
amazing Washburn family. The Goldfarbs
related their experience in surviving Hitler’s
slave labor camps during World War II and we
had an interesting program on women serving
during the war.
The above listing is representative of the
variety of programs presented by our
residents. The beat goes on!! In October, five
programs featured residents and in December
a cast of ten residents will perform the play,
Christmas Stars.
Hobbies
Entertaining and/or educating fellow
residents is a form of volunteering. Any
resident who has talent or experiences they
may wish to share should contact Marilyn
Martin. Keep the Marquette tradition of
resident entertainment/education alive and
well.
If you are not currently volunteering
in the MAGIC program, but would like to
help or if you are currently volunteering
and want to do more, please contact
Marilyn Martin. There is a complete list
of the various activities and programs
which constitute volunteering here at
Marquette. Our residents help make this
a great place to be.
Knit for
Charity
Mondays
1:30 pm
LLCR
Tech
Help
Mondays
2:30 pm
TC
T HE G REENHOUSE D OWN U NDER
Thursdays, November 5 and 12
2:00 pm
Lower Level Craft Room
Plan your gardening strategies and meet
the Greenhouse Gang (fellow resident
gardening aficionados!). Have a plant that
won’t grow? Interested in learning new
ideas? This is the place!
Weekly Game Board
 Duplicate Bridge—Tues 7:00 pm
Foundation Hall
 Bingo—Thurs 7:00 pm
Lower Level Multipurpose Room
From Your Foundation:
Your Foundation is thankful
for your support!
13
B IBLE S TUDY
RELIGIOUS SERVICES

Anglican
Mass—Sundays
9:30 am, Chapel
Discussion will center on the Book of
Proverbs. Contact Jaxie Miller (802-9147) for
more information. Everyone is welcome!
Officiated by Rev. Todd Bragg,
Rector of St. Margaret Anglican Church.
U NDERSTANDING F AITH T RADITIONS
Catholic
Mass—Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays
& Saturdays, 4 pm, Chapel
Communion—Tuesdays, Thursdays
4 pm, Chapel
Thanksgiving Day Mass
10 am, Chapel
Services offered by Fr. Phil Haslinger
and Fr. Clifford Vogelsang.

Episcopalian
Communion—Thursday, November 19
11 am, Chapel
Thank you to the staff from St.
Christopher’s Episcopal Church, Carmel.

Jewish
Shabbat—Friday, November 20
4:00 pm, LLMPR
Service offered by Rabbi Dennis Sasso,
Senior Rabbi, Congregation Beth-El
Zedeck.

Protestant
Church Service—Sundays
2 pm, Foundation Hall-A
Officiated by Rev. Joe Johnson and music
provided by Greg Gibson and his guest
vocalist.
Thursday, November 5
7:00 pm
Foundation Hall
Guest speakers will explain how their
individual faith affects the way they live and
the differences between forgiveness and
reconciliation.
S EEKING
THE
W AY
Friday, November 6 and 20
1:00 pm
Lower Level Game Room
Pastor Rob Fuquay’s sermons from St. Luke
United Methodist Church will be discussed.
Contact Barbara Furlow (228-0218) or
Priscilla Keenan (459-6040) for more
information.
G OD
IN THE
M OVIES
Thursday, November 12
6:30 pm
Foundation Hall
The Visitor (2008, PG-13) is a timely film
about love, loss, illegal immigrants and
uncaring bureaucrats. A quiet, touching film.
Religion

Tuesdays, November 3, 10, 17, 24
2:30 pm
2nd Floor Card Room
14
Alzheimer’s Walk 2015!
Pictures
Dr. Eugene Helveston shared his
telemedicine adventures from
around the world (Libya pictured).
The smile says it all!
Ruth Lollar at Gray’s Cafeteria!
“Double, double, toil and trouble. Fire burn
and cauldron bubble….” (Ruth Tout, Marilyn
Fulner, and Jeanne Hill).
Anderson Orchard!
Jeanette BeMiller, Jo Pratt, Charlotte Chadwick,
Melvin and Esther Goldfarb enjoying Linton’s
“Disneyland of Garden Centers”!
15
ACTIVE AGING WEEK, 2015!
Circle City Sidewalk
Stompers Clown
Band!
Kazoo Band Kickoff
with the Stompers!
Melvin Goldfarb says, “Prost!
Zum Wohl!” at the Oktoberfest celebration!
Fred Hecker: The best accordion
player this side of the
Mississippi!
Pictures
Goodwill/Gleaners Donations!
Speed Jigsaw Puzzle Competition! 28
players/35 pieces—Go! And the
winners are Charles Miller, Marion
Harcourt, Barbara Furlow, Jaxie Miller!
and
department
Department Director
MAC Manager
Cara Long
MAC Assistant Manager
Rachel Huffman
Program & Event
Coordinator
Marilyn Martin
Program & Event
Assistant
Casey Maish
228-2249
524-6517
228-2248
524-
Veterans Day 2014 Color Guard: Harry Stone, Jim Kenney, Wayne
Campbell, Richard Kent, Charles Miller and Larry Treadwell (not seen).

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